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STEELERS PREVIEW 2013: DON’T CALL IT REBUILDING


EVENTS 8.24 – 2pm VOICES GALLERY TALK: QUEER AND BROWN IN STEELTOWN WITH RAQUEL RODRIGUEZ AND AYANAH MOOR Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

8.30 – 8pm FILM SCREENING: CREATING THE PANDROGYNE: CELEBRATING BREYER P-ORRIDGE WITH GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE IN PERSON Tickets $10

8.31 – 2pm VOICES GALLERY TALK: TROUBLING THE LINE: AN EXCERPT – POETRY READING AND CONVERSATION WITH JENNY JOHNSON AND ARI BANIAS Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

9.7 – 8pm TRANS-Q LIVE! Tickets $10/$8 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot.

9.19 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: SCOUT NIBLETT Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

9.20 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2013: WEST OF ZANZIBAR, WITH LIVE MUSICAL ACCOMPANIMENT Tickets $10

Summer’s different here. Enjoy three provocative exhibitions under one roof.

GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE/CALDWELL LINKER/NICK BUBASH /through sept 15.2013/

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

www.warhol.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013


Over 21 • 9pm - Midnight

ROCK & BOWL! at the world-famous

08.21/08.28.2013 {COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 34

[MAIN FEATURE] 2013 Season Preview. Our look 20 Steelers at the prospects for the Steelers 2013 season. (Spoiler: They are going to the Super Bowl, goddammit.)

[NEWS]

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“I hope that this doesn’t become a political football and nothing gets done.” — Port Authority board member Amanda Green Hawkins on the sweeping overhaul of the transit agency’s board

[VIEWS]

16

“How can we possibly produce enough clean energy for billions of people at current usage rates? We can’t.” — Bill O’Driscoll on the importance of energy-efficient building design

[TASTE]

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“Toast rounds topped with fig jam, goat cheese and paper-thin slivers of ham, all drizzled with a syrupy balsamic glaze and a confetti of basil.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Lula

[MUSIC]

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“I was trying to get it going, but it was quite challenging. There isn’t that much of a world-music scene in Pittsburgh.” — Zambian musician Mathew Tembo, now of Chicago, on his time living here

[SCREEN]

allows people to be so cavalier 55 “What about killing in their youth, then to discuss it like Grandpa remembering a summer picnic?” — Harry Kloman, reviewing the film An Act of Killing

[ARTS]

art reaches out and pulls you in, 58 “Some but here it feels like it’s up to you whether to give yourself over.” — Robert Raczka on Ryoji Ikeda’s data.tron

[LAST PAGE] don’t think you can label a community 87 “Iracist. I don’t think you can label 10,000 people with one name.” — Longtime resident Jeff Healey on trying to overcome Brentwood’s painful legacy

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 62 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 75 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 76 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 77 NEWS

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{EDITORIAL} Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writer LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns OLIVIA LAMMEL, KIRA SCAMMELL

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{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“I’VE NEVER SEEN ANY OTHER BOARD OR AUTHORITY IN THE STATE LIKE THIS.”

INCOMING RE: Organic Theater’s Scarcity (Aug. 14) “…The show is beautifully crafted and acted. … “I also looked around the audience and saw so many people leaning forward, chin in hand, focused on what was being unveiled before us. We all may not have been exposed to this type of family but we all are familiar with it. The mother looking for a better life for her children no matter what the price or sacrifice, the strong bond between a brother and sister caught in a life not of their making. This family is relatable. “So what I was anticipating as being a night of watching an awful, awful reality based drama, ended up being a night of witnessing struggle, and what we all, in dire circumstance do to survive.” — Web comment from “Karen Hannon”

RE: We’re the Millers (Aug. 14) “The main thing of note is, despite what every review that I’ve read has said, it’s not all that ‘extreme’ or ‘vulgar.’ I went with a friend rather than Mom because of how ‘over-the-top’ it was supposed to be. If you read the ratings factor under the ‘R’ it goes on for 4 or 5 lines. That gives a TOTAL misconception. I think that what got censors so up-inarms was that it was MALE nudity, so let’s scare off as many prospective moviegoers as possible. It’s just a funny scene that, if taken out, would kill one of the best jokes of the movie.” — Web comment from “mgariti81”

Re: Professional cartoonists’ picks for best cartoonist — since 1946 — get an unprecedented showcase at ToonSeum. (Aug. 14) “Marmaduke wuz robbed.” — Web comment from “foo”

Monday Night Football is somethin I always dreamed about... #DreamsToReality — July 19 tweet from Steelers running back Le’Veon Bell (@L_Bell26), hours before making his professional debut against the Washington Redskins

{ILLUSTRATION BY JOHN HINDERLITER}

POWERSTEERING P

ORT AUTHORITY riders are used to change: route adjustments, fare increases, service cuts. But in the weeks to come, the transit agency itself will have new leadership at the wheel … and the road ahead may be bumpy. Under a state law passed in July, the authority’s board is set to be overhauled in September. And where Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald used to have total control of the appointment process, the new law compels him to share that power with Gov. Tom Corbett and legislative leaders in Harrisburg. That could affect everything from

scheduling routes to purchasing buses, from hiring executives and lobbyists to approving union contracts.

New law governing PAT board makes it uncertain who’ll be driving the bus {BY LAUREN DALEY} Ultimately, the changes could even determine whether the agency continues to exist in its current form.

“The board makes all the major operating decisions,” says Helen Gerhardt, a community organizer with Pittsburghers for Public Transit, an independent riderand driver-advocacy group. “And they have such a key role in approving the labor contract, which is key to the whole function of the operation of the system.” Fitzgerald is putting the best face on the changes, noting that nearly 60 percent of the authority’s operating funds come from the state. “I think it’s great they’re going to be involved, learning about it, seeing what we do, helping make policy,” says Fitzgerald. CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013


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POWER STEERING, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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THE RESTRUCTURING is a result of Act 72, which Corbett signed on July 18. It expands the board from nine members to 11. The larger board will include one appointee each from the governor, and from the Democratic and Republican caucuses in both the state House and Senate. The county executive retains control over six picks, though two of those are to be recommended by at least one of a handful of civic groups interested in transportation. Those range from the Allegheny Conference business group to the Committee for Accessible Transportation, a disabilityrights group. Gerhardt, the transit advocate, is concerned about the lack of labor and rider groups among those advisory groups. And with a “substantial board majority representing suburban, corporate and rural interests,” she’s worried that board members lack connection to the concerns of urban riders. “These people aren’t directly accountable to the voters, so they don’t have a constituent base or incentive to really represent the needs of riders,” she says. It’s not clear whether Gerhardt’s fears will come to pass. At press time, only Senate Democrats had made an appointment: state Sen. Jim Brewster (D-McKeesport), who also sits on the Senate transportation committee. (Fitzgerald says he’s “still evaluating” his appointees.) But Act 72 also sets

out new procedural rules that might complicate matters further. Under the new law, a supermajority of seven members must agree to “take action on behalf of the authority.” The upshot: For Fitzgerald to effect changes at the authority, he will need support from more than his own appointees. And Republicans have a special power to thwart Fitzgerald’s agenda. Tabling a bill — delaying action on it — ordinarily requires a majority, unless it’s opposed by board members appointed by the party opposite that of the county executive. In that case, only two oppositeparty votes are needed to halt actions like hiring a CEO or approving contracts over $5 million. The tabling power turned off Sen. Wayne Fontana (D-Brookline) and Jim Ferlo (D-Lawrenceville), who along with Brewster voted against the bill. “I don’t think there needs to be that much Harrisburg representation,” says Ferlo, who calls the requirement “ridiculous.” “I’ve never seen any other board or authority in the state like this,” Ferlo adds. In Philadelphia, the board of the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transit Authority (SEPTA) includes appointees from the governor and the legislative caucuses. But SEPTA is a regional system whose board includes appointees from the five counties it serves. If representatives of areas totaling at least one-third of the population object to a proposal, it takes three-quarters of the board to override the objection. “There’s a lot of converging interests here,” says SEPTA assistant general manager of public and government affairs Fran Kelly. “They come from city versus county, Democrats and Republican.” Still, he says, “Everyone gets a fair shake.” Fontana doesn’t oppose giving the state more say at the Port Authority — he has previously proposed his own bill to do so — but says that allocating veto power over major decisions “goes too far when the questions become ‘Is that a guy a Republican? Is that guy a Democrat?’” Fitzgerald acknowledges the provision could be “problematic if people wanted to get in there and ‘cause trouble.’” But he notes that tabling a motion can only “slow it down to slow it down,” since a majority can later untable it.

“I’M NOT GOING TO SIT HERE AND SAY IT’S GOING TO BE A PERFECT MARRIAGE, BUT A MARRIAGE IT’S GOING TO BE.”

SEPTEMBER

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Still, the changes are a dramatic turnabout for Fitzgerald, who just months ago asserted the right to remove any appointee at will. And given that Republicans — who control every branch of state government — have often been indifferent or even hostile to urban transit, some worry the new rules will add turmoil to an already difficult climate. The agency is currently without a CEO, and $30 million in additional state funding — part of a package Fitzgerald worked out to help avert a crippling 35 percent service cut — is also in jeopardy since the state legislature stalled on passing a transportationfunding package. “I hope that this doesn’t become a political football and nothing gets done,” says current authority board member Amanda Green Hawkins. “We have so many people who rely on transit.”

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WITH LIVE IRISH MUSIC

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013


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POWER STEERING, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

PofE T the

WEEK

Tyson

“There’s kind of checks and balances on both sides.” The legislation also requires a study of other potential reforms. One where there is broad agreement instructs the state Department of Transportation to study consolidating the authority with other local transportation agencies. Fitzgerald campaigned on the idea of regionalization, which was also recommended by a Corbett task force. The law also instructs PennDOT to study the “potential privatization of authority services” to reduce costs and increase revenues. PennDOT spokeswoman Jamie Legenos says that the department is doing preparatory work for those studies. “Those are parts of the bill I wish weren’t in there,” says Senate Minority Leader Jay Costa (D-Forest Hills). “But Democrats weren’t in control of the process. It was something important to the House Republican colleagues, and as a result that language stayed in there.” (Republicans in the legislature did not return calls for comment.)

“THERE’S A LOT OF CONVERGING INTERESTS HERE.”

FOR FITZGERALD, Act 72 could have been much worse. In the original version proposed by Senate Republican Leader Joe Scarnati, Fitzgerald got only one appointee. The others would have been made by Allegheny County Council, the mayor of Pittsburgh and elected officials from counties contiguous to Allegheny. “Given the ever-increasing amount of funding the state contributes to the Port Authority it is appropriate for state offi-

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cials to have a voice on the board,” Scarnati wrote in a March 28 co-sponsorship memorandum. “It is also important that local influence on the board be attained from a diverse group of individuals.” The proposal set off a heated exchange. Fitzgerald slammed Scarnati in the media, calling the proposal “cheap politics.” Scarnati fired back, citing Fitzgerald’s ouster of former CEO Steve Bland as a “fiasco.” “[I]t is clear the policy set by the County Executive is not moving the Port Authority in the right direction,” Scarnati added. Fitzgerald has made no bones about his hands-on style. As City Paper previously reported, he previously required appointees to sign undated resignation letters — a practice he’s since abandoned. At the Port Authority, he engineered Bland’s ouster though the board was divided; Fitzgerald also considered naming then-board member Joe Brimmeier to the position. Brimmeier, the former CEO of the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, was later indicted for allegedly directing turnpike contracts to vendors who donated to Democratic politicians. Fitzgerald says he doesn’t think those moves prompted the Act 72 overhaul. “Harrisburg has been a partner in tran-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013

sit for many years, but they’re a partner without the seat at the table,” he says. “That is unfortunate and I’ve supported the state having a seat at the table.” Scarnati’s earlier proposal, he says, seemed to put the state at the head of the table. “What I was against then was the county executive had one pick out of 11 — somebody’s got to be in charge of the system,” Fitzgerald says. “We can’t run an agency by committee.” State leaders credit Costa with brokering a compromise alongside state Sen. Randy Vulakovich (R-Shaler). But that doesn’t mean Democrats are still fully happy with the bill. It passed out of the Senate 28-19. Costa was among those voting yes: “If you work out a compromise you can live with, you need to support it,” he says. While a number of Democrats had concerns about the legislation, “the bill was going to pass without our support, so I thought it’d be important for us, as much as possible, to have our imprint on it.” Democrats hope that having more Republicans on the authority’s board will increase bipartisan awareness of transit needs. “Like most marriages, there’s going to be some potholes and we’re going to have to work through them,” says Brewster, the first appointee to the new board. “I’m not going to sit here and say it’s going to be a perfect marriage, but a marriage it’s going to be.” L D A L E Y @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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ALL GASSED UP

CBS Radio hands over the mic to natural-gas boosters {BY CHRIS POTTER} ON AUG. 15, at least, KDKA 1020 AM was

not the place to turn for news about the environmental debate over natural-gas drilling, or about claims that some drillers use accounting tricks to reduce royalty payments to property-owners. But if you wanted to know the name Range Resources spokesman Matt Pitzarella uses in his daughter’s Indian Princesses tribe, though … you didn’t want to touch that dial. CBS Radio, which owns KDKA and three other local stations, celebrated Aug. 15 as a “Marcellus Shale Festival” — a chance “to celebrate all that Marcellus Shale brings to our region.” The festival featured an on-air parade of drilling boosters at KDKA, as well as off-air programming at the North Side’s Stage AE. Morning host Marty Griffin, for example, touted the broadcast as a celebration of “hope and opportunity.” His guests included Pitzarella, Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald — who has aggressively pursued drilling opportunities on county land — and Phelim McAleer, maker of pro-drilling film FrackNation. Environmentalists, by contrast, were ridiculed in absentia: Griffin mocked Doug Shields, a vocal drilling opponent, by suggesting the former city councilor was “pounding on a bathroom door somewhere, looking for work.” Stage AE, meanwhile, hosted the local premiere of McAleer’s movie, and a concert by country-music performer Phil Vassar. A “town hall,” hosted by KDKA talk-show host Mike Pintek, featured four politicians, all of whom backed drilling. Pitzarella also participated in the panel discussion, titled “Marcellus Shale — A True Public-Private Partnership: Maximizing the Resource.” Taking questions from the audience, Pintek did ask a couple skeptical questions, including “Are we taxing this industry enough?” (Answer: Yes.) But with no dissenters on hand, such concerns were quickly dropped. And when environmentalists did appear, they say, they were ushered out. While the festival was billed as “free to the public,” Stage AE is private property, and Lucas Lyons says security told him to leave when he tried to convince attendees that drilling was dangerous. (“People started calling me ‘Obama,’” Lyons says — and because the president supports drilling, “I

was really confused.”) Another environmentalist, Kathryn Hilton, tried circulating anti-drilling literature. “I was fairly certain there weren’t going to be any alternate views available,” she says. And indeed, she says she was told to distribute the material outside. “The industry likes to say they operate in good faith,” Hilton says, “but the absence [of dissenting voices] suggests they aren’t.” The Festival events and broadcasts were sponsored by drilling interests, including an upcoming industry convention and Norton Rose Fulbright, a law firm with a drilling practice. Companies like Range are frequent CBS Radio advertisers; sports-talk station 93.7 The Fan even offers a sponsored “Fracking is Fun” factof-the-day feature. Hosting promotional events with on-air tie-ins is a common radio practice. (Full disclosure: That holds true for the two radio stations owned by the family that owns City Paper, which compete with CBS’ local properties.) But such events typically feature concerts or family activities, rather than promoting controversial industries. CBS Radio senior vice president Michael Young says CBS does “not normally” conduct such promotions, though the station has held smaller-scale “expos” on drilling before. “We promoted it as a Marcellus Shale Festival, and the town-hall meeting was about how private companies and the public sector were working together,” says Young. Gas drilling “represents a big deal for commerce in the area,” Young adds. It also means commerce for his stations: “To be honest, there is a business interest in it.” Still, Young says, “In our editorial coverage, I think you get a diverse sense of opinions, and of objective news coverage.” When asked about claims that environmentalists’ opinions were unwelcome at the Festival, Young said he couldn’t comment. But “if there’s a big story” related to drilling, “our folks will be out there and be objective.” But why should audiences believe that? When a broadcaster boosts an industry on and off the air, is it fair to expect listeners to distinguish a station’s news-gathering from its promotions? “I don’t think there’s a simple answer” to that, Young says. Sometimes the dividing line is “very obvious,” he says. “Other times, I think seeing it is a little harder.”

“THE INDUSTRY LIKES TO SAY THEY OPERATE IN GOOD FAITH. BUT THE ABSENCE [OF DISSENTING VOICES] SUGGESTS THEY AREN’T.”

