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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013


EVENTS 9.25 – 8pm

SOUND SERIES: KURT VILE & THE VIOLATORS, WITH SPECIAL GUEST OLD HEAD Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) Tickets $18/$15 Members & students

9.29.13 – 10am - 5pm

RADICAL DAY 2013, FEATURING FREE ADMISSION Free admission

10.3 – 5pm

ARTIST TALK: YASUMASA MORIMURA McConomy Auditorium at Carnegie Mellon University (Oakland) Co-presented with Carnegie Mellon University, School of Art’s Fall 2013 Lecture Series Free admission

10.9 – 8pm

SOUND SERIES: BILL CALLAHAN, WITH SPECIAL GUEST LONNIE HOLLEY Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) Tickets $18/$15 Members & students

10.18 – 8pm

UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2013: THE MONKEY TALKS, WITH LIVE MUSICAL ACCOMPANIMENT Tickets $10/ Members FREE

11.1 – 8pm

SOUND SERIES: JENNY HVAL, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, THE GARMENT DISTRICT Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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09.25/10.02.2013

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers LAUREN DALEY, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ALLISON COSBY, BRETT WILSON

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 39

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{ADMINISTRATION}

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Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

“There are the bones of a better film buried amid the headless dolls and cop-shop clichĂŠs.â€? — Al Hoff, reviewing Prisoners

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

[ARTS] lived experience of motherhood has 57 “The barely been tapped as a basis for making art.� — Robert Raczka on the work of Lenka Clayton

[LAST PAGE] of Mogadishu. The Power of 82 Streets Negative Thinking. Service: A Navy Seal at War. — Three of the books on Pirates manager Clint Hurdle’s desk

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 20 EVENTS LISTINGS 68 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 74 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 79 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 76 N E W S

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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PIRATE AUDIO {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

“TO SEE IT AS A FAN ... AND TO BE HERE NOW — I COULDN’T ASK FOR A BETTER SCRIPT.”

In the past decade, both the Steelers and the Penguins have made it at least to the preliminary rounds of the playoffs more than half the time — and as a result, local musicians have a handful of team songs they resurrect most seasons. There’s “The Mighty ’Guins”; there’s “Here We Go”; there’s “The Steelers Polka.” But the last time we had any reason to write a Pirates song, it was the likes of Myron Cope doing the job. (Remember his take on “U Can’t Touch This,” in 1991?) We can’t really blame local musicians for sleeping on the chance to record a Pirates anthem; for many of them, it’s uncharted territory. But rockers Gene the Werewolf have us covered.

Jon Belan — a.k.a. Gene — shows off his Pirates pride

Two weeks ago, the band released a retooled cover of Sister Sledge’s “We Are Family,” the disco tune that became the 1979 Pirates’ theme song. It was at the behest of local promoter (and sports fan) Brian Drusky, who had previously convinced the band to re-do “The Steelers Polka” for the 2011 NFL playoffs. It isn’t a straightforward cover; the band re-wrote the song in a day’s time, inserting references to the Pirates, PNC Park and individual standout players. As is traditional for these sports tunes — and for a lot of cover tunes in general — it’s being distributed free, and has a Piratesthemed video. It was all recorded on the fly with Gene’s live guitarist and engineer, Mike Ofca. “It’s kind of corny and cheesy,” says guitarist Drew Donegan. “But our band is sometimes, too.” A Pirates song is a first for Gene, whose members hadn’t even reached junior high the last time the Bucs had a winning season. The song hasn’t caught on quite like the band’s Steelers tune did but Donegan hopes it’s got at least a few weeks of shelf life. The Steelers song “spread like wildfire,” he notes. “This one hasn’t gone so fast, but then, as soon as we released it, they lost three in a row to the Padres. We’re hoping — not just for our sake — that they start winning again.”

{LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH PIRATES; RIGHT PHOTO BY LAUREN DALEY}

Neil Walker, at bat (left); Walker signs a ball for fan Bradyn Roberts.

HOMETOWN HERO S

IX-YEAR-OLD Bradyn Roberts stood dutifully along the dugout fence at PNC Park, watching some of the biggest names in baseball prepare for batting practice on Sept. 18. He stood quietly, his black Pittsburgh Pirates hat perched on his head, eyeing the players as they warmed up: Andrew McCutchen, Pedro Alvarez, A.J. Burnett, Neil Walker. When they were done stretching, Roberts made his move. “Neil!” Roberts shouted as he jolted from his perch into the dirt. “Will you sign my ball?” Walker, the 6-foot-3 Pittsburgh Pirates second baseman, walked up to the halfpint, who was proudly wearing Walker’s

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

No. 18 jersey. By the time all was said and done, Walker learned that Bradyn’s birthday was imminent (Friday) and that he knows all the players; signed his jersey, T-shirt and a bobblehead; and posed for numerous iPhone photos. Roberts was smiling ear to ear and so was Walker.

For Neil Walker, Pirates success is extra special {BY LAUREN DALEY} “I gotta go catch, but I’ll be back,” the second baseman promised. “Make yourself at home.”

IT’S EASY FOR Walker to identify with

Roberts because Walker is a Pittsburgh kid, too. He knows what it’s like to be a fan of this team. “He’s the most down-to-earth guy,” says Dan Riston, Bradyn’s grandfather and a Walker family friend. Walker’s own love of the team started around the same age as Bradyn’s, and it’s still evident today. Two hours before batting practice, Walker stood in the wings of a press conference with Pirates legend Bill Mazeroski, who was presenting some of his personal memorabilia for an auction in November. “I just wanted to see him more than anything,” Walker said, standing behind a row of television cameras focused on CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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Mazeroski’s 1960 World Series uniform. “I’m just fortunate to play the same position as someone like him in the same organization.” It’s an exciting time for the Pirates and players like Walker, who has watched this team struggle through a 20-year losing streak that finally ended this summer. As of press time, the Pirates were two wins from clinching a spot in the post-season. “It’s everything I’ve dreamed of. I’ve been a Pirates fan since I was 7 years old,” Walker says. “To see it as a fan, to be a part of it in the minors and to be here now — I couldn’t ask for a better script.” WALKER’S BASEBALL script opens at home

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in Gibsonia. His father, Tom Walker, pitched for the Montreal Expos, Detroit Tigers, St. Louis Cardinals and California Angels through the 1970s, and his brother Matt was drafted by Detroit. While developing into a future Major Leaguer, Neil Walker also became a Pirates fan. “I can remember sitting in Three Rivers Stadium, watching guys like Bonds, Bonilla and Van Slyke, running around the turf. I was maybe 6 or 7 years old,” Walker recalls. “Those were awesome teams to watch.” But Walker didn’t get caught up in wins or losses. Instead, he learned from what he saw on the field. “I was always watching how those guys played the game, how they prepared themselves and how they went about the game of baseball.” Walker played in high school for PineRichland, where he hit .657 with 13 home runs as a senior, helping his team win a Western Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic League title. In 2004, Walker became

the first WPIAL player to be selected in the first round of the Major League Baseball draft since 1978. And it was the Pirates who came calling, taking Walker with the 11th overall pick. Being drafted by his favorite team “is something that’s hard to describe,” Walker says. “It’s really a Cinderella story to grow up in this town, to be so involved with Pittsburgh … and ending up with the [home] team is really rare in baseball. I feel blessed.”

Modern Pirates fans are familiar with the power of the Zoltan “Z,” a hand symbol made by players after an offensive burst, but Pirates talismans go back much earlier. There’s the Green Weenie, invented by broadcaster Bob Prince in the 1960s — a green rattle in the shape of a hot dog meant to jinx opponents. And in the 1970s, Prince invented “Babushka Power,” which called for women in the stands to remove their head coverings and wave them in the air.

The significance isn’t lost on players like Mazeroski, who grew up as a Cleveland Indians fan “but never got to play for them.” Even manager Clint Hurdle can’t CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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HOMETOWN HERO, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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imagine what it’s like. “He’s been a fan since he was a kid. It’s his favorite team,” Hurdle says. “Everybody’s got a favorite team. I grew up in Michigan — the Lions, the Tigers, it would have been like me playing for them. I can’t imagine what Neil’s going through.” Since he became the team’s starting second baseman, in 2010, Walker’s contributions on the field have been notable. In 2012, he hit a career-high 14 home runs, the most by a Pittsburgh second baseman since 1999. He ranked third among National League second basemen in slugging percentage. “While all of our players have a tremendous incentive to be a part of the team that turns this organization around, no one has more of that incentive than Neil Walker, given the fact that he lived through all 20 of those years in this region,” says Pirates President Frank Coonelly. Coonelly credits Walker’s presence in the locker room and his “natural leadership talents as a young man.” “He’s a guy who shows by example,” says Pirates third baseman Pedro Alvarez, who calls Walker one of his best friends on the team. “I don’t know how he does it, to be the hometown kid and having to play in the big leagues at home. I’m sure he gets a lot of extra attention,” Alvarez says. But, Alvarez adds, Walker never appears stressed by it. “He comes to the park every day ready to play, ready to compete.” And having a

local guy on the team is great, he jokes: “When you’re trying to find a place to rent during the season, he knows all the spots and restaurants.” If there is added pressure being the hometown kid on this team, Walker says he doesn’t feel it.

Several Pirates — including Russell Martin, Francisco Liriano and Justin Morneau — have made postseason appearances with other teams. But only A.J. Burnett has played in and won a World Series, with the Yankees, in 2009 — the year he set the Major League record for most hit batsmen in the postseason, with five. SOURCE: ELIAS SPORTS BUREAU

“I prepare myself every day and I believe in what I’m doing. I go out there and play my game and everything else kind of takes care of itself,” he says. “We knew it was a matter of time [before] we’d have the group of guys here that’d take it to the next level. “We finally have that.” L D A L E Y @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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ON THE RECORD with Frank Coonelly, president of the Pittsburgh Pirates {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

PofE T the WEEK

PITTSBURGH PIRATES President Frank Coonelly has taken his share of the heat for the team’s record-breaking 20-year losing streak. No other baseball team — or professional sports franchise on the continent, for that matter — has amassed so many consecutive losing seasons. But things are looking up for the Pirates. At a press conference last week at the Western Pennsylvania Sports Museum, Coonelly spoke about the organization’s first winning season since 1992, flanked by local leaders who touted how much the city and region have grown over the past couple decades as well. After the event, he sat down with City Paper to talk about the effort involved in turning around one of the country’s most unsuccessful sports franchises.

PIRATES FANS HAVE BEEN WAITING SINCE ’92 FOR THE TEAM TO POST A WINNING RECORD. ARE YOU SURPRISED THE TEAM HAD SO MUCH SUCCESS THIS SEASON? It’s been a long road to get here and it’s taken longer than I would have liked. It was long and oftentimes painful. But we showed real tangible evidence of improvement in each of the last two years. We weren’t able to finish the job, but we’re confident that we could finish the job this year and take another important step.

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WHAT ARE YOUR EXPECTATIONS FOR THE CLUB MOVING FORWARD? NOW THAT THE TEAM HAS SECURED A WINNING SEASON, WOULD ANYTHING LESS THAN A DEEP POST-SEASON RUN BE SATISFYING? Not satisfying, no. We won’t be satisfied until we put a sixth championship banner up at PNC Park. WHAT DO YOU ATTRIBUTE THE TEAM’S RECENT SUCCESS TO? There’s been a building process that has been ongoing now — this is the sixth season of it. So we’ve infused the team with young talent that’s worked its way up through the system — both talent that we’ve signed internationally and through the draft. Then General Manager Neal Huntington and his team went out to fill holes that we had in the roster this offseason, and made some very strong acquisitions. So he’s brought in players that have filled some real needs for us and we’ve had

{PHOTO BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

Frank Coonelly

a core of [young] players who have developed and matured over the last three years. ARE THERE SIGNS THIS SEASON ISN’T A FLUKE — THAT THE TEAM IS SET UP FOR COMPETITIVE SEASONS GOING FORWARD? We hope this will be the first of many years of not only winning, but [of] championship-caliber baseball in Pittsburgh. Our minor-league system has moved from being ranked at or toward the bottom of all Major League Baseball organizations to certainly a top-five organization that will continue to feed talent to Pittsburgh.

The 2013 Pirates have become one of baseball’s elite teams without the payroll of an elite franchise. Opening-day payroll: $79.6 million Rank out of 30 teams: 20th Payroll per win (based on 87 wins through Sept. 18): $914,425 With their $229 million payroll, the New York Yankees’ cost per win: $2.9 million

I IMAGINE WHEN YOU’RE 10 YEARS INTO A STREAK OF LOSING SEASONS, IT CAN BE TOUGH TO BUILD MORALE. WHAT DO YOU SAY TO A TEAM, TO AN

ORGANIZATION, THAT MIGHT FEEL LIKE THINGS AREN’T TURNING AROUND? HOW DO YOU PLAY THAT NEXT GAME SO YOU FEEL LIKE WE’VE GOT A SHOT EVERY TIME? Great question, and one of the greatest challenges that any leader has. [It’s] a challenge I experienced … when things aren’t going well to continue to exude confidence in the plan, exude confidence in the program and the process, and [to] keep everyone with whom you work focused on the plan and the process. This is my sixth season, so I wasn’t here for 10 or 15. But when we came in, the lack of success had already reached heights that were approaching a record. We came in and asked our fan base for patience because it was going to take some time to build the organization the right way. That was a very tough thing to ask for, because our fans had already shown more patience than any fan base should ever be asked to show. HOW DO YOU ASK THAT? With a smile [laughs]. And logic … we could go in and try to toss some money and sign some short-term deals to some veteran players who might get us over the hump and get us to 82 wins. But we’re Pittsburgh: We call ourselves the “City of Champions” for [a] reason. We’re not looking to be mediocre and we don’t really believe that you want us to be mediocre. We need to be champions again, and in order to do that, we need to build from the ground up, and that takes some time. AS YOU’VE REBUILT THE TEAM FROM THE GROUND UP, HAVE YOU ALSO HAD TO REBUILD THE FAN BASE THAT WAY, TOO? Fortunately, we have not had to build from the ground up, because our fans can be put into three categories, and fortunately for us, category one are the great fans who have always been with us and never left us for all these 20 years. ... [T]hey believed [each season] we could win the world championship. Now, many of those years prior to the last couple, there was no tangible evidence that would support that belief, but they believed it. Group two are the fans that loved the Pirates but became frustrated and left us and have now come back. And we welcome them back. Group three are the fans who, for whatever set of reasons, were never interested in the Pittsburgh Pirates, but now have understood what’s happening and become part of the team. I don’t call them bandwagonjumpers — we have a large bus and there’s plenty of room for all three of those groups on our bus. A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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11th game of this Pirates season. The Pirate Parrot came to his birthday party last year. The bedroom in his Imperial home is decked out in Pirates gear. Nicolo Trigona is 2 years old. He was born into a Pittsburgh Piratesloving family. “My dad is the biggest diehard fan ever,” says Nicolo’s mom, Jenny Trigona. “He’s a teacher; otherwise, he’d be here today.” The Trigonas — Jenny, Nicolo and Matt — came out for the day game Sept. 19, and usually attend 10 to 15 games a year. They love the team. “We are loyal fans,” Jenny says. “No matter how bad they are, we will go to the game.” This year, though, the Trigonas have enjoyed the tidal wave of success experienced by their favorite club. They’ve purchased playoff tickets already and noticed an uptick in attendance. “Everyone’s talking about the team,” Jenny says. “The crowds are better.” But even without the winning record, Jenny says, she would be at the game. “I am the same fan no matter what the record is.”

Since 1993, number of different players who wore a Pirates uniform without ever experiencing a winning season with the club: 386 SOURCE: PITTSBURGH PIRATES

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The Pirates’ winning season and bid for a playoff berth — the first for both since 1992 — isn’t surprising to die-hard fans and longtime observers. For Pirates legend Bill Mazeroski, the difference this year has been in the bullpen. “The pitching is outstanding, up and down the whole pitching staff. … That’s half the battle,” he says. (As of Sept. 19, the bullpen had surrendered just 33 home runs in the first 77 games played at PNC Park — a league best.) Even second baseman Neil Walker, who

{PHOTO BY LAUREN DALEY}

It’s a Pirates life for Cynthia Thompson.

grew up a Pirates fan, says he’s not surprised by the team’s performance this year. “The fact of the matter is, at the professional level, it’s very tough to win. Unfortunately for this organization, it’s been very tough the last 20 years,” Walker says. “It’ll be nice not to have to answer the question any more — ‘Is this team the group?’ We feel this group we put together is one that’s very special and, at the same time, not terribly surprising. We’ve done what we’ve done because we believe in ourselves.” And the fans haven’t stopped believing, either. According the Pirates, the team surpassed 2.1 million fans in home attendance for just the second time in club history. (A record 2.4 million came out in 2001, the year PNC Park opened.) Self-described “life-long fan” Cynthia Thompson follows the team no matter what. “I’ve just been so grateful for this season,” she says. “I’ve been enjoying every minute of it.” Laura Sweeney, of Baldwin, attends games dressed head to toe in black and gold. While “I wear something different to each game, I’ve been doing this for 20 years, win or lose,” she says. One fan, a Pedro Alvarez near-lookalike known as Fake Pedro, attends games dressed in a jersey, baseball pants and hat similar to the Bucs’ third baseman. “He’s here pretty much every game; he’s a loyal fan,” says the real Pedro Alvarez. “Obviously it’s pretty cool to have fans like that. I think it shows the kind of character, the kind of loyal fans Pittsburgh has for their sports teams.” But others, still, have some doubts. For 26-year-old Brittany Dunlap of Boswell, it can be hard to get excited about the success. “It’s just hard to support them with 20 losing seasons,” she says. “We will watch them. You just can’t get your hopes up after all of those years.” L D A L E Y @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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{PHOTO BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

Chris Peters poses with some other former Pirates on Second Avenue

OFF THE MOUND Chris Peters enjoyed his time with the Bucs — even through the losing streak {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} Contact our Patient Health Care Coordinator today! healthcareinfo@ppwp.org or 412.258.9539 www.PlannedParenthoodHealthInsuranceFacts.org

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THE POPULAR memory of the Pittsburgh Pirates over the past two decades will forever be that of one of the greatest professionalsports franchise failures of all time. But obscured in 20 years of consecutive losing seasons are athletes who don’t think of that time as a failure at all. For them, the Pirates were a golden ticket — a chance to

With his team vying for the playoffs, a .326 batting average and a top-five rank in all the major hitting categories, Andrew McCutchen is becoming a favorite for National League MVP. The last Pirate to win the award was Barry Bonds, in 1992 — the Pirates’ last winning season. Championship Chase airs on PCNC Fridays @ 7:30pm, Saturdays @ 8pm and Sundays @ Noon

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

SOURCE: BASEBALLREFERENCE.COM

live a distant dream of being among the best in the world, and being celebrated for it. Chris Peters was one of them. Peters, whose family moved to Peters Township when he was a kid, was drafted by the Pirates in 1993, a year after what would turn out to be the club’s last winning season for two decades. He stayed until 2001, as both a starting pitcher and in a relief role. In 1997, the team won 79 games, securing the best record it would achieve during the losing streak. (The Bucs posted the same record last year.) “I was on top of the world — being in the major leagues, being in my hometown,” Peters says. But, he adds, no matter how excited you are to be there, losing matters. “It was tough losing as much as we did,” Peters says. “On the other hand, it was kind of one of those things where you look around and there are a lot of young guys. Even though we expected to win every night, you go up against teams with veteran superstar players.”


Today, Peters manages a handful of parking lots Downtown and in Oakland. After he left the majors, he sold cars at a South Hills dealership before family responsibilities made the long hours untenable. Baseball is still part of his life. He spends his summers coaching teenagers, did a brief stint as a pitching coach at Point Park University and, through the West Penn Allegheny Health System, he works with players seeking rehabilitation after being injured. Peters isn’t poor. But he’s on his second marriage (his current wife is a teacher), has four kids, and readily acknowledges that his time with the Pirates didn’t leave him set for life. (His salary ranged from about $1,000 a month in the minors to his largest contract, a yearly $500,000, in the late ’90s.) In 1999, Peters battled injuries and had surgery — his arm wasn’t the same afterward. He bounced around after he left the Pirates in 2001, and did a brief stint with the Montreal Expos. When people recognize him at the parking lots, many of them “are pretty tickled when they hear I first played for the Pirates,” Peters says. They also say, “Man, you played major-league baseball; now you’re parking cars. That ain’t right,’” he adds. “But the bottom line is: Not everyone

gets multi-million-dollar contracts,” he explains. “I played for a respectable amount of time, but I didn’t play for 20 years.” Joe Maize, Peters’ baseball coach at Peters Township High School, says he had a great arm, but was undersized and certainly not ready for the majors right out of school. Even Peters didn’t think of himself as the best player on his high school team, let alone a prospect. “I wasn’t necessarily someone that the Pirates really coveted,” he says. He was always athletic and also played basketball and football, but he didn’t particularly enjoy college baseball, or the college experience, and he left after his third year at Indiana University. So why did the Pirates draft him in the 37th round that year? “It’s a good question, really,” he says. “I don’t think I ever asked them that.” Marc Wilkins, a former Pirate who pitched alongside Peters, is more confident about the ’90s-era team and their roles as players. “There’s a reason we got to the majors in the first place — we worked our asses off,” he says. “I don’t think I ever sat back and thought, ‘Man, we’re failing; we suck,’” Wilkins adds. “You always have that ‘We’ll get them tomorrow’ attitude.”

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1-5 and I was supremely pissed off. In 2012, the team had gone from playoff contender to big loser, continuing its record streak of losing seasons, and I felt like I needed to do something about it. So I did what any good fan with access to a weekly newspaper would do â&#x20AC;&#x201D; I wrote a scathing article describing how the Pirates will never see success as long as Bob Nutting and his family are leading this franchise. I felt like I was in a position to speak about their business prowess, since I worked for several years at one of their newspapers. I questioned their bottom-line approach to player acquisition and the moves they made at the 2012 trade deadline. Basically I wrote: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not a fan of how the Nuttings do business â&#x20AC;&#x201D; any business.â&#x20AC;? So here we are in mid-September, and the Pirates are competing for a slot in the postseason and possibly a division title. There was no massive collapse â&#x20AC;&#x201D; though recently the team lost three straight games to the craptastic San Diego Padres and fell behind in the race for the division crown. Still, the Pirates ended their 20-year losing streak and appear to be a team on the rise.

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While the Pirates have been losing for 20 years, it really started to hurt in 2001, when PNC Park opened thanks to $212 million in taxpayer funds. Piratesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; record since that season (through Sept. 18): 907-1434. Public subsidy per win: $233,738 That puts writers like me in a tough spot. I made an argument in April that the Pirates would never ďŹ nd success under the Nuttings. But unless the ghost of John W. Galbreath â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the team owner who was responsible for three World Series titles â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is in there calling the shots, I was wrong. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not the only writer in town in this

{PHOTO BY LAUREN DALEY}

Sign at PNC Park, Sept. 19

situation. Were we wrong for our criticisms? Do we apologize? I put the question to one of my peers. Dejan Kovacevic is a columnist for the Pittsburgh TribuneReview and has been writing about the club and its lows for years. You may remember him from such columns as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pirates clueless about winning.â&#x20AC;? The article discussed the changes the Pirates had made, but which inexplicably left them still unable to win. In that piece, Kovacevic simply asks: â&#x20AC;&#x153;How are they still losers?â&#x20AC;? Kovacevic says he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ride the Pirates simply for fun. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was consistent in praising the plan for ďŹ ve years,â&#x20AC;? he explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What I panned was the execution for ďŹ ve years. That doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change. History gets made. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get rewritten. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This management team, to its considerable credit, just had the offseason of a lifetime in acquiring both Francisco Liriano and Russell Martin, plus Mark Melancon, through the well-timed, well-executed Joel Hanrahan trade. Fantastic stuff. But again, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t erase what came before.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true. In April, when I wrote that the Pirates were heading toward the cellar once again, I did have some compelling evidence, although I will allow that the season was just six days old. But that was after last seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mega-collapse and the decision by Bob Nutting to stay the course, instead of making wholesale organizational changes that were championed by fans and the media. Now, do I admit that I was wrong, or do I take the position that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only one good season after two decades of bad ones? How do we know whether the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually ďŹ xed for good? Should the Nuttings and their upper management, including President Frank Coonelly, get a pass for one incredible year? We posed that question to Coonelly himself.


