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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 09.04/09.11.2013

POETRY APPRECIATION: CITY TEACHER MOONLIGHTS AS FREESTYLE RAPPER 23


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013


EVENTS 9.7 – 8pm TRANS-Q LIVE! Tickets $10/$8 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot.

9.19 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: SCOUT NIBLETT Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

9.20 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2013: WEST OF ZANZIBAR, WITH LIVE MUSICAL ACCOMPANIMENT Tickets $10

9.21 – 2pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUERS Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

9.24 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ANGEL OLSEN Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot.

Kurt Vile & the Violators with special guest Old Head

9.29 – 10am-5pm RADICAL DAY 2013, FEATURING FREE ADMISSION Free admission

9.25 – 8pm Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) | Tickets $18/$15 Members & students

The Warhol welcomes The Philadelphia-based psychedelic-folk troubadour Kurt Vile and his dynamic band the Violators. Given their expanded profile from the past two years of extensive touring they will shift from The Warhol’s theater to the Carnegie Music Hall. Pittsburgh-based psychedelic rock ensemble, Old Head, featuring members of Modey Lemon, open the show.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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412-456-4800 TrustArts.org Groups (15+): 412-471-6930

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

PNC Broadway Across America-Pittsburgh is a presentation of The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Pittsburgh Symphony and Broadway Across America.


Over 21 • 9pm - Midnight

ROCK & BOWL! {EDITORIAL}

09.04/09.11.2013

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writer LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns OLIVIA LAMMEL, KIRA SCAMMELL

{COVER ILLUSTRATION BY MARK BREWER}

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 36

[NEWS]

06 14

“UPMC absolutely has the power to lift up the lower part of the labor market. And the region will be healthier — in all the meanings of that word — if they were to do that.� — Economist Stephen Herzenberg on Pittsburgh’s most important labor fight

[TASTE]

most local seafood houses, 18 “Unlike Wintzell’s is unapologetically Southern.� — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth on Alabama-based Wintzell’s Oyster House

[MUSIC]

23

“I caught him in the back of the room looking at one of the battles, and he was like, ‘Man, you killed it!’� — Teacher and battle-rapper Real Deal on students finding his performances on YouTube

[SCREEN]

a very expensive wreck reel, 32 “Like designed to flaunt an American muscle car wiping out dozens of tiny Euro police cars in various spectacular fashions.� — Al Hoff, reviewing Getaway

[ARTS]

year’s systematic flaying of the 34 “Last building could not have revealed a fleshier red color beneath.� — Charles Rosenblum on Ed Massery’s photographs of the Civic Arena

[LAST PAGE]

only we’d realized that people 55 “Ifwould pay admission to smell something terrible.� — Chris Potter on Pittsburgh’s new marketing opportunity

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 38 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 46 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 48 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 54 N E W S

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{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“WE COULD MAKE THIS A REGIONAL DESTINATION.”

INCOMING Re: Gullifty’s, landmark Squirrel Hill eatery famous for desserts, to close tomorrow (Online only, Aug. 28) “BYE BYE Gullifty’s 10 Pound Apple Pie ... sold the building to the Circle now the temptation has died.” — Web comment from “David Wells”

Re: Death Panels: Republican-led House committees are killing LGBT anti-discrimination bills before they ever get a chance to live (Aug. 28) “If [the] legislature has no idea how to solve REAL bread-and-butter issues, they come up with ridiculous BS to stir up the base. The only purpose of this particular issue is to [distract] from their inability to address real problems. When are people going to wake up and realize if rights are taken from any of us, they will soon be taken from all of us[?]” — Web comment from “Stephanie Palmer”

UP ON THE

FARM

Re: Pipe Dreams (Aug. 28) “If we want to stop the fracking we must stop buying their product. … We can break this industry, save our homes, and save our communities but we have to approach it in the correct way and we have to stop being part of the problem.” — Web comment from “Don Orkoskey”

In Pgh restaurant, Pirates on some TVs, Steelers others. Pirates in midst of playoff race. Steelers in Q4 of preseason game. Audio? Steelers — Aug. 24 tweet from NFL Network reporter Aditi Kinkhabwala (@AKinkhabwala)

{PHOTOS BY LAUREN DALEY}

Could a large urban farming operation be the answer to big tracts of vacant land in deserted hilltop communities like St. Clair Village?

S

T. CLAIR VILLAGE was once a bus-

tling complex of 680 apartments, with hundreds of families and the kind of trappings, like local softball teams, you’d expect from a community built in 1949. Today, the site is cordoned off by fences, its 107 acres of overgrown grass sprouting amidst disused streets and fire hydrants, an abandoned bus stop — and a sign that says “no hunting.” The city’s Housing Authority demolished the 357 housing units that remained there in 2010. The infrastructure — the roads and sewers and street signs — remain, but the people are gone, the sound of crickets punctuated only by the occasional passing bus. “It looks like a place you’d find in Nevada that was used to test bombs in World War II,” says Aaron Sukenik, executive director of the Hilltop Alliance. “It’s

like that Life After People show.” But Sukenik and other community leaders see the site — and a similarly vacant 82 acres in the Arlington Heights public-housing community, less than two miles away — as a blank slate. And they are filling it with a surprising

Could large urban farms be the future of two hilltop ‘zombie towns’? {BY LAUREN DALEY} vision: a “destination urban farm” that would allow for urban agriculture on a greater scale than many neighborhoods could boast. “These are massive swaths of land,” Sukenik says. “This would be one of those unique projects within our purview,

because the existence of such a thing would benefit the entire Hilltop. “We’ve started the process to see how we can turn these properties into something other than zombie towns.” ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, built in 1942, still

retains 143 occupied housing units. But much of its 82 acres, too, is a ghost town now — the result of a “downsizing plan” implemented in the late 1990s and early 2000s. At the time, “the preferred development model for housing authorities here in Pittsburgh and nationally was shifting substantially,” says Housing Authority spokesman Chuck Rohrer. Housing agencies, he says, were moving away from high-density developments — with high concentrations of poverty and crime — and beginning to “adopt the strategy of mixed-income development.” CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013


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UP ON THE FARM, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

The authority also hoped to “adapt to market demand within the city,” Rohrer says. Authority developments had high vacancy rates, even as “there was an abundance of low-income housing” elsewhere in the city. While other housing projects were razed as well, St. Clair and Arlington Heights have the Housing Authority’s largest tracts of unused land. Together, the 189 acres also make up the largest swath of vacant land in the city’s “hilltop” neighborhoods — communities like Allentown, Arlington, Arlington Heights, Beltzhoover, Carrick and Knoxville, wedged between the South Side and neighborhoods like Beechview and Brookline. To get an idea of the size of the hilltop properties, the David L. Lawrence Convention Center sits on eight acres, the former Iron City Brewery in Lawrenceville takes up about 10 acres of land and the entire North Shore development from Heinz Field to PNC Park is just 28 acres. Even the 18-hole Bob O’Connor Golf Course at Schenley Park is smaller at 65 acres.

you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice,

don’t drink & drive. About 82 acres of land in Arlington Heights remains vacant and gated.

Watch Championship Chase on the Pittsburgh Cable News Network (PCNC). Ty Miller, Tom Pungin, Brian Cook and Dee Thompson give a different perspective on your Steelers and other NFL teams. Liz Costa, Michele Newell and Jonas Chaney provide feature reports and interviews with players and in-studio guests. Championship Chase airs on PCNC Fridays @ 7:30pm, Saturdays @ 8pm and Sundays @ Noon

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

The Hilltop Alliance hopes to put at least some of that acreage under the plow. In partnership with urbanagriculture advocates Grow Pittsburgh, the Alliance applied for a $ 75,000 grant from the Pittsburgh Partnership for Neighborhood Development to study the project’s feasibility. The effort is in the early stages, focusing now on building grassroots support and establishing a steering committee. The Alliance is also soliciting the help of a landscape-architecture class at Chatham University, whose students will study both the topography and plant life that might do well in the area. Producing food on the sites would address a number of community needs, supporters say. For one thing, “The area

Tim Dolan and Aaron Sukenik, of the Hilltop Alliance

is a fresh-food desert,” Sukenik notes. “There’s nowhere to get fresh produce up here.” According to the Hilltop Alliance’s grant, there’s only one full-scale grocery in the entire community; other stores primarily offer packaged and processed foods. And the few community gardens in the hilltop are “showing signs of difficulty with sustaining the effort.” A 2012 report from food-advocacy organization Just Harvest echoes the point. “Hilltop residents are extremely limited in their options and must depend on the bus and distant stores for food,” the report notes. “Community gardening lends to a neighborhood that sense of control over their own food supply,” says Ken Regal, executive director of Just Harvest. “It provides real empowerment to people.” But this isn’t just about helping local families feed themselves, Sukenik says: The farm could also attract dollars from outside the neighborhood. “The ultimate objective is to be a social enterprise and to be revenue-positive, which is a very high possibility [for] something of this scale.” That could mean operating farm stands and selling flowers. Visitors could also be drawn in with pick-your-own opportunities to gather berries, pumpkins and Christmas trees. What’s more, growing produce can prevent other problems from taking root. The idle parcels are already strewn with trash, and “can be a breeding ground for crime,” Sukenik says. But with the “blank slate” the community has to work with, he says, “We could make this a regional destination.” That, in turn, would improve the area’s sagging property values: Homes in the area sell for less than half the citywide average, according to CONTINUES ON PG. 10


If we got you any closer you would need a field pass.

Getting to a Steelers game just got a whole lot easier. Tired of fighting traffic and searching for a parking space? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an option, take the T to Allegheny station. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a first down from Heinz Field and a whole world of hurt away from the old way. The Red and Blue lines can get you there, and the Park and Ride lots are wide open. Take the T and see. For more information go to PortAuthority.org. The Free Fare Zone is extended to North Side Station at West General Robinson Street Garage (courtesy of the Stadium Authority and Alco Parking) and Allegheny Station (thanks to the Pittsburgh Steelers and Rivers Casino).

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UP ON THE FARM, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

an analysis from the University of Pittsburgh Center for Social and Urban Research (UCSUR). THE PROPOSAL is one of the largest in the

PofE T the

WEEK

Hilltop’s “Green Toolbox Report” — a compendium of green strategies to improve the area. Other green strategies include tree-planting in cemeteries and hanging flower baskets along business corridors. The farm itself wouldn’t necessarily be a permanent fixture: Sukenik says the group is also studying leasing the land to allow for development in the future. The Housing Authority seems at least open to agricultural use. Rohrer, the authority spokesman, says the agency plans to maintain the existing housing at Arlington Heights, and “may entertain modernization or redevelopment in 2018” if there’s funding. St. Clair Village’s future has yet to be determined, he says; while the agency is considering using the site for storing equipment and service vehicles, it’s “willing to consider alternative uses for maximizing the usefulness of a site. This would include consideration of urban gardening projects or other uses.” Sukenik says the farm would also dovetail with the ReClaim South initiative by Growth Through Energy and

Community Health [GTECH] Strategies. That effort allows residents to participate in training sessions on vacantland management. An urban farm could work in the neighborhood, notes Megan Zeigler, director of ReClaim. To make such a plan profitable and sustainable, she says, “You do need large tracts of land, and sometimes finding that in every single neighborhood — even the high-vacancy neighborhoods — is hard.” Similar efforts have worked on a smaller scale elsewhere. In the Hill District, GTECH partnered with a number of organizations and the Ujamaa Collective to build the 12-acre Dwayne Cooper Garden of Hope at the former Francis Court public-housing site. The Garden serves as an urban farm, community vegetable garden and sunflower garden. “We really wanted to get Hill District residents involved in producing local food,” says Zeigler. The site has hosted summer youth crews and employed two adults and five teenagers. “You can teach people how to farm and you can teach people how to clean up a vacant lot,” Zeigler says. But “until they do it themselves and take ownership of the process, it’s not going to have as much of an impact.”

“IT’S LIKE THAT LIFE AFTER PEOPLE SHOW.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

LATER THIS MONTH, the Port Authority board of directors will have an entirely new look and format, thanks to state legislation passed this summer. Mid-September, the board changes to an 11-member structure with appointees elected by the governor, the Democratic and Republican caucuses from both the state House and the Senate, and Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald. (The county executive alone previously made the appointments.) Jack Brooks sat on the board for 17 years, and occasionally clashed with Fitzgerald, who has taken a hands-on approach to running the agency. As of press time, only four new appointments had been made: Senate Democrats appointed state Sen. Jim Brewster; Fitzgerald re-appointed John Tague and Thomas Donatelli; and Senate Republicans appointed Mount Lebanon businessman D. Raja, who challenged Fitzgerald in an ugly race for county executive two years ago. Brooks, for one, doesn’t expect to be re-appointed. “You have a better chance of seeing the tooth fairy” on the board, he tells City Paper. He talked with CP after his final board meeting, Aug. 23.

Jack Brooks

and this is my opinion. [Senate president pro tempore] Joe Scarnati brought [restructuring] through committee ... to show [Fitzgerald] “we’re running the show, not you.” HOW DID YOU FEEL ABOUT FITZGERALD’S POLICY OF HAVING BOARD MEMBERS TURN IN UNDATED, SIGNED RESIGNATION LETTERS? It was like him saying, “They’ll do what I want them to do.” When I disagreed with him, he brought in the new people and asked for resignations and all of that. I disagreed with that. [When members gave undated letters to Brooks] I threw them in the garbage can. … That’s not the way to do business. If a board can’t make a decision, why have a board? And the employees — you make employees nervous, it’s not nice.

“IF A BOARD CAN’T MAKE A DECISION, WHY HAVE A BOARD?”

GIVEN YOUR EXPERIENCE ON THE BOARD, HOW DO YOU THINK THE NEW BOARD MAKEUP WILL SERVE THE AUTHORITY? I think it’s going to be harder. You’ve got a board within a board. You’ve got Corbett, the House — these guys are all going to be a part of it. And they have the say-so of the majority of the board. It’s two boards within it. … As long as they keep politics out of it, I think it’ll work. YOU WERE AMONG THE FEW BOARD MEMBERS TO DEFY FITZGERALD BY BACKING FORMER CEO STEVE BLAND, WHOM THE BOARD ENDED UP FIRING. HOW MUCH OF THE BOARD RESTRUCTURING WAS DUE TO HOW THE BLAND SITUATION WAS HANDLED? [Fitzgerald] brought [restructuring] here,

MANY OF THE LEGACY COSTS THAT HAVE PLAGUED THE AUTHORITY — THE “GOLDEN PARACHUTES” THAT ALLOWED EMPLOYEES TO “RETIRE WITH BENEFITS WHILE WORKING,” AND LIFETIME HEALTH CARE FOR NON-UNION EMPLOYEES — TOOK EFFECT DURING YOUR TENURE. WOULD YOU HAVE DONE ANYTHING DIFFERENTLY? That wasn’t me — I was new on the board. [The legacy costs] transpired because [former PAT board chairman] Neal Holmes was talking to somebody and said, “Hey, that’s a good idea.” It didn’t come through the board, it went through the court. … Certainly if I had known about it, I wouldn’t have agreed with it. It was ridiculous. L D A L E Y @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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Labor steels itself for a fight with UPMC WHEN PITTSBURGHERS say â&#x20AC;&#x153;our universities and hospitals are the new steel mills,â&#x20AC;? they usually mean it as a compliment. This Labor Day weekend, it became a war cry. And health-care giant UPMC, whose 55,000 employees make it the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest employer, became the central battleground. UPMC has been fending off a campaign to unionize hospital service workers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the employees who do everything from prepare cafeteria meals to ferry patients to the OR. Signs opposing UPMC were scattered throughout Downtownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Labor Day parade, and labor activists and politicians later crammed into a conference room in the United Steelworkers building with a blunt message: UPMC head Jeffrey Romoff is shaping up as the 21st centuryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Henry Clay Frick. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A long time ago, labor had a ďŹ ght with the steel barons,â&#x20AC;? local AFL-CIO head Jack Shea thundered. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now we have the eds-and-meds barons, who are coming after low-wage workers in the same way.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;[I]tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our turn to restore the middle classâ&#x20AC;? established by laborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s struggle, said Bill Peduto, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s likely next mayor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We owe it to all of those who had to sacriďŹ ce â&#x20AC;Ś to make sure itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not lost.â&#x20AC;? The message built on a report released a week earlier by Pittsburgh United, a labor-afďŹ liated advocacy group. Titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unhealthy Choices,â&#x20AC;? the report estimated that UPMC pays service workers a median wage of $12.18 an hour; UPMC, it argued, possessed â&#x20AC;&#x153;the power of steel without the promise of wages.â&#x20AC;? UPMC claims that when you factor in beneďŹ ts, most service workers make more than $ 20 an hour. And even â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unhealthy Choicesâ&#x20AC;? suggests UPMC might not be dragging wages down, so much as failing to raise them up. The report quotes a 2011 UPMC memo asserting that executives had made â&#x20AC;&#x153;the prudent business decision â&#x20AC;Ś to benchmark [wages] at the 50th percentile so that we neither lead nor trail the majority of employers.â&#x20AC;? (Those execs set the bar higher when their own salaries are at stake: When Time magazine compiled a table of health-care CEO compensation in March, Romoff was at the top.) Still, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s little comfort to UPMC em-

{BY CHRIS POTTER}

ployees like Christoria Hughes, who told the Steelworkers gathering she made just over $ 12 an hour. While she says a supervisor once told her â&#x20AC;&#x153;be glad you have a job,â&#x20AC;? Hughes said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is no pride in having to budget for a hamburger, or in skipping breakfast.â&#x20AC;? In any case, UPMCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s size means it â&#x20AC;&#x153;absolutely has the power to lift up the lower part of the labor marketâ&#x20AC;? by raising wages to a ďŹ&#x201A;oor of $15 an hour, says Stephen Herzenberg, who directs the laborbacked Keystone Research Center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And the region will be healthier â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in all the meanings of that word â&#x20AC;&#x201D; if they were to do that.â&#x20AC;? Plenty of folks bridle at the notion that service workers deserve that kind of money. These are lowskill jobs! If employees donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like it, they should work somewhere else! If that sounds familiar, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a reason. Working in mills was also once regarded as unskilled labor, best left to immigrants. As labor expert John Fitch, who studied Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s steel industry, wrote in 1911, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Slavâ&#x20AC;? toiling in the mill â&#x20AC;&#x153;is misunderstood and despised â&#x20AC;Ś until â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hunkyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; has come to be a convenient designation and a term of opprobrium as well.â&#x20AC;? (â&#x20AC;&#x153;The suggestion that the right to quit offers â&#x20AC;Ś refuge from unjust conditions reveals ignorance,â&#x20AC;? Fitch added: Workers â&#x20AC;&#x153;cannot jeopardize â&#x20AC;Ś their families by leaving the known for the unknown.â&#x20AC;?) Decades later, after unionization drove up wages, working in the mill became an honorable, even noble, job. But we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pay steelworkers well because we valued their work; we ended up valuing their work because employers had to pay them well. The same thing could happen in the service sector. And the activists arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going anywhere: A protest is set for Oakland on Sat., Sept. 7, with acts of civil disobedience in the ofďŹ ng. But beating back that campaign doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t require UPMC to win popularity contests. It just needs to win a union-certiďŹ cation vote. And that battle takes place on its own turf, where UPMCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tactics have already run afoul of federal labor regulators. Depending on how that ďŹ ght plays out, UPMC execs might really get to take their place alongside H.C. Frick.

WE DIDNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T PAY STEELWORKERS WELL BECAUSE WE VALUED THEIR WORK; WE ENDED UP VALUING THEIR WORK BECAUSE EMPLOYERS HAD TO PAY THEM WELL.

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013


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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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September 7th • Stage AE

The conflicted double life of Israeli Orthodox Jew Shadar Hadar, 34, might be as formidable to manage as that of an international spy. Though deeply and defiantly religious, he typically around midnight “trades his knitted white yarmulke” for a “wavy blond wig and pink velvet dress” and takes the stage as a nascent drag queen, according to an August Associated Press dispatch from Jerusalem. His gayness has alienated his ex-wife (who bars him from seeing their daughter, now 11) and is only grudgingly accepted by his parents. As a bridge of sorts in his life, he has rejected the usual raunchy drag-queen personas and adopted instead that of a female rabbinic adviser, musing from the stage on optimistic teachings of Breslov Hasidic ultra-Orthodox Judaism.

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Philadelphia’s Veterans Stadium, whose construction was financed in 1964 by borrowing $25 million (and untold more as part of a subway expansion to service the stadium), was demolished in 2004 and is but a memory to the city’s sports fans. However, nine years later, the city is still paying for it (though next year will retire the $25 million bond and nine years from now, the city hopes, will retire the stadium/ subway bond). The city’s deputy controller told PhillyMag.com in June, profoundly, “When issuing a bond to build a facility, the debt payment on that bond should not outlast the facility.”