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[GREEN LIGHT]

DESIGNING DOWN DEMAND {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} WHEN ENERGY usage is discussed in

terms of climate change, most people frame the problem as one of supply: How can we possibly produce enough clean energy for billions of people at current usage rates? Ed Mazria, by contrast, emphasizes this simple answer: We can’t. Fossil fuels, according to U.S. Department of Energy figures, now supply 83 percent of the world’s energy — a percentage barely expected to decline by 2030, when we’ll be using one-third more energy than now. Even if renewables like wind and solar grow twice as fast as predicted, it would barely slow the burning of oil, coal and gas that’s raising sea levels and playing havoc with the climate. “We cannot supply our way out of the issue,” says Mazria. “On the demand side is where the opportunity really exists.” Mazria is the veteran Santa Fe, N.M.based architect who founded the 2030 Challenge. Its goal is to halve energy and water use in the built environment by 2030, and to assure that by then all new buildings will be “carbon-neutral.” That doesn’t mean living in cold, dark rooms. Indeed, planners, architects and designers are already creating structures that actually improve quality of life while still reducing demand — by enough, one hopes, to eventually phase out fossil fuels. Pittsburgh, which last week hosted the inaugural 2030 Districts Summit, boasts one of just four 2030 Districts. Among voluntary local efforts to reduce consumption — through better air-sealing, wise use of daylight, more efficient equipment, etc. — the 2030 District stands out for its ambitious, quantified target. Pittsburgh’s year-old district, administered by the Green Building Alliance, includes 100 buildings and more than half the square footage in its central business district; participants include PNC, Alcoa, Highmark and the City of Pittsburgh. Mazria, who spoke at the summit, says big ambition is necessary. The 2030 Challenge arose after Mazrie learned that — SUVs notwithstanding — buildings are responsible for nearly half our energy use. (Most of that goes to heating and cooling spaces; 77 percent of electricity usage also occurs in buildings.) A galvanizing 2003 cover story in Metropolis magazine, headlined

“Architects Pollute,” was followed in 2006 by the 2030 Challenge. The Challenge is distinct from the well-publicized LEED system for certifying so-called “green buildings,” only the highest-rated of which meet 2030 standards. Mazria was shocked by how quickly his idea spread. More than half of all architecture firms have now accepted the 2030 Challenge, as has an even higher percentage of the very largest firms, including global names like HOK and Perkins + Will. Last week’s summit hosted representatives from a dozen North American cities hoping to join Pittsburgh, Los Angeles, Seattle and Cleveland with their own 2030 Districts. Mazrie says that the big motivator here — aside from saving the planet — is saving on utility bills. He contends a good architect can usually achieve those future savings within a client’s construction budget. Energy use in the U.S. has leveled off in recent years, though much of that’s due to the recession. However, to meet the Challenge, Mazria says, everybody must join in: By 2030, the U.N. projects the world will add or renovate 900 billion square feet of building space — 38 percent of that in China. All of it needs to be high-performing. It would help if more governments emulated California’s, where new residences must be net-zero energy-users by 2020, and new commercial buildings by 2030. Allegheny County’s government manages some 1.8 million square feet of space in Pittsburgh’s 2030 District. When the county joined the District, it was three years into its own green overhaul — doing stuff like replacing 400 inefficient old window-unit air-conditioners and installing low-flow water fixtures at the county jail. County sustainability manager Jeaneen Zappa says the county also urges employees to share printers, unplug unused electrical devices and simply turn out the lights. By year’s end, the county hopes to have cut energy and water usage by 20 percent from 2008 levels. That’s countywide, not just in the 2030 District. But Zappa says the District’s 50 percent reduction goal is almost as as good a motivator as saving money: “It complements what we’re [already] doing, but it pushes us for a higher bar.”

“WE CANNOT SUPPLY OUR WAY OUT OF THE ISSUE.”

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

At age 20, Kyle Kandilian of Dearborn, Mich., has created a start-up business to fund his college expenses, but it involves a roomful (in the family home) of nearly 200,000 cockroaches. The environmentalscience major at University of MichiganDearborn breeds species ranging from the familiar household pests, which he sells on the cheap as food for other people’s pets, to the more interesting, exotic Madagascar hissing roaches and rhino roaches, which can live for 10 to 15 years. (Kandilian told the Detroit Free Press in July that of the 4,000 cockroach species, only about a dozen are pests.) Why not choose a more conventional “pet”? Because “[m]ammals smell,” he said.

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A 55-year-old woman in the Netherlands seemed to be experiencing orgasms emanating from her foot, she said, and Dr. Marcel Waldinger of Utrecht University (writing in the Journal of Sexual Medicine) produced a possible explanation. The applicable left-foot nerve enters the spinal cord at about the same level as the vaginal nerve, Waldinger wrote, and the woman’s recent foot injury might have caused the nerves to cross. The woman reported “five or six” orgasms per day that felt exactly like “regular” orgasms and, she said, were making her feel terribly guilty and embarrassed. After treatment with a nerve anesthetic, she reported being orgasmfree (in the foot, at least) for eight months.

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The intersection of West Gateway Boulevard and North Congress Avenue in Boynton Beach, Fla. (pop. 60,000), is nine lanes wide, busy even at 11 p.m. on Sunday

night. It was at that time in July when a 2-year-old girl darted across, a combination of good fortune and sometimes-rare Florida driver alertness allowing her safe arrival on the other side without a scratch. “It’s a miracle,” said Harry Scott, who witnessed it. “I’m telling you the truth.” Mom Kayla Campbell, 26, was charged with felony neglect, as she appeared “oblivious,” said police, to the child’s absence from home.

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An unnamed restaurateur from Nagoya, Japan, has filed a lawsuit against an affiliate of the country’s largest organizedcrime syndicate, Yamaguchi-gumi, demanding a refund of “protection” money she had been paying for more than 12 years (in total, the equivalent of about $170,000). The affiliate, Kodo-kai, burned down a bar in 2010, killing people, in a similar protection arrangement that went bad, and the plaintiff said she, too, was threatened with arson when she decided to stop paying. According to an expert on Japanese “yakuza,” a relative of one of the victims of the 2010 fire may also sue Kodo-kai.

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In June, following his guilty plea in Corpus Christi, Texas, to possession of child pornography, Jose Salazar, 70, offered to perform public service to reduce the 12-year sentence a federal judge had handed him. Salazar said he “had a lot to offer society,” according to an Associated Press story, and could be “useful” in mentoring children.

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At Atherstone, England’s, Twycross Zoo, a program is underway to try to teach quarter-ton giant tortoises to speed up. An

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extended outdoor pen had been built for Speedy, age 70; Tim, 40; and Shelly, 30; but that meant it took a longer time to round them up for bed at the end of the day. The Leicester Mercury reported in June that zoo officials were trying to use the lure of food to get the tortoises to significantly improve their way-under-1-mile-per-hour gait.

In July, the governor of Gorontalo province in Indonesia decreed that female secretaries should be replaced with males. He was responding to a recent excessive spate of extramarital affairs by male bureaucrats with their female secretaries. (“[O]ld women who are no longer attractive” could also be hired, he said.)

Tina Marie Garrison, 37, and her son Junior Lee Dillon, 18, of Preston, Minn., were charged in June with stealing almost $5,000 worth of gopher feet from the freezer of a gopher trapper in Granger, Minn., and selling them for the local offered bounty of $3 per pair. Garrison, Dillon, and the victimized trapper were friends, and it was not clear why the thinly populated gopher-foot market would not have deterred Garrison and Dillon.

People with issues: (1) Gerard Streator, 47, pleaded guilty in June in Waukesha, Wis., County Court to public lewdness and was placed on probation after his arrest last year for going through the motions of intercourse with a discarded couch on a public street. An off-duty police officer thought initially that he had caught a couple, but on closer inspection, he realized Streator (who was aroused) was alone. (2) The day before, in Ostersund, Sweden, a 35-year-old man was arrested after a surveillance camera revealed him to be the one who repeatedly punctured Per Edstrom’s bicycle’s tires and who that evening was seen sitting on the bicycle pleasuring himself.

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Louann Giambattista, 55, a 33-yearveteran American Airlines flight attendant, filed a lawsuit against the company in July alleging that it had subjected her to baseless hassles because of co-workers’ accusations that, argued her attorney, were wrongly “making her out to be a nut.” One of the accusations — based apparently on Giambattista’s hobby of raising pets at home — was that she was “hiding rats in her underwear (and pantyhose) and sneaking them onto planes.” The airline has allegedly subjected her to enhanced security measures for more than a year, allegedly causing her posttraumatic stress disorder and “debilitating anxiety.”

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Undignified Deaths: (1) A 28-year-old man was killed in Shelby, N.C., in April. Police say he had trespassed on a salvage lot at 5 a.m. and was underneath a wrecked car trying to steal a catalytic converter when the jack slipped, and the car fell on him. (2) A 42-yearold man was shot and wounded while on his front porch in Antioch, Calif., on Friday morning, June 28. He was treated and released, but walked out on his porch the next morning and was again shot, this time fatally.

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2013

Steelers Preview

DON’T CALL IT REBUILDING After a disappointing 2012 season, the Steelers are back with plenty of new talent — and lots of the same old swagger {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

Former Pitt standout LaRod Stephens-Howling will provide quickness out of the Steelers backfield.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013

{PHOTOS TAKEN BY HEATHER MULL AT THE STEELERS’ AUG. 10 PRESEASON GAME AGAINST THE NEW YORK GIANTS}


Watch Championship Chase on the Pittsburgh Cable News Network (PCNC). Ty Miller, Tom Pungin, Brian Cook and Dee Thompson give a different perspective on your Steelers and other NFL teams. Liz Costa, Michele Newell and Jonas Chaney provide feature reports and interviews with players and in-studio guests. Championship Chase airs on PCNC Fridays @ 7:30pm, Saturdays @ 8pm and Sundays @ Noon The Steelers celebrate a touchdown during their first preseason game.

A

LTHOUGH HE’S only a rookie,

Le’Veon Bell is already a dyed-inthe-wool Pittsburgh Steeler. Want proof? Ask the second-round draft pick out of Michigan State what the rebuilding process this year has been like for the Steelers, a team that finished 8-8 last year, missed the playoffs and saw high-profile free-agent departures unlike any other team in the NFL. “This is not a rebuilding team,” says Bell during training camp earlier this month. “These guys are hungry. We’re all hungry. g y

Rooke Le’Veon Bell is the favorite to be the Steelers’ starting running back.

“If you play this game, you have one goal and that’s to get to the Super Bowl.” Spoken like a guy who’s been around for 11 seasons already. “We don’t rebuild; we reload,” says Steelers 11th-year cornerback Ike Taylor. “Maybe other teams finish 8-8 and look to rebuild the next year. But when you’re as successful as the Steelers have been over the years, you never rebuild.” And so it goes with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Regardless of the challenges the team faces, the players, coaches and fans always y expect next year to be the year. And why shouldn’t they? The last time failed to make the playoffs the Steelers Steel 2009, when the team went 9-7. The was 2009 season the Black and Gold went next se to the Super Bowl, although they lost to the Green Bay Packers. “There are high expectations “Th when you’re a Pittsburgh Steeler,” says defensive end Brett Keisel. “That comes with the territory. Last year was frustrating. … We want to get back to winning our division and to be a playoff team, and there has been a sense of urgency to get back there.” But Bu if the Steelers expect to get back to t the top of the AFC North, not to mention the NFL, it’s going to take me a lot of o big plays from a lot of young players. players The Steelers’ off-season defections were wer many, and included some of the team’s team marquee names. Among the most notable: Linebacker James Harrison not went to division rival Cincinnati; offend sive lineman Max Starks went to San linem Diego, while his linemate Willie Colon w went to the Jets; wide receiver Mike Wallace went off to Miami; running CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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DON’T CALL IT REBUILDING, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

back Rashard Mendenhall joined his former offensive coordinator Bruce Arians in Arizona; and defensive tackle Casey Hampton departed, although he’s still an unsigned free agent.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013

Add the fact that tight end Heath Miller will miss several games while rehabbing a serious knee injury suffered last year, and it’s clear the Steelers need a lot of young guys to step tep up. As in years past, the he team decided not to fill its roster needs ds by signing free agents, relying instead d on rookies. Going into the team’s firstt preseason game against the New York Giants, for example, the Steelers carried 21 rookies on the roster. The Giants had just ust 12. “The rookies have been impressive,” says Keisel. “We said [prior prior to training camp] that we have to have our young guys come in, step up p and play football the way we play football. So far, those guys look good. But when the games matter ter and everything is on the e line, we’ll see what these guys uys are capable of.”

With Mendenhall’s departure, the Steelers didn’t surprise anyone by taking the 6-foot-1-inch, 230-pound Bell in the second round of the draft. Bell has impressed his teammates thus far, though he’s been slowed a bit by knee injuries. He missed the team’s first preseason game and re-aggravated the knee in the days leading up to the second. The legacy of great Pittsburgh running backs in Pittsburgh is not lost on Bell. “Any pressure I feel is pressure that I put on myself,” Bell says. “I don’t feel pressure at all from the top. They drafted me to come here and make plays, and that’s what I’m going to try and do. Right now, I’m just adjusting to the speed of the game and trying to continually get better.” In addition to Bell, the Steelers expect to get a change of pace in the backfield from Stephens-Howling, a free agent who spent his first four season with the Arizona Cardinals. A much smaller back than Bell at 5’7” and 185 pounds, Stephens-Howling rushed seven times for 40 yards in the first preseason game, impressing offensive lineman Ramon Foster. “He’s a fast guy,” Foster says. “He knows how to run the outside zone, and we blocked it the way it should be blocked. He made us look good, g , and made a name for himself.”

ON THE OFFENSIVE side e of the ball, the Steelers’ youth uth is especially obvious in the backfield. While running ning backs Isaac Redman, Jonaonathan Dwyer and former Pitt Panther LaRod StephensensHowling bring some experixperience to the running game, ame, it’s Bell who has received the he most attention. Safety Troy Polamalu

CONTINUES ON PG. 24


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DON’T CALL IT REBUILDING, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

Looking good is something that the pass-catching tight end David Paulson, offensive line will need to continue do- both out of Oregon. Wheaton has impressed teammates ing, both for the sake of the running game and for quarterback Ben Roeth- on both sides of the ball. “I see a lot of lisberger, who likes to play outside the promise in him,” says Roethlisberger. “I’m really liking what I see out of pocket and create plays on the fly. The line has been much maligned for Markus Wheaton,” agrees Taylor. “He the past few seasons, though there was just keeps improving.” As for Paulson? “I tell you what: Dasome good news last year. Roethlisberger took 30 sacks last year — the fewest vid Paulson has quietly been having a he’s taken since 2005. The line hopes to hell of a camp,” Taylor says. For his part, Paulson says he’s been improve on those numbers this year. “Our goal is to sustain the run and concentrating on improving each protect Ben,” says Foster. “If we have a day, especially with Miller’s uncertain good running game, then Ben’s going return date. “I’m getting a lot of reps and just to do what Ben does, and that’s make trying to take advantage of the time,” big plays.” And while the line is young, it Paulson says. “I don’t know what’s going to happen with Heath Heath. But if I get an features no o rookies. Foster is in his opportunity to play more, I have to fifth year, center enter Maurkice Pouncey take advantage of that and help in his fourth; rth; the line also feathis team win.” tures third-year d-year man Marcus Gilbert and d sophomores David DeCastro and Mike Adams. ON DEFE DEFENSE, no loss in All three of those players recent years for the missed significant gnificant time Steelers has loomed Steeler last year due to injury, large as the deso la and Adams ms was injured parture of James part in the offseason, eason, when he Harrison to the Ha was stabbed bed during an Bengals. The imBe attempted carjacking on pact of Harripa the South Side. ide. sson’s loss may Roethlisberger sberger says not be fully he’s happy with the way apparent unthe line hass been performtil the Steeling. “I’m excited for that ers travel to group,” he says. “They are reCincinnati for C ally gelling g and meshing toa Monday-night gether, and d I can’t wait to on Sept. 16. match-up o see how it goes with them.” fourth-year Currently, At leastt two other Worilds is linebacker Jason Ja players have ve an opporgetting the first-team reps tunity to stand and out on at Harrison’s position. But the Steelers rs offense: long before the it won’t be lo rookie wide e receiver rst-round draft pick, Steelers’ first-roun Markus Wheaton Rookie linebacker Jarvis Jones and second-year d-year

Rookie wide receiver Markus Wheaton will try to fill the void left by Mike Wallace’s departure.