During the team’s 20-year losing streak, most seasons played by a single player, shortstop Jack Wilson: 9 SOURCE: BASEBALLREFERENCE.COM

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if the first winning season in 20 years is nothing but a respite from our two decades of pain and anguish? What if we are the Florida Marlins? In that case, I’ll refuse to apologize. But I’ll be the first in line to say thank you for this winning season. CD EI TC H @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Alex Zimmerman contributed to this report

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games in 1998 and, excepting a 2003 World Series win, have been pretty lousy since? If we are like the Red Sox, sitting at a place that will lead this team to success for the next several years, then I’m willing and pleased to apologize for being wrong. But what if all of this is an aberration? What

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“Ownership provided the investment for what you’re seeing on the field today,” Coonelly said. “We’ve spent more money than any major-league club during my first five years here in the amateur draft, [and] that was all a strategic decision that ownership endorsed. In each of the last three years, ownership has approved us, not only increasing our payroll significantly from the year before as we moved through our budgeting process, but in each of those three years — at and around the trade deadline — approved additional payroll flexibility to go up and over the budget to acquire players that would hopefully give us an opportunity to play deep into the postseason. “While ownership will typically take the brunt of the blame when things don’t go well … Bob Nutting certainly deserves a lot of credit for what’s been built here and for having the patience to allow this process to reach this point.” That’s certainly a valid point, Mr. Coonelly. But what remains to be seen is, on what point are we sitting? Are we the 2004 Boston Red Sox, who righted the ship, won the World Series and have been serious contenders ever since? Or are we the Florida Marlins, who followed up their 1997 World Series victory by winning 54

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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In the public libraries of Seattle (as in most public libraries), patrons are not allowed to eat or sleep (or even appear to be sleeping) or be shirtless or barefoot or have bad body odor or talk too loudly — because other patrons might be disturbed. However, as the Post-Intelligencer reported in September, Seattle librarians do permit patrons to watch hardcore pornography on public computers, without apparent restriction, no matter who (adult or child) is walking by or sitting at the next screen (although librarians politely ask porn-watchers to consider their neighbors). Said a library spokesperson: “[P]atrons have a right to view constitutionally protected material no matter where they are in the building, and the library does not censor.”

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Among people earnestly devoted to palmistry (the foretelling of the future by “expert” examination of the inner surface of the hand), a few in Japan have resorted to what seems like cheating: altering their palm lines with cosmetic surgery. According to a July Daily Beast dispatch from Tokyo, Dr. Takaaki Matsuoka is a leading practitioner, preferring an electric scalpel over laser surgery in that the latter more often eventually heals over, obviously defeating the purpose. He must be careful to add or move only the lines requested by the patient (e.g., “marriage” line, “romance” line, “money-luck” line, “financial success” line).

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Iran’s INSA news service reported in January that officials in Shiraz had acquired a finger-amputation machine to perhaps streamline the gruesome punishment often meted out to convicted thieves. (A masked enforcer turns a guillotine-like

wheel to slice off the finger in the manner of a rotary saw.) Iran is already known for its reliance on extreme Islamic Sharia, which prescribes amputations, public lashings and death by stoning, and Middle East commentators believe the government will now step up its amputating of fingers, even for the crime of adultery.

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Measles, despite being highly contagious, was virtually eradicated in America until a small number of skeptics, using now-discredited “research,” tied childhood vaccinations with the rise of autism, and now the disease is returning. About half the members of the Eagle Mountain International Church near Dallas have declined to vaccinate their children, and as of late August, at least 20 church members have experienced the disease. The head pastor denied that he preaches against the immunizations (although he did tell NPR, “[T]he [medical] facts are facts, but then we know the truth. That always overcomes facts.”).

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Outraged Jewish leaders complain periodically about Mormons who, in the name of their church, posthumously baptize deceased Jews (even Holocaust victims) — beneficently, of course, to help them qualify for heaven. Church officials promised to stop, but in 2012 reports still surfaced that not all Mormons got the memo. Thus inspired, a “religious” order called the Satanic Temple conducted a July “pink mass” over the Meridian, Miss., grave of the mother of the founder of the Westboro Baptist Church, Rev. Fred Phelps Jr. — posthumously “turning” her gay. (Westboro infamously stages small, hate-saturated demonstrations denouncing homosexuals and American tolerance.) Ten days

later, Meridian prosecutors charged a Satanic Temple official with misdemeanor desecration of a grave.

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Australia’s chief diplomat in Taipei, Taiwan, said in August that he was suing local veterinarian Yang Dong-sheng for fraud because Dr. Yang backed out of euthanizing the diplomat Kevin Magee’s sick, 10-year-old dog. Instead, Dr. Yang “rescued” the dog, who is now thriving after he patiently treated her. Magee’s lawsuit claims, in essence, that his family vet recommended euthanization, that he had paid for euthanization, and that “Benji” should have been put down. Dr. Yang said the fee Magee paid was for “medical care” and not necessarily euthanization. (Benji, frolicking outside when a reporter visited, was not available for comment.)

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In August, a prosecutor in Houston filed aggravated rape charges against a 10-year-old girl (“Ashley”) who had been held for four days in a juvenile-detention center. A neighbor had seen Ashley touching a 4-year-old boy “in his private area,” according to a KRIV-TV report — in other words, apparently playing the time-honored game of “doctor.”

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Smithsonian magazine detailed in August the exhaustive measures that military officials have taken to finally block relentless Richardson’s ground squirrels from tunneling underneath Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana and interfering with the Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missiles on 24/7 standby. For example, officials had to use trial-and-error to plant underground screens deeper into the ground than the squirrels cared to dig. On the

same day, The New York Times disclosed that squirrels have caused 50 power outages in 24 states in the U.S. since Memorial Day after invading electric-company substations.

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In July, the Czech Republic approved Lukas Novy’s official government ID photo even though he was wearing a kitchen colander on his head. Novy had successfully explained that his religion required it since he is a “Pastafarian” — a member of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster (a prank religion pointing out that all deities’ power and wisdom comes from followers’ faith rather than from tangible proof of their existence).

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In August, a judge in Voronezh, Russia, accepted for trial Dmitry Argarkov’s lawsuit against Tinkoff Credit Systems for violating a credit-card contract. Tinkoff had mailed Argarkov its standard fine-print contract, but Argarkov computer-scanned it, changed proTinkoff provisions into pro-Argarkov terms, and signed and returned it, and Tinkoff accepted it without re-reading. At least at this stage of the lawsuit, the judge appeared to say that Argarkov had bested Tinkoff at its own game of oppressive, fine-print mumbo-jumbo.

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Washington, D.C., Park Police arrested Christopher H. Cleveland and charged him with shooting “upskirt” photos of unsuspecting women lounging on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. According to the officers, Cleveland (who said he was unaware that the photos were illegal) had a computer in his car that contained at least 150 PowerPoint slide presentations of at least 30 images each of his victims.

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DOG DAYS OF OCTOBER {BY ANDY MULKERIN} If you host a playoff-baseball party, it’s only logical that you offer the classic baseball food: hot dogs. But don’t just serve plain ol’ wieners — give your guests a full-fledged hot-dog bar! Here are some hints on how to stock up so you can, frankly, hit it out of the park. The classics: Just because they’re expected doesn’t mean ketchup, mustard and relish aren’t important. They’re the building blocks of more complex dogs … and are pretty great in combination. Fresh veggies: Chop up onions, tomatoes and cucumbers. Banana peppers are good for mild heat; even grated carrots can come into play. Pickled veggies: Beyond pickled jalapeños and olives, feel free to go unconventional. Quick-pickled radishes are a refreshing choice. Meat on meat on meat: We probably don’t have to remind you that bacon — especially crumbled — loves hot dogs. (Vegetarians take note: Some bacon-bit products like Bacos are vegan.) Chili is also crucial: Make it with meat, or make a veggie version, preferably with black (or other smallish) beans. Non-beefy: Don’t forget your vegan, vegetarian and otherwise healthconscious baseball-loving friends. There are great veggie dogs out there — Yves Jumbo Dogs fill out a bun nicely — and it’s nice to offer a turkey dog. (The best tend to be made with all-white meat.) Remember the bun: Bigger buns suit those who are piling on the condiments. If your guests like their dogs stacked with veggies or slathered in chili, get torpedo rolls or sausage buns. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM CITYPAP ER.COM

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{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

A

DOUBLE entendre can be witty, but sometimes a single dose is enough. Opening a restaurant/bar downstairs from the Google offices and calling it Social, for instance, is a move far more “duh” than double. Social’s logo is a cartoon speech bubble which instantly recalls the ubiquitous iconography of text messaging. We woniconog dered if texting might actually be the only conversational medium possible inside conve Social, Socia where the volume is as loud as at many live-music venues. We enabled oldfashioned conversation by sitting outside fash on the t spacious patio, which, despite being bordered by Penn Avenue and the Bakery Square parking lot, was pleasBak antly ant appointed with light strings, planters and an energetic, but not raucous, crowd of people meeting up after work or cro exercising at the nearby gym. ex Once you’re in the door, the establishment does not work the social-media li theme quite as hard. You don’t have to tweet your order to the kitchen, thankfully, and the menu isn’t full of cute social-

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Ahi tuna nachos

media puns. The fare (or “grub,” as per the menu heading) is what you’d expect for a restaurant practically captive to a worldly, but determinedly casual, workforce. Pizzas, sandwiches and salads have ingredients that wouldn’t be out of place at the trendiest restaurants, but preparations are un-fussy and there is little of the precious procurement name-dropping that marks menus eager to tout their sustainability credentials.

SOCIAL 6425 Penn Ave., Larimer. 412-362-1234 HOURS: Sun.-Thu. 11 a.m.-midnight; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-2 a.m. PRICES: $4-12 except large pizzas, $18-19 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED In addition to several menu salads, Social offers a checklist-style, build-yourown-salad option. The selection of greens, toppings, meats, garnishes and dressings was broad, almost to the point of over-

whelming. This is great for people who know exactly what they want, but even so, the proportions and presentation are still left to the discretion of a kitchen that can read your checklist, but not your mind. We’re pleased to report that our custom salad was to our liking. An appetizer order of fries spared us from having to make any choice at all. They’re served with three sauces: sour cream and onion, sriracha ketchup and truffle aioli. Each offered a different complement to the excellent, shoestringstyle potatoes. The sauces also helped dilute the fries’ saltiness, which was through the roof. Too much salt was a problem that recurred in the otherwise delicious soups, a classic, sweet-tart tomato and a velvety potato-leek, the latter topped with a few strands of fried leek for texture. Each soup had wonderful, intense even, depth of flavor that vied with its saltiness to make a dominant impression. Pizzas come in two sizes and a wide range of toppings, but don’t expect to order CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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MEET AND EAT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

a bunch of small pies to share around: One small is ample for two people if there is also a salad or appetizer on the table. Not appreciating this, we ordered both a classic pepperoni pizza and the “Green Eggs and Ham,” topped with garlic sauce, prosciutto, asparagus, red onion, fresh mozzarella, shaved parmesan and a sunny-side-up egg. All the toppings were pretty good (except for the asparagus, which was wan, approaching army green, and didn’t add much flavor while distracting with too much fiber). But it was Social’s crust that really stood out. It was thin and cracker-crisp without sacrificing hints of satisfying chew.

Bartender Max Carson

Chicken and steak sandwiches were both highlighted by extraordinary meat. The chicken breast was moist, meaty and flavorful, while the skirt steak, a cut always full of beefy flavor, was also incredibly tender. The rolls were Italian-style braided, but agreeably yeastier than most, and the toppings lived up to the meat. Blue cheese and mushrooms were rich enough to complement the beef, while fontina, prosciutto, asparagus pesto and roasted tomatoes provided a sophisticated range of flavors that still deferred to the chicken. Finally, custom ice-cream sandwiches (chocolate or vanilla served between either chocolate-chip or Reese’s-peanutbutter-chunk cookies) were a dessert in the kid-food-all-grown-up style. The cookies were good enough to eat on their own, and had the right, resilient texture for holding the ice cream. Salt aside — and we do hope the kitchen will set the salt aside — Social is a casual, convenient gathering place for those who enjoy upscale pub grub in an environment likely not too far, in terms of distance or design, from where they spent their workdays. Spread the word, by whatever medium you prefer. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

NOT STANDING STILL Wigle Whiskey to unveil two new products The minds at Wigle Whiskey are restless. The owners of the Strip District distillery have already developed two white whiskeys, a series of aged whiskeys and a Dutch-inspired gin. Wigle has also been licensed as one of the first grain-to-bottle organic distilleries in the country. And the distillery isn’t yet two years old. What’s more, Wigle is now releasing two new products: a line of bitters and a “Spirit Distilled From Honey” called Landlocked. “Through the gin process, we fell in love with working with botanicals, and bitters are the ultimate expression of botanicals,” says Wigle’s Meredith Grelli. She says that bitters were a natural progression in Wigle’s product development, since the pungent, almost medicinal, flavor is used to add a finishing touch to cocktails. “We want to have a full line of products that consumers can use to make an all-Wigle cocktail. Bitters will help us get there,” she says. It’s taken a little while longer than expected to get the bitters to market, because the booze-maker had to jump through a series of “non-potable” licensing hoops. But developing Landlocked, its honey spirit, was a more straightforward process. Meredith Grelli and her husband, distiller Alex, are both avid beekeepers and they wanted to make a spirit that would celebrate the region’s buckwheat-loving bees. There are two basic expressions of Landlocked: straight honey, and spiced with coco nibs, orange peels, vanilla and cinnamon. Un-aged versions of the spirit will be released on Oct 11; barrel-aged products are due sometime in the spring. With so much development happening so quickly, it’s natural to wonder if the company is spreading itself too thin. Grelli is unfazed by this question. “We will always be a whiskey company, first and foremost,” she says, adding that a product is never released until after going through taste tests and a lengthy development process. So don’t expect Wigle’s curious minds to stop experimenting. As Grelli says, “Innovation is what keeps us fascinated.” 2401 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-224-2827 or wiglewhiskey.com INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

ENJOY

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

CHURCH BREW WORKS. 3525 Liberty Ave., Lawrenceville. 412-688-8200. The Brew Works setting — the meticulously rehabbed interior of St. John the Baptist Church with its altar of beer — remains incomparable, and there are always several hand-crafted brews on tap to enjoy. For dining, the venue offers a flexible menu, suitable for all ages, ranging from pub nibblers and wood-fired pizza to nouvelle American entrées. KE

DITKA’S RESTAURANT. 1 Robinson Plaza, Robinson. 412-722-1555. With its wood paneling, white tablecloths and $30 entrees, Ditka’s aims for the serious steakhouse market — but never forgets its sports roots: Aliquippa-born Mike Ditka is the former Chicago Bears coach. Try the skirt steak, a Chicago favorite, or a fine-dining staple such as filet Oscar. LE

Try Our New Luncheon Buffet Soup • Salad • Entrées • Dessert

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all BOTTLES of WINE

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Del’s is Celebrating 65 Years in Bloomfield

Mediterrano {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. 422 Foreland St., North Side. 412-904-3335. This venue offers a nicely up-todate selection of refined pub grub, including inventively dressed burgers (corn chips, salsa and ranch dressing), meatloaf and fried chicken. A relaxed gastropub, with fun appetizers, such as steak “pipe bombs,” live music on one floor and menus housed in old LP covers. KE LA CUCINA FLEGREA. 100 Fifth Ave., No. 204, Downtown. 412-521-2082. The specialties of Italy’s Campi Flegrei are featured at this Downtown restaurant. The cuisine of this coastal region naturally offers seafood, but also vegetables and cured meats. Thus, a pasta dish might be laden with shellfish, or enlivened with radicchio and prosciutto. LE

fearless and successful preparations that make the menu a worthwhile read. KE LUKE WHOLEY’S WILD ALASKAN GRILLE. 2106 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412904-4509. Expect fresh fish from this fine-dining but casual establishment. There’s a wellcurated selection of mostly grilled fish with various sauces. Appetizers include favorites such as calamari, mussels and crab cakes, but also grilled corn with feta cheese. KE

MEDITERRANO. 2193 Babcock Blvd., North Hills. 412-822-8888. This Greek estiatorio offers hearty, homestyle fresh fare in a casual, yet refined, setting. Salads, appetizers (many of them less-familiar) and casseroles are on offer as well as heartier fare like kalamarakia (octopus), roasted leg LAS VELAS. 21 of lamb and stuffed Market Square, 2nd . w w w floor, Downtown. 412tomatoes. LF er hcitypap g p 251-0031. Authentic .com “family favorite” dishes NEW HOW LEE. are the standout at this 5888 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Mexican restaurant, offering Hill. 412-422-1888. It’s an a vibrant antidote to Mexican oddly signed storefront “cuisine” mired in tired clichés. restaurant, but this is Sichuan Trade a taco for cochinita pibil cuisine that rises above its (vinegar-marinated pork), peers with food that’s well chilaquiles (tortilla casserole) cooked, expertly seasoned or alambres (meat smothered and fearlessly spicy. The lesswith peppers, onions and typical entrees include cumin cheese). Also notable: abovemutton, dan dan noodles, average sides, including rice, tea-smoked duck and Chendu beans and potatoes. KE fried dry hot chicken. JF THE LIBRARY. 2304 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-0517. The entrée list at this bookishthemed bistro is short, usually a good sign that the chef is focusing on the strengths of his kitchen and the season’s freshest foods. Dishes revolve around the staples of meat, seafood and pasta, but in

PARK BRUGES. 5801 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-661-3334. This Belgian-style bistro offers more than moules (mussels), though those come highly recommended, in either a traditional creamwine preparation or spicy Creole. Rather than frites, try variations on French-Canadian poutine, such as adding chipotle pulled pork. CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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FULL LIST E N O LIN

Piacquadio’s {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Every Wednesday & Friday • 11:30am - 2pm

on our

CORNERSTONE. 301 Freeport Road, Aspinwall. 412-408-3258. The contemporary American fare at this warm and welcoming venue offers a creative take on a traditional menu. Every dish is served with a twist, but none — such as fancified mac-n-cheese, slow-roasted brisket sliders, grilled lamb burger or pulled-pork nachos — is too twisted. KE BIG JIM’S. 201 Saline St., Greenfield. 412-421-0532. Pittsburgh has seen a massive expansion of high-end dining. This cozy eatery — with bar and separate dining area — isn’t part of that trend. It’s oldschool Pittsburgh: good food in huge portions, with waitresses who call you “hon.” The place you go to remember where you’re from. JE

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Every Thursday at 7pm with ‘LIVE’ Music & Psychic Readings Friday Night KARAOKE with DJ ‘B’ at 10pm

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Full Service Bar • Over 50 Types of Tequila! Best Homemade Margaritas in The Burgh! Northview Plaza • North Hills • 412-366-8730

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A Unique Luncheon & Gourmet Food Destination

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

Dine-In or Take-Out Monday 8a-3p Tuesday-Friday 8a-8p Saturday Brunch 9a-3p

412-415-0338 538 California Ave. Pittsburgh Pa 15202 Check out www.skinnypetes.com

Steaks, tarte flambée flatbreads and even a burger round out this innovative menu. KE PARIS 66 BISTRO. 6018 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-404-8166. A charming venue brings Parisian-style café culture to Pittsburgh, offering less fussy, less expensive everyday fare such as crepes, salads and croques, those delectable French grilled sandwiches. With fresh flowers on every table, specials chalked on boards and French conversation bouncing off the open kitchen walls, Paris 66 epitomizes the everyday glamour of the French neighborhood bistro. KF PIACQUADIO’S. 300 Mount Lebanon Blvd., Mount Lebanon. 412-745-3663. There’s still pleasure to be had in oldfashioned breaded chicken and veal, served up at this classic Italian-American restaurant. Indulge in old-school comfort foods, such as manicotti (made with crepes) and beans and greens (with sausage), as well as chicken and pastas specials. KE SPAK BROS. 5107 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-362-7725. A pizza, sub and snack joint with fare for all: vegetarians, vegans and carnivores. You’ll find vegan pizza with soy cheese, seitan wings, steak sandwiches, pierogies — much of it made from locally sourced ingredients. J TAMARI. 3519 Butler St., Lawrenceville (412-325-3435) and 701 Warrendale Village Drive, Warrendale (724-933-3155). The concept is original and simple: blending the salty, citrusy flavors of Asia with the bright, spicy flavors of Latin America. Although the execution is highend, individual dishes are quite reasonably priced, with lots of small plates. KE TAMARIND FLAVOR OF INDIA. 257 N. Craig St., Oakland (412-605-0500); 2101 Green Tree Road, Green Tree (412278-4848); and 10 St. Francis Way, Cranberry (724-772-9191). This menu combines southern Indian cuisine with northern Indian favorites, including meat, poultry, seafood and vegetable curries with rice. Chief among its specialties are dosas, the enormous, papery-thin pancakes that are perhaps the definitive southern Indian dish. JE TESSARO’S. 4601 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-6809. This immensely popular Bloomfield institution, set in an old neighborhood corner bar, has built its reputation on enormous wood-fired hamburgers: choice meat, ground in-house; fresh rolls; and a variety of toppings. Regulars sit at the bar, and, on busy weekends, diners line up to get in. KE

offMenu {BY JESSICA SERVER}

UPROOTED Quiet Storm’s closing leaves local vegetarians feeling empty inside BY NOW, YOU’VE PROBABLY HEARD that the iconic veggie eatery Quiet Storm will close in October. While owner Jill MacDowell arranges a new partnership with Shadow Lounge/AVA’s Justin Strong, the turnover raises an important question: What’s the current state of vegetarian dining in Pittsburgh? “It’s a huge loss,” says Niki Penberg, founding organizer of the Vegan Pittsburgh restaurant outreach project. “The Quiet Storm’s been a really important part of the veg-dining scene.” Last week, MacDowell told City Paper that when she begins managing the kitchen in AVA’s new North Oakland location next month, the menu will include meat dishes. She’s pledged that when she finds a new, permanent home for Quiet Storm, the menu will again be meatless. For now, though, strictly vegetarian local eateries hover in the single digits, including upscale Eden, Zenith (for brunch) and vegan chain The Loving Hut. Compare that to Washington, D.C., whose population is twice the size of Pittsburgh, but which boasts eight times as many vegetarian- and vegan-dining options. To be sure, top local restaurants — such as Legume, Root 174 and Avenue B — feature at least one veg-friendly entrée nightly. Casual establishments in this meat-and-potatoes-town also cater to the vegetarian population. Places like Spak Brothers, Franktuary, Double Wide Grill, D’s Six Pax and Dogz, OTB Bicycle Café and Station Street hold true to Pittsburgh dining traditions (you want fries on that?) while still offering veggie options. Still, vegetarians and vegans want for eateries where they can order literally anything off the menu. “These restaurants aren’t just places to eat,” says Penberg. “They’re like sanctuaries for our values.” Penberg, a vegan for five-and-a-half years, has been frequenting Quiet Storm since the days when it offered live music. “I left the city and came back,” she says. “I was glad to see it was still around … like seeing an old friend.” Many hope for their “old friend” to succeed — meat-free — in its new circumstances. But whatever the future holds for the Quiet Storm, Penberg postulates, “I don’t think it’d be a gamble for more all-veg restaurants to start up here.”

“THESE RESTAURANTS… ARE LIKE SANCTUARIES FOR OUR VALUES.”

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PATINO ES OP DOG ED

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LOCAL

BEAT

EVERY YEAR, VIA HAS DEMONSTRATED THAT IT HAS AN EAR FOR THE SOUNDS OF SUBCULTURES

{BY RORY D. WEBB}

MUSIC MISSIONARY Braddock native Lee Davis graduated from Woodland Hills High School in 1988, but he credits his two years at Taylor Allderdice High School for inspiring his career in the music business. “The people that went there, because of their background, everybody was a free spirit,” he says. “Hip hop was really big at Allderdice, especially the four elements [MCing, DJing, breakdancing and graffiti]. Some of the best graffiti artists were at Allderdice at that time, and dancers, and then that whole hip-hop culture just exploded.” Since receiving a proclamation from the mayor of Pittsburgh at an event earlier this year that honored other music moguls including Roger Humphries and Shanice Wilson, Davis has assembled a three-man team to launch the 3 Horsemen/Mission Control Recordings business initiative. “One of the biggest things that independent artists need — the ones that are serious like Macklemore and Ryan Lewis — the one thing that they have that most independent artists don’t have is structure,” says Davis. Davis handles copyrights and publishing, New York native Robert Ross handles the paperwork and legal side, and investment specialist Michael A. Jordan is in charge of financing. “We’re now in a digital age where we’ve become so dependent on the viral presence that we’re forgetting that there’s still a business model that we still need to attach ourselves to,” says Ross. “We’re mentoring artists to be the best that they can be. We teach life skills, like what to say and what not to say in certain situations, whether it’s interviewing or on stage. We take them through a whole process; it’s not just, ‘You got talent, so we’re gonna put you out there.’” Mission Control’s first signing is hiphop artist Tek Bennett, a Penn Hills High School grad. “He writes, he produces, he does everything that an artist needs to do in order to make it.,” says Ross. “The mindset of Mission Control is controlling our environment and making the mission reachable, being able to take something and know that with the proper nurturing and with the proper analytics we can make the job happen.”