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Toronto is facing such a crippling backlog of challenges to parking tickets, reported the Toronto Star in August, that more than 73,000 citations from last year were still unresolved and that many cases were proceeding even less hurriedly. Mahmood-Reza Arab, a computer programmer who was ticketed for parking too close to a hydrant in 2005, and who has dutifully met all deadlines for making a proper challenge, was recently scheduled (again) for trial before a judge — this month (September 2013). A spokesman said the “normal” wait time for a court date is “only” 18 months.

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Adhering to “federal regulations,” the Denver Housing Authority ordered the immediate ejection of the family of Sandra Roskilly (her mother and autistic son) — because Roskilly had been shot dead in a random homicide in August. The mother, who shared the apartment with Roskilly for 10 years, said she was told that once the head of household is no longer present (no matter the reason), the apartment must be forfeited. Said Roskilly’s astonished brother, “[T]here was no question in my mind that my mother would at least be able to finish out the lease.”

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A British “art critic” created the “Colne Valley Sculpture Trail” in West Yorkshire by inviting patrons to walk a three-mile path past derelict buildings and discarded objects that the critic suggested, in a formal leaflet, were purposeful art objects designed to be provocative. (In reality, they were random junk.) An abandoned bathtub evoked “contradictory concepts of filth and cleanliness … in a countryside setting,” the critic wrote. A collapsed wall was built by fictitious artist Karen Braithwaite, who then destroyed it “with some sense of violence,” “suggest[ing] a sense of bereavement,

the turf above almost seeming to weep.” The author spoke to BBC News in July but insisted on remaining anonymous.

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Notwithstanding the city of Detroit’s various problems, residents still expect its police force to behave sensibly. But in July, a police commander’s office blundered, releasing to all officers a document concerning an order of form-fitting bulletproof vests. Each individual officer’s height and weight were on the email, but so were female officers’ bra-cup sizes (which were initially necessary to assure body-armor fit so as not to restrict mobility — but obviously were no one else’s business).

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In August, prosecutors in Broward County, Fla., accused two Lauderhill police officers of an improper 2012 traffic stop, charging both patrolmen in the squad car with demanding favors from two female motorists. Officer Franklin Hartley allegedly demanded oral sex from the passenger, and his partner, Thomas Merenda, according to the charge, “asked the victim to punch him in the ‘nuts,’ meaning genital area.” Said Merenda’s lawyer, of the charge: “outrageous, outlandish and absurd.”

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America’s military veterans, whom the country supposedly champions wholeheartedly and insists should be properly compensated for their service and the disruption to their lives, must navigate as many as 613 government forms from 18 different agencies to receive what they are due by law, according to a July study released by the American Action Forum. The principal agency, the Department of Veterans Affairs, purports to have been making great progress over the last few years, but earlier this year acknowledged that, still, about 70 percent of claims (covering 600,000 veterans) have been waiting longer than 125 days for yesor-no decisions.

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Finding an aberrant sexual behavior not previously mentioned in News of the Weird is an exhausting task, but British psychologist Mark Griffiths, of Nottingham Trent University, has succeeded: the eproctophile (a person sexually aroused by the passing of gas). Griffiths told LiveScience.com in July that he plans to study other rare “paraphilic disorders,” including “fire fetish, a blindness fetish and dacryphilia, or arousal by tears, weeping or sobbing.”

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A computer virus called “Ransomware” has been freezing computers since 2012, the FBI acknowledged, making much work for tech support, but likely never causing the victim to be arrested until Jay Matthew Riley, 21, of Woodbridge, Va., came along. The virus tricks people into thinking the FBI has discovered that they had inadvertently viewed child pornography and locks their computer, but since the viewing was probably accidental, “allows” them to avoid arrest by paying a $300 fine to unfreeze the computer. Riley apparently did have child porn (inadvertently gathered or not) on his computer and, frightened by the virus, gratuitously inquired at a local police station whether there were warrants for his arrest. No, they said, but in the course of conversation, he consented to a search and was arrested.

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS@ E A RT HL I NK . N E T OR WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013


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FRIED OYSTERS WERE PLUMP AND JUICY WITH A LIGHT, ALMOST FLAKY BREADING

BE FRUITFUL {BY AL HOFF} You can’t turn around these days without being strongly encouraged to preserve the bounty of summer fruit, and by the most adorable (read: laborintensive) methods possible. Surely you’ve seen the glossy photos of quilted glass jars, compete with amusingly designed labels and bits of raffia tied around the top? But what if you haven’t much time, creativity or storage space, yet you still have a freezer or fridge full of hoarded summer fruits you’d like to save for later use? Such was my dilemma, and I solved it with a blender and a box of small freezer bags. I converted all those blueberries, peaches, plums, strawberries and raspberries into a variety of purées. Simply toss fruit into the blender (or food processor) and hit pulverize. Depending on the fruit, you may need to add a little liquid (water, or other fruit juice). You can also add sweeteners (sugar, honey), as well as any other flavoring (perhaps a bit of that abundant fresh mint?). You can work with fruits individually, or combine: I always end up with random assortments of berries, and they taste great all whirred up together. Pour the purée into a freezer bag (label with a Sharpie) and squeeze out the air before sealing. In the freezer, these bags will miraculously assume the shape of any spare bit of room. Defrost to consume: great on ice cream or oatmeal, in a smoothie or cocktail, mixed with yogurt or in a cake. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

the

FEED

Overwhelmed by tomatoes? Co-workers tired of receiving your extra zucchinis? Got a plum tree groaning with fruit? Consider donating your extra produce to a food bank. Visit the Ample Harvest website (www.ampleharvest.org), and enter your ZIP code to find drop-off spots near you.

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SOUTHERN

SEAFOOD {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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HERE ARE ANY number of specific

reasons we find local restaurants more appetizing than chains, but they all boil down to one thing: a unique experience, as opposed to one that is focusgrouped to please the largest possible dining demographic. But sometimes, through some alchemy of business acumen and sheer popular demand, a local entrepreneur’s singular vision spins off into a chain. Wintzell’s Oyster House, a Gulf Coast seafood establishment that originated in Mobile, Ala., in 1938, is one such case. After opening about a dozen locations all around the Cotton State, Wintzell’s just opened its first non-Alabama outpost — and, randomly enough, it’s right by Century III Mall. Southern-style seafood being scarce around these parts, we set out to investigate. Pittsburgh’s Wintzell’s has all the character of a generic mall restaurant on the outside, albeit with a covered patio. But the inside has its own peculiar ambience, thanks to a decor consisting of hundreds of bumper-sticker-sized placards inscribed with sayings (mostly hokey, but a few pithy

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

Wintzell’s Oyster House’s sampler

winners) plastering the walls. This is an homage to J. Oliver Wintzell himself, who began with a six-stool oyster shack, before selling it off in the 1980s to the current ownership, which grew it into a chain. While this facsimile of the original Wintzell’s decor won’t fool you into thinking you’re anywhere you’re not, it is at least a reminder that this place has roots.

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE 530 E. Bruceton Road, West Mifflin. 412-650-9090 HOURS: Sun.-Thu. 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-midnight PRICES: Appetizers, soups, salads, and sandwiches $6-12; entrees $14-23 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED And those roots remain in the menu, which is dominated by seafood (mostly fried) in a way that few of today’s pleaseeverybody places would attempt. There are a few steak, burger, and chicken options,

but it’s clear that they’re the sideshow. Unlike most local seafood houses, which tend toward either New England menus (lobster plus lemon butter on everything) or cosmopolitan, contemporary cuisine, Wintzell’s is unapologetically Southern. Pittsburgh, meet grits, gumbo and okra. It’s a winning combination, even if it’s frankly at odds with seafood’s modern reputation as lean, healthy fare. Our first selection was easy. Wintzell’s made its reputation as an oyster bar, after all, so we ordered a dozen oysters on the half shell, prepared four different ways. Classic Rockefeller was superb, the spinach silky atop each briny morsel of oyster. Bienville reminded us of Newburg: tiny shrimp in a creamy sauce covering the oyster, which joined in the rich medley, contributing its salty brine. The other two options — grilled and Monterey — were drier preparations. With shredded cheese and sliced jalapeño pepper, Monterey put us in mind of oyster nachos. The success of these preparations largely hinged on the oyster itself. Where there was sufficient flesh and


liquor, there was a tasty blend of flavors, but smaller shells offered little more than an oyster nugget. Fried oysters were superb: plump and juicy with a light, almost flaky breading. A side of creamed spinach was dominated by the same silky spinach we’d had on the oysters Rockefeller, with just enough cream to enrich, but not enough to make it soupy. Fried catfish, on the other hand, was a disappointment. We couldn’t tell whether the flesh was too fishy, or the coating was too mild to stand up to the fish’s naturally muddy flavor. We always prefer cornmealbreaded catfish for that very reason, but Wintzell’s one-breading-fits-all approach failed it here. Hushpuppies served on the side, however, had excellent cornmeal flavor and a nice, light texture within a substantial dark, crunchy crust.

Akeem Allen shucks the oysters.

Cheesy grits with shrimp were also terrific. The texture was creamy and porridge-like, the cheese was rich but respectful of the grits’ corny flavor, and the tiny, sweet shrimp were plentiful and firm. A puddle of crawfish sauce added depth and brothy umami notes, and a shake from the house hot sauce on the table added a welcome kick. Wintzell’s “Southern BLT” was composed of crabcake, melted cheddar, lettuce, fried green tomato, hickory-smoked bacon and Creole remoulade on grilled Texas toast. We loved the idea, but the execution was greasy, mushy and without much distinctive flavor from any of the ingredients, save the bacon. Wintzell’s may be another replicant in a chain, but it’s the only one we’ve got, and it’s unlike anything else in the ’Burgh. That’s good enough for us … and so is the grub. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

RITE CHOICE For ritual wines, Pinsker’s offers more than Manischewitz For millennia, wine has been an integral part of the Jewish faith. Glasses are raised in prayer to celebrate holidays and to commemorate special occasions. “We’ve been drinking wine ever since the temples in Israel,” says Shlomo HOW DOES Perelman, owner of in Squirrel Hill. PERELMAN Pinsker’s For most American VERIFY A Jews in the modern CUSTOMER’S era, religious wine has Manischewitz, a RELIGIOUS meant beverage better known AFFILIATION? for sticky sweetness “I ASK YOU than for refinement. to Perelman, WHERE YOU According it need not be this way. GO TO SHUL.” “Sweet wine is an American invention,” he says. Early Jewish immigrants were constrained at first by lack of a suitable native grape to produce their own wine, and later by a dearth of quality kosherwine producers. But Pinsker’s, established in 1954 and owned by Perelman since 1983, offers better options for the observant. Tucked in the Judaica store’s back corner is a small wine room that Perelman has slowly expanded over the years. “We have wine from California, France, New Zealand, Israel, Chile and Spain,” says Perelman, who notes that Israel’s wine industry in particular is experiencing tremendous growth, both in terms of quantity and quality. But there’s a catch. Because Pinsker’s operates under a sacramental wine license, he can’t sell to the general public. State law dictates that sacramental wine can be sold only for religious purposes, Perelman says, meaning he can offer wine to only customers who are affiliated with a synagogue. How does Perelman verify a customer’s synagogue affiliation? “I ask you where you go to shul.” Despite Pinsker’s offerings, changing palates accustomed to generations of sweet wine is no easy task. That’s one reason why the store offers a selection of semi-sweet wine, meant to serve as a bridge to drier wines. Even Perelman himself begins his Sabbath ritual with a nod to the American influence on Jewish tradition. “My first glass on the Sabbath is always sweet wine,” he says, “though I’m not sure why.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

2028 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-3033 or pinskersjudaica.com

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

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DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

CAFÉ DU JOUR. 1107 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-9695. This Euro-style bistro is “open-kitchen cozy” with a quaint courtyard for intimate outdoor dining. A modestly sized yet thoughtful menu offers small-to-large plates, highlighting Mediterranean- and European-influenced California cooking with an emphasis on fresh, seasonal produce and excellently prepared meats. KF

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FAT HEADS. 1805 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-7433. This place seems to expand every few years, with reason: terrific beer selection, chicken wings and industrial-sized sandwiches. There’s outdoor eating on the “fatio,” but timing is everything: No matter how many tables they add, you may end up waiting for one. JE

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DORMONT DOGS. 2911 Glenmore Ave., Dormont. 412343-0234. This is an actual hot-dog (and veggie-dog) restaurant, with an emphasis on top-quality frankfurters, local bakery buns and fresh, innovative toppings. Try the Texas Avenue Dog, topped with chili sauce, cheddar, sour cream and Fritos, or the Bruschetta Dog, with marinated tomatoes, pesto and parmesan. J

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526 NORTHPOINTE CIRCLE CRANBERRY/SEVEN FIELDS 724-741-6015 WWW. BOHEMBISTRO .COM

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Gaucho Parrilla

GAUCHO PARRILLA. 1607 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412709-6622. Wood-fired meat and vegetables, paired with delectable sauces, make this tiny Argentine-barbecue eatery worth stopping at. The beef, chicken, sausage and seafood is all infused with flavor from the wood grill. Add-on sauces include: chimichurri; ajo (garlic and herbs in olive oil); cebolla, with caramelized onions; and the charred-pepper pimenton. KF

Lola Bistro {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} HOT METAL DINER. 1025 Lebanon Road, West Mifflin. 412-462-4900. This new-oldfashioned diner with a Harley theme offers a traditional menu with super-size portions. The thick, fluffy “mancakes” hang off the platter, and the huge breakfast burrito is like a Spanish omelet wrapped in a tortilla. For lunch, there are burgers, sandwiches and fresh pie. J

and dishes featuring habañero and poblano peppers denote some contemporary American updating. LE

JIMMY WAN’S. 1337 Old Freeport Road, Fox Chapel (412968-0848) and 1686 Route 228, Cranberry (724-778-8978). This upscale eatery delivers what Americans expect from a Chinese restaurant, plus fare with a modern, pan-Asian approach, HYEHOLDE. 1516 Coraopolis complete with Japanese and Heights Road, Moon French influences. Wan’s offers Township. 412-264-3116. inventive appetizers such Half cottage, half castle, as sashimi ceviche, Hyeholde is housed traditional and creative in a little fantasy sushi, dim sum and building dating to the Chinese-American www. per 1930s. The splendidly entrees both familiar pa pghcitym .co landscaped grounds (Peking duck) and less so host outdoor pig roasts, (dan dan noodles). KE clambakes and picnics in the summer. Unusual meats — LOLA BISTRO. 1100 Galveston elk, ostrich — are combined Ave., Allegheny West. 412-322with fresh, local ingredients in 1106. This is a neighborhood preparations that join classic and bistro with an atmosphere contemporary … and offer the you’d like to experience every exquisitely rare experience of night, and food good enough eating art. LE to do the same. The menu here offers “contemporary comfort IBIZA. 2224 E. Carson St., South cuisine” — it hews toward the Side. 412-325-2227. An urbane familiar (meat and fish, pot pie, wine bar and tapas restaurant, pasta Bolognese) while applying Ibiza is the sister restaurant to up-to-the-minute sensibilities to its next-door favorite, Mallorca. the details: house-cured meats, Ibiza’s menu starts in Spain infused oils, coconut milk in the but includes delicacies from Moroccan vegetable stew. LF Portugal, Argentina and other countries. Accompanied by a LOS CHILUDOS. 325 Southpointe wide international selection of Blvd., Suite 300, Canonsburg. wines, Ibiza offers a transportive 724-745-6791. This casual dining experience. KE neighborhood taqueria offers classic Mexican-American fare JG’S TARENTUM STATION sprinkled with more authentic GRILLE. 101 Station Drive, options such as tinga (saucy Tarentum. 724-226-3301. An stewed pork) and sopes, thick old-school continental menu cornmeal cakes. Los Chiludos and a well-restored train excels with Americanized station make this restaurant a Mexican dishes, imbuing them destination. The menu leans with authentic ingredients and toward Italian fine dining, preparations that recalls the plus steaks and chops. But fresh, flavorful fast food as it’s well-charred chicken Louisiana prepared in Mexico. JF

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PLUM PAN-ASIAN KITCHEN. 5996 Penn Circle South, East Liberty. 412-363-7586. The swanky space incorporates a dining room, sushi bar and cocktail nook. The pan-Asian menu consists mostly of well-known — and elegantly presented — dishes such as lo mein, seafood hot pot, Thai curries and basil stir-fries. Entrées are reasonably priced, so splurge on a signature cocktail or house-made dessert. KE

offMenu

RED ORCHID. 5439 Babcock Blvd., West View. 412-8372527. This cozy, family-run Thai restaurant offers a selection of mostly tried-and-true cuisine (salads, rice and noodle dishes, and curries), as well as chef’s specials, many involving tilapia filets. “Tulip dumplings” and Thai toast make for excellent starters, and the kitchen shows skill in balancing the flavors of more complex curries and meat entrees. KF

KELSEY WEISGERBER isn’t your typical lunch lady. The

{BY JESSICA SARVER}

FOOD FOR THOUGHT Local schools commit to healthy cafeteria choices

ROSE TEA CAFÉ. 5874 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-4212238. This bubble-tea café has broadened its offerings to include high-quality, authentic Chinese cooking. The menu is dominated by Taiwanese dishes, including a variety of seafood items. In place of the thick, glossy brown sauces which seem all but inevitable at most American Chinese restaurants, Rose Tea keeps things light with delicate sauces that are more like dressings for their freshtasting ingredients. KF SIMMIE’S RESTAURANT & LOUNGE. 8500 Frankstown Road, East Hills. 412-731-4689. Craving soul food and Maine lobster tails? A well-prepared selection of fresh fish tops this menu of Southern-style comfort food. Simmie’s also has a regular menu of seafood specialties, such as jumbo sea scallops and snow-crab leg clusters, as well as steaks, pork chops, sandwiches and burgers. KF SUN PENANG. 5829 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-4217600. Sun Penang’s aesthetic is Asian — simple but not austere — and to peruse its menu is to explore the cuisines of Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore. The Pangan ikan is a house specialty, and the Malaysian kway teow (practically the country’s national dish) may be the best you ever have without a tourist visa. JE TRAM’S KITCHEN. 4050 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-2688. This tiny family-run storefront café packs in the regulars. Most begin their meal with an order of fresh spring rolls, before moving on to authentic preparations of pho, noodle bowls and fried-rice dishes. The menu is small, but the atmosphere is lively and inviting. JF

Student Sean Folan and Kelsey Weisgerber cook together at ECS. {PHOTO COURTESY OF KELSEY WEISGERBER)

Little

26-year-old food-service director for the Environmental Charter School (ECS) in Regent Square is busy innovating her school’s lunch program. And it’s working. “Miss Kelsey,” she says a seventh-grader once told her, “I never realized you were giving me the healthiest thing I eat all day.” This year, Weisgerber is hoping to drive that lesson home by hiring two full-time food educators. The school has also newly partnered with Pittsburgh Community Kitchens, working out of The Neighborhood Academy in Garfield. There, 80 percent of food for both schools will be cooked from scratch, at a cost that is close to (though still higher than) the budget for many public schools. With their relative autonomy, charters can be a laboratory for lunchroom innovations, which may someday be transferrable to public schools as well. Weisgerber hopes her program can become a “model that’s achievable for other districts.” This week, Downtown’s City Charter High School welcomed back its students, who will receive lunch cooked fresh by another innovative food-service director, chef Mike Curry. From his enviable on-site industrial kitchen, Curry aims to provide more “real-world” food experiences. “Every day, there are options,” he says. “We’ll serve a salad with three protein options, fresh soup and a baked potato. All wraps include fresh field greens.” Out of the 425 meals a day Curry serves, a quarter of them are salads, due to student demand. Both Weisgerber and Curry imply that “it takes a village” to feed a child well, and that revamping old food systems requires collaboration between local farmers, chefs, vendors, schools, the government and, yes, the kids. Community participation is key. “Regular people caring about what kids eat will drive our future food market,” says Weisgerber. “If kids eat all processed foods, we’re going to see all processed foods in 10 years.” “First, schools have to believe in it,” says City Charter’s assistant principal Angela Welch. “We’ve chosen this battle. We will not serve chicken nuggets.” But surely the kids protest? “You know, they were so excited for fresh strawberries,” says Welch, “you’d think we just put money out in a bowl.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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LOCAL

“A KID WAS LIKE, ‘HEY MAN, DO YOU FREESTYLE?’ I ALWAYS SAY NO FIRST.”