Jarvis Jones, is expected to pick up where Harrison left off. Taylor, for one, says Jones is “mature for a rookie” and already has a pretty good grasp on the Steelers playbook. “He’s doing some nice things,” says head coach Mike Tomlin. “He’s productive and aware. He’s instinctual. I’m not displeased with his progress whatsoever.” Tomlin also says he’s seen some good things from rookie safety Shamarko Thomas, who Tomlin says is improving daily and is becoming “more verbal in communication, and that is a big part of that position. It is kind of the hub of communication. It is package football and he is embracing that.” But more than finding new personnel, the Steelers defense — which ranked first in the league last year both in pass defense and defense overall — has to find a way to force turnovers. Since 2011,

the Steelers have had negative doubledigit turnover differentials, after posting a franchise-best plus-17 in 2010. While turnovers are the one key area the defense must improve, it’s easier said than done. “We have to create more turnovers,” says linebacker Lawrence Timmons. “And I think if we have to hustle to the ball and play our brand of defense, those things will come. If we can do that and provide our offense with a short field, then we’ll be able to be a catalyst for them.” Taylor says the turnovers will come as long as the team plays solid, aggressive Steelers defense. “Things happen. It’s like a snowball effect. Last year we were playing hard, but they weren’t coming,” says Taylor. “If we can stay healthy this year and get back to creating turnovers, we’re going to be hell for a lot of people.”

“BEN’S GOING TO DO WHAT BEN DOES, DOES AND THAT’S MAKE BIG PLAYS.”

C D E I T C H@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

SEE THE STEELERS SHOW THEIR SUPPORT FOR WQED AT 24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013

wqed.org/twominute


2013

Steelers Preview

Seven Springs Mountain Resort presents the

21ST ANNUAL WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL

INT-ANGIBLES

Ike Taylor plays crucial role in Steelers defense — even if it’s not always clear in the highlight reels {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

The Seven Springs Wine & Food Festival is a celebration of Pennsylvania wine and food. Thirty wineries from all over the state will attend this event. Festival guests can sample from hundreds of different tastes, combinations and vintages, as well as purchase their favorites to take home.

WHEN FOOTBALL experts talk about the

NFL’s best shutdown cornerbacks, one name always seems to top their list: Ike Taylor. Wait. Actually, it doesn’t. In fact, there is a whole catalog of names that get spoken before Taylor’s: Darrelle Revis, Richard Sher{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} man, Peanut Tillman and an aging Champ Steelers cornerback Ike Taylor Bailey, just to name a few. Taylor himself can tell you the main reaWhile the 2011-12 season was generson why his name isn’t on that list: “Inter- ally considered one of Taylor’s best, for ceptions, that is it,” he says. But that doesn’t example, the only part of it many fans remean he agrees with the rankings. call was the overtime of the AFC wildcard “I don’t know what corner in front playoffs, when Taylor was scorched by a of me has two Super Bowl rings, a Super short pass over the middle from Denver Bowl interception, three Super Bowl ap- quarterback Tim Tebow to wide receiver pearances,” he says. “I line up against the Demaryius Thomas. That play went 80 best receiver every week. yards for the winning score. … You know, that’s not for “I DON’T KNOW WHAT In November 2006, Taylor everybody. Shout out to the was benched by then-head CORNER IN FRONT corners who have all those coach Bill Cowher before OF ME HAS TWO interceptions, but to line the job the folSUPER BOWL RINGS, regaining up against the best guy evlowing month due to injuA SUPER BOWL ery week, snap after snap, ries in the secondary. INTERCEPTION, a lot of those guys don’t Still, Taylor has been THREE SUPER BOWL one consistent presence want that.” Since entering the in a defense that, under APPEARANCES.” league in 2003 out the defensive coordinator Dick University of Louisiana-Lafayette, Taylor LeBeau, has consistently set the league has just 14 interceptions and one touch- standard year after year. Taylor must be down. Compare that to his former college doing something right. teammate, Chicago Bears corner Tillman, Last season, when the Steelers went 8-8, who has racked up 33 picks and eight Taylor was criticized for again posting lackscores, after entering the NFL the same year luster interception numbers and for getting as Taylor. Then again, the Bears haven’t beat on a couple of big plays. However, the won a Super Bowl since Tillman went pro. Steelers finished 2012 as not just the top “I’ve been here for 11 years,” Taylor says. team in terms of overall defense, but No. 1 “Everybody has their own opinions of me in pass defense. and I respect that, but I have to let that stuff “We’re number one. What else do we go in one ear and right out the other.” have to do, get to number zero?” Taylor For his part, head coach Mike Tomlin asks. “I guess we can try that.” has downplayed the emphasis on interAnswering critics like that and playing ception statistics. with a chip on his shoulder has no doubt “I really think when it comes to inter- been among the biggest reasons Taylor has ceptions it’s not about the number you get. survived so long with the Steelers. He seems It’s about what you do with the opportuni- to have an uncanny ability to bounce back ties that you get,” Tomlin said during a press from adversity: Even if others doubt his talconference before the Steelers second pre- ent, he never seems to. He’s well aware that season game. “I think measuring defensive since he was drafted in 2003, the Steelers backs or units solely on interception num- have drafted no fewer than 13 defensive bers is somewhat inaccurate.” backs and signed another 18 as free agents. Taylor’s career has certainly been full of And yes, he’s counting. ups and downs. But while his contributions “I’m going to keep counting, too,” Taylor to the team are sometimes minimized, his says. “It looks easy and everybody feels like blunders have been emphasized plenty. they can do it, but this is not for everybody.”

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2013

Steelers Preview

AWAY GAME

Former punter Josh Miller hits the road to document Steelers fandom — and help some former football heroes {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

FORMER STEELERS punter Josh Miller may

be enjoying more popularity now than he had on the field. He’s co-host of an afternoon-drive show on sports-talk radio station 93.7 The Fan, and his latest project — a book chronicling a road trip to Steelers bars around the country — will likely have a built-in audience of its own. Over the next 140 days, Miller and his friend and business partner, Shawn Allen, will visit and document 100 Steelers bars around the country. (Fans can vote on which sites they’d like to see included at www.alwaysahomegame. com.) And while the book aims to explore the depth and breadth of Steelers fandom, its purpose is even larger. WHERE DID THE IDEA FOR THIS BOOK COME FROM? I’ve always been impressed that when the Steelers break camp, they’re the only team

DO YOU THINK WE WILL SOON BE SEEING THE DECISION TO WRITE THIS OPENLY GAY PLAYERS IN THE NFL, AND BOOK, THOUGH, WASN’T JUST IS THAT SOMETHING THAT YOU THINK ABOUT CHRONICLING STEELERS WILL BE ACCEPTED BY PLAYERS? FANDOM, RIGHT? I would become saddened when I’d hear It’s amazing what people get used to. The about a lot of the older guys — and not more that it’s out there, the more people just Steelers, but all NFL players — who are talking about it, the more people are needed help today because they weren’t responding positively, the more acceptmaking the same money back then that ing people will become. I think it’s also players make now. There wasn’t really big that kids today are growing up more anything set up to help these guys down mature than they used to and that as a the road like there is today. So I began to topic it’s becoming more and more welthink that if I visited 100 Steelers bars in comed. I think it’s eventually not going to 140 days, if I could get the word out on so- be a big deal, and I think it will happen in cial media and get the Steelers behind us, the NFL in the next five years or so. that I bet that I can raise some money for some of these guys. I went to the Rooneys THE OTHER HIGH-PROFILE TEAM YOU and I pitched it; it was a soft pitch PLAYED FOR WAS THE NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS. TALK ABOUT THE DIFFERENCE because they loved it. BETWEEN BEING A STEELERS FAN AND There will be some proceeds donated {PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE PITTSBURGH STEELERS} A PATRIOTS FAN. Former Steelers punter Josh Miller will be going to from the book and there Steelers bars across the country for a good cause. will be pieces to auction off Boston fans are crazy in READ MORE their own right. But they in the world that thinks they’re going to everywhere we go. We’re have a bunch of sports win it all every year. Whether it’s true or even going to take some FROM to choose from, and you not, that’s the mentality. The cause and ef- pieces donated by the bars JOSH MILLER, can only divide your crafect of that is the fan base that they have. … we visit and auction that including his thoughts on playing for both Bill Cowher ziness between so many It’s the best fan base in the country, because off to all of Steelers Naand Bill Belichick, avenues. But when it they’re all over the place. The name of the tion. The bar that raises at www.pghcitypaper.com comes to the Steelers fan, book is Always a Home Game because that’s the most money will get to it starts and stops with the exactly what it felt like when you’d go into hand over the check to Mr. someone else’s arena and they come out of Rooney — hopefully about $ 200,000 — to Steelers. They’ve really put all their eggs in this particular basket. Now, it’s been get this thing going. their [own] tunnel and get booed. I was a little uncomfortable doing this a pretty great basket, and being a Steelmyself because I thought, “Why would a ers fan is just a whole other level. Any kicker do this?” Then it hit me: Who had a Patriots fan would love to see you on the better seat in the house than I did? Steelers Nation watched these gladiators fight from a distance. I saw what these guys looked like before they put the armor on and when they took it off. I saw the broken bones and the playing in pain and I saw them give everything they had to this game. AS A PUNTER, WERE YOU ABLE TO ESCAPE THE GAME IN PRETTY GOOD HEALTH? For the most part. There’s wear and tear that goes on. But I’m able to get out and play golf and I do OK. Compared to some of these other guys, I have nothing to complain about.

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THE NFL HAS BEEN TRYING TO IMPROVE PLAYER SAFETY. DO YOU THINK IT’S BEEN SUCCESSFUL? They’ve done everything that they possibly can. You know what you’re signing up for. It’s like asking a bull-rider, “Are you sure you’re safe enough?” Listen: You’re the one that decided to get up on the back of a fricking bull. You have to assume that unless you’re invisible, you’re going to get hurt. The NFL is doing what they can while protecting the purity of the game in an era where guys are bigger, faster, stronger than they used to be.

Josh Miller spent seven seasons with the Steelers.

street, politely ask for your autograph, maybe get your picture with their kid. But a Steelers fan would pull over and change your tires in the rain. That’s the difference between the two fan bases. You want more evidence? Ask yourself how a punter has a radio show. That doesn’t happen anywhere else. C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013


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The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you

2013

Steelers Preview w

THE BRITISH FAN ’S GUIDE don’t drink TO STEELERS & drive. FOOTBALL

to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice,

The Steelers take on the Vikings Sept. 29 in London {BY ANDY MULKERIN} ON SEPT. 29, the Steelers and the Minnesota

Vikings face off at London’s Wembley Stadium — part of an NFL effort to promote American football in the U.K. There’s bound to be some confusion on the part of fans who have their own idea of what “football” means. So we’ve collected a few pointers to help assuage any misunderstandings our friends across the pond might have about the sport we call football.

Big Ben: Yours is a 150-year-old clock tower. Ours is a 31-year-old quarterback with a questionable legal history and a tendency to play best outside of the pocket.

begins. Could we get rid of some of them, since they cancel each other out? Probably, but what would Marcus Gilbert do if he got laid off? Probably not sell underwear.

The scoring: In your kind of football, when you score, you get one point. In our football, you get six points. Then you get a chance for another point on top of that. Unless you do the kind of scoring where you get three points. Or the other kind where you get two. Hey, where are you going? Don’t you want to learn about football? Tackling: To you, tackling is a physical method of wresting the ball away from

The field: You tend to like to call a soccer your opponent. It’s important, but also incifield, or any other field, a “pitch.” We call our football field a “gridiron.” When we’re feeling poetic, at least. Honestly, we usually just call it a field. We really are pretty lazy.

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The goal posts: Those are for when Shaun Suisham kicks a field goal. It’s kind of like getting a goal in soccer, only up a little higher and there’s not a goalie blocking his shot. OK, it’s a lot easier than getting a goal in soccer.

The stops and starts: Soccer games go The feet: Here’s the thing about our foot- on and on and never stop, even after the

ball, guys: We don’t really kick the ball that much. Every now and again, yes. At the beginning of a half? Always. But in between, we mostly throw and carry it a lot.

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The ball: Yours is round, like a … ball. Ours is kind of a weird pointy oval, and we call it a “pigskin,” because we like to memorialize the four-legged heroes who sacrificed in order to make our game possible. The shape makes it a little easier for our Big Ben to throw, but also makes it more prone to wobbling, especially when you kick it. Speaking of which …

dental to the game. To us, tackling is about Lawrence Timmons obliterating the guy with the ball. One could argue that it’s the entire point of the sport, at least to some of us. The ball, the yard-lines, the passes — all part of an elaborate set-up to help make the tackling happen.

playing your football. Your football players come to America and sell us underwear. Our football players? Some of them are well over 300 pounds. That’s because there is an entire line of players on either side of the ball who exist almost exclusively to run into each other immediately after play

clock hits 60 minutes. Know who that’s really rough on? TV advertisers, who can’t get a word in edgewise. That’s why we have lots of built-in stops and starts in our football. A play starts, the 300-pound guys run into each other, Big Ben throws the ball and suddenly, tweeeeeet! The play is over, time to talk to your doctor about erectile dysfunction again.

The violent, unruly hooligans: We have them in American football too; we just call them “Raiders fans.” A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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ON

THE EXPERIENCE OF TAPAS — CASUAL, SOCIABLE, AFFORDABLE AND DELICIOUS

STEELERS DIGEST {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} The cafeteria at Pittsburgh Steelers training camp is much like one you remember from high school — except the rich, popular kids here are really rich and popular. After the morning practice at St. Vincent’s College in Latrobe, reporters assemble outside the chow hall in hopes of cornering players and getting some inside scoops. On any given day there are two dozen reporters from local and national news outlets gathered outside. Their questions range from topics suitable for the sports pages — rookie running back Le’Veon Bell’s knee injury and who will replace Mike Wallace — to those more suitable for publications like Teen People: “Do you use the Twitter much?” or “Is it true that David DeCastro has become a jokester?” Once inside the cafeteria, however, reporters are barred from interviewing players, who must get down to the business of eating. They have a host of healthy items to choose from, including a salad bar and entrees like baked chicken or broiled fish. There are also some highercalorie items like pizza, desserts and hand-dipped ice cream. Calorie counts are prominently displayed. And here, much like in high school, cliques are enforced by strict rules – both written and unwritten: Some tables are reserved for players and coaches, while reporters seem consigned to the back corner — just like when they were in AV club. There, they partake in another timehonored journalistic tradition: eating a meal that someone else paid for. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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is happening outside side Phipps Conservatory, ory, in Oakland. The festival val celebrates the popular, usuallyy red fruit, plus its buddy buddy, garlic. Cooking demos, activities mos, kids’ acti it and contests for home gardeners: Bring your biggest, prettiest and ugliest tomatoes. Donate some fresh produce for free admission to the Summer Flower Show. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat., Aug. 24

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SMALL AND SWEET

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

T

APAS DEVELOPED in Spain, where, it

is said, both the heat and the languorous nature of mealtimes dictated lighter, more modular menus than the traditional entrée plates heaped with meat, starch and veg. Since tapas arrived stateside, recipes have departed from Spanish tradition, but the fundamental “small plate” concept has caught on big. Because, really, is there a better style of food than tapas for sitting outside, with friends, sipping wine, on a summer evening? After our visit to Lula, our answer is an emphatic “no.” Lula is located in a “flatiron” building — one whose shape hews to the wedge of a triangular intersection — in the heart of Sewickley. This affords its interior broad window-walls on two sides and a welllit bar on the third. The space’s former tenant was a wine bar, and while Lula’s emphasis on food is a bit more forward than its predecessor’s, the bar remains at the heart of the establishment. The seating is informal, mostly lounge-style, on couches and stools rather than proper

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Various small plates at Lula

tables and chairs. Outside, small café tables line the sidewalk, and we pushed a few of these together to make the most of a perfect summer evening. Here we ordered most of the menu. The selection was eclectic, certainly not strictly (or even loosely) Spanish, but suggestive of Mediterranean cafés, with plenty of seafood, cured meats, cheeses and

LULA

515 Broad St., Sewickley. 412-749-1200 HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. PRICES: $7-15 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED summer-fresh produce. Portions were adequate for sharing among our party of six, and because a few items were out, we weren’t overwhelmed. The outage was apparently due to a vacation on the part of the head chef, who, according to our server, typically makes a daily trip to the Strip for provisions, letting him tailor op-

tions to the best available produce. Fresh figs, thus, had not been procured, but there was little else that we missed, and the overall quality of our meal testified to the establishment of a high standard in the kitchen. And Angelique was still able to satisfy her fig craving with a plate of toast rounds topped with fig jam, goat cheese and paper-thin slivers of ham, all drizzled with a syrupy balsamic glaze and a confetti of basil. The resulting combination of sweet, tangy, salty and smoky flavors was nothing less than luscious. Mini lobster melts featured the same baguette slices sandwiching some fine lobster salad, but the open-face technique which was so successful with the fig toasts would have helped the lobster play a more suitably prominent role. Tuna tartare was cleverly served rolled in translucent slices of cucumber, a preparation which honored this classic pairing, suggested sushi maki and portioned the tartare for easy sharing, all at once. A mild soy emulsion and spicy


sriracha sauce allowed each diner to customize his or her bite. A smoked-salmon plate, meanwhile, did not stray from traditional accompaniments such as capers and more baguette rounds. Caprese salad was also spared an update, though the wan tomatoes were a disappointment, especially this time of year. Perhaps the best presentation of the evening was spears of white asparagus wrapped in ham, drizzled with a balsamic reduction, and accompanied by slivers of lightly roasted sweet orange pepper. The asparagus, more mildly flavored than its green cousin, was perfectly tender, while the salty ham was well balanced by the subtly smoky peppers and the sweet-butnot-too-sweet sauce.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

WORK LESS … AND LIVERMORE

New East Liberty bar offers respite from the grind “This is a gateway to East Liberty,” says Bobby Fry, one of the owners of The Livermore. The newly opened bar makes an impressive entrance: Picture windows, capped with stained glass, flood light into the South Highland Avenue space, which formerly housed the Waffle Shop. Reclaimed bowling-alley lanes line the counter and bar. The new venture bears the name of early 20th century Wall Street speculator Jesse L. Livermore, who won and lost a few fortunes before killing himself — a fate that inspired Fry to choose his own career path carefully. “Maybe if he had just opened a bar with his buddies, his life wouldn’t have ended so tragically,” Fry says. The Livermore is, in fact, Fry’s second venture with Justin Steel and Kevin Cox, who also own Bar Marco in the Strip District. Fry will oversee Livermore’s bar alongside Sean Enright, who currently runs front-of-house at Bar Marco. The drink menu, leaner than its Bar Marco counterpart, features a mix of classics, spins and originals. Lighter drinks like Almost Home (sherry, a touch of Japanese whiskey and lavender-honey syrup) are typical refreshments, but daytime workers in search of a Mad Men-style business lunch won’t go thirsty: Washington, D.C., bartender Derek Brown’s “The Perfect Martini,” for one, is on the menu. “We decided we had to open up during the day,” Fry says. “This [neighborhood] is the co-working mecca of Pittsburgh.” If you choose to tackle the day without booze, teas and fresh-squeezed juices are available, along with light refreshments, created by Steel along with Bar Marco executive chef Jamilka Borges. By night, The Livermore serves as pre- and post-meal destination for aperitifs and nightcaps. “We’re near Notion and Spoon, some of the best fine-dining restaurants in the city,” Fry says. “I know the whole story of this neighborhood: how it once was booming, and then its downfall in the ’60s,” he adds. “We want to help play a part in its restoration.”

