Page 1

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 09.11/09.18.2013


Ad continued on Page 87 2

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013


EVENTS 9.19 – 8pm

SOUND SERIES: SCOUT NIBLETT New Hazlett Theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

9.20 – 8pm

UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2013: WEST OF ZANZIBAR Tickets $10

9.21 – 2pm

OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUERS Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

9.24 – 8pm

SOUND SERIES: ANGEL OLSEN Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

9.25 – 8pm

SOUND SERIES: KURT VILE & THE VIOLATORS, WITH SPECIAL GUEST OLD HEAD Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) Tickets $18/$15 Members & students

9.29.13 – 10am - 5pm

RADICAL DAY 2013, FEATURING FREE ADMISSION Free admission

Summer’s different here. Enjoy three provocative exhibitions under one roof.

GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE/CALDWELL LINKER/NICK BUBASH /through sept 15.2013/

N E W S

+

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

www.warhol.org

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

3


Affordable Fun for f Everyone! y

s expres

$1

from

a reserv plus a

ee tion f

rvic bus se

& Artisan's Marketplace At the Gateway to the Laurel Highlands

e

Aug. 24 thru Sept. 29 Weekends & Labor Day 10:30am- 6:30pm

Express bus service from $1*? Check. To 10 major cities? Check. th

LY! Sept. 14th & 15

s i l a v i t s e F h s i Ir This Weekend ON

With free Wi-Fi and power outlets?

Check.

ation Weekend!

reci Plus Military App

Discount Coupons Available at all:

Additional low fares available for travel on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays! *plus a reservation fee

Medieval Amusement Park Music, Comedy, Jousting, Over 100 Master Artisans Delicious Food & Drink, Games, Rides and More!

follow us on

FREE Parking

2SHQ5DLQRU6KLQH‡1R3HWV3OHDVH Just Southeast of Pittsburgh, off I-70 exit 51A

Purchase Tickets Now at: or PittsburghRenfest.com

For information Call: (724) 872-1670

4

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

Scan now to save!

stay connected


Over 21 • 9pm - Midnight

ROCK & BOWL! FRE E WI- FI

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 37

[PULL-OUT] The Pittsburgh International of 29 Duck! Festival of First is just one of many arts events happening this fall. See our Fall Arts Guide pull-out for upcoming art, film, stage, dance, music and more.

[NEWS] “The staff changes are a decided improvement. Whether Corbett can build on it remains to be seen.� — Veteran pollster Terry Madonna on whether Tom Corbett can salvage his political agenda this year

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writer LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Intern BRETT WILSON

EVERY

ROCK AND BOWL

{ART}

Wednesday

$ 8 A L L YO U C A N B O W L + L I V E BA NDS 9/11-THERE IS NO MOUNTAIN • 9/18 - JUMPCU TS

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers MICHAEL ARTMAN, SHEILA LETSON, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

Thursday

{ADVERTISING}

Friday

i n revitalize revitalizedd Lawrenceville WWW.ARSENALBOWL.COM

— Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth on Tan Lac Vien

[MUSIC] still doing a lot of the business 20 “I’m side of stuff. And driving. There’s a lot of driving.� — J.D. Eicher, on the mundane stuff you still do when you’re a full-time musician

EVERY

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, JEANNE MUMFORD, EMILY POZZUTO Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

an affectionate look back at when 27 “It’s working with computers involved a select fraternity of nerds.� — Al Hoff, reviewing Computer Chess

[ARTS] “Part of the reason for the success of Christianity is that Jesus has meant so many things to so many people.� — Reza Aslan, author of Zealot, discusses the historical Jesus

[LAST PAGE] from a Catholic university, 86 “IandwasJesuscoming was there on the bus and all I felt was fear.� — Gab Bonesso on her weirdest public-transportation experience ever

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 66 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 77 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 78 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 79 +

W/DJ mockster

$ 8 A L L YO U C A N B O W L 9 /12 8 0 ’S NI GH T • 9 /1 9 9 0 ’S NI GH T

DJ & KARAOKE $9.95 ALL YOU CAN BOWL WI TH DJ & KARAOKE

EVERY SAT

Afternoon

SUPER SATURDAY

EVERY

TOP SHELF saturday night

Saturday

$ 9.95 ALL YOU CAN BOWL • $1 OFF ALL TOP SHELF DRINKS • BAND OR DJ

$7 ALL YOU CAN BOWL, 12-3PM

EVERY SUN 50¢ SUNDAZE 50¢ BOWLING, A SHOES, HOT DOGS AND SODAS • 1- 4PM

P TUDYs7I&Is(EL S TO S CE LA P T IE s1U ES "OOKSs-AGAZIN WITHRESEARCHs D HELPYOUUNWIN s&UNEVENTSTO

fternoon

EVERY

DJ NIGHT + PRIZES

Sunday

W/ THE MOCKS TER • $8 ALL YOU CAN BOWL

EVERY

SERVICE INDUSTRY NIGHT

Monday

$8 ALL YOU CAN BOWL • $1.00 DRAF TS

EVERY

COLLEGE NIGHT

Tuesday

50¢ BOWLING • 50¢ DRAF TS • BAND OR DJ

carnegielibrary.org

{ADMINISTRATION}

[SCREEN]

N E W S

'80S/'90S NIGHT

EVERY

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Marketing and Promotions Intern JODI SHERER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

salad section included a tempting 15 “The jellyfish with pickled carrot and daikon.�

an Better th al your loc hop! Coffee S

412-683-5992 4 44TH AND BUTLER ST.

BOOK YO U R S PA R T IE! N OW

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[TASTE]

Lom

{COVER ILLUSTRATION BY PAT LEWIS}

63

ARSEowNl A .c

{EDITORIAL}

09.11/09.18.2013

06

at the world-famous

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

QUALIFY NOW! me eadowsgaming.com m

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

TA S T E

0DQDJHPHQWUHVHUYHVDOOULJKWV‹&DQQHU\&DVLQR5HVRUWV//&$OO5LJKWV5HVHUYHG

**$0%/,1*352%/(0"&$//   $0%/,1* 352%/(0" &$//    ‹&DQQHU\&DVLQR5HVRUWV//&$OO5LJKWV5HVHUYHG

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

5


INCOMING

“THE ONLY WAY TO GET A BULLY TO CHANGE HIS WAYS IS TO STAND UP TO HIM.”

Re: Quiet Storm, vegetarian cafe which helped launch Penn Avenue resurgence, to close in October (online only, Sept. 4) “This is so sad. My fiancé and I are seriously freaking out about where we can dine on a regular basis now. … We moved and have stayed in the East End because of the amazing amount of character in the small businesses.” — Web comment from “Caitlin Cahill” “Pittsburgh fails. … The city isn’t very veggie-friendly to begin with and with QS gone — well what is there?” — Web comment from “Andre Bouchard”

Re: Shelter for the Storm? Bill Peduto to the rescue! (Online only, Sept. 5) “Pittsburgh has been slowly displacing its residents for years due to ‘gentrification’ ... the idea that a $65,000 row house in a blighted neighborhood is now somehow magically worth $225,000 because of granite countertops is absurd, but that’s the problem with this city: It’s become inaccessible to the people who grew up here.” — Web comment from “H. Elwood Gilliland III”

{PHOTOS BY CHRIS POTTER}

Protesters briefly sat down in the middle of Fifth Avenue and Atwood Street to protest UPMC labor policies (above); Pittsburgh City Controller Michael Lamb and Allegheny County Controller Chelsa Wagner address the crowd (left).

Re: Up on the Farm: Could large urban farms be the future of two hilltop ‘zombie towns’? (Sept. 4) “As a resident of the few streets around St. Clair Village, I would welcome developmental changes that would benefit the neighborhood. However, having bought property and lived there for three years, I also value the emptiness of the village. Many people have marveled at the country atmosphere in a city-controlled neighborhood, and my fellow residents (many of whom endured St. Clair Village in all of its agonizing glory) are very content with the peaceful woodland setting they now live in. … Not every empty patch of land needs to be developed.” — Web comment from “VW”

“Bucs should send Steelers a thank-u note. Pirates weren’t even competitive in StL, & nobody noticed.” — Sept. 8 tweet from sports-talk host Mark Madden (@markmaddenx)

6

BULLY PULPIT In Oakland, labor fight with UPMC takes to streets in weekend protest {BY CHRIS POTTER}

A

T ABOUT 12:45 Sunday afternoon, hundreds of marchers along Fifth Avenue — who had been chanting “U-P-M-C, you are not a charity” minutes before — fell silent and dropped to the ground in the middle of the intersection with Atwood Street. With the hospital gi-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

ant’s Oakland nerve center a block away, and a police escort looking on, a bagpipe played “Amazing Grace.” The moment capped a Sept. 8 protest that was otherwise part labor rally, part block party — the latest salvo in a steppedup campaign by the Service Employees

International Union to organize hospital service workers. After singing two verses of the hymn, marchers cut down to Forbes Avenue and returned to their Bigelow Boulevard starting place, where they gathered for hot dogs and live music in the shadow of the Cathedral of Learning. Also being served: a heaping dose of resentment for what speakers alleged were UPMC’s “bullying” tactics, like its resistance to the SEIU’s organizing drive, and its refusal to negotiate a new contract with Highmark. “The only way to get a bully to change his ways is to stand up to him,” SEIU Healthcare PA President Neal Bisno told demonstrators shortly before the march stepped off. State Rep. Erin Molchany (D-South Hills) led an array of speakers, among them Allegheny County Controller Chelsa Wagner and Pittsburgh City Controller Michael Lamb, who complained about the fiscal impact of UPMC’s tax-exempt status. City Councilor Natalia Rudiak cited election returns — including her own victory during the May primary — as proof that voters wanted to challenge UPMC’s perogatives. “Voters supported the candidates who are actively standing up to UPMC,” Rudiak said. Also speaking was former patienttransporter Ron Oakes, a union supporter who was fired, reinstated after a union complaint, and then fired again. “If they think they’re going to silence me, they’re


WE’VE GOT THE BIGGEST NAMES IN ENTERTAINMENT AT SENECA ALLEGANY CASINO & HOTEL!

BIG & RICH

DON FELDER

THE PARTY LIKE COWBOYZ TOUR

FORMER LEAD GUITARIST OF THE EAGLES

Marchers carried this banner through Oakland during the Sept. 8 march.

out of their mind,” he said. (In April, UPMC told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review that Oakes was fired for absenteeism.) The crowd encompassed a range of unions, races and ages. A rough count by City Paper tallied more than 400 participants. Organizers say that nearly 700 signed in. Whatever the number, UPMC was not impressed: “Rallies of this kind demean the excellent care we provide to our patients,” it said in a statement, and “cast UPMC hospitals — and the great people who work here every day — in the worst possible light.” In fact, the quality of medical treatment and hospital staff were just about the only things not roundly denounced during the gathering. (Though one protester did hold

SAT., SEPT. 21 • 7 PM

aloft a sign asserting that UPMC stood for “Unable to Provide Meaningful Care.”) Criticism focused largely on UPMC’s executive suites, and CEO Jeffrey Romoff in particular: “Hey Romoff, get off it / You’re not a nonprofit!” was one marching chant. What’s next for the campaign? Labor activist Barney Oursler noted that late last week, the National Labor Relation Board found there was merit to several unfairlabor-practice complaints that the SEIU had filed against UPMC. That finding sets in motion a process to resolve the complaints, though there has been no formal hearing on those allegations. “The legal front is going to heat up,” says Oursler. “On the street, we have to keep the pressure on.”

WYNONNA & THE BIG NOISE COUNTRY MUSIC MEGASTAR

SAT., OCT. 12 • 7 PM

Tickets start at $45.

SUN., OCT. 20 • 5 PM

Tickets start at $25.

Tickets start at $30.

BUY YOUR TICKETS NOW Get your tickets at any Seneca Casino Box Office or Ticketmaster location.

LOW LIM MIT T BLA ACK KJAC CK

IS HER RE!

SENECA ALLEGANY CASINO & HOTEL ALWAYS GIVES YOU A GREAT DEAL MORE! Now we’re pleased to add Low Limit Blackjack to our exciting Table Games lineup. Wager $5 or less per hand – plus a “Hand Fee” of just 25¢ – and get in the game.

TRY IT TO ODAY! EXCLUSIVE NEW MEMBER PROMOTION

SHO OW W US YOURS.

CP OTTER @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

WE E’LL GIVE YOU OUR RS. SHOW US YOUR VALID PREMIUM CARD FROM ANOTHER CASINO* AND

{BY MATT BORS}

IDIOTBOX

WE’LL U WE’ UPG GRAD ADE YOU U TO O SEL LECT T CL LUB B ST S ATU US!

PLUS, RECEIVE A $100 FREE SLOT PLAY SIGN-UP BONUS. *Offer only applies to new Seneca Player’s Club members. New members will be upgraded to Select Club status upon enrollment. Management reserves the right to change or cancel this promotion.

STAY NOW THROUGH OCTOBER 31, 2013.

FALL RATES

85

*

$

FROM

Valid Monday - Thursday. Subject to availability.

*USE PROMO CODE: “STAYandPLAY” BOOK NOW! Online at SenecaAlleganyCasino.com or call 1-877-8-SENECA (873-6322).

WHY CHOOSE SENECA AS YOUR NEXT GETAWAY? MORE THAN 2,000 SLOTS • 33 TABLE GAMES • SIX FABULOUS DINING OPTIONS AAA FOUR DIAMOND ACCOMMODATIONS • SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE GENEROUS PLAYER’S CLUB REWARDS • LOCAL SHOPS, ATTRACTIONS AND OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES IN NEARBY ELLICOTTVILLE AND SALAMANCA Blackout dates apply.

I-86, Exit 20 Salamanca, NY 1-877-8-SENECA SenecaCasinos.com

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

7


PofE T the WEEK

{PHOTO BY LAUREN DALEY}

Richard Barcaskey speaking at the Aug. 29 press conference

ON THE RECORD with Richard Barcaskey, director of the Constructors Association of Western Pennsylvania {BY LAUREN DALEY} FOR YEARS, state lawmakers, transporta-

Bradick Bradick is a gentle and sociable Lab mix who wishes he could fit in your lap. He’s always polite, even around cats. Adopt him from Animal Friends!

Call Animal Friends today!

412-847-7000

tion advocates, riders and drivers have been waiting for Gov. Tom Corbett and the GOP-controlled state legislature to pass a comprehensive transportation-funding package. They failed to do so last term, and all eyes this fall are trained on legislators as they are once again expected to work on passing a bill. On Aug. 29, a coalition of labor and business leaders gathered under the Liberty Bridge — which has been hindered by a weight restriction imposed by PennDOT due to a lack of funding for maintenance. The group painted a grim picture: an estimated $500 million less for highway funding next year; a loss of 1,400 construction jobs in Pittsburgh; and at least 7,200 lost jobs for contractors statewide. At the rally, City Paper spoke with Richard Barcaskey, executive director of the Constructors Association of Western Pennsylvania, who says the coalition wants to “exhibit unified support” for the General Assembly to take action.

a need for an additional investment. What they disagree with is: How do you get [it]? And how you do that is: You increase user fees. There’s a fear the public’s going to respond negatively to increased user fees, but the point here is the public is going to respond negatively when [weight limits] on bridges are posted, when goods can’t get to them, when they have to take detours. ... The public’s going to be inconvenienced. DESPITE A CONSENSUS THAT THIS BILL SHOULD HAPPEN IN THE FALL, SOME STATE LEADERS SAY THAT THE 2014 PRIMARY ELECTION AND THE REPUBLICAN NO-TAX PLEDGE COULD PUSH IT BACK AGAIN. IS THAT A CONCERN? There are a lot of issues that are out there that cause a divide. … One of the issues that doesn’t — or shouldn’t — is roads, bridges and transit. Somebody said there are no Democratic roads and no Republican roads, and I think that’s what you see from the Senate: They passed [a transportation-funding package].

“IT’S ROADS, IT’S BRIDGES, IT’S TRANSIT, IT’S AIRPORT.”

EVERYONE SEEMS TO AGREE THAT A NEW TRANSPORTATION-FUNDING PACKAGE IS NECESSARY. WHY HAVEN’T WE SEEN ONE PASS YET? Political courage. ... Nobody disagrees — well, most people don’t disagree — there’s

THERE’S THE AGE-OLD ARGUMENT THAT SEEMS TO BE PLAYING OUT HERE, THAT ROADS AND BRIDGES ARE A RURAL ISSUE, WHILE RURAL LAWMAKERS ARE STATING PUBLICLY THAT THEY DON’T WANT TO SUBSIDIZE MASS TRANSIT IN URBAN AREAS. HOW DOES THE DEBATE MOVE PAST THOSE POINTS? I’m not sure it does, but that’s why we call for a comprehensive transportation-funding plan … that’s multimodal. It’s roads, it’s bridges, it’s transit, it’s airport. All in one. … It doesn’t do anybody service to pit one against the other. L D A L E Y @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013


CUSTOMER CHOICE

SALE! YOU CHOOSE!

1,500 or 0%

$

CASH BACK

on

2013

FINANCING*

Elantras & Sonatas

Financing for * Months* 0% 60 Months , 500 or 1 Financing for Months* Hyundai Cash Back 0.9% 72

$

PLUS:

Valued Customers Get an EXTRA

$

500

CASH BACK

!

* With approved credit Tiers 1-3. Valued owner coupon is only valid for current owners of a Hyundai - must present valid registration card.

AMERICAS BEST 10 YEAR/100,000 Mile

WE MAKE YOUR DEAL... THAT WILL MAKE YOUR DAY!

Assurance

WARRANTY*

POWERTRAIN LIMITED WARRANTY* *See dealer for LIMITED WARRANTY Details.

MORGANTOWN HYUNDAI at Morgantown Mall Next to Super-K

304-983-2277 shop24/7@DayHyundai.com SALE HOURS: Monday-Thursdy 9am-8pm • Friday 9am-6pm • Saturday 9am-4pm

Scan for a Special Video from Debbie Flaherty

Automotive Group

Proud supporter of Animal Friends

DayAuto.com N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

9


FALLBACK POSITIONS

Experience the upscale difference of

His agenda stymied, Corbett hopes for a do-over this autumn {BY LAUREN DALEY} AS LAWMAKERS departed Harrisburg af-

Lingerie & much more...

Couple’s Night

WED. SEPT 18 7-9PM

(MF,MM,FF)

HOW TO ENHANCE YOUR SEXUAL RELATIONSHIP

special someone out for a date night that will enhance your love life and open you both up to new ideas and fantasies. All couples are welcome to join the fun. Feel free to come early to shop and chat with Dana Kirkpatrick. Bring that spice back into your relationship or get a little spicier.

Refreshments served! - Free Gift with purchase! EVERYDAY: 20% DISCOUNT w/ Military ID GET A

TUESDAY: Ladies Day 20% OFF

WEDNESDAY: Student / Faculty 20% OFF w/ ID

FREE GIFT! Text SEXY to 81018

7775 McKnight Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15237 I www.adamevepittsburgh.com I 412-548-3384

W NOPEN O

SKY ZONE INDOOR TRAMPOLINE PARK

ALL AGES “ACTIVE FUN” FAMILY CENTER LEETSDALE/SEWICKLEY 740 BRICKWORKS DRIVE, LEETSDALE, PA

PITTSBURGH’S TRAMPOLINE PARK!

ULTIMATE 3D PLAY EXPERIENCE

ORDER TICKETS ONLINE! SKYZONE.COM/LEETSDALE

CALL 724-251-6100 AND BOOK YOUR SPECIAL EVENT TODAY! 10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

ing out two secretaries of education. “I think this was more or less [Corbett’s] summer of discontent,” says G. Terry Madonna, director of the Center for Politics and Public Affairs at Franklin & Marshall. Having turnover in such high-profile posts “is not exactly positive news,” Madonna says, though he credits the moves with building a stronger team. Two of Corbett’s new picks — chief of staff Leslie Gromis Baker and communications director Madelyn Lawson — assisted the campaign of former Gov. Tom Ridge, who was considerably more popular than Corbett is today. “The staff changes are a decided improvement,” Madonna says. “Whether [Corbett] can build on it remains to be seen.” Indeed, things get stickier in the General Assembly, where Madonna sees a

“THIS WAS MORE OR LESS CORBETT’S SUMMER OF DISCONTENT.”

with Dana Kirkpatrick, MS, NCC, LPC Join Adam & Eve Pittsburgh for a night of exploration, excitement, and temptation. Learn from Dana Kirkpatrick, certified relationship therapist, about how to communicate your deepest desires to your partner, how to introduce toys into your love life, and how to flame the fire. Bring that

ter passing a budget in June, there was, for once, little talk about the state’s spending plan. Instead, attention centered on the legislature’s failure to act on three of Gov. Tom Corbett’s top priorities: transportation funding, liquor privatization and pension reform. Corbett will get another shot this fall: The state Senate and House will reconvene on Sept. 23. But officials in both branches of state government face challenges ahead. For Corbett, who faces re-election next year, those challenges include a litany of bad polls, including an August Franklin & Marshall College survey showing that only 1 in 5 Pennsylvania voters think he’s doing a good job. Corbett spent his summer making numerous personnel changes: hiring a new chief of staff, communications manager and legislative affairs director, and forc-

HOURS: Tue-Thu: Noon-8pm Fri: Noon-9pm • Sat: 10am-10pm Sun: Noon-7pm

Follow us!


“huge disconnect.” It’s not just that Democrats and Republicans are at odds — a common occurrence. Republican leaders in the House and Senate are themselves “basically not on the same page” when it comes to Corbett’s agenda, says Madonna. “And there are personality differences among the leaders.” Those conflicts played out in the legislature’s failure to pass a GOP-led proposal privatizing state liquor stores, as well as the collapse of a plan to fund transportation. While the Senate overwhelmingly passed a spending package for roads, bridges and mass transit, things fell apart in the House. Hard-line conservatives led by Daryl Metcalfe (R-Cranberry) opposed the plan’s reliance on a slight increase in a gas tax. And even as Republican leaders struggled to close ranks, Democrats pushed for higher spending overall, spelling doom for the bill. “We just never saw in the House the same kind of bipartisan support for this that there was in the Senate,” says Erik Arneson, spokesman for Senate Republicans. “The two chambers are different for a lot of reasons — that’s part of the beauty of our system. It can also lead to some frustrating outcomes.” Among those outcomes: Once the transportation funding bill died in the House, the Senate decided against taking a vote on its own version of a bill privatizing liquor stores. Progress on the two bills, each of which appealed to different parts of the GOP caucus, had long been linked. “I’ve never seen anything like the divisions we have right now,” state Rep. Robert Godshall (R-Montgomery County) told the conservative news website PA Independent in July. Arneson expects the House to take up transportation and liquor again, and a package of child-safety bills born of the Jerry Sandusky sexual-abuse case. House Democratic spokesman Brett Marcy, meanwhile, says his caucus plans to push for transportation again, as well as Medicaid expansion, as part of the federal Affordable Care Act. Corbett and conservative Republicans have expressed doubts about the cost of the expansion, which Marcy contends is “a no-brainer.” Madonna says there’s a chance the fall session will yield some results. But making something happen, he says, “ultimately comes down to the governor.” LDA LE Y @ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

11


GET TRAINING. GET NOTICED. D.

GET CREATIVE. GET STARTED.

MAKE TELEVISION. ION. MAKE MOVIES. MAKE A DIFFERENCE. RENCE. RENCE

LUTHER DUPREE SERVICE COORDINATOR/COUNSELOR/WEBSITE DESIGNER AND PCTV COMMUNITY PRODUCER

Luther uses his show to highlight Pittsburgh sports. What will you do with your show? Take our FREE on-line orientation now at www.PCTV21.org PITTSBURGH COMMUNITY TELEVISION

412-322-7570

WATCH:

Steel City Sports World FIRST WEDNESDAY OF THE MONTH AT 6 PM COMCAST 21, VERIZON 47

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013


Dayton Enciso, pc

N

O TI O

M

Darcy Monteverde Dayton, Jennifer L. Enciso and Amy E. Peckk

Estate Planning:

O PR

Act today to secure your

W

NE

family’s tomorrow.

Real Estate: Select an attorney to conduct your closing at no extra expense.

Business Services: Proper planning can help you implement strategies for success. Call today to schedule. Evening appointments available.

4517 LIBERTY AVENUE

412-918-1845

DEKLEGAL.COM

BEER DIST. INC. 402-406 SEMPLE STREET OAKLAND

Pittsburgh’s 1st IMPORT and craft Beer Distributor and still the best!

we love beer!

$

With over 550 Beers in stock, how could you go wrong?

If we don’t stock it, we’ll order it for you!

15.49 + Tax 24 Cans

412.682.4396

we’re your first class travel agent for your taste buds

THURSDAYS 6PM | LEVELS

www.MELLINGERSBEER www. MELLINGERSBEER.com .com like us on Facebook!

@MellingerBeer

Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania

$500 PRIZE POOL GUARANTEED PLUS TOTAL BUY-IN MONEY

Registration begins at 5:45pm and ends at 8:30pm

• $10,000 in challenge chips • Top 6 scorers win cash • 10 hands of blackjack

Affordable PAP tests and birth control available at

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE

Planned Parenthood health centers.

777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

1.800.230.PLAN www.ppwp.org

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

13


S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS @ E ART HL I N K . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

+

First-time mother Amy Webb proudly notates dozens of data points about her child each day and obsessively tracks their detailed progression by computer on spreadsheets, according to the provocative firstperson account she wrote for Slate.com in July. In categories ranging from ordinary vital signs, to the kid’s progress in sound-making, to dietary reactions, to quantity and quality of each poop, stats are kept 24/7 (even with a bedside laptop to facilitate nighttime entries). She began tracking her own health during pregnancy, but then decided, “Why stop now?” when her daughter was born. Webb’s pediatrician rated the kid’s health as “A-minus,” but the parents’ as “C,” adding: “You guys need to relax. Leave the spreadsheets [out].” Webb and her husband remain confident that their extreme tracking optimizes their chances of raising a healthy daughter.

+

An Anglican parishioner complained in August about the “blasphemous” bumper sticker she saw on the car of Rev. Alice Goodman of Cambridge, England, but Rev. Goodman immediately defended it as not irreligious (although, she conceded, perhaps “vulgar”). The sticker read “WTFWJD?” which is a play on the popular evangelical Christian slogan “WWJD?” — “What Would Jesus Do?” Rev. Goodman pointed out that even Dr. Rowan Williams, the former Archbishop of Canterbury, seemed not to be shocked by her sticker when he saw it.

+

The wife of Valentino Ianetti was found dead in Stanhope, N.J., in 2010 with

47 stab wounds, leading police to immediately suspect her husband, who was at home with her. However, after three years’ incarceration, Ianetti, 63, won release in August by finally convincing prosecutors that his wife actually committed suicide. Although the case is still officially “under investigation,” the medical examiner concluded that 46 of the wounds were superficial — “hesitation” cuts perhaps self-inflicted as the wife built up the courage to administer a final thrust. Also, the wife was found with a heavy dose of oxycodone in her system and likely felt little pain from any of the 47 wounds.

+

James “Sonny” McCullough, the mayor of the New Jersey shore town of Egg Harbor (pop. 4,240), announced in August that he was selling his waterfront home — because real-estate taxes were too high (more than $31,000 a year) following a recent reassessment and he could no longer afford it. The mayor, 71, told The Press of Atlantic City that he had planned to live the rest of his life in the home, but was not even certain he could afford to live anywhere in Egg Harbor.

+

Germany’s center-left Social Democrats posted about 8,000 campaign placards in July that it proudly hailed as “eco-friendly” and biodegradable to attract the support of environment-concerned voters. However, 48 hours later, at the first rainfall, the posters became waterlogged and, indeed, biodegraded. Reported Hamburg’s Spiegel Online, “None of the campaign workers could have guessed … how quickly the environmentally friendly process … would begin.”

A lawyer and former spokesman for the judiciary of Kenya filed a petition in July with the International Court of Justice in The Hague, Netherlands, seeking a retrial of Jesus Christ and naming as defendants the state of Israel, King Herod, various Jewish elders, the former emperor of Rome (Tiberius), and of course Pontius Pilate. Dola Indidis claims that the proceedings before Roman courts did not conform to the rule of law at the time. (Indidis’ claim had been dismissed by the High Court in Nairobi, and a spokesperson for the ICJ said the court has no jurisdiction in such a case, for it is not one between governments.)

+

+

+

In August, a federal judge in Seattle sentenced Alicia Cruz, 31, to four years in prison for violating court-ordered drug treatment stemming from a 2011 conviction for stealing the identities of more than 300 people. Cruz had won a second chance (drug treatment, instead of prison) by convincing the judge that she was no longer a crook — that this time, she would abandon her identity-theft life and go straight. Added Cruz, “I’m a different person now.”

In August, minutes before a scheduled mixed-martial-arts fight in Immokalee, Fla., the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation canceled it as “unsanctioned.” Contestant Garrett Holeve, 23, who has Down syndrome, was to fight David Steffin, 28, who has cerebral palsy, and both had trained intensively for eight weeks and were outraged by the decision. Said Holeve’s father of his son’s reaction, “[T]hat hurts his feelings and angers him. ... Their decision is

Either Way ... ENJOY MIKE’S SMASHED APPLE CIDER AT THESE GREAT LOCATIONS:

14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

pretty arbitrary [and] discriminatory.”

+

Researchers can accurately estimate a person’s economic status just by learning which environmental toxins are in his body, concluded a University of Exeter (England) research team recently, using U.S. data. Although “both rich and poor Americans are walking waste dumps,” wrote the website Quartz, reporting the conclusions, poorer people’s typical food leaves lead, cadmium and the banned bisphenol-A, whereas richer people more likely accumulate heavy metals (mercury, arsenic, thallium) from aquatic lean protein (and acquire oxybenzone from the active ingredient in sunscreens). Previous research was thought to show that richer Americans ate healthier (for example, eating fruits and vegetables instead of canned foods), but the Exeter research shows they merely house different toxins.

+

In May, a Brazilian cancer-fighting foundation, AAPEC, published a series of photos of its new mascot that it hopes will call attention to the dread of testicular cancer, and the initial worldwide reviews demonstrate that, indeed, people may never, ever forget their first glance at “Mr. Balls.” AAPEC described its character as a “friendly snowman in the shape of testicles” — friendly in the sense of a buck-toothed humanoid with a puffy-cheeked smile and the body of a huge scrotal sac dotted with small curly hairs and rough skin. As photos of the genial “Senhor Testiculo” circulated in June, he was variously described as “disturbing,” “horrifying,” “terrifying” and “a nightmare.”