BEAT

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

I HEART WPTS Though Clear Channel Broadcasting is often blamed for the homogenization of radio, iHeartRadio, Clear Channel’s Internet radio platform, could help to preserve the artform. At least, that’s what Corey Mizell — DJ ChaChee on University of Pittsburgh’s college radio station, WPTS — hopes to see. WPTS became a member of iHeartRadio last December. iHeartRadio acts as a hub for hundreds of stations around the country, as well as a musicrecommendation service, and allows users to listen online, via mobile apps, and via video-game consoles. “What I hope is that [this will allow us to] be a better outlet for, basically, bringing radio back to the forefront, back to the essence of people loving music,” Mizell says. WPTS caught the attention of Clear Channel after the mtvU Woodie Awards placed it among the top college radio stations in the country. WPTS General Manager Greg Weston recalls, “It was an easy decision for us to be a part of it,” not least of all because all the necessary hardware was provided for free. While listeners could already stream WPTS at wptsradio.org, iHeartRadio has made the station more accessible. “We’ve been on other apps, but this one, with all the promotional support it gets from Clear Channel stations around the country, [is] very high-profile,” Weston says. Since WPTS is currently one of about 25 college stations available to stream on iHeartRadio, he says, “it’s a place where real college-radio junkies can go and find us without having to seek out our own stream.” And, he says, “the fact that we’re on a leading platform like that does give us a lot of credibility.” Mizell, who hosts the hip-hop show Culture Shock Radio on Friday nights, sees iHeartRadio as an opportunity to bring attention to local musicians. “When [an artist] is in contact with a radio station and they say, ‘We can play your song,’ that’s usually the first step. So for someone to hear, ‘I’ll have my song played on iHeartRadio,’ that’s a big deal.” And, of course, it provides a refreshing alternative to robotized Top 40 radio and impersonal Internet services like Pandora. As Mizell puts it, “We actually have that interaction with the live DJ on air. I always encourage listeners to call in, be on the air during the show, and be a part of the show.”

REAL-DEAL

TEACHER {BY RORY D. D WEBB}

“THE FACT THAT WE’RE ON A LEADING PLATFORM LIKE THAT DOES GIVE US A LOT OF CREDIBILITY.”

“I

N THE HIGH schools, they find out pretty quick,” says Trevor Weller. The Mount Oliver native got a degree in physical education from Slippery Rock in 2007 and has been moved around as a substitute and full-time teacher at various Pittsburgh elementary and high schools since. What the high school students tend to find out, though, involves his other career: In his time away from the classroom, Weller travels and competes in the increasingly popular battle-rap circuit under his alias, Real Deal. “I had a funny incident at Perry High School,” he says. “A kid was like, ‘Hey man, do you freestyle?’ And I was like, ‘Nah.’ I always say no first, because usually they’re like, ‘Let me hear something,’ or ‘Let me hear a 16,’ and you’re at school, trying to be a professional. “So I think I told the kid I didn’t, and then I caught him in the back of the room looking at one of the battles, and he was like, ‘Man, you killed it!’” An accomplished battle MC today, Weller’s interest in the hip-hop subgenre sparked around 2007. He developed his battle-rap and freestyling skills competing in local events such as Rhyme Calisthenics, which challenges MCs to

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Teacher’s got flow: phys-ed instructor and battle-rapper Trevor Weller

CONTINUES ON PG. 24

MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

REAL-DEAL TEACHER, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

Weller adds: “The freestyling was spin a game-show-style wheel and perform a variety of written and spontane- always my bread and butter, because ous unwritten rhymes. A five-time win- people are so much more impressed ner, Weller proved to be one of the city’s by the ability to come off the top with something as opposed to something toughest competitors. “He’s an amazing battler, but he’s you wrote.” In addition to Rhyme Cal, Weller asan even more extraordinary freestyler,” says Rhyme Cal host Thelonious Stretch. pired to compete in one of the era’s pre“He was doing stuff in his battles that mier battle-rap tournaments, Scribble no one else was doing. This dude was Jam, which was a long-running annual event in Cincinnati, Ohio. not only battling, he was “I found out about writing full storyboards Scribble Jam in ’06,” he with characters. MORE ON says. “I was like, ‘I gotta be “Anybody who says REAL DEAL there.’ Scribble Jam was all that freestyling isn’t imwww.realdealraps.com freestyle. Like, 45-second pressive, they get their rounds over the beats. They head shoved up their didn’t even tell you who asses often,” Stretch continues. “It takes a lot of brain capacity, won in the battle, because there were, and it requires fast thinking with witty like, 32 MCs. You just waited to see if your remarks. You’ve gotta have a well-rounded name was called for the next round.” Weller competed in Scribble Jam in vocabulary and be well rounded with any topic. He knows what’s going on 2007 and 2008; he made it to the second around him, and what’s going on in the round both years. He explains that he world, and that’s what makes him fast could see at that time that the freestyle and witty because if you don’t know any- aspect of the trend seemed to be coming to an end, as prepared, pre-written thing, what are you gonna talk about?”


battles seemed to be taking off. It was around this time that a battle league called Grind Time was starting to develop. One of the league’s founders, Sonny Bamboo, approached Weller about competing in their Midwest division. “My first Grind Time battle was in Indianapolis,” Weller says. “Then I went out to the West Coast; I was traveling and I was winning a lot. And then a lot of the times in the Midwest they weren’t able to get me an opponent worthy of what I earned, so I’d host a lot of them and then I brought the event to Pittsburgh.” Having graduated college by this time, Weller had to find a balance between furthering his two careers — as an educator and as a battle rapper. “At the time, I was substitute-teaching. So, substituting is a lot easier to take off — you don’t get paid, because you don’t work. For the first couple years I was doing that, and then I got contracted.” At first, he was split between two positions, at Arsenal Elementary and West Liberty Elementary. Now, Weller is teaching phys ed at Lincoln Elementary, where he is contracted through the end of the school year. He released his album Fight or Flight

MARTIAL (AND MUSICAL) ARTS {BY RORY D. WEBB} Like Trevor Weller, Farooq Al-Said — whose rap alias is Ayatollah Jaxx — competed in battles and the Rhyme Calisthenics MC competitions at the Shadow Lounge. Al-Said works with Hip Hop on L.O.C.K., a youth arts-education program that teaches elementary and high school students various elements of hip-hop music and culture, among other things. The program also led him to a job teaching at Propel Schools. He spoke with CP about rap and education. ON REAL DEAL: I’ve known Trev since I started rapping in Pittsburgh. There was always a mutual respect, but we didn’t have any real interaction until after we battled in Oakland in front of the library on Pitt’s campus. We actually got cool after the battle and just kind of built up a relationship from that. ON HIP HOP AS AN EDUCATIONAL MEDIUM: My first language was Arabic, and hip hop helped me learn how to speak English. Hip hop helped give me an outlet to focus my life and get on something positive. Hip hop has transcended music and turned into a culture that allows people fiscal opportunities that wouldn’t have existed for them otherwise.

Farooq Al-Said, a.k.a. Ayatollah Jaxx

ON TEACHING MARTIAL ARTS: I started teaching karate when I was 17, and then that kind of opened the door for me to being in a position of responsibility, in the custodial position, so to speak. Propel Schools needed a martial-arts instructor to do a trimester of martial-arts instruction; they asked if I could do it, and I said, “Yeah, absolutely.” One thing led to another, and they asked me to come back for the next year to be the full-time martial-arts teacher for four schools — to basically teach martial arts as a physical-education course. I had such a great success and turn-out with my class that they allowed me to take over as the physical-education instructor so that I can do physical education and martial arts combined. Physical education is such a taboo thing now. You’re only allowed to do a handful of things and stick to a very tight state-issued script, so for me to have the leeway that I do is fantastic. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CONTINUES ON PG. 26

09/20/13

PRESENTS

YOUNG THE GIANT VISIT WWW.961KISS.COM/SILVERBULLETBASH FOR MORE INFO AND TICKET INFORMATION

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REAL-DEAL TEACHER, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

Mode in March. In July, he was featured on BET, where he was part of a live battle-rap showcase that led to him trending on Twitter. Recently, he battled in Toronto at an event that was sponsored by Drake â&#x20AC;&#x201D; further showing that battle rap is being embraced by the mainstream. But even as Wellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second career takes off, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s committed to his ďŹ rst. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once I got contracted,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;some of the teachers saw [my battle rap videos] and they were just like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Man, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s awesome that you do that.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Obviously, they werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t telling the kids to look, but I think most of them recognize that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a way that I can reach out to some of the kids. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of kids in the inner city are really into hip hop. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not like [itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s] when I pull a kid to the side when he messes up that I rap. But I think they can detect when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve experienced their culture a little bit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just recently had a kid reach out who said I [substitute-taught] him at Carrick,â&#x20AC;? Weller recalls. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Man, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to work hard on this music, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re deďŹ nitely an inspiration with what you do and how you did it while still holding a positive job in the community.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

A THRILLING LINEUP {BY ANDY MULKERIN} In the late â&#x20AC;&#x2122;00s, having returned to Pittsburgh after a couple of years working on Capitol Hill, Mount Lebanon native Bobby Zappala fell in with some friends who started having barbecues in Shadyside for other young, entrepreneurial types. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybody thought that there was positive momentum going in Pittsburgh,â&#x20AC;? Zappala says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the same time, it was disjointed. There were people doing cool things, but you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know who they were. So we thought, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s start having parties, using our money, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll give any profits to cancer research, because weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not trying to make any money off this.â&#x20AC;? While those parties started out small, they grew quickly â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and this weekend, Thrill Mill, the nonprofit that Zappala and his friends started, has its biggest party yet, featuring the likes of De La Soul, Frightened Rabbit and RJD2. The Thrival Festival is Sat., Sept. 7 at the Bakery Square 2 development, on the site of the old Reizenstein Middle School at the border of Shadyside, East Liberty and Larimer. The event is about more than just music: Thrill Millâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to help Pittsburgh startups develop â&#x20AC;&#x201D; through support that includes its East Liberty incubator space, the Hustle Den.

De La Soul plays Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thrival Festival

As part of Thrival, the Hustle Denâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s denizens will have a chance to pitch their ideas to potential investors. In addition, there will be an â&#x20AC;&#x153;Innovation Showcase,â&#x20AC;? a series of TED-style short talks from local and national figures like Jim Newton, the founder of TechShop, a shared workshop facility whose sixth location opened this year, in Bakery Square. Plenty of people, though, will be most interested in the music: Zappala says the Thrill Mill team chose the lineup to appeal to a variety of audiences. Hip-hop legends De La Soul will appear, along with Scottish indie darlings Frightened Rabbit and producer and musician RJD2. Local support comes from Formula412. And while Zappala hopes to make Thrival a

growing annual event â&#x20AC;&#x201D; heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got sponsorship from PNC for multiple years of programming â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he also wants to keep the focus on Pittsburgh. â&#x20AC;&#x153;South by Southwest is great,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But while Austin is used as a venue, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost being pillaged: Everyone comes in from around the country, then leaves. I want this to be a showcase for whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on in Pittsburgh.â&#x20AC;? AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THRIVAL FESTIVAL featuring RJD2, FRIGHTENED RABBIT, DE LA SOUL, FORMULA412. Noon-10 p.m. (Music at 5 p.m.) Sat., Sept. 7. Bakery Square 2, Penn Ave., Shadyside. $20. www.thrivalfestival.com

Friday, Sept. 6 | 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10 pm ([SORGLQJOLTXLGQLWURJHQĂŚOOHGERWWOHV"%DOORRQSRSSLQJ ODVHUV"%HHQWHUWDLQHGDVZHEOHQGH[SORGHDQGEXUVW RXUZD\WKURXJKSRSXODUH[SHULPHQWVIURPYLGHRVKDULQJ ZHEVLWHVĂ&#x201D;DQGOHDUQVRPHVFLHQFHDORQJWKHZD\ This ADULTS-ONLYHYHQLQJLQFOXGHVIRXUçRRUVRIH[KLELWVOLYHPXVLF DQGKDQGVRQVFLHQFHGHPRV&DVKEDUDQGVQDFNVDYDLODEOHIRU SXUFKDVH9LVLW&DUQHJLH6FLHQFH&HQWHURUJIRUGHWDLOVDQGWRUHJLVWHU &RVWLQDGYDQFHGD\RIWKHHYHQW

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013


CRITICS’ PICKS

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FRI, SEPT 6 • 9PM DANCE ROCK

SUPERHUMAN HAPPINESS SAT, SEPT 7 • 9PM ROCK

STEELESQUE PLUS SUN

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Savages

OPEN STAGE WITH

Late last year, Carousel released its debut EP, a collection of three big tracks that bridge the divide between new- and old-school Pittsburgh rock with wandering guitar riffs and a steady rhythm section. Earlier this year, the four-piece, which rose from the ashes of Magic Wolf, signed to Tee Pee Records, home to guitar-worship bands like Coliseum and J. Mascis’ Witch. Tonight, Carousel celebrates the release of its Tee Pee debut, a full-length called The Jeweler’s Daughter, before lighting out for a European tour. The show, at Belvedere’s, also features local punks Zeitgeist and doom band Molasses Barge. Andy Mulkerin 10 p.m. 4016 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $8. 412-6872555 or www.belvederesultradive.com

[IRISH] + FRI., SEPT. 06 Tune up your bodhrán and get your tin whistle out of storage; it’s Pittsburgh Irish Festival weekend! The annual event, at the Riverplex at Sandcastle, kicks off tonight and runs throughout the weekend, with plenty of Irish music to be had along with the potatoes and cabbage. Red Hand Paddy and Gaelic Storm headline tonight, with Carbon Leaf closing out Saturday night and Skerryvore playing Sunday. Of course, plenty of local talent, including Bastard Bearded Irishmen, Corned Beef and Curry and na Gaels, represent as well. AM 4 p.m. Also 11 a.m.11 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 1000 Sandcastle Drive, West Homestead. $8-14. All ages. 412-422-1113 or www.pghirishfest.org Carousel N E W S

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It’s been a long journey for Michael Franti: The Oakland, Calif.-born singer and rapper came of age in the Alternative Tentacles band Beatnigs, and wound his way through the ’90s and ’00s in jam-rap-reggae band Michael Franti and Spearhead. The band’s latest, All People, sees Franti taking more of a turn toward pop music, though — in addition to bandmates, he worked with pro songwriters like Sam Hollander, Adrian Newman and The Matrix. The result is a catchy, radio-friendly full-length with the kinds of bells and whistles (literally) that Michael are rampant in sugary Franti and pop today. If this is Spearhead Franti’s play for pop stardom after all those years on the fringe, it may be working: The album’s first single, “I’m Alive (Life Sounds Like)” has been turning up everywhere, from PNC Park to Today on NBC. Tonight, the band brings its sunny vibes to Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead with openers Kopecky Family Band and Michael Bernard Fitzgerald. AM 7:30 p.m. 510 E. 10th St., Munhall. $35-38. All ages. 412-368-5225 or www. librarymusichall.com

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[POST-PUNK] + WED., SEPT. 11 With its debut album Silence Yourself, released in May, Savages became one of 2013’s buzziest bands. Think rhythmsection-heavy post-punk along the lines of Gang of Four or even Fugazi, with vocals along the lines of Patti Smith, or a cross between Grace Slick and The Slits’ Ari Up. Tonight, the fourpiece plays Mr. Small’s, along with opener Duke Garwood. AM 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $15. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

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FOR MORE DETAILS:

THU 05 31ST STREET PUB. The Dictators NYC, The Cheats, Thunder Vest. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CAVO. Yuri, Badboxes, Richardo Iamuuri. Strip District. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Passion & Pride: Polina, Amber, Kelly, Jude. South Side. 412-431-4950. SMILING MOOSE. Phil Ade, Shawn Chrystopher, Mars Jackson, Palermo Stone. South Side. 412-431-4668. WALNUT GRILL. The Keystone 3. Shadyside. 412-782-4768.

FRI 06 31ST STREET PUB. Shocked Minds, Torn Apart Hearts, The Activations. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Mike Medved. Richland. 724-444-7333. BELVEDERE’S. Carousel, Zeitgeist, Molasses Barge. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB CAFE. Mike Why & Jeremy Caywood: The Way Of Life (Early) Ray Lanich Band, Highway 4 (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DO DROP INN. Daniels & McClain. Natrona Heights. 724-224-3006. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Panoramic & True, The Dressed Frets. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Turnstyles, The Simulation Hypothesis, Surviving the Odyssey. Garfield. 412-924-0634. KEAN THEATRE. Hotel California. Eagles Tribute Band. Gibsonia. 724-444-5326. KENDREW’S. The GRID. Aliquippa. 724-375-5959. KOPEC’S. Drug Lust, Ratface, Secret Tombs. Lawrenceville. 412-973-7178. LINDEN GROVE. Switch. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Pinback, Deathfix. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PARK HOUSE. Butters Kissing Company. North Side. 412-224-2273. ROCK ANN HAVEN. Jukebox Band. Butler. 724-283-1826. THE SHOP. Druglust, Ratface, Secret Tombs. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. SMILING MOOSE. The Dirty Charms, Playoff Beard. South Side. 412-431-4668.

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412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

412.431.0700

TUESDAY SEPT. SEPT. 17

Lunchtime Live is a FREE, acoustic concert from Noon to 1 pm under the tent in Schenley Plaza. Grab your lunch to go and enjoy live music from local artists!

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Superhuman Happiness. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. The Hawkeyes. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 07 31ST STREET PUB. Valient Thorr, Ramming Speed, German Shepherd, Rogue Signals. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Arcane Haven. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BAKERY SQUARE. Frightened Rabbit, RJD2, De La Soul, Formula 412. Thrival Innovation Music Festival. www.thrivalfestival. com. Larimer. BROTHERS GRIMM. The GRID. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. BUCKHEAD SALOON. Walk of Shame. Station Square. 412-232-3101. CATTIVO. The Turpentiners, VertiGoGo, Jackals of Botswana, The Cheats, The Del Rios. Benefit for homeless cats. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157.

CIP’S. Mike Scheer. Dormont. 412-668-2335. CLUB CAFE. Teresa Hawthorne Band (Early) Between Two Rivers (Late) PBR&D&W (late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Total Package Total Package. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Blaming Murphy, Can’t Dance, Breckenwood. Aliquippa. 724-375-5080. HAMBONE’S. Southside American. CD release party. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARVEY WILNER’S. Lucky Me. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Weird Paul Rock Band, Awful Waffles, Scott Fry Experience. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KEAN THEATRE. Hotel California. Eagles Tribute Band. Gibsonia. 724-444-5326. THE LOOSE MOOSE. Gone South. Baldwin. 412-655-3553. MOONDOG’S. theCAUSE. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

LOCAL TWEETS Recent dispatches from the music Twittersphere @joyike (Joy Ike)

I don’t like people with sunglasses. I can’t tell if they’re studying me.

@DJBonics (DJ Bonics)

I like what Em was trying to do. But it just sounds like a DJ HERO song. It will be the we play “HIP HOP” song for all the POP stations.

@alispagnola (Ali Spagnola)

No I didn’t go into Whole Foods to ONLY eat the samples ... I used their bathroom, too.


OLD TRAILS. Silkwood Shower. Washington. 724-225-0484. THE R BAR. King’s Ransom. Dormont. 412-942-0882. REX THEATER. Dopapod Papadosio. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Waiting for Ray. Ross. 412-364-8166. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Tobacco Road. Shaler. 412-487-6259. SMILING MOOSE. Tumbleweed Wanderers, Circles & Squares, Rust Belt Kings Evil Streaks, The Lobot-o-mites, No Movement, Sablowski’s (late). South Side. 412-431-4668. STRATIGOS BANQUET CENTRE. The Holidays, Southside Jerry. North Huntingdon. 412-672-8901. TARENTUM ELKS. Daniels & McClain. Tarentum. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Steelesque. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TWIN HI-WAY DRIVE-IN. The Turbosonics. Robinson. 412-494-4990.

SUN 08 CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Michael Franti & Spearhead. Munhall. 412-368-5225. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Touche, Granati Bros.,The Jaggerz. Midland. 724-576-4644. REX THEATER. The Color of Valor. South Side. 412-381-6811. UNION STATION/THE PENNSYLVANIAN. Ariel Pink & Haunted Graffiti, No Age, YOSHIMIO + Hisham Akira Bharoocha + Ryan Sawyer TRIO, KC Marching Cobras. Downtown.

MON 09

ALTAR BAR. Chet Faker. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Tony Janflone, Jr. North Side. 412-322-1850. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Terry Bozzio. Warrendale. 724-934-1090.