“EAST LIBERTY IS ‘THE CO-WORKING MECCA OF PITTSBURGH.’”

Lula chef Amy Wander

Grilled vegetables — squash, zucchini, peppers and tomatoes — are a virtuous, if frequently uninspired, staple of simple summer cooking. Lula made theirs practically decadent with the addition of a lush pesto and crumbs of creamy, salty feta cheese. Toward the bottom of the menu are more substantial items, including filet mignon, lamb chops and a scallop dish. The scallops were out, but we were very pleased with the supple filet with fig sauce. Truffle frites took shoestring potatoes to their inevitable conclusion, being literally the thickness of a hefty string. They were addictively crispy and laced with just enough truffle oil to add earthiness without funk. We wish every town and every neighborhood had an establishment like Lula, where the experience of tapas — casual, sociable, affordable and delicious — is realized with such competence and care. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

ASPINWALL GRILLE. 211 Commercial Ave., Aspinwall. 412-782-6542. With a bar on one side and black-and-white vinyl booths on the other, the Grille serves as Aspinwall’s unofficial clubhouse. The expected bar and diner classics are all here, but the kitchen expands upon them with unusual presentations and ingredients. KE BENJAMIN’S WESTERN AVENUE BURGER BAR. 900 Western Ave., North Side. 412-224-2163. A casual-chic burger-and-sandwich joint is a tasty addition to the North Side. The menu consists of a Benjamin’s Western Avenue Burger Bar {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} matrix of burgers (two sizes, nine topping combos, beef THE CAMBOD-ICAN KITCHEN. CURRY ON MURRAY. 2121 or veggie patty), four other 1701 E. Carson St., South Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. sandwiches and eight beerSide. 412-381-6199. Having 412-422-3120. The menu here is friendly “snacks” (from nuts made the jump from street fairly standard Thai, featuring to a charcuterie platter). truck to modest sit-down your favorites but also offering Prices aren’t diner-cheap, venue, the owners few surprises. So alongside satay, but then some burgers retained their menu, larb salad, pad Thai and the come with red-wineso popular with the popular street-food noodle dish, braised onion and late-night crowd, pad see ew, look for moo dad truffle mustard. KE of fresh-cooked deaw, a fried pork appetizer or www. per pa Cambodian cuisine. a pumpkin-tofu curry. KF pghcitym .co BIGELOW GRILLE: Kabobs, fried wontons,

FULL LIST ONLINE

REGIONAL COOKING AND BAR. Doubletree Hotel, One Bigelow Square, Downtown. 412-281-5013. This upscale restaurant offers fine foods with Steeltown flair, like “Pittsburgh rare” seared tuna (an innovation borrowed from steelworkers cooking meat on a blast furnace). The menu is loaded with similar ingenious combinations and preparations. KE

BOSSA NOVA. 123 Seventh St., Downtown. 412-232-3030. This stripped-down, oversized industrial space somehow feels sumptuously swank. The menu is small plates, ranging from traditional tapas to Asianinspired dishes. With excellent food, exemplary service and a grown-up atmosphere, Bossa Nova is a nightclub you don’t have to be out clubbing to appreciate. KE CAFÉ DELHI. 205 Mary St., Carnegie. 412-278-5058. A former Catholic church in Carnegie now houses an Indian café, with a menu ranging from dosa to biryani to palak paneer. From a cafeteria-style menu, order street snacks (chaats, puris), or the nugget-like, spicy fried “Chicken 65.” Hearty fare includes chickpea stew, and a kebab wrapped in Indian naan bread. JF

chicken, shrimp cakes, curried vegetable bowls and fried noodles are among the restaurant’s staples, as is its distinctive in-house “moon sauce” and fresh limeade. JF

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Curry on Murray

CUCINA BELLA. 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., Bridgeville. 412-257-5150. This casual eatery offers an unassuming menu of pizzas and pasta that are prepared with a commitment to fresh ingredients and an openminded, thoughtful approach to flavor profiles. For instance, pizzas range from traditional tomato and cheese to arugula and prosciutto to the adventurous rosemary and pistachios, ricotta, sausage and green olives. KF

EASY STREET. 301 Grant St. (One Oxford Centre), Downtown. 412-235-7984. A relaxing Downtown venue succeeds with inventive bar fare such as a pork-belly sandwich and yellow-fin tuna tacos that straddle the Latin-Asian flavor divide. Less exotic fare is treated well, too: Pastrami is made in house, and the braised-beef sandwich features arugula, pickled onions and cambozola cheese. KE FUKUDA. 4770 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-567-5050. This neo-traditional Japanese restaurant excels at re-invention, with a menu that is inspired as much by modern American cuisine as it is by ancient Japanese tradition. Here, roasted beets are powdered, kale is crisped, and pork belly gets its own entrée. It offers a tapas-like, a la carte approach, ideal for sampling a menu that spans traditional sushi, charcoal-grilled skewers, ramen soup and neatly prepared, sliced proteins. LF GREEN PEPPER. 2020 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill 412-422-2277. At this family-run restaurant, diners will find authentic Korean recipes refreshingly not reconstituted for timid Americans — no egg rolls or Chinese-American stir-fries. Dumplings contain kimchi, and CONTINUES ON PG. 34


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the soup is pumpkin. Entrees include the more-familiar bulgogi (barbecued beef), as well as bibimbap, in which meat and veggies are mixed with rice. KE

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JANICE’S SWEET HARMONY CAFÉ. 2820 Duss Ave., Ambridge. 724-266-8099. A musically themed diner offers tried-and-true breakfast-andlunch diner standards (with fun, musical names such as “Slide Trombone”). This is your stop for French toast, German apple pancake, fruit-filled pancakes, and savory options such as skillet fry-ups (eggs, home fries, cheese, sausage). J

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013

HOKKAIDO SEAFOOD BUFFET. 4536 Browns Hill Road, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1422. This buffet-style restaurant rises above the scourge of the steam table to offer some true gems among its panoply of East Asian offerings. There’s standard Chinese-American fare, but also sushi, hibachi-style Japanese cooked to order, popular offerings such as crab legs and roast Peking duck, and even frog legs. KF

538 California Ave. Pittsburgh Pa 15202

NAKAMA JAPANESE. 1611 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-6000. Pittsburghers are crazy about this sushi bar/ steakhouse, and every weekend pretty people crowd inside to watch the knife-wielding chefs. Presentation is key for customers and restaurant alike: The interior is smart, the chefs entertaining, and the food is good, if pricey. LE POOR RICHARD’S WEXFORD ALEHOUSE. 10501 Perry Highway, Wexford. 724-9359870. This bar and restaurant delivers top-notch pub grub, plus a well-curated beer menu. Among the offerings: the Buffalo, N.Y. classic sandwich, roast beef on weck, a Germanic roll with caraway seeds; and mac-and-cheese, made with Buffalo hot sauce. Wellprepared burgers, wings, fish and chips, and sandwiches round out the menu. KE PUSADEE’S GARDEN. 5321 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-781-8724. Traditional Thai sauces and curries from scratch are among the reasons to stop by this charming eatery, which boasts an outdoor patio. Don’t miss the latke-like shrimp cakes, the classically prepared tom yum gai soup or the spicy duck noodles. KF THE QUIET STORM COFFEEHOUSE AND RESTAURANT. 5430 Penn Ave., Friendship. 412-661-9355. Bike punks, young families and knowledge-workers can all use a cup of joe, lunch or some homemade pastry. The Quiet Storm’s laid-back, familiar

vibe welcomes all to chill. Breakfast, lunch and Sunday brunches cater to vegetarians and vegans. JF SELMA’S TEXAS BARBECUE. 9155 University Blvd., Moon. 412-329-7003. The decor suggests humble and down-home, but the ingredients and preparation seem tailored to appeal to foodies, with everything from lemonade to tartar sauce and baked beans made in-house. Best of all, each meat has its own custom rub and is drysmoked for hours, then served unsauced so that diners can choose from the six different styles on offer. KF

Hokkaido {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} STONEPEPPER’S GRILL. 1614 Washington Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-854-4264. Though seemingly calculated to be just another chain, StonePepper’s relies on good proportions and expert preparations to give some distinction to familiar fare like pizza, burgers and salads. Don’t miss the signature dessert: cinnamon-bun pizza. KE TOMATO PIE CAFÉ. 885 East Ingomar Road, Allison Park. 412-364-6622. Located on the verdant edge of North Park, Tomato Pie is more than a pizzeria. It offers other simple Italian specialties including pasta and sandwiches, and the chef uses plenty of fresh herbs grown on the premises. FJ WAFFLES, INCAFFEINATED. 1224 Third Ave., New Brighton (724-359-4841) and 2517 E. Carson St., South Side (412-301-1763). The fresh-made waffles here are a marvelous foil for sweet and savory toppings. Sweet options include the Funky Monkey (chocolate chips, bananas, peanut butter and chocolate sauce). The Breakfast Magic has bacon, cheddar and green onions inside, topped with a fried egg and sour cream. Or customize your waffles with a dizzying array of mix-ins. J


offMenu {BY JESSICA SERVER}

HOT SPOT

At Braddock pizza oven, community spirit is baked right in.

Making pizza in the Braddock community oven {PHOTO BY JESSICA SERVER}

THE EDGAR Thomson steel works isn’t the only

source of smoke on Braddock Avenue: Beside the old St. Michael’s convent across the street, a community pizza oven pours its own plume into the air. The oven was inspired by an idea proposed by amateur baker Ray Werner. “He said, ‘Ovens do really exciting things,’ ” recalls Jeb Feldman, owner of UnSmoke System Artspace. “‘People come together around a space and cook, which is a communitybuilding activity.’ ” And thus, the oven was built from reclaimed material, and the effort of community activists like Feldman. Nearly five years later, the oven bakes a few times a month in peak seasons, when it serves as a beacon for non-profit events, literary readings (like the upcoming Wood-Fired Words) and other community-based activities. (Inquire about reservations at braddockmayor@gmail.com.) Writer, professor and food enthusiast Sherrie Flick was present for the oven’s first use. She’s taken her Chatham Food Writing classes — including one I attended — to the oven each summer. “Smoke, heat, ash — all combine with the food and atmosphere to create a fantastic eating experience,” says Flick. “It’s like a campfire without leaving the urban core.” Oven temperatures “can top 500 degrees when everything is right,” Flick adds. “Baking at that temp is stunning. You get a crispy, chewy crust that’s charred and smoky… the wood-fired flame almost becomes an ingredient itself.” Oven gatherings involve a potluck of toppings, many direct from gardens. It’s a creative, active, collaborative process, and the heat has attracted some big names, like chef Kevin Sousa, who tried his hand with the oven in May. Visiting the oven also means a chance to see the Braddock Farms urban garden, Feldman’s gallery and other revitalization efforts. Connecting outside residents to this unique eating experience, Feldman hopes, could help foster greater more investment in Braddock’s future. “It’s a great example of how to use space and close the [food] loop,” he says. “You plant, you grow, you cook and then you eat, and it all can happen outdoors… Every time it gets used, it activates an energy here.” I N FO @P G HCI TYPAP ER.CO M

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LOCAL

“I STARTED THINKING ABOUT MY OWN MUSIC: ‘WHY DO I PLAY REGGAE?’”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

DRINKING TO LOCAL TALENT

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DOS EQUIS SINGER-SONGWRITER COMPETITION FINALS. 9 p.m. Mon., Aug. 26. Lawrenceville Moose, 120 51st St., Lawrenceville. Free. www.wilsonmcginley.net

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FROM

REGGAE ROOTS TO

Singer-songwriter contest finalist Ronnie Gunn

Matt Wilson doesn’t fancy himself a music promoter, exactly — but in the course of working at the family business, beer distributor Wilson-McGinley, he ended up starting a summer-long singer-songwriter competition that wraps up this week at the Lawrenceville Moose. “Our Heineken rep was in, and showed me a brewery in Holland where they had a big music competition,” he recalls. “They just mentioned it in passing. But I kept thinking about it, and I started to think this would really work here.” “Here” is Lawrenceville, specifically: The distributor is on the border of Lawrenceville and the Strip, and Wilson chose nearby bars that already present live music to host the series. Preliminary contests were held at Hambone’s, Thunderbird Café, New Amsterdam and Belvedere’s. Each competition drew 15 to 17 performers; from each round, two competitors won via judges’ choice — judges included personalities from WYEP — while a third was a people’s-choice winner. The musicians each took one original song that they wrote or co-wrote and performed it, either solo or with minimal accompaniment. A total of 12 performers moved on to the final round, including Butler County chamber-pop songwriter Karter Schachner (a.k.a. Sol Persona) and Cranberry-based acoustic songwriter Ronnie Gunn. The finals take place Mon., Aug. 26, at the Lawrenceville Moose. Winners receive cash prizes, gift cards for Lawrenceville-based outfitter Backstage Guitars and studio time at local Parker Street Studio. So far, the whole thing has met with success; Wilson says he’s hoping to make it an annual event, even though it’s his first time promoting music events. “It’s been a great learning experience,” he notes. “The whole idea is promoting local business and local art,” Wilson adds, “and showing how they can really benefit each other when we all work together.”

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

M

ATHEW TEMBO’S musical journey began in Zambia, and at least for now, it has brought the multi-instrumentalist to Illinois, where he leads his band, Mathew Tembo and Afro Roots. But his first long-term home in the United States was Pittsburgh, where he moved in 2011. “My wife is from Pittsburgh,” Tembo explains. “We lived in Africa, and when we moved to the United States, we came to Pittsburgh first and lived there for about a year, before I went to Illinois for college.” There, Tembo would study worldmusic performance at Northern Illinois University — perhaps an odd choice for an accomplished musician who’d already toured internationally. But his layover in Pittsburgh was a time of transition, both geographically and stylistically.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013

Zambia to Chicago by way of Pittsburgh: Mathew Tembo

He had long been a reggae musician, because that’s what he played when he started as a musician in his teens. “I listened to a lot of reggae,” Tembo recalls. “In Zambia, after you [take] your highschool exam, you have one year to wait for

MATHEW TEMBO AND AFRO ROOTS

6 p.m. Sat., Aug. 24. Umoja African Arts in the Park, Point State Park, Downtown. Free. All ages. (Festival runs 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Sat., Aug. 24-Sun., Aug. 25.) www.umojacompany.org. Second show: 9 p.m. Sat., Aug. 24. Hambone’s Pub, 4207 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $6. 412-681-4318

your results. You need your results to go to college or work or anything like that. So all I did for that year was listen to music.”