“ONE OF THE BIGGEST THINGS THAT INDEPENDENT ARTISTS NEED IS STRUCTURE.”

DIFFERENT VOICES E

VERY YEAR since its inception in 2010, the VIA Festival has taken on a different form. From year one’s main stage at the state-of-the-art 31st Street Soundstage to last year’s takeover of a former bank building in East Liberty, every year is unique. This year’s main venue, even as of press time, was shrouded in a certain amount of mystery; it was only the third week of September when an address — 5854 Baum Blvd., in East Liberty near Whole Foods — was listed on the festival’s website. Via email in mid-September, festival founders Lauren Goshinski and Quinn Leonowicz explained: “We’re working on our signature pop-up venue that will hopefully come through. A unique venue really defines the feel of the overall event and presents interesting opportunities for visuals, collaborations, etc. It’s the hardest part, yet often the most rewarding.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF JANE CHARDIET}

{BY KATE MAGOC}

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

Noise artist Margaret Chardiet, who performs as Pharmakon

The festival, which also includes events at venues like the Rex Theater, Altar Bar and Brillobox, thrives on the city landscape. Leonowicz and Goshinski attended some of North America’s best festivals, including Movement in Detroit,

VIA FESTIVAL

FEATURING KINK, ACTRESS, ADULT, JACQUES GREENE, PHARMAKON, MANY MORE Tue., Oct 1-Sun., Oct. 6. Various venues citywide. Passes $60-140; individual events free-$25. www.via-pgh.com

Mutek in Montreal and Pitchfork in Chicago — and they decided the big-venue thing wasn’t for them. “Being in a city, in its venues, is prime territory for us,” they explain.

Much like their unique approach to the venues, the artist lineup typically offers names both well known and unknown; there’s always something new to discover. “VIA presents artists who not only exemplify their sub-genre at this point in time, but that also reveal a sound or culture hopefully before pop life can appropriate it, or massive festivals take notice,” Leonowicz and Goshinski explain. EVERY YEAR, VIA has demonstrated that

it has an ear for the sounds of subcultures. In particular, the organizers have always focused on the gay arts community, having featured the likes of Big Freedia and Le1f — both gay hip-hop artists. This year, the lineup is showing even more varied support of the gay music arena, featuring local drag queen Sharon Needles, who has achieved national success after winning RuPaul’s Drag Race;


Pittsburgh’s premier gay-centric house and techno party, Honcho; and Chicago’s infamous gay party, Men’s Room. Queer culture has never really been a stranger to the club scene, but VIA capitalizes on the subcultural shifts within gay hip hop. This year, the festival brings that support by way of innovative Chicago queer hip-hop collective Banjee Report, which includes the artists aCcb00mbaP (pronounced “Ace-BoomBap”), 1wo (pronounced “One Two”) and Mister Wallace. Banjee Report hosts regular parties in Chicago and runs a podcast. “I definitely feel like queer artists are at a point, just like Mykki [Blanco], with Le1f, with us — you don’t have to be defined by the queer aspect anymore,” aCcb00mbaP says. “Yes, we are queer. That’s the background we’re coming from, but I feel like we’ve honestly reached a point where we can just make music and be respected for that music.”

“I THINK KIDS FEEL LIKE THEY DON’T EVEN HAVE TO IDENTIFY SEXUALLY, WHICH IS GOOD.” Currently, mainstream hip hop still struggles to reach the kind of lyrical importance that it once had. Even Mackelmore and Ryan Lewis’ VMA-winning music video for “Same Love” — a song about a gay man coming out to the world — was criticized by former VIA artist and rising star rapper, Le1F. He stated in a tweet that was widely reported after the VMAs: “news just in: gay people don’t care about your video about gay people.” “Besides Kendrick Lamar, who’s been kind of stepping it up lately, I just feel like [hip hop] has been so dumbed down for so long. So it’s nice to be in a position right now where we’re basically just telling our stories from our viewpoints,” aCcb00mbaP says. “It is a subculture. We tap on some things that even mainstream people don’t really grasp, or understand, or want to know about the culture. We’re here to talk about those issues.” With marriage equality and other gay rights in the national debate, such issues are more important than ever before. However, aCcb00mbaP does have a positive outlook on how younger generations understand sexuality. “It’s definitely different generationally. Today, it’s younger and younger,” he says of coming out and identifying as gay. “I think kids feel like they don’t even have to identify, which is good. I’d like to

OPUS ONE PRESENTS

Art by Kevin Ramser of h3d Space

VIA VISUALS {BY KATE MAGOC} VIA’s focus on the visual-electronic arts is sometimes overshadowed by the music lineup (especially since we’re writing about it for the music section of the paper). But the festival organizers are equally dedicated to both aspects of the experience, drawing talent both locally and internationally. And the multimedia events frequently offer a kind of art that can’t fit neatly inside a frame or on museum walls. Parts of the visual experience edge more into academic realms than the party sphere, but there’s always overlap.

This year, VIA is taking the audio-visual element beyond the past format of one visual artist to one musical artist. Instead, the festival is building what Goshinski referred to as a “super team of artists.” The “super team” consists of h3D Space, which will span all of the Friday and Saturday events. Arguably VIA’s most ambitious and all-encompassing visual-arts project to date, h3D Space is a combination of curated, live and crowd-sourced imagery with virtual appearances from artistavatars. Each night, CGI video content and the real-life/virtual-presence dichotomy will be presented from a different angle. Also expressed: a fascination with the tension between high-gloss spectacles and the inherent imperfections in 3-D technology. Beyond the h3D, VIA feature screenings and new media performances from artists including: Casey Jane Ellison, of the Internet-famous “What the F*shion”; Peter Burr, with a multimedia performance called “Special Effects”; Jose Hamilton, who makes online artwork using the Tumblr platform; twohundredfiftysixcolors, an experimental film that charts the evolution of the GIF; and many more. For a complete schedule, see www.via-pgh.com. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

10/12 CITIZEN COPE (AGES 21+) 10/22 MINUS THE BEAR 10/23 BEATS ANTIQUE 09/26 THE RAGBIRDS 09/27 ERICA BLINN & THE HANDSOME 09/27 09/28 09/28 10/02 10/03 10/04 10/05 10/08

MACHINE (EARLY) THE BOOGIE HUSTLERS (LATE) NATHAN ANGELO (EARLY) MELVILLE WALBECK (LATE) THE DEFIBULATORS DAVID WAX MUSEUM CABINET & HOLY GHOST TENT REVIVAL MEAT PUPPETS HEY MARSEILLES

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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DIFFERENT VOICES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

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ON THE RECORD

POPULAR MUSIC is one cultural arena

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

that continues to be dominated by male performers, with female artists frequently deďŹ ned as the sweet songbird or sexy vixen, as opposed to electronic producer or hard-as-fuck rapper. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s VIA lineup does much to change that perception, featuring seven female artists from around the globe who are most deďŹ nitely not Katy Perry or Miley Cyrus. Instead, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re techno DJs, singers who produce their own beats, rappers who spit ďŹ re and ladies who can work modular synths. But the fact remains that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still difďŹ cult for women performers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I said in an interview a couple months ago how intimidated I was when I ďŹ rst started,â&#x20AC;? explains Valerie Martino, who performs under the name Unicorn Hard-on. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not that people were trying to intimidate me, but I was intimidated because I was kind of alone for a lot of what I did. I slowly did meet other women. And as timeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gone on, women are feeling more comfortable and being like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fuck yeah, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m gonna play music.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? As Unicorn Hard-on, Martino is a well-known ďŹ gure in the noise scene, a vaguely deďŹ ned genre in which she makes art with sound. Unicorn Hard-onâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sound is power electronics, beat-driven, electro-tinged and party-oriented, but still hard noise in its own right. Some parts of the harsh-noise scene have historically been associated with misogynistic imagery. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really know how to describe it. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to put anti-woman in somebodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s frame of whatever theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing if thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not what it is,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But for me, I never really got into the power-electronics stuff because it kind of just felt creepy to me.â&#x20AC;? Another noise artist playing this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s festival, Pharmakon, inspired Martino to do what she now does. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When Pharmakon came along, I was like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fuck, this is actually how power electronics should be,â&#x20AC;? Martino explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not saying that I like Pharmakon because sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a woman. She was just one of the ďŹ rst people Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d seen doing power electronics where I was actually like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Whoa, I actually do like this music.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel as creepy when she did it.â&#x20AC;? INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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VIA Festival artists are too numerous to list here; a full list is available at www.via-pgh.com.

with Billy Bragg

Footy fan: Billy Bragg

British folk-rocker Billy Bragg plays Mr. Smallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tue., Oct. 1, his first Pittsburgh appearance since 1997. He talked with CP via phone about football (and music; read more on our music blog, FFW>>, at www.pghcitypaper.com). IN PITTSBURGH, WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE FANATICAL FANS OF AMERICAN FOOTBALL, AND I KNOW YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE A FAN OF YOUR KIND OF FOOTBALL. Yes, what we call â&#x20AC;&#x153;football.â&#x20AC;? I think we call your football â&#x20AC;&#x153;gridiron.â&#x20AC;? AROUND THE TIME YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE IN PITTSBURGH, OUR GRIDIRON TEAM, THE STEELERS, WILL BE IN LONDON PLAYING AN NFL GAME. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be perfectly honest with you: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not a fan of American football, because it stops and it starts too much. If Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m choosing an American sport to watch on TV in a hotel room, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll probably go for hockey, because it flows more like soccer. Although, the first bit of promo I did for [my new album] Tooth and Nail, it was in February in New York, on the night of the Super Bowl. And I found it compelling. I think it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just the football, it was everything around it. WITH AMERICAN FOOTBALL, YOU CAN GET UP AND DO THINGS BETWEEN PLAYS. YOU CAN MAKE DINNER WHILE YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE WATCHING. Whereas with soccer, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s compelling, you have to sit and watch the whole thing. And also, the reason why soccer will always have the edge on gridiron is you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to get dressed up to do it. Anybody can put down a couple of T-shirts for goal [markers], grab a soccer ball and play. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BILLY BRAGG with JOE PURDY. 7 p.m. Tue., Oct 1. Mr. Smallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $25-40. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com


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[ALT-COUNTRY] + THU., SEPT. 26 If recent Breaking Bad episodes have piqued your interested in the Wild West, leave it to Juniper Rising to take you there — without the violence and meth labs, of course. The Brooklyn-based four-piece has been together for only a year, but its captivating mix of lo-fi surf rock and country-western has already garnered a lot of media attention; the hazy, twangy tunes will put you right in the middle of a modern-day Western film. Promoting its new 7-inch record Days of Heaven, the band plays Lava Lounge tonight with locals City Steps and Paddy the Wanderer. Allison Crosby 9:30 p.m. 2204 E. Carson St., South Side. $5. 412-431-5282 or www.lavaloungepgh.com

[INDIE ROCK] + FRI., SEPT. 27

Come tempt fate and fortune in D Minor. Carmina Burana October 4th-6th, Heinz Hall The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra presents Carmina Burana, a medieval tale that takes you to the heights of fortune and the depths of fate. Featuring the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh, Carmina Burana will immediately follow the world premiere of David Stock’s Sixth Symphony. You’re fated to love it.

For tickets: call 412.392.4900 or visit pittsburghsymphony.org.

Finishing up a tour around the U.S. this month before continuing across the pond, lo-fi folk singer Katie Crutchfield, better known as Waxahatchee, will play Pittsburgh g tonight. g Crutchfield’s music is reminiscent iniscent of Cat Power and Tegan and Sara, with h simple guitar riffs and straightforward lyrics. s. There’s nothing complicated about her sound, ound, and she’s not trying too hard; it’s just ust one solid, heartfelt track after another. her. It could be the unselfconscious ’90s 0s indie-rock feel, but Crutchfield’s music sic certainly holds an air of nostalgia for simpler times. Catch her at the Mr. Roboto Project tonight with Screaming aming Females, Tenement and Cookietom. AC 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8. All ages. www.therobotoproject.org rg

[HIP HOP] + FRI., SEPT. 27 There’s more to the story this month at Heinz Hall: October 11-13 Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 21 with pianist Yulianna Avdeeva BNY Mellon Grand Classics

30

October 17-20 Broadway and Beyond with Brian Stokes Mitchell

October 25 & 27 Noah Bendix-Balgley plays Bruch’s Scottish Fantasy

PNC Pops

BNY Mellon Grand Classics

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

Manfred Honeck Music Director

Plenty of hip-hop artists have some sort of “controversy” attached to their names, whether deserved, contrived or otherwise. But few come with the voice — or story y— of Immortal Technique. Tech ech calls himself a revolutionary; ary; he rails against racism, clasassism, war and government nt

Immortal Technique

conspiracy. He served time for assault after a short-lived stint at Penn State. He came of age as a battle-rapper, and brings that intensity to his often polemical tracks. Tonight, he plays Altar Bar along with Brother Ali; I Self Divine and Diabolic open. Andy Mulkerin 7:30 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $20-25. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

[POP] + SAT., SEPT. 28 Two years ago, Aaron Pfeiffer left town for New York City; tonight, the singer returns home for a show, with his full band, at Clear Story Studio. The young singer does everything from contemporary pop covers to jazz standards and originals, and does it all with the flair of an up-and-coming pop star. Plenty of singers are OK, but Pfeiffer is next-level; the next time he comes back to his hometown, it might be after he wins a TV singing competition. Get in on the ground floor. The show also includes a live art installation by Ryan Ostrowski. AM 7 p.m. 1931 Sidney St., South Side. $35 (includes Si drinks). www.showclix.com/event/ www.sh AaronPfeifferHOME AaronPfeiffe

[PIRATE PUNK] + SAT., SEPT. S 28 Talk Like a Pirate Day may be over, but buccaneer fever is high around town right now — to nowhere as much muc as Thunderbird Café tonight, where whe The Bloody Seamen, the city’s city best-known pirate-themed role-playing band, plays an a album-release show. The group is calling it gr Piratepalooza, and while Piratepalo it’s not necessarily a n baseball-themed show, a baseba shout will w certainly ring through the room when the band plays “Pittsburgh Pirate,” the featured single f from the new full-length, Ahoy Motherfuckers. The Dirty Motherfuck Charms, Semi-Supervillains Se and Weird Paul all play as well. AM 9 p.m. 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5. Lawre 412-682-0177 or 412-682-0 www.thunderbirdcafe.net www.thu


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SQUIRREL HILL, 5862 Forbes Ave. 412-422-2123 DORMONT, 2904 West Liberty Ave. 412-341-6591 ROSS TOWNSHIP, 4864 McKnight Rd. 412-635-3170 SOUTH SIDE, 1709 E. Carson St. 412-488-7001 ROBINSON TOWN CTR., 6533 Robinson Ctr. Dr. 412-787-5134 MONROEVILLE, 4053 William Penn Hwy. 412-373-1000 OAKLAND, 3613 Forbes Ave. 412-482-9026 DOWNTOWN, 416 Smithfield St. 412-261-1007 CHECK OUT OUR NEWEST STORE! DOWNTOWN, 967 Liberty Ave. 412-391-3065

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ONE NIGHT ONLY, TUESDAY OCTOBER 8 TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 26 BRILLOBOX. Single Mothers, Kid Durango, Old Fears. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. The Ragbirds, Justin Endler. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Rat, The Sablowskis, The Lockland Brakes, OC45. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LAVA LOUNGE. City Steps, Juniper Rising, Paddy the Wanderer. South Side. 412-431-5282. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Katatonia, Cult Of Luna, TesseracT, Intronaut. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PALACE THEATRE. Kenny Vance & The Planotones. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. THE PITTSBURGH WINERY. Luke Winslow-King. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

SMILING MOOSE. Young London, Goldhouse. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Paperhaus, Action Camp, Pet Clinic. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WALNUT GRILL. The Keystone 3. Shadyside. 412-782-4768.

HAMBONE’S. The Grifters, Broke Stranded & Ugly, Rue Snider. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Height With Friends, Van Allen Belt, Lord Grunge, Thin Sketch Mini-Boone, The Lampshades. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LEECHBURG ELKS THEATRE. The Dave Iglar Band. Leechburg. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT 724-493-1917. & TAVERN. Terrance LINDEN GROVE. Vaughn. O’Hara. . w ww per Dancing Queen. Castle 412-963-1514. a p ty ci h pg Shannon. 412-882-8687. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT .com MR. SMALLS THEATER. & TAVERN. Pete & Scott. Stars, High Highs. Millvale. Richland. 724-444-7333. 866-468-3401. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE OBEY HOUSE. King’s Ransom. TAVERN. Universal Beat Union, Crafton. 412-922-3883. Chaibaba, Diabolik Logik. REX THEATER. Chris Knight Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. Chris Knight Band. South Side. CLUB CAFE. Erica Blinn & the 412-381-6811. Handsome Machine, Jay Wiley SMILING MOOSE. The (early). Erica Blinn & the Whisky Rebellion. South Side. Handsome Machine record 412-431-4668. release. The Boogie Hustlers STAGE AE. Zoso. North Side. (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. CLUB COLONY. Five Guys Named Fletcher’s Grove. Lawrenceville. Moe. Scott. 412-668-0903. 412-682-0177. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Bobby V. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

FRI 27

MP 3 MONDAY STILLHOUSE PICKERS With the

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra The last chance to see The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses as it returns to Heinz Hall by popular demand with SECOND QUEST! Expect breathtaking new visuals and music exploring additional chapters from the Zelda franchise as well as your original favorites. Don’t miss the final area performance before the Quest ends in 2013. Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from Stillhouse Pickers, who release a new album with a show at Nied’s Hotel (5483 Butler St., Lawrenceville) this Sat., Sept. 28. Stream or download

FOR TICKETS, call 412-392-4900 or visit www.pittsburghsymphony.org 32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

“Honeysuckle Wine” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 28 THE ACME CLUB. KISS Tribute. Harmarville. ALTMAN’S. Tony Janflone Jr. Pleasant Hills. 412-653-6440. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Tracy Drach, Eve Goodman. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. CECIL PARK. Gone South. Cecil. CLUB CAFE. Nathan Angelo, Micah Dalton, Shane & Madi (Early) Melville Walbeck, Aultman Brothers (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Albion Cross. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Dead Fame, Mancontrol, Shutterdown, Agnes Wired for Sound. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GOOSKI’S. Dead River, Rogue Signals, Perish. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HARVEY WILNER’S. Alter Ego. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Sleepers Awake, Supervoid, Mother Hawk, Black Plastic Caskets, Horseburner. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KOPPER KETTLE. Silkwood Shower. Washington. 724-225-5221. MILLERSTOWN INN. The Dave Iglar Band. . 724-445-2157. MINERAL BEACH. The Bill Ali Band. Finleyville. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Mike Mangione & CONTINUES ON PG. 52


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ėę ēĘęĎęĚęĊ ĔċĎęęĘćĚėČč The Art Institute of Pittsburgh Address: 420 Blvd of the Allies, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 Website: www.artinstitutes.edu/pittsburgh/ Phone: 412.263-6600 Current Enrollment: 1174 Student Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Tuition: $487/Credit Hour School Type: Private Most popular majors: Graphic Design, Culinary, Digital Filmmaking & Video Production, Game Art & Design, Fashion Design, Photography, Interior Design, Media Arts & Animation Regular Application Deadline: Rolling Distance from downtown Pittsburgh: Located in downtown Pittsburgh Awards & recognitions: The Art Institute of Pittsburgh is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE). The Interior Design program is accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA). . The Culinary program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation (ACEFEF) Campus life description: The Art Institute of Pittsburgh has been serving students, alumni and employers beginning in 1921, and offers 22 programs within 14 career and educational areas.

Deciding to further your education can be the most important decision of your life. You may be considering a career change, an associates, bachelor’s or master’s degree, or trade school training. If so, this section is here to help you discover the right degree program for you. Flip through these pages and let us pinpoint the right school for you. You will even find tips for repayment post-graduation. The non-profit organization, DoSomething.org, found that males with just a high school diploma or equivalent had an average income of $17,000 less than those with a bachelor’s degree in 2010. Similarly, females earned an average of $15,000 less per year than their postsecondary grad counterparts. Remember, it is never too late to go back to school and follow your dreams! A D V E R T I S I N G

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With Mobile Learning @ The Hill, minds are engaged 24/7. Learning happens anytime,anywhere. Full-time students get iPads. Professors enhance courses with technology. There’s even a Center for Innovative Teaching that supports the entire academic community. Ready to learn more about what makes us a leader in using mobile technology for education? Register for our October 20th Open House at

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Seton Hill University PA 15601 Address: 1 Seton Hill Drive, Greensburg, Website: www.setonhill.edu Admissions (724) 838-4281 Phone: 800-826-6234 / Undergraduate 8 Graduate & Adult Studies (724) 838-420 Current Enrollment: 2600 Student Faculty Ratio: 1:16 ate & $766/credit graduate Tuition: $14,175/semester undergradu School Type: Private

, Music, Education Most popular majors: Biology, Business issions adm g Regular Application Deadline: Rollin racing students of all faiths. emb rsity unive Religious Affiliation: A Catholic -based financial aid: 95% of our students Percentage of students receiving need receive some form of financial aid 35 miles Distance from downtown Pittsburgh: twice been named an Apple Distinguished Awards & recognitions: Seton Hill has nd the best ways to use technology to expa Program for consistently demonstrating ides prov tive initia Mobile Learning on the Hill learning opportunities. The university’s and students. lty facu ime full-t all iPads & Macbooks to ,» a: «Best Regional College,» «Best Value U.S. News & World Report calls Seton Hill .» rams Prog ation Educ e » with «Top Onlin «Best Grad School (Physician Assistant) prohilltop campus in the Laurel Highlands Campus life description: Our 200-acre pus cam our say ents stud Our . ctive education vides an inspirational setting for a distin n.) a Griffi looks like Hogwart’s. (And our mascot is

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5 Reasons you should go to College MAKE MORE MONEY People who only received their GED or high school diploma, according to gearup.wa.gov., earn about $28,816 per year. People who received a bachelor’s degree or higher earn about $59,539 per year NETWORKING College leads to connections in the work force. Friends in college can help lead to good jobs. Also, professors and organizations can help you land a job after graduation. JOB SECURITY In 2009, there were 9.7 million unemployed high school graduates, compared with 5.2 million college graduates without jobs, according to greatschools.org HEALTHIER LIFE If you have a college degree, it is more likely that you will receive insurance and benefits through work. MAKE MEMORIES College is the time in your life to experience something new, expand your mind and make life-long memories.

CCAC

Community College of Allegheny Coun ty Address: Four campuses and four cent ers, located as follows: Allegheny Campus (North Shore) Boyce Campus (Monroeville) North Campus (McCandless) South Campus (West Mifflin) Braddock Hills Center Homewood-Brushton Center Washington County Center West Hills Center Website: ccac.edu Phone: 412.237.3100 Current Enrollment: 32,256 credit stud ents; 28,969 noncredit students Student Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Student Facu lty Ratio Percentage of students receiving need -based financial aid: 44% Tuition: $99.75 per credit (plus applicable fees) for Allegheny County residents. Flat rate tuition of $1,496.25 for 12–1 8 credits for Allegheny County residents . Most popular majors: Nursing General Studies Liberal Arts Business Criminal Justice and Criminology Psychology Early Education and Child Development Campus life description: CCAC provides nearly 100 clubs and organizations, four honor societies, intercollegiate and intramural spor ts, cultural events and student governme nt leadership positions, providing CCAC students the opportunity to pursue interests outside of the classroom.