DAWG’S BOTTLE SHOP

HOUSE OF 1,000 BEERS

GREENSBURG

NEW KENSINGTON

ORIGINAL HOT DOG SHOP

SUDS N SUBS

OAKLAND

MCKEES ROCKS

RIB-KENS

99 BOTTLES

MONROEVILLE

SCOTT TOWNSHIP

GUNTOWN BEER

PACKS & DOGS

CANONSBURG

MT. WASHINGTON

STINKY’S

BROOKLINE PUB

LAWRENCEVILLE

BROOKLINE


DE

SI

the

ON

THE SALAD SECTION INCLUDED A TEMPTING JELLYFISH WITH PICKLED CARROT AND DAIKON

DESSERT QUEST {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} The recent closing of Gullifty’s in Squirrel Hill has caused many locals to lament the loss of the eatery’s much ballyhooed desserts, a wide assortment of classic pies and cakes. If there’s a silver lining to the demise of the Murray Avenue icon, it’s that now Pittsburghers will have to undertake the delicious task of seeking out new places for dessert. Not all restaurants may have a glass case full of coconut cream pies, but many are harboring desserts worth heralding. One of those is another Pittsburgh institution, Monterey Bay Fish Grotto, known for its wide selection of fish entrees, and great city views at its Mount Washington location. I took an out-of-towner there for the seafood and cityscape, but the surprise stars of the evening were the desserts. Two standouts would warrant a return trip just to indulge in the last course. The “steaming chocolate latte” is no beverage. It’s a warm, moist soufflé, in a large cup, and topped with Chantilly cream and chocolate “steam.” Since it’s gluten-free, it’s also a great alternative to a chocolate cake. Grilled-cheese sandwiches are all the lunch rage, but as a dessert? Try angelfood cake, stuffed with cream-cheese frosting, then grilled. The perfectly caramelized cake is topped with almonds and fruit compote, and served with ice cream. Pittsburgh is hardly a dessert desert — you just need to look around. Or in this case, up. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

1411 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington. 412-481-4414

the

FEED

The suburbs get a beer fest! The parking lot of the Mars/ Cranberry Double Wide Grill will host

Craft Beer Tap Fest, offering more than 60 brews ews (including fall favorites and rarities), 1-4 p.m. Sat., 21. Sat Sept. S Tickets are $30 in advance; $35 day of. See www.doublewidegrill.com for more info. Remember: There’s no walking in the ’burbs, so get a designated driver.

MORE FROM

VIETNAM {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

J

UST BECAUSE Pittsburgh has been cu-

linarily conservative doesn’t mean it can’t catch up in terms of global cuisine. And to the delight of our palates, catching up is precisely what local restaurateurs have spent the past decade doing. But even as tapas, tacos, North African and even authentic, regional options in Italian dining have made a big splash, one cuisine from a small Asian country has been quietly thriving all this time. We speak, of course, of the aromatic cuisine of Vietnam. Back when the city’s only Asian options seemed to consist of unimaginative Chinese and mediocre sushi, being able to find Vietnamese food in Pittsburgh was thrilling. And the cuisine’s relative unfamiliarity means it is, still, a choice that feels somewhat adventurous. It did seem, however, that the menu of our first local Vietnamese establishment became a template for all its successors: summer rolls, pho (soup), bun (noodle bowls) and usually a couple non-pho noodle soups pretty much rounded out the options.

Broken rice with pork chop, shredded pork, shrimp and fried egg

Even places that stretched the choices did so at the margins. Now, Tan Lac Vien in Squirrel Hill has at last opened our eyes to much broader possibilities. Aside from numerous options in the tried-and-true pho and bun categories, the restaurant’s menu features an entire section devoted to a class of dishes we have never even encoun-

TAN LAC VIEN 2114 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8888 HOURS: Sun.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers $4-6; individual entrees $10-15; family style dishes $15-35 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED tered before: com tam. “Com” means rice, and “tam” means broken. Broken rice? Yes: In Vietnam, damaged rice left over from the milling process is gathered, served in a mound and surrounded by heaps of proteins and vegetables. Lacking a plenteous supply of scratch-and-

dent rice, American Vietnamese kitchens — or at least this one — substitute short grain. Our knowledgeable server recommended com tam with a fried egg so that it could be broken up, Korean bibimbap style, over the rice. The yolk formed a sort of sauce that united the other ingredients — salad vegetables, pickled vegetables, pork chop and “shredded pork” — in delicious harmony. The salad section also had a number of new-to-us options, including a tempting jellyfish with pickled carrot and daikon, but ultimately we opted for beef with lime dressing. Paper-thin slices of delectably tender beef almost melted into shredded cucumber, carrots and scallions in a vibrant citrus dressing; with a little rice on the side, this alone would make a supremely satisfying meal. Another new experience was makeyour-own summer rolls. From a number of hot meat-filling options, we chose smoky, tender grilled pork. Instead of loose vermicelli, this component was provided by flat patties of noodles, making it easy to portion CONTINUES ON PG. 16

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

15


MORE FROM VIETNAM, CONTINUED FROM PG. 15

the right amount into each roll. The remainder of the plate was heaped with an array of greens, herbs and sliced carrot and daikon. All these ingredients we stuffed into translucent, dried rice-paper wrappers which we rendered pliable by soaking them briefly in what looked like a bagel-slicer full of water. Under other circumstances, making one’s own summer rolls could come off as a gimmick, but the opportunity to experience such authentic ingredients and methods made this order well worthwhile. “Worthwhile” doesn’t begin to describe the noodle soup. Hu tieu sate, one of six chef’s specials, contained sliced beef in a broth described as “thick spicy lemongrass.” “Thick” was only relative to clear pho broth — this was no chowder — but it was good and spicy all right, with tangy and umami base notes. The rare slivers of meat were cooked just enough from contact with the hot broth, while noodles lent additional substance, and fresh tomato wedges added bracing, bright astringency.

Owners Steve and Thy Ngo

Shrimp skewers packed juicy ground meat onto a sugar-cane spear; the effect was a complete transformation of the shrimp, caramelized yet moist and slightly sweet. Banh xeo were savory crepes filled with tiny shrimp, sautéed pork, sprouts and an array of other vegetables. The crepe was bright yellow and had a craggy surface that suggested a bubbly technique; the result was crisp and almost hearty, but not at all tough. The only tough part was eating it without a fork and knife. Despite our overflowing table, we felt that we’d only scratched the surface of Tan Lac Vien’s menu. Add in great service and a funkily modern decor, and this restaurant delivers an exceptional experience for small-city diners with big-city tastes. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

TENDING THE FLAME City’s first “Cocktail Week” keeps focus on local bartenders As if we didn’t have enough of a cocktail buzz already, Pittsburgh is about to embark on its first-ever cocktail week, running from Sept. 16-22. “I think Pittsburgh is ready to do something like this,” says Mike Basista, a drinks photographer who organized the week’s events with Rob McCaughey (of Dreadnought Wines) and Will Groves (Butterjoint). More established cocktail conventions — like Oregon’s upcoming Portland Cocktail Week, or Tales of the Cocktail in New Orleans — draw brand representatives, bartenders and drinkers from all around the country. By contrast, Pittsburgh’s Cocktail Week is focused on the local. “If you look at most of the cocktail weeks around the country, they tend to be more of a road show,” says McCaughey. “What we wanted to do was focus on the people who are already here, and give them a chance to showcase what they’re doing.” To that end, the signature element of Pittsburgh Cocktail Week is a craft-cocktail competition between area bars. To participate, cocktail fans download an app created by Pittsburgh tech firm Rhomania, visit participating establishments, and vote on their favorite drink. The winning bar will receive a selection of bar equipment. The festival also includes daily seminars scheduled for industry professionals and the general public. For example, Verde is offering a professional tequila seminar titled “Tequila 201,” an exploration into the nitty-gritty of agave geography and ageing techniques. The lesson will, Basista says, be “very geeky.” By contrast, Verde’s public seminar that evening will focus on building a couple of simple tequila cocktails, including a classic margarita “that doesn’t involve a slushy machine.” According to organizers, the week will be a success if it expands the scope of Pittsburgh cocktail culture. “There are a lot of people who don’t realize there is a thriving cocktail scene here, but it’s here and it’s real,” McCaughey says. “Hopefully this will create a bit of buzz and excitement about what’s been happening here over the last few years.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

www.facebook.com/PittsburghCocktailWeek or visit www.pghcocktailweek.com for a calendar of events.


Skinny Pete’s Kitchen

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

A Unique Luncheon and Gourmet Food Destination

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

AZUL BAR Y CANTINA. 122 Broad St., Leetsdale. 724-2666362. Colorful and convivial, Azul dishes up Southern Californiastyle Mexican cooking in a festive atmosphere. The menu offers the familiar fajitas, tacos and burritos — to be washed down with margaritas — as well as quirkier fare such as crunchy sticks of jicama and fried ice cream. JE BURMA-TOKYO RESTAURANT. 320 Atwood St., Oakland. 412802-6163. This tiny restaurant run by two siblings offers sushi as well as a selection of cooked dishes from their native Burma and several neighboring countries. Among the intriguing selections: The Burmese shan tribe noodles, with a distinctive, intensely flavored sauce and varied vegetables; and the Kyae oae soup, with rice vermicelli, mustard greens, a variety of meatballs and tofu. JF

S K I N NY P E TE’S U P C O M I N G E VE NTS

September 11th Acoustic Happy Hour 3pm-6pm with host with special guest

Farm to Family Workshop!

Monday, September 16 Introduce your hungry little one to delicious, healthy eats at Skinny Pete’s!

Plan a dinner date and have some fun!

Savory Hill {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} cuisine, including in-house chili sauce and various kimchis. The brief menu includes traditional appetizers such as dumplings and gimbop (sushi-like rolls), as well as entrées ranging from bulgogi (beef stir-fry) to spicy marinated chicken and Korean pancakes. KF

FULL LIST ONLINE

GOLDEN PIG. 3201 Millers Run Road, Cecil. 412-220-7170. This little jewel-box of a diner offers authentic, home-style Korean

Pigs-2-Peaches {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} KAYA. 2000 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-261-6565. Kaya is a local culinary mainstay, offering inventive Caribbean-inspired contemporary cuisine. The menu, much of which is vegetarian, changes frequently. But it remains

+

TA S T E

• • • •

OSTERIA 2350. 2350 Railroad St., Strip District (412-281-6595) and 100 Wood St., Downtown (412-586-7743). You won’t get better casual Italian cooking for your money than here. The menu has been pared to the essentials of Italian cuisine: antipasti, pizza, panini and pasta — and their preparations represent a unique marriage of Old-World recipes and local ingredients. JE OVER THE BAR BICYCLE CAFÉ. 2518 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-3698. This twowheel-themed café and bar offers a creative pub-grub menu (with many offerings named for bicycle parts). The salads are more impressive than those you’ll find at most bars, and the menu features vegetarian and vegan options. Try the battered zucchini planks wrapped around melty cheeses. JE PIGS-2-PEACHES. 100 Wises Grove Road, New Brighton. 724-581-4595. It’s not just barbecued meats and sides at this diner, but also breakfast, sandwiches and burgers for lunch, and homemade desserts aplenty. The barbecued meats are juicy (sauce on the side), and fried okra, fried green tomatoes and biscuits round out the Southern-style comfortfood experience. KF RAMEN BAR. 5860 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-5138. What’s not to love about a big steaming bowl of wheat noodles, flavorful homemade broth and plenty of meat and vegetable add-ins? Besides the traditional offerings, Ramen Bar also has an intriguing penchant for applying the ramen CONTINUES ON PG. 18

N E W S

Kids Receive:

divided into tropas — tropical tapas — and entrees. KE

CHICKEN LATINO. 155 21st St., Strip District. ISABELA ON 412-246-0974. This GRANDVIEW. 1318 quick-serve chicken Grandview Ave., joint serves up www. per pa Mount Washington. Peruvian-style, woodpghcitym .co 412-431-5882. This finefired and deliciously dining restaurant atop seasoned rotisserie Mount Washington places chicken. Besides the bird, as much focus on the food as on hamburgers and the occasional the skyline. There are a la carte special (pork, ceviche), sides dishes, but the selections are all include such south-of-the-border from the seven-course, prix fixe staples as plantains, refried dinner that is the heart of the beans and fried yucca. J Isabela experience. The cuisine is contemporary and varies widely DAVIO. 2100 Broadway Ave., among European, American and Beechview. 412-531-7422. Davio Asian influences. LE is a cozy restaurant (down to the family photos) with friendly service. The menu is classic Italian — no wacky ingredients or preparations — but only a few entrées seem lifted from the Standard Italian Restaurant Repertoire. Specialties are crab and veal. L FUEL & FUDDLE. 212 Oakland Ave., Oakland. 412-682-3473. The ambience conjures the nostalgia of Route 66 road trips. Much of the reasonably priced fare is in the “goes well with beer” category, and the beer list includes a couple of house brews. But there’s plenty that’s new: Pizza, baked in a woodfired brick oven, comes with everything from Jamaican jerk chicken to hummus; entrees include glazed salmon and “truck-stop sirloin.” KE

GREG GEIBEL

JOHN CLARK

+

M U S I C

+

Adults Receive:

Meals • Dinner Activities • Corking Fee Personalized Fun Food Kit or Beverage Copy of MY FOOD NOTEBOOK! for 1 Adult and 1 child TO REGISTER: call 412.415.0338 or email Danielle@skin (ages 3-12)

$

25

nypetes.com

Dine-In or Take-Out Monday 8a-3p • Tuesday-Friday 8a-8p • Saturday Brunch 9a-3p

412-415-0338 • 538 California Ave. • Pittsburgh Pa 15202 Check out our Brand New Website

LAST CHANCE TO WIN TICKETS TO SEE…

LIVE JAZZ & BLUES MUSIC EVERY WEEKEND

Jazz Jam Every Tuesday Swing Dance Every Friday 8pm-12am 150+ Craft Beers “Jazzed” Up Comfort Food Open Daily At 11am Private Space Available For Your Next Event

YOUNG THE GIANT PLUS MORE! Visit Visi Vi sitit pghcitypaper.com for your chance to WIN PRIZES!

www.jamesstreetgastropub.com FOLLOW US ON

Hint: Find the Right side of the Bottle

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

www.skinnypetes.com

LIKE US ON

422 FORELAND STREET, NORTH SIDE 412-904-3335 +

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

17


DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

offMenu

technique to a variety of classic dishes from across Asia, such as Chinese ground-pork dishes. JF

THE VIEW on our

PATIO --------- TUESDAY ---------

HALF OFF

all BOTTLES of WINE

Yes...That Bob’s Sub! D COME EAT A LEGEN AT ONE OF OUR 3 NEW LOCATIONS! PITTSBURGH

INDIANA

NEW KENSINGTON

215 SMITHFIELD ST. (412) 594-3686

550 PHILADELPHIA ST. (724) 471-2127

87 TARENTUM BRIDGE RD. (724) 335-0900

WWW.BOBSSUB.COM

Thai Tapas and Wine Bar

Upscale Casual Authentic Thai

LUNCH SPECIALS Monday-Friday

11:30am to 3:00pm

1712 Murray Avenue Squirrel Hill 412.421.8801

OPEN DAILY Sun-Thurs 11:30am-10pm Fri-Sat 11:30am-11pm

www..silkelephant.net www 18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

EVERY WEDNESDAY IN SEPTEMBER

1/2 OFF Bottles of Wine

HAPPY HOUR 5-7PM 5-7

$

5

ffeatured Mixed Drinks, M Wines and W Appetizers A

526 NORTHPOINTE CIRCLE CRANBERRY/SEVEN FIELDS 724-741-6015 WWW. BOHEMBISTRO .COM

{BY JESSICA SARVER}

PIE-EYED Coffeehouse baker Megan Drew has a vision

SEVICHE. 930 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-697-3120. This upscale Latin American-style tapas restaurant specializes in citrus-cured fish, while also offering a small selection of Latin-inspired tapas and finger sandwiches. And what better to wash down an empanada or mini taco than a refreshing capirinha cocktail? KE SIX PENN. 146 Sixth Ave., Downtown. 412-566-7366. Open late for the Downtown theater crowd, this cheery restaurant satisfies theater buffs, families and young professionals alike. The seasonal menu offers lively updates on comfort food from lobster mac-n-cheese to braised short ribs. Gourmet burgers and pizzas make for quick meals. Linger for homemade desserts, or stop by after the show. KE THAI CUISINE. 4625 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-688-9661. This Thai restaurant in the heart of Pittsburgh’s Little Italy serves up authentic dishes with warm, friendly service. The restaurant also offers an updated vegetarian menu that features mock duck, vegetarian pork and other meat substitutes, as well as the more familiar non-meat offerings of tofu and vegetables. KF WAI WAI. 4717 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-0133. Eschewing the epic list of dishes most Chinese-American restaurants proffer, this attractively decorated storefront venue sticks to a modest number of basics with a few less-typical dishes, such as Singapore mai fun (a dish of stir-fried rice noodles) or sha cha (a meat-and-vegetable dish from China’s Gansu province) JF YO RITA. 1120 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-904-3557. This venue offers Mexican-inspired cuisine, through a variety of tacos. Inventive fillings might include: beans-and-greens, artichokes or mushrooms, as well as more traditional meats (fish, pork, beef). Combine with a starter, like grits or potatoes, and a craft beer for a full meal. JE

Strawberry pie {PHOTO COURTESY OF MEGAN DREW}

ENJOY

SAVORY HILL. 988 Brodhead Road, Moon. 724-457-7109. This “eclectic bistro” offers a fortifying menu of locally sourced, creatively prepared fine dining. The starters span rarefied (scallops) to comforting (nachos), and include truly memorable salads. Entrees include a Southwest surf-n-turf with chipotle peppers, and slowbraised short ribs with risotto and multi-colored carrots. LE

ONE BITE and you’ll know: These are not your grandmother’s muffins. The unique treats crafted by Megan Drew’s onewoman-enterprise, Drew’s Pie Supply, grace the counters of The Commonplace Coffee Company’s two Pittsburgh locations (in Squirrel Hill and Voluto, in Garfield), as well as the New Hazlett Theater. Named after Drew’s Cowboy Supply, the Penns Creek, Pa., store once operated by her parents, the bakery is now rounding up clientele eager for seasonally-inspired baked goods with a kick. “I just really like feeding people,” says Drew. Encouraged by former Commonplace manager Andre Chubb, Drew transformed her hobby into a business when Commonplace took over Voluto in 2012. Drew inherited the small back kitchen and got to work renovating the menu to offer refreshing departures from blueberry muffins and brownies. As Commonplace Voluto’s manager and resident baker, Drew prepares 100 items daily — from cheddar corn scones to champagne grape puffs and grapefruit vanilla-bean muffins. Voluto now hosts Pie Day Friday in conjunction with the monthly Penn Avenue gallery crawl, offering several Drew’s Pie Supply’s flavors until 10 p.m. The crust is a family recipe, though Drew’s pies often deviate from her mom’s traditional flavors with creations such as the gooseberry-raspberry pie and lemon hazelnut tart. Sourcing from farmer’s markets, Drew uses local ingredients whenever possible, and dreams up innovative combinations from whatever’s available. “I learned from my mom’s cooking to use what I have to make something good,” she says. “It forces me to be creative.” She also thinks in “sets of three” — a method used in coffee tastings — to craft items with a well-balanced “element of salt, element of sweetness and something tangy,” like her almond tart with crabapple. Drew believes baking can use the same local, seasonal principles as restaurants, and that it can be done slowly too. “If I had it my way, everything would be made to order,” she says. Drew hopes that her Pie Supply may eventually occupy a “slow bakery” storefront (possibly partnering with Commonplace), where she can craft items from scratch while you wait. Until that happens, though, that parmesan black-pepper scone may satisfy your craving. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


Little

BANGKOK IN THE STRIP

Authentic Thai Cuisine

LAST CHANCE TO WIN TICKETS TO SEE…

PATINO ES OP DOG ED ALLOW

All Lunches $

7 - $9 freshest

THE LOCAL PRODUCE FROM THE STRIP Mon 11:30-3:00 Tue-Thu 11:30-9:00 Fri-Sun 11:00-9:00

Dine in / Take Out BYOB

ERS E B T F A R 40 C N TAP! O OR ENS F E R C G S I B 8 GAMES BASEBALL

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

1906 Penn Avenue Strip District 412-586-4107 GOUTDOOR DINING D

100 Adams Shoppes “New Mars Location”

LITTLEBANGKOK INTHESTRIP.COM

doublewidegrill.com

412.390.1111

724-553-5212

ROCKTOBERFEST Our award winning Oktoberfest-style lager is back, along with a Bavarian-inspired seasonal menu.

NOW P ON TA CK

PUMKELWEIZEN

RO BOTTOM

AT

YOUNG THE GIANT

Our liquid ode to autumn... An unfiltered,  pumpkin-spiced German dunkelweizen with notes of fruit and clove.

FRENCH TO DEATH A West coast-ified saison brewed with 100 lbs. of fresh Cascade and Centennial hops.

Look for Rock Bottom beer at

PLUS MORE!

PITTSBURGH ABIDES this Friday (9/13) at

Visit PROMO tab at pghcitypaper.com for your chance to WIN PRIZES!

Bayardstown Social Club More info at www.pghabides.com

Hint: Find the Left side of the Bottle

171 E. BRIDGE ST. • AT THE WATERFRONT

2008 Readers -2012 ’ Choice

Best Mex Restauraican nt

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

Gift s Certificate Available!

Family Owned and Serving Pittsburgh for 15 Years!

1/2 off

appetizers and drinks during any home games

HAPPY HOUR Mon-Fri 5-7pm

Full Service Bar • Over 50 Types of Tequila! Best Homemade Margaritas in The Burgh! Northview Plaza • North Hills • 412-366-8730

www.elcampesinospgh.com MON-THURS 11AM-10PM • FRI-SAT 11AM -10:30PM • SUN NOON-9PM N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

19


LOCAL

“WE SPENT A LOT OF TIME PLAYING ALL OVER THE PLACE AND NOT MAKING ANY MONEY.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

When Dan Bubien was laid off from his day job early this year, it was sad, of course … but it was also fortuitous. The former Sun Kings frontman was working on his first solo album, and suddenly it became his main job. “It was honestly the best thing that could have happened to me,” he says with a laugh. Bubien, an Aliquippa native who lives in Baden, has been playing music for most of his life. As a teenager, a sports injury sidelined him from athletics, and he took up guitar, something he picked up from his dad, also a musician. “When I was young and I first started to really delve into it, I always liked blues music,” Bubien explains. Later, he got into reggae, and then funk, both of which came through in his late-’00s band, The Sun Kings. That band broke up in the early 2010s, leaving Bubien to continue developing his signature sound: a blend of blues roots, Southern-soul vocals and funk sounds. The 36-year-old Bubien wrote much of his new album, Empty Roads, with friend and collaborator Roman Marocco, another Aliquippa native who wrote the lyrics to more than half of the songs. Bubien recorded it with Jay Dudt at Audible Images, who helped to fill out the roster of studio musicians. “Jay was really digging it,” says Bubien, “and he kept saying, ‘I really hear horns right here,’ or ‘I hear a girl singing here,’ and I’d say, ‘Yeah! Yeah! Me too! Let’s make this happen!’” Between Bubien’s contacts from his Sun Kings days and Dudt’s friends from Duquesne University, where he teaches, there was plenty of assistance. The result is an album as slick as anything on WDVE, with names like Eric DeFade and Ralph Guzzi — both local jazz favorites — in the liner. Bubien’s solo work is more rock-andsoul than the blues-and-reggae stuff he previously was known for. But that kind of thing happens, he says, when you’ve been playing for a long time. “As you get older, your tastes change, your interests change,” he notes. “That’s what happened here.” AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DAN BUBIEN CD RELEASE. 10 p.m. Fri., Sept. 13. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

20

King no more: Dan Bubien

GETTING SOME SOUL

PULLING FOR THE UNDERDOG {PHOTO COURTESY OF DREW REYNOLDS}

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

J

.D. EICHER IS a musician, yes — he’s been playing guitar since he was a kid, and majored in music and business in college. But more than that, Eicher is a storyteller. That’s clear even before you listen to his well-crafted, lyric-heavy songs. It’s clear when, for example, you notice that the names of his band’s three albums — The Shape of Things, Shifting and the new one, Into Place — form one phrase when you put them together in order. It’s no coincidence — there’s a lot of thought going into this stuff. “I kind of wanted to do a three-part project that grew together,” Eicher says. “Three albums, with some parts tying them all together.” A Youngstown native, Eicher formed his band, J.D. Eicher and the Goodnights, when he was at Westminster College in New Wilmington, Pa. Some of his bandmates

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

Words and music: J.D. Eicher (foreground) and the Goodnights

hail from Pittsburgh, so he generally refers to the band as being “from Youngstown and Pittsburgh,” even though he himself still lives in Youngstown. The album trilogy was thought out ahead of time, but not written in advance, Eicher says. That would be taking it a little

J.D. EICHER AND THE GOODNIGHTS CD RELEASE WITH JOY IKE

9 p.m. Fri., Sept. 13. Hard Rock Café, 230 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square. $6-8. 412-481-7625

too far. “I primarily just outlined them ahead of time,” he explains. “I had the themes I wanted to write about. But I think it’s important to write the record around

the time you’re going to release it, so that it feels relevant to who you are at the time.” Eicher’s identity does insert itself into the new album here and there, but he can’t be mistaken for a confessional songwriter. While songs like the album-opener “Ode to the Underdog” clearly come from Eicher’s personal experiences, he also tends to write songs like a fiction writer would. “Inevitably, I’m always in the song,” he admits. “There’s always some part of me there. But I’ve always loved story-songs; I love to create those stories. A couple of songs on the new album have random characters I created — I like to create a person to meet the needs of the song sometimes.” “I wrote [‘Ode to the Underdog’] for us as a band, and for anybody in a situation like that,” he explains. “We spent a lot of time playing all over the place and not making any money. That song is about toughing


it out, and just sticking with it.” Eicher cites as influences everyone from Jackson Browne and The Beatles to Death Cab for Cutie; the common denominator tends to be that his favorites are lyrical storytellers, writers who don’t fill in the words as an afterthought. Into Place includes some love songs, but on the whole it’s about all different aspects of life. “You’ve Got a Lot of Growing Up to Do” sounds like a slightly preachy indictment of the annoying people we all encounter every day — until Eicher indicts himself, too. (“To me and anyone I’ve missed / You’ve got a lot of growing up to do.”) Eicher and the band recorded Into Place mostly in Nashville, working for a portion of the process at Sound Emporium, the legendary studio where artists including Al Green, Kenny Rogers and Patty Griffin have recorded. Eicher and his crew worked with Dustin Burnett, who earned a Grammy nomination last year for his mixing work. On one track, “Lately Lady,” Eicher shares billing with some guests — O.A.R. saxophonist Jerry DePizzo and local vocalist Joy Ike, with whom Eicher has toured before, and who is sharing the bill on the band’s CD-release show this weekend. “I knew I wanted a duet with a female vocalist,” Eicher recalls, “and immediately I knew I should call up Joy.” Touring is something Eicher has been doing a lot of — both with and without his band. Some of the Goodnights have day gigs, but Eicher himself is a full-time musician, by his estimation, touring 15 to 20 days a month over the summer, and a little less during the colder months. “I guess when I went full time [as a musician], I thought I’d be playing much more music,” Eicher says. “But I’m still doing a lot of the business side of stuff,” even though a deal with Rock Ridge Music label has helped. “And driving. There’s a lot of driving.” “But,” he continues, “I’m able to set my own schedule. I definitely prefer it” over balancing a day job and music gigs. “Even if it’s financially precarious sometimes.” With the help of Rock Ridge, Eicher says, “We’ve started to grow and understand the whole world of radio and labels and management and all that. We feel optimistic about where we’re headed.” Wherever they’re headed, Eicher is going to take his commitment to telling stories with him, even as the pop-music world seems to reward wordiness less and less. “I’ve always loved literature, and loved to read,” he says. “Songwriting was kind of a passion for me from the beginning. I love language, and I love the way it works together with the music.”

DAN BUBIEN EMPTY ROADS (SELF-RELEASED)

The semi-reclusive singer-songwriter (real name Terry O’Hara) has returned with another stellar set of beautiful, somewhat depressing songs. Like his prior release, it’s studded with local guest musicians — Phil Johnson of Sleep Experiments; Dan Harding and Megan Lindsey of Good Night, States; Guy Russo of Broken Fences. Also like his prior release, this one is wintry, contemplative and a must-listen.

ANDREW JD LAPTOP RAP 3 (SELF-RELEASED)

Lots of indierock samples strung together in a lo-fi recording with the artist rapping over them. The beats aren’t so bad, but there’s some work to be done before this one can hit the big time. The vocals are low in the mix, and it doesn’t help that much of the rapping is somewhat fast and muddled; the whole thing ends up a bit tough to listen to. At least one flippant reference to domestic violence doesn’t help the cause, either.

+

10/02 DAUGHTER 09/13 PLEDGEMUSIC TOUR FT. BLEU

AND WILL DAILEY (EARLY)

TIGER$EYES HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMP

09/13 DAN BUBIEN (ALBUM RELEASE) (LATE) 09/14 BIRDS OF CHICAGO (JT NERO & ALLISSON RUSSELL

(SELF-RELEASED)

09/14 SPETHZ (LATE) 09/17 PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT

Pretty indie rock from the solo project of one Matt Kiefer; this one is a four-song EP. Joan of Arc-style guitar noodling, Aloha-style percussion spasms and vocal delivery that belies a pop-punk past but moves beyond the clichés you’ll often find in that genre. Nice stuff, especially for a first effort.

AMULKE R IN@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

N E W S

OPUS ONE PRESENTS

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

TA S T E

FROM PO' GIRL) W/

W/

M U S I C

+

JOLIE HOLLAND

09/18 DISAPPEAR FEAR W/ANNE FEENEY 09/19 SARAH LEE GUTHRIE & JOHNNY IRION 09/13 ROBERT DELONG W/BADBOXES 09/18 X AMBASSADORS

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

+

CORONADO (UNPLUGGED) (EARLY)

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

21


TURNING JAZZ ON ITS HEAD {BY MIKE SHANLEY} WHEN A JAZZ group can maintain a steady

lineup for several years, it establishes a strong level of trust among the musicians. The Lina Allemano Four has lasted eight years, a rarity for an improvising band, and that time has seen the band develop a strong onstage rapport. “We started out being a little more — I don’t know if you’d call it straight ahead, but the compositions I was writing back then were a little less open,” says Torontobased trumpeter Allemano, speaking with CP from her home. Then, “I started realizing I can write specifically for these guys, to their strengths. Now I write these tunes that are almost like sketches. It’s totally open.” The instrumentation features trumpet, alto saxophone, bass and drums. While it mirrors the lineup of Ornette Coleman’s classic quartet, which abandoned chord structures for a style that introduced the term “free jazz,” Allemano’s music has more expansive melodic qualities. “I’ve always really been drawn to

Improving the improv: Lina Allemano Four

melody and bass players, I guess,” she says. “A lot of bass players are melodic, too. I think that’s why I started to get into that sort of sound: horns and bass and drums. “The melody is so strong and there’s a huge open area that’s not getting — I was going to say ‘cluttered,’ but that’s very negative. I don’t mean to say that chordal instruments are cluttered. There was something I really liked about having that openness of horns and just the bass underpinning things. And also it seems

really nice to switch around roles that way too. A bass player could be melodic; the horns could be accompanying it.”

LINA ALLEMANO FOUR 9 p.m. Tue., Sept. 17. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Free. 412-687-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net

On last year’s Live at the Tranzac, the group experiments with time and dynamics successfully. “Flummox” begins

with a steady tempo which gradually gets pulled apart as Allemano and saxophonist Brodie West solo, eventually snapping back into place for the closing statement. “Atomic Number 22” begins with a heavy, bowed bass line from Andrew Downing that makes the melody comes off like a hard-rock riff. In a later section of the tense piece, the volume drops down, with Downing sounding like a cellist and the horns holding some soft, long tones. Rather than closing the song, it continues at this level, creating suspense before the final resolution. The quartet’s staying power means that the sound and shape of a tune can vary from any given performance. “Sometimes they set up a little groove with some of the stuff, sometimes not,” Allemano says of the band. “Sometimes it stays free, sometimes it goes in and out. I like that I never know how it’s going to go. [So I’ll wonder,] is this going to be a groovy rendition or not.” Intrigued jazz fans might be interested to know that the Allemano Four’s local performance will be presented in connection with the Space Exchange series at the Thunderbird Café. Like the weekly showcase of local music projects, this show has no cover charge.

PITTSBURGH’S Hottest Live Music Scene!