And along with the Western pop airing on the radio, Tembo says, it was reggae that commanded his attention: “It sounds a bit like African music, and apart from that, it talked about issues that people in Africa knew, like poverty, corruption, slavery, all those things. There was still apartheid going on in South Africa when I started getting into music.” After studying classical piano, Tembo became a successful reggae artist in Zambia, and began touring. But by the mid-’00s, his music was beginning to change. “I was playing in Denmark in 2004,” he recalls. “And when I played there, they asked me why I played reggae when I was from Africa and there was a lot of music going on in Africa. So when I went back home, I started thinking about my own music: ‘Those people are right, why do I CONTINUES ON PG. 38


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FROM REGGAE TO ROOTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 36

OPUS ONE PRESENTS

play reggae?’ So I started experimenting with traditional African instruments.” Tembo now plays a slew of them: the silimba, a sort of Zambian marimba; the kalimba, a thumb piano; and the kalumbu, a one-stringed instrument. During his year in Pittsburgh, Tembo plugged in to the local music scene to some extent, playing with local artists including Colter Harper, Preach Freedom and Geña. “When I was [in Pittsburgh], I was trying to get it going,” he says. “But it was quite challenging to do that. There isn’t that much of a world-music scene in Pittsburgh. There is a lot of punk rock, and I know they have a jazz scene, but the world music scene is not there.” One connection he did make in Pittsburgh was with Occidental Brothers Dance Band International: Tembo saw the band perform its brand of Central and West African dance music at The Andy Warhol Museum, and met guitarist Nathaniel Braddock. When Tembo moved to DeKalb, Ill., to pursue his world-music studies, he got in touch with Braddock and ended up jamming with him. Braddock then asked him to sing with Occidental Brothers.

“THE FACT THAT I PLAY TRADITIONAL ZAMBIAN INSTRUMENTS ALREADY GIVES IT THAT FEEL.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013

“At first, I was like, ‘No, I can’t do this.’ Because we listened to a lot of that music in Zambia — Congolese music. And I’ve always been like, ‘I hate this music!’ So I said no. But he gave me a CD, and I went home and listened to it, and I started liking it. I realized I could sing it.” Meanwhile, Tembo assembled his own group to play a style of African music inflected with other kinds of pop. “The fact that I play traditional Zambian instruments already gives it that feel,” he says. “But I also appreciate jazz, and play with a lot of jazz musicians. And my singing — I sing in mostly African languages. That gives it that African feel.” Tembo is returning to Pittsburgh this weekend for the first time with Afro Roots (though some of the Chicago players can’t make it, so some of his old Pittsburgh compatriots will be helping out). He’ll play two shows in one day: one at 6 p.m. on Saturday as part of the Umoja African Arts in the Park festival, and another that evening at Hambone’s, in Lawrenceville, with opener Batamba. “When I lived there, I played mostly reggae,” he says. “This is the first time I’ll play a lot of this music in Pittsburgh.” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

NEW RELEASES {BY RORY D. WEBB}

MARS JACKSON HYPECHILL (SELF-RELEASED)

Hype and chill musical vibes collide on Mars Jackson’s new release. The Hill District-born rapper begins with fun, ambitious rhymes on “High Class Society,” a smooth production debut from prominent Pittsburgher DJ Nugget. Jackson’s strengths include his beat selection and versatility, as he molds sounds that range in influence from A Tribe Called Quest to vintage Three 6 Mafia. He enlists local electro-pop band Badboxes for help on “Sacrifice,” an experimental track that could fit into most collegeradio rotations. Another highlight is “More Promises,” an introspective song in which Jackson questions some of his own thoughts and actions while reflecting on relationships with family and friends.

THE CAMP RESPECT MY MIND (SELF-RELEASED)

The Camp unites six hip-hop artists who have previously developed reputations as solo artists in Pittsburgh’s music scene. As a collective, the group’s debut album release highlights comfortable collaborations atop hardhitting beats. Each member brings a unique flavor: Draztyk’s gruff voice; 41Deuce’s impeccable cadence; Kid A’s in-the-pocket wordplay; Jay Nizzy’s more laid-back flow; YM DaKid’s streetsavvy rhymes and knack for making a catchy hook. The crew’s producer, Mysterious, has won several local beat battles in recent years. On Respect My Mind, he samples Bootsy Collins on “Rather Be With You” and crafts an excellent, dark original production with “Frauds.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


LUNCHTIME

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LIVE ACOUSTIC MUSIC NOON TO 1PM TUESDAY AUG. 27

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Hey, Bulldogs: Casino Bulldogs (from left: Jason Hahn, Brad Pfeuffer, Greg Trimeloni)

NO GAMBLE HERE {BY ANDY MULKERIN} THE GUYS in local indie-rock band Casino

Bulldogs have come to a comfortable place. “One thing that’s nice about having been playing for five years is that we’re a lot more efficient now,” explains guitarist and singer Greg Trimeloni. “Songs get done quicker, albums get done quicker, the process is easier.” He should know — the onetime Duquesne University music student has recorded four of the band’s five albums. And while the band does play its fair share of shows, including its upcoming CD-release show for the new album Fashion in Various Evils, it’s no longer about hitting on all cylinders for the trio. “It’s more [about] getting it on CD, getting it recorded well,” says drummer Brad Pfeuffer. “We’re more focused on that than [on] trying to take over the world, play every show, that kind of stuff.” Fashion is a feel-good collection of guitar-rock tunes along the lines of the ’90s indie model: Think Pavement-inspired, but with whispery vocals, and more rhythm-based than guitar-crazy. Most of these tunes could make a good soundtrack to a road trip. Casino Bulldogs make music that’s varied enough to be interesting from song to song without going too far off into jarring territory. Trimeloni and Pfeuffer first bonded over the jukebox at the bar where

Trimeloni worked: “A lot of loud, drumand guitar-driven rock,” says Trimeloni. “I was really into Dave Grohl growing up.” “But,” he adds, “we really are into a lot of different stuff. One of the first songs we ever bonded over was ‘The Bends,’ by Radiohead. We like Wilco, Arctic Monkeys — plenty of different stuff.” Over five years, the band has been through some changes, including the addition of Jason Hahn (of The Hypnogerms) on bass — which Hahn, a guitarist, picked up just for the band. But some things haven’t changed much. “There are two kinds of songs that we write, and I think all along, it’s been like that,” says Pfeuffer. “There’s the two-and-a-half minute, short, dirty rock ’n’ roll song, and then there’s the more melodic, medium-tempo thing.”

MOST OF THESE TUNES COULD MAKE A GOOD SOUNDTRACK TO A ROAD TRIP.

CASINO BULLDOGS CD RELEASE

WITH TRIGGERS, THE YELLERS 9:30 p.m. Fri., Aug. 23. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $7. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

“In our style of music, it’s natural to have a balance,” adds Trimeloni. “Instead of all heavy, fast songs or all slow songs, we like to have that arc.” It’s suited them well: After five years and five records, Casino Bulldogs have hit a nice stride making easy-on-the-ears, fun indie rock, and are happy with where they are as performers. And maybe that’s the real definition of success. A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013


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Let’s start at Rohrich Mazda in Pittsburgh where you can find new car models like the CX-9, MAZDA6 and the MX-5 Miata. We like the MAZDA6 in red and the MX-5 Miata in silver. Then head to the Rohrich Scion showroom to see the FR-S and the iQ. If you are looking for a fuel efficient vehicle, the iQ gets 36 miles per gallon in the city. While on your car shopping journey, head out to Monroeville and stop by Imports by Day Auto. They have huge selections of new and used vehicles and carry both the Audi and Volkswagen brands. Also in Monroeville is A&L Motor Sales where you can check out the new BMWs, Jaguars and Land

Rovers. If you are looking for a premier luxury car dealership, this is the place to go. Monroeville is also home to #1 Cochran Fiat, where there are new and used FIAT cars that can fit any budget. We especially like the 2013 FIAT 500 Abarth. To end your shopping experience, make your way to Moon Township and visit Kelly Cars to browse their new or pre-owned Chryslers, Jeeps, RAM Trucks or Dodges. Learn more about their Kelly Advantage on their website, www. kellycarschryslerjeepdodge.com. These next few pages will help lead you to the right vehicle for you!

huge selections of new and used vehicles at all DAY locations. We offer numerous financing options through manufacturers, local banks, and nationwide banks. We even offer a Guaranteed Credit Approval program at five of our locations, for those customers with less than perfect credit. Our Service Departments are top-notch and now offer online scheduling. And for those that like to do-it-yourself, you can purchase parts for your vehicle at any location at wholesale pricing.

Imports by Day in Monroeville, PA treats the need of each individual customer with paramount concern. We know that you have high expectations, and as a car dealer, we enjoy the challenge of meeting and exceeding those standards each and every time. Allow us to demonstrate our commitment to excellence.

General Manager, Gary Desanzo, has been with the Day Group for over 10 years. He started as a Sales Consultant and then worked in the Internet Sales Department. He also worked in the Finance Department and then became one of our Sales Managers at one of our sister stores. With his background in just about all aspects of the business, having him as our New General Manager is very exciting for all of us.

Our experienced sales staff is eager to share its knowledge and enthusiasm with you. We encourage you to browse our online inventory, schedule a test drive and investigate financing options. You can also request more information about a vehicle using our online form or by calling (888) 552-0240.

Our eight locations keep up busy, but we do not forget about the community. Best Buddies and Audi USA have a strong partnership that encourages dealers to support Best Buddies’ efforts to increase awareness of struggles faces by individuals with IDD and funding for critical friendship programs in local schools.

Founded in 1979, by William Numrich; his legacy lives on through his daughter and current owner, Debbie Flaherty. Our group consists of Day Chevrolet (Monroeville), Imports By Day (Monroeville) aka Day Audi and Day Volkswagen, Day Ford (Monroeville), Day Apollo Volkswagen Subaru (Moon Township), Days West Liberty Subaru (Pittsburgh), Days Toyota Scion (Pleasant Hills), Day’s Centennial Chevrolet (Uniontown), and Day’s Hyundai of Morgantown (West Virginia).

Also, the entire Day Automotive Group family is proud to support Animal Friends, a Pittsburgh-based non-profit providing pets with shelter, love, and new homes. This is a cause close to the heart of our owner, Debbie Flaherty. And when we call ourselves a family, we mean it. Day Automotive Group was selected to be a 2012 Top Workplace in Pittsburgh. This is conducted by surveying all employees by a third-party and being graded against all employers in Pittsburgh.

All of this and more is why our motto will Because of the size of our group, we have always be “We’ll not only make your DAY, an inventory that can’t be beat. We have We’ll make your deal!”

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OF MONROEVILLE 4515 William Penn Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (866) 979-3862 www.fiatusaofmonroeville.com Nearly two years after re-introducing the iconic FIAT brand to the Pittsburgh market, #1 Cochran FIAT of Monroeville presents a new addition to the FIAT family. The all-new fivedoor FIAT 500L offers the same exceptional contemporary Italian design, but with more interior space. FIAT’s first five-passenger car opens the brand to an entirely new consumer and is being called an urban utility vehicle.

$18,000”, J.D. Power’s “Best City Car” and MotorWeek’s 2013 Drivers Choice Award. “The FIAT brand has really crossed the generational lines in Pittsburgh. Our elder generation has embraced the car from a point of nostalgia, while the younger generation explores it for the qualities it brings; value, technology and its effect on the environment in regard to fuel economy. We’re looking forward to seeing what’s in store for the future of this brand,” said Irwin. FIAT’s re-entry into North America came in March of 2011. Just months later, #1 Cochran was among a pool of only 130 dealers in the nation to be chosen to sell the brand. #1 Cochran FIAT of Monroeville opened its doors in October of 2011. FIAT’s introduction into the Pittsburgh market was just a part of a series of growth-driven changes taking place at #1 Cochran. The company had recently opened a new Subaru showroom at the Monroeville MegaCenter, and has since opened dealerships in the North Hills and the Allegheny Valley, as well as building a brand new Volkswagen showroom in Dormont and an all new world-class Buick GMC showroom at its Robinson Campus. #1 Cochran’s new Volkswagen showroom is the region’s only “White Frame” facility which reflects the German automaker’s new architectural design concept.

The 500L offers the Abarth’s same 1.4 liter turbo engine; however, with an optional dual clutch automatic transmission for better fuel economy. Other options include touch screen navigation, back up camera and sensors, Bluetooth, heated mirrors, keyless entry and rear reclining seats. The generous cargo space with rear seat sliders provides additional versatility. “The L appeals to those looking for safe, roomy, fuel efficient cars that bring value and style. This model meets the needs of shoppers who may love the 500, but did not find it to be practical,” said Randy Irwin, #1 Cochran has developed significantly since #1 Cochran’s Retail Campus Performance first opening its doors in 1965; it is currently the leading automotive retailer in Western Director for its Monroeville operations. Pennsylvania and one of the top private dealer In just a short time, FIAT has made its mark groups in the nation. The company operates in the U.S., earning its place among industry 21 new-vehicle franchises throughout experts and automotive enthusiasts. The Monroeville, Robinson Township, Pittsburgh FIAT 500 has received numerous honors, North and South Hills and the Allegheny including IIHS’s Top Safety Pick, Consumer Valley. #1 Cochran employs more than 750 Digest’s “Best Buy for Subcompact Cars”, a team members across its various sales, Kelley Blue Book “10 Coolest Cars Under service and collision repair operations.

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2013 on our Rohrich Scion website or feel free to call our Scion dealership to get an estimate of any service work your car or truck may need, or to ask a question. Our Scion service staff will get back to you as soon as possible with an answer. Give the Rohrich Scion Service Department a chance to earn your business, and find out how different our

service is from others in the Pittsburgh area. Rohrich Scion currently sells these new car models: FR-S, iQ, tC, xB, xD. We invite you to visit us at Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Scion Central, Rohrich Scion your Pittsburgh new car, used car and used truck dealer.

selection is to our customers, so carrying all the popular models is a top priority. We also showcase a service and parts department comprised of Master-Certified technicians able to handle any service issue.

3780 William Penn Highway Monroeville, PA 15146 (412) 373-6071 almotors.com A&L Motor Sales in Monroeville is here to provide you with affordable luxury. Celebrating our 65th year anniversary, A&L can assist you with all of your automotive needs. Our Sales, Parts, Service and Detailing Departments will keep your car running and looking great all year long. We have the full line of new, certified pre-owned and used BMWs, Land Rovers and Jaguars. Stop in any day Monday through Saturday for a test drive. Our commitment to our customers does not stop there. The skilled technicians in our Service and Parts departments are waiting to service your vehicle and provide you with the parts you need. A&L BMW: A&L BMW serves as your preferred Pittsburgh BMW dealer. We offer a complete lineup of all the latest new BMW models, as well as a robust selection of quality used and certified preowned vehicles. We know how important

A&L Land Rover: Just ten minutes from downtown Pittsburgh, our new Land Rover off-road track is sure to exhibit the unprecedented capability of our vehicles. At A&L Land Rover, our commitment to uphold the Land Rover standard of excellence allows our customers access to our unsurpassed industry knowledge and expertise. We are proud to offer the Pittsburgh area full inventories of new and Certified Pre-Owned Land Rover SUVs. Our expert Land Rover service and parts technicians are standing by to help you with any car repair or parts replacements you may require. A&L Jaguar: If you are planning to buy or lease a new or pre-owned Jaguar and live in North Hills or South Hills, East End or West End of Pittsburgh, shop A&L Jaguar and find out why we are the premier luxury car dealership in Pittsburgh and surrounding areas. Our A&L Jaguar dealership is more than just used and new luxury cars. Our fully trained Jaguar auto repair technicians will keep your Jaguar running like new. If you are in need of a Jaguar auto parts, simply fill out our parts order form or call our Jaguar car parts experts with any questions you may have.