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University of Pittsburgh Bradford Address: 300 Campus Drive, Bradford , PA 16701 Website: www.upb.pitt.edu Phone: 800-872-1787 Current Enrollment: 1,500 Student Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Tuition: $12,208 per year for PA resid ents Most popular majors: Accounting, biolo gy, business management, criminal justic e, education, nursing and sports medicine . Percentage of students receiving need -based financial aid: 94% Distance from downtown Pittsburgh: 165 miles Awards & recognitions: The Princeton Review named us one of 150 Best Value College in the United States in 2012 and for nine consecutive years recognized us one of the best colleges in the Northeast. TheB estColleges.org named us one of the 10 best regional campuses in the United States in 2013. Campus life description: Pitt-Bradford is a safe, friendly institution for students who want to earn the world-renowned Universit y of Pittsburgh degree in a personalized environment. Students can choose from 37 bachelor’s degrees, 5 associate degr ees and more than 50 minors, concentrations and pre-professional programs. Students can gain real-world experience through internship s, undergraduate research and study-ab road opportunities. But it’s not all work and no play on campus. At Pitt-Bradford, students have more than 50 clubs and organizat ions from which to choose in addition to varsity and intramural athletics and access to many outdoor activities such as hiking, skiing, fishing, spelunking, white-water rafting and horseback riding.

THE TEAM LEADER WHO SAW A DISEASE STEAL HER MOTHER’S PAST AND IS DETERMINED NOT TO LET IT TAKE HER DAUGHTER’S FUTURE. BE A PART OF THE MOVEMENT TO RECLAIM THE FUTURE. START A TEAM. JOIN A TEAM.

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alz.org/walk 1.800.272.3900 PITTSBURGH WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S NORTH SHORE Saturday, October 5, 2013 Registration begins at 7:00 a.m. Walk begins at 9:00 a.m.


Pitt-Bradford grads get good jobs.

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ĆėđĔĜēĎěĊėĘĎęĞ TIPS FOR POST-GRADUATION REPAYMENT Obtaining a higher-education is one of the best investments you can make, but it can take a heavy toll on your finances post-graduation. Here are some tips to make the repayment process less stressful and more manageable. DO NOT PROCRASTINATE Unfortunately, keeping lingering debt off your mind does not make it go away. If you keep putting off the repayment of your student loans, it will literally cost you. Interest will accrue over-time and in the end your loan will cost you more money, and potentially hurt your credit. During your post-graduate grace period, take the time to figure out the first steps in the repayment process by calling your loan provider and asking questions.

Carlow University Address: 3333 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Website: www.carlow.edu Phone: 412-578-6059 Current Enrollment: 2,310 Student Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Tuition: Undergraduate tuition and fees: $25,416 / Graduate tuition: $744-$874 per credit School Type: Private Most popular majors: Nursing, biology, business management, education, psychology, art therapy, deciding Regular Application Deadline: Rolling admissions Religious Affiliation: Catholic Percentage of students receiving need-based financial aid: 90% Distance from downtown Pittsburgh: 2-3 miles Awards & recognitions: Achieved President’s Honor Roll for Community Service for eight consecutive years. Campus life description: Carlow University’s main campus is an oasis located in the heart of the bustling Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The neighborhood boasts the largest concentration of cultural, academic, and medical institutions in the area. Our private, 14-acre campus is secluded, yet in the heart of an active community just 10 minutes from downtown Pittsburgh. Carlow is a comprehensive Catholic master’s university which prepares students for leadership and service in professional and personal life.

CREATE A PAYMENT PLAN Figuring out your finances will give you an understanding as to what you can, and cannot afford. Find out your monthly loan cost, and from there write down your other major costs such as rent, utilities and car payment. This will show you how much money you have for personal use, and ensure that you set aside the necessary finances to repay your loans. COMMUNICATE WITH YOUR LOAN PROVIDER Student loans are much more flexible than many other loans. If you are having trouble making your monthly payments, call you loan provider and let them know. Often times you can defer your loans, which means putting a hold on making payments. If that is not an option, forbearance is much easier to obtain, and will postpone regular payments for a short amount of time. If you do need to choose either of these options, remember that interest still accrues, so begin repayment as soon as possible. UTILIZE AUTOMATIC WITHDRAWAL If you can afford to have your student loans automatically withdrawn from your bank account, it ensures that you never miss a payment. A D V E R T I S I N G

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50+

UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS & CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

LIVE ON CAMPUS

STUDENT TO STUDENT TO FACULTY FACULTY RATIO RATIO

Our residence halls are

11:1

steps away from the hustle and bustle of Oakland and downtown Pittsburgh, yet secluded on our

CARLOW’S PERSONALIZED EDUCATION PREPARES YOU FOR TODAY...TOMORROW...AND FOR LIFE.

private, hillside campus.

WEACCEPTUPTO

88 CREDITS FROMOTHERINSTITUTIONS

Conference-winning C onference-winning women's women's soccer soccer and and ssoftball oftball tteams, eams, ttennis, ennis, v o l l ey b a l l , b asketball, volleyball, basketball, and women women and and men's men's cross cross ccountry ountry and

84%

A PRIVATE, LIBERAL ARTS UNIVERSITY EDUCATION AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE.

OF GRADUATES ARE EMPLOYED OR IN GRADUATE SCHOOL WITHIN ONE YEAR OF GRADUATION CARLOW.EDU | 412.578.6000 | 3333 FIFTH AVENUE | PITTSBURGH, PA 15213 A D V E R T I S I N G

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ēĎěĊėĘĎęĞĔċĎęęĘćĚėČč ėĆđęĚĉĎĊĘ ĊėĆ ēĊė ĔđđĊČĊĔċ Ċē ral Studies University of Pittsburgh College of Gene , 4200 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA ning Lear of l edra Cath , Address: Fourth floor 15260 Website: cgs.pitt.edu Phone: 412-624-6600 Current Enrollment: 1,438 Student Faculty Ratio: 14:1 rs, 13 certificates Academic programs offered: 12 majo of (includes pre-med track), Administration ces Scien ral Most popular majors: Natu munications Justice, and Media & Professional Com ed financial aid: Pitt students receive over -bas need iving rece ents stud of Percentage $162 million in need-based financial aid n: 79% college credit from previous institutio Percentage of students transferring eight nia sylva Penn in value top ranked as the Awards & recognitions: Pitt has been ges Colle ic Publ in Value Best consecutive times in The Kiplinger 100: 50 years, CGS has been addressing the than more For on: ripti desc life pus Cam We with work, family, and other obligations. unique needs of students who are busy onpers the want who rs othe veterans, and support adult learners, transfer students, of e ntag adva ive petit com the and ity, mun alized attention of a small academic com ats — rsity. CGS provides flexible course form unive d owne d-ren worl a from ee degr a es. class end week and convenient evening including online and hybrid courses — and ing tutor free and , nars semi ent career developm Even our academic success programs, eed. succ ents stud st busie the even sessions are held in the evenings to help

We’re what’s next. START OR COMPLETE YOUR DEGREE. CHANGE OR ADVANCE YOUR CAREER. Whether your next step is pursuing a careerfocused major to prepare for a “bachelor’s degree-required” job market or you just need a few courses for graduate school, CGS is the region’s best choice for busy students who want to fit a college education into their already full lives.

cgs.pitt.edu 412-624-6600

LEAH SWANZY, CGS graduate, natural sciences, health services, managing health programs and projects certificate

“The flexibility of my CGS courses allowed me to apply my studies immediately. I could learn about health care management in class one evening and see it in action working at the hospital the next day.”

A D V E R T I S I N G

DAVID RIVERA, CGS student, legal studies

“My first legal studies instructor had more than 30 years of experience working in the field yet made the subject approachable. He gave me confidence to continue my studies, even when it was challenging to balance school with my full-time job.”

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MICHELE WILLIAMS, former CGS student, public service

“Returning to school after many years can be intimidating. But CGS supported me every step of the way, from ensuring that all my previous credits transferred to providing services that helped me to achieve my academic goals on a realistic timeline.”


IUP Indiana University of Pennsylvaniaa Address: Indiana, Pa. Website: www.iup.edu Phone: 724-357-2230 Current Enrollment: 14,800 Student Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Tuition: $6,428 School Type: Public Most popular majors: Communications Media; Criminology; Psychology; Nursing; Business Regular Application Deadline: May 1 Distance from downtown Pittsburgh: 60 miles Awards & recognitions: Princeton Review’s Best Colleges; U.S. News and World Report’s “Best Colleges”; Forbes magazine’s “America’s Best Colleges”; Washingt on Monthly’s college ranking based on contributions to society; President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll; GI Jobs magazine’s “Military Friendly Schools,” faculty in Princeton Review’s Best 300 Professors; RateMyProfessor “Top 10 Best Professor s”; Dr. Donald Asher’s Cool Colleges for the Hyper-Intelligent, Self-Directed, Late Blooming and Just Plain Different; Consumer Digest’s “Best Values in Public Colleges and Universit ies” Campus life description: IUP has a diverse population: 14,800 students coming from 48 states and 60 different countries. Students can live in new, modern, suite-sty le residence halls with living-learning communities ranging from women in science to nursing and allied health. With more than 100 clubs and organizations, intercolle giate and intramural athletics for sports from the traditional to recreational, and a robust Greek community, IUP offers something for every interest. Honor fraternities and organizat ions provide opportunities for leadership development and recognition of academic excellence at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

A D V E R T I S I N G

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CAL U Overwhelmed with your options? Break your choices down into categories. This will make it easier to compare and contrast the pro’s and con’s of each school you are looking at. COST • Are you paying for your higher education? • Will your family be supporting you? • Will you be receiving financial aid or any scholarships? These are important questions to ask before committing to a school. A schools price tag can be intimidating, but do not let it discourage you. You never know how much a school will cost you until you apply for financial aid. TYPE This is an easy step to overlook, but comparing different types of school should be an imperative part of your research. • Is this school private or public? • Does it have any religious affiliations? • If so, do they require you to take certain courses you don’t feel comfortable taking? • Does it specialize in any certain areas, or educate on a broader spectrum?

SIZE/GEOGRAPHY The size of a school is an important fact in your education research. There are schools that have less than 100 students, and universities that have over 30,000 students. Only you can determine which size is best for you. Also, where is the school located? Do you want to be in a city, or a more rural area? • What kind of high school did you attend- large or small? • Do you prefer everyone knows you, or do you like blending in to a crowd? • Do you want the culture of a city? Larger schools can offer you more activities and a richer student-life population. However, you can get a more personalized education at a smaller school. Determine which is more important to you.

A D V E R T I S I N G

California University of Pennsylvania Address: 250 University Ave., California, PA 15419 Website: www.calu.edu Undergraduate enrollment phone: 724-938-4404 Graduate enrollment phone: 724-938-4187 Current enrollment: 8,300 (6,500 undergraduate; 1,800 graduate) Student-faculty ratio: 20-to-1 Number of undergraduate degrees offered: More than 130 Number of master’s degrees offered: 35 Subject matter expertise: Cal U specializes in real-world education, so students build their resumes even before they graduate. Popular programs focus on business administration, criminal justice, education, science and technology — including the only 4-year mechatronics engineering technology program in Pennsylvania. Graduate: Cal U’s graduate programs prepare leaders for success in business administration (now 100% online!), education, nursing, social work, exercise science, legal studies and more. Distance from downtown Pittsburgh: 35 miles Tuition: $6,622 per year (undergraduate/Pennsylvania resident) Students receiving financial aid: More than 90% Awards & recognition: ‘Best in the Northeast’ and ‘322 Green Colleges’ (The Princeton Review); Military-Friendly University (G.I. Jobs); ‘Best for Vets’ (Military Edge); Top 3 online schools (Guide to Online Schools.com) Campus life description: Our beautiful, riverside campus features “smart” classrooms, campus-wide Wi-Fi and award-winning, suite-style residence halls. Every student has access to the new Herron Recreation & Fitness Center, with more than 100 student organizations, Division II athletics and a full schedule of campus events, there are always plenty of options for after-class activities.

Cal U Q&A Q: Why choose Cal ? A: Cal U blends solid academics with real-world education. Nearly every program includes research, fieldwork, clinical practice or other hands-on activities, so you can begin building a resume even before graduation. Q: What about internships? A: Cal U students find internships close to home, across the country and around the world. Each year more than 3,000 Cal U students take part in internships or other experiential education. Q: How’s the housing? A: Cal U’s suite-style residence halls are among the best in the nation. (And they’re heated and cooled with sustainable ggeothermal energy, too!) Q: How do I learn more? A: Come see Cal U for yourself! Call 724-9384404 to arrange a campus tour or visit us on Discovery Days. Or visit Cal U online at www.calu.edu.

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C A L I F O R N I A U N I V E R S I T Y O F P E N N S Y LVA N I A

REAL-LIFE EDUCATION CALU A proud member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.

REAL-WORLD

E

mployers want job candidates with experience. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why California University of Pennsylvania focuses on real-life education for real-world careers.

A Cal U education begins with a solid academic foundation in your choice of more than 130 undergraduate or 35 graduate programs. Then our expert professors add hands-on activities, field studies, clinical practice or meaningful research â&#x20AC;&#x201D; real opportunities to put learning into practice. So our students can start building their resumes even before graduation.

CALIFORNIA B U I L D I N G

CAREERS At California University, we describe our mission in four simple words: Building Character.

Building Careers. As a member of the State System of Higher Education, Cal U is among the most affordable four-year universities in Pennsylvania.

So choose real-life education. Choose Cal U. Learn more at www.calu.edu.

UNIVERSITY

C H A R A C T E R . A D V E R T I S I N G

OF

PENNSYLVANIA

B U I L D I N G S U P P L E M E N T

C A R E E R S .


A D V E R T I S I N G

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YOUNGSTOWN STATE UNIVERSITY Youngstown State University Address: One University Plaza, Youngstown, Ohio 44555 Website: www.ysu.edu Phone: 330.941.2000 Current Enrollment: 13,813 Student Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Tuition: $7,899 (in-state), $13,899 (out-of-state) School Type: Public Regular Application Deadline: August 1 (Fall semester), December 1 (Spring semester) Percentage of students receiving need-based financial aid: 89.5% Distance from downtown Pittsburgh: 61 miles Awards & recognitions: • YSU is included on Forbes magazine’s list of America’s Top Colleges for 2013. • YSU is ranked among the top third of similar universities nationally in Washingt on Monthly’s 2013 College Guide and Rankings. • YSU is ranked #21 out of nearly 400 Ohio post-secondary institutions for “highquality education with consistent, long-term payoffs in the workplace” according to affordablecollegesonline.org. • YSU named Tree Campus USA for fourth consecutive year • LEED Gold Certification awarded to the Williamson College of Business by the U.S. Green Building Council • YSU named a 2014 Veteran Friendly School YSU is an urban Y rresearch institution ooffering: • More than 115 uundergraduate majors tthat allow students tto invest their time aand talent into an aacademic program tthat fits their career aand personal goals. • In-demand graduaate and post-graduaate degree programs, iincluding 44 masters programs, one specialist program and three doctoral programs. • The Affordable Tuition Advantage program, which extends lower tuition rates to many out-of-state students from counties near the Ohio state line. • NCAA Division I sports featuring eight men’s and 10 women’s teams to support on the road or at home at any of our beautiful and well-maintained athletic fields and facilities. • Highly regarded theater/music programs and performances that showcase talented students and add to the diverse entertainment options on campus. • The 70,000 sq ft Andrews Recreation and Wellness Center featuring state-ofthe art facilities and equipment including multi-purpose courts, a 53’ climbing wall and designated areas for strength and conditioning, aerobics and meditation. • More than 140 student organizations on campus that offer students a deeper sense of community and a higher level of involvement on campus. • On-campus living options for students who want a comfortable home away from home in a social atmosphere while pursuing academic endeavors.

A D V E R T I S I N G

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University Scholars Program at YSU Academic Excellence, Service, and Achievement

Most prestigious full-tuition, room-and-board scholarship at YSU

Awarded to 40 highly accomplished incoming freshmen

Living-learning emphasis within modern Cafaro House residence hall

Connection of like-minded student leaders

Network of successful Scholar alumni

Opportunities for accelerated courses, faculty connections, community relations

Boasting Goldwater scholars, Fulbright awardees, Rhodes nominees, research fellows

Named “Program of Character,” John Templeton Foundation

Recognized nationally on President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll

ysu.edu A D V E R T I S I N G

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A D V E R T I S I N G

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 32

THUR, SEPT 26 • 9PM INDIE ROCK

PAPER HAUS, ACTION CAMP, PET CLINIC BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

SEPT. 26, 10–11PM CITY STEPS, JUNIPER RISING, PADDY THE WANDERER

OCT. 3, 10–11PM DEREK WOODZ BAND, AMRCNDREAMING

OCT. 10, 10–11PM BURLESQUE SHOW $2.50 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282

FRI, SEPT 27 • 9PM JAM ROCK

FLETCHERS GROVE SAT, SEPT 28 PUNK/ROCK/CELTIC

THE BLOODY SEAMEN MON, SEPT 30 • 9PM

OPEN STAGE WITH SGD TUES, OCT. 1 • 9PM JAZZ

SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES OPEN FOR LUNCH Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

The Union, Brewer’s Row. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MOONDOG’S. The Turbosonics, Ben Dumm & the Deviants. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, Mike Dillon Band. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PALACE THEATRE. Tower of Power. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. The Optimists, Marshmellow Overcoat. Shaler. 412-487-6259. ROOSTERS ROADHOUSE. The Accelerators. Bridgeville. 412-221-1543. SMILING MOOSE. Motive, Rain Audio The Beauregards, The Bynars, Polar Scout, Mustache Required. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Bloody Seamen. Lawrenceville. 412-6820177. VERONA COMMUNITY PARK. Reb Beach, Aimee Jane, Fates Edge. Verona.

SUN 29 ALTAR BAR. Blood On The Dance Floor. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Joe Satriani & Steve Morse Band. Munhall. 412-368-5225. CARSON CITY SALOON. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. South Side. 412-481-3203. CLUB CAFE. The Static Jacks, Blackbird Bullet, Wayne Beck. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Call of the Void, Sistered, Wrought Iron, Meth Quarry. Garfield. 412-3612262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Elli Perry, James Maple, Zach Schmidt. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Deap Vally. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

MON 30 ALTAR BAR. Grieves. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. North Side. 412-322-1850. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Molecules, Microwaves, Cyrus Gold, KMFD. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

TUE 1 BRILLOBOX. U.S. Girls, Shockwave Riderz, Nic Lawless & His Young Criminales. Part of VIA. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Leroy Justice, Sephus Lee, Radio Days. South Side. 412431-4950. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Colleen Green, White Fang, the Memories, Ouais, BlodMaud. Bloomfield. 201-675-7902. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Billy Bragg, Joe Purdy. Millvale. 866468-3401. REX THEATER. Antibalas. South Side. 412-381-6811. STAGE AE. 9th Annual Voices Carry for Auberle. Donnie Iris, Etta Cox, Billy Price, Joe Grushecky, Jeff Jimerson, Kelsey Friday, Bill Deasy, more. North Side. 412-673-5856 x 1317.

52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & Electro, post punk, industrial, new TAVERN. Lenny Smith & wave, alternative dance. South The Ramblers. North Side. Side. 412-431-4668. 412-322-1850. BRILLOBOX. Pharmakon, Container, Aaron Dilloway & BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Richard Pinhas, John Elliott, Forma, Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Unicorn Hard-On. Bloomfield. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. 412-621-4900. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF chill. House music. aDesusParty. HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Bela East Liberty. 412-362-6001. Flecks New York Banjo Summit. Munhall. 412-368-5225. CLUB CAFE. The Defibulators, The Mixus Brothers. South Side. 412-431-4950. ALTAR BAR. Jonny Craig. CLUB ICE. Bubba & Johnny, Strip District. 412-263-2877. The Sonics, Mike Vale. Latrobe. 724-787-3250. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Sputzy Sparacino. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the MELWOOD SCREENING Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. ROOM. Raime, Dream Weapon. 412-381-4300. part of VIA Fest. Oakland. 412-681-5449. MR. SMALLS 565 LIVE. Jimmy Adler THEATER. Daughter, & Charlie Barath. BelBear’s Den. Millvale. levue. 412-522-7556. 866-468-3401. www. per a p EXCUSES BAR & pghcitym .co GRILL. The South Side Groove Squad feat. Bill Toms. South Side. 412-431-4090. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ GOOD TIME BAR. Jill West & hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. Blues Attack, Bo’ Hog Brothers. 412-687-2555. Millvale. 412-821-9968. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta SHEREE’S TAVERN. Bobby Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. Hawkins Back Alley Blues. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. Sutersville. 724-872-9918. 412-224-2273. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Muddy Kreek Blues Band. North Side. 412-231-7777. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. CECIL PARK. Jill West & Blues Downtown. 412-456-6666. Attack. Cecil. BLUE STEEL. DJ Budro. Monaca. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. 724-773-0905. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo 412-431-4090. Claat Friday’s Reggae. East Liberty. FRANK’S PUB & GRILL. Shot O’ 412-362-1250. Soul. Bethel Park. 412-833-4606. DRUM BAR. VDJ Jack Millz. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. The North Side. 412-231-7777. Olga Watkins Band. Downtown. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. 412-471-9100. THE R BAR. The Eldorado Kings. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Dormont. 412-942-0882. South Side. 412-431-2825. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Ron & The RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ RumpShakers. New Alexandria. Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. 724-433-1322. WIGHTMAN SCHOOL. The CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Jimmy Adler Band. Squirrel Hill. Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip 412-421-5708. Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. WOOLEY BULLY’S. Sweaty East Liberty. 412-362-1250. Betty Blues Band. New Brighton. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 724-494-1578. 412-431-8800. DRUM BAR. DJ Michael Joseph. North Side. 412-231-7777. GREENDANCE - THE WINERY AT LAVA LOUNGE. Motor City Shake. SAND HILL. Sweaty Betty Blues Motown & funk dance party Band. Mt. Pleasant. 724-547-6500. w/ DJ Soulful Fella. South Side. 814-746-5060. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. THE R BAR. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. South Side. 412-431-2825. Dormont. 412-942-8842. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

WED 02

WED 2

HIP HOP/R&B TUE 1

BLUES THU 26

FRI 27 FULL LIST E ONLIN

DJS

THU 26

FRI 27

SAT 28

SAT 28

SUN 29

WED 2

JAZZ

SUN 29 PERRYTOWNE DRAFT HOUSE. DJ Tony Smith. McCandless. 412-367-9610.

THU 26 AMBRIDGE SONS OF ITALY. Jazz Jam Night. Ambridge. 724-266-3991.

ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

FRI 27 ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. LA CASA NARCISI. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. LITTLE E’S. The Bonidie Guitar Jazz Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala RML Jazz. Greensburg. 412-370-9621. TONIC BAR & GRILL. Stranger Convention. Downtown. 412-456-0460.

SAT 28 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. Roby ‘Super Sax’ Edwards The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CLEAR STORY STUDIO. Aaron Pfeiffer. South Side. 412-310-3538. CLUB COLONY. Take Two. Scott. 412-668-0903. LITTLE E’S. The Eddie Brookshire Quintet. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Ahmad Jamal. North Side. 412-322-1773. NATILI’S. Lucarelli Brothers, Peg Wilson. Butler. 724-287-5033.

SUN 29 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Maureen Budway Quartet. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. STONE VILLA WINE CELLARS. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Acme. 724-423-5604.

TUE 1 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Roby Edwards. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

ACOUSTIC THU 26 ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. El Reys. North Side. 412-322-1850. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Rebecca. McMurray. 724-942-1108. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Mike Medved. Pleasant Hills. 412-714-8670. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Lenny & Jeff. Murrysville. 724-733-4453.


EARLY WARNINGS

SAT 28

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDREW WHITTON}

SPITFIRE GRILL. The Flow Band. Greensburg. 724-205-6402. STONE VILLA WINE CELLARS. The Flow Band. Acme. 724-423-5640.

COUNTRY THU 26 ELWOOD’S PUB. Midnight Rooster. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

FRI 27 LEVELS. Gary Prisby. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 28

Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Agway Shoplifters. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Luke Bryan, Thompson Square, Florida Georgia Line. Burgettstown. 724-947-7400. NIED’S HOTEL. The Stillhouse Pickers, Slim Forsythe. The Stillhouse Pickers cd release party. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Saddle Up 2.0. North Side. 412-231-7777.

{MON., DEC. 02}

CLASSICAL

Lissie

{FRI., NOV. 01}

Dead Milkmen

Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District {WED., NOV. 27}

Lissie

MGMT

FRI 27

Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side

BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. PERRYTOWNE DRAFT HOUSE. Ashley & Garret. McCandless. 412-367-9610.

FRI 27 BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. David Childers. Harmony. 724-452-0539. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. Acoustical Bruce. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. MARIO’S SOUTH SIDE SALOON. Michael Todd. South Side. 412-381-5610.