103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086 www.jergels.com

22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

UPCOMING NATIONAL SHOWS

I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

PROMOTIONS BUY YOUR TICKETS NOW AT JERGELS.COM

SAT // OCT 5 1:00-5:00 PM

• 20 Breweries • Filet Sliders, Homemade Pizzas, Hot Sausage Sandwiches, Burgers & Dogs on the Outside Grille • 3 Bands: The Lava Game Jill West & Blues Attack Angel Blue & The Prophets • $65 VIP @ 1PM // $50 GA @ 2PM • FREE First Annual T-Shirt & Taster Glass • Door Prizes every 30 minutes

SHOWS THIS WEEK Thu Fri Sat Mon Tue Wed

9.12 9.13 9.14 9.16 9.17 9.18

JIMBO & THE SOUPBONES // 8 pm DANCING QUEEN // 9 pm FERRIS BUELLER’S REVENGE // 9 pm PITTSBURGH VS CINCINNATI // 8:40 pm kick-off BIKE NIGHT W/ALEX TALBOT DUO // 8 pm BODEANS // 8 pm


CRITICS’ PICKS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF TARINA WESTLUND}

Portland Cello Project

[SYNTH POP] + WED., SEPT. 18

Electronic music is very much of the zeitgeist, and that’s evident in how many artists have come from disparate backgrounds and settled on processors and synths. Robert DeLong was an indie-rock drummer before becoming an electronic producer and performer — and a popular one. DeLong has gotten tons of good press for his first full-length, Just Movement, and his live show — featuring “instruments” like a Wii controller — are renowned. He plays Brillobox tonight with locals Badboxes. Andy Mulkerin 9 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

There are many good things coming out of Baltimore lately, at least musically speaking, and Jumpcuts — Andy Shankman’s synthpop solo project — is one of them. The first Jumpcuts album, Electrickery, came out earlier this year, a fun and catchy ride recorded by Rob Girardi, one of Baltimore’s top behindthe-scenes guys. Tonight, Shankman brings Jumpcuts to Arsenal Bowl for the Rock ’n’ Bowl series. AM 9:30 p.m. 212 44th St., Lawrenceville. $8 includes all-you-canbowl. 412-683-5992 or www.arsenalbowl.com

[INDIE CLASSICAL] + TUE., SEPT. 17

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MYLES PETTENGILL III}

[ELECTRONIC] + FRI., SEPT. 13

[ACOUSTIC] + THU., SEPT. 19

If Pittsburgh really is the new Portland, we better step up our cello game. Tonight, Portland Cello Project visits Club Café to show us just what kind of string-instrument stuff a first-class hip city has going on. Founded in 2007 in its namesake town in Oregon, the PCP is a loose collective of musicians centered around director Douglas Jenkins. The group has played with plenty of indie darlings — The Decemberists, Thao Nguyen — in addition to doing its own thing. The show tonight also features alt-folk singer Jolie Holland. AM 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $15. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

N E W S

+

As fall begins, we settle back into some of the regular concert series that go on throughout Robert the colder months; DeLong Calliope’s Roots Cellar series is one that’s kicking into gear tonight with an appearance from Tim Farrell. The eastern Pennsylvania resident is a master of fingerstyle guitar, having released solo albums of his own compositions and interpretations of classics, and accompanied plenty of others. He’s also an educator — which informs his easygoing, conversational live performance style. Tonight, he plays the Roots Cellar venue at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. AM 7:30 p.m. 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. $12-17. All ages. 412-361-1915 or www.calliopehouse.org

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

23


Huntington Bank presents The th

Voices Carry 9 Annual

October 1, 2013

6:30 pm–10:30 pm Stage AE

Performances by Donnie Iris, Scott Blasey, Joe Grushecky, Jeff Jimerson, Billy Price and Chris Higbee.

Purchase Your Ticket Online www.auberle.org/voices-carry Benefiting the at-risk children and families of Auberle

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 12 ALTAR BAR. Mission of Burma. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Gaslight Anthem, The Sidekicks, Gates. Millvale. 866-468-3401. WALNUT GRILL. The Keystone 3. Shadyside. 412-782-4768.

FRI 13 99 BOTTLES. Ray Lanich Band. Carnegie. 412-279-1299. ALLEGHENY COUNTRY RIFLE CLUB. Daniels & McClain. Millvale. ALTAR BAR. Flume. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Jenkins & Crum. O’Hara. 412-963-1514. BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. The Harlan Twins, Charlie Hustle & the Grifters. Strip District. BRILLOBOX. Robert DeLong, Bad Boxes. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Bleu, Will Dailey, Jacob Klein (Early) Dan Bubien (late). Album Release. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Brightside, Driver, Whoovez, Purge, Graves, Breach. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Bailey Park, The Midnight Special. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Dan Tedesco. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LINDEN GROVE. Nightlife. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MOONDOG’S. Norman Nardini. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Gaslight Anthem, The Sidekicks, Gates. Millvale. 866-468-3401. OBEY HOUSE. Lenny Smith & The Ramblers. Crafton. 412-922-3883. ROYAL PLACE. Silkwood Shower. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Randall Baumann Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. LoveBettie. North Side. 412-231-7777. THE WOODEN NICKEL. The Witch Doctors. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

SAT 14 ALTAR BAR. Headphone Disco. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BALTIMORE HOUSE. The Tony

24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

Janflone Jr. Band. Pleasant Hills. Blue, The Martin David Band. CAFE SUPREME. Aces Full. Irwin. South Side. 412-431-4668. 724-861-0990. STAGE AE. Queens of the Stone CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF Age. North Side. HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. WUNDERBAR COFFEE HOUSE. Graham Nash. Munhall. Christopher Bell. Harmony. 412-368-5225. 724-256-7383. CLUB 206. E-Z Action. Braddock. 412-646-1203. ALTAR BAR. Morbid Angel. CLUB CAFE. Birds Of Chicago, Strip District. 412-263-2877. Coronado (Early). South Side. CARSON CITY SALOON. The 412-431-4950. Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. South Side. CLUB COLONY. Five Guys Named 412-481-3203. Moe. Scott. 412-668-0903. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. The Hat DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & Madder, Patton, Williams Band. GALLERY. Christopher Bell. Garfield. 412-361-2262. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. HOWLERS COYOTE ELWOOD’S PUB. CAFE. Paul Collins Dave Iglar. Cheswick. Beat, Neighbours, Josh 724-265-1181. Verbanets. Bloomfield. THE FALLOUT 412-682-0320. SHELTER. Brittany www. per pa SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Bordella, Andy Powder pghcitym .co Weather Permitting & the Drips, Open Mic. feat. Red Western, City Aliquippa. 724-375-5080. Buses, Amun Raqs. Shadyside. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. 412-363-5845. Crunk Witch, Little War Twins, THE SHOP. Motorpsychos, 8 Cylinder, Bit Mummy. Garfield. Last Question, Creature of 412-361-2262. Exile, Meth Quarry. Bloomfield. HAMBONE’S. The Hellfire Club 412-951-0622. & Ryan Taylor. Lawrenceville. TALL TREES AMPHITHEATER. 412-681-4318. The Holidays, Southside Jerry. HARD ROCK CAFE. JD Eicher & Monroeville. the Goodnights, Joy Ike. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HARVEY WILNER’S. Platinum. CLUB CAFE. Portland Cello West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. Project, Jolie Holland. South Side. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. 412-431-4950. The Lopez, City Steps, Derek MR. SMALLS THEATER. DePrator, Motometer. Bloomfield. Blue October, The Last Place 412-682-0320. You Look, Tori Vasquez. Millvale. MARS AREA SENIOR HIGH 866-468-3401. SCHOOL. The Holidays, Southside SMILING MOOSE. Storm Jerry. Benefit concert for Glad The Bay, No Tide. South Side. Run Lake Conservancy. Mars. 412-431-4668. 724-898-2063. MCCANDLESS TOWN HALL. Lenny Smith & The Ramblers. ALTAR BAR. Hellbound Glory McCandless. 412-364-0616. Supersuckers. Strip District. MR. SMALLS THEATER. GWAR, 412-263-2877. Hatebreed, Iron Reagan. Millvale. BRILLOBOX. X Ambassadors, 866-468-3401. Household Stories, The NEW HAZLETT THEATER. Olafur Lux Republic. Bloomfield. Arnalds. North Side. 412-320-4610. 412-621-4900. PETER B’S. Fungus. Sarver. CLUB CAFE. Disappaer Fear, Anne 724-353-2677. Feeney. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE R BAR. The Gum Band. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. The Dormont. 412-942-0882. Dumplings, The Cell Phones, REX THEATER. The Reckoning, Fancy Tramp, Nox Boys, Several The Re-52s. South Side. Conclusions. The Dumplings 412-381-6811. cassette release party. Garfield. ROOSTERS ROADHOUSE. 412-361-2262. Daniels & McClain. Bridgeville. HARMONY RIDGE. ZanaFest 412-221-1543. 2013. Granati Brothers, The Dallas SCHENLEY PLAZA. Marks Band, Corned Beef & Tracksploitation, The Van Allen Curry, The Drowning, many more. Belt, Wreck Loose, Diego Byrnes, Ambridge. 724-266-2414. The Great Boges. Oakland. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Alias 717-321-5184. Punch, CHUD missle, Westboro SMILING MOOSE. Charm Bastard Church and Latecomer. & Chain, Bob Gilmore, Marc Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. McDonough Suite Mary, End of

SUN 15

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 17

WED 18


DJS THU 12 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FRI 13 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. CJ’S. DJ Mighty Man. Strip District. 412-642-2377. DRUM BAR. VDJ Dave Ott. North Side. 412-231-7777. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 14 BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. DRUM BAR. VDJ Craig McClintock. North Side. 412-231-7777. LAVA LOUNGE. Motor City Shake. Motown & funk dance party w/ DJ Soulful Fella. South Side. 814-746-5060. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

SUN 15 SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 18 BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B THU 12 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Main Squeeze w/ Aqueous. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 14 CJ’S. The Top Flight Band. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

N E W S

EARLY WARNINGS

BLUES

NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

THU 12 SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

ACOUSTIC

FRI 13

ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Mark Ferrari Duo. Murrysville. 724-733-4453. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Rebecca. McMurray. 724-942-1108. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Will Crum. Pleasant Hills. 412-714-8670. BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. PERRYTOWNE DRAFT HOUSE. Ashley & Garret. McCandless. 412-367-9610.

BRIDGEVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY. Jill West & Blues Attack. Bridgeville. 412-221-3737. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Blues Orphans. Jimmy Adler. North Side. 412-904-3335. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. The Olga Watkins Band. Downtown. 412-471-9100. THE WOODEN NICKEL. The Witchdoctors. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

New Found Glory

SAT 14 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. .32-20 Blues Band. Robinson. 412-489-5631. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. 412-431-4090. HOPEWELL PARK. .32-20 Blues Band. Hopewell. 724-561-2111. LEAF & BEAN. Bill Toms. Strip District. 412-434-1480. NIED’S HOTEL. Shot O’ Soul. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Pawnbrokers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 13

SUN 15

Steve Winwood

BOSTON WATERFRONT. Jill West & Blues Attack. McKeesport. 412-751-8112.

{TUE., JAN. 21}

ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Amanda Noah. Richland. 724-444-7333. THE BEER MARKET. Gina Rendina. North Side. 412-322-2337. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin the Troubadour. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. MARIO’S SOUTH SIDE SALOON. Michael Todd. South Side. 412-381-5610. MULLANEY’S HARP & FIDDLE. Tim & John. Strip District. 412-642-6622.

Jay Z

SAT 14

WED 18

with Alkaline Trio, H2O

Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side {FRI., DEC. 06}

Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland

SAT 14

JAZZ THU 12 ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

FRI 13 ANDYS. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. CLUB COLONY. Take Two. Scott. 412-668-0903. LEMONT. John Sarkis. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. The New View Trio Feat. George Jones. Downtown. 412-392-2217. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245. VIVO KITCHEN. Jeremy Fisher Trio w/ Kristan Mancini Fisher. Sewickley. 412-259-8945.

TA S T E

New Found Glory

Consol Energy Center, 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown

ATRIAS RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Nick Fiasco. Wexford. 724-934-3660. THE R BAR. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Dormont. 412-942-8842.

+

{THU., NOV. 14}

+

ANDYS. Kenia. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. FLA-BAS FARM. Tom Roberts & The Cotton Club Fla-Bas Band. Cranberry. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roby ‘Supersax’ Edwards. North Side. 412-904-3335. KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. Tom Browne, Fred Wesley, Pamela Williams, House of Soul. East Liberty. 412-731-6607. LITTLE E’S. The Bridgette Perdue Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. NINE ON NINE. John Bagnato. Downtown. 412-338-6463. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

SUN 15 3RD ST. The St. John Affair, Don Aliquo Quartet, Michele

M U S I C

+

Bensen & Friends. Jazz on 3rd. 3rd St & 3rd Ave., Carnegie. Carnegie. 412-331-1047. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Reggie Watkins Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Harold Betters Quartet. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

TUE 17 ANDYS. Eric Susoeff. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jazz Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Ortner/ Marcinizyn Duo. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series feat. Lina Allemano Four. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 18 ANDYS. Eliseo Rael. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Flo Wilson. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

SUN 15 HEINZ CHAPEL. Daria Burlak, Organist. Oakland. 412-624-4157.

MON 16

THU 12

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JONATHAN WEINER}

ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Ray Lanich. Ross. 412-364-8166. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Aliver Hall. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

CIP’S. Tim Lionelli. Dormont. 412-668-2335. LIGONIER BEACH. Shelf Life String Band. Ligonier. 724-238-5553. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

SUN 15 ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Joel Lindsey. Pleasant Hills. 412-714-8670. HAMBONE’S. Calliope East End Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Mamadou Kelly, Leila Gobi, Batamba. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

REGGAE SAT 14 FRANKLIN AVE. The Flow Band. Aliquippa. 724-846-6400.

COUNTRY THU 12 CLUB CAFE. Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys, The Allegheny Rhythm Rangers. South Side. 412-431-4950.

FRI 13 FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Keith Urban, Little Big Town, Dustin Lynch. Burgettstown. 724-947-7400.

SAT 14 CHRISTINA’S. Steeltown. White Oak. 412-673-0199. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Chris Higbee. North Side. 412-231-7777.

CLASSICAL FRI 13 KERRITH LIVENGOOD, MARK FROMM, FEDERICO GARCIA, JOHN ARRIGONELSON, ZVONIMIR NAGY. Alia Musica. PNC Recital Hall, Duquesne Univ., Uptown. 412-396-6080.

SAT 14 PITTSBURGH CAMERATA. Such Morning Songs. Sixth Presbyterian Church, Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707.

SUN 15 CARNEGIE MELLON PHILHARMONIC. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-268-2383.

MON 16

TUE 17

HAMBONE’S. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

THE PATRIARCH TIKHON CHOIR. First Baptist Church, Oakland. 412-621-0500.

TUE 17

OTHER MUSIC

PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Gene Stovall. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

WED 18 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jack Puskar. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

E V E N T S

W. NEW CASTLE ST. PLAZA. Rocket to the Stars Vocal Competition. Butler. 724-256-5769.

SAT 14 LEMONT. Phil & Roxy. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LEVELS. Gina Rendina. North Side. 412-231-7777.

MON 16

SAT 14

+

FRI 13

+

HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

C L A S S I F I E D S

25


What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

September 11 - 17 WEDNESDAY 11 Mayer Hawthorne

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Superhumanoids. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Califone THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-6820177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

CHARITY RANDALL THEATRE Oakland. Tickets: picttheatre.org or 412-561-6000 x207. Through Sept. 28.

Mission of Burma ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-

The PittsBurgher

PITTSBURGH RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL

Big Sandy and His Fly-Rite Boys

Tattoo Convention

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 LAUREL HIGHLANDS

show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

SATURDAY 14

Randall Baumann’s Thunderbird Ramble

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 8p.m.

DAVID. L. LAWRENCE CONVENTION CENTER. All ages event. Tickets: shaneoneillproductions.com. Through Sept. 15.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

Rancid

DJ ‘B’ Karaoke & Trivia

STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Tim Timebomb and Friends & more. All ages

Strip District World Festival

KELLY STRAYHORN THEATER East Liberty. 412-363-3000. Tickets: showclix.com, Dorsey's Records & Stedefords Records. 7p.m.

The Main Squeeze with Aqueous

FRIDAY 13

A Skull in Connemara

Tom Browne, Fred Wesley & Pamela Williams

263-2877. With special guests The Gotobeds & A.T.S. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Savages Tickets: ticketweb.com/ MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. opusone. 8p.m. 412-821-4447. With special guest Duke Garwood. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m. Steel City

THURSDAY 12

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

DELS BAR & RISTORANTE Bloomfield. 412-683-1448. Free event. 9p.m.

Graham Nash

RIVERS CASINO AMPHITHEATER North Side. Tickets: showclix.com/event/ thepittsburgher2013. 1p.m.

Black Angels Over Tuskegee BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Festival of Colors PALACE OF GOLD Moundsville WV. Tickets: festivalofcolors. us. 11a.m.

Gwar / Hatebreed MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Iron Reagan. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Queens of the Stone Age STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Guards. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

PENN AVENUE 22ND TO 25TH STREET Strip District. Free event. For more info visit stripdistrictworldfestival.com. Through Sept. 15.

SUNDAY 15

Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival LAUREL HIGHLANDS. For more info call 724-872-1670. Tickets: pittsburghrenfest.com. Through Sept. 29.

TUESDAY 17 Blue October

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest The Last Place You Look & Tori Vasquez. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 7:30p.m.

Portland Cello Project CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Raise a glass as we kick off the Fall Season at the Waterfront! SHOE & WINE CELEBRATION

Trunk Shows

FRIDAY THROUGH SATURDAY • SEPTEMBER 13-14

$ 20.00 Gift Certificate e 26

Must Present this Certificate at Check-out. Minimum Purchase $100. Cannot be Combined with Other Offers or Discounts. Some Vendor Exclusions Apply. Not applicable on Allen Edmonds, Dansko and New Balance. See Store for Detail. Valid Through 9/30/13. MAILR GS

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

Jason Bodamer: MERRELL Rusty Ortiz: ALLEN EDMONDS Jarrod Harbottle: ECCO

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes


OUT OF THE PAST

OLD HEADS WILL SMILE AT THE CLUNKY, NOISY KEYBOARDS AND OVERHEAD PROJECTORS

{BY AL HOFF} I last hung out with hulking space herovillain Riddick (Vin Diesel) in 2000, when the character debuted in Pitch Black. I took a pass on 2004’s The Chronicles of Riddick, and thus wound up at the new Riddick, well, in the dark. There’s no preamble, and the first 20 minutes of David Twohy’s futuristic actioner is pretty head-scratching. Riddick emerges from the muck of an uglylooking yellow planet; fights space hyenas, space eels and space freak lizards; changes from a metal outfit to a leather outfit; and gets pissy about some unexplained flashback.

F N HB

He’s gotta wear shades: Vin Diesel as Riddick

Then the film settles into an understandable, if predictable, storyline: Two groups of mercenaries arrive on Planet Icky and join forces to capture Riddick, who, being Vin Diesel, is a billion times smarter than them. Mercs are variously eviscerated and a new threat (oh hi, lots of space freak lizards) gets everybody batting for the same team. That’s Team Hyper-Macho, by the way, and includes the film’s one actress, Katee Sackhoff, out-bad-assing her role as Starbuck on Battlestar Galactica. Riddick’s ongoing status (and — spoiler alert — future) is never really clarified. But with his cocky machismo, casual sexism and woven-leather trousers, it’s just as likely he is perpetually on the run from an outdated past. Will no planet have him? AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

See the classic 1923 Harold Lloyd silent comedy

Safety Last!

as it was meantt to be seen — with live musical cal accompaniment nt from pianist Philip ip Carli. Tickets at www.showclix.com.. 2 p.m. Sat., Sept. 14.. Regent Square e

PO

{BY AL HOFF}

I

Of men and machines: Patrick Riester portrays a computer-chess whiz.

F YOU RECKON there’s not much inter-

esting about watching some guys play chess on computers, you wouldn’t be wrong. But if you’re willing to give it a shot, there’s much about the new film Computer Chess that’s amusing. Computer Chess is a mockumentary, set in the early 1980s, during a computerchess tournament. A couple dozen guys — there is one woman, who is treated like an intriguing alien — spend the weekend at a bland hotel. They rig up their bulky computers, fire up the chess programs they’ve coded and pit the machines against each other. Because this is rudimentary computer-gaming, there’s still some level of human engagement: The other team’s plays must be keyed in by hand, for instance. And of course, the “intelligence” of computers must be programmed by humans, and this existential bridge between man and machine is one of the topics bandied about by the competitors. So is the likely future use of artificial intelligence in warfare — and in computer dating.

On one level, it’s an affectionate look back at when working with computers involved a select fraternity of nerds, charting the limits of new — and newly accessible — technology. Knowledge of computers or chess isn’t necessary to enjoy this film, though those with such insights might get a few deeper chuckles. Old heads will

COMPUTER CHESS DIRECTED BY: Andrew Bujalski STARRING: Myles Paige, Wiley Wiggins, Patrick Riester Starts Fri., Sept. 13. Melwood

CP APPROVED smile at the outmoded eyewear (doublebarred aviators); clunky, noisy keyboards; overhead projectors; and AMC cars in the parking lot. Chess is written and directed, in vintage-video style and in black-and-white, by Andrew Bujalski, among the originators of mumblecore (Funny Ha Ha). It’s an

ensemble piece (with these chess nerds, there is some mumbling), covering several of the competitors and organizers, as well as the participants of a couples-encounter retreat also at the hotel. The couples are the touchy-feely yin to the chess guys’ machine-based yang, but there’s overlap of purpose: “We’re all kind of like seekers,” says one man in the encounter group. This isn’t a film for everyone. There’s not much story, but rather a few threads that start, stop, weave and often just get lost. (A few go down rabbit holes.) For those who have the patience for self-indulgent filmmaking, especially of the studiously lo-fi variety and on esoteric subject matters, Computer Chess does offer a nostalgic, even thoughtful, snapshot of sorts: of when the banality of a hotel room could glow not just with flat fluorescent bulbs, but with the rosy dawn of a new age; when explorers mumbled, fumbled and grumbled toward the future; when humans still beat computers at chess; and when it took two people to carry a hard drive. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

27


October 12 – November 3, 2013

November 9 – December 15, 2013

VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE

A music-filled journey

March 8–30, 2014

March 29 – May 4, 2014

TRIBES

GROUNDED

CHARLES IVES TAKE ME HOME

2013 Tony Award® winner for Best Play

A provocative New York hit

28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

A high-intensity drama


RIVERS CASINO AMPHITHEATER • SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14 / 1PM-7PM Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-GAMBLER

PITTSBURGH’S TOP RESTAURANTS COMPETING FOR THE BEST BURGER IN THE BURGH! ------- $35 -------

AMSTEL LIGHT SPECIALS ALL DAY

TICKET INCLUDES ONE SAMPLE FROM EACH RESTAURANT, A CHANCE TO WIN A VACATION GIVEAWAY AND ACCESS TO VENDORS AND AMPHITHEATER AREA

CELEBRITY GUEST JUDGE PITTSBURGH STEELER LARRY FOOTE ON-SITE VENDORS LOCAL PERFORMANCES TRIP GIVEAWAYS AND MORE!

PARTICIPATING LOCATIONS BRGR/SPOON • CAIN’S SALOON • BOBBY HENDRIX • THE RIVERS CASINO – CULINARY • COURTHOUSE TAVERN • LUKE WHOLEY’S WILD ALASKAN GRILLE • LATITUDE 40 • REDBEARD’S DOWNTOWN 6TH STREET • BIGHAM TAVERN • BENJAMIN’S WESTERN AVENUE BURGER BAR • THE URBAN TAP • MARIO’S EAST SIDE/SOUTH SIDE SALOON

ENJOY LIVE ENTERTAINMENT BY: LOVEBETTIE WITH SPECIAL GUEST TRIPHAZARD FROM THE UK, CHEAP & EASY, MOTOMETER, HIGHWAY 4, LYNDSEY SMITH & SOUL DISTRIBUTION, RON AND THE RUMPSHAKERS, DJ ENN ERA, DJ BROMEO VISIT WWW.MIDNIGHTGURU.COM/THEPITTSBURGHER FOR DETAILS

MUST BE 21 / LAST YEARS EVENT WAS SOLD OUT! • TICKETS ON SALE NOW: WWW.SHOWCLIX.COM/EVENT/THEPITTSBURGHER2013 PRODUCED BY: DIANA RUA MEDIA • A portion of the proceeds benefit URBANpolish and Serve2Cure

2

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


34)2838,)49&0-' 7)48)1&)6

 .%2-2)%2832- ',-,%697,-38% ()863-8%68-787-26)7-()2') ()7-+2

+-2%6)-',)68 1-8','34)  .)77-'%*6)0-2+,9=7)2 7'388,3'/-2+ 2-'30%/94)697 %(%10))1-00)6 6977360%2(3  *6%2/4%,0

'LMLEVY7LMSXE

7%14732-%;%= [[[QEXXVIWWSVK

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2013

3


hilarious

The whodunit from the madcap min d of McDonagh — complete with flying skulls!

RIGINA NO

L

A

Crazy Mocha Coffee House on Baum Blvd. in Friendship

Pittsburgh CO

SINCE 2000

M PANY

www.CrazyMocha.com C M h

By Martin McDonagh

Directed by Martin Giles A Pittsburgh Premiere Septemb er 12–28 The Charity Randall Theatre in the Stephen Foster Memoria l, Oakland Note: Str ong language and situations

.

Tickets at picttheatre.org or call 412.561.6000 x207 T H E A T R E

4

Professional Theatre in Residence at the University of Pittsburgh

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


(aaZIQEbLJ (_bQaba 8-Ə90>>=)?<./ *e_EbLJƏ=PZha ._Ze[Ə=PZha (XXeETƏ,iPQGQbQZX (_bQabƏ>ETSa (_bQabƏ=beJQZƏ9E_bQLa 2e_QLJƏ,iPQGQbQZXa 6LVGL_Ə,gLXba hhhźMEILGZZSźIZV((9NP

7LhƏ6LVGL_Ə=I_LLXQXNƏ =L[bźƏ&bPƏ -Z_VƏJZhXTZEJŻƏ

ƏƏƏƏƏƏ hhhźEE[NPźZ_NƏ

8_ƏgQaQbƏZe_ƏhLGaQbLŻ

consol energy center friday, september 20 TICKETS ON SALE NOW s Ticketmaster.com Charge by phone 800.745.3000 : A BEAVER PRODUCTION :

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2013

5


2013

FALL ARTS PREVIEW

Welcome to the circus: Zimmerman & de Perrot’s Hans Was Heiri, Oct. 18 and 19

[FESTIVAL]

Pittsburgh THE RUBBER DUCK IS The International Festival Firsts also offers theater, ONLY THE BEGINNING ofboundary-pushing dance and visual art {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

W

{COVER ILLUSTRATIONS BY PAT LEWIS}

HEN PREVIEWING the 2013 Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts, first things first: that duck. Rubber Duck that is the face (and plump yellow body) of this The 40-foot-tall Rubb Trust festival kicks it all off Sept. 27. The inflatable watermonth-long Pittsbugh Cultural Tru River and anchored at the Sixth Street Bridge for the festifowl will be towed up the Ohio Riv val’s bridge-top kickoff party, part of o the Trust’s fall Gallery Crawl. Every performance and exhibit exhibi in the festival is either a U.S. or world premiere by a Project included. But although the Duck looks just like the noted artist, The Rubber Duck Proj Florentijn Hofman has floated since 2007 in cities from from Ducks that Holland’s Studio Floren Pittsburgh’s own, custom-built Duck. Trust vice-president Hong Kong to Sao Paolo, this is Pit who curated the festival, says the Duck is being manuof programming Paul Organisak, w

6

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

factured from vinyl at Brunswick, Ohio’s Inflatable Images. While other cities’ Ducks have topped 50 feet, ours is just 40 feet so it can duck under the Fort Duquesne Bridge. (The massive pontoon the Duck will ride is being made at Western Pennsylvania Steel Fabrication, in New Castle.) Considering the splash the Duck made overseas, how did Pittsburgh become the first North American city to bag it? Organisak says he simply asked.


Organisak also runs the Trust’s Pittsburgh Dance Council, and routinely spends many weeks each year overseas, scouting artists. He says that over the past 18 months, he spent 20 weeks on the road — not counting New York trips — and pursued 50 artists before securing the eight who comprise the festival. But the Duck first appeared to him online as he sat in Pittsburgh, via a 2012 email blast from Australia’s Sydney Festival. “As soon as I saw the Duck in Sydney, I said, ‘That’s it,’” Organisak says. He immediately emailed Hofman, and negotiated the Duck’s U.S. premiere (including a provision that no Ducks will visit other U.S. cities until January). The yellow Duck is no golden calf: Its appeal is both obvious and elusive. It’s this festival’s signature spectacle, much like the riverfront Theatre Titanik at the 2004 Festival of Firsts. In a culture where many people consider contemporary art inaccessible, says Organisak, such spectacle is “a way of bringing the city together around an art experience.” On an aesthetic level, the Duck recalls the work of sculptor Claes Oldenburg, whose oversized replicas of everyday objects (“Clothespin,” “Typewriter Eraser”) similarly recast their environments. The Duck also demands a certain mystery: Organisak says that Hofman insists that the Duck simply appear, and bob about absent any explanatory signage. It will be moored at the Point until Oct. 20. But enough about the Duck. While the Festival of Firsts does include other visual art — solo and collaborative light-and-sound installations by Austrianborn Kurt Hentschlager, at venues including Wood Street Galleries and Space Gallery — most attractions are performances. (By the way, Organisak acknowledges the Eurocentricity of the festival’s artist roster. But he says that his attempts to book artists bending theater. Kiss & Cry (Oct. 2-4), a U.S. premiere by from other parts of the world — one Middle-Eastern theater piece in particular — Belgium’s NanoDanses, is like live filmwere hamstrung by logistical problems like making: Actors’ hands on a miniature set perform the story of a woman who, cost and uncertainty over visas.) near life’s end, recalls her greatMontreal-based modernest loves, all while the action dance troupe Compagnie PITTSBURGH is projected on screen at Marie Chouinard’s Sept. the New Hazlett Theater. INTERNATIONAL 28 program includes the The Pigeoning (Oct. 9U.S. premiere of “GymFESTIVAL 12) is Brooklyn-based nopedies,” set to music OF FIRSTS puppeteer Robin Froby Satie. On Oct. 18 and Sept. 27-Oct. 26. Various venues, Downtown and North Side. hardt’s world-premiere 19, Swiss troupe ZimTicket prices vary. dark comedy about an merman & de Perrot 412-456-6666 obsessive-compulsive ofperform the U.S. premiere or www.trustarts.org fice worker’s distaste for of Hans Was Heiri, a circuspigeons, performed in the intilike, acrobatics-heavy piece mate Bricolage Productions space, for seven performers on a stage that rotates on a horizontal axis. (Think: at 937 Liberty Ave. It’s Dark Outside (Oct. 9-12) was well Cut-away house rotating like a pinwheel.) The remaining five acts are genre- received at this year’s prestigious Edinburgh

Pittsburgh Premiere Like live filmmaking: NanoDanses’ Kiss & Cry, Oct. 2-4

Fringe Festival. Australia’s Perth Theatre Company presents this play blending puppetry, mask work, animation and live performance in “a grand epic Western about adventure, redemption and dementia.” Measure Back (Oct. 22-26) sounds darker still. New York-based Christopher McElroen and T. Ryder Smith’s ever-timely performance work explores how both the mass media and everyday citizens respond to war. The world-premiere piece, which includes audience participation, is staged for audiences of 40 or fewer on the fifth floor of the Baum Building (above Space Gallery). Also of an ultimately political bent is The God That Comes (Oct. 24-26). Nova Scotia-based Hawksley Workman’s wild one-man cabaret is a rock ’n’ roll retelling of the story of Bacchus, the god of wine, based largely on Euripdes’ The Bacchae, about a revolt against an oppressive king. DR ISC O L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Recording Artists

Jose Fajardo, Jr. y su Orquesta Classic Cuban Charanga Sound

Friday, Nov. 8

10:30pm

Tickets on Sale Sept. 13 www.trustarts.org or 412-456-6666

IMPROV, FEATURES THURSDAY . THE CABARET ALSOURDAY LATE-NIGHT COMEDY EVENTS D SAT SALSA FRIDAYS, AN

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE 655 PENN AVENUE

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2013

7


Art by Tammy Rae Cartland from Alien She, Sept. 21-Feb. 16, at Miller Gallery

VISUAL ART V

27-Dec. 31), at Wood Street Galleries, is an immersive 3-D animation of motion, light and sound, and his ZEE (Sept. 27-Oct. 27), at {BY NADINE WASSERMAN}} 943 Liberty Avenue, is a dense fog that “obLIGHT AND SOUND are suddenly quite scures the gallery walls, floor and ceiling,” prominent in the visual arts. In New York, accompanied by a droning soundscape. Probably less disorienting will be James Turrell’s shifting light installathe Festival’s “The Rubber Duck” tion fills the Guggenheim rotunda, ..(Sept. 27-Oct. 20), a fourwhile Soundings: A Contempo..story-high ducky created by rary Score, at the Museum FALL ARTS ..Studio Florentijn Hofman of Modern Art, features ..that will float on the sound artists from a {EVENT} Allegheny River. variety of disciplines. The Allegheny Regional Too much natural Locally this fall, Asset District presents RADical light? Seek out PittsDays, its annual slate of free the Pittsburgh Cultural performances, events and burgh’s own permanent Trust’s Pittsburgh Interexhibits around town. Turrell installations at national Festival of Firsts Sept. 21-Nov. 10. The Mattress Factory, will include several audiowww.radworks then check out three new visual installations. At here.org installation-style shows there: Space Gallery, Granular SynDetroit: Artists in Residence (Sept. thesis (Sept. 27-Oct. 20), by Kurt 13-May 25); Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Hentschlager and Ulf Langheinrich, will fuse sight and sound in a manner that will Memory (Sept. 13 into next summer); and alter perception. Hentschlager’s Hive (Sept. Janine Antoni (Sept. 13-May 26).