TUE 10 ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Jenkins & Crum. North Side. 412-322-1850. CLUB CAFE. Matthew Mayfield, Scott & Rosanna. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. GT, Resin, Low Man. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. North Mississippi Allstars, Lightnin’ Malcolm. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

WED 11 31ST STREET PUB. The Koffin Kats, Peelander-Z, Porno Tongue. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. There Is No Mountain. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5993. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. MoJo JoJo. North Side. 412-322-1850. CLUB CAFE. The Brothers Comatose, The Unknown String Band. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Nic

Lawless, Psychic Teens, Triangle & Rhino, Black Brick. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Savages, Duke Garwood. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

DJS THU 05 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FRI 06 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic, DJ APT ONE. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DRUM BAR. VDJ Craig McClintock. North Side. 412-231-7777. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

FRI 06 ALTAR BAR. Ana Popovic & Mo Better Love. Strip District. 412-263-2877. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Gresh. Downtown. 412-471-9100. PENN BREWERY. The Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-237-9400.

SAT 07 EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Bill Toms. 412-431-4090. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. 412-431-4090. THE R BAR. Kings Ransom feat.Craig King. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2013 11AM-7PM

A DAY OF UNLIMITED ENTERTAINMENT!

BUY TICKETS ONLINE! STUDENT DISCOUNT

COLOR THROWING LIVE MUSIC ALL DAY LONG DANCE AND DELICIOUS FOOD

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SUN 08 TUGBOAT’S. The Watts Brothers. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992.

WED 11 ATRIAS RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Nick Fiasco. Wexford. 724-934-3660.

COME AND CELEBRATE THE WORLD’S HAPPIEST EVENT

PALACE OF GOLD 3756 McCrearys Ridge Rd. Moundsville, WV 26041 info@festivalofcolors.us facebook.com/festivalofcolor

JAZZ THU 05

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. . Entrepreneurial www per a p ty Thursdays. Downtown. pghci m .co 412-392-2217. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 07

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. DRUM BAR. VDJ Dave Ott. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

FRI 06

SUN 08 SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 11 BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B THU 05 MR. SMALLS THEATER. MC Chris, Dr. Awkard, Jesse Dangerously, Tribe One. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

BLUES THU 05 SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the

ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CLUB COLONY. RML Jazz. Scott. 412-370-9621. KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. J. Rosalynn Smith-Clark. The Ladies Who Sing w/ the Band. East Liberty. 412-363-3000. LITTLE E’S. Jared Wilson & The Vibe. Downtown. 412-392-2217. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Jazz Express. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

SAT 07 ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BONNIE & CLYDE’S. RML Jazz. Wexford. 412-370-9621. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Lucarelli Brothers, Peg Willson, Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. Sandy Dowe The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. HILLMAN CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS. Bill Frisell Explores the Music of John Lennon. Fox Chapel. 412-968-3045. CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

LEMONT. Dr. Zoot. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. Velvet Heat Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. The Neon Swing X-Perience. Downtown. 412-471-9100. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

SUN 08

EVERY TUESDAY

METAL NIGHT

$2.50 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

YOUNG THE GIANT

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

PLUS MORE!

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT

Visit PROMO tab at pghcitypaper.com for your chance to WIN PRIZES!

EVERY THURSDAY

BAND NIGHT EVERY FRIDAY

80’S NIGHT

Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282

Hint: Find the Left side of the Bottle

EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Tania Grubbs Quartet. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LA CASA NARCISI. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. Rick Matt. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

TUE 10 ANDYS. John Bagnato. Downtown. 412-773-8884. KATZ PLAZA. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 11 ANDYS. David Bennett. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Fred Pugh. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

EARLY WARNINGS

ACOUSTIC

Local album release dates

THU 05 ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Artistree. North Side. 412-322-1850. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Jerry Coleman. Murrysville. 724-773-4453. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Rebecca. McMurray. 724-942-1108. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Mike Medved. Pleasant Hills. 412-714-8670. BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank of Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. PALACE THEATRE. The Bricks. Greensburg. 724-836-1123. PERRYTOWNE DRAFT HOUSE. Ashley & Garret. McCandless. 412-367-9610. SEVICHE. Jason Kendall Duo. Downtown. 412-697-3120.

{TUE., SEPT. 10}

J.D. Eicher and the Goodnights Into Place {TUE., OCT. 01}

The Meets It Happens Outside {SAT., OCT. 05}

Brent Malin and the Railroaders Two Trees

FRI 06

BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Ronni Weiss. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. BONNIE & CLYDE’S. Lenny & Jeff. Wexford. 724-934-2110. TAVERN IN THE WALL. Peter DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. King. Aspinwall. 412-782-6542. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. Doc & Tina. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. HAMBONE’S. Monday Night HARMONY MUSEUM BARN Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. ANNEX. Bluegrass & Beyond Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. Music Festival. Danny Kalb, The Honeycutters, The Allegheny Drifters, Midnight Drive, North PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Gene Allegheny Fiddlers, Well Strung, Stovall. Carnegie. 412-429-7272. more. Harmony. 724-452-7341. ROCK BOTTOM. Lee Asbury. LEVELS. Juan & Erica. North Side. Waterfront. 412-779-3882. 412-231-7777. MARIO’S SOUTH SIDE SALOON. Michael Todd. ALLEGHENY ELKS South Side. 412-381-5610. LODGE #339. W. NEW CASTLE ST. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. PLAZA. Jason Deutsch, Wednesdays. North Shift Change, Side. 412-321-1834. Modern Nature. Butler. . PARK HOUSE. 724-256-5769. www per a p ty pghci m Bluegrass Jam w/ The .co Shelf Life String Band. ELWOOD’S PUB. North Side. 412-224-2273. Acoustical Bruce. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. HARMONY MUSEUM BARN ANNEX. Bluegrass & Beyond HEALCREST URBAN FARM. Music Festival. Danny Kalb, Amun Raqs. Garfield. The Honeycutters, The Allegheny Drifters, Midnight 412-228-1762. Drive, North Allegheny Fiddlers, PITTSBURGH PUBLIC MARKET. Well Strung, more. Harmony. Vince Burns. Strip District. 724-452-7341. 412-281-4505. LEVELS. Nick & Nina. North Side. 412-231-7777. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. THE PITTSBURGH WINERY. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. Clinton Clegg, Max Somerville, Jimbo Jackson, Mark Dignam, Gary Musisko. Songwriters in the Cellar. FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

MON 09

SAT 07

TUE 10

CLASSICAL

WED 11

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 07

WORLD

SAT 07

LIVE MUSIC ALL WEEKEND LONG ON THE MAIN STAGE ON 22ND STREET. Glory Days (Springsteen Tribute) – Jumping Jack Flash (Rolling Stones Tribute) – Dancing Queen Freedom Band – Kenny Blake – and many more! 30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

The Band Perry, Rascal Flatts. Burgettstown. 724-947-7400.

COUNTRY THU 05 FRI 06

ROYAL PLACE. Steeltown. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000.

FRI 06

AXIOM BRASS. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600.

SAT 07

RIVER CITY BRASS. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

SUN 08 SANDRO LEAL-SANTIESTEBAN, VIOLIN & HANNAH WHITEHEAD, CELLO. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3108.

OTHER MUSIC THU 05

LEVELS. Aaron Short. North Side. 412-231-7777.

FRI 06 LEMONT. NiteStar. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

SAT 07 WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. All Keyed Up. Dueling pianos. North Side. 412-231-7777.

MON 09

HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.


What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

September 4 - 10 The Dreaming

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests Definitive Strike & Winters Descent. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 59 The Lion King

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-4800. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Sept. 29.

MC Chris MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Dr. Awkward, Jesse Dangerously & more. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb. com/opusone. 7:30p.m.

FRIDAY 60

23rd Annual Pittsburgh Irish Festival RIVERPLEX West Homestead.

newbalancepittsburgh.com

A Night Of Comedy with Muse Jodi White & Jerry Costell CONSOL ENERGY CENTER

412-422-1113. Tickets: pghirishfest.org. Through Sept. 8.

LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Over 18 show. Tickets: latitude40pitt.com. 8pm.

Darius Rucker STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000.Doors open at 6p.m.

Kid Rock

44th Annual A Fair in the Park

PHOTO CREDIT: JOAN MARCUS DISNEY ©

WEDNESDAY 48

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

MELLON PARK. Free event. For more info visit afairinthepark. org. Through Sept. 8.

Super Human Happiness

THE LION KING

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5 BENEDUM CENTER

All My Sons RAUH THEATRE - PITTSBURGH PLAYHOUSE Oakland. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse.com or 412-392-8000. Through Sept. 22.

guests Bottom Shelf Blues Band & more. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

Pinback MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Deathfix. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or

Ana Popovic And Mo Better Love ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special

ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

SATURDAY 7 Arcane Haven

1

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Trophies, Bury Thy Kingdom & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. With special guests ZZ Top & Uncle Kracker. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 6:45p.m.

Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival

Downtown. With special guests Cage The Elephant. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

MONDAY 9 Chet Faker

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

TUESDAY 10

LAUREL HIGHLANDS. For more info call 724-872-1670. Tickets: pittsburghrenfest.com. Through Sept. 29.

SUNDAY 8

Michael Franti and Spearhead

The Rides

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. With special guests Stephen Stills, Kenny Wayne Shepherd & more. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 8p.m.

North Mississippi Allstars

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. With special guests Kopecky Family Band & more. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 7:30p.m.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Lightin’ Malcolm. All ages show. Tickets: 866468-3401 or ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

WEXFORD

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

Pittsburgh’s Larges Largest Selection of Classic Styles

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

Wide selection meets top style at the New Balance® store —where you’ll find the 574. 574 It features the classic look that stands the test of time. N E W S

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OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 newbalancepittsburgh.com FACEBOOK.COM/ NEWBALANCEPGH +

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LOVE HURTS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

ONE COULD IMAGINE GETAWAY AS A VERY EXPENSIVE YOUTUBE WRECK REEL

Here’s a line of dialogue you won’t find in many tragic romances: “That Crushing Fist is quite something.” Or this: “The 64 Hands have endless variations.” Both are spoken in the first reel or so of The Grandmaster. The new film by arthouse favorite Wong Kar Wai is essentially a romance about two people thrown together by circumstance and kept apart by war (though the opposite is also true). But because it also tells the story of Chinese kung-fu legend Ip Man — whose students included Bruce Lee — its two hours harbor a half-dozen or more extended hand-to-hand battles.

CP APPROVED

A lover and a fighter: Tony Leung as Ip Man

We meet Ip (Tony Leung) in the 1930s, during China’s regional kungfu wars. He and martial-arts scion Gong Er (Zhang Ziyi) meet brutal, in a sensually charged fight scene. But the Japanese invasion forces Ip to flee to Hong Kong, and though the lovers meet again, fate has other plans. Leung and Zhang are beautiful, charismatic and graceful, and the battles (featuring some wire work) are wonderfully stylish. With its sumptuously emotive music and even lusher visuals — including fights in the rain, the snow, and various breakable interiors — The Grandmaster should please fans of both romances and kung-fu dustups. In Mandarin, with subtitles. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

IN A WORLD … Lake Bell writes, directs and stars in this comedy about a female voice-over artist trying to succeed in a male-dominated field. Starts Fri., Sept. 6. Manor

Snakebit in Sofia: Selena Gomez and Ethan Hawke ride out a long night.

{BY AL HOFF}

G

ETAWAY ISN’T just the title of this

car-chase clunker: It’s a useful suggestion. But if you somehow get suckered into this drive-by disaster from Courtney Solomon, at least go forewarned.

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Forget about plot. A former race-car driver (Ethan Hawke) is forced to drive around Sofia, Bulgaria (that’s right, Bulgaria), under the direction of a mysterious Euro Man on the phone, and cause mayhem with a souped-up Mustang. Or Euro Man will kill his wife. (“I’m watching you always.”) So, it’s kinda like Speed, but in a car, and in Bulgaria. “Assignments” include: smashing into holiday displays (take that, Christmas!), blowing up a power station and giving a lift to an American teen-age carjacker/tech-head/brat played by Selena Gomez.

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The charmless Gomez can’t act or keep her seat belt on with any consistency. Her hair, though, is very full and shiny. A-plus hair. Hawke’s hair is by

Weed Whacker, so that we know he is a troubled soul.

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Forget about dialogue. Hawke: “I’m gonna go for it.” Gomez: “No, don’t go for it.” (Spoiler alert: He goes for it.)

GETAWAY DIRECTED BY: Courtney Solomon STARRING: Ethan Hawke, Selena Gomez, Shelby Super Snake Mustang

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Solomon makes about 100 edits a minute, and most of the frenetic film goes like this: street, Shelby clutch, gearshift, Hawke’s furrowed brow, tachometer, Shelby grill, wrecked car, Gomez struggling to react, squealing wheel. Rinse and repeat. Did I mention it was a Shelby Mustang?

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In today’s world of Internet clip reels, one could imagine Getaway as a very expensive YouTube wreck reel,

designed to flaunt an American muscle car wiping out dozens of tiny Euro police cars in various spectacular fashions. There’s a lot of anti-police anger here — the cop-car kills are at Smokey and the Bandit 2 level.

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There is one good scene, a throwback to classic films like Gone in 60 Seconds, in which the camera stays fixed, looking out the dashboard, as we careen through the streets in one long take, narrowly avoiding carefully choreographed wrecks and near-wrecks.

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In the last reel, there are a couple of blackout scenes, which created audible relief in the theater: This piece of junk is over. But alas, the camera whirred back to life each time. There was a streetside resolution caused by deus ex machina (technically, deus ex truck), before we zipped away for the real conclusion, which was breathtaking in its incoherency. Get. Away. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013


despite new angles and fresh information, the life of a man can be unknowable. 2:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 7, and 7 p.m. Sun., Sept. 8. Oaks (AH)

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

HIS GIRL FRIDAY. A newspaper editor juggles his ex-wife (and former reporter) while prepping to cover an execution, in this razor-sharp 1940 comedy from Howard Hawks, adapted from the Ben HechtCharles MacArthur play The Front Page. Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell star. Screens as part of a monthlong, Sunday-night series of films about old-school news reporting. 8 p.m. Sun., Sept. 8. Regent Square

NEW RIDDICK. Vin Diesel stars in a sci-fi actioner about a man trying to outrun alien predators, mercenaries and a dangerous figure from his past. David Twohy directs this latest installment of the Riddick saga, which began with 2000’s Pitch Black. Starts Fri., Sept. 6.

AND WHILE WE WERE HERE. A married American woman, on a writing assignment on an island off Italy’s Amalfi coast, has an affair with a younger man. Kate Bosworth and Iddo Goldberg star; Kat Coiro directs. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Sept. 10. Hollywood

REPERTORY GONE WITH THE WIND. Sure, you know the story: Those damn Yankees burn the South; Ashley can’t man up; Scarlett pouts all over Tara; and Rhett Butler doesn’t give a damn. But sure as some Southern belles will never go hungry again, Victor Fleming’s epic 1939 historical melodrama holds up to repeated viewings. See it on a big screen. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 4. AMC Loews. $5 A SINGLE SHOT. David M. Rosenthal directs this new thriller about a tragic shooting death, and the hunter and backwoodsmen who get caught up in its aftermath. Sam Rockwell and William H. Macy star. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 4. Hollywood ERASERHEAD. “Mother, they’re still not sure it is a baby!” There’s much that sticks in one’s head after seeing Eraserhead, even if it was more than 30 years ago. For me, it’s that immortal line, which sums up how funny, unnerving, twisted and inexplicable David Lynch’s 1976 film is. Beautifully shot in black and white, and with an inventive score, the work features, without much narrative explication: a depressed man (Jack Nance), his girlfriend, their newborn offspring, a mysterious radiator and chickens. This mystifying but strangely compelling art-house favorite opens a series of Lynch films at the Hollywood. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Sept. 5; 7 p.m. Fri., Sept. 6; 2 and 10 p.m. Sat., Sept. 7; and 7 p.m. Sun., Sept. 8. Hollywood (Al Hoff)

Adjust Your Tracking YOUR TRACKING: THE UNTOLD CP ADJUST STORY OF THE VHS COLLECTOR. Press “play,” then pause. This new documentary from Dan M. Kinem and Levi Peretic looks at the world of obsessive VHS-tape collectors, who search through the stacks of now-forlorn video cassettes seeking treasures. First, there’s a recap of VHS history, from its “miraculous” advent in the 1970s (record TV to watch later!) and its glory days supported by mom-and-pop shops and a public hungry for home-viewing content, through Blockerbusterization and finally, a nearvanishing of the format. Various interviewees nostalgically recall clam-shell cases and terrible cover art, the quirks of the format, and the huge world of

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Chris Smalley’s “Apocalyptic Isolation” at Film Kitchen entertainment that opened up when zillions of movies and other recorded fare were easily available on VHS. Today, they troll flea markets, eBay and assorted grubby stores seeking to rescue tapes from oblivion, and build their gigantic collections. The filmmakers mostly interview a subset of collectors, those guys (it’s almost always guys) who focus on low-rent, direct-to-video horror films. Most seem motivated by innate obsessive tendencies and a desire to own all the video nasties they were kept from renting as youngsters. You might also be surprised to learn that one usurping technology — the Internet — has facilitated a boom in select VHS genres, with some vintages tapes now re-selling for hundreds of dollars. It would have been interesting to hear from other sorts of collectors — say, fans of homeshot videos, or oddball instructional tapes. But obsessive collecting has many universal traits that can be extracted from this parade of junk-gore enthusiasts, and this film is loads of fun for fans of VHS, notquite-dead formats and films about hard-core collectors. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with the directors. 8 p.m. Thu., Sept. 5. Melwood (AH) DRIVE-IN SUPER MONSTER-RAMA. The seventh annual Monster-Rama is a tribute to the late Peter Cushing, the iconic British horror and sci-fi actor who appears in the eight classic drive-in screened (in 35 mm) at this two-night event. Films for Fri., Sept. 6, include: Brides of Dracula (1960), Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed (1969), Fear in the Night (1972) and From Beyond the Grave (1974). On Sat., Sept. 7, catch Madhouse (1974), At the Earth’s Core (1976), Asylum (1972) and Shock Waves (1977). Gates open at 7 p.m., films begin at dusk. Fri., Sept. 6, and Sat., Sept. 7. Riverside Drive-In, Route 66, N orth Vandergrift. 724-568-1250 or www.riversidedrivein. com. $10 per person each night (kids under 12

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free with adult). Overnight camping available for additional charge. THE SONG REMAINS THE SAME. For some 1970s mega-acts, like Led Zeppelin, it wasn’t enough to, say, have your own jet with the band logo painted on the side; the biggest bands also demanded time on the big screen, ideally in a feature that captured not only the group’s performance but also its ethos and driving concerns. Like going on a quest dressed as a hermit, or seeking the Holy Grail. Frankenstein It never hurts to brush Must Be up on your mythology Destroyed at before settling in for Drive-In Super the two-hour-plus film Monster-Rama that is Led Zep’s 1976 contribution to rockstar self-indulgence. The concert footage was shot over three nights in 1973, and includes: hits like “Stairway to Heaven” and “Whole Lotta Love”; plenty of guitar noodling from Jimmy Page; deliciously baroque fashions; and several interstitial “stories,” in which band members act out various fantasies. The film is a somewhat jumbled, and occasionally tedious, mess, but it’s a fair time capsule of its bloated cultural times. And, of course, your chance to get the Led out. 9 p.m. Fri., Sept. 6; 7 p.m. Sat., Sept. 7; and 4 p.m. Sun., Sept. 8. Hollywood (AH)

CP

CITIZEN KANE. Orson Welles’ dark 1941 portrait of newspaper magnate Charles Foster Kane remains an astonishing piece of filmmaking — and a deeply enjoyable film to revisit. Its visuals are so rich and layered that many await discovery, such as inventive tricks Welles used to create the illusion of a grand film from much smaller fragments. The film’s nonlinear narrative first plays as a mystery, but on subsequent screenings, the out-of-order sequences become puzzle pieces the viewer can assemble differently. And repeat viewings only strengthen Welles’ premise (so neatly aped in the opening newsreel montage of Kane’s life) that,

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FILM KITCHEN. This month’s installment of the series for local and independent film and video features recent work by four local artists. Highlights include four shorts by Chris Smalley. “Apocalyptic Isolation” is Smalley’s dark comedy blending romance, time travel and the end of the world; it begins when a young man, out walking with his girlfriend, is romantically upstaged by a version of himself visiting from the near future. The 15-minute work is both clever and unexpectedly poignant. Smalley also presents “A Weird One” — a collagelike comic narrative weaving together several urban shaggy-dog stories (“Hey, man, wanna check out the demon portal in my basement?”) — and two shorter experimental works. Film Kitchen curator Matthew Day also screens John R. Jaquish’s “Day of the Heist” (18 min.), a bank-robbery drama shot in Brownsville on black-and-white 35 mm film (a high-end medium seldom used by independent filmmakers). The Sept. 10 program also features short films by Nathan Cobbett and Sean Ferris. 8 p.m. Tue., Sept. 10 (7 p.m. reception). Melwood. $5. 512-691-9500 (Bill O’Driscoll)