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[PUNK ROCK] + FRI., AUG. 23 Was a time when Pittsburgh was overrun with street-punk bands; these days, they’re few and far between. But a couple that were active primarily in the mid-’00s are getting it back together tonight for another go: Tommy Gutless and Weekend Warriors — members from both are now in ska outfit The Pressure and street punks The Sablowskis — bring it back tonight at Howlers; American Pinup and Lost in Society play as well. Andy Mulkerin 10 p.m. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412-682-0320 or www.howlerscoyotecafe.com

[POP] + SUN., AUG. 25 Rickie Lee Jones came of age in Hollywood the late ’70s, rising rapidly as one of America’s great young songwriters. She palled around with the likes of Dr. John and Tom Waits, won a Best New Artist Grammy and had a Top 10 hit with “Chuck E.’s in Love,” a tune that mixed jazz and pop in the way Van Morrison and Boz Scaggs were doing at the time. But while she’s had a long and lauded career since, she’s largely regarded as a musician’s musician, more a respected figure than a celebrity. All the better for those who get to see her play for free tonight at Hartwood Acres in one of the county parks series’ most interesting bookings this year. AM 7:30 p.m. Middle Road, Hampton. Free. 412-767-9200 or www.alleghenycounty.us

[PUNK ROCK] + MON., AUG. 26 The 31st Street Pub gets punk this Monday with a double whammy from legendary outfits The Queers and The Dwarves — a

double-bill not recommended for the overly serious or easily offended. The Queers satisfy melody-minded anarchists with a sound caught somewhere between The Ramones and The Beach Boys, while The Dwarves take things to a raunchier place with perverse lyrics and more hardcore punk sounds. Special guest The Atom Age will make an appearance as well. Kira Scammell 9 p.m. 3101 Penn Ave., Strip District. $15-20. 412-391-8334 or www.31stpub.com

[JAZZ] + TUE., AUG. 27 Local jazz quintet Stranger Convention gives a modern twist to classic jazz, infusing it with nonjazz, rock, electronic and acoustic elements to create what the group calls “nu-jazz” — putting it in line with contemporaries like The Bad Plus. Stranger Convention will be joined by Kinetic, a jazzy Afropop-meets-R&B group, for an energetic and soulful evening at Club Café. KS 8:30 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $5. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

[INDIE-POP] + TUE., AUG. 27 Geographer, the San Francisco-based indie group headed up by Mike Deni, is known for mid-paced, synth-driven pop tunes overlaid with Deni’s airy, thoughtful vocals. Samplers and drum machines are nothing out of the ordinary in the current music moment, but Deni’s songs put Geographer at the head of the class of polished, Arthur Russell-inflected pop outfits; tonight, the band plays Altar Bar along with GRMLN and The Artless. AM 7 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $14. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

Geographer {PHOTO COURTESY OF VICTORIA SMITH}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 22

ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. El Reys. North Side. 412-322-1850. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Old Friends Duo. Murrysville. 724-733-4453. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Rebecca Kaufmann. McMurray. 724-942-1108. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Mike Medved. Pleasant Hills. 412-714-8670. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Aaron Lewis. Munhall. 412-368-5225. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Ivory Weeds, Rivka, Nic Lawless, Martin John. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HARD ROCK CAFE. Brian Davis, East Coast Turnaround, The James Everett Band. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. David Bronson, Boon & Wiliams Brothers Band, Nik Westman. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LAVA LOUNGE. Nevada

Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Rising Regina, Laura B. & the Off Labels (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950. CLUB COLONY. Groove Doctors. Scott. 412-668-0903. HAMBONE’S. Woody Pines, Ye Olde Royal Shithouse Players. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HEY ANDY’S. Fungus. Monongahela. 724-258-4755. www. per HOWLERS COYOTE pa pghcitym CAFE. Outside .co 31ST STREET PUB. Tommy Gutless, Weekend Crooked Cobras, World Warriors, American War IX, Late Comer. Strip Pin Up, Lost In Society. Bloomfield. District. 412-391-8334. 412-682-0320. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & LINDEN GROVE. Dancing Queen. TAVERN. John Puckett. O’Hara. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. 412-963-1514. MEADOWS CASINO. Jimbo ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & & the Soupbones. Washington. TAVERN. Mike Flaherty. Richland. 724-503-1200. 724-444-7333. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD BELVEDERE’S. Wehrmacht, GRILLE. The GRID. Ross. Nunslaughter, Occultist, 412-364-8166. Travesty, Castle Blood, Oh Shit SMILING MOOSE. Reverse They’re Going To Kill Us, Get The Curse (early) Instead of To The Chopper. Lawrenceville. Sleeping, Maid Myriad. South Side. 412-687-2555. 412-431-4668. BRILLOBOX. Casino Bulldogs, ST. CLAIR PARK. Lake Street Dive. Triggers, The Yellers. Casino Greensburg. 724-838-4324. Bulldogs CD Release. Bloomfield. STAGE AE. Adam Ant & The 412-621-4900. Good, The Mad & The Lovely CIOPPINO SEAFOOD Posse, Prima Donna. North Side. CHOPHOUSE BAR. Gene Stovall TERRACE GARDENS. Daniels & McClain. Clairton. 412-233-2626. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Bear Cub, Gypsy & His Band of Ghosts. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Highway 4 Band. North Side. 412-231-7777. WOOLEY BULLY’S. The Dave Iglar Band. New Brighton. 724-494-1578. Mountains, Doomsday Initiative, Crash City. South Side. 412-431-5282. SMILING MOOSE. Action Camp, Maria Rose. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Slim Forysthe,The Wheals, Zack Perkins Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WALNUT GRILL. The Keystone 3. Shadyside. 412-782-4768.

FRI 23

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SAT 24

31ST STREET PUB. Kingsnake, Foghound, Supervoid, Serpent Lord. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CIP’S. The Good Guys. Dormont. 412-668-2335. CLUB CAFE. Nick Marzock Balloon Ride Fantasy, The Wreckids (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Gone South. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. 50 Caliber Dream, Visionaires, O’ Kingdom. Aliquippa. 724-378-7669. FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. John Mayer, Phillip Phillips. Burgettstown. 724-947-7400. HARVEY WILNER’S. Ancient Bloom. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Skulfest 5. Distraught, Who Killed Spikey Jacket?, Aspects of War, Lost Tribe, Krang, Bad Doctors. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

Be immersed in a live laser light show that features animated graphics and 3D atmospheric effects! Visit CarnegieScienceCenter.org for shows and times. BACK BY POPULAR DE MAND —

Beatles, Queen, and Sublime!

CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

HOME PROTECTION NEVER LOOKED SO GOOD

MEADOWS CASINO. Totally 80’s. Washington. 724-503-1200. MONONGAHELA AQUATORIUM. Ron & The RumpShakers, No Bad JuJu. Monongahela. THE PRAHA. The Dave Iglar Band. Tarentum. 724-224-2112. THE R BAR. TheRockit Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882. SMILING MOOSE. To The Wind. South Side. 412-431-4668. TARENTUM EAGLES. Daniels & McClain. Tarentum.

SUN 25

BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Tom Watt & the Fruitcakes. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. STAGE AE. We The Kings, Breathe Carolina, T. Mills, The Ready Set. North Side.

MON 26

31ST STREET PUB. The Queers, The Dwarves, The Atom Age. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Sputzy. North Side. 412-322-1850.

TUE 27

ALTAR BAR. GRMLN. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Kinetic, Stranger Convention. South Side. 412-431-4950. SMILING MOOSE. Said The Whale, Influx. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 28

ATRIAS RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Nick Fiasco. Wexford. 724-934-3660. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Fatality, Lady Beast, Vermithrax. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. SCHENLEY PARK. Daniels & McClain. Flagstaff Hill. Oakland. 412-255-2539.

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52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013

DJS THU 22

SAT 24

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. Motor City Shake. Motown & funk dance party w/ DJ Soulful Fella. South Side. 814-746-5060. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Vex. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Pat Flaherty. Downtown. 412-471-2058. RIVERS CASINO. Video DJ’s. Drum Bar. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

SUN 25

SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 28

BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. 412-325-6769. HAMBONE’S. Rock N’ Roll DJ Mangler. Pub Game Night. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

BLUES THU 22

FULL LIST E N O LwIN w.

SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

w BELVEDERE’S. Neon paper pghcitym w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s .co EXCUSES BAR & Night. Lawrenceville. GRILL. The South Side 412-687-2555. Groove Squad feat. Bill Toms. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & South Side. 412-431-4090. Gangsta Shak. Homewood. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. 412-969-0260. Billy & Jon of Billy the Kid & PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. The Regulators. Canonsburg. 412-224-2273. 724-746-4227.

FRI 23

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. LAVA LOUNGE. 80’s New Wave Flashback. w/ DJ Electric. South Side. 412-431-5282. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Harry Lurker. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Diamond. Downtown. 412-471-2058. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

FRI 23

SAT 24

565 LIVE. The Jimmy Adler Band, Charlie Barath. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. 412-431-4090. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Sweaty Betty, The Whiskey River Kings. North Side. 412-904-3335. OAK HOLLOW PARK. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Community Day Festival. North Huntingdon. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Jill West & Blues Attack. Shaler. 412-487-6259. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Ron Yarosz & the Vehicle. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 25

BROOKLINE PUB. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Brookline. 412-531-0899. TUGBOAT’S. Mystic Knights. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992.

WED 28

THE R BAR. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Dormont. 412-942-8842.

JAZZ THU 22

ANDYS. Lisa Hindmarsh. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MOUNT LEBANON PUBLIC LIBRARY. Jeff Berman’s Eye 2 Eye. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

FRI 23

ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Ron Wilson, Jeff Grubbs. Downtown. 412-325-6769. ECHO. RML Jazz. Cranberry. 412-370-9621. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Jazz Conspiracy Swingtet, The Phoenix Jazz Project. North Side. 412-904-3335. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 24

ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The John Hall Band. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. FRESCO’S RUSTIC EUROPEAN CUISINE & WINE BAR. Donna Bailey. Wexford. 724-935-7550. LEMONT. Rebecca Kaufman & Dave Crisci. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. RIVERVIEW PARK. Salsamba. Stars at Riverview Jazz Series. North Side. 412-255-2493. TALL TREES AMPHITHEATER. 11th Annual Monroeville Jazz Festival. Feat. Tony DeSare & the Tony DeSare Quartet, Elevations w/ Benny Benack III. Monroeville. 412-372-4332. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Bridgeville. 412-370-9621.

SUN 25

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Don Aliquo. North Side. 412-904-3335. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. John Marcinizyn. Shadyside. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. STONE VILLA WINE CELLARS. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Acme. 724-423-5604.


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Anderson. Scott. 412-668-0903. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

CLEVELAND {WED., SEPT. 11}

Deerhunter

Beachland Ballroom

COLUMBUS, OHIO Wexner Center

FRI 23

McCurdy. Harmony. 724-452-0539. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin the Troubadour. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. LEVELS. Gina Rendina. North Side. 412-231-7777. MARIO’S SOUTH SIDE SALOON. Michael Todd. South Side. 412-381-5610. SOHO. Jason Kendall & Jim Graff. North Side. 412-321-7646. W. NEW CASTLE ST. PLAZA. Jordan Auth, Shift Change Acoustic, Full Circle. Butler. 724-256-5769.

SAT 24

THE CORNER. Brad Yoder. Oakland. 412-683-1400. LEVELS. Matt Barranti & Bill Ali. North Side. 412-231-7777. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Graham Buckey. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. SEVICHE. Jason Kendall & Jim Graff. Downtown. 412-515-5082.

FRI 23

BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Tracy Drach, Eve Goodman. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Ben Valasek, Jeff DeSantis, Logan

NEWS

HAMBONE’S. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

TUE 27

PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Gene Stovall. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

WED 28

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. North Side. 412-321-1834. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. EMAY. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. CLUB COLONY. Hewlett

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THUR, AUGUST 22 • 9PM CLASSIC COUNTRY/ ROOTS ROCK

H D TVs

SLIM FORYSTHE, THE WHEALS, ZACK PERKINS

SOUTH HILLS PREMIER SPORTS BAR & EATERY

FRI, AUGUST 23 • 9PM INDIE ROCK

BEAR CUB PLUS

GYPSY AND HIS BAND OF GHOSTS SAT, AUGUST 24 • 9PM BLUES

COLLEGE FOOTBALL SATURDAYS BREAKFAST

RON YAROSZ AND THE VEHICLE

8AM - NOON

WORLD FAMOUS BLOODY MARY BAR

TUES, AUGUST 27 • 9PM JAZZ

SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH

THU 22

PALACE THEATRE. Sugar Mountain. Greensburg. 724-836-1123.

MON 26

THU 22

COUNTRY

{THU., NOV. 21}

Destroyer

ACOUSTIC

REGGAE

POINT STATE PARK. Ras Prophet, The Flow Band. Downtown. 412-224-4086.

Underground Arts

ANDYS. Erik Lawrence. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. CREAMY CREATIONS. Double G & Friends. Penn Hills. 412-727-1780.

SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Weather Permitting feat. Machete Kisumontao, Callan, Delicious Pastries. Shadyside. 412-363-5845.

SUN 25

Mark Lanegan

WED 28

SUN 25

POINT STATE PARK. The Flow Band. Downtown. 412-224-4086.

{SAT., OCT. 12}

ANDYS. Mark Strickland. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jazz Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335. KATZ PLAZA. Kenia. Downtown. 412-456-6666. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Mike Tomaro & James Moore. Shadyside. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Ben Opie’s Baseless Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

HAMBONE’S. Matthew Tembo & Afro Roots, Batamba. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

SAT 24

PHILADELPHIA

TUE 27

SAT 24

BEERS ON TAP

BEN OPIE'S BASELESS TRIO OPEN FOR LUNCH

Watch Every Game Here

Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

PARK HOUSE. The Slim Forsythe Quartet. North Side. 412-224-2273.

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

SAT 24

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Agway Shoplifters. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

$

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

2.50

BOTTLES or 16oz DRAFTS

SUN 25

IRWIN PARK AMPHITHEATRE. Chris Higbee. Irwin. 724-864-3100.

FOOTBALL SUNDAYS

CLASSICAL SUN 25

ORGANIST RUSS WEISMANN. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082.

BREAKFAST 8AM - NOON

OTHER MUSIC

WORLD FAMOUS BLOODY MARY BAR

THU 22

CLUB COLONY. Mark Venneri. Scott. 412-668-0903.

FRI 23

AUGUST 22

SAT 24

NEVADA MOUNTAINS, DOOMSDAY INITIATIVE, CRASH CITY

LEMONT. Phil & Roxy. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. CLUB COLONY. Mark Venneri. Scott. 412-668-0903.

Watch Every Game Here

2.50

$

MON 26

HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

AUGUST 29 EMO NIGHT

BOTTLES or 16oz DRAFTS

WED 28

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes SingAlong. trustarts.culturaldistrict. org/event/3941/hello-donny-ashowtunes-sing-along. Downtown. 412-325-6769. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. Crusic Percussion. Solar Concert Series. North Side. 412-322-5058.

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OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FOR BREAKFAST LUNCH & DINNER

$2 PBR Drafts

Come in for a Late Night Bite! • Kitchen open till 1AM Full Menu Available for Take-Out

Everyday 9-11

$5 PBR Drafts

ICE COLD BEER TO GO!

& Fireball Shot All Day ‘till Midnight

3239 West Liberty Ave, Dormont, PA 15216 412-561-7444 • www.CainsSaloon.com

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What to do August 21 - 27 WEDNESDAY 21 Live on the River Beach Bumz Jimmy Buffett Tribute/ Beach Party Boys Beach Boys Tribute

RIVERS CASINO North Shore. Free event. For more info visit riverscasino.com. 7p.m.

Cheap Trick STAGE AE North Shore. With special guests Freddie Nelson. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Satellite / Jillette Johnson HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests Corey James & MIA Z. Limited all ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

THURSDAY 22

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

IN PITTSBURGH Chris Pureka

All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 7:30p.m.

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 23

The Boogie Hustlers

John Mayer: Born & Raised Tour 2013

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests The Wheals. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

16th 16 th ANNUAL SHADYSIDE ARTS FESTIVAL

Adam Ant STAGE AE North Shore. With special guests Prima Donna. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

SATURDAY 24 2nd Annual Party in the Park

NORTH PARK - NORTH STAR PAVILION. Over 21 event. Free. 2p.m.

Aaron Lewis

21st Annual Wine & Food Festival

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225.

SEVEN SPRINGS MOUNTAIN RESORT. 800-452-2223. Over

SATURDAY, AUGUST 24 WALNUT STREET, SHADYSIDE

21 event. Tickets: 7springs. com. 11a.m. Through Aug. 25.

WALNUT STREET. Free event. renceville. 412-682-0177. Over For more info call 561-74621 show. Tickets: greyareaprod. 6615. 10 a.m. Through Aug. 25. com. 8p.m.

Animal Friends' Bark in the Dark! Pledge Walk & Summer Festival

Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival

HARTWOOD ACRES. To register & for more info visit thinkingoutsidethecage.org. 5p.m.

LAUREL HIGHLANDS. For more info call 724-872-1670. Tickets: pittsburghrenfest.com. Through Sept. 29.

16th Annual Shadyside Arts Festival

Ron Yarosz & The Vehicle THUNDERBIRD CAFE Law-

SUNDAY 25

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Featuring Phillip Phillips. Tickets: livenation. com, ticketmaster.com or call 800-745-3000. 7:30p.m.

MONDAY 26 UPMC Summer Kids' Zoofari

PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM Highland Park. Free with general admission. Through August 30.