SAT 28 CIP’S. Driving Blind. Dormont. 412-668-2335. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. We’re About 9, Chana Rothman. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. NINE ON NINE. Mark Strickland. Downtown. 412-338-6463. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 01 MALL AT ROBINSON. Juan Vasquez. Robinson. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Gene Stovall. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Ian McFeron. Downtown. 412-325-6769. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

CARNEGIE MELLON WIND ENSEMBLE. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-268-2383.

MON 30 ARABESQUE WINDS. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 27

WORLD SEVICHE. Geña y Peña, Preach Freedom. Downtown. 412-697-3120.

LEMONT. Groove Doctors. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. PALACE THEATRE. Michael English, Jeffrey & Sheri Easter. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

SUN 29

SAT 28

THU 26

CALVARY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH. Two Sides of Celtic: Grainne Hambly & William Jackson. Harp concert. North Side. 412-323-1070.

REGGAE FRI 27

HAMBONE’S. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion

99 BOTTLES. The Flow Band. Carnegie. 412-279-1299.

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FRIDAY EVENING MUSIC CLUB. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg. ORGANIST RHONDA SIDER EDGINGTON. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082. YO-YO MA W/ PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Once Upon a Time Gala Concert. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

LEMONT. Groove Doctors & Kenny Blake. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LEVELS. Gina Rendina. North Side. 412-231-7777.

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MON 30 HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

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What to do Sept 25 - Oct 1 WEDNESDAY 25 Hed Pe

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Better Left Unsaid & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Mary Gauthier CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Little Green Cars THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-6820177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 26 Danny Brown / Action Bronson

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Trash Talk. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

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LIVE Music and Psychic Reading

Compagnie Marie Chouinard

DELS BAR & RISTORANTE Bloomfield. 412-683-1448. Free. 7p.m.

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 27

SUNDAY 29

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Hasan Salaam & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Farewell my love & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 7p.m.

Immortal Technique / Brother Ali

Blood on the Dance Floor

JOE SATRIANI SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL

Gallery Crawl CULTURAL DISTRICT. 412-4566666. Free event. For more info visit trustarts.org. 5:30p.m.

Stephen Lynch CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 8p.m.

Zoso - The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Tribute STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 8p.m.

SATURDAY 28 Allegheny Green Innovation Festival

HARTWOOD ACRES AMPHITHEATER. Free event. For more info visit alleghenycounty.us/

Pepper

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Grieves and RDGLDGRN. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

TUESDAY 10 Johnny Craig

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests William Beckett, Kyle Lucas & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Flecher’s Grove THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9:30p.m.

MONDAY 30

greenfestival. 11a.m.

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club

Pittsburgh Art Car Festival

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Deap Valley. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. Benefiting the at-risk children and families of Auberle. Tickets: auberle.org/voices-carry. Doors open at 5:30p.m.

Joe Satriani

Leroy Justice

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 7:30p.m.

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guests Sephus Lee & Radio Days. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

PENN AVENUE & WINEBIDDLE. Free event. All ages. For more info visit pittsburghartcar.com. 12p.m.

Melville Walbeck / Aultman Brothers CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 10:30p.m.

9th Annual Voices Carry

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

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BOXED IN {BY AL HOFF}

THE STORY IS A GENTLY UPLIFTING ONE OF HOW FRIENDSHIPS FORM AND DEVELOP

Denis Villeneuve’s thriller Prisoners begins with a decent premise: After two children are abducted and police release the only suspect, one of the fathers takes matters into his own hands with violent results. This could have been an interesting drama about people pushed to extremes, shifting morality (does one crime justify another?) and how tenuous “normal family life” is.

At odds: Jake Gyllenhaal and Hugh Jackman

But after establishing these parameters, Prisoners gets bogged down in an increasingly ludicrous serial-killer plot, hitting so many genre clichés that any seasoned film-goer will quickly sort out the twists. (The script is from Aaron Guzikowski, who gave us 2012’s shippingcontainer thriller Contraband.) It’s a shame, because there are the bones of a better film buried amid the headless dolls and cop-shop clichés. The film is well shot by Roger Deakins, with plenty of washed-out gloom and claustrophobia. There’s a respectable cast, though most of the screen time is dominated by Hugh Jackman as the aggrieved dad and Jake Gyllenhaal as the dogged cop, at the expense of Terence Howard, Maria Bello and Viola Davis. (I preferred Gyllenhaal’s heavy but low-key cop to Jackman’s firebreathing act.) But as the red herrings and baroque plot twists piled up past the twohour mark, I only wished that Villeneuve, who directed the Oscar-nominated Inciendies, had used the extra time to let his story breathe: Good idea, good actors — let them work it out. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2. There is continuing trouble ouble with the machine Flint Lockwood invented. nvented. First, it turned the weather into food; now, w, it’s making animal-food food hybrids. Cody Cameron ron and Kris Pearn direct rect this animated ed family comedy, y, featuring the e voices off Bill Hader and nd Anna Faris. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts ts Fri., Sept. 27.

At watch, among the art: museum guard Johann (Bobby Sommer)

HANG-UPS

{BY HARRY KLOMAN}

I

T’S DIFFICULT to appreciate art by

looking at pictures of it. Part of the power of any piece comes from being in its presence, just inches from the artist’s brushstroke or chisel, knowing that he (or she) stood right where you’re standing — and even closer (no ropes or hawk-like docents) — creating what you can only observe. In Museum Hours, American independent filmmaker Jem Cohen tells the story of Johann (Bobby Sommer), a guard at Vienna’s Kunsthistorisches Museum, and Anne (Mary Margaret O’Hara), a Canadian visitor whom he befriends. The two get to know each other and have long, thoughtful talks about life and art, which you might think are the opposite of each other — but of course, not really. Anne is in Vienna to visit a comatose cousin with whom she was close in childhood but hasn’t seen in years. So Johann shows her around and fills her

time with talk of friends, family, desire, history, materialism and the meaning of their lives and of the art in the museum — the latter being much easier to comprehend than the former. It’s effectively a dramatized essay, and it reminds me slightly of Atom Egoyan’s Ararat, but without that film’s absorbing emotional and intellectual complexity.

MUSEUM HOURS DIRECTED BY: Jem Cohen STARRING: Bobby Sommer, Mary Margaret O’Hara In English, and German, with subtitles Starts Fri., Sept. 27. Regent Square

Cohen’s irony is often heavy-handed, and he tends to underline it. As a younger man, Johann tells us, he promoted rock bands (loud music) and did woodworking (loud buzz saws), so now, in his elder years, he’s due for some dead

silence. The film provides a Baedeker of its hazy gray contemporary city (Cohen never knew the old Vienna), and the story is a gently uplifting one of how friendships, even temporary ones, form and develop. Sommer is not a professional actor, which makes his dialogue feel more natural, but also less dramatically absorbing. (Speaking English, he sounds somnambulistic, like Wim Wenders.) Early in the film, Johann tell us that the Bruegel room at his museum is the most popular, and that when people look at art they’ve seen before, they always discover new things. This is a cliché, he immediately acknowledges, but it’s also true, especially with Bruegel (Pieter the Elder, although Johann never says). I think this observation is just as true for Cohen’s didactic film: at its heart, yes, a cliché, but still somewhat open to involvement and interpretation. What else do we have? I N F O@ S T E E L C I T Y M E D I A . C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

BRIDGE TO FREEDOM. This hour-long doc (part of PBS’ Eyes on the Prize series) chronicles the historic 1965 civil-right march from Selma, Ala., to Montgomery. A short film about recent voting-rights issues, “GOP ‘Changing the Rules’ to Suppress the Vote,” will also screen. The film screens as part of the Battle of Homestead Foundation’s monthly film series, featuring works related to labor and economic issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Sept. 26. Pump House, Homestead. Free. 412-831-3871

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

BAGGAGE CLAIM. You know how when you’re at the baggage claim you notice that everyone’s suitcase looks almost exactly the same? Same deal with most rom-coms — pretty much the same story, only the actors, the city and the protagonists’ occupations change. In David E. Talbert’s version, Montana (Paula Patton) is a Baltimore flight attendant who uses work skills to reconnect in flight with some men she used to date. Her two — two! — sassy friends assure her that these guys might have changed. Meanwhile, her best bud from high school, the kind, warm and successful William Wright (right!) (Derek Luke) lives right next door … You bought the ticket, so you know where this plane is going. It’s an uneventful flight, but comfy enough for this sort of trip. Starts Fri., Sept. 27. (Al Hoff) DON JON. Jon (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) is a successful New Jersey lothario, though he freely admits he prefers masturbating to Internet porn. Then he meets a “dream” girl (Scarlett Johansson), and tries to make a go of a real-life relationship. Some parts of Gordon-Levitt’s film — he wrote and directed this comedy — are a funny send-up of the Jersey-centric dating scene: all gym-tan-laundry, gum-cracking and Sunday pasta dinners with the parents. It’s as if the cast of Jersey Shore were tasked with making an After-School Special on the difference between hook-ups and relationships. But in the final third, the film veers into more serious territory, and tries to make some nuanced points about sex, love, artificial expectations created by porn or rom-coms, why feelings matter and blahblahblah. It’s a bit like cruising along in Jon’s silly-but-fun muscle car and then hitting a speed bump hard. I respect the intentions, but I didn’t find this successful as a comedy-message-film hybrid. And I’m a little troubled that this film gets to have it both ways: ogling a lot of women and treating them as rate-able sex objects all in the name of mildly criticizing this behavior. But plenty of people laughed at all that, so check your own comfort level. Starts Fri., Sept. 27. (AH)

INDIANA JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM. It’s whip-crackin’ adventure in India as the be-hatted Jones (Harrison Ford) searches for a mystical stone. Steven Spielberg directs this 1984 hit, the sequel to Raiders of the Lost Ark. 10 p.m. Fri., Sept. 27, and 10 p.m. Sat., Sept. 28. Oaks

Rush when all the pieces line up right, these are some of his more enjoyable films. Rush, about the early-1970s rivalry between two Formula 1 race-car drivers, is in this camp. It’s a well-paced bio-pic about two conveniently different men — James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth), the carefree and occasionally careless British playboy, and Austrian Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl), who is intense and serious. Their real-life rivalry played out over several years and had plenty of twists and turns. What transpires will be familiar to fans, but it’s a fresh, engaging story for non-fans or those not old enough to know the history. Bruhl (Inglourious

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RUSH. Director Ron Howard is partial to old-school-Hollywood storytelling, and

ALL THE PRESIDENT’S MEN. Intrepid Washington Post reporters Carl Bernstein (Dustin Hoffman) and Bob Woodward (Robert Redford) link nefarious dealings at the Watergate building to the Nixon administration in Alan J. Pakula’s 1976 adaptation of real-life events that dismayed a nation, brought down a president and made stars of rumpled journalists. The film concludes a month-long series of films about news-gathering. 8 p.m. Sun., Sept. 29. Regent Square (AH)

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GIMME SHELTER. If Woodstock was all about the lovey-dovey hippie times, then this document of the Rolling Stones concert held soon after, at Altamont Speedway, in Northern California, proves those times had turned dark. The Stones infamously hired Hell’s Angels as security with fatal results — all captured on film by documentarians David and Albert Maysles. Many things contribute to the end of an era, and there is never just one point where it all changes, but this 1970 concert film is a kinetic account of one clear moment. 7 p.m. Wed., Sept. 25. Melwood. $2 (AH)

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closing anecdote is superb.) E.L. Doctorow observes that World War II showed Salinger “the damage done to innocence in this world,” an experience Salinger poured into The Catcher in the Rye. Meanwhile, in real life, it seems he targeted innocence — often in the form of girls and very young women — and then proceeded to destroy it. Salinger is almost too slickly told, a must-see for people who care about such things. But it offers nothing psychologically unique nor biographically new, except for some details at the end about the decades of work that Salinger left to be published posthumously. Frankly, it all sounds dreadfully indulgent — and enough to keep us talking for generations. Manor (Harry Kloman)

REPERTORY

ENOUGH SAID. In this comedy from Nicole Holofcener, a divorced woman meets a new man she likes, who turns out to be the ex-husband of her new friend. Julie Louis-Dreyfus, James Gandolfini and Catherine Keener star. Starts Fri., Sept. 27. PORTRAIT OF JASON. One night in 1966, filmmaker Shirley Clarke and her crew set up in the Hotel Chelsea apartment of Jason Holliday, and filmed him for 12 hours. It’s simply Holliday in one corner, but the middle-aged man commands the camera — smoking, drinking, singing, laughing and recounting episodes from his life as a gay man, a black man, a hustler, a wannabe cabaret performer and a houseboy. He’s variously funny and sad, cocky and vulnerable. Holliday was gay when it was still illegal to be so, and his tales of this life run from the amusing escapades of a secret club to the traumas of being arrested. Portrait (1967) is not slick — the black-and-white film goes in and out of focus; the crew is heard discussing techniques and set-ups (as well as verbally baiting Holliday); and Holliday winds up nearincoherent. But in all, it’s a fascinating document. To be screened in a recently restored version. Starts Sat., Sept. 28. Harris (AH)

CHINATOWN. Roman Polanski’s 1974 neo-noir classic set among the power brokers of 1930s Los Angeles holds up remarkably well on all counts: the sharp wide-screen photography; the period detail; the moody tone; and a full roster of fine performances, including Jack Nicholson playing somebody other than himself. And, of course, the smart script by Robert Towne — a complex storyline, rooted in historical events; the snappy banter; and the pervasive cynicism that helped define new American cinema of the 1970s. 7 and 9:45 p.m. Sat., Sept. 28, and 2 p.m. Sun., Sept. 29. Hollywood (AH)

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Salinger Basterds) is especially good, never surrendering the off-putting drive that fueled Lauda while still conveying his vulnerability; Hemsworth has the easier job portraying the party boy Hunt. In all, a solid piece of entertainment, juiced up with a splash of romance, a bit of male melodrama, some daredevil driving and shattering wrecks, and an amusing amount of period fashions. Starts Fri., Sept. 27. (AH) SALINGER. For all of the mystique he created about himself by refusing to be a public figure, J.D. Salinger lived a rather conventional artist’s life: compelled to write in his youth, damaged by witnessing horrors (D-Day and Dachau), and a narcissist who cared more passionately about his writing than about the people closest to him, most of whom he ultimately treated cruelly. Shane Salerno’s handsome documentary reconstructs the writer’s life from every scrap of memory his friends could provide and with insights from smart people who never met him. (A. Scott Berg’s

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

DOCUMENTARY WEEK. The Parkway Theater begins a week of recent documentary films about various artists and artforms. Music: Who Is Harry Nilsson? (Wed., Sept. 25); Architecture: Sketches of Frank Gehry (Thu., Sept. 26); Art: Jean Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child (Fri., Sept. 27); and Film: American Grindhouse (Sat., Sept. 28). All films start at 7:30 p.m. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $3 PRETTY OLD. The beauty tyranny for women never stops … or does it? Walter Matteson’s doc looks at the Ms. Senior Sweetheart Pageant, held in Massachusetts, in which the ages of the participating ladies range from 67 to 84. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 25. Hollywood SIGN PAINTERS. Faythe Levine’s earlier film, Handmade Nation, documented the rise in independent crafting. Her newest film, co-directed with Sam Macon, looks at a different aspect of handiwork: namely, the vanishing art of painting and lettering commercial signs, which once meant everything from billboards and shop names, to sales banners and even street signs. Advance tickets available at www.showclix.com. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Sept. 26. Harris

Don Jon THE BROKEN CIRCLE BREAKDOWN. A mismatched couple in a Belgian bluegrass band — he’s an atheist, she’s religious — find their relationship tested when their daughter becomes seriously ill. Felix Van Groeningen directs this new drama. In Flemish, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Oct. 1. Hollywood E.T. — THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL. See this muchloved, feel-good alien story, about the greenishbrown space traveler who befriends some suburban kids, on the big screen. Steven Spielberg directed the 1982 film starring Henry Thomas, Drew Barrymore and a wrinkly, long-fingered dude from space. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 2. AMC Loews


[DANCE]

ARRAYED ON THE WALL, THEY LOOK HARMLESS ENOUGH

GYMNOPÉDIES {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

COMPAGNIE MARIE CHOUINARD performs 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 28. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $19-$55. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org N E W S

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[ART REVIEW]

MOTHERS’ DAYS Compagnie Marie Chouinard dancer performs “Henri Michaux : Movements.” {PHOTO COURTESY OF MARIE CHOUINARD}

Canadian choreographer Marie Chouinard says she has butterflies in her stomach over her latest work, “Gymnopédies.” That’s because when I spoke with her recently about the work that premiered in Lisbon, Portugal, this past June, she was still revising it. “I am sure it will turn out good, but my stomach doesn’t know that yet,” joked Chouinard, by phone from Montreal. With a successful 35-year career as a dancer and choreographer behind her, it is a good bet the work — which makes its U.S. premiere here Sept. 28, alongside 2011’s “Henri Michaux: Mouvements” — will meet her exacting standards. Chouinard’s troupe, Compagnie Marie Chouinard, last performed in Pittsburgh in 2009. The troupe returns to the Byham Theater to launch both the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts and the new Pittsburgh Dance Council season. “Gymnopédies,” set to music by pioneering French composer/pianist Erik Satie (1866-1925), is mostly a work of duets that Chouinard says explore “the intimacy and humor” of Satie’s music. The 11 dancers pull double duty: Not only do they dance, but each also takes a turn as pianist, playing one of the three short “gymnopédies” that are repeated over and over throughout the 34-minute contemporary dance work (which contains nudity). “They are not professional pianists, but there is an intimacy and fragility about having them perform the music that I like,” says Chouinard. Also making its U.S. premiere is “Henri Michaux: Mouvements,” a 35-minute coverto-cover interpretation of Mouvements, the 1951 book from Belgian-born artist Henri Michaux (1899-1984). Chouinard says she discovered the book of abstract India-ink drawings and poetry in 1980, but began thinking of it as the basis for a dance work only several years ago. Set to an original score by composer Louis Dufort, the work’s dancers, costumed in black and dancing on a white floor, interpret in movement 64 of Michaux’s drawings that are projected on a screen behind them. “They are like a snapshot of movement,” says Chouinard. “The drawings are very expressive and animated and you can sense movement in them.” Chouinard says she choreographed every aspect of the book into her work, including its covers; Michaux’s 15-page poem; his postface (which the dancers recite); and even a blank page, for which Chouinard says she instructed her dancers to hide beneath the dance floor.

Feat: Lenka Clayton’s “One Brown Shoe” (detail)

{BY ROBERT RACZKA}

L

ENKA CLAYTON has developed a way of making art that involves about as little overhead as writing poetry — i.e., her time and thought are the primary, and most valuable, components. No welding equipment, no 12-foot-wide canvases and, presumably, no monthly rental fees on storage spaces filled with unsold works. Her schemes are clever, her touch is light, and her modus operandi is extremely flexible. Clayton describes herself as a British conceptual artist. As a movement, capital-C Conceptual art ran its course in the 1970s. But the aftershocks continue to be felt today in small-c conceptual art as a freewheeling approach that emphasizes insight and cleverness over traditional skills and subjects. Rather than toiling away to add more stuff to what’s already here, Clayton typically makes art by transforming the pre-existing: thinking things through, accumulating or selecting items, and altering and arranging them so that they speak to us in unexpected and revealing ways. Based in Pittsburgh since 2009, Clayton

is currently engaged in her self-created An Artist Residency in Motherhood. She describes it as a fully funded residency in her home and life as the mother of two young children. In subverting the cliché of the heroic, unattached (and usually male) artist, Clayton emphasizes motherhood’s potential for “exploration and artistic

LENKA CLAYTON: EMERGING ARTIST OF THE YEAR continues through Nov. 3. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org

production.” With a faint echo of Mary Kelly’s “Post-Partum Document” (197379), Clayton’s ongoing “Mother’s Days” — which features in her Emerging Artist of the Year exhibit at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts — chronicles the eventful lives of various mothers, including their largely invisible labor.

Danger is a key concern in the parenting of young children, and it’s not surprising that it shows up repeatedly here. In “Objects Taken Out of My Son’s Mouth,” 63 approximately bottle-cap-sized choking hazards are carefully laid out in a grid, the causes of a series of anxiety-provoking potential crises. “The Distance I Can Be From My Son” is a series of short videos that measure the short distance within which one can maintain any vigilance; each segment concludes with Clayton bolting after her young son as he goes out of view. In “Dangerous Objects Made Safer,” 30 tools have been individually encased in felt to render them less threatening. Arrayed on the wall, they look harmless enough, but there is an undercurrent of responsibility and, presumably, worry. Even this transformation shows a light touch, as nothing has been permanently altered but rather only wrapped, such that they could be unwrapped and returned to their function as tools. A fundamental aspect of Clayton’s approach to art is that, while she might alter things, she doesn’t generally make things CONTINUES ON PG. 58

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MOTHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAYS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 57

THE MUSIC OF T H E S O U L O F A G E N E R AT I O N

beyond, say, the series of genial ink-onpaper â&#x20AC;&#x153;Typewriter Drawings.â&#x20AC;? But sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not averse to having other people make things, soliciting content through crowdsourcing. For 2013â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;One Brown Shoe,â&#x20AC;? the ambitious project that is the exhibitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s centerpiece, Clayton had each partner in a married couple (though why â&#x20AC;&#x153;married,â&#x20AC;? I might ask) independently make a shoe out of any material. She stipulated only that the shoe be brown, a minimal dictum that was interpreted loosely. The parameters turned out to be just right, such that anyone could conjure the idea of â&#x20AC;&#x153;shoeâ&#x20AC;? as the basis for creating an essentially sculptural form, which is also readily recognizable by the audience. The resulting display coheres through its shared subject, yet is incredibly varied and inventive. (One senses an artistic background among many though surely not all of the participants.) The project highlights the endless variety of human creativity while embodying the difference in perspective between any two people, including those in a close relationship.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

SHARPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;PRINTS {BY BILL Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;DRISCOLL}

Lenka Claytonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interventions are clever, surprising and delightful. Her artworks are not aesthetically pleasing in the conventional sense, though nothing is abrasive, either, and the effect is low-key and soothing, but also intellectually stimulating. Taken as a whole, they make the profound point that the lived experience of motherhood, including the insight and changes it brings, has barely been tapped as a basis for making art â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with motherhood having considerable potential as a subject as well as a site. One last thought: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artist of the Yearâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Emerging Artist of the Yearâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the titles of the concurrent shows at PCA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; sound speciďŹ c, but upon examination are rather vague. A posted statement (on a text panel in the gallery and/or on the PCA website) explaining the criteria for selection, and the process by which artists are nominated and chosen, would clarify just what the awards represent.

Running through Jeffrey Condranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s excellent debut short-story collection, A Fingerprint Revealed (Press 53), is an intriguing thread: Each of the 10 otherwise diverse stories depicts non-Islamic Americans interacting with Muslims. But while some of these stories have clear political overtones â&#x20AC;&#x201D; characters confronting immigration or anti-terrorism laws, for instance â&#x20AC;&#x201D; most of them delve into individual human relationships, with charactersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; creeds and ethnicities contributing just one factor to the mix. Another motif is the bookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s references to Pittsburgh: Condran, whose publication credits include the prestigious Kenyon Review, teaches writing and literature at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh and is co-founder of indie publisher Braddock Books. The opening story, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Praha,â&#x20AC;? models these themes but doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t set the tone: This is a more ambitious book than its well-written but fairly conventional entry suggests. The charming â&#x20AC;&#x153;Irregularsâ&#x20AC;? is also an outlier: Narrated in â&#x20AC;&#x153;reminiscence,â&#x20AC;? itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Rushmore-esque story about a precocious grade-schooler who wants to be Sherlock Holmes and his Watson, a Muslim girl whose fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been carted away by the authorities. Condran settles into his groove with stories like â&#x20AC;&#x153;House of Terror,â&#x20AC;? in which an American abroad learns his wife has given half their life savings to a foundation run by a Jordanian poet with whom she might have had an affair. Condran skillfully sketches the armature of moments, his protagonist explaining how his wife has betrayed him by exploding their â&#x20AC;&#x153;personal mythologyâ&#x20AC;? as a couple. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cinemagicâ&#x20AC;? is narrated by an ACLU lawyer separated from her husband, living with her vampire-obsessed teenage daughter, and representing a Jordanian man who has run afoul of the Patriot Act. The story plumbs intriguing domestic dynamics, partly through its charactersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; discussion of movies. In the collectionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s title story, Condran artfully deploys shifting points of view to depict an encounter between a divorced couple, with the man bitterly predicting that his ex-wifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new lover will â&#x20AC;&#x153;see him [the husband] in what she knew [in bed].â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mohammed Happenedâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; about a college student who savagely beats a Jordanian classmate â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is told from the perspective of a female friend of the assailant, and leaves a sick feeling in the pit of the stomach. The resonantly complex â&#x20AC;&#x153;Building Citiesâ&#x20AC;? is narrated by a man who â&#x20AC;&#x201D; though estranged from his own daughter â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was once briefly a surrogate father to a young Islamic woman whose house he is now renovating. Condran packs a lot into these 158 pages. None of these stories overstays its welcome, and most leave you wanting more.