HIGHLIGHT

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS COMING SOON FROM SETON HILL THEATRE & DANCE Comedy of Errors by William Shakespeare

September 27–October 5

FOR A FULL LISTING OF UPCOMING PERFORMANCES, VISIT

setonhill.edu/arts.

8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


Still, no doubt the season’s most anticipated group show is the Carnegie International (Oct. 5-March 16) at the Carnegie Museum of Art, a major exhibition of new international art that will include a series of large-scale commissions. Other new or forthcoming one-person shows are: Yasumasa Morimura: Theater of the Self (Oct. 6-Jan. 12), The Andy Warhol Museum’s 30-year retrospective honoring this Japanese photographer fascinated with self-portrait, celebrity, gay and transgender life and art history; Akiko Kotani: Artist of the Year and work by Emerging Artist of the Year Lenka Clayton (both through Nov. 3), at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts; the painting show Fragmentation: New Works by Seth Clark (Sept. 17-Oct. 12), at Box Heart Art by Yasumasa Morimura from Yasumasa Gallery; HOLDUP in the HOOD: Francis Morimura: Theater of the Self, Oct. 6-Jan. 12, Crisafio (photography) at Gallery 707, and at The Andy Warhol Museum Proud To Be An American?, photographs by Rebecca Chiappelli, at Gallery 709 (both raphy exhibit Clayton Days Revisited: A Project by Vik Muniz (through Oct. 27). Sept. 13-Nov. 3); and Oasis (Sept. 13Also at the Frick, to mark the Nov. 2), paintings by Leslie Ansesquicentennial of the Battle sley, at Sweetwater Center FALL ARTS of Gettysburg, is Civil War for the Arts. Continuing at Era Drawings From the the Frick Art & Historical {OPERA} Collection (Nov. 9Becker C Center is the photogPittsburgh Opera stages 12). Violence today Jan. 12) Verdi’s classic Aida, .is the ttopic of ENOUGH Oct. 12, 15, 18 and 20, ..Violence: Artists Speak ..Violenc with soprano Latonia at the Society ..Out a Moore. Benedum Contemporary Craft for Cont Center, Downtown. 27-March 22). And (Sept. 27www.pittsburgh opera.org response to sexist, racin respons homophobic violence, ist and homo She, at Carnegie there’s Alien Sh (Sept. 21-Feb. 16), Mellon’s Miller Gallery (S and cultural proan examination of art an duction influenced by tthe 1990s Riot Grrrl movement. Other group shows will cover a range of topics. Green at Silver Eye Center for Photography y (through Oct. 5) explores the “purposely ambiguous idea” of “green” lifestyle and more. as a noun, adjective, lif Artists: Preserving the Master Visual Artists Legacy, y at Pittsburgh Center for the 3), honors artists Arts (through Nov. 3 have had a signifi60 and older who ha cant impact on our region. Continuing at Pittsburgh Glass Gla Center is Lifeforms (through Nov. 17), 17 an homage to and extension of Rudolf and Leopold Rud Blaschka’s glass biological models. biolog Work on a larger scale appears at the Carrie Furnaces National Historic N Landmark, where Alloy Allo Pittsburgh, an arts initiative co-found co-founded by Sean Derry and Chris McGinnis, in collaboration with co the Rivers of Steel National Nationa Heritage Area and the Kipp Gallery at In Indiana University of Pennsylvania, will prese present 15 temporary site-based artworks by em emerging regional artists. The exhibit opens S Sept. 28.

The Piano Hawk Used & new • bought & sold

20% OFF with this ad on our

outstanding selection of BOOKS. (offer expires 10/15)

929 Liberty Ave in Downtown Pgh’s Cultural District

412-471-1899

Open Sun 11:30-4pm, Mon-wed 11:30-6pm, Thur 11:30-8pm, fri 11:30-7pm, closed sat Store closed September 19,20,26 & 27

PIANO TUNING & REPAIR Emily Hawkins 412-407-4266

Art by Claudia Alvarez from ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out, Sept. 27March 22, at Society for Contemporary Craft

HIGHLIGHT

I N F O@P O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Join us as we celebrate creativity and the fall season, for the 8th annual ‘Art Under Glass’ festival, featuring: local artists & crafters, live entertainment, hayrides to the pumpkin patch, wine tasting, and more!

EVERY WEEKEND IN OCTOBER 11AM-5PM

The Squirrel Hillbillies October 20, 1:00-3:30pm

Adam Brock October 26, 11:30-1:30pm

Hayrides will take place every weekend in October during the fall festival. They will run throughout the day from 11:00 am till 5:00 pm. The All-Inclusive Fee Includes: hayride to the pumpkin patch, corn maze, pumpkin launch. 315 Coleman Rd. McDonald, PA 15057 724.926.2541 Located in Cecil Twp., minutes ffrom Bridgeville Exit off ff I-79

bednersgreenhouse.com for the complete schedule CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2013

9


The Palace Theatre Highlights! F/S/S Thu Fri Sat Fri Sat Fri Sat

Stage Right presents Disney’s My Son Pinocchio Latshaw Productions: Kenny Vance/The Planotones Latshaw: Michael English w/guests The Easters Elko Concerts presents Tower Of Power Latshaw Productions presents Sha Na Na River City Brass presents Autumn Leaves Elko Concerts presents Dave Mason Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Laurel Region presents The Clarks Oct 13 Sun Westmoreland Cultural Trust: An Acoustic Evening with Mary Chapin Carpenter & Shawn Colvin Oct 15 Tue WCT presents Menopause The Musical Oct 24 Thu Latshaw Productions presents Herman’s Hermits starring Peter Noone plus The Marcels Oct 26 Sat Elko: Jonas Brothers with opener Bonnie Mckee Nov 2 Sat Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra’s Opening Night Nov 3 Sun WCT presents Cyndi Lauper/She’s So Unusual Tour Nov 6/7 We/Th Westmoreland Cultural Trust presents Blue Man Group Nov 10 Sun Elko Concerts presents Matt Nathanson: Last of the Great Pretenders Tour w/Joshua Radin Nov 12 Tue Elko Concerts presents Jonny Lang Nov 14 Thu Mills Entertainment presents Buddy Valastro: The Cake Boss - The Family Celebrations Tour Nov 15 Fri Elko Concerts presents Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo Nov 16 Sat Latshaw Productions: An Evening with Amy Grant Nov 17 Sun Latshaw: Trace Adkins The Christmas Show Nov 22-24 F/S/S Stage Right presents Shrek The Musical Nov 29 Fri WCT: Theatre IV‘s The Shoemaker/Christmas Elves Dec 5 Thu Latshaw: The Temptations’ Christmas & Hits Dec 6 Fri Latshaw Productions presents Michael McDonald This Christmas, Evening of Holiday & Hits PalacePA

Sep 20-22 Sep 26 Sep 27 Sep 28 Oct 4 Oct 5 Oct 11 Oct 12

JONAS BROTH ERS

CYNDI LAUPER

BLUE MAN GRO UP

KINS TRACE AD

The Palace Theatre, Greensburg 724-836-8000 • www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS The Pillow Project’s The Jazz Furnace, Oct. 12

DANCE E

installment of her site-specific series that’s what she said, Sept. 28 at Assemble. {BY STEVE SUCATO} Also on Sept. 28, The Pittsburgh Dance Council opens its season with Montreal’s PITTSBURGH’S DANCE scene has seen lots acclaimed Compagnie Marie Chouinard, of changes of late, including the addition world-premiering a new work at the of new dance troupes Geeksdanz, Maree Byham Theater as part of the Pittsburgh ReMalia/merrygogo and Yes Brain Dance Cultural Trust’s Pittsburgh International Theater. Most recently there is Reed- Festival of Firsts. On Oct. 18-19, the fesDance, the retooled successor to the now- tival and the PDC season continue as defunct August Wilson Center Dance circus arts meet dance in Swiss duo Ensemble, still headed by Greer Zimmermann & de Perrot’s Reed. The fall dance season Hans Was Heiri, at the FALL ARTS includes both the new and August Wilson Center. the familiar. Bodiography Contem{EXHIBIT} Texture Contempoporary Ballet spreads Artist Tommy Joseph rary Ballet goes Nearly a little Light and Joy carves a 16-foot Tlingit totem Wild in its seasonSept. 29 alongside the pole on site at the Carnegie opener Sept. 20-22 at Westmoreland Choral Museum of Natural History. the New Hazlett TheSociety and the PittsNov. 25-Dec. 15. Oakland. ater, featuring Kelsey burgh Festival Orcheswww.carnegiemnh.org Bartman’s new work “The tra, at Seton Hill UniverRose.” The company then sity. Bodiography then teams heads to Pittsburgh Dance with La Roche College Nov. 15Center Nov. 23 for WIP, a works-in16 for its annual Multiplicity progress showing. On Sept. 20-21, Wood showcase, at the Byham. Street Galleries present Light Lab, two The Kelly-Strayhorn Theater launches evenings of dance with works by Maree its season Oct. 3-5 with the newMoves ReMalia, Taylor Knight, Jasmine Hearn Contemporary Dance Festival, featuring and others. Hearn then presents the fourth locals Gia Cacalano, ReedDance and

HIGHLIGHT

NEXT STOP, London!

In Cooperation with Tuskegee Airmen Memorial of the Greater Pittsburgh Region, Inc

Byham Theatre, Pittsburgh

September 14, 2013 • 8pm For Tickets: 412-456-6666 The Box Office at Theater Square - 665 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online at TrustArts.org 10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Ad sponsored by

State Farm

CONTINUES ON PG. 12


Audition forMurder September 21 Gaetano’s Gaet G Ga aet etan ano’s a no’s o’s s Restaurant 1617 BANKSVILLE BANKSV ROAD Order tickets online: www.eatdrinkmurder www. eatdrinkmurder.org .org

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2013

11


FALL ARTS PREVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

Continuum Dance Theater performs Objects of DESIRE on Dec. 14.

Staycee Pearl Dance Project (SPdp), plus of Twyla Tharp. The Oct. 25-27 program visiting talent. On Nov. 1, Fresh Friday, at includes Tharp masterworks “In the Upper KST’s Alloy Studios showcases works by Room” and “Nine Sinatra Songs.” And from Maree ReMalia and Jil Stifel. Murphy/ Dec. 6-29, PBT’s holiday favorite The NutSmith Dance Collective rounds out KST’s cracker returns; both PBT productions are season Nov. 15-16 with the premiere of at the Benedum Center. Rounding out 2013: The inaugural See What I Hear, exploring the relationPittsburgh Bellydance Festival launches ship between sound and human instinct. Nov. 1-3, featuring The BellyPoint Park University’s Conser...Off competition at Pittsvatory Dance Company opens burgh Dance Center; SPdp its season Oct. 4-6 with FALL ARTS presents a work-in-progthe Student Choreography ress showing of Staycee Project. Then the troupe {EVENT} ...Pearl’s I’d rather not performs works by Kyle Handmade Arcade holds ...say, at PearlArts StuAbraham and others in its annual Holiday Craft Fair. ...dios on Nov. 15; the Contemporary ChoreogDec. 7. David L. Lawrence ...Duquesne University raphers, on Nov. 15-24; Convention Center, Downtown. ..Tamburitzans perform both productions are at www.handmade Nov. 23, at West Mifflin George Rowland White arcade.com Middle School; and ContinPerformance Studio. And uum Dance Theater worldDec. 10-15, the company perpremieres Objects of DESIRE, its forms Nicolas Petrov’s Romeo & show developed through a series of comJuliet at the Pittsburgh Playhouse. The Pillow Project returns to its munity workshops, Dec. 14 at the New large-scale performance roots with The Hazlett Theater. Jazz Furnace, Oct. 12 at The Carrie Blast I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM Furnace site in Rankin/Swissvale. The multimedia happening features the company’s signature “Freejazz” improvisational movement style. For Attack Theatre, TV crime dramas {BY ANDY MULKERIN} N} are the theme in The Chalk Line, Oct.25Nov. 9 at Attack’s Spring Way Studio. And AS PITTSBURGH’S reputation as a liveDec. 6-7 at Pittsburgh Opera’s George music town continues to revive, we see a R. White Studio, Attack presents its number of musicians who haven’t visited annual family-friendly program, Holiday in years returning this fall. Unwrapped. Also for the kids, Geeksdanz The last Pittsburgh appearance for gets a jump on Halloween with the ghostly Icelandic post-rockers Sigur Ros was a deManifestations, Oct. 19 at Steel City cade ago, at the Byham Theater. On Sept. Improv Theater. 19, they come back, this time to Stage AE. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre pays homage Love-and-politics balladeer Billy Bragg was to dance icon Twyla Tharp in An Evening last here in 1997, when he was traveling

HIGHLIGHT

MUSIC M C

CONTINUES ON PG. 14

12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


“...change the way you see the world.” — Travel+Leisure Magazine

FA L L I N G WAT E R . ORG CARMAA presents

Sunday, October 27

VICTORIA STILWELL and THE POWER OF POSITIVE TRAINING

Duquesne University Union Ballroom

LECTURE 1 to 3 pm — $40

600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (parking available in Duquesne’s Forbes Avenue garage)

The Power of Positive Training

Register today at: VIP LUNCH 11 to 1 pm — $125 “Meet and Mingle with Victoria”

carmaa-petadoption.com or call

412-780-4983

Sponsored by

Duquesne University Animal Law Society

McDonoughMuseum of Art

Graphic Advocacy International Posters for the Digital Age 2001-2012

September 12 - November 8

Museum Hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 11am - 4pm. phone 330.941.140 525 Wick Ave.Youngstown State University, Youngstown, Ohio 44502 mcdonoughmuseum.ysu.edu

Organized by Professor Elizabeth Resnic and Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Boston

YSU’s Center for Contemporary Ideas, Art, Education + Community

opening reception thursday, sept 12, 6-8pm + lecture by curator Elizabeth Resnick, 5-6pm CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2013

13


FALL ARTS PREVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

Watch Championship Chase on the Pittsburgh Cable News Network (PCNC). Ty Miller, Tom Pungin, Brian Cook and Dee Thompson give a different perspective on your Steelers and other NFL teams. Liz Costa, Michele Newell and Jonas Chaney provide feature reports and interviews with players and in-studio guests. Championship Chase airs on PCNC Fridays @ 7:30pm, Saturdays @ 8pm and Sundays @ Noon

along “the Mon”

5 FAB Fall

Events

along ong the th Monongahela River, PA’s 2013 River of the Year

FestiFall at Friendship Hill Sept. 21 & 22

Brownsville Nemacolin Castle

Historic Brownsville Walk with Venture Outdoors

Sept. 29

Greensboro All-town Yard Sale Oct. 5

Friendship Hill

Appalachian Bicycle Racing Association Cyclocross race Oct. 5 in Point Marion

Point Marion

Nemacolin Castle Candlelight Tour Nov. 29 Morgantown

Mon River of the Year marketing materials are supported by the Laurel Highlands Visitors Bureau through the Fayette County Tourism Grant Program.

visit www.monrivertowns.com for more info

about the U.S. working with Wilco on a Project on Sept. 27 includes Don Giovanni new project called Mermaid Avenue. On Records standouts Screaming Females, Waxahatchee and Tenement. Oct. 1, he makes his return, playFor the hip-hop crowd, a ing Mr. Small’s. It’s been a few few shows are on the radar years, too, since we’ve seen FALL ARTS for late September: At Altar Rancid around these parts; Bar, Danny Brown appears the legendary Bay Area Sept. 26; at Stage AE, Wale punks make it to Stage AE {COMEDY} Sept. 29. Sept. 13. performs on Sep Jerry Seinfeld at the The Andy If you like your shows Much of T Benedum Center, Downtown. Oct. 5. Museum’s fall a little more intimate, Warhol Museu www.trustarts.org programming a killer lineup at Sound Series prog September, the Mr. Roboto takes place in S though it continues through Niblett (Sept. mid-November. Scout Nib garage hero 19), Angel Olsen (Sept. 24) and g Kurt Vile (Sept. 25) all perform within a one-week span; Bill Callahan returns to singer Jenny town Oct. 9, Norwegian sin Pittsburgh debut Hval makes her Pittsbu Nov. 1, and poetic Baltimore synth-pop outfit Future IsNov. 15. (Kurt lands plays Nov Vile and Bill Callahan’s take place show both ta at Carnegie Museum Oakland.) venues in Oa In early October, come to exwe’ve com falling leaves pect falli and VIA, tthe annual ..electronic-music..electron ..-and-much-more ..-and-m ..festival. It spans ..several venues runs Oct. 1-4, ..and run featuring everyone Chicago rapfrom Chi Chief Keef to per Chie garage-pop weirdos garage-po and someU.S. Girls a times-Pittsburghtimes-Pit based Wise Blood. heads, some of Old head

HIGHLIGHT

Wale, Sept. 29

Autumn Day-Tripping

Pittsburgh tsb

Sigur Ros, Sept. 19

CONTINUES ON PG. 20

14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


PITTSBURGH

CULTURAL

TRUST

BVS>WbbaPc`UV1cZbc`OZB`cabWa^`]cRb]^`SaS\bVc\R`SRa]T^`]U`O[abVWagSO`bVObeWZZ S\VO\QSZWTSW\bVS>WbbaPc`UVO`SO/RWdS`aS[Wf]T0`]OReOg[caWQRO\QSdWacOZO`b W\bS`OQbWdSe]`YaV]^aO\Rc\RSÂż\OPZSSf^S`WS\QSaÂżZZbVSQ][W\U[]\bVa B@GA=;3B67<5<3EB67AG3/@/@B1/<16/<53:7D3A/<2E36=>3B=16/<53G=C@A

Celtic Thunder Sunday, October 6 | Benedum Center

Marilyn Maye Monday, October 6 | Cabaret Theater

Disneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s THE LION KING September 3-29 | Benedum Center

SPANK! The Fify Shades Parody September 19-21 | Byham Theater

The Rubber Duck Project Launching September 27

Compagnie Marie Choiuinard Saturday, September 28 | Byham Theater

Nanodanses | Kiss & Cry October 2-4 | New Hazlett Theater

The Pigeoning October 9-12 | 937 Liberty

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dark Outside October 9-12 | Trust Arts Education Center

Zimmermann & de Perrot October 18 & 19 | Byham Theater

Peter Pan October 20-27 | Various Locations

Measure Back October 22-26 | Baum Building

The God That Comes We Will Rock You October 24-26 | Cabaret at Theater Square October 29-November 3 | Benedum Center

Maureen McGovern Monday, November 4 | Cabaret Theater

Sweet Honey In The RockÂŽ Saturday, November 9 | Byham Theater

Selling England By The Pound Wednesday, November 13 | Byham Theater

Time For Fun November 17-24 | Various Locations

Potted Potter November 20-24 | Byham Theater

The Three Sleuths Straight No Chaser Wednesday, November 20 | Benedum Center Wednesday, December 11 | Benedum Center

0]f=TÂżQSObBVSObS`A_cO`SÂ&#x2019;B`cab/`ba]`U " "#$$$$$Â&#x2019;5`]c^aBWQYSba" "%$'! CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2013

15


THIS ONE IS GOING TO BE HUGE

GALLERY CRAWL in the Cultural District

'SJEBZ 4FQUFNCFS  QN

TRUSTARTS.ORG/Crawlt FREE ADMISSION TO ALL EVENTS Presented by THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST Department of Education and Community Engagement

Official launch party of The Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts 16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Other Sponsors:


EVERYONE REMEMBERS THEIR FIRST.

A PROJECT OF

Never before seen artists and performances.

TrustArts.org/first

SEP 27-OCT 26, 2013

Supported by The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, two anonymous donors, the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, the Carol R. Brown Performance Fund, the Buhl Foundation, The Heinz Endowments, the Hillman Foundation, the Richard King Mellon Foundation, The Pittsburgh Foundation, and the Snee-Reinhardt Charitable Foundation.

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2013

17


I M AG I N AT I O N U N TA M E D

SEPTEMBER 3-29, 2013

Photo by Lois Greenfield P

BENEDUM

CENTER

The Broadway Musical

OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 3, 2013 BENEDUM CENTER

NOVEMBER 26-DECEMBER 1, 2013 BENEDUM CENTER

DECEMBER 31-JANUARY 5, 2014 HEINZ HALL

FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 2, 2014 BENEDUM CENTER

MARCH 11-16, 2014 BENEDUM CENTER

TRUSTARTS.ORG

MAY 20-25, 2014 HEINZ HALL

SEASON TICKETS GROUP TICKETS

412-456-1390 412-471-6930

PNC Broadway Across America – Pittsburgh is a presentation of The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Pittsburgh Symphony and Broadway Across America. “Broadway Across America” is a registered service mark of Key Brand Entertainment, Inc. All rights reserved.

18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS TrustArts.org/Education Join us ever y month for Second Saturday Art Workshops in the Trust Arts Education Center. Th es e s tu d i o wo r ks h o p s w it h in c lu de a variet y of c las s es in c lu din g j ewelr y makin g, pa inting, car to o n i n g, p u p p et m aki n g, qu ilt in g, an d mo re. SEPTEMBER 14, 2013

STORY QUILTS 1 0-2pm $ 40 A l l Leve l s /A l l Ag e s

TWIN HERRINGBONE BRACELET

EXPLORING ABSTRACT PAINTING

APRIL 12

1 1 -2p m $ 40 A l l Leve l s /Ad u l t

1 1 -2pm $40 For a l l l eve l s

JANUARY 11, 2014

JEWELRY MAKING

1 1- 2pm $ 40 A l l Leve l s /Ad u l t

1 1 –2p m Fee: $50, includes materials F or Ages 1 5 and ol de r

OCTOBER 12

UPCYCLE YOUR STYLE!

PITTSBURGH SKETCH CRAWL

1 1 -2p m $ 35 F or 6 th, 7 th, and 8t h G ra de A rti s ts

1 0-4pm Free All Ag es (c h i l d re n 16 and under m u s t b e acco mpa n i e d by a n a d u l t )

MASTER THE PORTRAIT

SWIMMY, FREDERICK INCH BY INCH: ILLUSTRATION AND COLLAGE

CAMP BROADWAY EXP

NOVEMBER 9

1 1 –2p m Fee: $50, includes materials F or Ages 1 5 and ol de r

JULY 12

THE IMPRESSIONIST LANDSCAPE

FELTED ANIMALS 1 1- 2pm $ 40 A l l Leve l s /Ag e s 1 2 a n d U p

DECEMBER 14

FAMILY PUPPET MAKING WORKSHOP FOR THE FEDEX GROUND PARADE AT HIGHMARK FIRST NIGHT PITTSBURGH 2014 1 1- 2pm Free All Ag es

MARCH 8

HOW TO APPROACH A GALLERY FOR REPRESENTATION 1 1 -2p m F ee: $ 40 A l l l evel s

MOSAICS 1 1 -2p m $25 (includes materials) F or Hi gh School Ar t i s t s

BELLY DANCE

MAY 10

JEWELRY MAKING: THE ELIZABETH TAYLOR BRACELET

1 -2p m $ 25 Parent & Chi l d Toge t h e r

Wed nes da ys , 6 -7: 3 0 pm Oct . 9, 1 6 , 2 3 , Nov 6 , 1 3 , 2 0 $ 10, Trus t Art s Educ a t ion Center, 805 L ibert y Avenue

Thurs da ys , 6 : 3 0-7: 3 0 pm O c t . 1 0 , 1 7, 24 , N ov. 7, 1 4 , 2 1 $ 10, Trus t Art s Educ a t ion Center, 805 L ibert y Avenue

FEBRUARY 8

OZ PUPPETS

YOGA

1 -2pm $25 Pa re n t & Ch i l d Toge t h e r

PITTSBURGH SKETCH CRAWL

1 1–2pm $ 40 All Level /Ad u l t

OTHER WORKSHOPS THIS SEASON:

1 0 -4 pm Fre e Al l Age s

S a t u rd a y, A p r i l 2 6 , 2 0 1 4 9am-5 pm Ages 1 0- 1 3 Tuit io n $1 2 5 No ex perienc e nec es s a r y! (Recom m ended for beginner to intermediate levels, though all skill levels a re welc om e.)

PASTEL PAINTING

THE YOUNG WRITERS INSTITUTE

1 1 -2pm $40 For a l l l eve l s

Saturdays, Januar y 25–March 1 Grad es 4 - 8 m eet 1 0- 1 pm Grad es 9- 1 2 m eet 1 2 - 3 pm Tuit io n $2 5 0

AUGUST 9

DRAWING THE CLOTHED FIGURE

For m ore in form a t ion, visit w w w.w pw p.pit t .e d u /yo u t h /y w i call 4 1 2- 624 - 6557 , or ema il wpwp@pit t .edu

1 1 – 2 pm $40 For a l l l eve l s

PUPPET MAKING HAPPY HOUR FOR THE FEDEX GROUND PARADE AT HIGHMARK FIRST NIGHT PITTSBURGH 2014 5:30- 8pm Thurs da y, D ec em ber 1 2 , 2 01 3 Free, Trus t Art s Educ a t ion Center Ages 2 1 + For more in formation or to register visit Tru st A rt s.o rg/Ed u c at io n Call 4 1 2- 4 7 1 - 60 7 9

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2013

19


FALL ARTS PREVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 14

Sweet Honey in the Rock, Nov. 9

whom were aghast a couple of years ago Still Loves You Boris Yeltsin, the Midwestwhen a cleaned-up Trent Reznor accepted ern indie band with the name that won an Oscar for his score for The Social Network, them a trip to Moscow, plays the William will appreciate the return of Nine Inch Pitt Union at Pitt; Oct. 26, Mt. Kimbie Nails, playing the Petersen Events Center plays CMU. CocoRosie is back with a new alat Pitt Oct. 8, with openers Explosions bum and appears Nov. 8 at Alin the Sky. It’s something of a tar Bar; the following night, homecoming for the MercerFALL ARTS up-and-coming duo Pure born, Allegheny CollegeBathing Culture plays educated Reznor. {MUSIC} Club Café. And for a Perpetual it-band.. Pittsburgh Symphony complete change of Sleigh Bells comes.. performs Orff’s choral pace, also Nov. 9, Sweet back to Mr. Small’s masterpiece Carmina Burana, Honey in the Rock, the Oct. 4; those who enjoy Beethoven and more. ensemble that comear-splittingness might Oct. 4-6. Heinz Hall, bines spirituals, gospel also cotton to Broncho, Downtown. www.pso. and more in a moving the garage-rock sensamovi culturaldistrict.org display of a cappella taltions from Oklahoma, who t ent, plays the Byham Theater play Brillobox Nov. 5. Theat on its 40th anniversary tour. On the lighter side, two of the gems of the singer-songIt’s a tale of two guitarists with wi writer vein, Mary Chapin Carthe same first name on Nov. 12; 1 penter and Shawn Colvin, are mopers and Anglophiles will w welteaming up for a duo tour this come former Smiths (and Mo Modfall; it lands at the Palace Theater est Mouse, and more) guitarist guitar in Greensburg Oct. 13. The younger Johnny Marr to Mr. Small’s, while wh set might be more interested in check bluesy types will want to che the Jonas Brothers, who play the CONTINUES ON PG. 22 Palace Oct. 26, proving that the window of opportunity for a boy band to sell out arenas is fleeting indeed. The college kids always bring some interesting stuff — while Pitt and Carnegie Mellon both have their big music events in the spring, there are a few campus shows worth checking out this fall. On Oct. 25, Someone

20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

FARM ®

Billy Bragg, Oct. 1

AX

S

TR

HIGHLIGHT


The Palace Theatre

PRESENTS:

Greensburg, PA

KENNY VANCE AND THE PLANOTONES

Thur • Sept. 26 • 8PM

MICHAEL ENGLISH W/GUESTS THE EASTERS

Fri. • Sept. 27 • 2 & 8PM

SHA NA NA

Fri. • October 4 • 8PM

HERMAN’S HERMITS PETER NOONE PLUS THE MARCELS Thu. • October 24 • 8PM

AN EVENING WITH AMY GRANT

Sat. • November 16 • 8PM

TRACE ADKINS THE CHRISTMAS SHOW

Sun. • November 17 • 7:30PM

THE TEMPTATIONS CHRISTMAS & HITS

AN EPIC ONE-DAY PERFORMANCE EVENT AT THE CARRIE BLAST FURNACE SITE OCTOBER 12, 2013

Thu. • December 5 • 8PM

MICHAEL MCDONALD HOLIDAY & HITS

Fri. • December 6 • 8PM

CHRISTMAS MEMORIES LATSHAW POPS ORCHESTRA

Tues. • Dec. 10 • 2&8PM

Call The Palace Theatre

724.836.8000

SITE TOURS WITH INSTA L L ATION S : N O O N – 5P M PERF ORMA NCES & L IV E MUSIC : 7P M – M I DN I G HT TICKETS: $ 1 5 STUD ENTS: $ 10

F OR MORE D ETA IL S, V ISIT:

THEJAZZFURNACE.COM ©2013 THE PILLOW PROJECT

www.ThePalaceTheatre.org CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2013

21


FALL ARTS PREVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 20

WILD & WONDERFUL WINE WEEKEND

15 17 2013 NOVEMBER 15-17,

Taste wines from around the world, paired with culinary delicacies, during this three-day gourmet wine event. All inclusive package includes 2 nights lodging, event activities/meals for two people: $499. Individual Package: $290 160 New Hotel Rooms • Renovated Main Lodge Building Seasonal Recreational Activities Reservations required by calling 800-622-4121. For a full schedule of events and menus, visit us online!