We The Kings

TUESDAY 27

STAGE AE North Shore. With special guests Breathe Carolina, T. Mills & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests GRMLN and the Artless. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Geographer

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013


PINT OF NO RETURN

FOR THE KILLERS, IT WAS LESS ABOUT IDEOLOGY THAN COMMERCE

{BY AL HOFF} If you loved Shaun of the Dead and guffawed through Hot Fuzz, you’ll want to finish out Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg’s “Cornetto Trilogy,” which concludes with The World’s End. It’s similarly executed — an ensemble comedy headed by Pegg and Nick Frost, and directed by Wright — and doubles, as did the others, as a genre riff-mash-up. The gang has tackled zombies, rom-coms, cop actioners and cozy murders; now it’s sci-fi and reunion films.

Gary (Simon Pegg) has the evening mapped out.

CP APPROVED

Wrapping up the trilogy is certainly an easier quest than the one the five lads are on: Back in their hometown after 20 years apart, their dissolute leader Gary (Pegg) insists they re-tackle an unfinished pub crawl — 12 pubs, from The First Post to The World’s End. Turns out things in town are not quite right, and each pub stop brings more disturbing developments. End is not quite as fresh and funny as Shaun was, and as in Hot Fuzz, some of the clever dialogue and small-scale humor gets drowned out by noisy action sequences. And despite reaching a conclusion, the film feels less focused in the final reel. Still, there are plenty of laughs, a full complement of 1990s Brit-pop, and a lesson or two about how things change, how they stay the same and what remains important. Hint: friends. Also, beer: “‘Til the bitter end,” says Gary. “Or the lager end.” Starts Fri., Aug. 23. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM AHOFF @PGHCITYPAPER. COM

YOU’RE E NEXT T. A gang of ax-wielding ng home-invaders ders wearing animal nimal heads get more than they ey bargained for or when one e family member er fights back. ck. Adam Wingard directs this horror thriller. Starts rts Fri., Aug. ug. 23

Re-imagining: a scene from The Act of Killing

DEAD RECKONINGS {BY HARRY KLOMAN}

G

ENOCIDE IS difficult to capture on

film. The people who commit it rarely invite an audience, and if you just show up with cameras, you could become one of the statistics. What’s a filmmaker to do? In The Act of Killing, documentarian Joshua Oppenheimer has the actual killers recreate what they did in 1965, when the Indonesian military overthrew the government and dubbed anyone who opposed them a communist who had to die. Now these killers — gangsters in their youth — are silver-haired old men with stories to tell. The result is not one irony after another, but rather the same irony, over and over. For the killers, who speak with a disturbing nonchalance, it was less about ideology than commerce, a way to make money. But even today, communism could never take hold in Indonesia because the gangsters won’t allow it (bad for business). One killer, Anwar Congo, a respected figure in Indonesia, explains that the assassins at first beat their victims to death, which created a bloody mess, so they came

Ride along with history: Aging Indonesian gangsters recall their bloody crimes.

up with a less exsanguinating “system” of garroting. He demonstrates, using a live subject, and says that to forget what he did, he would sing, dance and do drugs. Then he

THE ACT OF KILLING DIRECTED BY: Joshua Oppenheimer In Indonesian, with subtitles Starts Fri., Aug. 23. Melwood

CP APPROVED demonstrates once again with a little musical number. He later reviews the strangulation footage and critiques his performance.

More recollections follow, as do more recreations, with costumes and makeup, often in the mode of the Hollywood films that the killers say “influenced” them, and stylishly filmed by Oppenheimer. There are, of course, some who have regrets. “I know my bad dreams come from what I did,” one says, putting it simply, “killing people who didn’t want to die.” The Act of Killing becomes more introspective half way through, following a discussion about the consequences of setting the historical record straight. Still, one gets the overall impression that the tropical paradise of Indonesia is a pretty fuckedup place, and has been for a while. One assassin finally cries, and Congo retches when he visits a killing site, but it’s hard to say whether a more straightforward film would have elicited the same response. What allows people to be so cavalier about killing in their youth, then to discuss it like Grandpa remembering a summer picnic (or worse: Grandpa acting in community theater)? Perhaps one death is a tragedy, and a million deaths is just a reminiscence. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

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NEW

BLUE JASMIN E. Woody Allen’s latest, a drama just lightly brushed with humor, stars Cate Blanchett as Jasmine, the Xanaxpopping widow of a Bernie Madoff-style bilker (Alec Baldwin). Evicted from ill-gotten Park Avenue/Hamptons luxury after the law swooped in, bitter, brittle Jasmine seeks refuge in San Francisco with her sweet, working-class sister, Ginger (Sally Hawkins), whom she’d previously done her best to avoid. Echoes of A Streetcar N amed Desire are unavoidable: Ginger, for instance, has a taste for blue-collar guys Jasmine can’t stomach. But Allen gets the most mileage from flashbacks juxtaposing Jasmine’s cosseted past with her new earthy reality, including an ill-fated stint as a dental receptionist. Blanchett is, as usual, compulsively watchable, as Jasmine navigates post-nervous-breakdown stresses and struggles to keep her lies (to herself and everyone else) straight. The supporting cast — also including Bobby Cannevale and Peter Sarsgaard — is very good. Meanwhile, there’s piquant social commentary not only in Jasmine’s eventual resort to gold-digging, but also in how this once-privileged woman is always advising everyone else to move on with their lives, even as her biggest sin remains her inability to face herself. Starts Fri., Aug. 23. (Bill O’Driscoll)

CP

CLOSED CIRCUIT. Working on an international terrorist’s trial puts a pair of lawyers (and former lovers) in danger. Eric Bana, Rebecca Hall and Jim Broadbent star; John Crowley directs. Starts Wed., Aug. 28. THE MORTAL IN STRUMEN TS: CITY OF BONES. A New York City teenager (Lily Collins) discovers that she comes from a bloodline of half-angel warriors tasked with rooting out demons. Harald Zwart directs this film adapted from Cassandra Clare’s book series. Starts Wed., Aug. 21. PARANOIA. An ambitious mobile-phone engineer (Liam Hemsworth) becomes a pawn in a corporate espionage battle between two rival CEOs (Gary Oldman and Harrison Ford), in this not-very-thrilling thriller from Robert Luketic. If it weren’t so obtuse and dull, it could almost be a parody of similar slick films. It features, of course: the nail-biting downloading of files; a zillion-dollar shiny-angled apartment; a chase through a restaurant kitchen; a curmudgeon in a ball cap; and rousing dialogue like, “We’re gonna use what they taught me to destroy what they built.” Strictly late-summer filler. (Al Hoff)

REPERTORY

CINEMA IN THE PARK. Skyfall, Wed., Aug. 21 (Schenley), and Sat., Aug. 24 (Riverview). Jack the Giant Slayer, Thu., Aug. 22 (Brookline); Fri., Aug. 23 (Arsenal); Sat., Aug. 24 (Grandview); and Sun., Aug. 25 (Schenley). Chimpanzee, Tue., Aug. 27 (West End/Elliott Overlook), and Thu., Aug. 29 (Brookline). The Avengers, Wed., Aug. 28 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-422-6426 or www.citiparks.net. Free BOY IN THE PLASTIC BUBBLE. John Travolta stars in this earnest 1976 TV movie about a bright, sensitive teenager born without immunities, who must live in protective bubbles or spacesuits. Though sentimental in a low-key way, the movie has a few groaners — including the shot of a spacesuited Travolta running along

56

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013

Blue Jasmine a beach hand-in-hand with a girl. For this So Bad It’s Good Screening, there will be live heckling by the Ink & Paint Club. 7 p.m. Wed., Aug. 21. Hollywood. $10 DIABOLIQUE. A boarding-school principal’s mistress (Simone Signoret) enlists his fragile, putupon wife (Vera Clouzot) in a plot to kill her lover, the other woman’s husband. The plan goes well … until the body disappears. Henri-Georges Clouzot’s stylish 1954 psychological thriller is an exercise in sexual intrigue, moody mise-en-scène and palpable tension. Time has rendered Diabolique less frightening, though it’s still a worthy and intriguing drama. If its plot twists seem familiar and much imitated, recall that many of them originated with this film. In French, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., Aug. 21. Melwood. $2 (AH)

CP

SUN SET BOULEVARD. There’s much to recommend Billy Wilder’s noir-ish 1950 drama about faded silent-screen star Norma Desmond (Gloria Swanson) and the much younger screenwriter, Joe Gillis (William Holden), who moves into her creepy Hollywood mansion as a kept man. The opening scene is a cracker, as we realize the dead guy floating in the pool is narrating the story; the tale, a searing look at the brutal studio machine, the vagaries of fame and assorted pathetic souls that live in half-light of reflected glory, only grows darker. 2 p.m. Thu., Aug. 22. Hollywood (AH)

CP

PAPADOPOULOS & SON S. Stephen Dillane stars in this British comedy about a millionaire wiped out by the banking crisis who opens a fish-and-chip shop with his brother. Marcus Markou directs. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 22. Hollywood THE CAN YON S. The list of trashy-fun bona fides for this drama was long: Lindsay Lohan comeback role; James Deen, porn star; Paul Schrader directing; Bret Easton Ellis writing; and set in the morally compromised intersection of Hollywood and Internet sex hookups. Interest was further piqued when the N ew York Times ran a juicy behind-the-scenes tale early this year. But alas, this tale of a manipulative film producer (Deen) and his emotionally damaged girlfriend (Lohan) — plus their respective lovers — doesn’t break any new ground in this well-trod field. If there’s a point, it’s that people are self-serving, the movie business is vapid (with the Internet swooping in) and — ho hum — bad things happen in this sunlit stew of vacant beauties. And for all the hype about the group sex scenes, Canyons is mostly folks sitting around talking in bored tones. If only it had reveled in the camp it could have been! 7 and 9 p.m. Fri., Aug. 23; 7 and 9 p.m. Sat., Aug. 24; and 7 p.m. Sun., Aug. 25. Hollywood (AH)


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10y T%-Shirt wi

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Paranoia PUBLIC EN EMY. William Wellman’s 1931 CP THE film made James Cagney a gangster star and established the formula for the wave of crime pics to come: A kid grows up tough in the slums, and, pursuing the American dream on his own terms, makes opportunistic use of burgeoning crime rackets. Warner Bros. tacked on a phony warning that such men were to be reviled, but who wouldn’t want plush apartments, tailored tuxedos and beautiful, loose women, as depicted in this fast-paced, pre-Code drama? 7:30 p.m. Fri., Aug. 23. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $3 (AH) REWIN D THIS! Josh Johnson’s new documentary looks at the impact of VHS technology and hometaping on history and culture. 3 p.m. Sat., Aug. 24 ($5 alone or $10 double-feature with Bloodsuckers), and 4 p.m. Sun., Aug. 25. Hollywood

— but the plot is secondary to the top-notch fight sequences, which has Lee dispatching a slew of comers with various techniques. The sharp-eyed fan may catch future martial-arts action stars Jackie Chan and Chuck Norris among the bit players. And nobody should miss the film’s tour de force climax, in which Lee goes footto-claw with the villain in a room full of mirrors. 10 p.m. Sat., Aug. 24, and 7 p.m. Sun., Aug. 25. Oaks (AH)

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ROPE. Two college friends undertake an experiment in superior morality by killing an “inferior” classmate, and throwing a dinner party immediately after. (The corpse is present but not obvious.) Alfred Hitchcock’s 1948 film was based in part on the notorious Leopold-Loeb case of the 1920s, but was also notable for the film’s “single take.” Shot in real time and in one room, reel jumps are cleverly concealed, heightening the film’s claustrophobic suspense. Farley Granger and John Dall portray the student killers; James Stewart is their professor. Continues a Sunday-night, month-long series of films featuring directors and their actor muses. 8 p.m. Sun., Aug. 25. Regent Square (AH)

CP

4110 BUTLER ST • LAWRENCEVILLE • PITTSBURGH, PA 15201 (412) 687-0510 • WWW.HOUSEOFTHEDEADPGH.COM

THE BREAKFAST CLUB. A little sad, a little happy is one way to sum up this 1985 dramedy about high school from John Hughes. You don’t need me to re-tell the plot (five kids from different cliques discover they have plenty in common). So, whether you’re a brain, an athlete, a basket case, a princess or a criminal — just be there when the bell rings. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 28; 9 p.m. Fri., Aug. 30; and 7 p.m. Sat., Aug. 31. Hollywood THE OUTSIDERS. Francis Ford Coppola’s 1983 adaptation of S.E. Hinton’s novel about teenage gangs. Starring C. Thomas Howell, Matt Dillon and a whole slew of soon-to-be-famous young actors. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 28. AMC Loews. $5

The Canyons BLOODSUCKERS FROM OUTER SPACE. Glenn Coburn directs this low-budget 1984 horror comedy film about farmers who become zombies. Featuring President Pat Paulsen! This VHS classic screens in a 35 mm print. 5 p.m. Sat., Aug. 24. Hollywood. $7 alone or $10 double-feature with Rewind This! STATE OF GRACE. Sean Penn, Ed Harris and Gary Oldman star in this 1990 drama about Irish gangsters in New York City. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Aug. 24. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $3 ENTER THE DRAGON. Robert Clouse’s 1973 Englishlanguage kung-fu flick made a household name of its star, Bruce Lee, who would die unexpectedly at age 33 just a month before the film’s premiere. The story is a Bond rip-off — Lee infiltrates a martial-arts competition held on the island fortress of a criminal

NEWS

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NOTHING BUT A MAN. Michael Roemer directs this 1964 independent drama about a African-American mill worker who faces challenges at home and at work (where he attempts to unionize), as well as pervasive discrimination in his Southern town. The film stars Ivan Dixon, Abbey Lincoln and also features a young Yaphet Kotto. The film screens as part of the Battle of Homestead Foundation’s monthly film series, featuring works related to labor and economic issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 29. Pump House, Homestead. Free. 412-831-3871 BREATH OF THE GODS. Jan Schmidt-Garre’s new documentary traces the ancient roots of yoga (the god Shiva is said to have perfected 8.4 million poses), as well as its introduction as a practice in the early 20th century. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 29. Hollywood AN DY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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[BOOKS]

YOU’RE LEFT WITH AN UNEXPECTED, EXPANDED SENSE OF WHAT’S PLEASING

DAY TO DAY

{BY OLIVIA LAMMEL}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KATHRYN SCHANCK}

[ART REVIE W]

Martha Feisler’s diary

“Today is my birthday, 20 years of age,” begins the first entry in the pocket diary that Martha Feisler kept from September 1864 to August 1865. Almost 150 years later, most of the entries from this journal have been printed in Today Is My Birthday: The Civil War Era Diary of Martha Feisler. Kathryn Schanck, of Bon Air, bought the diary on eBay for $40. It was written in Fairview, a rural community near Erie, Pa., where the German-immigrant Feisler family had settled. (The diary was shipped from Indiana, where Feisler’s family later moved.) The self-published book (available at gtysbrg@aol.com) includes several recipes that Feisler, a passionate baker, scribbled down, including for ginger cake and molasses cookies. She helped in the garden, washed and ironed, and cared for her siblings. Some people equate “Civil Warera woman” with Scarlett O’Hara in her green velvet dress. But as Schanck notes, “Someone who’s working is not going to be dressed like that.” Feisler’s entries are brief. A typical one from March 16, 1865, read, “Rainy & stormy. Helped Carrie to iron. Sewed this afternoon.” On April 15, 1865, Feisler wrote, “Got the news that Mr. Lincoln was shot.” But the value of this diary lies mostly in its portrayal of the everyday life of a Northern middle-class woman of her time. “That’s what Mattie is,” says Schanck affectionately. “She’s one of us.” Martha, also known as Mattie, had received an elementary-school education. She writes about studying music, horseback riding and sledding with friends. She often mentions Sunday school, prayer meetings and choir. Schanck, a retired Pittsburgh Police officer, grew up in Polish Hill. She considers genealogy research her second profession and has complied two books of her own family’s history and a family cookbook. Schanck spent a year piecing together the Feisler family story. She used records on ancestry.com, church records, U.S. Census data and service records from the National Archives. Transcribing Feisler’s diary, meanwhile, spanned three summers. Schanck worked on her patio, holding the pages up to the sunlight — the only way she could decipher the smeared ink and smudged pencil. Serendipitously, Schanck met Joan Fiesler, a genealogist at the Fairview Area Historical Society. Joan’s husband is the great grandson of Martha’s oldest brother. Earlier this year, Fiesler gave Schanck a tour of Fairview: “I felt like I was right there with Martha,” says Schanck. “It was the greatest thing.”