His Girl Friday MYSTERY SCIENCE THEATER 3000: THE MOVIE. The popular 1980s Comedy Central TV show, in which junky old movies are mocked on screen, had its own big-screen version in 1996. In this extended episode, directed by Jim Mallon, Mike Nelson and his robot companions are forced to watch the 1955 stinker This Island Earth. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 11. AMC Waterfront. $5 HOLLYWOODBURGH SHORTS. Catch this screening of five short webisode-type films that function as a preview of the locally produced Hollywoodburgh, an in-development 30-minute dramedy, hoping to find a home on TV or the Internet. The show is about two Pittsburgh guys who move to Hollywood to pursue careers in show business, and subsequently bounce back and forth between the two towns. 7 p.m. Thu., Sept. 12. Hollywood. Suggested donation: $5 for one person, or $10 for three people ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, N orth Side. www.warhol.org

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[COMEDY]

WE’VE LOST THE SENSE OF PERMANENTLY ENGINEERED UTOPIA

AFTER THE END {BY MARGARET WELSH}

WHAT’S YOUR SHOW LIKE? Ragnarok did not mark the end of the world as I had predicted it. But it, in many ways, ended my world, insofar as I had a solid 50 minutes of apocalyptic Mayan material which would not make any sense after 2012, and I’d made very few plans for what I would do after that material was retired. I started essentially from scratch in January, performing unadvertised shows, just learning to tell stories and tell jokes. And consequently, I realized I had more to say to the world. HOW MUCH WERE YOU HOPING THE WORLD WOULD END? I guess I always secretly hoped that the world wouldn’t end, but I turned 42 this year, and that’s around the time that people start dreaming about apocalypse. The consolation of apocalypse is that life has a dramatic and consequential ending instead of the slow, dwindling [to] a life of irrelevance that is so terrifying to anyone, but especially to a creative person. YOUR PERFORMANCE STYLE HAS GROWN MORE CASUAL; YOU’LL NOW WEAR JEANS ONSTAGE INSTEAD OF SUITS. It’s a sad statement on my wardrobe that wearing jeans is a radical change for me. I’ve spent a good period of my career pretending to be an expert in fake history and fake trivia, pretending to be so many different things. While [these were] authentic reflections of me, the only thing left, after the world did not end, was to stop hiding behind tuxedos, and funny sunglasses and ridiculous comedy mustaches, and try — such as it may — to be myself. Though, the comedy mustache is still there; I can’t tell if that’s because I actually am a weird guy with a mustache, or [because] I’m afraid if I try to shave it, it will spit acid like the facehugger in Alien. MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

JOHN HODGMAN with Gab Bonesso. 7 p.m. Fri., Sept. 6. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheatre.com

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John Hodgman and his comedy mustache

Known as a correspondent on The Daily Show With Jon Stewart, and for his bestselling books of fake trivia, John Hodgman is something of a renaissance man. This week, the professorial humorist — who recently starred in his own apocalypsethemed comedy special, Ragnarok — pauses from writing Ayn Rand parodies for The New Yorker and settling squabbles on his podcast, Judge John Hodgman, to play the Rex Theater. A longer version of this interview is at www.pghcitypaper.com.

DOME ALONE [ART REVIEW]

{BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

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O YOU MISS the Civic Arena? I

know I do. Although I only saw a few concerts and sporting events over the years there, I loved the thing as an object of architecture. And that’s why I am especially glad that Ed Massery, perhaps the region’s foremost architectural photographer, made the half-centuryold structure the subject of a series of images before it came down last year. The pictures are on view in the lobby of the USX Tower, courtesy of the Photo Forum Gallery. Massery is an accomplished visual poet for hire. In his frequent work photographing buildings for the architects, contractors or other entities who build them, he has a knack for capturing the right moment. It is near the end of the day, and though the sun sets with vivid, painterly swaths across the sky, there is enough light to illuminate the building

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

Sunset over a landmark: one of Ed Massery’s images of the now-vanished Civic Arena

compellingly, its handsome profile set confidently in the picture frame. Invariably masonry glints and steel gleams, niceties of architectural joinery puff up their bolts. Meanwhile, lights are on in-

LAST LIGHT — THE CIVIC ARENA: THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF ED MASSERY continues through Sept. 28. Photo Forum Gallery at USX Tower, 600 Grant St., Downtown. 412-661-5800 or www.photoforumgallery.com

side the building, punctuating its façade and illuminating the narrative adventures of its inner spatial machinations. Sure, Photoshop has a role here, but Massery seems to know, lighting from within and without, that dusky moment

when the building looks its best. When the subject is the Civic Arena, that question first takes on a delightful architectural tone. Did the building look its best when its stainless steel radiated the metallic timelessness of a cloudy day made structural? Or when a skyscrapertop view made it seem as like an interplanetary stepchild of Pittsburgh’s otherwise-rectilinear architecture? Shooting in both color and black-and-white, Massery catches in the wild the very clouds that Constable conjured in oil. And yet the architectural morbidity that we all foresee zooms in swiftly enough. Last year’s systematic flaying of the building could not have revealed a fleshier red color beneath. Nor could the hapless induced collapse of structure and skin been more viscerally zoomorphic in its silent screech of death. Those bits of stainless steel that were salvaged and


hawked as souvenirs might just as easily be ivory. Still, here is a certain magic of architectural photography. Some buildings live more substantively in architectural photography than they ever do in life. Most of the buildings of Chicago’s famed 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition stood little more than a year before succumbing to an unplanned fire that materially underscored the Fair’s planned temporary status. A similar phenomenon occurred at the other end of the spectrum of architectural styles. Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion, the German Modernist star of the 1929 World’s Fair, originally stood for less than a year before being ripped down. But both structures lived on as influential examples in architecture books without the benefit of corporal reality.

Other fascinating examples are those, like the Civic Arena here, best remembered in their moment of destruction. The Pruitt-Igoe housing complex lives on as the portrait of the moment of explosive collapse, as if such a vivid indictment might be contagious among all examples of inferior Modern architecture. Similarly, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge twisted itself into a destructive immortality in a way that Chubby Checker could only admire. The video is a YouTube classic, and the stills live on as well. Such images persist because they have specific didactic lessons for architectural history: Build like this, don’t build like that. Massery is certainly more than sufficiently skilled as a photographer for his iconic images to take hold. But the message is not yet clear. Build more like the Civic Arena? That’s not it. We’ve lost the sense of permanently engineered utopia, even as we’ve gained an improving sense of urbanism. Tear down things like the Civic Arena? That’s not it, either. There’s still plenty of mid-century Modernism to appreciate and save, even if some of it is flawed. Try to see ambitious works of architecture through the eyes of very talented photographers? Actually, now might be just the right moment for such a lesson. But hurry, because this exhibition is only up for another month. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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BRUSHES WITH DEATH {BY TED HOOVER}

Dan Bisbee mixes it up in The Art of Murder. {PHOTO COURTESY OF SOUTH PARK THEATRE}

SOME BUILDINGS LIVE MORE SUBSTANTIVELY IN ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY THAN THEY EVER DO IN LIFE.

[PLAY REVIEW]

Playwright Joe DiPietro leads something of a double life. On one hand, he is the book writer of several big New York musicals: I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change; All Shook Up; Nice Work If You Can Get It; and Memphis. (He won a Tony for the latter.) On the other hand, he writes community-theater staples — small shows about simple people doing mundane things. In this category we find The Last Romance and the hugely popular Over the River and Through the Woods. South Park Theatre presents DiPietro’s The Art of Murder — decidedly not one of his Broadway outings. Here DiPietro has set out to write a genre play, specifically a comedy mystery thriller. We’re in the home of hugely successful artist Jack Brooks, who also happens to be a flaming idiot. (Dan Bisbee gives a quite energetic performance in the role.) Brooks lives with his doormat of a wife (Ivy Steinberg, playing it curiously low-key). And here comes Jack’s outrageously hateful art dealer (Dave McDonald, making the most of the comedy). In the way of these things, somebody is going to kill — or try to kill — somebody else, and we’re supposed to figure it out. It’s not entirely DiPietro’s fault that he’s writing in a limited, and limiting, genre where it could be said that the most technically proficient and theatrically successful examples have already been written: Gaslight, The Mousetrap and the gold standard, Deathtrap. So if DiPietro’s attempts feel like a bit of a retread … well, I think most playwrights would face that same problem. Director Cindy Swanson could drive the pace a bit more; long pauses between lines — never a good idea — are deadly to a thriller. And a more uniform acting style from the company could help smooth over some of DiPietro’s rougher patches. Amber Kocher contributes a lovely set design. There’s nothing terribly wrong with The Art of Murder; it’s an easygoing sort of play that, whatever its faults, takes up two very short acts. If you’re a fan of the genre, you might notice the sketchy plotting and obvious set-ups. But certainly the South Park Theatre audience was there for a good time, and by the end they’d had just that.

The hilarious whodunit from the madcap mind of McDonagh— complete with flying skulls!

By Martin McDonagh A Pittsburgh Premiere September 11–28 Directed by Martin Giles The Charity Randall Theatre in the Stephen Foster Memorial, Oakland Note: Strong language and situations.

Tickets at picttheatre.org or call 412.561.6000 x207 T H E A T R E

Professional Theatre in Residence at the University of Pittsburgh

@rt

WESTMORELAND 30 MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

The Westmoreland Museum of American Art @rt 30 is now open at 4764 State Route 30 in Greensburg, featuring pieces from the permanent collection, American Marketplace, Art on Tap and more!

Pop-Up Exhibition: Kristen Kovak

Wednesday - Friday 12 pm - 7 pm Saturday & Sunday 10 am - 5 pm wmuseumaa.org 724-837-1500

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE ART OF MURDER continues through Sept. 14. South Park Theatre, Corrigan Drive and Brownsville Road, South Park. $12. 412-831-8552 or www.southpark theatre.com

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[EXHIBIT]

RE: CYCLING {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} LIKE MANY visitors to BIKES: Science on Two

Wheels, at the Carnegie Science Center, I had a moment of happy recognition. Where some will find semblances of their childhood bikes displayed, I spotted the 1976 Schwinn Varsity Bicentennial: a 10-speed with curved handlebars that, paint job aside, recalled the first bike I ever bought myself. I got my Schwinn Traveller III used at age 17, for $75, and rode it into my 30s. Indeed, with dozens of models from the antique to the carbon-fiber on display, BIKES briskly catalogues the bicycle’s many permutations over the past 150 years. (Exhibit partners include Pittsburgh’s Bicycle Heaven and Ohio’s Bicycle Museum of America.) And thanks to some engaging hands-on displays about inertia, friction and the like, visitors will learn some science. Unfortunately, however, the show largely ignores something big that happened between when I acquired that Schwinn three decades ago and when I gave it up for a more commuter-friendly model: the bicycle’s evolution from toy to tool. BIKES does offer some history. We see how bicycle forerunner the velocipede (dating to 1817!) acquired pedals in the 1860s, then transformed from the precarious, huge-wheeled “penny-farthing” to the modern “safety bike,” with its drive chain. Signage notes that the 19th-century U.S. biking craze was an adult phenomenon, but that, thanks to car culture, “bikes were seen as children’s toys” by the mid-20th century.

BIKES: SCIENCE ON TWO WHEELS

continues through Jan. 1. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400 or www.CarnegieScienceCenter.org

Yet viewing BIKES, you’d never know that adults today use bikes for anything but racing or recreating. Rather, BIKES lovingly documents such phenomena as how bike-makers stole design elements from cars, motorcycles and even rocket ships — not to mention such marketing flourishes as the banana seat. And the exhibit serves as a mini-showroom for contemporary recreational models, from fatbikes (with their bulbous tires) to mountain bikes and BMX — even an off-road racer with a robotic shifter. Sure, seeing the ’53 Schwinn from Peewee’s Big Adventure is a hoot. But along with honoring the bicycle as consumer product,

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JIM JUDKIS}

Riding high: A “tall bike” display is part of BIKES.

why not display bikes as transportation — working bikes? According to 2009 U.S. Department of Transportation numbers, 54 percent of all U.S. bike trips are strictly for transport (up from 43 percent in 2001). And the U.S. Census and the League of American Bicyclists confirm that Pittsburgh is among the cities where bike commuting is growing fastest. BIKES notes that Europeans have long valued bike-racing — but doesn’t mention that in cities like Amsterdam, at least onethird of commuters bike it. The exhibit includes a 1915 delivery bike with a built-in basket, but no example of the increasingly popular modern cargo bike — which the current edition of locally based magazine Bicycle Times (available for free at the exhibit) only half-jokingly calls “The New SUV.” The exhibit claims that 19th-century bicyclists were actually the first to lobby for the paved roads later plied by horseless carriages. Why not also highlight the contemporary boom in bike lanes, bike trails and bike-share programs? Dozens of U.S. cities have such programs, with Pittsburgh slated for its own. One BIKES display amusingly explains that bikes are “solar-powered,” because food comes from the sun. But the exhibit never plays up the health or environmental benefits of bicycles. And when an exhibit placard quotes Susan B. Anthony saying, “bicycling … has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world,” you’re left wishing for further insights on bikes and culture. BIKES is fun. But bicycling isn’t just for fun. D RI S C OL L @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013


[ART REVIEW]

SPICE WORLD {BY ROBERT RACZKA} HOW MANY Spice Girls can you name?

You can be sure Terry Boyd can name them all: Scary, Sporty, Baby, Ginger, Posh. That’s because Boyd’s not just a fan, he’s a fan with a collection of Spice Girls memorabilia — lunch box, fanzines, a T-shirt proclaiming “Spice Boy.” Boyd’s also got memories of relatives who liked to dress up in Spice Girls-inspired outfits, with the snapshot evidence on display as part of his exhibit The Spice Girls Live at The Inn. You may recall that the Spice Girls were more than a teen pop group: They were a global marketing phenomenon, starting with their 1996 hit “Wannabe,” and ultimately became the best-selling British group since The Beatles. They meant a lot to a lot of people and sometimes still do, including their status as symbols of “girl power,” which saw conventionally feminine appearance as not being exclusive of social and political empowerment. They were also seen as representatives of a cooler, post-Thatcher Britain, and ranked high as gay icons. Boyd’s 10 paintings here pay tribute to this ’90s sensation. Loosely rendered in oil, there are enough signifiers for fans to recognize the band. In addition to the sparkly tight dresses, animal-print fabrics, big hair and Union Jack — in short, British glamour of a decade-plus ago — the paintings capture something of the feel of the publicity stills upon which they were presumably based, with the five women seen in theatrical poses facing the camera and the audience, as it were.

DRAG HIM TO A SHOW HE'LL ACTUALLY ENJOY!

{PHOTO COURTESY OF NIKKIA MARGARET HALL}

Broadway’s Smash Comedy About the Sexes Written by Rob Becker

Terry Boyd’s “All Is Forgiven”

NOW - OCT 20

a series of sketchy paintings in which, instead of details such as facial features, he’s taken painterly liberties with gestural brushstrokes and expressionistic backgrounds. Consequently, the Spice Girls appear to be a persistent though somewhat faded memory. The one painting in which the Spice Girls don’t appear is “All Is Forgiven,” featuring a fan dressed in a Ginger Spice-inspired Union Jack outfit. I’m not sure what’s being forgiven, but I’m reminded that without fans there can be no celebrities, and without excess there can be no glamour.

FINA L WEEK 7 S!

THE SPICE GIRLS APPEAR TO BE A PERSISTENT THOUGH SOMEWHAT FADED MEMORY.

CLOCabaret.com

Groups 412-325-1582

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

BEER DIST. INC.

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TERRY BOYD: THE SPICE GIRLS LIVE AT THE INN

ock it, If we don’t stfo r you! it r de or we’ll

Boyd’s Spice Girls paintings have antecedents in Warhol’s Marilyns and Lizzes, as well as Elizabeth Peyton’s stylized celeb portraits. As with many younger artists, Pittsburgh-based Boyd finds pop culture a suitable source for extended consideration. In so doing, he has created +

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continues through Sept. 27. The Inn, 5601 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-298-5703 or www.collegeinnprojects.com

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In Cooperation with Tuskegee Airmen Memorial of the Greater Pittsburgh Region, Inc

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Byham Theatre, Pittsburgh

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The Box Office at Theater Square - 665 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online at TrustArts.org +

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FOR THE WEEK OF

09.0509.12.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. Peter Beste, Joe Johnston and Judy Natal. The opening reception is tonight. BO 6-8 p.m. Exhibit continues through Oct. 5. 1015 E. Carson St., South Side. Free. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereye.org

{FILM}

SEPT. 06

Shock Waves at Drive-In Super MonsterRama

{STAGE} Plenty besides the plays is new at Pittsburgh New Works Festival. The long-running fest has a new home, Off the Wall Theater’s cozy Carnegie digs. And catching shows is easier: Now, each of the 12 fully staged one-acts will be performed five times over two weekends. The plays, drawn from scripts submitted locally, nationally and internationally, include comedies and dramas, each produced by a local troupe. Program A, which launches the festival tonight, includes works by local talents Kyle Zelinsky (“All Things to All People”) and David Katzin (Tennessee Williams send-up “Suddenly, Last Supper”) plus “Moon Over Gomorrah,” a comedy by Byron Wilmot, of Rochester, N.Y. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Programs A and B continue through Sept. 15. Festival continues through Sept. 29. 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $12-17 (festival pass: $40). 888-718-4253 or www. pittsburghnewworks.org

+ FRI., SEPT. 06 {ART} However you want to explore it — a color, an ethos, a wad of cash, a landscape feature —

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

GREEN is the title and theme of the new exhibit at Silver Eye Center for Photography. Local photographer Dylan Vitone organized this show featuring work by Pittsburgh-based photographers Sue Abramson, Kim Beck and Ed Panar, plus outof-towners Adam Amengual,

{MUSIC} {PHOTO COURTESY OF KELLY BOGAL}

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All hail Peter Cushing! The seventh annual two-day DriveIn Super Monster-Rama, at Riverside Drive-in, presents eight classic horror and sci-fi films featuring the iconic British actor and Hammer Films stalwart. Tonight, see Brides of Dracula, Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed, Fear in the Night and From Beyond the Grave. On Saturday, catch Madhouse, At the Earth’s Core, Asylum and Shock Waves. Films are screened in 35 mm; the horror begins at dusk and continues into the wee hours. Al Hoff Gates at 7 p.m. Also 7 p.m. Sat., Sept. 7. $10 per person each night (kids under 12 free with adult). Overnight camping available for additional charge. Route 66, North Vandergrift. 724-568-1250 or www.riversidedrivein.com

SEPT. 07

Artist Art rti tist ist of of the Year

A classically trained soprano, J. Rosalynn Smith-Clark returns to her Pittsburgh jazz roots for tonight’s show, Ladies Who Sing With the Band. The program, featuring live accompaniment, honors AfricanAmerican women vocalists who have inspired Smith-Clark, from Billie Holiday and Nancy Wilson to Jill Scott and Lauryn Hill. The performance at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater benefits underserved youth. Smith-Clark founded Opera Noir, a nonprofit that promotes cultural diversity in classical arts and music. OL 8 p.m. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $40 -$75. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

{STAGE}

All My Sons, the 1947 play that made Arthur Miller’s name, opens the season at The REP. Point Park University’s professional theater company stages this family drama centering on a businessman


Image (detail) by Doug Aitken {COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

sp otlight On Sun., Sept. 8, Pittsburgh will be one of just nine cities to host Station to Station, a railroad-enabled night of contemporary art, film and music. This “Nomadic Happening” is the latest from artist Doug Aitken, known for projects like blanketing MOMA with projections. Station to Station offers each city a different line-up of artists. The cross-country train that pulls into Downtown’s Union Station will bear performers including Thurston Moore (with new bandmate John Moloney); Ariel Pink & Haunted Graffiti; experimental punk duo No Age; YOSHIMO (of OOIOO and Boredoms); and the Kansas City Marching Cobras, a marching band that combines African dance with voodoo. There will also be multimedia visual art installations, and screenings of new and classic experimental films by the likes of Bruce Conner, Yayoi Kusama, Kelly Sears, Kenneth Anger, Raymond Pettibon and others. Singular to Pittsburgh will be a presentation by organic-food activist Alice Waters. Outside the station, with its ticketed events, is free programming including artistic interpretations of yurts, those portable huts traditionally used by nomads in Central Asia. There will also be a slow-food-produce yurt and two gallery yurts showcasing locally crafted artisan products. After the concert, the train — which began its journey in the Brooklyn Navy Yard — continues on to Chicago and toward the Pacific. Olivia Lammel 6:30-10:30 p.m. Union Station, 1100 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $25. www.stationtostationpittsburgh.eventbrite.com

who sent faulty airplane parts overseas during the war. The director is frequent REP hand Robert A. Miller (the playwright’s son), and the show stars Philip Winters and Penelope Miller Lindblom. The first performance at the Pittsburgh Playhouse is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Continues

For tonight’s concerts, see CP’s music section. Today’s “innovation” programming at Bakery Square I, meanwhile, includes PIT Talks (like TED talks) by speakers from Carnegie Mellon University, GTECH and more. Innovation Row hosts reps from local universities, government, arts groups, investment

SEPT. 06 Art by Judy Natal

through Sept. 22. 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $15-27 (2 p.m. Sat., Sept. 7, is pay-what-youwill). 412-392-8000 or www. pittsburghplayhouse.com

+ SAT., SEPT. 07 {TALK} Local entrepreneurial nonprofit the Thrill Mill, Inc., presents the inaugural Thrival Music and Innovation Festival.