CanaanResort.com • 800.622.4121

Waxahatchee, Sept. 27

out onetime wunderkind Jonny Lang at siblings and their movie-star sister. City follows with Ted Dykstra and Richard Greenthe Palace Theater. November looks good for metalheads blatt’s 2 Pianos 4 Hands (Nov. 30-Dec. 22), a new-to-Pittsburgh two-actor romp at Stage AE; on Nov. 20, Slayer about childhood friends pursuappears, and Nov. 25, Lamb FALL ARTS ing their dream of concertof God is back, giving piano stardom. plenty for you to thank {OUTDOORS} A play that made a Satan for before your New York splash in 2011 Venture Outdoors leads Thanksgiving dinner the Snyder Cemetery Hike was Stephen Adly Guirthe following week. & Picnic Hike, including local gis’ The Motherfucker And we’d be remiss ghost stories and a picnic. With the Hat, a gritty if we didn’t mention the Oct. 20. Moraine State Park, comedic drama about show that will highlight Portersville, Pa. www. gritty New Yorkers. baremany people’s fall conventureoutdoors.org bones productions, which cert calendars: Just in time staged Guirgis’ Jesus Hopped for the holidays, arguably the ‘A’ Train last year, has the the most popular man in music, Justin Timberlake, headlines Consol Pittsburgh premiere (Nov. 21-Dec. 8). Two local premieres are much belated. Energy Center Dec. 14 on his 20/20 No Pittsburgh troupe has yet staged A Experience World Tour. Skull in Connemara, the darkly comic 1997 AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M whodunnit by Irish bad-boy auteur Martin McDonagh (The Lieutenant of Inishmore). Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre corrects that omission with a production starring nationally credited actor James Keegan {{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}} (Sept. 11-28). And University of Pittsburgh THE SEASON’S roster of plays has a distinct Stages has the Pittsburgh premiere of tilt toward new and recent work. That Venus, Pulitzer-winner Suzan-Lori Parks’ 1996 work about the means a ton of African woman who local premieres — 200 years ago was always good news exploited in British for theater fans. freakshows as the A 2012 BroadHottentot Venus way hit, for in(Oct. 24-Nov. 3). stance, kicks things One highlight off for City Theatre: James of the 2011 season Vanya and Sonia Keegan in was City Theatre’s and Masha and A Skull in Connemara, production of MadSpike (Oct. 12-Nov. Sept. 11-28 eleine George’s 3), by City favorite thought-provoking Christopher DuPrecious Little. Now rang, concerns a George’s 2010 play wild, comic family Zero Hour — an reunion between “almost-love story” dull, middle-aged

HIGHLIGHT

STAGE E

CONTINUES ON PG. 24

22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


Presented by Allegheny Health Network

Sept. 14–15 | 10 am – 5 pm Stroll through a variety of health-related vendors to participate in hands-on activities, including sports demos, health screenings, healthy cooking, and sampling — plus a yoga class for kids!

Register by Friday for Fam ily Bike Ride with former Steeler Chris Hoke and KDKA-TV personaliti es!

bring your curiosity bring your passion bring your date Tour a world-class art collection in your own backyard.

Okay, it’s time to come clean—art is your first love. But share it with someone close to you and we’re pretty sure they’ll understand. Come open your heart at Carnegie Museum of Art.

cmoa.org | 412.622.3131

guided tours daily | members visit free shop the museum stores for creative gifts one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2013

23


FALL ARTS PREVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, Nov. 22

about two women in Queens â&#x20AC;&#x201D; premieres of Henry Jamesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ghost story The Turn of the locally at Off the Wall Theater (Oct. 25-Nov. Screw, at Prime Stage Theatre (Nov. 1-10). All the premieres notwithstanding, 9). The troupe then locally premieres Well, the critically acclaimed 2006 work by Lisa you can slake your thirst for classics, too. Arthur Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s All My Sons (through Sept. Kron (2.5 Minute Ride) (Dec. 13-28). Playwright Jez Butterworth is hot fol- 22) and The Crucible (Oct. 3-12) are on the boards at the REP and Carnegie Mellowing a 2012 best-play Tony for lon Drama, respectively. PittsJerusalem. Now, Quantum FALL ARTS burgh Public Theater begins Theatre stages the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s its â&#x20AC;&#x153;Masterpiece Seasonâ&#x20AC;? first look at Parlour Song with Thornton Wilderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (Nov. 1-24), an earlier {EXHIBIT} Our Town (Sept. 26-Oct. work by Butterworth, The Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum 27) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; featuring Tom opens TapeScape, â&#x20AC;&#x153;a massive that examines bland sculpture and indoor landscape Atkinson as the Stage suburban affluence unmade completely out packing Manager â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and Sam dercut by â&#x20AC;&#x153;illicit desires tapeâ&#x20AC;? that kids can play on. Shepardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s True West â&#x20AC;Ś painful memories â&#x20AC;Ś Oct. 19. North Side. www. (Nov. 14-Dec. 8). And Point mysterious occurrences pittsburghkids.org Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Conservatory will try and downright eerie... to get your toe tapping with disappearances.â&#x20AC;? Oklahoma! (Oct. 18-27). Even the One of Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most honwacky doings at Bricolage Productionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ored (and prolific) resident playwrights is back, as Point Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s REP stages the world Midnight Radio include the troupeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reprise premiere of Tammy Ryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soldierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Heart of Orson Wellesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; epochal radio drama War (Sept. 26-Oct. 13). Ever tuned to social is- of the Worlds (Oct. 24-Nov. 9). D RI S C OL L @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM sues, Ryan (Lost Boy Found in Whole Foods) here explores the psychological scars of a soldier returning home from the Iraq war to life as a mother. Some of the seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest plays are {BY AL HOFF} the world-premiere one-acts in the Pittsburgh New Works Festival (continuing through Sept. 29), and the commissioned, NOW THAT the mostly lackluster summerholiday-themed one-acts in Pittsburgh movie season is in our wake, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to Playwrightsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; annual Theatre Festival in look ahead to fall: better films, festivals Black and White. But surely the oldest and local treats. The first of the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Burghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two long-runto bow this season is Is He Dead?, Mark Twainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s farce about a starving artist who ning festivals to return is the 28th annual masquerades as a woman â&#x20AC;&#x201D; written in Pittsburgh International Lesbian and Gay 1898, first published in 2003 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is onstage Film Festival, now called Reel Q (www. at Little Lake Theatre Co. through Sept. 21. reelQ.org). The fest runs Oct. 11-19, and Classic stories receiving theatrical reboots offers 15 full-length films. Opening night include Jeffrey Hatcherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new adaptation is a two-fer: Reaching for the Moon, a

HIGHLIGHT

+ /,./$/+*.-,/(,.-()*

'.*//',.*%/(( %/-+/).+'.,-)#+).%

+#()*.',.-()*%/!+-,/.--.-+*//- -.*

!,.' ,//!) ,

!+.+# +'/&$"&&%/&$

        

$" "& " -*-.,*-) .()().(#

FILM

CONTINUES ON PG. 26

24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


UPMC Eye Center Eye Care & Optical

Complete optical care, from exams to contacts and fashion frames. From a world-class leader in health care.

LOCATIONS Oakland-Forbes Ave. • 412-647-PITT(7488) Oakland-UPMC Presbyterian • 412-647-2145 Uptown-UPMC Mercy • 412-232-8520

UPMC.COM/EyeCenter

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2013

25


FALL ARTS PREVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

Give Your Child An Edge in Life 9Improve Self Esteem 93 Rules of Concentra on 94 Rules of Discipline 97 Rules of Leadership 97 Magic Words 912 Bully Buster Strategies

Try 2 Free Lessons Get our FREE Info DVD & Booklet just call or visit our web site.

Rothrock’s Kung Fu & Tai Chi 2340 E. Carson St Pi sburgh 11965 Perry HWY Wexford 3222 Lebanon Church West Mifflin

Call Now!

Get all the details at: www.rothrockskungfu.com Carrie, Oct. 18

TICKETS START AT $10!

bio-pic about two lesbians in Brazil, and I shriekers on Friday and Saturday nights Am Divine, a documentary about the late throughout October, plus a slate of holiday films in December. drag queen. The Hollywood (www.thehollywoodIn October, Pittsburgh Filmmakers dormont.org) continues its rep proopens The Patience Stone (Oct. 4), gramming and David Lynch sea fable-like drama set in an ries, along with some special Afghanistan-like country; FALL ARTS events: an Ed Piskor book Birth of the Dead (Oct.25), release with screening of a doc about Night of the {STAGE} classic graffiti film Wild Living Dead; and the Pittsburgh International Style (Oct. 10); Battleship original The Wicker Man Children’s Theatre opens its Potemkin, with live mu(Oct. 28). Also in Octoseason with Theatreworks sic (Oct. 13); and special ber, the Regent Square USA’s Peter Pan. Oct. 20-27. screening events for HalTheater hosts the touring Various venues. loween and Christmas. Found Footage Festival, www.trustarts.org Speaking of local, Pittson Oct. 26. burgh — specifically BradSoon after, the 32nd andock — gets a close-up in the nual Three Rivers Film Festival (www.3rff.com) kicks off. The Filmmakers crime thriller Out of the Furnace, starring affair runs Nov. 8-23, with screenings at Christian Bale and Casey Affleck, and set to the Harris, Regent Square, Melwood and open Oct. 4. Wide-release feature films ripped from Waterworks theaters. As always, variety is key, with short features, documentaries, the headlines include: Captain Phillips (Oct. 11), in which indies and internaSomali pirates entional cinema. counter Tom Hanks; The Andy Warhol The Fifth Estate Museum (www.warJackass Presents: Bad (Oct. 11), with Benehol.org) will screen Grandpa, dict Cumberbatch as more Unseen TreaOct. 25 WikiLeaks’ Julian Assures from the George sange; and Mandela: Eastman House, inLong Walk to Freecluding restored sidom (Nov. 29), starlent films West of Zanring Idris Elba as the zibar (Sept. 20), The South African leader. Monkey Talks (Oct. 18) In the might-happen and Special Delivery d e p a r t m e nt : T h e (Nov. 8). previews for Gravity The Oaks Theater (Oct. 4), about a free(www.theoaksthefloating astronaut, ater.com) is reprising have been giving its Moonlit Matinee audiences fits. Horror Film FestiIn the remake val, screening classic

HIGHLIGHT

SEPTEMBER 26 - 7:00PM CONSOL ENERGY CENTER ALLAMERICANPROSPECTSGAME.COM

FEATURING FUTURE STARS OF THE NHL! TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW AT THE BOX OFFICE, TICKETMASTER.COM, ALL TICKETMASTER OUTLETS AND CHARGE BY PHONE AT 800-745-3000.

26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


@rt

WESTMORELAND 30 MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

The Westmoreland Museum of American Art @rt 30 is now open at 4764 State Route 30 in Greensburg, featuring pieces from the permanent collection, American Marketplace, Art on Tap and more!

Pop-Up Exhibition: Kristen Kovak

Wednesday - Friday 12 pm - 7 pm Saturday & Sunday 10 am - 5 pm The Best Man Holiday, Nov. 15

department, look for Romeo and Juliet (Oct. Dallas Buyers Club (November), about a 11), repenned by Julian Fellowes (Downton man fighting for AIDS medications. Also of interest: Runner Runner (Oct. 4), Abbey); Carrie (Oct. 18), Stephen King’s telekinetic-teen horror tale; and Spike Lee’s a thriller about online poker, starring Ben Affleck and Justin Timberlake; remake of the Korean thriller Oldboy Ender’s Game (Nov. 1), the sci(Oct. 25). Also, Ben Stiller directs fi tale adapted from Orson FALL ARTS and stars in The Secret Life of Scott Card’s novel; and Black Walter Mitty (Dec. 25) Nativity (Nov. 27), a holiHere’s Part Two: The {COMEDY} day drama adapted from Hunger Games: Catching Mitch Fatel at the the Langston Hughes’ Fire (Nov. 22), The Hobbit: Pittsburgh play. On Dec. 20, the Coen The Desolation of Smaug Improv. Oct. 17-19. brothers check in with the West Homestead. (Dec. 13) and Anchorman www.pittsburgh. 1960s folk-singer odyssey 2: The Legend Continues improv.com Inside Llewyn Davis, and Tom (Dec. 20). Plus, spin-offs: Hanks returns to play Walt DisJackass Presents: Bad Grandpa ney, opposite Emma Thompson, in (Oct. 25); Thor: The Dark World (Nov. 8); and Tyler Perry’s A Madea Saving Mr. Banks. For Christmas, Meryl Streep heads up Christmas (Dec. 13). Your hopes for laughs include: Don Jon an all-star cast in an adaptation of August: (Sept. 27), a Joseph Gordon-Levitt comedy Osage County; Christian Bale and Bradley about porn; Last Vegas (Nov. 1), a quartet Cooper are a pair of con men in David O. of older dudes hitting Sin City for one last Russell’s American Hustle; Robert DeNiro hurrah; and the sperm-bank comedy Deliv- and Sylvester Stallone beat each other up ery Man (Nov. 22), with Vince Vaughn. Also as washed-up boxers in Grudge Match; and in the mix: About Time (Nov. 8), a time- 47 Ronin delivers your long-awaited gift of travel rom-com from Richard Curtis (Love Keanu Reeves, samurai swordsman. AHO F F @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M Actually). And on Nov. 15, Terrence Howard heads an ensemble cast of college buddies who re-unite, in The Best Man Holiday. Here’s the line-up for better dramas (a.k.a. Oscar bait): The Counselor (Nov. 15), {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} a legal thriller (with drugs) starring Brad Pitt and Michael Fassbender; Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street (Nov. PLENTY OF TOP literary names are visiting 15), starring Leonardo DiCaprio; Bruce Pittsburgh this fall, most of them AmeriDern in Alexander Payne’s dramedy can, and most hosted by familiar presentNebraska (Nov. 22), about an estranged ers. But one addition to the scene is also family; and Matthew McConaughey in rather international: The Prague Writers’

HIGHLIGHT

LITERARY Y

wmuseumaa.org 724-837-1500

The Calliope Concerts 2013-14 Tickets: 412-361-1915 or www.calliopehouse.org 10/26 11/16 12/7 1/25 3/8 3/29 4/5 4/26

Vieux Farka Toure Blue Highway Bruce Cockburn True Blues Karan Casey Jake Shimabukuro Steel Wheels Martha Redbone Roots Project

13 14 Single or season tickets. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland.

CONTINUES ON PG. 28

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2013

27


FALL ARTS PREVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

Have a nice trip, see you this fall!

BOOK NOW

OVER 1,300 ROOMS!

Amy Tan, Nov. 25

Festival, as hosted by Point Park Univer- by author Daniel Handler, best known as sity, runs Oct. 18 and 19, and marks the creator of Lemony Snicket. Just across the street in Oakland, the first time the prestigious festival is taking place outside the Czech Republic. The Pitt Contemporary Writers Series presents: Charles Bock, author of acclaimed event features venerable Pulitzer2008 debut novel Beautiful winning novelist E.L. Doctorow FALL ARTS Children (Sept. 19); renowned (Ragtime) — who’ll give the poet Anne Waldman (Oct. first public reading of his {MUSIC} 10); and writer Emily Raboforthcoming novel, Anteau (Nov. 7). The readings drew’s Brain — along with Squonk Opera reprises its Mayhem & Majesty. are free. Indian-born novelist and Sept. 27-29. New As usual, some of the MIT professor Anita Desai; Hazlett Theater, very biggest names are Vaclav Havel biographer Eda North Side. Downtown, at the Pittsburgh Kriseova; Egyptian writer and Speakers Series. But only seplaywright Hamdy El-Gazzar; ries subscribers can see the likes of and Czech economist Tomas Sedlacek, among others. The festival is free and former Prime Minister of Greece George open to the public, and its theme is “Birth of Papandreou (Oct. 9); author and humorist Bill Bryson (A Short History of Nearly EvNations/The Pursuit of Happiness.” Among more accustomed names, Pitts- erything) (Oct. 30); and — sure to be controversial — former U.S. burgh Arts & Lectures Secretary of Defense has a nice lineup, beRobert Gates (Nov. 20). ginning with Michael Also Downtown, Moss, the journalist at the Byham Theand author of Salt, Sugater, PA&L and the ar, Fat, a new exposé Pittsburgh Cultural of the processed-food Trust present bestindustry (Sept. 23). He’s selling author Terry followed by mystery McMillan (Waiting to diva Sue Grafton (Oct. Exhale) on the heels of 7), novelist Amy Tan her latest novel, Who (Nov. 25) and shortAsked You? (Sept. 30). story superstar George Some of the best Saunders (Dec. 9). Spereadings will take cial PA&L treats include place at venues that the Oct. 25 appearance

EXPERIENCE GLASS BLOWING THIS FALL! COME AND CREATE YOUR OWN GLASS PUMPKIN ALONGSIDE VESSEL STUDIO’S SKILLED CRAFTSMEN

SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS IN SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER

VESSEL STUDIO GLASS Located in historic South Side!

RESERVATIONS NEEDED

30-minute sessions • $35 per person GLASS PUMPKINS AND GOURDS ON DISPLAY FOR PURCHASE AS WELL

28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

117 S. 16th Street 412.779.2471 www.vesselstudio.net

E.L. Doctorow, Oct. 18-19

HIGHLIGHT


arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily programmed months in advance. Wiley Cash, author of acclaimed novel A Land More Kind Than Home, visits Chatham University (Fri., Sept. 13). Pitt grad and honorary local boy-made-verygood Michael Chabon returns with his well-reviewed latest novel, Telegraph Avenue, at the Waterfront Barnes & Noble (Mon., Sept. 16). British author John Lawton, best known for his Inspector Troy series, visits Mystery Lovers Bookshop with Then We Take Berlin, whose Cockney protagonist turns spy in Cold War Germany (Oct. 17). Of particular local interest is Kelcey Parker. Lilianeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Balcony is her â&#x20AC;&#x153;multi-voiced novella-in-ďŹ&#x201A;ash set at Frank Lloyd Wrightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fallingwater,â&#x20AC;? which alternates between a Kaufmann-family domestic drama set in 1952 and four ďŹ ctional narratives about present-day tourists to Fallingwater. Parker â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a former volunteer guide at Fallingwater now teaching at Indiana University South Bend â&#x20AC;&#x201D; has two Pittsburgh dates: at The New Yinzer Reading Series, at ModernFormations Gallery (Nov. 21), and at the East End Book Exchange (Nov. 23). Fall is also time for grassroots literary festivals: The Third Annual Pittsburgh Zine Fair (Sept. 22) features more than 50 local artists and writers, plus zine archives from

Terry McMillan, Sept. 30

P I TTS B U R G H C U LT U R A L T R U ST

the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh and The Mr. Roboto Project. The fest, which takes place at The Union Project, is prefaced by a Sept. 21 zine reading at Assemble, courtesy of Literary Arts Boom. D RI SCO L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Do you have

recurrent

diarrhea and abdominal

: A F Ô&#x2021; < 3 L L % 5 A A > Ô&#x2021; 6 D ; @ = E % 9 D 7 3F Ô&#x2021; B 7 A B > 7 THE JAZZ SCENE STARTS AT THE

B4?C!#Â&#x201C;'?<

BĹ&#x152;Ó&#x2021;Ĺ&#x2013;Ĺ&#x2026;Ĺ&#x2DC;Ĺ&#x2022;Ĺ&#x160;Ĺ&#x2039;Ô&#x2021;<Ĺ&#x201E;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ô&#x2021;AĹ&#x2022;Ĺ&#x2020;Ĺ&#x2039;Ĺ&#x2C6;Ĺ&#x2013;Ĺ&#x2014;Ĺ&#x2022;Ĺ&#x201E;Ô&#x2021;

Cabaret Theater

4Ĺ&#x201E;Ĺ&#x2020;Ĺ&#x17D;Ĺ&#x2013;Ĺ&#x2014;Ĺ&#x201E;Ĺ&#x160;Ĺ&#x2C6;Ô&#x2021;4Ĺ&#x201E;Ĺ&#x2022;5Ĺ&#x201E;Ĺ&#x2026;Ĺ&#x201E;Ĺ&#x2022;Ĺ&#x2C6;Ĺ&#x2014; 6 5 5 P e n n A v e n u e , C u l t u ra l D i s t r i c t # !#$%%%%%Â&#x201C;CadbcPacb^aV

pain or discomfort? If so, please contact us about our research study of an investigational medication for adults who have irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. This research may last up to 51 weeks.

Qualified participants must:

Qualified participants receive:

â&#x20AC;˘ Be 18 years of age or older â&#x20AC;˘ Have had recurrent diarrhea and abdominal pain or discomfort for at least six months

â&#x20AC;˘ Study-related care and study medication at no cost â&#x20AC;˘ Compensation for time and travel

All Show Times 5-9pm unless otherwise noted.

PRESENTED BY

412-363-1900 â&#x20AC;˘ Clinical Trials Research Services, LLC â&#x20AC;˘ www.CTRSLLC.com CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2013

29


YESTERDAY

TODAY

Now you can add Stored Cash Value to your ConnectCard. Faster, safer and more flexible than cash.

ConnectCard.org 30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

PortAuthority.org


COME SPEND THE WEEKEND WITH US! Treat yourself to a day of pampering and romance... Enjoy tax free shopping on clothes and shoes... Browse unique specialty shops... Discover the many events and attractions throughout the county...

Nestled in western Pennsylvania at the crossroads of I-80 and I-79 is Mercer County Pennsylvania. Here you will open the door to all kinds of experiences! Relax in a 1890s castle with a world-class spa at Buhl Mansion. This deluxe full service B&B offers over 100 pampering services. Escape to the Old South when you visit Tara - A Country Inn, inspired by the movie “Gone with the Wind.” Tara offers Southern Hospitality and a chance to experience a World Class Country Inn. Shop over 130 stores at The Grove City Premium Outlets, or three of the world’s largest stores in Sharon, PA. Around every corner you will find something unexpected in any of Mercer County’s specialty shops. Enjoy the over 85 beautifully decorated indoor Christmas trees, each with a different theme, when you visit Kraynak’s Santa’s Christmasland; and bring home a souvenir from Wendell August, America’s oldest and largest forge. Experience Mercer County in an extraordinary way!

To start planning your Escape to Mercer County, call 800-637-2370 or visit us on the web at www.VisitMercerCountyPA.com to request your free Escape Package.

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2013

31


for Fabulous Fall Fantasies!

Buhl Mansion Guesthouse & Spa

Daffin’s Candies

Tara - A Country Inn

Reyers Shoes

The Original Quaker Steak & Lube®

The Winner

Shop til you drop. Eat at great restaurants. Stay at award-winning inns. WATERFIRE SHARON — Saturday, October 12 Lighting occurs at dusk and continues until Midnight A day-long event of music, food and unique arts programming culminating with the lighting of over fifty sparkling bonfires on the Shenango River, accompanied by enchanting music and diverse performers from around the globe. *date subject to change – visit WaterFireSharonPA.org for specific event info.

SharonPa.com ~ 800-637-2370


CITY THEATRE 2013–2014 SEASON

NEW PLAYS. FRESH. BOLD. PROVOCATIVE. PLUS TWO SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS

January 18 – February 9, 2014

THE MOUNTAINTOP

On stage for a limited time!

A soul-stirring drama

May 3–25, 2014

HOPE AND GRAVITY

November 30 – December 22, 2013

2 PIANOS 4 HANDS

A kinetic world premiere

A smash comedy with music from Bach to Billy Joel January 8–26, 2014

SOUTH SIDE STORIES A hometown favorite—back by popular demand!

Tickets: start at $35 Subscriptions: start at $99 Discounts available for seniors, persons under 30, and groups.

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

412.431.CITY (2489) CityTheatreCompany.org N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

61


SPACEBALLS. In Mel Brooks’ 1987 spoof of Star Wars, Lone Starr (Bill Pullman) and Barf the Mawg (a furry John Candy) set their intergalactic RV to hyperspeed in order to save the Druish Princess Vespa (Daphne Zuniga) and her robot, Dot Matrix (voice of Joan Rivers), from the evil clutches of Dark Helmet (Rick Moranis). Brooks is on board as both President Skroob and Yogurt, a wizard wise in the ways of the Schwartz. May the puns be with you. 10 p.m. Fri., Sept. 13, and 10 p.m. Sat., Sept. 14. Oaks

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW AMERICAN MADE MOVIE. Nathaniel McGill and Vincent Vittorio’s documentary film is a primer covering some of the issues that led to the huge decline in American manufacturing, while spotlighting a few longtime and new businesses that chose to stay American. Economists and academics weigh in, while the filmmakers collect anecdotal material from producers, including such well-known brands as New Balance and Lousville Slugger, and entrepreneurs such as a jewelry-maker with a contract at the gift shop at the Smithsonian’s American History Museum. But the surface is just barely scratched on this complex issue, and there are notable omissions, including any discussion of wages (union, non-union, overseas), the role of the federal government (not one mention of NAFTA) or the parsing and subcontracting of manufacturing (“assembled in USA from foreign parts”). This film felt like it was aimed at educating high schoolers — which is not a bad idea — but I’d have preferred a meatier, more rigorous analysis. Mon., Sept. 16, through Thu., Sept. 19. Harris (Al Hoff)

SHARKNADO. This Sy-Fy original is a terrifying harbinger of climate change, as a freak storm off the coast of California dumps angry, hungry sharks all over water-logged Los Angeles. Conversely, it is a non-stop hoot starring 90210’s Ian Zeiring and Tara Reid. 9 p.m. Sat., Sept. 14. Hollywood

In a World ... old ways tricky. Robert DeNiro, Tommy Lee Jones and Michelle Pfeiffer star in this comedy from Luc Besson. Starts Fri., Sept. 13.

9/21 Reservoir

IN A WORLD … There have been a million behind-the-scenes comedies about the movie biz, but this ensemble pic has two marks of distinction: (1) it’s set in the tiny, but no less backbiting, realm of voice-over work, and (2) it’s written and directed by a woman, Lake Bell. Bell also stars, portraying Carol, daughter of a voiceover king (Fred Melamed), who hopes to break into this boys’ club. She winds up competing with her American Made dad and his douche-y Movie protégé (Ken Marino) for work in a new movie trailer that will re-introduce the classic opening words: “In a world …” It’s a slender story to provide a steady stream of mishaps, wry asides (Carol describes her dad’s young girlfriend as “smelling of Lifesavers”) and assorted cameos. A couple subplots underline the importance of voice work and sound recording, plus you’ll leave the theater with a fresh understanding

9/28 The Big

DRAMA OF ASTONISHING “GRADE A: AEMOTIONAL PURITY.”

AUSTENLAND. A woman obsessed with the BBC adaptation of Pride and Prejudice travels to a Jane Austen-themed resort hoping to meet a real-life Mr. Darcy. Keri Russell stars in Jerusha Hess’ rom-com. Starts Fri., Sept. 13. Regent Square THE FAMILY. A Mafia family relocates to Normandy, France, but finds giving up the

SATURDAY NIGHT AT MIDNIGHT Dogs

Lebowski

10/5 10/12 10/19 10/26 11/2 11/9

Jaws Poltergeist

CP

– Owen Gleiberman, ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

“BRIE LARSON IS A REVELATION... ONE OF THE YEAR’S BEST PERFORMANCES. An exceptional film in every way.” – Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

“A

WONDER. EXCEPTIONAL, MOVING AND INTIMATE.

Honestly earns every bit of its emotional impact.” –Kenneth Turan, LOS ANGELES TIMES

The Shining The Exorcist Alien The Birds

1729 MURRAY AVENUE . 412-422-9851 TICKETS AVAILABLE AT WWW.MANORPGH.COM

62

CASABLANCA. In this 1942 classic directed by Michael Curtiz, an American guy has a café in Casablanca, Rick’s, where everybody goes. By rights this film should have been a disaster: It all takes place in one room; the love story is hokey, based on ridiculous coincidence and interrupted by complicated war details, cheesy patriotism and one-liners; and there are dozens of bit players. Yet it’s as close to perfect as a Hollywood film ever was. 11 a.m. Sun., Sept. 15; 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 18; and 2 p.m. Thu., Sept. 19. Hollywood (AH)

CP

STARTS FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 13TH

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

SOUTH SIDE WORKS CINEMA 425 CINEMA DRIVE (412) 381-7335 PITTSBURGH

of the obvious: Men do snag all the high-profile voice-over gigs. Manor (AH) INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2. Typically, the Lambert family’s ghost problem from 2010’s Insidious has not gone away. Patrick Wilson and Rose Byrne make another go of clearing the supernatural from their lives in this sequel, directed by James Wan. Starts Fri., Sept. 13. STILL MINE. Writer-director Michael McGowan’s low-key drama is based on a true story, parts of which are universally familiar. New Brunswick farmer Craig Morrison (James Cromwell) and his wife (Genevieve Bujold) are in their 80s, and failing health is impacting their previously fiercely independent lives. It’s what Morrison does next that makes his story extraordinary: At the age of 87, he designs and builds a new home, better suited to his wife’s infirmities, allowing them to stay together. But he neglects to file the proper permits, and the half-built house becomes a point of contention between Morrison and the authorities. That’s about it for plot (and the outcome is no surprise), so the film’s small pleasures are in Cromwell’s pleasantly gruff performance and its underdog tropes. It also delicately walks a line between sentimentalizing the couple’s longtime relationship and depicting some of the inevitable challenges that come with aging. Starts Fri., Sept. 13. Manor (AH)

REPERTORY

SUPER TASK FORCE ONE. A family superhero film, locally produced and directed by Steve Rudzinski, in the tokusatsu style (i.e. Power Rangers). Villains, weapons and a band of plucky heroes, plus a cameo from David J. Fielding (Zordin in Mighty Morphin Power Rangers), who will also attend the screening. 4 p.m. Sun., Sept. 15. Hollywood. $5 BIG GAY LOVE. A party planner (Jonathan Lisecki) meets a potential love interest, but he’s insecure competing against Los Angeles’ beautiful people. Ringo Le writes and directs this new rom-com, presented by the Pittsburgh Lesbian and Gay Film Society. 7:30 p.m. Sun., Sept. 15. Hollywood

Still Mine

HOLLYWOODBURGH SHORTS. Catch this screening of five short webisode-type films that function as a preview of the locally produced Hollywoodburgh, an in-development 30-minute dramedy, hoping to find a home on TV or the Internet. The show is about two Pittsburgh guys who move to Hollywood to pursue careers in show business, and subsequently bounce back and forth between the two towns. 7 p.m. Thu., Sept. 12. Hollywood. Suggested donation: $5 per person, or $10 for three people

IN THE HOLE. Integrity matters little to CP ACE boozed-out newspaper reporter Kirk Douglas, who delays the rescue of a man trapped in a cave in order to have a Bigger Story, in this 1951 drama from Billy Wilder. Newspaper guys are hardboiled that way; what’s shocking is everyone else’s complicity. Ace in the Hole (a.k.a. The Big Carnival) is one of the most cynical films to come out of the Hollywood system. Continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of films about old-school journalism. 8 p.m. Sun., Sept. 15. Regent Square (AH)

LABYRINTH. This cultish 1986 film from Muppetmaster Jim Henson spins a fairy-tale-ish yarn about a teenage girl (Jennifer Connelly) who must navigate a strange world in order to rescue her baby brother from a goblin king (David Bowie). Featuring one of the Thin White Duke’s worst hairdos ever. 7 p.m. Fri., Sept. 13; and 2 and 7 p.m. Sat., Sept. 14. Hollywood

SOMEWHERE BETWEEN. Linda Goldstein Knowlton directs this documentary about girls who were adopted from China into American homes, and how now, as teen-agers, they construct their identities. Knowlton will lead a panel discussion following the screening. 7:30 p.m. Mon., Sept. 16. 1500 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. Free. mnovy@pitt.edu


[ART REVIEW]

“HIS VIEWS ON VIOLENCE ENCE WERE FAR MORE PLE NORMALLY THINK.” COMPLEX THAN PEOPLE

ART FOR A CAUSE {BY ROBERT RACZKA}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

HAITIAN ART GALLERY Friends of HAS Haiti, 6739 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-361-4884 or www.friendsofhasgallery.org N E W S

[BOOKS]

ALL THOSE JESUSES {BY CHRIS POTTER}

An untitled 2000 painting by Prince Luc

There may be someone out there who doesn’t like Haitian art but I would need to see proof. And while there are other places in Pittsburgh to see Haitian art, Friends of HAS Haiti is hard to beat. (HAS, or Hôpital Albert Schweitzer, is a separate nonprofit to which Friends contributes.) The Friends of HAS Haiti are known for their annual H’Art and Soul of Haiti benefit, which has featured prominent musicians such as the Tom Tom Club, along with a large selection of Haitian art for sale. The Friends also maintain a Haitian Art Gallery, which had been tucked away on a low-profile second floor, but recently relocated to a ground-floor space in Point Breeze’s “main street.” The gallery is an informal affair, basically filling the office walls with many dozen Haitian artworks. The staff are welcoming and you can get a pretty good idea of what the art might look like competing with and complementing the contents of your home (in contrast to the white void of most art galleries). HAS dates to the 1950s, with the Friends established as a separate nonprofit in 1999, and clearly it is well established in its ties to the Haitian art community. Many of the paintings are fine examples of what you might think of when you think of Haitian art: namely, brightly colored genre scenes in a folk or primitive style (more Grandma Moses than Michelangelo, yet not unsophisticated). But there’s a broad range of styles here, with some of the paintings being surrealistic, precisely naturalistic, impressionistic, expressionistic or abstract, including more than a few showing some awareness of modernism. There are also examples of metalwork cut from old oil drums and hammered to make reliefs of decorative motifs or scenes of native life. There are some exuberant sequined works, as well. Some of the art can be viewed online, with the gallery’s website currently under expansion. The Friends are dedicated to raising awareness of Haitian culture and supporting Hôpital Albert Schweitzer through the sale of Haitian art as well as through other programs. In addition to conventional health services, with the support of the Friends, HAS has developed forward-looking environmental, economic and cultural projects, including reforestation and disease prevention. It’s a perfect fundraiser: Support a terrific cause, take home terrific art.