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Lenka Claytonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dangerous Objects Made Saferâ&#x20AC;? (implements covered in felt)

0DUPCFS/PWFNCFSsBenedum Center

[BOOK REVIEW]


The most important exhibition of new INTERNATIONAL art in the US happens in Pittsburgh. Opening weekend October 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6 View the exhibition, engage with artists at the museum, and join the community celebration in Braddock with Transformazium.

Sponsored by

Major support for the 2013 Carnegie International has been provided by the A. W. Mellon Charitable and Educational Fund, The Fine Foundation, the Jill and Peter Kraus Endowment for Contemporary Art, and The Henry L. Hillman Fund. Additional major support has been provided by The Friends of the 2013 Carnegie International. Major gifts and grants have also been provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jill and Peter Kraus, Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann, Ritchie Battle, The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art, Marcia M. Gumberg, the National Endowment for the Arts, and The Pittsburgh Foundation.

Idiosyncrasy Carolyn Alexandra Frischling

Digital Works Opening: Thursday October 3, 2013 6:00-8:00pm

Mendelson Gallery 5874 Ellsworth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15232 Tel. 412-361-8664 N E W S

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MC KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER EATER

[PLAY REVIEW]

PRESENTS...

WEIMARKED

HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS WITHOUT REALLY TRYING A musical by Frank Loesser and book by Abe Burrows, Jack Weinstock, and Willie Gilbert, based on Shepherd Mead’s 1952 book of the same name

SEPTEMBER 27,28,29, 2013 Saturday & Sunday performances at 8:00pm. Sunday matinees at 2:00pm. TICKETS ARE $18.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

{BY F.J. HARTLAND} THE THEATRE FACTORY launches its 19th 1614 COURSIN ST. ST.

McKEESPORT

(412) 673-1100 For Reservations www.mckeesportlittletheater.com

season in a very big way — with Kander & Ebb’s Cabaret. That director Scott P. Calhoon is able to shoehorn this major musical into such a small space is nothing short of miraculous. And his clever scenic design keeps the set changes flowing smoothly, in a cinematic way. Best of all, even when the location leaves the Kit Kat Klub, there are lingering reminders of it. Though the red-and-black color scheme fits the decadence of the cabaret, maybe there is too much black: It deadens the stage pictures. Calhoon does create some interesting, partially lit tableaux at tables in the nightclub, which comment on the action. As American Clifford Bradshaw and British entertainer Sally Bowles, Eric James Davidson and Victoria Brady have excellent stage chemistry. They do acrobatic blocking on the tiny bed in Cliff’s room. Their final scene is heartbreaking, and they take perfectly timed pauses that add to the dramatic conclusion of their relationship. As landlady Fraulein Schneider,

Beverly Price nearly steals the show. Vocally, she is outstanding, and she ably plays the wide range of emotions the script demands. Her version of “What Would You Do?” is deeply moving. Leon Zionts is captivating as Herr Schultz, bringing real charm to the production. His scenes with Price are some of the show’s most memorable. The production has some flaws. As the Emcee, Scott P. Sambuco brings no humor or charm to the opening of the musical; he is just sinister. When Sambuco (who also choreographed the show) sings the famous “Wilkommen,” it isn’t welcoming; it will

CABARET continues through Oct. 6. The Theatre Factory, 235 Cavitt Ave., Trafford. $16-18. 412-374-9200 or www.TheTheatreFactory.com.

make you want to run and hide. Starting with sinister leaves nowhere for Sambuco to go as the show takes its dark turn. The costumes, by Kimberly Katruska, are ill-fitting and are a mish-mash of periods. Yes, some of the clothing captures the 1930s, but some of the costumes look more 1980s and ’90s. Sambuco’s Emcee wears a most unflattering pair of dance pants. One of Brady’s dresses is so short that she spends much of the scene uncomfortably tugging it down to avoid exposure. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


GALLERY CRAWL 29

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2013 TONY AWARD® WINNER FOR BEST PLAY!

HAUNTING

The

[STAGE BRIEFS]

STAGE BRIEFS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

+ “DELIRIOUSLY FUNNY!” —THE NEW YORK TIMES

October 5: GAETANO’S October 16: THE GATEWAY CLIPPER

NanoDanses’ Kiss & Cry

For tickets and info www.eatdrinkmurder.org NOW BOOKING HOLIDAY PARTIES

Performance-art troupes frequently blur genres, for instance blending video with live action. Belgium-based NanoDanses takes things one step further, if not two. Choreographer Michèle Anne De May and filmmaker Jaco Van Dormael’s Kiss & Cry tells the story of an elderly woman recalling her greatest loves. But the actors are the hands of performers that dance and mime on a miniature set, all while the action is tracked by cameras, feature-film style, and projected onscreen for the theatrical audience, with poetic voiceover narration. “You’re watching a live film being made,” says Paul Organisak, who curated the show for the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts. “It’s stunningly beautiful.” Performances internationally have left reviewers remarking on the expressiveness of hands, and on NanoDanses’ evocation of setting ranging from desert to undersea (employing a fish tank). Video excerpts online suggest a dreamy sensibility, with set pieces including a model train, and a scene where two miniature beds dance amidst fallen leaves. Kiss & Cry makes its U.S. premiere with three performances at the New Hazlett Theater. 8 p.m. nightly Tue., Oct. 1, Wed., Oct. 2, and Thu., Oct. 3. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $25. 412-456-6666 or www.pifof.org

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A MADCAP FAMILY REUNION

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

412.431.CITY (2489) / CityTheatreCompany.org

A new initiative uses free, site-specific, interactive performances in three neighborhoods to explore how Pittsburgh perceives the idea of “revitalization.” Unlisted: Second Steel is the second stop for Unlisted, a project founded by an international group of graduate students in Belgrade, Serbia. In Belgrade, Unlisted interrogated that city’s unused spaces. Second Steel teams locally based and visiting artists — including theater collective Yinzerspielen — to ask what “revitalization” actually means here. The series begins inside East Liberty boutique Townhouse (6016 Penn Ave.), with an interactive performance and installation that’s ongoing from 7-10 p.m. Wed., Sept. 25, and noon-6 p.m. Thu., Sept. 26. It features dancers from The Pillow Project and a sound design in which interview subjects discuss how they travel. Second Steel continues at 7 p.m. Thursday and 7 p.m. Friday in the North Side’s parking lot 7H (at Sandusky Street and Lacock), with a performance work exploring how things like raised highways can separate people. And at 2 p.m. Saturday, on two empty Hill District lots at 2306 Centre Ave., four performers — including local names Christina Springer and Edwin Lee Gibson — present an audience-interactive work on a set designed by local architects. www. unlistedpittsburgh.wordpress.com DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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ORGANIZED BY

Final Weeks! Open your eyes to the cultural history of the Arabian peninsula. Explore 200 archaeological objects only recently available for view in North America.

PRINCIPAL CO-SPONSORS OF THE US TOUR

Tours every Saturday and Sunday at 12:30 p.m. & 2 p.m.

FURTHER GENEROUS SPONSORSHIP

SPONSORED LOCALLY BY

Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is organized by the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution in association with the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ExxonMobil and Saudi Aramco are gratefully acknowledged as principal co-sponsors of the tour of Roads of Arabia in the United States. Sponsorship is also provided by The Olayan Group and Fluor Corporation.

carnegiemnh.org | 412.622.3131

one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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SERVICES AVAILABLE

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[BOOKS]

BEING ROBERTO {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} PITTSBURGH PIRATES legend Roberto Clemente has been gone for more than 40 years, but his name remains the one most closely tied to the franchise. Many fans even claimed there was no way that Clemente’s number, 21, would be tied to 21 consecutive losing seasons. As important as Clemente’s legacy is to Pittsburgh, it’s infinitely more important to his family. That love, admiration and duty to their husband, brother and father is the overarching theme of the new oral history titled Clemente: The True Legacy of an Undying Hero (Celebra). The book’s credited author is The Clemente Family, but it’s a collection of anecdotes and quotes as told to long-time sports columnist Mike Freeman, of the online sports site Bleacher Report. The 262-page book’s layout is as stunning as its content, with more than 100 photographs accompanying the text. Freeman’s familiarity with his subject is obvious. “Clemente was one of the first professional athletes to fully understand that power and wealth didn’t have to just transform a single individual,” writes Freeman. “They could act as engines to alter the lives of many.” The photos, from all phases of Clemente’s career, are presented without captions and tend to follow each chapter’s theme rather than any chronological order. Overall, it’s a pretty powerful experience. At the end of the second chapter, called simply “Sacrifice,” for example, is a picture of one of Clemente’s young sons wearing a suit, kissing a large poster of his father’s face. It’s presumably from the time around the 38-year-old rightfielder’s funeral. The book is brilliantly put together to take the reader on a journey through Clemente’s life through the eyes of those

Roberto Clemente with his wife, Vera

who knew him best. They talk about Clemente the ballplayer, the humanitarian, father and husband — both the good and the trying aspects of being close to a truly remarkable, beloved man. “As the years went by, and everyone reminded me of how I looked like my father and acted like my father, each comment reminded me that my father was, in fact, gone,” says Clemente’s oldest son, Roberto Jr., who was 7 when his father died. “I thought of something drastic. I was 13. I went to my mom and said ‘I want to change my name.’ She said, ‘It will be okay. It’ll get better.’ There was so much pressure being Roberto Clemente, at that moment, I didn’t want to be Roberto Clemente.” The book also stands as a testament to Clemente’s wife and steward of his legend, Vera, and her ability to hold the family together after Roberto was killed in a plane crash in 1972, on his way to an earthquake-relief mission in Nicaragua. “My dad was great, but my mom was incredible,” says youngest son Ricky Clemente. “Look at what she did. She raised us alone after our dad died. She never felt sorry for herself. She never abused the Clemente name. She’s just a great person.”

“THERE WAS SO MUCH PRESSURE BEING ROBERTO CLEMENTE, AT THAT MOMENT, I DIDN’T WANT TO BE ROBERTO CLEMENTE.”

C D E I T C H @ S T E E L C I T Y M E D I A . C OM

CORRECTION In last week’s stage review of A Skull in Connemara, two roles were miscredited: Jason McCune played Tom, and Alec Silberblatt played Mairten. Last week’s stage review of Saving the World said that the show concludes Throughline Theatre’s season; in fact, the company opens The Farnsworth Invention Oct. 25.

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EVERYONE REMEMBERS THEIR FIRST. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 COMPAGNIE MARIE CHOUINARD #:)".5)&"5&3t1.

Dance conceived from primeval dreamsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; earthy and strong, yet shaped by irrepressible secrets and unseen dimensions in time.

Never before seen artists and performances. A PROJECT OF

TrustArts.org/first

SEP 27-OCT 26 Supported by The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, two anonymous donors, the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, the Carol R. Brown Performance Fund, the Buhl Foundation, The Heinz Endowments, the Hillman Foundation, the Richard King Mellon Foundation, The Pittsburgh Foundation, and the Snee-Reinhardt Charitable Foundation.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

09.2610.03.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JASON COHN}

+ FRI., SEPT. 27 {ART}

SEPT. 27

The Scarehouse

+ THU., SEPT. 26 {STAGE}

Wednesdays - 5pm to 8pm Thursdays - 5pm to 8pm Fridays - 4pm to 6pm

DRINK SPECIALS $1 off all Beers $2 off all Mixed Drinks $2 off all Champagne Cocktails $2 off all Wines by the Glass

CHEF’S SELECTION PALATE PLEASERS $1 each

25 Market Square perlepgh.com 66

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

The short list of crucial American plays surely includes Our Town. Thornton Wilder’s 1938 classic about families in a small, early-20th-century community remains a staple on high school reading lists. But Pittsburgh Public Theater bets the play also still has the power to move and surprise you. The Public begins its season by peopling Grover’s Corners with a huge, all-Pittsburgh cast led by Tom Atkins as the Stage Manager. The cast of 24, directed by the Public’s Ted Pappas, also includes Tony Bingham, Bridget Connors, Wali Jamal and Larry John Meyers. The first performance is tonight. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 27. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-55. 412316-1600 or www.ppt.org

crahn!” and you’re there. Elena Alexandratos, Jeffrey Carpenter, Patrick Jordan, Maggie Ryan and Sam Turich provide the voices for this evening of comedy, with live music. BO 9 p.m. Continues through Oct. 5 . 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-25. www.bricolagepgh.org

{SCARES} It’s haunted-house season again, but The Scarehouse is upping the ante. Starting tonight, the popular seasonal attraction in Etna complements its zombies and scary clowns with “The Basement,” promising “adult content, explicit language, crawling, handcuffs, and physical contact with disturbing characters in disgusting situations” — you know, like your last office party. In any case, visiting The Basement costs a bit extra; only one or two guests can enter at a time; and you have be 18 or older and sign a waiver. Enjoy. BO 7 p.m.midnight. Continues through Nov. 2. 118 Locust St., Etna. $19.99-$34.99. 412-781-5885 or www.scarehouse.com

{STAGE}

{STAGE} With its Midnight Radio series, Bricolage has had as much affectionate fun as anyone with Pittsburghese and other local folkways. So expect the latest of these live radio-style performances to walk that fine line between parody and homage. This week and next, Shakesburgh blends the Bard and the ’Burgh; think, “Uneasy lies the head that wears the

Over the past year the nation has suffered several mass shootings, not to mention the steady drumbeat of everyday gun violence. Tonight, the Society for Contemporary Craft opens ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. These 40 works by 14 contemporary artists from around the world illuminate the impact of violence on our communities and even suggest solutions. The works, ranging from ceramics, metals and fiber to mixed media, are on display starting with tonight’s opening reception. Brett Wilson 5:30-8 p.m. 2100 Smallman St., Strip District. Free. 412-261-7003 or www.contemporarycraft.org

SEPT. 27 17 Border Crossings

Few of us are as well traveled as Thaddeus Phillips. The writer and performer — based in Philadelphia and Colombia — shares his experiences in 17 Border Crossings, an hourlong one-man show about his adventures at international borderlines during 15 years of travel. Incorporating influences from the cinema and Austrian musicals to standup comedy and “cheap magic,” Phillips takes us from Tunisia and


sp otlight

Cuba to Bali, Bosnia and Israel. Tonight’s performance at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater — the first of two shows this weekend — is preceded by the theater’s season-launch party. BO 8 p.m. (7 p.m. party). Also 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 28. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $10-20. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

is pay-what-you-will). 412392-8000 or www.pittsburgh playhouse.com

+ SAT., SEPT. 28 {TALK} “Economic recovery” sounds like a myth anymore unless you’re in the 1 percent. If it

{ART} No longer just the preserve of the history-minded, the Carrie Furnaces National Historic Landmark has also been a film set and the subject of a photo exhibit. Now — some years after a certain giant deer-head sculpture paved the way — it’s also an art venue itself. Local artists Sean

Kipp Gallery and the Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area, have organized 14 area emerging artists for Alloy Pittsburgh 2013. The grandscale show of temporary, site-based works building on the region’s industrial heritage opens with a reception this afternoon. BO 2-6 p.m. ($20). Ticketed tours continue Saturdays through Oct. 26. Rankin. www.alloypittsburgh. blogspot.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

Art by Kurt Henschlager

Fair warning: Starting Friday, there’ll be a 40-foot-tall yellow rubber duckie floating in the Allegheny. That night, the duck docks by the Roberto Clemente Bridge to mark the start of the Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts. The month-long Pittsburgh Cultural Trust showcase features world and U.S. premieres by international artists. It includes not only the first North American appearance of Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman’s world-famous duck, but also dance and stage works (covered elsewhere in this section) and cutting-edge audiovisual installations by Austrian artist Kurt Hentschlager at three galleries: Wood Street (the 3-D-animated “Hive,” pictured), Space and 943 Liberty. And there’s more: The festival opening coincides with the Trust’s fall Gallery Crawl. About 30 galleries, performance spaces and other venues — including outdoors spaces — will be open late with exhibits, comedy, dance, short films and more. But the capper’s back on the Clemente Bridge, which is shutting down for the night for The Rubber Duck Bridge Party, featuring the art and food vendors of Night Market IV. All Gallery Crawl events including the Bridge party are free. Bill O’Driscoll 5:30-10 p.m. Downtown. Free. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

+ MON., SEPT. 30 {WORDS}

OCT. 01

Emerson String Quartet

In works like The Music Lesson and Lost Boy Found in Whole Foods, Pittsburghbased playwright Tammy Ryan has made her name tackling tough social issues. Ryan’s back with Soldier’s Heart. Point Park University’s professional theater company, The REP, world-premieres this drama about a Western Pennsylvania soldier who returns from Iraq to her life as a mother with deep psychological scars. John Amplas directs a cast headed by Marie Elena O’Brien. The first performance is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 13. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $15-27 (Sept. 28 performance

N E W S

seems like it’s always been that way … well, it hasn’t, and it needn’t be. Today, the Thomas Merton Center’s New Economy Working Group hosts a day-long Summit “Unconference” to explore economic growth and how Pittsburghers can help remake the local economy into one “where the benefits are equitably shared between … employees or employeeowners, stakeholders and host communities,” all while strengthening social ties and restoring nature. Equitably, the unconference is free. BW 10 a.m.-4 p.m. First United Methodist Church of Pittsburgh, 5401 Centre Ave., Shadyside. Free. 412-361-3022 or www. thomasmertoncenter.org

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Derry and Chris McGinnis, working with Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s

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SEPT. 27 Soldier’s Heart

+ TUE., OCT. 01 {MUSIC} Just back from a European tour, the venerable Emerson String Quartet plays Carnegie Music Hall. The Grammywinning New York City-based group’s 37th season is also its first with cellist Paul Watkins, himself an acclaimed soloist and conductor. Watkins joins

violinists Eugene Drucker and Philip Setzer and violist Lawrence Dutton for a program including Beethoven’s String Quartet in C Major, Mozart’s String Quartet No. 16 and Britten’s String Quartet No. 3. Pittsburgh Chamber Music Society hosts. BO 7:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-35. 412-624-4129 or www. pittsburghchambermusic.org

+ FRI., SEPT. 27

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ABBY GLEASON}

{STAGE}

Who Asked You? is the title of Terry McMillan’s new novel. But if there’s a Q&A afterward, perhaps you can put a question to McMillan herself when the best-selling Waiting to Exhale author speaks at the Byham Theater tonight. Who Asked You? is a seriocomic story about family. The evening, presented by Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures and the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, includes a book-signing. BO 7:30 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $10-40. www. pittsburghlectures.org or 412-622-8866

{DANCE} No, dancer/choreographer Jasmine Hearn’s that’s what she said doesn’t refer to the punchline of some crude joke. Rather, this site-specific dance series explores the rites of passage that females of color experience in America. The monthly series funded by The Pittsburgh Foundation continues Sat., Sept. 28, with three performances of “Installment 4: Swimming,” at Assemble gallery. Hearn (pictured) is a Point Park grad who has worked with The Pillow Project and Staycee Pearl dance project. Of “Swimming,” she says, “It focuses on the idea of learning how to swim and what that means in our culture.” The 30-minute program also addresses the stereotype that black people don’t swim. Hearn will perform the solo work accompanied live by a soundscape of singing and spoken word performed by Pittsburgh’s Alaina M. Dopico. Like the series’ prior installments, “Swimming” will make the most of its venue. Hearn says of Assemble: “It’s an intimate and open space with some nooks and crannies that can be used to create powerful images.” Steve Sucato 7, 8 and 9 p.m. Sat., Sept. 28. 5125 Penn Ave., Garfield. $10 suggested donation. www.facebook.com/events/527113180702805

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER 17 BORDER CROSSINGS. 17 monologues by Thaddeus Phillips that draw inspiration from stand-up comedy, musicals about Austria, cheap magic, Native myths of the Arizona desert, more. Sept. 27-28. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE. Six adolescents compete for the coveted Spelling Bee Championship. Fri-Sun. Thru Oct. 6. Grand Theatre, Elizabeth. 412-384-0504. BINGO! A riotous musical about a group of die-hard bingo players who never miss their weekly game. Thu-Sun. Thru Oct. 5. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. COLORADO. Dark comedy about the disappearance of a teenage beauty queen. Presented by 12 Peers Theater. Fri-Sun. Thru Oct. 13. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744. DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN. A comedic & prehistoric look at the battle of the sexes. Wed-Sun. Thru Oct. 20. Pittsburgh CLO,

Downtown. 412-456-6666. THE DEVIL’S ARITHMETIC. Staged readings of an adaptation of the book by Jane Yolen. Presented by Prime Stage Theatre. Sat., Sept. 28, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE DUTCHMAN. Two strangers struggle to reconcile their differences in the underbelly of the city while fighting the urge to consummate their mutual attraction. Presented by Meagan Reagle & Peter Milo w/ 5th Wall Theatre. Sept. 27-29. Future Tenant, Downtown. 412-325-7037. HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS WITHOUT REALLY TRYING. Comedy following J. Pierpont Finch up the executive ladder in the business world of the 1950s. Fri-Sun. Thru Sept. 29. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. THE LION KING. Thru Sept. 29. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. MIDNIGHT RADIO: SHAKESBURGH. Comedic homage to Shakespeare, Pittsburgh-style. Thu., Sept. 26 and Fri, Sat. Thru

Oct. 5. Bricolage, Downtown. SECOND STEEL: NORTHSIDE. A performance created by 412-471-0999. Pittsburgh-based and visiting THE ODD COUPLE. Comedy by theater & visual artists respondNeil Simon. Fri, Sat. Thru Sept. 28. ing to revitalization on the North Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. Shore. Parking Lot Blue 7H, 724-591-8727. Sandusky St. & E. Lacock. PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS Sept. 26-27. 407-222-5848. FESTIVAL. Premiering Bored Of A SKULL IN CONNEMARA. Play Education!, Even, One 2nd, Dinner by Martin McDonagh. Presented Theatre of the Absurd, Whistleby Pittsburgh Irish & Classical blower, Hotline. Thu-Sun. Theatre. Wed-Sun. Thru Thru Sept. 29. Off the Sept. 28. Charity Randall Wall Theater, Carnegie. Theatre, Oakland. 412-944-2639. 412-561-6000. POLYGOON’S SOLDIER’S HEART. www. per REVENGE. Interactive a p Play by Tammy Ryan pghcitym medieval theater per.co about the struggles formance. Presented by women face in the military. Stage & Steel Productions. Presented by The REP. Thu-Sun. Fri, Sat. Thru Sept. 28. SS Peter & Thru Oct. 13. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church Oakland. 412-392-8000. Hall, Carnegie. 412-480-4758. SQUONK OPERA’S MAYHEM SECOND STEEL: HILL DISTRICT. & MAJESTY. A show which A performance created by pushes the boundaries of musical Pittsburgh-based & visiting theater athleticism & visual wizardry, while artists and architects responding to asking the question…“What does revitalization as it relates to the music look like?” Sept. 27-29. New Hill District. Sat., Sept. 28, 2 p.m. Hazlett Theater, North Side. 2306 Centre Ave, Hill District. 412-320-4610. 724-822-9228.

FULL LIST ONLINE

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SPONSORED IN PART BY PARTICIPATING BREWERIES

103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086 | www.jergels.com | 724.799.8333

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CN OT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

THU 26 COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu. Thru Sept. 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE CELLAR DWELLERS. Benefits John Jaquish’s film, Arms & The Man. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

THU 26 - SUN 29 GARY OWEN. Sept. 26-29 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 27 BARPROV. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. MORPH ILLOGICAL & FACE PLANT IMPROV. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. STEPHEN LYNCH. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall, Munhall. 412-368-5225.

SAT 28 CAGEMATCH IMPROV. Sat, 9 p.m. Thru Sept. 28 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. COMEDY SHOW W/ SOLOMON. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE LUPONES: MADE UP MUSICALS. Sat. Thru Oct. 12 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.