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{IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

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and entrepreneurial outfits. There’s also a pitch-fest featuring local startups and regional and national investors. Unlike investing, it’s all free (though the concert is ticketed). BO PIT Talks, Innovation Row and Hustle Den, Noon-5 p.m. (free). Music: 5-10 p.m. ($20; Bakery Square II). 6425 Penn Ave., Larimer. www.thrillmill.com

{FOOD} Today, samples will abound

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at the Heinz History Center’s second annual HometownHomegrown food expo, showcasing local culinary trends and food vendors. Participants include the Original Oyster House, the East End Food Co-Op and Uncle Charley’s Sausage, to name a few. Wigle Whiskey will present on the history of spirits in the region. The Center’s kitchen classroom will host cooking demonstrations with WQED’s Rick Sebak and Chris Fennimore and area restaurants. OL 10 a.m.3 p.m. 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. $6-15 (children under 5, free). 412-454-6000 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

{ART} It’s arguably the biggest night of the year at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. The venerable venue opens three shows, including one spotlighting its Artist of the Year, Akiko Kotani (pictured). The longtime Slippery Rock University professor’s work — mostly combining painting, drawing and fiber — has been exhibited internationally. ationally. Meanwhile, Emerging Artist of the Year Lenka Clayton yton continues her edgy conceptual ceptual practice with works including luding “One Brown Shoe,” in which Clayton had 100 married couples each make ke a single brown shoe from m materials found at home, then paired the previously y secret results. And the PCA’s latest Master Visual Artists tistss show honors artists past st age 60. The 10 artists tists include Tadao Arimoto, moto, Tina Williams ams Brewer, Risë isë Nagin and d Mark Perrott. rott. BO 5:309 p.m. 6300 00 Fifth Ave.,, Shadyside. e.

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SEPT. 06

Ladies Who Sing With the Band

$3-4 (children 12 and under: free). 412-361-0873 or www.pca.pittsburgharts.org

are by an international array including award-winning poet Joy Harjo; poets Sridala Swami (India) and Wang Jiaxin (China); and current or former COAP exiled writers-inresidence Israel Centeno, Khet Mar and Yaghoub Yadali. As in years past, this ninth annual concert — held outdoors, on the North Side’s Sampsonia Way — plans more surprises, both literary and humanthemed. BO 7:45 p.m. rights themed Way and Monterey, Sampsonia W Free. 412-323-0278 North Side. Fr www.cityofasylum.org or www.cityof

{MUSIC AND POETRY}

City of Asylum/Pittsburgh’s annual Jazz-Poetry Festival invariably satisfies. This year, musical curator and renowned saxophonist Oliver Lake’s collaborators are acclaimed vocalist Dee Alexander (pictured) and her trio; the readings (some incorporating live music)

WED., ED., SEPT. 11 +W {MAGIC} A birthday-pa birthday-party magician Pittsburgh native Lee inspired Pittsb Terbosic’s career. care Now Terbosic audiences all over himself tricks a Tonight, the magithe country. To cian launches launche a four-day, fiveshow stint sti at Bricolage Theater. Theate The two-act show, show 52 Up Close, is full fu of card tricks and sleight-of-hand. Alongside “pick Alo a card, any card” c audience interaca tion, Terbosic t

SEPT. 07

Jazz-Poetry Festival

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offers a behind-the-scenes peek into the mind of a magician, and weaves a story throughout. OL. 8 p.m. Shows continue through Sept. 14. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $25. 412-2070798 or www.52upclose.com

+ THU., SEPT. 12 {ART}

For the past week, John Zobele has been installing rrrecycle bin at Future Tenant gallery. This exhibition is the first of three in the Trespass Residency and Performance Series. The Point Park student’s work consists of digital art collages: Cultural icons, some moving images and some still photos, flash across the screen and meld together. Tonight’s opening reception features a performance by Bye-Product, Zobele’s electronic-music alias. Rrrcycle bin continues through Saturday; then Trespass welcomes Andrew Huntley, followed by Meagan Reagle, Peter Milo and the 5th Wall Theatre. OL 6-9 p.m. Trespass continues through Sept. 29. 819 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-3257037 or www.futuretenant.org

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Weddings, Nightclubs, Proms, Corporate Events... We’ll do our part to make it perfect.

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER ALL MY SONS. Play by

OFFIC OF THE P IAL DJ ITTS CELEBRAT BURGH ION!

PROUD PARTNER

www.pittsburghdjcompany.com itt b hdj

Arthur Miller. Presented by The REP. Thu-Sun. Thru Sept. 22. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. ART OF MURDER. Comedy about an eccentric but accomplished painter who lays out a plan to murder his art dealer. Thu-Sat. Thru Sept. 14. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. AUDITION FOR MURDER. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Sat, 7 p.m. and Sat., Sept. 21, 7 p.m. Thru Sept. 7. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640. DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN. A comedic & prehistoric look at the battle of the sexes. Wed-Sun. Thru Oct. 20. Pittsburgh CLO, Downtown. 412-456-6666. THE LION KING. Thru Sept. 29. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS FESTIVAL. Premiering All

Things to All People, Suddenly, Last Supper, Moon Over Gomorrah, Unveiled, The Perhaps, The Test. Sept. 5-8. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 412-944-2639. RENT. Presented by SplitStage Productions. Sept. 5-7. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 1-888-718-4253. Fri, Sat. Thru Sept. 7. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. ROMEO & JULIET. Presented by Pittsburgh Shakespeare in the Parks. Sept. 7-8. Allegheny Commons, North Side. 412-404-8531. SISTER’S SUMMER SCHOOL CATECHISM: GOD NEVER TAKES A VACATION. Interactive comedy theater. Thu-Sun. Thru Sept. 15. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489.

COMEDY THU 05 COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu. Thru

Sept. 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

SAT 07

BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. COMEDY SHOWCASE. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE END OF THE WORLD SHOW. Feat. Brett Goodnack, Tessa Karel, Krish Mohan, Jamison Linz, more. Fri, 10 p.m. Thru Sept. 13 Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

BILL BENDEN, JAY BOC, LISA DAPPRICH. Charleroi Midget Football League Funny Fundraiser. 5 p.m. Stockdale VFD, . 724-640-6783. DAVID KAYE, DAVID MICHAEL, TOM MUSIAL. Avonworth Softball Boosters Funny Fundraiser. 7:30 p.m. Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Emsworth. 412-996-7707. THE DEATH SHOW: AN IMPROVISED FUNERAL. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-805-2130. TOM ANZALONE, LIONEL HAMILTON, SHARON DALY. Chartiers-Houston Boys Basketball Boosters Funny Fundraiser. 7 p.m. Chartiers Twp. VFD, Meadow Lands. 724-809-6711.

FRI 06 - SAT 07

TUE 10

THU 05 - SAT 07 TAMMY PESCATELLI. Sept. 5-7 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 06

MISSY MORENO & FRIENDS: I LOVE THE 80S. Sketch comedy performance. Sept. 6-7 Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 11

Off-the-Wall

FREE BEER SAMPLING SAT., SEPT. 7 TH 6-8PM First 100 patrons over 21 will receive a 12oz. sample bottle of Straub Beer

$19.99 /case /case 12oz. 12 2 oz NR’s at MELLINGER BEER on Semple St in Oakland 40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

PUBLICNOTICES EXHIBITS P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

100 Bottles of

STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. An eclectic showroom of fine art sculpture & paintings from emerging artists. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Roads of Arabia: Archaeology & History of the Kingdom of Saudi


VISUAL

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“Braddock House,” by Jill Joyce, from Raw Images at Gallery on 43rd Street

NEW THIS WEEK BOKSENBAUM FINE ARTS GALLERY. 2nd Anniversary Show. Work by S.Boksenbaum, L.Boksenbaum, Danielle Robinson, James Geuntner, & SMSmith. Opens Sept. 7, 6-9 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-3212. BOULEVARD GALLERY. East Suburban Art League Exhibit. Artists’ reception: Sept. 7, 6-9 p.m. Verona. 412-828-1031. CAVO. Translations. Local artist showcase feat. Abby Diamond, Megan Gardner, Shade Ilmaendu, Hizwerks, Kara Zuzu, Nate Taylor, more. Opens Sept. 5, 8:30 p.m. Presented by RAW:natural born artists. Strip District. 724-252-2286. GALLERIE CHIZ. Text meets Texture. Work by Nancy McNary-Smith & David Montano. Opening reception: Sept. 6, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Elementals. Collaborative works by Matt Hunter & Gabrielle Fischer. Opening reception: Sept. 7, 7-11 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Raw Images. Photographs by Jill & Flannery Joyce. Opening reception: Sept. 6, 7-10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Human, Nature. Performance art installation by Sarah Jane Sindler. One night only, Sept. 6, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-361-2262. MENDELSON GALLERY. This Way to the Egress. Paintings by Ben Matthews. Opening reception: Sept. 6, 6-9 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-8664.

MINE FACTORY. Once Is Never Enough. Group show by the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Curated by Vicky A. Clark. Opening reception: Sept. 7, 6-9 p.m. & by appointment. Homewood. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Eric White: Monoprints. Opening reception: Sept. 6, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Gestures: The Fine Art of Non-Verbal Communication. Work by Kyle Anthony Adams, Ren Burke, Mark Dobosh, Anne Michelle Lyons, Katie Lynn Moran, more. Opening reception: Sept. 6, 6-11 p.m. Garfield. 412-328-4737. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year: Akiko Kotani. Emerging Artist of the Year: Lenka Clayton. Master Visual Artists: Preserving the Legacy. Work by Tadao Arimoto, Gary Jurysta, Contance Merriman, Risë Nagin, Chuck Olson, Marjorie F. Shipe, Paul Zelevansky, more. Opening reception: Sept. 7, 5:30-9 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. GREEN. Photographs by Sue Abramson, Adam Amengual, Kim Beck, Peter Beste, Joe Johnson, Judy Natal, & Ed Panar. Opening reception: Sept. 6, 6-8 p.m. South Side. 412-431-1810. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Whimsical Gardens. Acrylic Paintings by Maura Taylor. Opens Sep. 1, reception Sep. 7, 6:30-9:30 p.m. & by appointment. Friendship. 412-953-2599.

ONGOING ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. All Through the Night. LGBQT photography by Caldwell Linker. S/HE IS HER/E. Feat. over 100 works by Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, dating from the mid 1970s to the present. The Patron Saint of White Guys That Went Tribal & Other Works. Work by Nick Bubash. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. The Art of Elizabeth Catlett from the Collection of Samella Lewis. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BE GALLERIES. Miniatures. Work by Caitlyn Burroughs. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOXHEART GALLERY. Julia. Paintings by Sonja Sweterlitsch. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Beauty at the Edge of the Unreal. Pop art by Stephane Pedno. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. EASTSIDE GALLERY. Donna Hollen Bolmgren. An estate sale of the artist’s works. Benefits the Master Visual CONTINUES ON PG. 42

Arabia. Archaeological materials KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. exploring the cultural history Tours of a restored 19th-century, of the Arabian Peninsula. middle-class home. Oakmont. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, 412-826-9295. Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. MARIDON MUSEUM. Oakland. 412-622-3131. Collection includes jade and CARNEGIE SCIENCE ivory statues from China CENTER. BIKES: Science on and Japan, as well as Meissen Two Wheels. Feat. hands-on porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. activities, demonstrations & MCGINLEY HOUSE & a collection of historic, rare, MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. & peculiar bicycles. Ongoing: Historic homes open for tours, Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), lectures and more. Monroeville. Miniature Railroad and 412-373-7794. Village, USS Requin submarine, NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to and more. North Side. more than 600 birds from over 412-237-3400. 200 species. With classes, lectures, CARRIE FURNACE. Built demos and more. North Side. in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 412-323-7235. are extremely rare examples NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 of pre World War II ironrooms helping to tell the story making technology. Rankin. of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. 412-464-4020 x.21. University of Pittsburgh. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL Oakland. 412-624-6000. HISTORY. Explore the OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer complex interplay between church features 1823 pipe culture, nature and organ, Revolutionary biotechnology. Open War graves. Scott. Fridays 5-8, Saturdays 412-851-9212. 12-4 & Sundays OLIVER MILLER 12-4. Garfield. HOMESTEAD. 412-223-7698. This pioneer/ www. per pa COMPASS INN. Demos Whiskey Rebellion pghcitym o .c and tours with costumed site features log guides featuring this house, blacksmith shop restored stagecoach stop. & gardens. South Park. Ligonier. 724-238-4983. 412-835-1554. CONNEY M. KIMBO PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY GALLERY. University of MUSEUM. Trolley rides and Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: exhibits. Includes displays, Memorabilia & Awards from walking tours, gift shop, the International Hall of Fame. picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Oakland. 412-648-7446. Washington. 724-228-9256. DEPRECIATION LANDS PHIPPS CONSERVATORY MUSEUM. Small living & BOTANICAL GARDEN. history museum celebrating the Summer Flower Show. Glass settlement and history of the art surrounded by colorful Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. blooms. Feat. work by 412-486-0563. Daviea Davis, Jason Forck, FALLINGWATER. Tour the Steven Sadvary, Lisa Platt, famed Frank Lloyd Wright more. 14 indoor rooms & 3 house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. outdoor gardens feature FIRST PRESBYTERIAN exotic plants and floral displays CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany from around the world. stained-glass windows. Oakland. 412-622-6914. Downtown. 412-471-3436. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball FORT PITT MUSEUM. museum & players club. West Unconquered: History Meets View. 412-931-4425. Hollywood at Fort Pitt. PITTSBURGH GLASS Original movie props, CENTER. Lifeforms. Exhibition photographs, & costumes of natural imagery in alongside 18th century lampworked glass. Curated by artifacts & documents, Robert Mickelsen. Friendship. comparing & contrasting 412-365-2145. historical events w/ Hollywood PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG depictions. Reconstructed fort AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 houses museum of Pittsburgh animals, including many history circa French & Indian endangered species. Highland War and American Revolution. Park. 412-665-3639. Downtown. 412-281-9285. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL A Reverence for Life. Photos CENTER. Ongoing: tours of and artifacts of her life & work. Clayton, the Frick estate, with Springdale. 724-274-5459. classes, car & carriage museum. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour on the Homestead Mill. this Tudor mansion and Steel industry and community stable complex, and enjoy hikes artifacts from 1881-1986. and outdoor activities in the Homestead. 412-464-4020. surrounding park. Allison Park. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ 412-767-9200. HISTORY CENTER. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the Pennsylvania’s Civil War. other Frank Lloyd Wright house. In-depth look at Pennsylvania’s Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. significant contributions during

FULL LIST E N O LIN

the Civil War feat. artifacts, military encampments, life-like museum figures, more. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. Scottdale. 724-887-7910.

FESTIVALS FRI 06 - SUN 08 PITTSBURGH IRISH FESTIVAL. Irish cuisine, music, marketplace, Gaelic Mass, more. Sept. 6-8 Riverplex at Sandcastle, West Homestead. 412-422-1113.

SAT 07 - SUN 08 PITTSBURGH RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL. Medieval entertainment, children’s activities, artisan market, more. Southeast of Pittsburgh off I-70, exit 51A, Route 31. Sat, Sun. Thru Sept. 29 724-872-1670. SAXONBURG FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS. Arts & crafts, live music, 5K race, car show, more. Sept. 7-8 Roebling Park, Saxonburg.

DANCE FRI 06

FRESH WORKS. Feat. choreographer Jasmine Hearn & filmmaker Alisha Wormsley. 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000.

FUNDRAISERS SAT 07 30TH ANNUAL FAMILY HOUSE POLO MATCH. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-647-0389. GLADIATOR ROCK’N RUN. Extreme obstacle course CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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benefiting Talk About Curing Autism. gladiatorrocknrun.com/ event_sept_7.html 8:30 a.m. Steel City Raceway, Export. 304-284-0084. ROARING 20S PARTY. Themed party benefiting the Washington County Historical Society. 7 p.m. LeMoyne House, Washington. 724-225-6740.

SUN 08 3RD ANNUAL SPONSOR THE TROOPS POKER RUN. 10 a.m. Runt’s Roadhouse, Sarver. 724-493-1917. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. BRUNCH & BAROQUE. Brunch, live music, more. Benefits Quantum Theatre & Chatham Baroque’s 25th anniversary collaboration. 5 Shadyside Lane, Shadyside. quantumtheatre.com/support/ galas.html 12:30-3 p.m. 412-362-1713.

POLITICS WED 11 CONVERSATION SALON. Large Print room. Second Wed of every month. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

3 NIGHTS ONLY!

LITERARY THU 05

ALLISON AMEND. Author of A Nearly Perfect Copy. 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafter happyhour.wordpress.com Third and First Thu of every month The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323.

FRI 06 BRIDGES & RIVER SHORES FREE WALKING TOUR. Fri. Thru Sept. 27 Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel, Downtown. 412-471-5808.

SAT 07 THE PEOPLE’S UNIVERSITY: AN INTRODUCTION TO INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM. 3-5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. WRITERS IN THE GARDENS. Progressive readings in private North Side gardens feat. Joan E. Bauer, Robin Clarke, Vanessa German, Peter Trachtenberg, more. Reservations at cityof asylumpittsburgh.org 3:30 p.m.

MON 09

XXX Star & AVN Best New Starlet 2013

SEPT. 5-7 THURSDAY thru SATURDAY E AMATEUREPNTIT. 4 WED, S

N EX T W EE K : The College Co-ed of XXX Porn:

Tasha Reign SEPT. 12-14 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Mon-Sat: Noon-2am, Sun: 3pm-2am

12 STEPS TO PEACE: CREATIVITY IN RECOVERY FROM ANXIETY. Writing & discussion group. Mon, 6-7 p.m. Thru Nov. 25 Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-337-4976.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

Artists exhibition. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. EVOLVER TATTOO ARTS. Escape. Work by Delilah Spring, Laura Lee Burkhardt, Keith Caves, John Faust Jr., Emile Goss, & Sema Graham. South Side. 412-481-1004. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pigment & Silver. Photography by Ellen Bjerklie-Hanna, A. Jason Coleman, Danielle Goshay, Brenda Roger, & Cynthia Zordich. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. The Clayton Days, Revisited: A Project by Vik Muniz. Feat. his 65-photo collection. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. RetroFRESH. Contemporary paintings by James Kennedy, Claire Hardy, Donald Deskey, Alexander Minewski, Louise Evans-Scott, Vladimir Naiditch, & Henri de Waroquier. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772.

HILLMAN CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS. Low Tides & Bucolic Daze. Hand painted photography by Rosemary Pipitone. Fox Chapel. 412-968-3045. THE INN. The Spice Girls: Live at the Inn. Work by Terry Boyd. Lawrenceville. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Automata, a Kinetic Art Show. Work by Zac Coffin, Nick Romero, Alberto Almareza, Katy Dement, T.R. Reed, Jeannie Holland, Sylvia Cross, more. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Perspective 2013: A Photography Exhibition. Robinson. 412-788-0816. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Glassweekend ‘13. Work by Rhoda Baer, John de Wit, Jon Goldberg, Mikyoung Jung, Catherine Labonte, Matthew Perez, Erica Rosenfeld, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. Society of Sculptors Annual Exhibition. Juried by Carolina LoyolaGarcia. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Garfield.

412-441-6147-ext.-7. PENN STATE UNIVERSITY GALLERY. Retrospective. Work by Eloise Piper. New Kensington. 724-334-6032. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Hand Tinted Vintage Photographs. Hand tinted black & white photographs on tin, paper & glass. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Art Interprets Alzheimer’s. Work by George Roby & Herbert Ascherman, Jr. Downtown. 412-261-7003. TOUCHSTONE CENTER FOR CRAFTS. On Uneven Ground. Abstract Mosaics by Rachel Sager Lynch. Patrick Daugherty: Influenced by the Right People™. Oil paintings. Farmington. 724-329-1370. TRUNDLE MANOR. The Insidious Collection. Paintings by Jamie Apgar. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WILDCARD. Thrifted. Found vintage art show, benefiting the MGR-Youth Empowerment Program. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. data.tron. Installation by Ryoji Ikeda. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

TUE 10 CIVIL WAR PITTSBURGH: FORGE OF THE NATION. Discussion & book signing w/ journalist Len Barcousky. 7:30 p.m. Harmony Museum, Harmony. 724-452-7341. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

WED 11 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116.