Y

OU COULDN’T call Reza Aslan a martyr, but people have tried to push him around — and ended up regretting it. The Iranian-born scholar’s book, Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth, became a best-seller after a notorious Foxnews.com interview, in which correspondent Lauren Green tried to pillory Aslan for being a Muslim who dared write about Jesus. Aslan’s briskly written book claims that Jesus was concerned not with a kingdom in heaven, but one on Earth: an Israel free from Roman occupation. Later Christian writers, Aslan argues, downplayed those concerns, portraying a less subversive, more ethereal Christ who appealed to more nonJews — and threatened Rome less. The Pittsburgh stop on Aslan’s book tour, hosted by the World Affairs Council, is a kind of homecoming: His wife grew up here … and his brother-in-law preaches at a Wexford church. A longer version of this interview appears on www.pghcitypaper.com.

SHOULD YOUR PORTRAYAL OF JESUS CHANGE HOW CHRISTIANS APPROACH THEIR FAITH? It doesn’t have to. … The core of Christianity is that Jesus is both fully God and fully man. Christians tend to only hear or focus on the fully-God part. I think the reason Christians

ccaption???????????????? cap tion???????????????? tio

have been, for the most part, very positive about this book is because it’s giving them a glimpse of who Jesus the man would have been. ISN’T ANY ATTEMPT TO FIND THE “TRUE JESUS” KIND OF REDUCTIVE? When you go to the church in Nazareth, they have this amazing display. They’ve asked Christians from all over the world to send depictions of Jesus and Mary. And it’s

“THE POLITICS OF JESUS” WITH REZA ASLAN 6 p.m. Tue., Sept. 17. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $25. 412-281-7970 or www.worldpittsburgh.org

remarkable: The painting from Peru depicts them as essentially migrant coffee-workers. The painting from China depicts them as Chinese. The painting from Thailand depicts Jesus as blue, as though he’s a Hindu god. Part of the reason for the success of Christianity is that Jesus has meant so many things to so many people. In a sense, all of [those meanings] are equally valid. ... What I’m trying to do is peel back those layers of interpretation, and get to the core of who the person was. ONE CRITIC SAYS YOU DEPICT JESUS AS AN “ORDINARY POLITICAL REVOLUTIONARY RESCUED BY AN EXTRAORDINARY STORYTELLING MACHINE.” IS THAT A FAIR TAKE? I don’t know if I would say Jesus was CONTINUES ON PG. 64

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

63


20% DISCOUNT

For up to 4 people. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Expires October 31, 2013

h” urg e “OLLB SONeeLENth S UR ZNER TR EY TO iighhbborrhhoods

Ne t iic N Histor TOUR #1 H Neighborhoods $25 ge rita He #2 UR TO a P ittsBUR GH ER ” “A rriv e a V isito r; De par t $

25

STATION SQUARE NTOWN HOTELS AND PICKUPS FROM 6 DOW 42-2349 L -3 CAL 00 NS 1-8 RESERVATIO

M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS...

HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS WITHOUT REALLY TRYING A musical by Frank Loesser and book by Abe Burrows, Jack Weinstock, and Willie Gilbert, based on Shepherd Mead’s 1952 book of the same name

SEPTEMBER 13,14,15,20,21,22,27,28,29, 2013 Saturday & Sunday performances at 8:00pm. Sunday matinees at 2:00pm. TICKETS ARE $18.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • MCKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS

www.mckeesportlittletheater.com

ALL THOSE JESUSES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 63

ordinary. You’re talking about an illiterate, poor, marginal Jewish peasant from the backwoods of Galilee, who managed to gather a movement to himself on behalf of the poor and the weak that was so threatening to the religious and political powers of the day that he was arrested, tortured and executed. … A lot of critics say I describe Jesus as some sort of violent revolutionary, but I say in the book that there is no evidence that he openly advocated violence — though his views on violence were far more complex than people normally think. BUT ON TOPICS LIKE VIOLENCE, CRITICS SAY YOU CHERRY-PICK WHICH BIBLE PASSAGES TO ACCEPT AS HISTORIC. FOR EXAMPLE, YOU QUOTE JESUS TELLING THE APOSTLES TO SELL THEIR CLOAKS AND BUY SWORDS. BUT YOU DON’T MENTION THAT WHEN HIS DISCIPLES TRY TO DEFEND JESUS IN THE GARDEN OF GETHSEMANE, HE SAYS, “HE WHO LIVES BY THE SWORD DIES BY IT.” You have to take that in context. … The Garden of Gethsemane is not a place of fountains. It’s a forest, a place to hide from the authorities. And all four Gospels talk about this massive force that comes to arrest Jesus. … The skirmish was over time whitewashed so that it [fits] into the theological argument the Gospel writers were trying to make [about Jesus’ nonviolence]. How can you take that event and cleanse it? Well, you have Jesus say, “Stop the fighting.” … The fact that it’s a swordfight, in and of itself, should make you pause and rethink the notion of Jesus as a pacifistic preacher with no interest in the cares of this world. That Jesus would have gone totally unnoticed. It would not have required an armed posse to arrest him. THIS INTERVIEW WILL BE PUBLISHED SEPT. 11. AS SOMEONE WITH EXPERIENCE OF BOTH ISLAM AND CHRISTIANITY, HOW WOULD YOU ASSESS THE DIALOGUE BETWEEN THOSE FAITHS? DO WE UNDERSTAND EACH OTHER BETTER THAN WE DID 12 YEARS AGO? I think the middle does, especially in the United States. This is the most religiously diverse nation in the history of the world: You have no choice but to know and understand your neighbor. On the other hand, the fringes seem to have gotten further and further away from each other. And unfortunately, because they are so much louder, that group is all we ever hear. But often the largest voice is the quietest. That’s how change happens: not because religious leaders made it happen, but because neighbors made it happen. C POT T E R @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

64

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

[ART REVIEW]

GILDED STAGES {BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

“Croquet I” (2000), a photograph by Vik Muniz {IMAGE COURTESY OF THE FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER}

PRESENT THIS AD FOR A

Restored in 1990 and opened as a house museum, Clayton — the Henry Clay Frick family mansion — is an artifact of the Gilded Age. It is decorated almost entirely as the family left it in 1905. In 2000, the neighboring Frick art museum exhibited Clayton Days, a series of photographs taken in the house, and in the environs of the Frick historic site. Artist Vik Muniz made the images during a residency that marked the institution’s “first venture into working with a living artist.” In the 1990s, spurred by artist Fred Wilson’s groundbreaking exhibition Mining the Museum, museums of every stripe began exploring ways to present their collections anew. Many invited contemporary artists to create projects that could offer insight and a new perspective. The Frick chose Muniz, widely recognized today for such politically charged projects as “Sugar Children” and “Pictures of Garbage.” At the Frick, Muniz chose to create a fictional late-19th-century narrative using contemporaneous photographic tools and techniques, including an 8-by-10-inch vintage camera, period lenses and orthochromatic film. Inhabiting the persona of a 19thcentury photographer, Muniz cast Frick staff as characters in vignettes exploring daily life at the turn of the last century, as well as the history of art and photography. The concept of Clayton Days is ultimately more interesting than the final product. The images come off as precious and contrived. The most interesting are actually the 14 that Muniz re-photographed from the Frick family photo albums, a method recalling artist Sherrie Levine, who gained recognition in 1980 by appropriating the photographs of Walker Evans. Currently reinstalled as Clayton Days Revisited: A Project by Vik Muniz, the exhibition, organized by Sarah J. Hall, director of curatorial affairs, also includes 10 more recent works by the artist to put the project in a larger context. But Clayton Days doesn’t really hold up. According to Hall, Muniz tried to capture the small things that are not presented in history books or on house tours. But Clayton is no run-ofthe-mill 19th-century home. It belonged to Henry Clay Frick, an extraordinarily controversial figure in American history. To make only subtle reference to “workers” and instead focus primarily on period photography, allegorical imagery and esoteric arthistorical references is a missed opportunity. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CLAYTON DAYS REVISITED: A PROJECT BY VIK MUNIZ continues through Oct. 27. Frick Art & Historical Center, 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org


[PLAY REVIEWS]

TAKING PRIDE

MILLER TIME

{BY ALAN PETRUCELLI}

{BY TED HOOVER} SOMETIMES THE circle of life whimpers. ALL MY SONS was Arthur Miller’s first hit

show, and with a new Playhouse REP production — directed by Robert Miller (son of Arthur) — you have an opportunity to see how firmly in control Miller was even at this early stage. The 1947 play is one (eventful) day in the life of the Keller family. Papa Joe might or might not have sold defective airplane parts during the war. Missing son Larry might or might not have died flying a bomber. And Chris, the younger son, might or might not discover the truth. (Here’s a spoiler … he does.) Much of Miller’s work is now placed in the “well-made play” genre, which makes me laugh. In today’s theater, “well-made” is a genre and not a goal. Vivid individualized characters in fat-free vehicles constructed like iron-plated battleships: If only all playwrights set about to craft plays this monumental — instead of exploring banal artistic trends — my job would be a lot easier. It can be said that Miller gets a bit melodramatic: If two emotional plot points ended sooner, this play would be even more powerful. But that is, believe me, a very minor complaint.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

Daina Michelle Griffith, Phillip Winters, Penelope Lindblom and Shaun Cameron Hall in the REP’s All My Sons

a quite modern performance. Like I said: Mashed up together it’s a bit jarring. Still, All My Sons is too infrequently performed in Pittsburgh, and this production gives you a taste of what you’ve been missing. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

GUIDED MISSAL {BY F.J. HARTLAND}

ALL MY SONS continues through Sept. 22. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $15-27. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

Miller fils is smart enough to recognize the strength in the script and, for the most part, lets the production do what it’s designed to do. (That’s much trickier than you’d think.) He’s done a good job getting strong performances from his company. But he hasn’t gotten the same performance: There are several different acting styles on stage, and to say that’s distracting would be something of an understatement. Daina Michelle Griffith and Phillip Winters seem the most organic; these are uncluttered, straightforward performances in sync with the time period. The role of Chris, so firmly fixed in heady post-WWII optimism, might be unplayable in such a cynical age, but Shaun Cameron Hall gives it his all. Justin Fortunato hits up the melodrama as the bad-news messenger, and by playing her subtext on top, Penelope Lindblom gives

“THERE ARE Protestants here. I can smell them,” says Sister. “Just like a lion smells fear.” So begins Sister’s Summer School Catechism: God Never Takes a Vacation, now at City Theatre. For anyone from the generation that attended parochial school back in the day when nuns wielded rulers, this “summer school” will bring back many memories. As one older audience member said during the performance I attended, “You’re opening a lot of old wounds, Sister.” To which Sister replied, “Let me get the salt.” Summer School Catechism is the latest installment in the wildly popular interactive series by playwright Maripat Donovan. When polled by Sister, the majority of the audience had already seen a “Catechism” show. Many had already seen this version! School begins with Sister doling out tissues to any woman wearing a blouse too low or a skirt too high. Women with particularly plunging necklines are handed a lobster bib. One bare-

IF ONLY ALL PLAYWRIGHTS SET ABOUT TO CRAFT PLAYS THIS MONUMENTAL.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

shouldered woman at the matinee was given a “Terrible Towel” to drape over herself. “Ladies, before you leave the house,” Sister advises, “look at yourself in the mirror and ask, ‘Would the Blessed Mother leave the house in this outfit?’” Then — once the chewing gum has been collected — summer school begins. There is no formal script. It is up to actress Kimberly Richards, as Sister, to make the performance work. Richards has brilliant improvisational skills and truly engages the audience. Her quick wit and one-line zingers keep her “students” laughing for nearly two hours. During a question-and-answer period, she fields queries about her personal life with honest answers (such as that she was born in

Sometimes it whispers. When it comes to The Lion King, it roars. The mammoth Disney musical — the story of lion cub Simba, who must avenge his father’s death — has returned to Pittsburgh. This PNC Broadway Across America touring production is a bit smaller-scale, but it’s still a mane event. Much of the show’s success will always be attributed to Julie Taymor’s innovative and ingenious costume design. Strip away the skins and stripes, and this is a show about animals. The actors must appear as animal-like as possible — and each rhino and zebra and hyena and elephant and gazelle and cheetah and wildebeest costume carefully showcases both man and beast. The entire cast was top-notch, but L. Steve Taylor leads the pack as Lion King Mufasa. Here too is where Taymor’s costume genius is at its best: Taylor’s mask can either rest on his forehead or cover his face. Resting, Mufasa is regal, dignified, powerful. Mask comes up, and the father of Simba is sensitive and vulnerable. Such subtle symbolism proves, especially on repeated viewings, the brilliance of the work.

THE LION KING continues through Sept. 29. Benedum Center, 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $70-150. 412-456-666 or www.trustarts.org

Pittsburgh) or with a curt “None of your business.” Richards also shows a commanding knowledge of church history as well as Catholic doctrine. (And — in case you’re wondering — Sister is crazy about the new Pope.) Before the lesson is over, there is a slide show, a baseball game and prizes awarded. To show how popular Sister is, she drew a sell-out crowd on the Steelers’ opening day. And the audience had a rollicking good time.

Sets are simple, almost minimalist, but serve the action superbly. There wasn’t one glitch to bitch about on opening night. Well, maybe one. Disney + animals = perfect kids’ show, no? No. Every LK audience I have been part of teems with very young children, but this is not kiddie fare. Blame it on the 1994 animated film, perhaps on Elton John and Tim Rice’s bouncy music, and almost certainly on the Stan-and-Ollie comedy team of meerkat Timon and warthog Pumbaa, who is ostracized from the animal world for his excessive farting. Still, animals rushing down the Benedum aisles, fireflies dancing in the night sky and pop-up cacti can keep small attention spans riveted only for small amounts of time. Parents also need to remember there’s a dark side of life, even in the animal kingdom, and death and evil and murder and revenge will need to be explained on the drive home to Sewickley. Perhaps that’s where a reprise of “Hakuna Matata” comes in?

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

SISTER’S SUMMER SCHOOL CATECHISM: GOD NEVER TAKES A VACATION continues through Sun., Sept. 15. Lester Hamburg Studio at City Theatre, South Side. $45. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

65


FOR THE WEEK OF

09.1209.19.13

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LOUIS STEIN}

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

SEPT. 13

Frankly Scarlett

Permitting presents its first annual Pittsburgh Abides: “That’s Not Her Toe, Dude” at Bayardstown Social Club. The evening features Lebowskithemed events including a costume contest and a bowling-ball-polishing competition, all culminating in a screening. The event is self-seating, so bring your own blankets and chairs — or maybe a nice rug, to really tie the room together. Brett Wilson 5 p.m. 3008 Penn Ave., Strip District. $10. www.pghabides.com

{ART}

+ THU., SEPT. 12 {STAGE} Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre has had a virtual lock locally on playwright Martin McDonagh, who in the 1990s stormed the theater world with profanely nervy, often bloody plays like The Lieutenant of Inishmore. But even PICT had never assayed A Skull in Connemara, from McDonagh’s Leenane trilogy. Starting tonight, PICT stages this 1997 dark comedy, a whodunnit about a small-town gravedigger confronted with the bones of his own wife, who died mysteriously. Martin Giles directs a cast including nationally credited actor James Keegan. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Charity Randall Theatre, Stephen Foster Memorial, Forbes Avenue at Bigelow, Oakland. $20-48. 412-561-6000 or www.picttheatre.org

{STAGE} With her spoken-word work and other performances — often through the arts group she co-founded, Sun Crumbs — Christina Springer was a key voice in Pittsburgh’s 1990s art scene. After a decade away for motherhood, Springer returns as performer and presenter with her one-woman show She Diva Died. & Come Again? Text, sound and movement explore the conflict between the artist and the mother, with a focus on the challenges of raising a young black man. See it tonight

66

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

and tomorrow at the KellyStrayhorn Theater. BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Fri., Sept. 13. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $15-50. www.kelly-strayhorn.org

+ FRI., SEPT. 13 {FESTIVAL} Fans of The Big Lebowski, your moment is now. Weather

Samuel Johnson called patriotism “the last refuge of a scoundrel.” But in Pittsburgh-based photographer Bea Chiapelli’s Proud to be an American?, there’s more to it. “I began this project with a close-minded view of what it meant to be patriotic,” says Chiapelli. But her views have changed, and the show explores how flags, songs and other expressions of patriotism often divide us in love of country. The opening reception at 709 Penn Gallery is tonight. BO 6-8 p.m. 709 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. www.trustarts.org

{ART}

SEPT. 12

She h Diva i Died. & Come Again?

From the 1920s until urban redevelopment blew it up a few decades later, the Hill District was a national locus of African-American culture — home to the Pittsburgh Courier newspaper, an iconic jazz scene and more. In a new exhibit of her paintings at Sweetwater Center for the Arts, Leslie Ansley honors that past, including Hill natives like photographer Teenie Harris and playwright August Wilson, and frequent visitors like Dizzy Gillespie. The opening reception for Oasis is tonight. BO 6-9 p.m. Exhibit continues through Nov. 2. 200 Broad St., Sewickley. Free. 412-741-4405 or www. sweetwaterartcenter.org

{WORDS} New York Times best-selling author Wiley Cash visits Chatham University as part


sp otlight Art by Jessica Frelinghuysen

“[A]n environment burgeoning with opportunity” might not be how everyone would describe Detroit. But artists are different. And so as one of three new exhibitions marking its 35th anniversary, The Mattress Factory presents Detroit: Artists in Residence, featuring artists who live and work in The Largest American City to Declare Bankruptcy. As Design 99, Gina Reichert and Mitch Cope use abandoned houses as their medium, creating both art and off-the-grid structures; their work has been exhibited worldwide. Nationally known Jessica Frelinghuysen creates portable architectural spaces, like kids’ backpacks that hold plant seedlings. Internationally exhibited Scott Hocking makes sculptural installations in iconic abandoned buildings in Detroit. Nicola Kuperus and Adam Lee Miller perform as the dark electronic pop band ADULT; their props and sets are exhibited as installations. Also exhibiting are Russ Orlando, who blends ceramics, performance and photography, and Frank Pahl, who creates large installations from found materials to produce orchestrated sound. The Sept. 12 Detroit opening in the museum’s main building complements two other new solo shows: Janine Antoni, by the New York City-based performance and installation artist known for questioning the roles of femininity and the female body, in 1414 Monterey Street; and Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory, by the Japanese performance and installation artist, launching the museum’s brand-new space at 516 Sampsonia Way. Bill O’Driscoll Reception: 7-9 p.m. Thu., Sept. 12. 500 Sampsonia Way, North Side. $15. 412-231-3169 or www.mattress.org

of its annual Melanie Brown Lecturer Series. Cash gives a free reading from his upcoming novel, This Dark Road to Mercy, and from previous bestseller A Land More Kind Than Home, a tale about the evil two brothers must face. The New York Times Sunday Book Review called Land More Kind “intensely felt and beautifully told.” BW 8 p.m. Mellon Board Room, Mellon Hall, Chatham campus, Shadyside. Free. 412-365-1100 or www.chatham.edu/mfa

{STAGE} Seems like almost anything can happen in Jason Burkett’s play Saving the World, an absurdist comedy about a scientific discovery that could: (a) end hunger, or (b) destroy humanity. Reviewing the world-premiere 2003 production, in California, one critic summarized: “God arm-wrestles with the devil, bullets get shot out of the air, Dr. Sharon takes an inflatable T-Rex to the mat, and Dr. Healy goes into labor.” And that’s just in Act II. Starting tonight, Throughline Theatre Company

{COMEDY} All-female comedy troupe Frankly Scarlett lost a core member when Robin Hitchcock left the continent last year, moving to South Africa. But her current visit is a great excuse to name the group’s new show The Frankly Scarlett Comedy Hour: World Domination. Tonight and tomorrow, at Arcade Comedy Theater, Hitchcock joins Abby Fudor and Liz Labacz for a night of original sketches, impromptu improv games, comic videos and a little song and dance. A couple male performers will contribute, but the improv is all-female. BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 14. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $5-10. www. arcadecomedytheater.com

St., Downtown. $25-50 ($100 ticket includes reception). 412456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

+ MON., SEPT. 16 {WORDS}

SEPT. 13 Proud to be an American?

{OPERA} Composer Tobias Picker and librettist Gene Scheer are big names in contemporary opera. Fans of Microscopic Opera Company know Picker’s Fantastic Mr. Fox and Scheer’s Three Decembers

Art by Bea Chiappelli

at CAPA High School Theater, with seven singers and an 18-piece orchestra. Katherine Drago, Dimitrie Lazich and

Sept. 17; Thu., Sept. 19; and Sat., Sept. 21. 111 Ninth St., Downtown. $15-35. www.microscopicopera.org

with the off-Broadway cast. The inspirational drama, focusing on six pilot trainees confronting racism and other obstacles, is on stage tonight only at the Byham Theater. BO 8 p.m. 101 Sixth

+ SAT., SEPT. 14 {STAGE} GE}

Art by Leslie Ansley

SEPT. 13 Oasis

tackles the local premiere of this philosophical slapstick. BO 8 p.m. Grey Box Theatre, 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $1215 (opening night: $22-25). www.throughlinetheatre.org

N E W S

and To Hell and Back. Thérèse Raquin is the pair’s 2001 adaptation of Emile Zola’s tragic romance/murder story. Starting tonight, Microscopic stages the chamber version

+

TA S T E

+

Anna Singer star. Following tonight’s opening-night performance, Picker himself joins company artists for a conversation. BO 8 p.m. Also Sun., Sept. 15; Tue.,

M U S I C

+

Black Angels ngels Over Tuskegee is Layon n Gray’s 2010 play about the he Tuskegee Airmen, who became, ecame, during World War II, the nation’s first African-American -American militaryy pilots, navigators, bombardiers ombardiers and aircraft-maintenance -maintenance men. An n off-Broadway production tion had a long run, and now w Pittsburgh’s New Horizon n Theaterr has teamed with the e Tuskegee Airmen Memorial ial of the Greaterr Pittsburgh Region to stage the he SEPT. show,

S C R E E N

16

Michael Chabon

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

Telegraph Avenue, Michael Chabon’s pretty much universally praised 2012 novel, is about neighborhoods, class, race, music geekery, record stores, kung fu, young love, married love and midwifery — but it’s mostly about fathers and sons, long-lost, surrogate, conflicted and otherwise. And it’s all propelled by Chabon’s almost offhandedly gorgeous prose. The book is out in paperback — the occasion of Chabon’s first visit in some years to the town where he studied creative writing, at Pitt, back in the ’80s. His short book tour includes Barnes & Noble at the Waterfront, tonight. BO 6 p.m. 100 W. Bridge St., West Homestead. Free. 412-832-0622

+ THU., SEPT. 19 {WORDS} Charles Bock’s first book, the Beautiful Children, 2008 novel n set in Las Vegas — where was se grew up in a family of Bock g pawnbrokers — and focused pawn homeless teenage runon ho aways. The novel was named a aways New York Times Notable Book and won w the Sue Kaufman Award Awa for First Fiction. Bock, who llives in New York, has also contributed to Esquire and contri Harper’s on subjects like animaHarpe and youth basketball. His tion a reading tonight opens free re University of Pittsburgh’s the Un Pittsburgh Contemporary Pittsbu Writers series. BO 8:30 p.m. Writer Frick Fine F Arts Auditorium, Schenley Plaza, Oakland. Free. Schen 412-624-6506 or www.pgh 412-62 writerseries.wordpress.com write

C L A S S I F I E D S

67


Weddings, Nightclubs, Proms, Corporate Events... We’ll do our part to make it perfect.

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER ALL MY SONS. Play by

OFFIC OF THE P IAL DJ ITTS CELEBRAT BURGH ION!

PROUD PARTNER

www.pittsburghdjcompany.com itt b hdj

Arthur Miller. Presented by The REP. Thu-Sun. Thru Sept. 22. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. ARRIVEDERCI, AL!: DINNER W/ THE GODFATHER. Interactive dinner theater. Sat., Sept. 14, 7 p.m. Kean Theatre, Gibsonia. 724-444-5326. ART OF MURDER. Comedy a painter who lays out a plan to murder his art dealer. Thu-Sat. Thru Sept. 14. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. BLACK ANGELS OVER TUSKEGEE. Off-Broadway play by Layon Gray. Presented by New Horizon Theater. Sat., Sept. 14, 8 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666. THE BOARDINGHOUSE. Story about the Home Sweet Home Boardinghouse, where life is anything but normal. Presented by Actors & Artists

Mark Twain. Thu-Sun. Thru of Fayette County w/ Pioneer Sept. 21. Little Lake Theatre, Drama Service. Sept. 12-15. Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. Geyer Performing Arts Center, THE LION KING. Thru Sept. 29. Scottdale. 724-887-0887. Benedum Center, Downtown. DEFENDING THE 412-456-6666. CAVEMAN. A comedic & THE ODD COUPLE. Comedy prehistoric look at the battle by Neil Simon. Fri, Sat. of the sexes. Wed-Sun. Thru Sept. 28. Comtra Thru Oct. 20. Pittsburgh Theatre, Cranberry. CLO, Downtown. 724-591-8727. 412-456-6666. ROMEO & JULIET. HOW TO SUCCEED Presented by IN BUSINESS Pittsburgh WITHOUT REALLY . w ww per Shakespeare in TRYING. Comedy a p ty ci pgh m the Parks. Sept. 14following J. Pierpont .co 15. Arsenal Park, Finch up the executive Lawrenceville. ladder in the business 412-404-8531. world of the 1950s. SAVING THE WORLD. Play Fri-Sun. Thru Sept. 29. by Jason Burkett. Presented McKeesport Little Theater, by Throughline Theatre McKeesport. 412-673-1100. Company. Thu-Sat. Thru INDIANA SMITH & THE Sept. 21. The Grey Box RESTAURANT OF DOOM. Theatre, Lawrenceville. Interactive murder mystery 1-888-718-4253. dinner theater. Sat., Sept. 14. SISTER’S SUMMER Tambellini Bridgeville Restaurant, SCHOOL CATECHISM: Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. GOD NEVER TAKES A IS HE DEAD? A recently VACATION. Interactive comedy discovered comedic by work

FULL LIST ONLINE

theater. Thu-Sun. Thru Sept. 15. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. A SONG FOR CORETTA. Staged reading about a group of people paying respects to Coretta Scott King. Presented by Demaskus. Sun., Sept. 15, 3 p.m. Creamy Creations, Penn Hills. 412-628-2498. SYLVIA. Comedy by A.R. Gurney about a dog & the dysfunctional couple that adopts her. Presented by the Indiana Players. Fri-Sun. Thru Sept. 22. Philadelphia Street Playhouse, Indiana. 724-464-0725. THERESE RAQUIN. Opera based on Emile Zola’s novel. Presented by Microscopic Opera Company. Every other. Pittsburgh CAPA, Downtown. 412-580-9267. THUGS, MUGS & .38 SLUGS. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Fri., Sept. 13. Cafe Notte, Emsworth. 412-417-5517.

COMEDY THU 12

Thèrése Raquin By Tobias Picker Libretto by Gene Scheer

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CN OT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu. Thru Sept. 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

FRI 13 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. THE END OF THE WORLD SHOW. Feat. Brett Goodnack, Tessa Karel, Krish Mohan, Jamison Linz, more. Fri, 10 p.m. Thru Sept. 13 Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

FRI 13 - SAT 14 CEDRIC THE ENTERTAINER. Sept. 13-14 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 14 AMISH MONKEYS’ COSTUME SHOW. Improv comedy. They’ll bring the costumes, you pick pieces to base games on. 8 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464. KNIGHTS OF THE ARCADE: EPIC COMEDY D&D ADVENTURE. Improv Dungeons & Dragons show. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

September 13-21 CAPA Theater | microscopicopera.com

TUE 17 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & CONTINUES ON PG. 71

68

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013


Clinical Trials Research Services, LLC

HOME PROTECTION

is currently conducting clinical trials in the following areas:

IBS with Diarrhea Endometriosis Constipation Diabetes Gout Osteoporosis

NEVER LOOKED SO GOOD

Chronic Diarrhea High Cholesterol High Blood Pressure Vaginal Dryness/Hot Flashes Birth Control/Oral Contraception

Principal Investigators â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dr. S. Berg, Dr. G. Rosenberg, Dr. L. Dobkin Do you have a medical condition that is not listed? Give us a call. Our studies change regularly and we may have a study thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right for you. Please call 412-363-1900 for more information.