“Mediated Nostalgia (Babble),” by Patricia BellanGillen, from Necessary Fictions at James Gallery

VISUALART NEW THIS WEEK THE BREW HOUSE. Threaded. Multi-media sculpture & installation, feat. light, glass, cheeseweird, & jesusporn by Matt Eskuche, Theo Keller, Jarrod Futscher, Jason Forck, & Elizabeth Fortunato. Artist receptions: Sept. 28, 7-10 p.m.; Nov. 2, 7-10 p.m. & by appointment. South Side. 843-469-8342. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Zivi Aviraz, Matthew Spangler, Avery Pratt. Group show. Opening reception Sep. 28, 5-8 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Gravitational Pull. Multimedia work by Megan Biddle. Reception Oct. 18, 6-9 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. 14th International Exhibition of Botanical Art & Illustration. Opens Sept. 27. Oakland. 412-268-2434. THE INN. Dos Solos. Emerging Artist Enterprise Series, Vol. II. Feat. new work by Gianna Paniagua & Alex Hamrick, curated by Nikkia Margaret Hall. Opening reception Sep. 26, 6-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. JAMES GALLERY. Necessary Fictions. Work by Patricia Bellan-Gillen. Opening reception: Sept. 27, 6-9 p.m. West End. 412-922-9800. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. common discourse. Group show feat. work by Jen Blazina, Ron Desmett, Michael Janis, Susan Longini, Carmen Lozar, Heather Joy Puskarich, Demetra Theofanous & Randy Walker. Opening reception Sep. 28, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-5200.

THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Opening reception: Sept. 27, 5:30-8 p.m. Artist dialogues: Sept. 28, noon-4 p.m. Strip District. 412-261-7003. THE TOONSEUM. Duck! Showcase of original animation art, comic art & artifacts of some of cartooning’s most iconic quackers. Opens Sept. 27. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TOWNHOUSE. Second Steel: Townhouse. A performative sound installation created by Pittsburgh-based & visiting artists responding to revitalization in East Liberty. 7p.m., Sep 25 & noon-6 p.m., Sep 26. East Liberty. 412-246-9007.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. HOLDUP in the HOOD. Multimedia work by Francis Crisafio. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. Proud to be an American? Photographs by Bea Chiappelli. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Predator of Prey. Work by Victoria Jon. Downtown. 412-325-6766. BE GALLERIES. Deliberate Voyages. Paintings by Wesley Smith. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BFG CAFE. New Artists Showcase. Group show. Garfield. 412-661-2345.

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BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. East Suburban Art League Exhibit. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Fragmentation. New Works by Seth Clark. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Marsha’s Peace Art; Abstract & Pointillist. Work by Marsha Lee Moore. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. The Clayton Days, Revisited: A Project by Vik Muniz. Feat. his 65-photo collection. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Text meets Texture. Work by Nancy McNarySmith & David Montano. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Elementals. Collaborative works by Matt Hunter & Gabrielle Fischer. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Raw Images. Photographs by Jill & Flannery Joyce. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Different Dimensions: The “Unpainting” Exhibit. Group show feat. mixed media, wall ceramics, fiber, sculpture, mosaics, more. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. THE INN. The Spice Girls: Live at the Inn. Work by Terry Boyd. Lawrenceville. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Perspective 2013: A Photography Exhibition. Robinson. 412-788-0816. CONTINUES ON PG. 71

ROTATIN S EASO G CRAFTSNAL ON TAP

THE SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. Mon, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 4 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Thru Dec. 16 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

21 H D TVs

TUE 01 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

SOUTH HILLS PREMIER SPORTS BAR & EATERY

GO BUC’S

WED 02 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 27 Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502. STEEL CITY COMEDY TOUR. First Wed of every month, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 2 Buckhead Saloon, Station Square. 412-232-3101.

BLACK N GOLD

SUNDAYS

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

MONDAY NIGHT

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. An eclectic showroom of fine art sculpture & paintings from emerging artists. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Roads of Arabia: Archaeology & History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Archaeological materials exploring the cultural history of the Arabian Peninsula. 412-622-3131. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. BIKES: Science on Two Wheels. Feat. hands-on activities, demonstrations & a collection of historic, rare, & peculiar bicycles. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. Ligonier. 724-238-4983.

FOOTBALL 4-11PM ALL YOU CAN EAT

CRABS LEGS

$

5 BARCARDI MOJITOS 6-10PM $ 3.50 SUMMER SHANDY 11-12AM

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

SATURDAYS BREAKFAST 8AM-NOON BLOODY MARY BAR 8AM-6PM STEAKHOUSE NOON-1PM

HAPPY HOUR MON-FRI 5-7PM $1 OFF ALL DRAFTS, MIXED DRINKS & WINE ½ OFF APPETIZERS OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FOR BREAKFAST LUNCH & DINNER Come in for a Late Night Bite! • Kitchen open till 1AM Full Menu Available for Take-Out

ICE COLD BEER TO GO!

3239 West Liberty Ave, Dormont, PA 15216 412-561-7444 • www.CainsSaloon.com

CONTINUES ON PG. 70

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 69

STAGE & STEEL

[HOUSE TOUR]

PRODUCTIONS

presents

MONDAYS 9-11PM Charlie is trying to write a fantasy novel... Only the characters haven’t told him how it ends yet.

DINNER THEATER

SEPT. 20 & 27

Friday 7:30pm ONLY $25 Reservation only! STAGEANDSTEEL.COM 412-480-4758

REGULAR SHOWS

SEPT. 21 & 28 Saturday 8pm show T I C K E TS :

$12 General $10 Student/Senior $5 Kids 12 & Under

St. PETER & St. PAUL HALL 220 MANSFIELD BLVD CARNEGIE, PA 15106

INDUSTRY NIGHT $2

16oz Drafts

$3 Fireball Shots

ALL DAY EVERY DAY $3.50 24oz Bottles

ALL BUCCO GAMES $3.50 24oz Bottles ONLY DURING GAME

1314 EAST CARSON ST. S OUT HS ID E POOL + PING PONG + DARTS

BLACK & GOLD HEADQUARTERS ALL GAMES

$10 BUCKETS OF BEER (mix and match)

SIX PACKS TO-GO for the walk to the stadium

HAPPY HOUR MON-FRI 5-7PM

WEDNESDAYS FREE POOL 6-10PM

709 EAST ST. (412) 979-5075 CORNER OF E. OHIO / EAST ST.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Summer Flower Show. Glass art surrounded by colorful blooms. Feat. work by Daviea Davis, Jason Forck, Steven Sadvary, Lisa Platt, more. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Lifeforms. Exhibition of natural imagery in lampworked glass. Curated by Robert Mickelsen. Friendship. 412-365-2145. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pennsylvania’s Civil War. In-depth look at Pennsylvania’s significant contributions during the Civil War feat. artifacts, military encampments, life-like museum figures, more. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement.

SAT 28 - SUN 29

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ALBERT NIKO TRIULZI}

This Saturday, Wilkinsburg Community Development Corp. hosts the inaugural Wilkinsburg House & Garden Tour, beginning at Mifflin Avenue United Methodist Church. WCDC Executive Director Tracey Evans discussed the tour via email. HOW DID THE TOUR COME ABOUT? The idea has come up over the years. The [WCDC] took the lead this year to showcase the gorgeous architecture and restorations of properties that had been vacant for years. We wanted to share sustainable-garden projects as well as our historic churches. Wilkinsburg was once known as the city of churches; we have around 35. IS WILKINSBURG OVERLOOKED BY POTENTIAL HOMEBUYERS? We’ve experienced an increase in people interested in Wilkinsburg, whether it’s as homeowners, renters, businesses or investors. The WCDC’s had a 253 percent increase in inquiries over the last year. We’ve seen a really positive community attitude toward local governance, tackling crime, vacant property and school-district issues. These aren’t easy, but we have come up with innovative solutions that are changing neighborhood dynamics and bringing new investment to the borough. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., Sept. 28. 905 Mifflin Ave., Wilkinsburg. $15-18. www.WilkinsburgCDC.org

Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and cokemaking in this pre-Civil War industrial village. Scottdale. 724-887-7910.

Haunted Hills, North Versailles. THE SCAREHOUSE. Haunted house open select dates through Nov. 2. Sept. 27-Nov. 2 Etna. 412-781-5885.

HOLIDAY

SAT 28

FRI 27 - WED 02 HAUNTED HILLS HAYRIDE/ VALLEY OF DARKNESS HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL. Live bands, karaoke, & DJs every Friday & Saturday. Benefits The Autism Society of Pittsburgh & The Spectrum Charter School. hauntedhillshayride.com Sept. 27-Nov. 2

SPECIAL THU 26 - WED 02 RADICAL DAYS. Dozens of cultural establishments will offer free admission on designated days. Visit radworkshere.org for full schedule. Thru Nov. 10

FESTIVALS 2ND ANNUAL CHILE PEPPER FARM FESTIVAL. Chile roasting, hay rides, wine tasting, live music, more. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. White Oak Farm, Allison Park. 412-261-2606. BEN AVON FALL FESTIVAL. Artisan market, cupcake decorating contest, used book sale, children’s activities, more. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Church Ave., Ben Avon. 412-720-0602.

MCCONNELLS MILL HERITAGE DAYS FESTIVAL. Sept. 28-29 McConnell’s Mill State Park, Portersville. 724-368-1100. 30TH ANNUAL PENN’S COLONY FESTIVAL & FOLK ARTS MARKETPLACE. 185+ craftsmen & artisans, authentic 18th century circus, horse-drawn surrey rides, more. Sept. 28-29 Penn’s Colony, Saxonburg. 724-352-9922. PITTSBURGH RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL. Medieval entertainment, children’s activities, artisan market, more. Southeast of Pittsburgh off I-70, exit 51A, Route 31. Sat, Sun. Thru Sept. 29 724-872-1670.

SUN 29 16TH ANNUAL ALAMEDA FALL FEST. Fishing tournament, petting zoo, craft show, car cruise, more. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Alameda Park, Butler. 724-284-5383.

MON 30 - WED 02 PLEIN AIR MT. LEBANON FESTIVAL. Open air painting festival. Demos, competitions, vendors, more. pleinairmtl.com Sept. 30Oct. 6 Mt. Lebanon Municipality, Mt. Lebanon. 412-343-3412.

DANCE FRI 27 PRE-BIRTHDAY BASH 40. Dance performance, art installation & fashion show. Presented by Marylloyd Claytor Dance Company. 5:30-8 p.m. YWCA Downtown. 412-216-2616.

SAT 28 COMPAGNIE MARIE CHOUINARD. Interpretive dance performance. Part of the Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts. 8 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

MON 30 POLYNESIAN FIRE SHOW. Feat. traditional dance & drumming. Presented by Latshaw Productions. 11:30 a.m. & 1 p.m. Seven Springs, Champion. 1-800-452-2223.

FUNDRAISERS THU 26 2ND ANNUAL PINK PARTINI & FASHION BASH. Part of Pittsburgh Fashion Week, benefits The American Cancer Society. pittsburghfashionweek.com 6-8 p.m. Tanger Outlets, Washington. 724-225-8435.

FRI 27 ART ON FIRE. Contemporary glass auction & celebration w/ honorary guest, Nancy Callan. 6-11 p.m. American Eagle Outfitters Headquarters, South Side. 412-365-2145. FURRY FRIENDS FESTIVAL. Ask the Vet” Q&A session, Puparazzi Pet Photos, mini pet massages by Critter Sitters. Benefits the the Animal Rescue League Shelter & Wildlife Center. Longwood at Oakmont, Verona.


ICANDY LADIES DANCE PARTY. Gay/lesbian dance party benefiting the Animal Rescue League. 8 p.m. Cruze Bar, Strip District. 412-471-1400. ONCE UPON A TIME GALA CONCERT. Feat. cellist Yo-Yo Ma. 7:30 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. SLIPPERY ROCK ROTARY/VNA AUTUMN GOLF CLASSIC. 11:30 a.m. Oakview Golf Club, Slippery Rock. 724-431-3213.

SAT 28 BURGH AREA RAINBOW 4-1-2 BOWLERS INVITATIONAL. Benefits the International Gay Bowling Organization. 1-4 p.m. Princess Lanes, Whitehall. 412-586-4727. HAITI BENEFIT CONCERT. Feat. Slow Machete, Mark Williams, Peace Ike, Joy Ike. 7 p.m. Northgate Church, Ross. 412-980-3888. HOT PINK PITTSBURGH. Live jazz by Dane Vannatter & Quartet & Maureen Budway, hors d’oeuvres, raffle, more. Benefits Adagio Health. $25 tickets available for students (must be purchased directly from Adagio Health.) 6:30 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-253-8163. OKTOBERFEST CRAFT BEER TASTING. Benefits the Community Foundation of Upper St. Clair. 7 p.m. St. Thomas More Family Life Center, Upper St. Clair. 412-831-1107. PIRATE WORLD RECORD. Dress up like a pirate & help break the world record of the largest gathering of pirates. Also feat. costume contest, music, more. Benefits the Wounded Warrior Project. 2 p.m. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-471-0235. WALK TO CURE DIABETES GREENSBURG. Benefits JDRF. jdrf. org. 8:30 a.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg. 412-471-1414.

VISUAL ART

MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. This Way to the Egress. Paintings by Ben Matthews. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MERRICK ART GALLERY. Gary Henzler Solo Exhibit. New Brighton. 724-846-1130. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Alien She. Work by Ginger Brooks

burgh Student Marxist Association. 7:30 p.m. O’Hara Student Center, Oakland. 412-716-1790.

LITERARY THU 26

ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. A FIRESIDE CHAT W/ RON SUSKIND & PAUL O’NEILL. Discussion w/ former U.S. Treasury secretary & the author of A Hope in the Unseen: An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League. 7 p.m. The Neighborhood Academy, East Liberty. 412-626-6851. . BOOK ‘EM BOOKS w w w SPANISH paper TO PRISONERS WORK pghcitym CONVERSATION .co PARTY. Read & code letCLUB. Second and ters, pick books, pack ‘em or Fourth Thu of every database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Oakland. 412-622-3151. Garfield. 412-361-3022. PITTSBURGH 5K VISIONWALK. Benefits the Foundation Fighting BRIDGES & RIVER SHORES Blindness. 9 a.m. Heinz Field, FREE WALKING TOUR. Fri. Thru North Side. Sept. 27 Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel, Downtown. 412-471-5808.

SUN 29

FULL LIST E N O LIN

FRI 27

WED 02

5TH ANNUAL CELEBRATING SENIOR CHAMPIONS. Celebration of healthy aging, healthy living, & healthy communities. Dinner, live music, more. Benefits the UPMC Senior Communities Benevolent Care Program. 5:30 p.m. Omni William Penn, Downtown. 412-622-9239.

POLITICS THU 26 OUR CLASS STRUGGLE. Discussion hosted by the Workers International League & the Pitts-

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CONTINUED FROM PG. 69

SAT 28 MEET THE POET: PAOLA CORSO READING & DISCUSSION. Author of The Laundress Catches Her Breath. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. ONE BOOK, ONE COMMUNITY: CIVIL WAR AUTHOR TALK. w/ David Neville, Michael Kraus, & Kenneth Turner, authors of The Civil War in Pennsylvania: A Photographic History. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Senator John Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6000.

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Takahashi, Tammy Rae Carland, Miranda July, Faythe Levine, Allyson Mitchell, L.J. Roberts, & Stephanie Syjuco. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Eric White: Monoprints. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Gestures: The Fine Art of Non-Verbal Communication. Work by Kyle Anthony Adams, Ren Burke, Mark Dobosh, Anne Michelle Lyons, Katie Lynn Moran, more. Garfield. 412-328-4737. PANZA GALLERY. Sanctuary. Multimedia exhibit by members of the Pittsburgh Society of Artists. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PENN STATE UNIVERSITY GALLERY. Retrospective. Work by Eloise Piper. New Kensington. 724-334-6032.

MON 30 12 STEPS TO PEACE: USING CREATIVITY TO TRANSFORM ANXIETY. Writing & discussion group. Mon, 6-7 p.m. Thru Nov. 25 Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. 412-337-4976.

TUE 01 JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. RAY HALLIDAY. Author of The Kid That Even the Dogs Didn’t Like. Part of Pitt-Greensburg’s Written/ Spoken Series. 7 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg.

PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Hand Tinted Vintage Photographs. Hand tinted black & white photographs on tin, paper & glass. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year: Akiko Kotani. Emerging Artist of the Year: Lenka Clayton. Master Visual Artists: Preserving the Legacy. Work by Tadao Arimoto, Gary Jurysta, Contance Merriman, Risë Nagin, Chuck Olson, Marjorie F. Shipe, Paul Zelevansky, more. Shadyside. 412-361-0873.

ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY MEDIA ARTS GALLERY. Ireland. A collection of three years of photography abroad. Downtown. 412-397-3813. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic! The Art of Burton Morris. Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. GREEN. Photographs by Sue Abramson, Adam Amengual, Kim Beck, Peter Beste, Joe Johnson, Judy Natal, & Ed Panar. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Art Interprets Alzheimer’s. Work by George Roby & Herbert Ascherman, Jr. Downtown. 412-261-7003.

Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke

SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Colorblind Landscapes of Pennsylvania. Paintings by Ryan Ian McCormick. Friendship. 517-862-1963. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Oasis. Paintings by Leslie Ansley. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TOUCHSTONE CENTER FOR CRAFTS. Patrick Daugherty: Influenced by the Right People™. Oil paintings. Farmington. 724-329-1370. USX TOWER. Last Light - The Civic Arena. Photography by Ed Massery. Downtown. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WILDCARD. 365 Critters. Animal illustrations by Jeff Brunner. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 27 ROCK BAND! Open stage for teen singers, songwriters & instrumentalists to play w/ Emma Cox & Elliot Beck. Presented by Hope Academy. Fri, 5:30-7 p.m. Thru Dec. 27

East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 43.

SAT 28 3D FOR KIDS. 3D animation & photography workshop. Ages 7+. 1 p.m. Greensburg Hempfield Area Library, Greensburg. 724-837-5620. CONTINUES ON PG. 72

PIRATE GAME SPECIAL!

$

4 MILLER LITE POUNDERS

WED 02 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. RODEF SHALOM BOOK REVIEW SERIES. Rabbi Jonathan Perlman discusses Care of the Soul by Thomas Moore. 7:30 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

PIRATE GAME DAY SPECIAL! $

3 16oz. MILLER LITE DRAFTS

KIDSTUFF THU 26 HEALTHY SMILE DAYS: FREE DENTAL SCREENINGS. Ages 3+. 1-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

$

THU 26 - WED 02

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing

M U S I C

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2.25 MILLER LITE DRAFTS

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 71

make a real connection Call Livelinks. The hottest place to meet the coolest people.

KID’S MINI MARKET. Mini market of local kid’s vendors feat. handmade apparel & gifts & a free photo session w/ a professional children’s photographer. 12-5 p.m. Yobro Apparel, Lawrenceville. 412-407-7689. PLAY W/ CLAY ON THE POTTER’S WHEEL. Ages 3+. Sat, 12-2 p.m. Thru Oct. 5 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUR YOUR FUTURE: CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Meet Dr. Allison Barth & tour her lab at the Department of Biological Sciences. Ages 9-17. Barbuton@ carnegiesciencecenter.org 1-3 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000.

SAT 28 - SUN 29 LITTLE MERMAID. Original, interactive, musical theater production. Sat, Sun. Thru Oct. 6 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201.

MON 30

Try it Free!

412.566.1861 Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 Ahora en Español 18+

www.livelinks.com

FAMILY GAME NIGHT. Last Mon of every month, 5-8 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. MUNCHKIN MONDAYS. 10 a.m.2 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

WED 02 WRITING & ART WITH TESS. Story & craft-time for kids ages 5 & up. First Wed of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

OUTSIDE SAT 28

EVENT: LightLab Performance Series (contemporary

BEGINNER PADDLES W/ VENTURE OUTDOORS. Ages 12+. 9-11 a.m. Moraine State Park, Butler. 412-255-0564. MINGO CREEK PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by The Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. 7:30 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory, Finleyville. 724-348-6150.

dance), at Wood Street Galleries, Downtown

CRITIC: Maira Duarte, 32, a dancer from the North Side

SAT 28 - SUN 29 KAYAKING DISCOVERY COURSE. Presented by L.L.Bean. Sat, Sun, 10-11:30 a.m. Thru Oct. 13 North Park, Allison Park. 412-318-1200.

TUE 01 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 02 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 26

WHEN: Sat.,

Sept. 21 The show was based around a balance of technology and performance, and it emphasized the performers’ abilities to interact with the technology and the audience. It was definitely eclectic and not the kind of event you would go to or expect to see at a ballet or a musical or any other kind of artistic show. The performances [tonight] have been very interesting because on one hand you see performances by relative newcomers, and then a very experienced artist comes up. It is just very interesting to see how they are doing in this very creative setting, and what differs [between] each performer. While the performances alone were very interesting, the technology behind the show really brought it to another level. I came to the show because I am a dancer and my life is about showing different aspects of artistry, which is exactly what this show is about.

BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. GEEK PITTSBURGH PRE-CON PARTY. Feat. staged readings of William Shakespeare’s Star Wars. 7-9 p.m. The ToonSeum, THE RUBBER DUCK BRIDGE Downtown. 412-232-0199. PARTY. Launch of The Rubber INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S Duck Project, food & art vendors, ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. music, more. Part of the Pittsburgh Social, cultural club of American/ Festival of Firsts & the Gallery international women. Thu First Crawl. 5:30-10 p.m. Clemente Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. Bridge, North Side. pittsburgh@gmail.com. INTERVIEWING 101. Employment workshop presented by WorkAble. FOREST GARDENING INTEN9:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Millvale CommuSIVE. Sept. 27-28, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. nity Center, Millvale. 412-487-6316. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical MONONGAHELA AREA Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 HISTORICAL SOCIETY x 3925. MEETING. Speaker: Dr. Miles S. Richards. First Presbyterian Church BACK-TO-BACK of Monongahela, RUNWAY SHOW. Monongahela. Feat. designs & concepts PRESERVING THE . w ww per from Art Institute a HERBAL HARVEST. p ty ci h pg Students. Part of .com 7-9 p.m. Phipps Garden Pittsburgh Fashion Week. Center, Shadyside. pittsburghfashionweek.com 412-441-4442 x 3925. 7 p.m. Art Institute of Pittsburgh, UNDERSTANDING Downtown. 412-263-6600. OBAMACARE: CONSUMER CATHOLIC YOUNG ADULT EDITION. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie SYMPOSIUM. 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. WEST COAST SWING. Swing 412-456-3140. dance lessons for all levels. Thu, COMMUNITY FLEA MARKET 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, & CRAFT SHOW. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. The Palms At O’Neil, White Oak. 412-664-1000. DANCE FOR PARKINSON’S EASTERN PRIMITIVE PITTSBURGH. Dance classes RENDEZVOUS. Craft seminars, designed for people w/ Parkinson’s primitive archery, children’s games, Disease to explore the art of dance Dutch oven cooking contest, more. & live music. Sat, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 28 Cooper’s Thru Nov. 23 Pittsburgh Ballet Lake Campground, Slippery Rock. 724-538-4717. Theatre, Strip District. 412-387-2542.

FRI 27

FRI 27 - SAT 28

SAT 28 FULL LIST ONLINE

$2 WELL DRINKS 10PM-MIDNIGHT

2-4-1 LAP DANCES

THU 26 - SAT 28

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

B Y B RE T T W I L S ON

FALL CRAFT FAIR. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. East Union Presbyterian Church, Cheswick. 412-767-5750. HAPPY GRUMPS. A social hour for the wise older crowd. Bring your concerns, rants & hopes for some fun & good conversation. Sat, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Thru Dec. 28 Ritter’s Diner, Bloomfield. 412-337-4976. THE IMPACT OF MIND & BRAIN RESEARCH AT CMU. Panel discussion about the federal BRAIN Initiative. McConnomy Auditorium. 10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. INCLINE HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at the bottom of the Monongahela Incline. Sat. Thru Oct. 26 412-302-5223. MOUNT WASHINGTON BLOCK PARTY. 21+ event feat. music by The Pressure, a photo booth, games, & more. Shiloh Street business district, Mt. Lebanon. Email christina@mwcdc.org for info. PLANNING & PLANTING WORKSHOPS. Learn basic soil science, cold frame design, fall planting, more. Sat. Thru Sept. 28 Shadyside Nursery, Shadyside. 412-532-6896. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN FLEA MARKET. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-431-0118.


SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WILKINSBURG HOUSE & GARDEN TOUR. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Mifflin Avenue United Methodist Church, Regent Square. 412-727-7855.

SAT 28 - SUN 29 35TH ANNUAL POW WOW. Singing, dancing, arts & crafts, native foods, more. Sept. 28-29 Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center, Dorseyville. 412-782-4457. AMERICAN INDIAN HERITAGE WEEKEND. Get a first-hand look at the everyday lives of 16th & 18th century American Indians. Sept. 2829 Meadowcroft Museum of Rural Life, Avella. 724-587-3412. ECHOES FROM OUR PAST HISTORIC WALK. Cemetery tour w/ live-actor portrayals of notable deceased in Butler Co. Sept. 28-29 Butler Little Theatre, Butler. 724-283-8116. HARMONY MUSEUM ANTIQUE SHOW. Sept. 28-29 Harmony Museum Barn Annex, Harmony. 724-452-7341.

SUN 29 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727.

Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. NATIVE HERBACEOUS PLANTS & THEIR USES IN THE LANDSCAPE. Mon, 7-9 p.m. Thru Oct. 21 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SELF-GUIDED OLD ALLEGHENY COUNTY JAIL MUSEUM TOUR. Mon, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Thru Sept. 30 Old Allegheny County Jail Museum, Downtown. 412-471-5808.

TUE 01 WILKINSBURG HOUSING INFORMATION FAIR. 6-7:30 p.m. Landmarks Housing Resource Center, Wilkinsburg. 412-727-7855.

WED 02 ARTIST OPPORTUNITY GRANT 2.0 LAUNCH PARTY. pittsburghartscouncil.org/grants 6:30-8:30 p.m. 720 Records, Lawrenceville. COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE. Seeking new players, no experience necessary. Wednesdays, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-7878. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

HORSES WITH HOPE

Horses With Hope provides therapeutic horse-riding and experimental learning programs for children and adults with special needs. Animal-lovers are needed to work as volunteer horse leaders and side walkers to help maintain riders’ safety during 45-minute riding sessions. Sessions are held at the South Park horse-show arena and on Gretna Road in Washington, Pa. Training is provided. Email annehwh@gmail.com or visit www.horseswithhope.org for information.

JAPANESE TEA CEREMONY & WORKSHOP. w/ Yuko Eguchi. Presented by Margaret’s Fine Imports. 6-8 p.m. Christine Frechard Gallery, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606. LYME DIEASE SUPPORT GROUP. Email pghlyme@gmail.com for information. Christ Lutheran Church, Millvale. MYSTICAL PSYCHIC FAIR. 12-5 p.m. Library Fire Hall, South Park. 724-348-8063.

MON 30 BRYAN FAZIO CONGO DRUMMING: BASICS & BEYOND. Music workshop, ages 14+. Mon. Thru Oct. 21 Bottlebrush Gallery & Shop, Harmony. 724-452-0539. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m.

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AUDITIONS GEMINI THEATER COMPANY. Auditions for Sleeping Beauty Holiday. Oct. 7-8. Actors ages 10+, adult roles are contracted, paid positions. 1-2 min. of an a cappella song & cold readings. Call for appointment. geminitheater. org Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464. MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. Auditions for The Westing Game. Seeking 3 teenage boys (one Asian), 1 40-something AfricanAmerican woman, 1 20-something male. Also, men & women ages 40-60. Call for appointment. McKeesport. 412-673-1100. MILDRED MILLER INTERNATIONAL VOICE COMPETITION. Opera Theater’s voice competition for professional singers ages 19-35. Apply at http:// www.yaptracker.com/ for the competition in Nov. 412-621-1499. THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Seeking a Stage Director for Spring 2014 production of “Utopia Limited” by Gilbert & Sullivan. Performance dates: March 7-16. Resumes accepted through Oct 5, 2013. Gilbert & Sullivan or other Operetta experience preferred. Send resumes & contact info to: directorsearch@ pittsburghsavoyards.org THE WEST VIRGINIA BLUES SOCIETY. Call for bands for the 7th Annual Appalachian Blues Competition in Huntington, WV. Information, application & rules available at www.wvbluessociety.org.

SUBMISSIONS ACTING OUT! PITTSBURGH

INTRODUCTORY LEVEL SCOTTISH GAELIC CLASS. Wed. Thru Nov. 6 Bottlebrush Gallery & Shop, Harmony. 724-452-0539. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. TEA CLASS & TASTING. History of tea, steeping techniques, Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea

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samples & European cookies will be served. First Wed of every month, 7 p.m. Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

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PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. Accepting submissions for showcase of locally written lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender-theme 1-act plays. Manuscript details at facebook. com/events/519459561475242 412-256-8109. ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF PITTSBURGH NEW MEMBERS SCREENING. Screening Sept. 29. Bring five works of art in the same medium, 2D or 3D. Drop off 11 a.m.-2 p.m., pick up 4-6 p.m. aapgh.org Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-1370. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer. com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

I’m a 23-year-old homo. Life has done good and bad things to me. Good things include intelligence, a full ride to college and a job with a six-figure income. Sadly, my place in life is different from the place occupied by most other young gay men. When meeting someone, I am often bummed to discover that they are in a state of transience (between cities, between degrees), or I detect a difference in socioeconomic upbringing/status that will make it hard for us to relate, or they are not as smart as I am, or most often a combination of all these things. These thoughts sap my interest, telling me that “it just wouldn’t work.” Am I right to keep looking, or should I go on that second date, even though the odds of compatibility seem slim? LOTS OF FIRST DATES

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

I’m tempted to tell you not to go on “that second date” with anyone you feel is beneath you — not to spare you his ghastly company, but to spare him the ghastliness of yours. If dating gay men your own age means exposing yourself to guys who are in “states of transience” — completely normal states for dudes in their early 20s — then date guys in their 30s and 40s. Not that dating older guys is a surefire recipe: Your snobbery and elitism are so repulsive that most older guys will be blocking your number before you can call about a second date. Andrew Sullivan wrote a beautiful post at The Dish about the egalitarianism of getting laid. He recalled dancing all night in a gay club full of African-American guys back when he was a “cute twinky English schoolboy”: “There’s nothing like dating or fucking a person of another background, race or class to help you see the humanity in everyone,” Andrew wrote. “How do you get scared of generic young black men when you’ve danced with them all night long? … In that sense, I’ve always felt that being gay was a real moral blessing. I could have been so much worse a human being if I’d been straight.” You’re young, and I’m being hard on you. But if you don’t get a grip on your snobbery, you will become so much worse a human being than you need to be. And remember: We gay people are a tiny minority. If you reject as potential partners, friends and fuck buddies all gay men who aren’t of your class, education level, social status (ugh) or salary level (barf), you won’t be left with many guys. Which is not to say you’ll wind up alone. There are other gay snobs out there. You could find a boyfriend who’s just like you. But I wouldn’t wish that kind of guy on anyone. Not even on you.

so this isn’t a problem, just a mystery. I know that the clitoris is much larger than the part you can see, and she gets off on the feeling of pressure on and around where the glans would normally be. So I’m sure she has developed nerves and, I guess, has a clit under the skin. Have you ever heard of this? Is it common? CLITORLESS LAD IN TORMENT

“It’s pretty rare, but yes, it happens,” said Debby Herbenick, a research scientist at Indiana University, a sexual-health educator at the Kinsey Institute, the author of Sex Made Easy (among other books), and the only woman who has ever chased me around a room with a vulva puppet. When a woman doesn’t have an exposed clitoral glans, “there’s usually other genital parts that haven’t developed or have developed in atypical ways,” said Herbenick. “But there have been a few case reports in which the women had other typically developed genital parts — labia, etc. — while the clitoris alone is missing or very small. Some of these women report erotic sensation in the clitoral area.” Should your girlfriend talk to a doctor? “I haven’t seen this woman’s genitals,” said Herbenick, “but sometimes there is atrophy or even ‘coverage’ of the clitoris (for example, the hood fuses over the glans partially or completely) due to vulvar skin disorders such as lichen sclerosus. Some children have LS, and often it goes undiagnosed for years and, without treatment, her clitoral hood could have fused over the glans. A dermatologist or gynecologist knowledgeable about vulvar dermatoses could look into this possibility via a very small biopsy. (Doctors with expertise in vulvar health can be found through issvd.org.)” Follow Dr. Herbenick on Twitter @DebbyHerbenick.

“THERE’S NOTHING LIKE DATING OR FUCKING A PERSON OF ANOTHER BACKGROUND girlfriend and I have a TO HELP YOU SEE My vibrant relationship, but I an issue that clouds THE HUMANITY have up the sexual chemistry: childhood, I was IN EVERYONE.” Since told by my family that

I recently started dating a 26-year-old female. I was surprised when she told me that she gets nothing out of oral sex: Eventually, I was to discover that this was because she has no external glans (clitoris hood/head). It’s just smooth skin where a clit would be. She is probably the easiest person I’ve ever met to get to orgasm,

abortion was a horrible, horrible thing. And that thought has complicated my relationships. I simply don’t know how to get past this thought and indulge my partner and myself sexually without feeling uncertain about the possible outcome of our getting funky. I feel awful that my girlfriend has to deal with this moral panic. Help! Bummed About Bad Experiences Some suggestions: Use a hormonal birth control method and a condom and pull out before you come. Stick to oral sex, mutual masturbation and doing her in the butt (if that’s something your girlfriend enjoys). Deposit a few loads at a sperm bank, keep ’em on ice until you want kids, and get a vasectomy. Or you could learn more about abortion while acting responsibly, i.e., using birth control and condoms. Abortion is not a horrible, horrible thing. It is a medical, medical thing. This week on the Savage Lovecast, the appalling crisis of homeless LGBT youth, at savagelovecast.com

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

09.25-10.02

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): For four days twice a year, the East China Sea recedes to create a narrow strip of land between two Korean islands, Jindo and Modo. People celebrate the “Sea-Parting Festival” by strolling back and forth along the temporary path. The phenomenon has been called the “Korean version of Moses’ miracle,” although it’s more reasonably explained by the action of the tides. I foresee some sweet marvel akin to this one occurring in your life very soon, Libra. Be ready to take advantage of a special dispensation.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The desire for revenge is a favorite theme of the entertainment industry. It’s presented as being glamorous and stirring and even noble. How many action films build their plots around the hero seeking payback against his enemies? Personally, I see revenge as one of the top-three worst emotions. In real life, it rarely has redeeming value. People who actively express it often wreak pain and ruin on both others and themselves. Even those who merely stew in it may wound themselves by doing so. I bring this up, Scorpio, because now is an excellent time for you to shed desires for revenge. Dissolve them, get rid of them, talk yourself out of indulging in them. The reward for doing so will be a great liberation.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Just for a few days, would you be willing to put your attention on the needs of others more than on your own? The weird thing is, your selfish interests will be best served by being as unselfish and empathetic and compassionate as you can stand

to be. I don’t mean that you should allow yourself to be abused or taken advantage of. Your task is to express an abundance of creative generosity as you bestow your unique blessings in ways that make you feel powerful. In the words of theologian Frederick Buechner, you should go “to the place where your deep gladness and the world’s deep hunger meet.”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Imagine a scenario like this: The CEOs of five crazily rich U.S. corporations, including a major defense contractor, stage a press conference to announce that in the future they will turn down the massive welfare benefits and tax breaks the federal government has been doling out to them all these years. Now picture this: The Pope issues a statement declaring that since Jesus Christ never had a single bad word to say about homosexuals, the Catholic Church is withdrawing its resistance to gay rights. I am envisioning a comparable reversal in your life, Capricorn — a flip-flop that seems equally improbable. But unlike the two I named, yours will actually

unfold in the course of the next eight months. If it hasn’t already started yet, it will soon.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Matteo Ricci was an Italian Jesuit priest who lived from 1552 to 1610. For his last 28 years, he worked as a missionary in China. Corresponding with his friends and family back home required a lot of patience. News traveled very slowly. Whenever he sent out a letter, he was aware that there’d be no response for seven years. What would you express about your life right now if you knew your dear ones wouldn’t learn of it until 2017? Imagine describing to them in an old-fashioned letter what your plans will be between now and then … what you hope to accomplish and how you will transform yourself. Right now is an excellent time to take inventory of your long-term future.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The cosmos is granting you a poetic license to practice the art of apodyopsis with great relish. You know what apodyopsis is, right? It refers to the act of envisioning people naked — mentally undressing them so as to picture them in their raw state. So, yes, by all means, Pisces, enjoy this creative use of your imagination without apology. It should generate many fine ramifications. For instance, it will prime you to penetrate beneath the surface of things. It will encourage you to see through everyone’s social masks and tune in to what’s really going on in their depths. You need to do that right now.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

   

  

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you. wyep.org

I’ve got a good feeling about your relationship with intimacy in the coming weeks. Judging from the astrological omens, I think you will have a good instinct about how to drum up interesting fun with your most important allies. You’ll just naturally know what to do to make your collaborative efforts synergistic. So by all means cash in on this potential. Don’t just sit back and hope for the best; rather, call on your imagination to provide you with original ideas about how to make it all happen.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Would you be willing to go to extraordinary lengths to transform aspects of your life that you have felt are hard to transform? Now would be a good time to do that. Luck will flow your way if you work on healing your No. 1 wound. Unexpected help and inspiration will appear if you administer tough love to any part of you that’s addicted, immature or unconscious. Barriers will crumple if you brainstorm about new ways to satisfy your frustrated yearnings.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I bet your normal paranoia levels will decline in the coming weeks. Fears you take for granted won’t

make nearly as much sense as they usually seem to. As a result, you’ll be tempted to wriggle free from your defense mechanisms. Useful ideas that your mind has been closed to may suddenly tantalize your curiosity. I won’t be surprised if you start tuning into catalysts that had previously been invisible to you. But here are my questions: Can you deal with losing the motivational force that fear gives you? Will you be able to get inspired by grace and pleasure rather than anxiety and agitation? I advise you to work hard on raising your trust levels.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Sometimes people have nothing to say because they’re too empty,” writes author Yasmin Mogahed, “and sometimes people have nothing to say because they’re too full.” By my reckoning, Cancerian, you will soon be in the latter category. A big silence is settling over you as new amusements and amazements rise up within you. It will be understandable if you feel reluctant to blab about them. They need more time to ripen. You should trust your impulse to remain a secret and a mystery for a while.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Insight is not a light bulb that goes off inside our heads,” says author Malcolm Gladwell. “It is a flickering candle that can easily be snuffed out.” Take that as a constructive warning, Leo. On the one hand, I believe you will soon glimpse quite a few new understandings of how the world works and what you could do to make it serve you better. On the other hand, you’ve got to be extra alert for these new understandings and committed to capturing them the moment they pop up. Articulate them immediately. If you’re alone, talk to yourself about them. Maybe even write them down. Don’t just assume you will be able to remember them perfectly later when it’s more convenient.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): After a storm, British wildlife lover Gary Zammit found a baby heron cowering in a broken nest. Its parents were dead. Zammit took the orphan under his wing. He named it Dude, and cared for it as it grew. Eventually he realized that Dude was never going to learn to fly unless he intervened. Filling his pockets full of the food that Dude loved, Zammit launched a series of flying lessons — waving his arms and squawking as he ran along a flat meadow that served as a runway. Dude imitated his human dad, and soon mastered the art of flight. Can you see ways in which this story might have metaphorical resemblances to your own life, Virgo? I think it does. It’s time for your mind to teach your body an instinctual skill or self-care habit that it has never quite gotten right. What pose would it be a relief for you to drop? How are you faking, and what could you do to stop? Freewillastrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013


FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

LIVE 77 + WORK 77 + STUDIES 78 + SERVICES 79 + WELLNESS 80

LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES

WORK MOVING SERVICES

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

STORAGE ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069 Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Guardian Storage Clean and Secure Units 5x5 to 10x30 available Downtown/Strip District 2839 Liberty Ave 412-208-4625 Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

SOUTH FOR RENT Homestead 2BR, Liv, Din, Kit, Large Game Rm or used as 3rd BR, 1.5 Bath $785+utils 412-583-4288 South Side Flats Newly renovated 3 BR house. New appls, incl W/D. Ready to move in. $1,500+ g&e 412-977-4018 NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

Financial Service Rep (FSR) Full Time Requirements: • Prior/related experience • Excellent communication skills necessary to address member service needs via various channels • Ability to cross-offer products, services & solutions to members

• Must Pass background check & bondability • HS diploma or equivalent • Salary commensurate with exp., benefits package, EOE

Qualified applicants send resume & salary requirements to hr@riverset.com. No phone calls please!

HELP WANTED Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN) Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

HELP WANTED Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

CONDUCTOR POSITIONS

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

Buffalo and Pittsburgh Railroad, Inc. is currently recruiting for Conductor Positions throughout the Pennsylvania area. You must have a valid Driver’s License, High School Diploma or GED. This is a union position and consists of outdoor work and you must be able to work a flexible schedule, with excellent company benefits. A pre-employment physical, drug screen, and background check will be required. Please apply on line at www.gwrr.com/jobs

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the provisions of the Fictitious Names Act, 54 Pa.C.S. Section 301 et. seq., that an application for registration of a fictitious name was filed with the Department of State of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania at Harrisburg, PA on 8/22/2013, for the conduct of a business in Allegheny County under the fictitious name of Owlet Organics, with its principal place of business at 4737 Coleridge St. Pittsburgh, PA 15201. The name and address of the person owning or interested in said business is Amanda Meiers, 4737 Coleridge St. Pittsburgh, PA 15201.

WLTJ – Q92.9FM Is Looking For Our Next Middayy Announcer! A minimum of three years on-air experience is a must. on, Duties include commercial production, show preparation, remote broadcasts and personal appearances at both client and charity events. Working knowledge of broadcast equipment is required,, including computer software for audio editing. Please email resume and demo to: Q929fmjobs@steelcitymedia.com Steel City Media is an equal opportunity employer

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

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STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

HIGH CHOLESTEROL? OSTEOPOROSIS? CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

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BIRTH CONTROL?

ENDOMETRIOSIS?

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

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See what our clients are saying been very In the past two years, I’ve ads and our of ign des the satisfied with both When I know I have ke. evo they e ons resp the subjects in the 24-35 to advertise for research k of using the City age group, I immediately thin Paper. — Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

People with Current Cold Sore or Canker Sore needed for a Research study (UPMC Oakland) This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions. Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart. Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100. Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

For more information, please call 412-246-6367

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013


Ink Well

ANNOUNCEMENTS

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

ACROSS

1. Like content from the @Horse_ebooks account on Twitter 5. Nigerian currency 10. Twisted the truth 14. Guthrie at Woodstock 15. Image transmitter 17. Battery unit? 18. Second U.S. astronaut in space, after Alan Shepard 19. Old New York socialite name 21. Big name in synthesizers 22. Jazzy composer of the early 20th century 28. Skeleton opening? 29. Wall climber 30. Certain social networking update 32. Korean subcompact since 2000 35. Big ball 36. Gangster who coined a term on September 26, 1933, when he yelled “Don’t shoot, [67-Across]!” 41. Butt-related 42. Echolocating devices on submarines 43. Minority Leader Nancy 46. Navy noncom 47. Pirate’s body? 50. Journalist who published info leaked by Edward Snowden 54. Anthony’s partner in talk radio 55. Mail, e.g. 56. Pioneering black sportscaster

62. IV alternative 63. One’s home, often 64. It recently confirmed that Voyager 1 has left the solar system 65. Got everything right on 66. Two-time loser to Graf at the US Open 67. See 36-Across

DOWN

SERVICES

THE GOOD GUYS

1. Columnist Dan who coined the noun “santorum” 2. What some third-wave feminists identify as 3. Very 4. Car driver? 5. It might be spiked during the holidays 6. “Much ___ About Nothing” (“Simpsons” episode) 7. Announcement from an invisible friend? 8. Scrupulousness 9. Perpendicular to this answer 10. Claypool of Primus 11. Recent Tea Party targeter 12. Socialist Bolivian president Morales 13. One to the left on the Hill 16. When horror movie scenes are generally set 20. Washington football team QB, to fans 23. “___ Almighty”

24. Eddies’ cousins 25. They may be garnished 26. Emphatic type: Abbr. 27. Invalid 31. “Hey, I’ve been wanting to bring this up ...” 32. One of the lesser Kardashians 33. Billy Joel’s “___ to Extremes” 34. Dope quantity 36. Chart (out) 37. Rare blood type: Abbr. 38. Give a ring 39. Kitten’s scruff 40. Stockholm currency 44. Frenches, in England 45. Enters, as data 47. Hype man

for the titular dish in “Green Eggs and Ham” 48. Kid’s book character whose portrait hangs in the Plaza Hotel 49. Mrs. Rocky Balboa 51. Easy putt 52. Skywalker, e.g. 53. Squeeze the juice from, with “out” 56. Model Carangi played by Angelina Jolie in a biopic 57. “___ Builds Levee Out Of Poor People To Protect Convention Site” --The Onion 58. First lady? 59. H.S. equivalency exam 60. South Africato-Egypt dir. 61. Some capts.-to-be {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

REHEARSAL

Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes

Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

PSYCHIC

GENERAL FOR SALE

Ellen Singleton, GodGifted Psychic. Helps relationships, stops divorce, cheating, solves severe problems. Free 15-minute reading. (832) 884-9714 (AAN CAN)

KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Buy a Harris Bed Bug Kit. Complete Treatment Program. Odorless, Non-Staining. Available online at homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES)

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

Pittsburgh

Lawyers Attorney Robert Domenick Accepting new divorce clients Flat Rate for Uncontested Divorces

Experienced, Dedicated, Affordable

(724) 523-9530 Westmoreland County

CLASSES ADOPTION AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN) Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

VOLUNTEERS Become a volunteer tutor and help an adult learn to read. Contact Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council at 412.393.7600 or gplc.org Open up a Life We have a waiting list of 200 adults who need your help.

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 Void in Illinois/New Mexico Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

Need N eed a Lawyer? La aw wye yer? r?

A Loving, financially secure, joy filled home & family awaits your newborn.

Meet M eet Bob! Bob!

Alex + Tony 800-838-0809 (exp. pd)

SPECIALIZES IN: Criminal Defense, Civil Litigation, Personal Injury and more!

ADOPTION:

Call for a FREE CONSULTATION.

Art Classes to Zoo Trips & Everything in between. 1st baby will be our King/Queen.

Law Offices of

Robert Goldman

412-531-6879

Expenses Paid

1-800-598-4594 Shira & Justin

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WELLNESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

MIND & BODY Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

$40/hr

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

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China Massage $50/HR Free Table Shower

Shadyside Location

1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

412-441-1185

724-519-7896

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

Chinese Bodyworks Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

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(1st Floor)

Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

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TIGER SPA

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

Aming’s Massage Therapy

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Judy’s Oriental Massage

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted


get your yoga on!

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

WEIGHTLOSS TREATMENT

Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

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Water Pipes And Glass W lass For All Your Smoking Needs Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop

Flexible Hours Including Mornings

1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

Health Services

JADE

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

Help is Available!

SUBOXONE We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

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- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

Addictions

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Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

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5 books on manager Clint Hurdle’s desk

1. The Conviction to Lead 2. Streets of Mogadishu 3. The Power of Negative Thinking 4. Service: A Navy Seal at War 5. Chasing Francis

Random things you’ll see in the Pirates locker room 1. A light saber of a shark 2. Candy bowl in the shape Jason Grilli’s locker) 3. Small red charcoal grill (in

RAISE IT!

P Pittsburgh has Pirates fever. Fans are displaying splaying the Jolly Roger and dressing llike it’s the playoffs. Take in the sights, plus us these bonus Pirates factoids CP reporter Lauren Daley picked up on a visit to PNC C C Park.

Pittsburgh Pirates Hall of Famer Bill Mazeroski is auctioning off part of his personal memorabilia in November. Among the items: 1. Game-7-winning uniform from 1960 World Series 2. 1960 World Series MVP Award 3. Bronzed professional-model cleats from 1960 World Series Game 7 4. A bronzed professionalmodel bat that hit his Game-7-winning home run 5. A rare “Momen” Roberto Clemente professional-model bat

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.25/10.02.2013

Random Buc facts from this season: 1. A record-low 95 home runs have been hit at PNC Park 2. The Pirates have out-homered their opponents 62-33 at home 3. The Pirates have established a PNC Park record with 50 wins at home. The last three seasons that the Pirates won more than 47 games at home (1990-92), they won the division title.


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September 25, 2013