KIDSTUFF THU 05 - WED 11

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 07 135 9th Street 412-281-7703 www.blushexotic.com DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

VISUAL ART

LET’S MOVE FAMILY FUN DAY. Croquet, sack races, ring toss, hoop rolling, hopscotch, more. Presented by UPMC Health Plan. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Frick Art &

Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600.

SAT 07 - SUN 08

LITTLE MERMAID. Original, interactive, musical theater production. Sat, Sun. Thru Oct. 6 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201.

SUN 08

SNOWBALL DAY. Snow-themed activities. 9-11 a.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-1637.

WED 11

LEARNING PARTIES. Ages 3-14. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-913-9709.

OUTSIDE SAT 07 CHARLEROI TO MONONGAHELA PADDLE. Presented by the River Town Program. 8:15 a.m. Monongahela Aquatorium, Monongahela. 412-481-9400.

MINGO CREEK PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. 7:30 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory, Finleyville. 724-348-6150.

SAT 07 - SUN 08 KAYAKING DISCOVERY COURSE. Presented by L.L.Bean. Sat, Sun, 10-11:30 a.m. Thru Oct. 13 North Park, Allison Park. 412-318-1200.

TUE 10

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 11 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 05 BUYING & SELLING ONLINE: EBAY & ETSY BASICS. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library,

Downtown. 412-281-7141. EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. 7424 Washington St., Swissvale. First and Third Thu of every month, 7 p.m. 412-271-7660. GLOBALPITTSBURGH FIRST THURSDAYS. International community networking event. 5-8 p.m. Luke Wholey’s Wild Alaskan Grille, Strip District. 412-392-4513. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512.


WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Storytelling Barbeque: One

BLACK & GOLD

Dream, Our Stories, at the Union Project, Highland Park CRITIC: Kristen Priestley, 44,

FRI 06 KNOW THE SHOW BEFORE YOU GO: DISNEY’S THE LION KING. Pre-performance information session w/ theater critic, Chris Rawson. 6:30 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. MERIDIAN STATION CAR CRUISE. 4-8 p.m. Meridian Station, Butler. 724-482-4436. OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING W/ TIME CAPSULE CATALOGUERS. Take a first look inside one of Warhol’s unopened boxes. 7 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. PARTY IN THE TROPICS. Cocktails, dancing, more. 7-11 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. RAINBOW RISING COFFEE HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and friends. Music, games, movies, entertainment and more. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Smithton. First Fri of every month 724-872-5056. REPRESENTING, THEORIZING & RECONFIGURING THE CONCEPT OF TRANSGENERATIONAL HAUNTING IN ORDER TO FACILITATE HEALING. Discussion w/ Dr. Maurice Apprey. College Hall. 6:30 p.m. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-661-4224.

S U N D AY S

a travel agent from Brighton Heights WHEN: Wed.,

Aug. 28

WATCH THIS SUNDAY’S 1 PM GAME

It was a storytelling event to commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King’s speech 50 years ago today. There was a free meal, which was a wonderful way for the community to come together. After that, there were some powerful stories that were related to some of the issues that Dr. King spoke about. They were personal stories about different events in people’s lives that related to the theme of race relations. There were all different types of stories, but they all kind of related to someone’s personal experience with getting along with others. It seemed just like a great community of people — all different ages, people from different walks of life — that just came together for the common interest of finding out more. It was a great thing to do to hear from some different people that I maybe [otherwise] would not have heard their stories.

and get rid of that Hangover with FREE Spicy Mac ‘n Cheese & Ham Samiches! $5 Bloody Mary Pitchers $2.50 Miller Lite

Lets Go Stillers!!!

B Y O L IV IA L AMME L

140 S. 18TH STREET • SOUTH SIDE

frame on display. 12-2 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. PITT-GREENSBURG OPEN HOUSE. 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg. 724-836-9880. PITTSBURGH NORML RISE UP & RALLY. Guest speakers, crafts, live music, more. Presented by Pittsburgh’s National Organization for Reforming Marijuana Laws. 15TH ANNUAL BOCCE 3-6 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. TOURNAMENT. Feat. teams 412-454-5582. from all over Butler Co. PRESERVING THE HARVEST: 9 a.m. Alameda Park, Butler. CANNING, DRYING & 724-283-6353. FREEZING BASICS. 2:30 p.m. HOMETOWN-HOMEGROWN. Carnegie Library, Downtown. Food expo feat. 50 local 412-281-7141. vendors. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. SATURDAY NIGHT Senator John Heinz SALSA CRAZE. Free History Center, Strip lessons, followed by District. 412-454-6000. dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. INCLINE HAUNTED . w w w La Cucina Flegrea, WALKING TOUR. aper p ty ci h g p Downtown. Begins at the bottom .com 412-708-8844. of the Monongahela SCOTTISH COUNTRY Incline. Sat. Thru Oct. 26 DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., 412-302-5223. social dancing follows. No partner KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, Korean grammar & basic 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Carnegie Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SEPARATION ANXIETY KOREAN II. For those who already & DOG-DOG PLAY SEMINAR. have a basic understanding w/ canine behaviorist Nicole of Korean & are interested in Wilde. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. American increasing proficiency. Sat Legion Langley Post 496, Carnegie Library, Oakland. Sheraden. 412-780-4983. 412-622-3151. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. LOVE BIKES. Nic Brungo will Free Scrabble games, all levels. discuss the natural strength Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon & flexibility of bamboo Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. as a building material w/ a 412-531-1912. partially-built bamboo bike

SAT 07

FULL LIST ONLINE

SOUTH SIDE--FROM RIVER TO RAIL TOUR. Begins at 18th St. at the Monongahela River. 2-3:30 p.m. 412-471-5808. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target - East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SUMMER SATURDAY AT PROVIDENCE PLANTATION. 18th century living history program feat. fireside cooking, spinning wool, harvesting gardens, more. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Providence Plantation, Evans City. 724-538-8818. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WINE TIME AT THE COLONY. Wine tasting, artisan market, more. 12-6 p.m. Penn’s Colony, Saxonburg. 724-352-9922.

412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

SUN 08 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CANONSBURG SUNDAY CAR CRUISE. Sun, 1-5 p.m. Thru Sept. 22 The Handle Bar & Grille, Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

make a real connection

MURAL OPENING. Designed & painted by 10 local high school students. 5-7 p.m. Sylvania Natives, Squirrel Hill. 412-567-8119. UKULELE GROUP JAM SESSION. 5 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. WISHCRAFT: HOW TO GET WHAT YOU REALLY WANT. Support group for life goals. Sun, 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-371-1707.

Call Livelinks. The hottest place to meet the coolest people.

MON 09

Try it Free!

412.566.1861 Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 Ahora en Español 18+

www.livelinks.com

BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry, North Park. THE DEN. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SELF-GUIDED OLD ALLEGHENY COUNTY JAIL MUSEUM TOUR. Mon, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Thru Sept. 30 Old Allegheny County Jail Museum, Downtown. 412-471-5808. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

FOOTBALL SEASON IS HERE! COME WATCH THE BIG GAMES!

DISCOUNT AT DOOR WITH GAME TICKET!

FREE DRINKS! FREE LIMO PICKUP TO THE CLUB! CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM 18 AND OVER

824 Island Ave. McKees Rocks 44

(412) 771-8872

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

cluberoticapittsburgh.com

[PERFORMANCE ART]

TUE 10 THE ART OF COMEDY SCREENWRITING. Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Sept. 24 3rd Street Gallery, Carnegie. 412-276-5233. ATTACK THEATRE’S SEASON KICKOFF PARTY. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Attack Theatre Spring Way Studio, Strip District. 412-281-3305. CHRIS MAYHEW, MIKE STEIDLEY. Cyclocross & balancing demos. 12 & 5 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. PITTSBURGH MUSIC ALLIANCE SEASON LAUNCH PARTY. Hors d’oeuvres, live music, more. 5:30-7 p.m. Fairmont Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-773-8800. REMEMBERING WALTER FORWARD. Speaker: Dr. Miles S. Richards, historian. Presented by the Squirrel Hill Historical Society. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707.

WED 11

Sarah Jane Sindler specializes in designing and

52 UP CLOSE. Feat. magician Lee sculpting jewelry. But this Friday, the ColoradoTerbosic. Sept. 11-14 Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999. born artist brings something slightly less BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT tangible to the Unblurred Gallery Crawl. With GROUP. For Widows/Widowers over 50. Second and Fourth , a one-night-only Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. performance installation, Sindler — with the help St. Sebastian Church, Ross. 412-366-1300. of 12 mannequins — explores human identity COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE. and what she describes as “the societal castes Seeking new players, no experience necessary. Wednesdays, high-end fashion places on us in the 21st Squirrel Hill. 412-422-7878. century.” 7 p.m. Fri., Sept. 6. Garfield Artworks, CREATIVE CONNECTIONS. For Seniors only. Wed, 2 p.m. Thru 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield. Call 412-361-2262 Sept. 25 Mount Lebanon Public or visit www.reldart.com. Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, PEARLS OF WISDOM: A GEYER PERFORMING ARTS Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. WOMAN’S GUIDE TO CENTER. Auditions for The ENGLISH CONVERSATION SURVIVING & THRIVING Nutcracker. Sept. 14. Basic (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount IN CORPORATE AMERICA. movement audition, bring Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Presented by MBA Women ballet, jazz, & pointe shoes if Lebanon. 412-531-1912. International. 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh experienced. Also seeking FALL & WINTER HARVEST: Grille, Downtown. 412-897-4713. adults for opening party scene. GROWING YOUR VEGGIES THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. Call for appointment. Darlynn’s YEAR ROUND. Presented A meeting of jugglers & spinners. School of Dance, Mt. Pleasant. by Bob Madden, Garden All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. 724-887-0887. Dreams Urban Farm & Nursery. Union Project, Highland Park. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING Call to reserve a spot. 6:30 p.m. 412-363-4550. ARTS CENTER DANCE East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. VIBURNUMS. Garden workshop. COMPANY. Auditions for The 412-242-3598. 7-9 p.m. and Sat., Nutcracker. Sept. 8. Dancers ages FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Sept. 14, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. 8-18, combinations in ballet & Farmers’ market. Wed, Phipps Garden pointe. centerauditions.org/ 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Center, Shadyside. index.php/dance-company/theOct. 30 Phipps 412-441-4442 x 3925. nutcracker. Auditions for Peter & Conservatory & www. per WEST COAST SWING the Wolf. Sept. 8. Dancers ages a p Botanical Garden, pghcitym WEDNESDAYS. 12-18, combinations in ballet & .co Oakland. 412-622-6914. Swing dance lessons. pointe. centerauditions.org/ FITNESS Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, index.php/dance-company/ CONSULTATIONS. South Side. 916-287-1373. peter-and-the-wolf Lincoln Park Wed RDL Fitness, McCandless. WINE TOUR DE FRANCE. Performing Arts Center, Midland. 412-407-0145. Wed. Thru Sept. 18 724-259-6443. INTRODUCTORY LEVEL Dreadnought Wines, Strip District. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING SCOTTISH GAELIC CLASS. 412-391-1709. ARTS CENTER PROFESSIONAL Wed. Thru Nov. 6 Bottlebrush COMPANY. Auditions for Gallery & Shop, Harmony. White Christmas. Sept. 21-22. 724-452-0539. CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY’S Male/Female dancers/singers LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! DEPT. OF THEATRE & & a female age 10-12, tap/jazz Practice conversational English. DANCE, MON VALLEY combinations & 32 bars of a Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, DANCE COUNCIL. Auditions Broadway-style song. Bring sheet Oakland. 412-622-3151. for Miracle on 34th St. Sept. 7. music, accompanist provided. OBSCURE GAMES/PUB GAME Male/female singers & dancers, centerauditions.org/index.php/ NIGHT. Wed, 7 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 age 6-adult. California University, professional-company/ Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. California. 724-938-4220. 412-681-4318. white-christmas Lincoln Park

Human, Nature

FULL LIST ONLINE

AUDITIONS


Performing Arts Center, Midland. 724-259-6443. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. Auditions for The Westing Game. Seeking 3 teenage boys (one Asian), 1 40-something African-American woman, 1 20-something male. Also, men & women ages 40-60. Call for appointment. McKeesport. 412-673-1100. PITTSBURGH OPERA. Auditions for extras in performance of Aida. Sept. 7. Men age 18+, non-singing roles. Call for appointment. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-251-7224. PRIME STAGE. Auditions for Turn of the Screw. Sep. 7-8. Seeking adult non-equity actors for the roles. SAG-AFTRA actors are also encouraged to audition. Prepare a 2-minute dramatic monologue using a British dialect. To schedule a time & for more information visit www.primestage.com. The Oakland School, Oakland. THE THEATRE FACTORY. Auditions for Margaret Edson’s Wit. Sept. 14. Women age 20-80/men age 20-60s, equity & non-equity, 2-min. monologue & cold readings. thetheatrefactory. com Trafford. 724-454-7193. THE WEST VIRGINIA BLUES SOCIETY. Call for bands for the 7th Annual Appalachian Blues Competition in Huntington, WV. Information, application & rules available at www.wvbluessociety.org.

www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. PITTSBURGH SOCIETY OF ARTISTS NEW MEMBERS SCREENING. Screening Sept. 29. Bring five works of art in the same medium, 2D or 3D. Drop off 11 a.m.-2 p.m., pick up 4-6 p.m. aapgh.org Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-1370.

SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking submissions for Fellowship 14. Submit a 1-page Artist’s Statement in PDF format, a biography/CV in PDF format, & work sample to silvereye. org/f14-submit. Email jzipay@ silvereye.org for information. 412-431-1810. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

LAWRENCEVILLE TREE CARE DAY

Because a neighborhood can never have too many healthy trees, Tree Pittsburgh and Lawrenceville United are joining forces for Lawrenceville Tree Care Day, on Sat., Sept. 28. Volunteers are needed between 9 a.m. and noon to help “spruce” up and re-mulch tree pits. Supplies and snacks will be provided. Call 412-802-7220 or visit www.lunited.org.

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Seeking young composers to submit new works for annual Reading Session. pso.culturaldistrict.org/ event/6236/10th-annualreading-session 412-392-4828. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail. com Ongoing.

individual artists & artist groups for month-long exhibitions in a new transitional gallery measuring. Artists will be responsible for all aspects of their exhibition. Send images & a brief introduction to the work to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

SUBMISSIONS BLAST FURNACE. Seeking submissions for Volume 3, Issue 3. Theme is “prized possessions,” tangible or otherwise. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems. www.blastfurnace.submittable. com/Submit THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. INSISTENT LIGHT POETRY COMPETITION. Submit 2 of your best poems, no themes or restrictions. cathleenbailey. blogspot.com/2013/08/insistentlight-first-annual-poetry.html KELLY STRAYHORN THEATER. Accepting applications for the KST Photography Fellowship. Submit resume, cover letter, & link to online portfolio to david@kelly-strayhorn.org. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit

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BLACK & GOLD HEADQUARTERS ALL GAMES

$10 BUCKETS OF BEER (mix and match)

SIX PACKS TO-GO for the walk to the stadium

HAPPY HOUR MON-FRI 5-7PM

WEDNESDAYS FREE POOL 6-10PM

709 EAST ST. (412) 979-5075 CORNER OF E. OHIO / EAST ST.

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You can never have too much BOB!

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Settle this for us: Which is the bigger ask — a one-time, once-in-a-lifetime threesome or regular (and pretty damn elaborate) bondage sessions? RULING ON PRIVATE ENQUIRY REQUIRED

Let me guess: Your partner is into bondage, and you’re not. But you’ve been tying him/her/ some-other-point-along-the-gender-spectrum up for months, years or decades … and the partner regards your request for a once-in-alifetime threesome as too much to ask. Regular and intense bondage sessions are the bigger ask in terms of time and effort — particularly if I guessed wrong, ROPER, and you’re the person who’s getting tied up even though bondage isn’t your thing. But a threesome, even just one, is going to be a bigger ask emotionally for most people. While the former requires patience and endurance, the latter requires revisiting feelings about monogamy, sharing your partner with another person, etc. I am a hetero male. I had a female FWB for several months. She started dating a new guy, and he asked that she stop talking to me. That seems like a red flag. If he’d asked that we stop having sex, that would be one thing, but asking her to end the friendship seems like a warning sign of a controller. Should I say anything to her?

Log on to www.Q929FM.com and click the “listen live” link!

FIXING TO EXPLODE

Shakespeare diagnosed your problem centuries ago: Boozing “provokes the desire, but it takes away the performance.” As for “bad mama jama,” I wasn’t familiar with the expression — first guess: a Martin Lawrence comedy about a male FBI agent who goes undercover as the first black woman to edit the Journal of the American Medical Association — but the Google tells me it’s a song about something or other.

Thought experiment: Let’s pretend your girlfriend is a lesbian. (Why not? Your girlfriend does.) What kind of a lesbian GF is she? The kind who doesn’t fuck you much, sucks in bed on those rare occasions when she does fuck you, and manipulates you to keep you from calling her on her bullshit. Your GF — lesbian or not — is selfish and making you miserable. End it.

My boyfriend and I have been having problems. I am too critical, and he has “erectile dysfunction,” a.k.a. issues getting and staying hard. But I recently discovered that he can get hard in an instant by licking my feet or using them to masturbate! This is great! I want to explore this with him, but I can’t find enough information on the Internet on how to support him. Any advice? Your boyfriend doesn’t have “erectile dysfunc-

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

You could’ve saved face by saying something like: “Yeah, I was quite the pervert back then, but weren’t we all at that age?” Your parents, your new wife, et al. would’ve imagined your brother doing something much worse than wearing women’s clothes. But it’s too late for that comeback. My advice now: Pick a special, solemn occasion — your brother’s anniversary party, midnight mass, his son’s graduation — and show up in full fuckin’ drag.

WHERE DID O GO?

TRULY OVER EROTIC SLUMP

www.Q929FM.com

DEVASTATED IN DENVER

Hetero female. I cannot orgasm when I have been drinking. Isn’t that the opposite problem of most women? Also, what is a bad mama jama?

Isolating a partner from family and friends is a classic abuser move — but asking a girl you’ve just started dating to cut off a friend she’s been fucking for months isn’t necessarily an abuser move. If he’s asking her to cut off non-FWB friends and family members in addition to you, you should speak to her. But if it’s only you, then it’s just garden-variety insecurity on the new BF’s part. Let your friend know that you hope you can re-establish your friendship once her new BF is feeling more secure, or is out of the picture.

Listen to Q92.9 LIVE online!

At my 50th birthday party, my older brother announced to everyone — including my new wife, our parents and his teenage son — that I used to wear women’s clothes. I was humiliated and deeply hurt. I wanted to punch him and tell all his secrets. But I didn’t. Now I am planning to humiliate him on a special occasion of his. Childish, but what else can I do to save face?

I’m a 33-year-old lesbian. A year ago, my partner and I split up for five months. During that time, I dated a girl while my partner engaged in multiple sexual relationships — all with men. We ended up getting back together. One problem keeps me from moving on: I am the only woman my partner has been with, and I can’t stop thinking about the fact that she spent so much “quality time” with so many men. I can’t help but wonder if she’s bi or straight! We are a year into our “new” relationship and we never have sex. I initiated sex a week ago — the first time we’ve had sex in four months! — and she came, I didn’t, and she didn’t care. Any time I try to talk about it, she gets defensive and tells me that she is attracted to me and doesn’t like sex with guys. What do I do?

CAN’T UNDERSTAND LOVER’S LOSS

Listen to Q92.9 LIVE on your computer!

tion,” TOES. Like millions of men presumed to have ED, he simply wasn’t doing the things that turn him on. Now that he is, he doesn’t have any issues getting and staying hard. And you don’t need anything off the Internet. You already have everything you need to support him: those lovely feet of yours and your supportive, sex-positive attitude. Have fun.