10:00PMĂ?12:00AM ÂĽ NO COVER 9/13

BROKE, STRANDED & UGLY

10/4

10/11

KEITH GALLAGHER + TOM PANEI

10/18

MIKE FERRARI

10/25

CLASSIC ROCK 9/27

Learn to shoot

ROCK + ALTERNATIVE

BLUEGRASS/ ALTERNATIVE FOLK 9/20

DROP TOP TO DALLAS

ACOUSTIC ROCK

ANDY HALTER + TODD HARTMAN

ONE ON ONE CLASSES AVAILABLE 7 DAYS A WEEK

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; AS LITTLE AS 1 DAY NOTICE

ACOUSTIC DUO

HUGE SELECTION

MIKE MEDVED

B U Y- S E L L - T R A D E

ACOUSTIC COVERS

KEITH GALLAGHER + TOM PANEI

FREE RANGE PASS

CLASSIC ROCK

AT OUR CRANBERRY LOCATION ONLY

1 hour range time. Expires 12/31/13.

CRANBERRY - 724.742.BEEF(2333) / WWW.BRGRPGH.COM

2980 LEBANON CHURCH RD. â&#x20AC;˘ WEST MIFFLIN, PA 15122 â&#x20AC;˘ 412-469-9992 W W W . A N T H O N YA R M S . C O M N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

69


FRIDAY THE 13TH PARTY

VISUAL

ART

September 13TH 7pm • Acoustic Music with Brad Evans 10pm • DJ $2.50 Miller Lite Miller Girls $3 Fireball Whisky

Work (detail) by Wesley Smith, from Deliberate Voyages at Borelli-Edwards Galleries

NEW THIS WEEK

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE

3 MILLER $

LITE

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

8 MILLER $

LITE

DRAFTS

PITCHERS

ALL DAY SATURDAY

ALL DAY

SATURDAY FOR COLLEGE FOOTBALL

3 MILLER .50

$

LITE

24oz BOTTLES

DURING ALL

BUCCOS GAMES

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @M2THIRD 70

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

709 PENN GALLERY. Proud to be an American? Photographs by Bea Chiappelli. Opening reception: Sept. 13, 6-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-6070. BE GALLERIES. Deliberate Voyages. Paintings by Wesley Smith. Opening reception: Sept. 13, 6-8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOXHEART GALLERY. Fragmentation. New Works by Seth Clark. Artist reception: Sept. 21, 5-8 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Marsha’s Peace Art; Abstract & Pointillist. Work by Marsha Lee Moore. Opens Sept. 13. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. FUTURE TENANT. rrecycle bin. Installation by John Zobele. Opening reception 6-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Different Dimensions: The “Unpainting” Exhibit. Group show feat. mixed media, wall ceramics, fiber, sculpture, mosaics, more. Opening reception: Sept. 14, 6-8 p.m. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. MATTRESS FACTORY. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni. Opening reception:

Sept. 12, 7-9 p.m. North Side. 412-231-3169. ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY MEDIA ARTS GALLERY. Ireland. A collection of three years of photography abroad. Opening reception Sep. 12, 5-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-397-3813. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic! The Art of Burton Morris. Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Opens Sept. 15. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Oasis. Paintings by Leslie Ansley. Opening reception: Sept. 13, 6-9 p.m. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. WILDCARD. 365 Critters. Animal illustrations by Jeff Brunner. Opens Sept. 12. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

ONGOING ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. All Through the Night. LGBQT photography by Caldwell Linker. S/HE IS HER/E. Feat. over 100 works by Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, dating from the mid 1970s to the present. The Patron Saint of White Guys That Went Tribal & Other Works. Work by Nick Bubash. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN

CULTURE. The Art of Elizabeth Catlett from the Collection of Samella Lewis. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BFG CAFE. New Artists Showcase. Group show. Garfield. 412-661-2345. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. East Suburban Art League Exhibit. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Julia. Paintings by Sonja Sweterlitsch. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Beauty at the Edge of the Unreal. Pop art by Stephane Pedno. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. EASTSIDE GALLERY. Donna Hollen Bolmgren. Benefits the Master Visual Artists exhibition. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. EVOLVER TATTOO ARTS. Escape. Group show. South Side. 412-481-1004. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pigment & Silver. CONTINUES ON PG. 73


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 68

John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen STAND-UP COMEDY porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. MCGINLEY HOUSE & The BeerHive, Strip District. MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. 412-904-4502. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. AUGUST WILSON CENTER NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN more than 600 birds from over CULTURE. Pittsburgh: 200 species. With classes, lectures, Reclaim, Renew, Remix. demos and more. North Side. Feat. imagery, film & oral 412-323-7235. history narratives to explore NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 communities, cultures, & rooms helping to tell the story innovations. Downtown. of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. 412-258-2700. University of Pittsburgh. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Oakland. 412-624-6000. Preserved materials OLIVER MILLER reflecting the industrial HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/ heritage of Southwestern PA. Whiskey Rebellion site Homestead. 412-464-4020. features log house, blacksmith BULGARIAN-MACEDONIAN shop & gardens. South Park. NATIONAL EDUCATION 412-835-1554. AND CULTURAL PENNSYLVANIA CENTER. How Bulgaria TROLLEY MUSEUM. Saved Its Jews During Trolley rides WWII. www.bmnecc. and exhibits. Includes org/holocaust.aspx. displays, walking w. w w West Homestead. er tours, gift shop, hcitypap g p 412-461-6188. picnic area and Trolley .com CARNEGIE MUSEUM Theatre. Washington. OF NATURAL HISTORY. 724-228-9256. Roads of Arabia: PHIPPS CONSERVATORY Archaeology & History of & BOTANICAL GARDEN. the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Summer Flower Show. Glass Archaeological materials art surrounded by colorful exploring the cultural history blooms. Feat. work by of the Arabian Peninsula. Daviea Davis, Jason Forck, Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Steven Sadvary, Lisa Platt, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. more. 14 indoor rooms & Oakland. 412-622-3131. 3 outdoor gardens feature CARNEGIE SCIENCE exotic plants and floral displays CENTER. BIKES: Science on from around the world. Two Wheels. Feat. hands-on Oakland. 412-622-6914. activities, demonstrations & PITTSBURGH GLASS a collection of historic, rare, CENTER. Lifeforms. Exhibition & peculiar bicycles. Ongoing: of natural imagery in Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), lampworked glass. Curated by Miniature Railroad and Village, Robert Mickelsen. Friendship. USS Requin submarine, and more. 412-365-2145. North Side. 412-237-3400. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG FALLINGWATER. Tour the AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 famed Frank Lloyd Wright animals, including many house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. endangered species. Highland FIRST PRESBYTERIAN Park. 412-665-3639. CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany RIVERS OF STEEL stained-glass windows. NATIONAL HERITAGE Downtown. 412-471-3436. AREA. Exhibits on the FORT PITT MUSEUM. Homestead Mill. Steel Unconquered: History Meets industry and community Hollywood at Fort Pitt. artifacts from 1881-1986. Original movie props, Homestead. 412-464-4020. photographs, & costumes SENATOR JOHN HEINZ alongside 18th century HISTORY CENTER. artifacts & documents, comparing Pennsylvania’s Civil War. & contrasting historical In-depth look at Pennsylvania’s events w/ Hollywood significant contributions during depictions. Reconstructed fort the Civil War feat. artifacts, houses museum of Pittsburgh military encampments, history circa French & Indian life-like museum figures, War and American Revolution. more. From Slavery to Freedom. Downtown. 412-281-9285. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role FRICK ART & HISTORICAL in the anti-slavery movement. CENTER. Ongoing: tours Ongoing: Western PA Sports of Clayton, the Frick estate, Museum, Clash of Empires, and with classes, car & carriage exhibits on local history, more. museum. Point Breeze. Strip District. 412-454-6000. 412-371-0600. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the HISTORY CENTER. Museum other Frank Lloyd Wright commemorates Pittsburgh

STONE COLD GRO0VE PRODUCTIONS

WED 18

presents

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14 at Kelly Strayhorn Theater - 7pm TOM BROWNE, FRED WESLEY AND PAMELA WILLIAMS

EXHIBITS

FULL LIST ONLINE

WITH SPECIAL GUEST

THE HOUSE OF SOUL BAND Tickets also available at Dorsey’s Records and Stedefords Records

S 3 NIGHYT! L ON

COUPLE’S NITE:

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21 at Kaufman Center

FREE CONCERT ON THE HILL!

Wed, Sept 11

LYNDSEY SMITH AND SOUL DISTRIBUTION

THE OLD E. ALLSTARS AND INTRODUCING “CUE”

NEXT WEEK: XXX Starlet & Hometown Hottie

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12

Alexis Monroe

“TAUK” LIVE!

at Mullens Northshore WITH SPECIAL GUESTS theCAUSE Tickets also available at Dave’s Music Mine

LIVE SEPT. 17- 21

ullens M Bar & Grill

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Mon-Sat: Noon-2am Sun: 3pm-2am

135 9th Street 412-281-7703 www.blushexotic.com DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

N O RTH

S H O R E

( A C R O S S F R O M P N C PA R K )

all tickets available at showclix.com stonecoldgroove.net Find us on Facebook at StoneColdGrooveProductions

8-10pm Gather your friends for a night of food, drinks & trivia. Giveaways, Skyy Vodka Tasting & more.

BLACK & GOLD

9:30-1:30am

HEADQUARTERS

let your voice be heard

ALL GAMES

$10 BUCKETS OF BEER

Now Booking Events, Parties & more Open 7 days a week for special events contact cattivo44@comcast.net

(mix and match)

SIX PACKS TO-GO for the walk to the stadium

HAPPY HOUR MON-FRI 5-7PM

Check our website for more events & daily happenings

WEDNESDAYS FREE POOL 6-10PM

146 44th St . Pgh, PA 15201

709 EAST ST. (412) 979-5075

www.cattivo.biz

CORNER OF E. OHIO / EAST ST.

CONTINUES ON PG. 73

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

71


September’s Featured Mixologist:

LUNCHTIME

LIVE

Congratulates September’s Featured Mixologist

AT

SCHENLEY PLAZA

BROUGHT TO YOU BY 96.9 BOB FM, Q929, AND PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

FALLON O’DONNELL CLADDAGH IRISH PUB

Fallon O’Donnell (yes, she is Irish) is a Butler native. She is now in her senior year at University of Pittsburgh working towards a philosophy and political science degree. She started in the serviceindustry as a server, and becoming a bartender was just a natural

progression. Fallon has worked at Claddagh for three years. When not behind the bar, you can find her jogging or at school. When asked if she’s ever been given anything other than money as a tip, she surprisingly said “new socks and one time, a garlic press.”

LIVE ACOUSTIC MUSIC NOON TO 1PM TUESDAY SEPT. SEPT. 17

FALLON’S FEATURED RECIPE:

The ABSOLUT Cilantro Shandy 1.25 oz. ABSOLUT Cilantro 0.5 oz. Simple Syrup 1 oz. Cucumber Puree Half of a fresh squeezed lime Dash of Lemonade Shake the top 4 ingredients together and pour over a Collins glass. Top with lemonade. Garnish with a sprig of cilantro.

407 CINEMA DR. SOUTH SIDE WORKS 412-381-4800 www.claddaghirishpubs.com SEPT 28TH 11AM – MIDNIGHT

Join us for the 1ST ANNUAL OYSTER FEST at Claddagh Irish Pub - Sponsored by Jameson Featuring ABSOLUT Bloody Mary Shooters & Luke Wholey’s Oysters [ENJOY WITH ABSOLUT RESPONSIBILITY®.] ABSOLUT® VODKA. PRODUCT OF SWEDEN. 40% ALC./VOL. DISTILLED FROM GRAIN. ©2012 IMPORTED BY ABSOLUT SPIRITS CO., NEW YORK, NY.

72

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

To learn more about Claddagh Irish Pub and the ABSOLUT Cilantro Shandy, click on the CPTV Player on pghcitypaper.com or scan the QR code

Wojo TUESDAY SEPT. SEPT. 24

Montford Lunchtime Live is a FREE, acoustic concert from Noon to 1 pm under the tent in Schenley Plaza. Grab your lunch to go and enjoy live music from local artists! FOR MORE DETAILS:

WWW.BOBFM969.COM WWW.QBURGH.COM


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 71

industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905.

FESTIVALS SAT 14 SLIPPERY ROCK VILLAGEFEST. Crafters, vendors, live music, more. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Main St., Slippery Rock, Slippery Rock.

SAT 14 - SUN 15 PITTSBURGH RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL. Medieval entertainment, children’s activities, artisan market, more. Southeast of Pittsburgh off I-70, exit 51A, Route 31. Sat, Sun. Thru Sept. 29 724-872-1670.

FUNDRAISERS THU 12 COCKTAILS FOR A CAUSE. Benefits the YWCA. 5:30 p.m. Tavern 245, Downtown. 412-391-5100. EXTRA BASES FOR EXTRA MILE. Networking event at a Pirates game. Includes buffet, drinks, more. Benefits the Extra Mile Education Foundation. 6 p.m. PNC Park, North Side. 412-456-3103.

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 70

Photography by Ellen Bjerklie-Hanna, A. Jason Coleman, Danielle Goshay, Brenda Roger, & Cynthia Zordich. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. The Clayton Days, Revisited: A Project by Vik Muniz. Feat. his 65-photo collection. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. RetroFRESH. Contemporary paintings by James Kennedy, Claire Hardy, Donald Deskey, Alexander Minewski, Louise Evans-Scott, Vladimir Naiditch, & Henri de Waroquier. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Text meets Texture. Work by Nancy McNary-Smith & David Montano. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Elementals. Collaborative works by Matt Hunter & Gabrielle Fischer. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Raw Images. Photographs by Jill & Flannery Joyce. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488.

GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HILLMAN CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS. Low Tides & Bucolic Daze. Hand painted photography by Rosemary Pipitone. Fox Chapel. 412-968-3045. THE INN. The Spice Girls: Live at the Inn. Work by Terry Boyd. Lawrenceville. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Perspective 2013: A Photography Exhibition. Robinson. 412-788-0816. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. This Way to the Egress.

Paintings by Ben Matthews. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MINE FACTORY. Once Is Never Enough. Group show by the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Curated by Vicky A. Clark. Homewood. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Eric White: Monoprints. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Glassweekend ‘13. Group show. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Gestures: The Fine Art of Non-Verbal Communication. Group show. Garfield. 412-328-4737. PENN STATE UNIVERSITY GALLERY. Retrospective. Work by Eloise Piper. New Kensington. 724-334-6032. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Hand Tinted Vintage Photographs. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year: Akiko Kotani. Emerging Artist of the Year: Lenka Clayton. Master Visual Artists: Preserving the Legacy. Work by Tadao Arimoto, Gary Jurysta, Contance Merriman,

Risë Nagin, Chuck Olson, Marjorie F. Shipe, Paul Zelevansky, more. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. GREEN. Group show. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Art Interprets Alzheimer’s. Work by George Roby & Herbert Ascherman, Jr. Downtown. 412-261-7003. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Whimsical Gardens. Acrylic Paintings by Maura Taylor. Friendship. 412-953-2599. TOUCHSTONE CENTER FOR CRAFTS. On Uneven Ground. Abstract Mosaics by Rachel Sager Lynch. Patrick Daugherty: Influenced by the Right People™. Oil paintings. Farmington. 724-329-1370. USX TOWER. Last Light The Civic Arena. Photography by Ed Massery. Downtown. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

THUR, SEPT 12 • 9PM R&B/FUNK/JAM

THE MAIN SQUEEZE WITH AQUEOUS

FRI, SEPT 13 • 9PM ROCK

THE RANDALL BAUMANN BAND SAT, SEPT 14 • 9PM BLUES

THE PAWNBROKERS FREE SHOW MON, SEPT 16 • 8PM WORLD MUSIC

MAMADOU KELLY & LEILA GOBI WITH BATAMBA TUES, SEPT 17 • 9PM

SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH

LINA ALLEMANO FOUR OPEN FOR LUNCH Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

drinks, music from the 50s, 60s & 70s. Benefits Most Holy Name. Most Holy Name of Jesus Parish, Troy Hill. 412 231-2994 x.3. FOOTSTEPS FOR RECOVERY 5K RUN/WALK. 7TH ANNUAL CHARLIE Harmar Pavilion. Benefits ROSS MEMORIAL GOLF the Pennsylvania Educational OUTING. Benefits Mainstay Network for Eating Disorders. Life Services. 10 a.m. 9 a.m. North Park, Allison Park. Quicksilver Golf Club, Midway. 412-913-1373. 412-344-3640. FRIENDSHIP WALK. NATIONAL AVIARY’S Benefits Best Buddies BLACK & WHITE PARTY. Pennsylvania. 8:30-10:15 a.m. Fortune telling, strolling Kennywood Park, West Mifflin. magic, cash bar, refreshments, 717-658-3939. more. 6-10 p.m. National Aviary, HELP OUT HAPPY HOUR. North Side. 412-323-7235. Benefits Gwen’s Girl’s. XTREME BINGO W/ 5-7 p.m. James Street HAUS OF HAUNT. Gastropub & Benefits the Delta Speakeasy, North Side. Foundation of 412-904-3335. Pittsburgh & LIVE! IN ww. r w Pittsburgh AIDS Task LAWRENCEVILLE. pape pghcitym Force. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Musical performances, .co Opera, Strip District. food, drinks & 412-322-2800. artwork provided by Lawrenceville residents, artisans, & businesses. DANCE FOR PARKINSON’S Benefits Lawrenceville United. PITTSBURGH. Dance classes 7 p.m. Teamster Temple, designed for people w/ Lawrenceville. Parkinson’s Disease to MORNINGSIDE MILE RUN. explore the art of dance & Benefits the Wounded Warrior live music. Sat, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Project & Morningside Area Thru Nov. 23 Pittsburgh Community Council. Jancey & Ballet Theatre, Strip District. Greenwood St., Morningside. 412-387-2542. 8 a.m. 412-204-7410. FALL OLDIES DANCE. In honor of the late DJ Terry Lee, BOOK BLAST 5K RUN/WALK. feat. DJ, Joe Parknavy. Food,

FRI 13

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 14

SUN 15

Benefits the Monroeville Public Library. 9 a.m. Monroeville Community Park, Monroeville. 412-372-0500. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. CF CYCLE FOR LIFE. 30 or 50-mile bike ride benefiting the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. 7 a.m. Roselea Farms, Coraopolis. 412-321-4422.

MON 16 OKTOBERFEST GOLF OUTING. German food, beer, more. Benefits the Westmoreland County Historical Society. Greensburg Country Club, Jeannette. 724-532-1935.

POLITICS THU 12 POWER, PRIVILEGE, & PATRIARCHY. Discussion about sexism & racism in politics, journalism, & society w/ Zerlina Maxwell. 7 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. 724-837-7040. GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United

IRUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQYLVLWZZZZLONLQVEXUJFGFRUJ

CONTINUES ON PG. 74

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

73


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 73

Band Night Every Thursday!

SEPTEMBER 19 Straub’s newest seasonal is an all-malt India Pale Lager with a blend of Bravo, Cascade, and Columbus hops. Cold-conditioned and unfiltered, it pours a deep golden color, and has aromas of citrus, orange-peel and grapefruit. Smooth and refreshing. AVAILABLE NOW IN 12 OZ. BOTTLES AT BETTER BEER DISTRIBUTORS, INCLUDING: BEER & POP 4 LESS BRIDGEVILLE BREWSKI’S DISTRIBUTOR RUSSELTON JR’S BEER WAREHOUSE ROCHESTER SAVE ON BEER CRANBERRY A TRIBUTE TO

Our 140 Year History

PROUDLY BREWED IN ST. MARYS, PA

STRAUBBEER.COM

NOISE NOTHING MACE BALLARD CHERNOBEAR $2.50 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282

Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

KIDSTUFF

SUN 15

THU 12 - WED 18

PITTSBURGH ANTI-DRONE WARFARE COALTION MEETING. Third Sun of every month, 1-3 p.m. Thru Sept. 15 Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

LITERARY

BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 13 - WED 18

THU 12 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

SAT 14 FULL LIST E DUCK CALL ORCHESTRA. Record ONLIN www. per pa pghcitym .co

FRI 13 JOY KATZ & ELLEN MCGRATH SMITH. Mad Fridays Reading Series. Delanie’s Coffee, South Side. 412-927-4030. WILEY CASH. Reading w/ author of A Land More Kind Than Home. 8 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100.

SAT 14 BOOK SIGNING W/ C. ANTHONY MARTIGNETTI. Author of Lunatic Heroes: Memories, Lies & Reflections. Also feat. music by Nicolas Despo. 4 p.m. Eljay’s Used Books, Dormont. 412-344-7444. PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

MON 16 12 STEPS TO PEACE: USING CREATIVITY TO TRANSFORM ANXIETY. Writing & discussion group. Mon, 6-7 p.m. Thru Nov. 25 Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. 412-337-4976. MICHAEL CHABON. Book signing. 6 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Waterfront. 412-462-5743. OUT OF THE GUTTER: GRAPHIC NOVEL DISCUSSION GROUP. Third Mon of every month, 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

TUE 17 JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

74

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

your own duck calls that will play as Florentijn Hofman’s 40-foot-tall “Rubber Ducky” tub toy travels towards the Roberto Clemente Bridge. Sat. Thru Sept. 21 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 14 - SUN 15 LITTLE MERMAID. Original, interactive, musical theater production. Sat, Sun. Thru Oct. 6 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201.

TUE 17 FREE COMMUNITY ORCHESTRA - EL CEO. For classically-inclined musicians of all ages & abilities. 3 p.m. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800.

OUTSIDE SAT 14 BEGINNER PADDLES W/ VENTURE OUTDOORS. Ages 12+. 9-11 a.m. Moraine State Park, Butler.

& compass skills, more. Ages 12+. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011.

SAT 14 - SUN 15 KAYAKING DISCOVERY COURSE. Presented by L.L. Bean. Sat, Sun, 10-11:30 a.m. Thru Oct. 13 North Park, Allison Park. 412-318-1200.

SUN 15 EAST END OLYMPICS. Games, music, beer, free pizza, more. www.eastendolympics.com 12 p.m. Bayardstown Social Club, Strip District.

OTHER STUFF THU 12 THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. Interactive games, hosted by Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MEDITATION & WHOLE LIFE TRANSFORMATION. Supreme Meditation & the Science of Transformation w/ Acharya Kedar. Free public program. Doors open at 7:15, seating ends at 8 p.m. and Thu., Sept. 19 Winchester Thurston, Upper School, Shadyside. 724-420-5826.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

DREAMS OF HOPE

Every year, Dreams of Hope, a performance troupe of LGBTQ and allied youth, puts on 18 to 20 original outreach shows featuring drama, song, dance and more, in various non-traditional venues around the city. Volunteers are always needed, particularly for office work and on show days. The next volunteer orientation is at 1 p.m. Sun., Sept. 22. Call 412-361-2065 or visit www.dreamsofhope.org for information.

412-255-0564. WAGMAN PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh 7:30 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Frazier. 724-224-2510. WOODLAND TREASURE HUNT: ORIENTEERING 101. Learn basic map, navigation

MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant


U T E O G L N I S inner Club

[POLITICS] Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194.

SUN 15

THU 12 - FRI 13 SHE DIVA DIED. & COME AGAIN? Multi-media performance by Christina Springer portraying the battle between the artist & the mother. Sept. 12-13 Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

THU 12 - SAT 14 52 UP CLOSE. Feat. magician Lee Terbosic. Thru Sept. 14 Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999.

FRI 13 PGH ABIDES: “THAT’S NOT HER TOE, DUDE.” Screening of The Big Lebowski & Lebowski-related activities. 5 p.m. Bayardstown Social Club, Strip District. BRIDGES & RIVER SHORES FREE WALKING TOUR. Fri. Thru Sept. 27 Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel, Downtown. 412-471-5808.

FRI 13 - SAT 14 2ND ANNUAL UKRAINIAN FOOD FESTIVAL. Sept. 13-14 SS Peter & Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church Hall, Carnegie. 412-527-5359.

FRI 13 - MON 16 STEEL CITY TATTOO CONVENTION. Vendors, tattoo booths, live entertainment, more. Sept. 13-16 David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-565-6000.

Political analyst and pundit Zerlina Maxwell — who contributes to the New York Daily News, Feministing.com and BET.com, among other outlets — isn’t afraid to dive into unfriendly waters. An occasional guest on Sean Hannity’s show on Fox News, she received violent threats earlier this year after suggesting that, rather than encouraging women to prevent rape by carrying guns, men should be taught not to rape. Thursday, Maxwell appears at Pitt-Greensburg to present her talk “Power, Privilege and Patriarchy.” 7 p.m. Thu., Sept. 12. 150 Finoli Drive, Greensburg. Call 724-837-7040 or visit www.greensburg.pitt.edu.

SAT 14 ANNUAL DEUTSCHTOWN GERMAN PARADE. E. Ohio St., North Side. Luncheon to follow at Teutonia Mannerchor. 11 a.m. BEADS OF COURAGE BEAD CHALLENGE. Watch as regional artists make beads for the Beads of Courage program at Children’s Hospital. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145. CULTURE CLOZ OPENING CELEBRATION. Drum circle, henna artist, live music by DJ Tee Jay, more. 10 a.m. Culture Cloz, East Liberty. 787-209-3656. EARLY AMERICAN HEARTH COOKING. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The Old Stone House, Slippery Rock. 724-738-4964.

FREE SENIOR HEALTH FAIR. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Risen Lord Parish-Education Center, North Side. 412-761-1507. HAPPY GRUMPS. A social hour for the wise older crowd. Bring your concerns, rants & hopes for some fun & good conversation. Sat, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Thru Dec. 28 Ritter’s Diner, Bloomfield. 412-337-4976. INCLINE HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at the bottom of the Monongahela Incline. Sat. Thru Oct. 26 412-302-5223. MEET THE FILMMAKER: JOHN JAQUISH FILM SCREENING & DISCUSSION. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. PLANNING & PLANTING

WORKSHOPS. Learn basic soil science, cold frame design, fall planting, more. Sat. Thru Sept. 28 Shadyside Nursery, Shadyside. 412-532-6896. RABIES/MICROCHIP/NAIL CLIP CLINIC. Proceeds benefit Animal Care & Welfare’s low-cost spay & neuter program. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Christ United Methodist Church, Bethel Park. 412-853-6621. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances.

AFRONAUT(A) FILM CLUB. Screenings of works by experimental black filmmakers. Every other Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 29 The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. MEXICAN WAR STREETS HOUSE & GARDEN TOUR. Walking tour of homes & gardens in the Historic North Side Neighborhood. mexicanwarstreets.org 11 a.m.-5 p.m. PFLAG GREENSBURG. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Third Sun of every month, 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. PITTSBURGH REPTILE SHOW & SALE. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Futules’ Harmar House, Cheswick. 724-516-0441. RIVERS OF STEEL SUNDAY HERITAGE MARKET. Farm & artist market. Third Sun of every month. Thru Sept. 15 Homestead Pump House, Munhall. 412-464-4020.

D

ADVENTURES IN DINING with the

GAY COMMUNITY

Great Food t People Grea Great Fun Dont Miss This Remarkableience! Dining Exper osphere. Warm, Relaxed Atm

13 Friday, Sept. 20, 20

RSVP AT: 412-337-0701 SINGLESOUTPGH@YAHOO.COM

MON 16 FREE SENIOR HEALTH FAIR. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Bridgeville Public Library, Bridgeville. 412-325-4222. NATIVE HERBACEOUS PLANTS & THEIR USES IN THE LANDSCAPE. Mon, 7-9 p.m. Thru Oct. 21 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SELF-GUIDED OLD ALLEGHENY COUNTY JAIL MUSEUM TOUR. Mon, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Thru Sept. 30 Old Allegheny County Jail Museum, Downtown. 412-471-5808. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

Real hook ups, real fast.

Free

TRY FOR

MON 16 - WED 18 PITTSBURGH COCKTAIL WEEK. Feat. specialty cocktails representing the best about Pittsburgh, classes, more. Various locations. pghcocktailweek.com/2013/04/ pittsburgh-cocktail-week-2013. html Sept. 16-22

Try it Free!

412.566.1861 Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 Ahora en Español 18+

www.livelinks.com

CONTINUES ON PG. 76

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

75


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 75

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

TUE 17 THE ART OF COMEDY SCREENWRITING. Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Sept. 24 3rd Street Gallery, Carnegie. 412-276-5233. FLU + YOU. Flu vaccination clinic for adults age 65+. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. THE HISTORY OF LATROBE BREWING COMPANY. Presentation by James L. Tito. 7 p.m. Westmoreland County Historical Society, Greensburg. 724-532-1935. SECRETS FROM THE TEMPLE MOUNT’S SOIL. Presentation by Gabriel Barkay. 12 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

WED 18

EVENT: Druglust, Ratface and Secret Tombs at The Shop, Bloomfield CRITIC: Andrew Woehrel, 25, full-time punk rocker from Bloomfield WHEN: Fri.,

It was a great punk show at The Shop with a really good lineup, and I’m really excited I was able to come to this show tonight. I came to see Secret Tombs, but it was really cool getting to see Druglust and Ratface also: They were both really awesome bands. My favorite part hands-down was getting to see Ben Klahr sing. He’s the lead singer of Secret Tombs. Overall, though, I would say every band brought something to the night and it’s been great. I think it’s awesome how packed The Shop has gotten tonight, as it’s definitely one of the coolest places to come see live music in Pittsburgh. It definitely makes me excited as a punk rocker to be able to come to these things in the Pittsburgh neighborhoods.

BAPTISTERY OF FLORENCE TALK. Professor Franklin Toker will speak about his findings under the baptistery. 12 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-648-2400. FARM TO TABLE: KEEP IT REAL, KEEP IT LOCAL. Presented by Erin Hart of American HealthCare Group. Call to reverse a spot. 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. if experienced. Also seeking INTRODUCTORY LEVEL adults for opening party scene. SCOTTISH GAELIC CLASS. Call for appointment. Darlynn’s Wed. Thru Nov. 6 Bottlebrush School of Dance, Mt. Pleasant. Gallery & Shop, Harmony. 724-887-0887. 724-452-0539. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! ARTS CENTER PROFESSIONAL Practice conversational COMPANY. Auditions for English. Wed, 5 p.m. White Christmas. Sept. 21-22. Carnegie Library, Oakland. Male/Female dancers/singers 412-622-3151. & a female age 10-12, OBSCURE GAMES/PUB GAME tap/jazz combinations & 32 NIGHT. Wed, 7 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 bars of a Broadway-style song. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. Bring sheet music, accompanist 412-681-4318. provided. centerauditions.org/ THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. index.php/professionalA meeting of jugglers company/white-christmas & spinners. All levels Lincoln Park Performing welcome. Wed, Arts Center, Midland. 7:30 p.m. Union 724-259-6443. Project, Highland Park. MON RIVER ARTS. 412-363-4550. www. per a p pghcitym WEST COAST SWING Auditions for A .co WEDNESDAYS. Swing Christmas Story. dance lessons. Wed, Sept. 9 & 12. Adults & 9 p.m. The Library, South children needed. Email for Side. 916-287-1373. appointment, dlmusic@verizon. WORKABLE CAREER FAIR. net. T Grand Theatre, Elizabeth. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. South Hills 412-628-1032. Interfaith Ministries, Bethel Park. THE NEXT MILLIONAIR! 412-854-9120 x 14. Looking for actors & actresses for the movie production of The Next Millionair. CARNEGIE PERFORMING ARTS Call Robert for further CENTER. Auditions for The details. Thru Sept. 20. Nutcracker. Sept. 21. Dance 412-904-2954. students, male/female age THE THEATRE FACTORY. 5-adult. carnegieperforming Auditions for Margaret artscenter.com/auditions Edson’s Wit. Sept. 14. Women Carnegie. 412-279-8887. age 20-80/men age 20-60s, GEYER PERFORMING ARTS equity & non-equity, 2-min. CENTER. Auditions for The monologue & cold readings. Nutcracker. Sept. 14. Basic thetheatrefactory.com Trafford. movement audition, bring ballet, jazz, & pointe shoes 724-454-7193.