I’m a submissive gay boy into puppy play. And I have a huge crush on a certain sex-advice columnist and his crazyhot husband. How do I get to be their owned puppy? BOY AFTER REAL KINKS

Good news, BARK! Terry says we can get a puppy! But he says we’ll have to get our puppy fixed. That’s a big ask, I realize, but we wanna be responsible dog-owners. This week on the Savage Lovecast, Dan speaks with porn-industry director, performer and producer Joanna Angel at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE


Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

09.04-09.11

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In his “Song of the Open Road,” Walt Whitman wrote some lyrics that I hope will provide you with just the right spark. Even if you’re not embarking on a literal journey along a big wide highway, my guess is that you are at least going to do the metaphorical equivalent. “Henceforth I ask not good fortune — I myself am good fortune,” said Uncle Walt. “Henceforth I whimper no more, postpone no more, need nothing. Strong and content, I travel the open road.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Mystical poet St. John of the Cross (1542-91) was one of Spain’s greatest writers. But not all of his work came easily. When he was 35, a rival religious group imprisoned him for his mildly heretical ideas. He spent the next nine months in a 10-by-6-foot jail cell, where he was starved, beaten and tortured. It was there that he composed his most renowned poem, “Spiritual Canticle.” Does that provide you with any inspiration, Libra? I’ll make a wild guess and speculate that maybe you’re in a tough situation yourself right now. It’s not even one percent as tough as St. John’s, though. If he could squeeze some brilliance out of his predicament, you can, too.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The American naturalist John Burroughs (1837-1921) traveled widely and wrote 23 books. “I still find each day too short for all the thoughts I want to think,” he testified, “all the walks I want to take, all the books I want to read and all the friends I want to see.” Let’s make that longing for abundance serve as your ral-

lying cry during the next two weeks, Scorpio. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you have a cosmic mandate to push to the limits — and sometimes beyond — as you satisfy your quest to be, see and do everything you love to be, see and do.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Punk icon Henry Rollins did an interview with Marilyn Manson, rock ’n’ roll’s master of the grotesque. It’s on YouTube. The comments section beneath the video are rife with spite and bile directed toward Manson, driving one fan to defend her hero. “I love Marilyn Manson so much that I could puke rainbows,” she testified. I think you will need to tap into that kind of love in the coming days, Sagittarius: fierce, intense and devotional, and yet also playful, funny and exhilarating. You don’t necessarily have to puke rainbows, however. Maybe you could merely spit them.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): If you want to know a secret, I talk less crazy to you Capricorns than I do to the other signs. I tone down

my wild-eyed, goddess-drunk shape-shifting a bit. I rarely exhort you to don an animal costume and dance with the fairy folk in the woods, and I think the last time I suggested that you fall in love with an alien, angel or deity was … never. So what’s my problem? Don’t you feel taboo urges and illicit impulses now and then? Isn’t it true that like everyone else, you periodically need to slip away from your habitual grooves and tamper with the conventional wisdom? Of course you do. Which is why I hereby repeal my excessive caution. Get out there, Capricorn, and be as uninhibited as you dare.

feelings you have as you eat especially delectable food. It’s derived, of course, from the word “orgasm.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, you are in an excellent position to have a number of orgasmic-like breakthroughs in the coming week. Orgasnoms are certainly among them, but also orgasaurals, orgasights and orgasversations — in other words, deep thrills resulting from blissful sounds, rapturous visions and exciting conversations. I won’t be surprised if you also experience several other kinds of beautiful delirium.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

Germany’s Ostwall Museum displayed a conceptual installation by the artist Martin Kippenberger. Valued at $1.1 million, it was called “When It Starts Dripping From the Ceiling.” Part of it was composed of a rubber tub that was painted to appear as if it had once held dirty rainwater. One night while the museum was closed, a new janitor came in to tidy up the premises. While performing her tasks, she scrubbed the rubber tub until it was “clean,” thereby damaging the art. Let this be a cautionary tale, Aquarius. It’s important for you to appreciate and learn from the messy stuff in your life — even admire its artistry — and not just assume it all needs to be scoured and disinfected.

If you were about to run in a long-distance race, you wouldn’t eat a dozen doughnuts. Right? If you were planning to leave your native land and spend a year living in Ethiopia, you wouldn’t immerse yourself in learning how to speak Chinese in the month before you departed. Right? In that spirit, I hope you’ll be smart about the preparations you make in the coming weeks. This will be a time to prime yourself for the adventures in selfexpression that will bloom in late September and the month of October. What is it you want to create at that time? What would you like to show the world about yourself?

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

   

  

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you. wyep.org

In her novel White Oleander, Janet Fitch suggests that beauty is something to be used, “like a hammer or a key.” That’s your assignment, Pisces. Find practical ways to make your beauty work for you. For example, invoke it to help you win friends and influence people. Put it into action to drum up new opportunities and hunt down provocative invitations. And don’t tell me you possess insufficient beauty to accomplish these things. I guarantee you that you have more than enough. To understand why I’m so sure, you may have to shed some ugly definitions of beauty you’ve unconsciously absorbed from our warped culture.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “No regrets? Really?” asks author Richard Power. “I have regrets. They are sacred to me. They inform my character. They bear witness to my evolution. Glimpses of lost love and treasure are held inside of them; like small beautiful creatures suspended in amber.” I think you can see where this horoscope is going, Aries. I’m going to suggest you do what Powers advises: “Do not avoid your regrets. Embrace them. Listen to their stories. Hold them to your heart when you want to remember the price you paid to become who you truly are.” (Find more by Richard Power here: tinyurl.com/RichardPower.)

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Urbandictionary.com says that the newly coined word “orgasnom” is what you call the ecstatic

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the land. It’s the foundation of the most politically powerful nation on the planet. And yet when it originally went into effect in 1789, it was only 4,543 words long — about three times the length of this horoscope column. The Bill of Rights, enacted in 1791, added a mere 462 words. By contrast, India’s Constitution is 117,000 words, more than 20 times longer. If you create a new master plan for yourself in the coming months, Cancerian — as I hope you will — a compact version like America’s will be exactly right. You need diamond-like lucidity, not sprawling guesswork.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): There are two scientific terms for tickling. “Knismesis” refers to a soft, feathery touch that may be mildly pleasurable. It can be used to display adoring tenderness. The heavier, deeper kind of tickling is called “gargalesis.” If playfully applied to sensitive parts of the anatomy, it can provoke fun and laughter. Given the current planetary alignments, Leo, I conclude that both of these will be rich metaphors for you in the coming days. I suggest that you be extra alert for opportunities to symbolically tickle and be tickled. (P.S. Here’s a useful allegory: If you do the knismesis thing beneath the snout of a great white shark, you can hypnotize it.) If you could make money from doing exactly what you love to do, what would it be? Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013


FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 49 + STUDIES 50 + SERVICES 51 + WELLNESS 52 + LIVE 54

WORK

STYLIST Advertise Here Today!

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkgreatpay.com (AAN CAN)

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper! Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

Full & Part Time

CUSTOMER SERVICE

Experienced Stylist & Manicurist Needed

DeStefino

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE WANTED! Steel City Media is seeking F/T A.E. FOR WRRK and WLTJ radio. 2 yrs min. sales experience, possess excellent verbal skills & a self-starter. Requires own vehicle and auto insurance.

Southside Works 2751 Sydney St. Pgh 15203

Submit resume or email:

Please Contact Aimee: 412-606-4516 or Liz: 412-488-4418

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

Steel City Media, Attn: Chris Kohan, 650 Smithfield Street, Suite # 2200. PGH., PA 15222 or c.kohan@steelcitymedia.com No phone calls please. EOE.

412.316.3342

CUSTOMER SERVICE FREE TAX SCHOOL. Earn extra Income after taking course. Flexible schedules, convenient locations.

REGISTER NOW! WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

Your ad could be here

Courses start Monday, September 9, 2013 Call 412-586-5766

ART

The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

Department Pittsburgh City Paper is seeking a Graphic Designer to join its Art Department. Qualified candidate must possess: • Strong communication and organizational skills. • Strong design skills with extensive knowledge of InDesign, Photoshop & Illustrator. • Ability to work in a fast-paced, deadline oriented atmosphere.

Small fee for books.

City Paper offers paid vacation, medical benefits and 401K. Applicants should send resume and design samples to: Kevin Shepherd Pittsburgh City Paper 650 Smithfield St. Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Or via e-mail to: kshep@steelcitymedia.com No phone calls please. • Pittsburgh City Paper is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

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STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

People with Current Cold Sore or Canker Sore needed for a Research study (UPMC Oakland)

ENDOMETRIOSIS?

DIABETES?

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

BIRTH CONTROL?

OSTEOPOROSIS?

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

See what our clients are saying been very In the past two years, I’ve ads and our of ign des the satisfied with both When I know I have ke. evo they e ons resp the subjects in the 24-35 to advertise for research k of using the City age group, I immediately thin Paper. — Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

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This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions. Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart.

DO YOU HAVE A CHRONIC COUGH, SHORTNESS OF BREATH, OR DIFFICULTY BREATHING? Have you been diagnosed with chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) A research study is being conducted in your area for an investigational inhaled medication for COPD. If you are a current or ex-smoker and 40 years of age or older you may qualify to participate.

Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100. Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

For more information, please call 412-246-6367

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

All study-related care is provided at no charge, including physical exams, lab tests, and study medication. Compensation for time and travel may be available for those who qualify.

PLEASE CALL

412.650.6155


SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENTS

REHEARSAL

Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/ GordonShoes

Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

Advertise Here Today!

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

COMMUNITY Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) 4836 Ellsworth Avenue, Pittsburgh Meeting for Worship Sunday Mornings at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. All are welcome! www.quaker.org/ pghpamm/ or call 412-683-2669

GENERAL FOR SALE

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Buy a Harris Bed Bug Kit. Complete Treatment Program. Odorless, Non-Staining. Available online at homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES)

Cut your STUDENT LOAN payments in HALF or more Even if Late or in Default. Get Relief FAST Much LOWER payments. Call Student Hotline 1-888251-5664 (AAN CAN)

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

ADOPTION VOLUNTEERS PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 Void in Illinois/New Mexico Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

FINANCIAL

CLASSES

Become a volunteer tutor and help an adult learn to read. Contact Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council at 412.393.7600 or gplc.org Open up a Life We have a waiting list of 200 adults who need your help.

KILL ROACHES! Buy Harris Roach Spray/ Roach Trap Value Pack or Concentrate. Eliminate RoachesGuaranteed. Effective results begin after spray dries. BUY ONLINE homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES)

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

Pittsburgh Lawyers

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

Need N eed a Lawyer? Lawye yer? r?

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

Meet M eet Bob! Bob! SPECIALIZES IN: Criminal Defense, Civil Litigation, Personal Injury and more!

Call for a FREE CONSULTATION.

Sealed proposals shall be addressed to and deposited at the School District of Pittsburgh, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, on September 13, 2013, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for:

Law Offices of

Robert Goldman

412-531-6879

Partial Roof Replacement - HVAC shop area and gymnasium Pittsburgh Allderdice High School General Prime

Partial Sidewalk Replacement along Chartiers Avenue Pittsburgh Greenway 1463 Chartiers Ave. General Prime

advertise your business in pittsburgh city paper

Project Manual and Drawings for bidding purposes will be available for purchase by Contractors August 28, 2013 at Modern Reproductions, 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 from 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Modern Reproductions may be contacted by Phone at 412-488-7700 or Fax at 412-488-7338 to determine the cost of the Project Manual and Documents. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual.

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Accepting new divorce clients Flat Rate for Uncontested Divorces

Experienced, Dedicated, Affordable

412.316.3342

We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent hotline: 412-622-7920/www.pps.k12.pa.us

N E W S

Attorney Robert Domenick

(724) 523-9530 Westmoreland County

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WELLNESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Need a new employee? Call today to speak with one of our Classified advertising representatives. We get results!

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

Zhangs Wellness Center

Opiate Addiction Treatment Right Track LLC Taking new patients for Suboxone treatment Call 412-207-8774

TIGER SPA

412-401-4110 $40/hr

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

DOWNTOWN 322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor)

Judy’s Oriental Massage Therapeutic Massage

STAR Superior Chinese Massage Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

China Massage $50/HR Free Table Shower

Shadyside Location

1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

412-441-1185

724-519-7896

massage Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

Chinese Bodyworks Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

THIS SPACE! call 412.316.3342

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950


get your yoga on!

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

NOW IN SQUIRREL HILL! Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL - a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

J&S GLASS

Water Pipes And Glass W lass For All Your Smoking Needs

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop

MONROEVILLE, PA

1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg

412-380-0100

FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

www.myjadewellness.com

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available!

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free.

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Actually, so are all the others. N E W S

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Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

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LIVE

EAST FOR RENT

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

SOUTH FOR RENT

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

STORAGE ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069 Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper. 0

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Find your next place to “LIVE” in City Paper! South Side Flats Newly renovated 3 BR house. New appls, incl W/D. Ready to move in. $1,500+ g&e 412-9774018 Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342 Southside Flats- 2BR, office, eq.kit, porch, crtyrd, w/d hkups, Avl 10/1 $895+ utils. dmttei@aol.com, 412366-9177 Your Classified Ad printed in more than 100 alternative papers like this one for just $1,150! aTo run your ad in papers with a total circulation exceeding 6.9 million copies per week, call City Paper Classifieds at 412-316-3342. (AAN CAN) 0

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Campbell’s Fort Pitt Motel

Pittsburgh’s Pocono Touch 0

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Featuring Heart Shaped Whirlpool Tubs Private Balcony or Patio & Gas Fireplaces Savings on Sundays thru Thursdays Ask about parent daycare special

SQ. Hill Beatiful Kitch. Great Loc., nice yard, gleaming hw flrs updated kitch. w/ granite counters, cozy breakfast nook and nice bkyrd. Partly finished bsmnt. 1 car grg. Freshly painted, c/a, zoned htg. Just 3 miles from Oakland, CMU, U of PGH. Walking dist. to SQ.Hill businesses. Immed. move-in avl. No pets. Yrd Svc incl. Contact Christa Ross, RE/MAX Select Realty 724-933-6300 x214 or 724-309-1758

Your ad could be here

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

412.316.3342

There is light at the end of the tunnel.

7750 Steubenville Pike, Oakdale PA 15071 12 Miles West Of PGH, 7 Miles From Airport www.fortpittmotel.com

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{BY BEN TAUSIG}

Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

412-788-9960 • 412-788-4592

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

Ink Well

DEBT GROWTH

Find your next job in the City Paper’s “WORK” section.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.04/09.11.2013

ACROSS 1. Under 6. Via, informally 10. Word of doing 14. 2012 Republican National Convention city 15. Shoe brand with a pocket 16. ___ of evil 17. Debauched tectonic layer? 20. Fruit quaff that may be carbonated 21. Prepared to shoot 22. Google alternative 23. Youtube upload, briefly 24. Pegged as bad-tempered? 30. Traffic tangle 32. Salt Lake City collegian 33. North Korea, initially 34. High school physics subject 35. With 43-Across, event where people say grace before shoving dozens of hot dogs in their mouths? 37. Travel through time? 38. Rendered with a pen 40. Ace’s asset 41. Deducted from gross weight 43. See 35-Across 47. Equal in betting 48. Vivian on “The

Fresh Prince,” e.g. 49. The Silver Bullet Band leader 52. Oscar-winning 1978 song for Donna Summer 57. Interested in headaches, puking, and bloodshot eyes? 59. Genesis guy whose name means “hairy” 60. Food co-op goddess 61. Bondage gear 62. Wet in the morning, in a way 63. Way off 64. “From Russia With Love” actress Lotte

DOWN 1. 1944 battle city 2. It may feature a side part 3. Chorus letters spelled with the body 4. Wedding feature 5. Belieber, say 6. ER sorting process 7. It’s over your head 8. Cad 9. Letters before Ronald Reagan or Abraham Lincoln, at sea 10. Bar entry requirement 11. Bar entry requirement 12. Hajj, e.g. 13. Talked without

real knowledge 18. 6.2-mile race 19. Shovel partner 23. Throws one’s hat in the ring 24. Impressionist who painted people on lawns, in cafés, brutally murdering each other, etc. 25. Italian cathedral 26. A/C unit 27. Trippy graphics 28. Plead with 29. List of the day’s activities, casually 30. Fries, e.g. 31. Roberts or Ephron of writing 35. Call through the PA system 36. Old-school online

chat option, briefly 39. Many a Pesci role 41. “The Thing” limb 42. Adele of popular entertainment 44. Emperor who was friends with Seneca 45. Kyle Busch’s org. 46. Archbishop Desmond 49. Lose, as a layer 50. Natural facility 51. Work on, as a bone 52. Nissan electric car 53. ___ 51 54. High time? 55. Queens College is part of it: Abbr. 56. She, in Italy 58. IBM graphical interface {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


THE SMELL OF SUCCESS For post-industrial Pittsburgh, change is in the air {BY CHRIS POTTER}

AS EVERY Pittsburgher now knows, the Indonesian corpse flower

blooms only for a few days — and it reeks like rotting flesh during that time. When such a flower bloomed at Phipps Conservatory last month, thousands of locals turned out to see it, and smell it, for themselves. Even New York papers took notice, giving Pittsburgh the kind of national “earned media” tourism officials willingly furnish real corpses for. Corpse flowers, after all, bloom just once a decade. And a lot can change in 10 years. Just look at how Pittsburgh responded the last time a local scent got national attention. Almost 10 years ago to the day — on Oct. 30, 2003 — the comic strip “Get Fuzzy” spawned the kind of local outrage normally reserved for away-team desecrations of the Terrible Towel. In that day’s installment, the protagonist’s talking housecat visits a travel agency to ask about vacations “based primarily on smell.” The punchline: A travel agent hands over a brochure from Pittsburgh.

According to a 1989 LTV “Odor Study” (recently posted online by local blogger Chris Briem), residents identified such scents as coal tar, burnt mothballs and the evocative “general coke-plant odor.” But Pittsburgh’s olfactory sense was perhaps less sophisticated than it is today, and Murphy’s plan failed in the face of resident opposition. Now the LTV site is slated for yet another mixed-use development, with office space and housing and terrific river views. But not, so far as I can tell, a single skunk-cabbage patch to attract olfactory thrill-seekers. Back in the old days, of course, you hardly had to step off the porch to smell something rotten. In the early 1900s, the famous Pittsburgh Survey reported, tens of thousands of households lacked sewer access: “Privy vaults” were often “seen in Pittsburgh full to the brim and overflowing with liquid filth. Some drained down the side of a hill … into a neighbor’s back yard.” Saw Mill Run alone was supposed to drain the sewage of some 35,000 resi-

THERE’S APPARENTLY A MARKET FOR STENCH-BASED TOURISM HERE AFTER ALL. Though “Get Fuzzy” didn’t appear locally back then, nearly 400 Pittsburgh loyalists contacted strip creator Darby Conley, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported: “I’ve never gotten death threats before,” Conley told the paper. But we may owe Conley an apology: There’s apparently a market for stench-based tourism here after all. A reported 12,000 people showed up at Phipps while its corpse flower was in bloom. Some stood in line for hours, hoping to catch a whiff. If only we’d known. If only we’d realized that people would pay admission to smell something terrible. We might have handled the city’s vaunted Renaissance much differently. Today, “Washington’s Landing” is a tony mixed-use housing and office development along the Allegheny River. But back when it was known as Herr’s Island, it housed a cattle yard, slaughterhouse and rendering plant. Together, reported the Pittsburgh Press in 1974, “they produce the famous ‘Herr’s Stink.’ … The smell is so bad, say workmen on the 31st Street Bridge over the island, that ‘you can’t even drink your coffee when the wind blows the wrong way.’” Then-mayor Tom Murphy redeveloped the island in the mid1990s, thereby depriving Pittsburgh of a chance to capitalize on stench tourism year-round. But he almost made up for it by backing a plan to refurbish the former LTV coke works in Hazelwood. That site, too, could have been a mecca for odor connoisseurs.

dents, but “[a]s a matter of fact excreta were found exposed on the ground at the edge of the run.” Other observers decried the contrast between such squalor and the affluence found in the East End. “Rich men’s homes and poor men’s hovels! What an anomaly we have here!” protested reformer Abraham Oseroff as he documented the unsanitary conditions he found between Downtown and the prosperous East End. Oseroff wasn’t the only one who failed to realize what a gold mine Pittsburgh really had. By the mid-1900s, civic leaders were busily scrubbing the city’s air and water. Even today, local officials talk about our overstressed sewers — which dump raw sewage into the rivers during heavy rains — as if they were problems to fixed, rather than amenities to cash in on. But then when the mills and rendering plants were running, who could have known that someday a bad smell would be not just a memory here but a novelty — something to seek out? Who could have seen how far we have come? A century ago, Pittsburghers would pay any price to avoid foul stenches. A decade ago, we threatened anyone who joked about finding them here. But today, thousands of us will pay a $15 admission to seek them out. And it makes you wonder: In a city where artisanal olive oils and ice cubes make up a greater and greater share of local commerce, is a bad smell becoming the ultimate luxury good? C POT T ER@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

September 4, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 36

September 4, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 36