FULL LIST ONLINE

AUDITIONS

76

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

Sept. 6

B Y B RE T T W I L S ON

SUBMISSIONS BLAST FURNACE. Seeking submissions for Volume 3, Issue 3. Theme is “prized possessions,” tangible or otherwise. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems. blastfurnace.submittable. com/Submit THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. INSISTENT LIGHT POETRY COMPETITION. Submit 2 of your best poems, no themes or restrictions. cathleenbailey. blogspot.com/2013/08/insistentlight-first-annual-poetry.html KELLY STRAYHORN THEATER. Accepting applications for the KST Photography Fellowship. Submit resume, cover letter, & link to online portfolio to david@kelly-strayhorn.org. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. PITTSBURGH SOCIETY OF ARTISTS NEW MEMBERS SCREENING. Screening Sept. 29. Bring five works of art in the same medium, 2D or 3D. Drop off 11 a.m.-2 p.m., pick up 4-6 p.m. aapgh.org Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-1370.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

My boyfriend and I have been monogamous for five years. His dick is of average size. It’s not small enough for him to have dealt with the baggage associated with “small dicks.” Yet, I’ve had sex with big dicks, and I would love to try one of those dick sheaths or extenders. But my boyfriend is a sensitive guy, and I feel like I’m going to fuck up our sex life if I ask for one. How can I propose this without him feeling like his manhood is insufficient? SINCERELY LOVES AVERAGE MAN

“Getting a sheath onto her boyfriend’s dick without hurting his feelings will be a bit tricky,” said Matthew Nolan of OhJoySexToy. com. “No matter their size, lads around the world are brought up with dick insecurities. Having said that, a dick sheath isn’t the worst thing in the world for her to bring to the table: It involves her boyfriend as a participant, and it keeps his dick in the loop.” Matthew and his partner, Erika Moen, create an informative and entertaining weekly comic that focuses on the world of sex — from sex-toy reviews to interviews with people in the sex industry. They research and write the text together, and Erika does the drawing. (Why comics? “Sex education is typically very dry,” said Erika: “a wall of text about abstract concepts and then some alien diagrams. Comics are especially well equipped to teach people about their bodies, sexual options and reproductive choices because they combine images and text. Adding in a joke or two helps make people feel included in the conversation instead of being lectured at.”) In a recent comic, Matthew gave cock sheaths a try. Cock sheaths — for those of you who haven’t visited a sex-toy shop in a while — are a popular new sex toy that allows an average dude to be huge, and a huge dude to be ridiculous. They’re pliable-butfirm hollow dildos that a guy wears over his dick. The dude slides his hard, lubed-up dick inside the sheath, pulls his balls through a ring at the base that prevents the sheath from sliding off, and bangs away at his partner’s hole(s). That’s the theory, anyway. “The dick sheaths I tried weren’t the greatest thing,” said Matthew. “They dull the senses and turn your dick into an unwieldy mess. Despite owning a few, my preference is to use a big dildo on my partner.” But if it’s a dick sheath you want, Matthew has some advice. “SLAM should suggest going sex-toy shopping with her boyfriend,” said Matthew. “She could tell her boyfriend she’s in a filthy mood and fancies something big. She should put the emphasis on wanting him to give her some big-toy fucking and add that this is something that you can do together. Have him help pick out different toys — like some big dildos — while saying encouraging things like, ‘Ooohh, wouldn’t you like to fuck me with this one?’ When you come across the cock sheath, add it to your cart, explaining

that it would be a perfect sex-toy solution for your mood.” I’m going to break in here for a second: If you feel like your boyfriend might have a meltdown if you start talking about wanting something huge for a change, head to the sex-toy shop without any stated agenda, and see how he reacts to the cock sheaths on display. If he recoils, you might wanna steer him over to the body paints and bondage gear. But if he seems intrigued and not threatened, ask him how he’d feel about fucking you with one, without seeming too invested yourself. And if you leave the sex-toy store with a cock sheath and a boyfriend whose ego is still intact? “Be encouraging about enjoying the extra size and having him fuck you with toys,” said Matthew. “Keep it jovial — laugh about it and tell him he’s sexy. A fun atmosphere can help alleviate insecurities. And by the time you’re done and dusted, you’ll know better if you prefer him with or without the sheath.” Go to OhJoySexToy.com to see examples of Erika and Matthew’s work. Follow them on Twitter at @PlusTen Strength and @ErikaMoen.

A FUN ATMOSPHERE CAN HELP ALLEVIATE INSECURITIES.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

I am a 22-year-old heterosexual female. I may possibly be bi. I really like the dick, but I fantasize about fucking a pretty woman with a strap-on. I asked my boyfriend of a year if I could live out my fantasy, but he said he doesn’t want me “fucking another woman like a man.” I asked if I could do this to him instead, but he said no. I like BDSM, but the most he’ll do is hold my arms down and spank me. I’ve asked for other things — bondage, nipple clamps, paddles, etc. — but he says that stuff takes too much time and the bother of it “kills the mood.” I offered to set up stuff beforehand — ropes already tied to the corners of the bed, for instance — but he doesn’t want me to do that because “what if someone saw it?” Am I just being selfish? My ex-husband (yes, ex-husband: I got married at 16 and divorced last year) would call me a freak when I opened up about my desires, so I made sure not to hide them from my current boyfriend when we met. Now what am I supposed to do? Just drop it? CONFUSED AND SEXUALLY DENIED

Yes, CASD, you should drop it — and by “it” I mean “him.” You wasted five years on a man who couldn’t meet your needs and sex-shamed you about your perfectly ordinary kinks. You’ve been with this new guy for a year, and he’s every bit as lazy, inconsiderate and sex-shamey as your ex-husband. DTMFA. There are tons of guys out there who would (1) be happy to indulge your kinks and (2) make lovely boyfriends or husbands. Go find one — or two or three or four. On the Savage Lovecast, it’s Bible-study time with nondouchey Christian John Shore at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

77


PLAY MASSAGE Enticing Massage 412-322-5140 FOXY LADY 412-805-2557 M4M-HOT YOUNG MAN WITH MAGICAL HANDS. 412-400-1530

ADULT VIDEO

Man 2 Man by Lee Professional and Discreet

FUN, FLIRTY, LOCAL Women! Call 412-566-1861 Try FREE! livelinks.com WILD LOCAL CHATLINE Listen to Ads & Reply FREE 412-9205566 Code 7964, 18+ Where Local Girls Go Wild! Call 412-894-0205 Try FREE! redhotdateline.com

24/7

412-628-1269

412-277-1589

Steel City Escorts

Man to Man

412-771-2473

HOT GAY & BI LOCALS Browse & Respond FREE! 412-937-9999 Use FREE Code 7965, 18+

Meet Hot Black Singles Now Call FREE! 412-235-6296 vibeline.com

MEET SEXY LOCALS! Send Messages FREE!! 412-920-5566 Code 7963 Curious? 412-9379999, 18+

MARIA

Fall Fantasy Fall into these magic hands with a sensual massage. Lite dom/role playing. Call today. Don’t delay.

out call only 24/7 All major CC

ADULT PHONE

24/7 by a ppt.

PROFESSIONAL AND DISCREET

412-734-5399

Outcall Only c 24/ 7 c

www.adorableplaymates.com

Adult Video! Vintage & Rare Erotica 412-469-1347

ADULT PHONE

ADULT PHONE

Gorgeous, prompt, discreet. All major cc’s acct’d.

412-306-1773

Ink Well {BY BEN TAUSIG}

ADULTS ONLY Busty Beauty 801-661-9739

DOMINATION

MISTRESS

AMANDA Stripped, Bound, Gagged now the fun begins...

Help Me Discipline My NEW Naughty Slave Girl call for an appt.

412-461-5258 ACROSS 1. Harvard and Yale, e.g. 7. Secret society member, perhaps, briefly 11. Subject of many a rambling, GIFhappy personal site 14. Mathers, on stage 15. “Better sound through research” company 16. Postal motto word 17. Drug paraphernalia for those who aren’t sure they want to go through with it? 19. Antagonist 20. Word in a French motto 21. Amalfi Coast city 23. Tales 24. “Argo” shah 26. Spools of sushi? 31. Print casualty of 2012 34. “Informer” rapper 35. “... ___ quit!” 36. Some cell phones 37. Dress (up) 40. Evidence in some exonerations 41. Forget to put in, say 43. Half-asses 45. Unspectacular, unsuccessful batted ball? 49. Bendiness 50. Land surrounded by agua 54. Contaminated water consequence

78

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

GAY RIGHTS

56. Attach to eat, like a newborn 59. Judah Ben-___ 60. Criminal accomplice with a healthy complexion? 62. ___-rock 63. Cruising 64. The heebie-jeebies 65. Boil stuff 66. Fire 67. Like nobility

DOWN 1. Turn on one’s parents, say 2. Mature insect stage 3. Catholic official 4. Pieces of Indian jewelry 5. Sainted emperor called the Thracian 6. Manhub.com content, e.g. 7. Consumer scam watchdog org. 8. Classic American Chinese pork dish 9. Stand-up comic Patton 10. Place for aging whites 11. Prunes from one’s social network 12. Spork, alternately 13. Dairy Queen Blizzard add-in 18. Animal-skin dwellings 22. Nights before big things 25. “K3wl” 27. NYC-based culture site, with “the”

28. Party barrel 29. Burt Reynolds ex Anderson 30. Bird that may be mute 31. Clueless “Skyrim” player, e.g. 32. “Motherhood: The Second Oldest Profession” author Bombeck 33. 2006 Nintendo collection that included boxing, bowling, and golf 37. “___ have to pry the buzzer out of my cold, dead hands”-Ken Jennings 38. “Hollywood Squares” win 39. Big hairy ruminant 42. Prepare, as

a dirty bed? 43. Pennsylvania baseball park that might (weirdly) host playoff baseball in 2013 44. Means of paperless travel 46. Old Oldsmobiles 47. Weather Channel meteorologist Maria 48. “Keep your pants on” 51. Sandbar 52. Asshole 53. Put up stakes? 54. Mate 55. Netflix competitor 57. Summer month, in Paris 58. “Home” novelist Morrison 61. Big hairy ruminant {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

09.11-09.18

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): This is a good time to free yourself from a curse that an immature soul placed on you once upon a time. I’m not talking about a literal spell cast by a master of the dark arts. Rather, I’m referring to an abusive accusation that was heaped on you, perhaps inadvertently, by a careless person whose own pain made them stupid. As I evaluate the astrological omens, I conclude that you now have the power to dissolve this curse all by yourself. You don’t need a wizard or a witch to handle it for you. Follow your intuition for clues on how to proceed. Here’s a suggestion to stimulate your imagination: Visualize the curse as a dark purple rose. See yourself hurling it into a vat of molten gold.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The current chapter of your life story may not be quite as epic as I think it is, so my advice may sound melodramatic. Still, what I’m going to tell you is something we all need to hear from time to time. And I’m pretty sure this is one of those moments for you. It comes from writer Charles Bukowski: “Nobody can save you but yourself. You will be put again and again into nearly impossible situations. They will attempt again and again through subterfuge, guise and force to make you submit, quit and/or die quietly inside. But don’t, don’t, don’t. It’s a war not easily won, but if anything is worth winning then this is it. Nobody can save you but yourself, and you’re worth saving.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The cosmos hereby grants you poetic license to be brazen in your craving for the best and brightest experiences … to be uninhibited in feeding your obsessions and making them work for you … to be shameless as you pursue exactly and only what you really, really want more than anything else. This is a limited-time offer, although it may be extended if you pounce eagerly and take full advantage. For best results, suspend your pursuit of trivial wishes and purge yourself of your bitchy complaints about life.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): At the last minute, Elsa Oliver impulsively canceled her vacation to New York. She had a hunch that something exciting would happen if instead she stayed at her home in England. A few hours later, she got a message inviting her to be a contestant on the U.K. television show Who Wants To Be a Millionaire? In the days and weeks that followed, she won the equivalent of $100,000. I’m not predicting anything quite as dramatic for you, Sagittarius. But I do suspect that good luck is lurking in unexpected places, and to gather it in you may have to trust your intuition, stay alert for late-breaking shifts in fate and be willing to alter your plans.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “The only thing standing between you and your goal,” writes American author Jordan Belfort, “is the bullshit story you keep telling yourself as to why you can’t achieve it.” I don’t entirely agree with that idea. There may be other obstacles over which you have little control. But the bullshit story is often more than half the problem. So that’s the bad news, Capricorn. The good news is that right now is a magic moment in your destiny when you have more power than usual to free yourself of your own personal bullshit story.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Is the truth a clear, bright, shiny treasure, like a big diamond glittering in the sunlight? Does it

have an objective existence that’s independent of our feelings about it? Or is the truth a fuzzy, convoluted thing that resembles a stream of smoke snaking through an underground cavern? Does it have a different meaning for every mind that seeks to grasp it? The answer, of course, is: both. Sometimes the truth is a glittering diamond and at other times it’s a stream of smoke. But for you right now, Aquarius, the truth is the latter. You must have a high tolerance for ambiguity as you cultivate your relationship with it. It’s more likely to reveal its secrets if you maintain a flexible and cagey frame of mind.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It’s a good time to indulge in wide-open, highflying, anything-goes fantasies about love — IF, that is … IF you also do something practical to help those fantasies come true. So I encourage you to dream about revolutionizing your relationship with romance and intimacy — as long as you also make specific adjustments in your own attitudes and behavior that will make the revolution more likely. Two more tips: 1. Free yourself from dogmatic beliefs you might have about love’s possibilities. 2. Work to increase your capacity for lusty trust and trusty lust.

experiment with this principle. See if you can increase your levels of joy and grace by describing what’s happening to you with beautiful and positive words.

in the air after a person wearing perfume or cologne passes by. For our purposes, we will expand the definition to include any influences and impressions left behind by a powerful presence who has exited the scene. In my astrological opinion, Gemini, sillage is a key theme for you to monitor in the coming days. Be alert for it. Study it. It will be a source of information that helps you make good decisions.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): This is Correct Your First Impressions Week. It’s a perfect time for you to re-evaluate any of your beliefs that are based on mistaken facts or superficial perceptions. Are you open to the possibility that you might have jumped to unwarranted conclusions? Are you willing to question certainties that hardened in you after just a brief exposure to complicated processes? During Correct Your First Impressions Week, humble examination of your fixed prejudices is one of the greatest gifts you can give yourself. P.S. This is a good time to reconnect with a person you have unjustly judged as unworthy of you.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Cataglottism” is a rarely used English word that has the same meaning as French kissing — engaging in liberal use of the tongue as you make out. But I don’t recommend that you incorporate such an inelegant, guttural term into your vocabulary. Imagine yourself thinking, while in the midst of French kissing, that what you’re doing is “cataglottism.” Your pleasure would probably be diminished. This truth applies in a broader sense, too. The language you use to frame your experience has a dramatic impact on how it all unfolds. The coming week will be an excellent time to

What’s the part of yourself that is least evolved and needs most transformation? Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “A good story should make you laugh, and a moment later break your heart,” wrote Chuck Palahniuk in his book Stranger Than Fiction. From what I can tell, Aries, the sequence is the reverse for you. In your story, the disruption has already happened. Next comes the part where you laugh. It may be a sardonic chuckle at first, as you become aware of the illusions you had been under before the jolt exposed them. Eventually I expect you will be giggling and gleeful, eternally grateful for the tricky luck that freed you to pursue a more complete version of your fondest dream.

   

  

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Taurus musician David Byrne was asked by an interviewer to compose a seven-word autobiography. In response, he came up with 10 words: “unfinished, unprocessed, uncertain, unknown, unadorned, underarms, underpants, unfrozen, unsettled, unfussy.” The coming days would be an excellent time for you to carry out similar assignments. I’d love to see you express the essential truth about yourself in bold and playful ways. I will also be happy if you make it clear that even though you’re a work-in-progress, you have a succinct understanding of what you need and who you are becoming.

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

wyep.org

The French word sillage means “wake,” like the trail created behind a boat as it zips through water. In English, it refers to the fragrance that remains

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

79


www.paguard.com PHEAA.org/jobs

schneiderjobs.com/ newjobs www.panerabread.jobs

NOW HIRING Full-Time and Part-Time Associate Positions Applications available at the following locations

sodexoupitt@gmail.com

Greensburg - Westmoreland Mall Shadyside - Centre Ave Cranberry - Next to Joanneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Allison Park - Home Depot Plaza Fox Chapel - Waterworks Plaza Settlers Ridge - Ridge Rd Parkway Exit Murrysville - Walnut Plaza Blvd of the Allies - Across from Magee Hospital Penn Center - Across from Sheetz

Flexible hours, Daylight and Evening Scheduling

Apply at your local Panera Cafe or at panerabread.jobs 80

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013


Sodexo University of Pittsburgh Now Accepting Applications for Immediate Hire!

Peterson Events Center: Food Court Supervisor, Catering Supervisor, Game Day Suite Supervisor, Banquet Servers, Cooks, Utility Workers

University Club: Lead Banquet Captain, Catering Banquet Servers, Tipped WaitstaďŹ&#x20AC; for Faculty Club and College Room, Banquet Set-up and Support, Sous Chef, Utility Workers

Also Hiring: Catering Banquet Servers, Pastry Chef, Bakers, Cooks and Prep Cooks, Utility Workers, Catering Drivers, Resident Dining Supervisor, Production Supervisor, Retail Supervisor, Barista. Full and Part time positions available, competitive wages. Applications are accepted Monday through Thursday 9am-4pm in the HR OďŹ&#x192;ce located in McCormick Hall at the University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. Please contact sodexoupitt@gmail.com or 412.624.2347 for more information. Sodexo values workforce diversity- EOE, M/F/D/V

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

81


FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 82 + STUDIES 82 + SERVICES 83 + WELLNESS 84 + LIVE 85

WORK HELP WANTED $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkgreatpay.com (AAN CAN)

STUDIES There is light at the end of the tunnel.

Department

ART

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

ENDOMETRIOSIS? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.316.3342

CALL TODAY!

Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SERVICE!

CLINICAL STUDIES

OSTEOPOROSIS?

Find your next place to â&#x20AC;&#x153;WORKâ&#x20AC;? in City Paper!

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

CLINICAL STUDIES

Your ad could be here

412.363.1900 CTRS

BIRTH CONTROL? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

Find your next job in the City Paperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;WORKâ&#x20AC;? section.

HIGH CHOLESTEROL? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

Pittsburgh City Paper is seeking a Graphic Designer to join its Art Department. QualiďŹ ed candidate must possess: s3TRONGCOMMUNICATIONANDORGANIZATIONALSKILLS s3TRONGDESIGNSKILLSWITHEXTENSIVEKNOWLEDGEOF )N$ESIGN 0HOTOSHOP)LLUSTRATOR s!BILITYTOWORKINAFAST PACED DEADLINEORIENTEDATMOSPHERE #ITY0APEROFFERSPAIDVACATION MEDICALBENElTSAND+ Applicants should send resume and design samples to: Kevin Shepherd 0ITTSBURGH#ITY0APER 3MITHlELD3T3UITE 0ITTSBURGH 0! Or via e-mail to: kshep@steelcitymedia.com

People with Current Cold Sore or Canker Sore needed for a Research study (UPMC Oakland) This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions. Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart. Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100. Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

For more information, please call 412-246-6367

.OPHONECALLSPLEASEs0ITTSBURGH#ITY0APERISAN%QUAL/PPORTUNITY%MPLOYER

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 82

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013


SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENTS

REHEARSAL

Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes

Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Advertise Here Today!

COMMUNITY Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) 4836 Ellsworth Avenue, Pittsburgh Meeting for Worship Sunday Mornings at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. All are welcome! www.quaker.org/ pghpamm/ or call 412-683-2669 Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 Void in Illinois/New Mexico A Loving, financially secure, joy filled home & family awaits your newborn. Alex + Tony 800-838-0809 (exp. pd)

CLASSES

GENERAL FOR SALE

GENERAL FOR SALE

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Buy a Harris Bed Bug Kit. Complete Treatment Program. Odorless, Non-Staining. Available online at homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES)

KILL ROACHES! Buy Harris Roach Spray/ Roach Trap Value Pack or Concentrate. Eliminate RoachesGuaranteed. Effective results begin after spray dries. BUY ONLINE homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES)

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

VOLUNTEERS Become a volunteer tutor and help an adult learn to read. Contact Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council at 412.393.7600 or gplc.org Open up a Life We have a waiting list of 200 adults who need your help.

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section. Heritage Estates MultiFamily Garage Sale Saturday, September 14th, 8am to 12 noon. Heritage Estates off of Reiss Run Road in the North Hills (Camp Horne Rd/ Mt. Nebo area). 20+ families, something for everyone. Collectibles, Sports Memorabilia, Presidential Buttons, Toys, Clothing, Jewelry, Furniture, Children’s items and much more! 1600 Heritage Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15237. Look for balloons!

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper! Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

FINANCIAL Cut your STUDENT LOAN payments in HALF or more Even if Late or in Default. Get Relief FAST Much LOWER payments. Call Student Hotline 1-888251-5664 (AAN CAN)

The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

Pittsburgh Lawyers

Advertise Here Today!

Need N eed a Lawyer? Lawye yer? r?

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

Meet M eet Bob! Bob! SPECIALIZES IN: Criminal Defense, Civil Litigation, Personal Injury and more!

Call for a FREE CONSULTATION.

Sealed proposals shall be addressed to and deposited at the School District of Pittsburgh, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, on September 13, 2013, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for:

Law Offices of

Robert Goldman

412-531-6879

Partial Roof Replacement - HVAC shop area and gymnasium Pittsburgh Allderdice High School General Prime

Partial Sidewalk Replacement along Chartiers Avenue Pittsburgh Greenway 1463 Chartiers Ave. General Prime

advertise your business in pittsburgh city paper

Project Manual and Drawings for bidding purposes will be available for purchase by Contractors August 28, 2013 at Modern Reproductions, 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 from 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Modern Reproductions may be contacted by Phone at 412-488-7700 or Fax at 412-488-7338 to determine the cost of the Project Manual and Documents. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual.

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

Accepting new divorce clients Flat Rate for Uncontested Divorces

Experienced, Dedicated, Affordable

412.316.3342

We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent hotline: 412-622-7920/www.pps.k12.pa.us

N E W S

Attorney Robert Domenick

(724) 523-9530 Westmoreland County

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

83


WELLNESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

MIND & BODY Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

$40/hr

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

China Massage $50/HR Free Table Shower

Shadyside Location

1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

412-441-1185

724-519-7896

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

Chinese Bodyworks Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

724-519-2950

(1st Floor)

Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

THIS SPACE! call 412.316.3342

TIGER SPA

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

Aming’s Massage Therapy

Xin Sui Bodyworks

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

84

with this ad

Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

DOWNTOWN 322 Fourth Ave.

STAR

Therapy

$10 Coupon

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668

412-401-4110 $40/hr

Superior Chinese Massage

massage

GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE

Need a new employee? Call today to speak with one of our Classified advertising representatives. We get results!

Zhangs Wellness Center

Opiate Addiction Treatment Right Track LLC Taking new patients for Suboxone treatment Call 412-207-8774

Judy’s Oriental Massage

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted


get your yoga on!

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

NOW IN SQUIRREL HILL! Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

J&S GLASS

Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop 1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

Help is Available! Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

MOVING SERVICES Guardian Storage Clean and Secure Units 5x5 to 10x30 available Downtown/Strip District 2839 Liberty Ave 412-208-4625 Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

SOUTH FOR RENT South Side Flats Newly renovated 3 BR house. New appls, incl W/D. Ready to move in. $1,500+ g&e 412-9774018 Southside Flats- 2BR, office, eq.kit, porch, crtyrd, w/d hkups, Avl 10/1 $895+ utils. dmttei@aol.com, 412366-9177

EAST FOR RENT

+

E V E N T S

Squirrel Hill Beatiful Kitch. Great Loc., nice yard, gleaming hw flrs updated kitch. w/granite counters, cozy breakfast nook and nice bkyrd. Partly finished bsmnt. 1 car grg. Freshly painted, c/a, zoned htg. Just 3 miles from Oakland, CMU, U of PGH. Walking dist. to SQ.Hill businesses. Immed. move-in avl. No pets. Yrd Svc incl. $2,300/ MO. Contact Christa Ross, RE/ MAX Select Realty 724-933-6300 x214 or 724-309-1758

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

www.myjadewellness.com +

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

N E W S

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

STORAGE

Water Pipes And Glass W lass For All Your Smoking Needs

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

LIVE

VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

85


Everyone wanted to make sure that I would be OK

A rite of passage It was a rite of passage for a young man to be able to go on the bus by yourself. That was big-time. When we were around 5, 6, 7 — right in there — me and my brother got the opportunity. Either my grandfather or grandmother walked us up to the bus stop that was nearby, and we were to get off at the end of the line, where my dad would pick us up. But nobody told us an important detail: that the bus may not stop at the end of the line. In fact, it started back over at the beginning of the bus route. We didn’t really figure this fact out too much, other than me and my brother were figuring we were going a little bit too long. We also noticed that some of the stops we had seen before. Behind the scenes, of course, my mother and my dad were going nuts: “Where are the kids, oh they didn’t get off the bus. Oh my God, oh my God.” Finally the bus driver [was on] the final route of his day, so he was at the final stop, and he turned around, around and saw us and was like, “Oh my God.” He got the story from us, G [and] he went back to the bus stop that we got on, and there was my frantic mother, mothe and grandfather and father. We got g a little bit of heck, but a lot more mor laughs.

I was at work, which was in Downtown Pittsburgh, and at the end of my workday I had a meeting that I had to go to. I had an ACCESS ride scheduled, but it was a beautiful clear spring day, and [handicapped-]accessible buses had only been running a short while. And I thought, “I’ll just take a bus.” It was rush hour, so there were maybe 25 people standing at the bus stop. A bus that I knew would get me to Oakland pulled up, and the driver opened the door. I said, “I’m going to Bellefield and Fifth Avenue in Oakland,” and he said “Lady, the lift isn’t working.” He hadn’t n t even tried it. I said, “Would Would you give it a try?” try? And he said, “The lift isn’t working.” rking.” All of the sudden, 25 strangers said, “Well, ell, that isn’t right. That’s not fair. Why isn’t it working?” They were saying “Could d we help you somehow?” I said, “I’ll ’ll be fine, there will be another buss coming along in about 10 minutes.” s.” Nonetheless, no one got on the bus. Everyone wanted to make sure that I would be OK. K. Ten minutes later, another buss came along, and I said to the driver, “I’m going to Fifth and Bellefield in Oakland,” and he e said, “Well, I can take you there,” re,” SINCE LAST MARCH, “Transit Tales” has been canvassing Pittsburgh for stories and he deployed the lift. Twenty-five people that I have e about local transit — how it serves and shapes the region, by connecting us to our never met cheered loudly. The e jobs, our community and each other. bus driver looked sort of startled: ed: The project — an effort by Pittsburghers for Public Transit, Pittsburgh He didn’t think he’d done Community Reinvestment Group and Bricolage Production Company — seeks to anything heroic. I got on the lift, ift, raise awareness of transit as officials in Harrisburg debate transportation funding I got in the bus, other people this fall. Organizers hope to build support for Senate Bill 1, which would fund got on the bus. And I was sitting ng transit with $510 million annually. But they also hope to build a sense of the ways there thinking, “Only in that transit not only serves a community, but helps build it. Pittsburgh would this happen.” .” These stories were edited for length by Chris Potter; full-length versions of these I smiled all the way to Oakland. d. and other tales are available at www.youtube.com/user/TransitTalesPgh. Find out BY LUCY SPRUILL, RUILL, how to submit your own story at www.transittalespgh.org. SQUIRREL HILL L HIL L

TRUE TALES OF LOCAL TRANSIT

BUS LINES

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

When you drive, e, every day is a little bit terriblee I think my quality of life is really, y, really improved by having the bus, and particularly the P71. Riding the P71 is faster than riding in a car. If you tell people from other places es that there’s a limited-access highway y and only buses go on it — and there’s never ver a rush hour, and you just zip straight Downtown — they’re kind of blown away by that. Every now and then there’s a day when en it’s terrible, the bus doesn’t come. But it’s so o much better than driving, because when you d drive, i every day is a little bit terrible, and the cumulative effect is so soul-deadening. [The last time Port Authority was facing service cuts] I really got worried, because the value of our home is going to fall. We specifically stayed in the neighborhood for many different reasons, but a really big one was being able to get to work so quickly and easily. And I was like, “Not only is our life going to be worse from day-today if we lose this bus, but our home is not going to be worth as much.” BY PAIGE FORSTER, REGENT SQUARE

86

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.11/09.18.2013

BY RUSS FEDORKA, MCKEESPORT

Je Jesus was there on the bus I wa was a freshman at Duquesne University, and for my work-study Univ job I had to take a bus to the University of Pittsburgh to go to a Univ bunch of different libraries. And bunc there was a man dressed like Jesus ther Christ, trying to get me to believe Chris was the son of God and walk he w with him for eternity in the garden good. It was very bizarre and of g didn’t know what to do, and I I did was 18 and I was coming from a Catholic university, and Jesus was Cath there on the bus and all I felt was ther fear. So I got off the bus at a stop that wasn’t mine, and then all I felt was guilt. BY GAB BONESSO, MCKEES ROCKS

“W got plenty “We of food, you wa want a plate?” Crowded and crazyy and funny and scary When I hear the words “public transit,” the first thing that comes to my mind [is] the greatt mass off h humanity, it squeezed d iinto t a small place. How crowded and crazy and funny and scary they can be, all at the same time. It’s really kind of amazing that so many people can be packed into so small a space, and still coexist. The variety of people that you see packed onto subways and buses, and they’re all getting along, because they don’t have a choice. It’s really an amazing testament to how we can, when we have to, cooperate with each other. BY JOE SCHULTZ, NEW YORK CITY (FORMERLY OF SHADYSIDE)

I love the people I meet [as an ACCESS driver], especially when you on a regular basis. I’m surprised get people o people I’ve met that were how many p and children during the teenagers an and can tell me how Depression a used to be and how everybody Lawrenceville u people telling me about got along together, together or our special-needs specia how they’re able to go to work and just be independent. And always “What are you doing for the holidays?” and their families coming out: “What are you doing working today? You know what, we got plenty of food, you want a plate?” One of the most beautiful things I’ve seen is to be on Grandview Avenue on Mount Washington and seeing a full moon over the three rivers, over the stadiums. This truly is one of the most beautiful cities in the world. And I can honestly say if it wasn’t for ACCESS and transit, I’d have never been able to see all these things, nor be able to help all these people to be in a position to see all these great and wonderful things. BY ACCESS DRIVER JARED HILL, WEST MIFFLIN


Ad continued from Page 2 N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

87


Play your cards right.

$25 BUY-IN

BLACKJACK TOURNAMENT MONDAYS IN SEPTEMBER

DRAWING WEDNESDAYS IN SEPTEMBER

ASK ABOUT THE

LUCKY 7 ADDED BONUS!

Win up to $7,000 each week

BLAC

NGE

JK ACK CHALLE

10 HANDS FOR $10

Win a Suited Blackjack in our High Limits Table Room and receive an entry for a chance to win

$2,500 Cash!

THURSDAYS IN SEPTEMBER UP TO $500 PRIZE POOL GUARANTEED PLUS TOTAL BUY-IN MONEY

777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM VISIT RUSH REWARDS PLAYERS CLUB FOR COMPLETE PROMOTIONAL DETAILS.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

September 11, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 37

September 11, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 37