A T A D G BI {BY ROBERT RACZKA}

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hearted, aesthetically severe and, well, perfect. It’s mathematical, geometrical, computational and methodical — devoid of the messiness of nature and human nature, and willfully adrift in the abstractions of mathematics and data. data.tron consists of a single screen, about 10 by 40 feet. You can stand back and take it all in or, given its size, you can move in close and immerse yourself, though the work is unaffected by one’s presence, as uncaring as the inside of a computer. Some art reaches out and pulls you in, but here it feels like it’s up to you whether to give yourself over. Projected on the screen is a timebased sequence just under 10 minutes long, broken up into half a dozen distinct but related segments, and with a clear beginning and end: The screen goes dark before the next cycle commences. But we’re a restless sort these days, and

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YOJI IKEDA’S data.tron is cold-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013

Ryoji Ikeda’s data.tron

I noted that not everyone stuck around long enough to see that there’s more than one segment. There’s no indication of duration on the wall label, and departing viewers probably thought they’d “got it.” But regardless of where in the cycle you enter, watching it at least once all the way through is highly recommended

RYOJI IKEDA: DATA.TRON

continues through Sept. 8. Wood Street Galleries, 601 Wood St., Downtown. 412-471-5605 or www.woodstreetgalleries.org

because the work has a clear structure roughly akin to a musical composition. Not surprisingly, the Japanese-born, Paris-based, forty-something Ikeda was a successful sound artist before expanding his practice into multimedia presentations. His website describes him as

“Japan’s leading composer and visual artist”; presumably, others concur. Here’s some idea of what happens: At the outset, with a mood-setting electronic soundtrack, a series of white bars of varied widths constantly shift against a black background that is broken into lateral sections, with some bars moving upward and some down, while everything flickers like a silent film of too few frames per second. Of course, descriptions such as background, movement, etc. are metaphorical references to motion pictures, while data.tron consists of computer code creating the illusion of movement and progression. The ever-changing patterning of light and dark feels functional, as if something has been measured and encoded and is being processed or transferred at high speed. After a minute or two, the projection shifts to a different sequence. The segments are of unequal duration, and all feel related.


Experiencing data.tron, one feels as if everything can be reduced to data, and hovering over the piece — where one might look for a critique of how data is collected and used — there appears to be a reverence for technology. The concluding segment seems the purest manifestation of data, with thousands of numerals uncontextualized by words or spacing that might indicate sequences. The numerals change rapidly and freeze, and then disappear, leaving an unexpected, expanded sense of what’s pleasing. On the opening evening of the exhibit, Ikeda performed “test pattern [live set]” in the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s nearby Pierce Studio. While closely related to some segments of data.tron, this approximately half-hour performance was even more consistent throughout, with the visuals limited only to black, white and gray rectangles. They flickered, fractured into vertical bands — at one point, more than I could count — and moved with endless agitation against a background of electronic sounds, seemingly building toward something that turned out to be a field of static and white noise. Ikeda wordlessly orchestrated the sound and visuals into something spare and elegant that was never dull or monotonous; the music of Morton Feldman came to mind. If you missed “test pattern,” an unofficial version of a performance in Barcelona is posted on YouTube.

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

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In Crowdsourced, 12 local artists were asked to draw directly on the walls of SPACE Gallery, and to collaborate with the larger public, including attendees of the July 12 opening reception. At its best, this exhibit curated by Robert Raczka (a CP contributor) is a playful excursion into new ways to do art. The works — many, appropriately enough, unsigned — range from pencil sketches to more conceptual pieces. In a colorful mural of numbered “Psychic Drawings,” the artist wittily attempted to sketch what audience members were thinking. In “Redactions/ Highlights,” participants were asked to name a city location, then were provided with its Google Maps street view and told to “edit” it to improve the landscape. A parody of commercial yard signs includes “Start Today! Dismantle the Patriarchy from Home,” and “Cubist House Painting.” Then there is Barbara Weisburger’s display of cell-phone photos of food people sent her (including a cake reading “Best of Luck With Your Thing”). The dishes range from the banal to the artful; some of the food is quite tasty-looking, though that might have been because I saw the show before dinner. Continues through Sept. 1. 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. www.pgharts.org

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MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

Visit us at our new location on Route 30 in Greensburg! The Westmoreland Museum of American Art building is going through a major renovation and expansion but for now we are open at 4764 State Route 30 in Greensburg, featuring pieces of our permanent collection, monthly pop-up exhibitions, American Marketplace Shop & Café, events, classes and more! Westmoreland @rt 30 Hours: Wednesday-Friday 12:00pm-7:00pm Saturday and Sunday 10:00am-5:00pm Art on Tap 5.2.7 is the second Friday of every month! For more information please visit us at wmuseumaa.org or call us at 724-837-1500 Robert Gwathmey (1903 - 1988), By the Sea, 1974, Oil on Canvas, Gift of Thomas Lynch Fund, Peter Moshein, Robert and Arlene Kendra, William H. Jamison Art Acquisition Fund. 2012.5

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Rankin’s Carrie Furnaces, part of a long-decommissioned U.S. Steel plant, are among the region’s last non-working remnants of the Big Steel era. Silver Eye Center’s open call for photos resulted in Carrie Furnaces: Contemporary Views. These 51 images from 32 artists ably document how time and weeds have slowly drawn this National Historic Landmark back toward nature. In an image by Dan Wetmore, a rusting control panel is raked with sunlight like a forest floor, while in Howard Grill’s “Carrie Furnace II,” a bell-shaped blast furnace, tattooed with graffiti, looms amid concrete troughs pooling with silt. Adam Piscitelli’s “Cold Steel” finds the plant through falling snow, across a river, haunting and haunted. In Brad Fetchin’s “Light Blast,” a shaft of sunlight reanimates a pool of molten metal. Curiously, only three of these photos depict people, the most striking being Ivette Spradlin’s wide shot of a young woman silhouetted before the complex. That’s ironic — for as suggested by the expected still lifes of abandoned hardhats and tattered goggles, what really haunts us about Carrie is the absence of so many vanished lives there. Continues through Sat., Aug. 24. 1015 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereyecenter.org

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ART BRIEFS

The public collaborates on an installation in Crowdsourced. {PHOTO COURTESY OF THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST}

IT’S MATHEMATICAL, GEOMETRICAL, COMPUTATIONAL AND METHODICAL.

@rt

[ART]

Some segments are simpler and others more complex, some more slow-paced and others more frenetic. data.tron is mostly devoid of color, though some words are highlighted in red or blue. Overall, the elements are limited to: lines; rectangles by the hundred and diagrams; numbers that either fill the screen by the thousands or appear in countless strings that seem to represent something, and very well may; technical and scientific terms that flash by, though when one does register — such as “secondary structure” or “biopolymer” — it doesn’t tell you much; and a soundtrack of electronic hums, clicks, thrums of wavering pitch and sonar-like pings. There is a rhythm and arc to the piece that reflects careful arrangement, with recurring sound and visual themes stitching it together. data.tron is not a rumination on randomness.

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A SEASON OF EPIC PROPORTIONS. AND THIS IS JUST THE FIRST HALF.

Alchemists’ Lab

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PITTSBURGHPLAYHOUSE.COM OR 412.392.8000

{PHOTO BY JAMES ORR}

Deborah Bender, Jena Oberg and Lily Junker in Little Lake’s Crimes of the Heart

[PLAY REVIEWS]

RACING HEART {BY TED HOOVER}

LET’S POP IN and visit with an old friend.

Time was you couldn’t swing a dead cat in this city without hitting a local production of Beth Henley’s tragicomedy Crimes of the Heart. Not only does it feature a small cast and one set (enough to secure it a place in the heart of any theater company), but it comes with an impressive provenance: a host of theatrical awards, including the 1981 Pulitzer Prize. It’s a funny, sweet show about three Mississippi sisters living through what one of them describes as a “very bad day.”

year. Considering that Crimes was also turned into a popular movie … well, it’s no surprise I’ve spent a lot of time with Lenny, Meg and Babe MaGrath. But lately the show is so rarely staged that this latest production, at Little Lake Theatre, will probably be a lot of people’s first exposure to it. I wouldn’t call this a definitive version, however. Director Sunny DisneyFitchett and her company stage what is certainly the fastest production of Crimes of the Heart on record. Regular readers will know that lethargic, leaden-paced productions are the cause of these fetching bags under my eyes. So the speed isn’t the problem. Fast is good! As long as subtext and nuance don’t get lost in the shuffle — which, unfortunately, they do here. Henley’s writing is tricky; there’s a lot more going on underneath than is visible to the naked eye. But for the most part, director and cast blow right past the interior of the play. Jena Oberg, as Lenny, comes closest to giving voice to the sugared sourness informing Henley’s writing: We get a real sense of the sadness and risk her charac-

FAST IS GOOD — AS LONG AS SUBTEXT AND NUANCE DON’T GET LOST IN THE SHUFFLE.

CRIMES OF THE HEART

continues through Aug. 31. 500 Lakeside Drive South (off Route 19), Canonsburg. $12-20. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelaketheatre.org

For years on end, Henley’s brand of Southern-fried melancholy used to appear at local theaters at least twice a

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ter is battling. Deborah Bender and Lily Junker, playing Meg and Babe, certainly can’t be faulted for a lack of enthusiasm (or volume) in their portrayals. Just to be clear: This is by no means a bad production. But Crimes of the Heart has a lot more resonance. Believe me: I’ve seen it enough to know. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

WATCHED PLOTS {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

CHOICE ROLES for women “of a certain age” being in short supply, The Cemetery Club offers tempting meat and potatoes to MerryRam Productions, in association with Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co.

THE CEMETERY CLUB continues through Sat., Aug. 24. MerryRam Productions at Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co., 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-20. www.pghplaywrights.com

Ivan Menchell’s 1990 comedy-drama is better known in its 1993 film incarnation, transplanted to and shot in Pitts-

burgh, with Ellen Burstyn starring in an elevated central role. The original play, set in metro New York, is firmly about a trio of fairly recent widows, each dealing with her own grief, friendship, loneliness and future. The action, directed here by Marcus Muzopappa, opens on the fourth anniversary of the widowhood of Doris, the longestserving and still most devout mourner. She and best buddies Ida and Lucille (in order of husbands’ demises) make monthly visits to their late spouses’ graves, thus giving rise to the informal sobriquet “cemetery club” to define their relationship. Alas, the male playwright does not provide much history as to how these women ever became the tight-knit group the script describes. Instead, we get a strained relationship among distinctive characters. Having the most fun with scenery-chewing is undoubtedly Claire Fraley, as the scarily outrageous and tragically scared Lucille. Fraley may flub

a line or her Queens accent, but her voguing is dead on, and her fear palpable. Lynne Franks brings passion and humor to the bereaved Doris. Arlene Merryman plumbs Cemetery’s most dynamic character, her sorrow ready to be exchanged for a new lease on, and lust for, life. Opposite Merryman is Rich Ivaun, as a somewhat stoic widower, and Karen Hanes as a passing rival. A tip of the hat to PPT’s design and tech people, especially set designer Diane Melchitzky and co-constructer Barney McKenna. Wonderful weeds, guys. Though billed as “present day,” Cemetery Club is unabashedly a period piece, dating to a time when people played vinyl records, depended upon directory assistance and ignored the now-obvious symptoms of a heart attack. The characters are certainly not today’s sexagenarians, and perhaps they weren’t much more credible in period. But it’s an amusing, and occasionally thoughtful, outing.

HAVING THE MOST FUN WITH SCENERYCHEWING IS UNDOUBTEDLY CLAIRE FRALEY, AS THE SCARILY OUTRAGEOUS AND TRAGICALLY SCARED LUCILLE.

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is organized by the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution in association with the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ExxonMobil and Saudi Aramco are gratefully acknowledged as principal co-sponsors of the tour of Roads of Arabia in the United States. Sponsorship is also provided by The Olayan Group and Fluor Corporation.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

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+ THU., AUG. 22 {BOOKS} For an inkling of how absurdly rich Pittsburgh’s industries made some folks — or even if you’re just a history buff, architecture fan or old-house enthusiast — check out Pittsburgh’s Mansions (Arcadia Publishing). The 127page paperback by Melanie Linn Gutowski illustrates, in mostly vintage black-andwhite photos, the palaces the affluent here built themselves in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Some abodes, like Henry Frick’s Clayton, abide; many, like William Thaw’s Lyndhurst, once at the corner of Fifth and Beechwood, are no more. Tonight, local author Gutowski holds a launch party at the Mansions on Fifth hotel, on Shadyside’s old Millionaire’s Row. Bill O’Driscoll 6-8 p.m. 5105 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. Free. 412-381-5105

THREE COURSES PLUS DESSERT

AUG. 24 Tri-It

{STAGE} Tonight, the stage of the Peter Mills Theater becomes “Big Daddy” Pollitt’s Mississippi Delta plantation home. This weekend and next, The Summer Company puts on Tennessee Williams’ Pulitzer Prize-winner Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Though the cast is full of company regulars, this production marks the Summer Company debut of

AUG. 24 Julia

THE BENNY BENACK TRIO $55.00 PER PERSON TICKETS CAN BE PURCHASED IN THE RESTAURANT OR ONLINE THROUGH OUR WEBSITE

+ FRI., AUG. 23

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 28, 2013 A 6:30 PM

{COMEDY} Art by Sonja Sweterlitsch

24 MARKET SQUARE

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{COMEDY} It’s a big week for local comics at Club Café. Tonight, catch the Steel City Comedy Tour, featuring Chuck Krieger, with Mike Wysocki, Tommy Kupiec, Tone Bock and Ray Zawandi. And on Friday, the venue’s late slot is held down by The Wham Bam Thank You Jam, with Day Bracey, Parris Knight, Matt Light, Alex Stypula and storyteller Stacy Keene, hosted by Amy Capiross, with music by Big Gypsy. BO Steel City Comedy: 8 p.m. ($8). Wham Bam: 10 p.m. Fri., Aug. 23 ($8-10). 56 S. 12th St., South Side. 866-468-3401 or www.ticketweb.com/clubcafe

FEATURING

www.nolaonthesquare.com

Curt Wootton, best known for his goofy YouTube character “Pittsburgh Dad.” Wootton plays Brick opposite Cassandra Hough, as Maggie. Justin Sines directs. Olivia Lammel 8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 31. Duquesne University campus, Uptown. $10-15. 412-243-6464 or www. thesummercompany.com

With Pittsburgh’s own improvcomedy scene burgeoning, there might be more interest than ever in the latest visit to Pittsburgh Public Theater’s O’Reilly Theater by The Second City. The venerable but ever-changing troupe returns with Happily Ever Laughter, an especially optimistically titled new collection


sp otlight {PHOTO COURTESY OF NANCY D. ZIONTS}

The touring version of Broadway hit In the Heights visited Pittsburgh in February 2010. Thanks to Snowmageddon, turnout was light. But due to this crowd-pleasing musical’s contemporary Latin score and vibrant choreography, “[t]he energy in the audience was electric,” says Justin Fortunato, who was there. Now Fortunato’s Carrnivale Theatrics (along with Front Porch Theatricals) stages the first regional production of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s multiple-Tony-winner, set in New York’s largely Latino Washington Heights neighborhood. Carrnivale went all out: The cast of 23 — including performers originally from Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico — reflects auditions held in New York as well as Pittsburgh. (Half the performers are students from either Point Park or Carnegie Mellon University.) Joe Caruncho Jr. (pictured) stars as “Usnavi,” and “Kevin Rosario” is played by Tony Chisoldes, who took the role on Broadway. And the crew includes such top local talent as choreographer Keisha Lalama and set designer Tony Ferrieri. “People will come to the show and see a street corner of New York City” onstage at the New Hazlett Theater, promises Fortunato, who directs. While In the Heights is sometimes called a “rap show” (some lyrics are rapped) or “dance show,” Fortunato says it’s really “a storytellers show” about three days in the lives of several Washington Heights neighbors — immigrants proud of both their home countries and their new community. Bill O’Driscoll Fri., Aug. 23-Sept. 1. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $18-25 (opening night: $35). 888-718-4253 or www.carrnivale.com

of sketch comedy and improv. Young performers following in the Second City footsteps of Stephen Colbert and Tina Fey include Cody Dove, Kelsey Kinney, Dana Quercioli, Tim Ryder and Nate Sherman. Tonight’s show has a specially ticketed option including a post-show party; two more shows follow tomorrow. BO 8 p.m. Also 5:30 and 9 p.m. Sat., Aug. 24. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-48 (Aug. 23 post-show-party: $75-100). 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

outing. The event is called Tri-It, and it’s tailored to beginners who’d like to get outside but don’t know where to start. The trip will finish up with a picnic by the water. OL 8 a.m.-noon. Babcock Boulevard and East Ingomar Road, North Park. $40 ($25 for kids). 412-255-0564 or www.ventureoutdoors.org

+ SAT., AUG. 24 {OUTDOORS} Today, Venture Outdoors offers an activity sampler of sorts. In three hours, participants will go on a paddle, a bike ride and a hike through the versatile trails and waterways of North Park. The organization combines three of its most basic activities into one

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+ WED., AUG. 28 {STORIES}

AUG. 23

Happily il E il Ever Laughter

{OUTDOORS}

{BURLESQUE} The burlesque revival takes many forms, from classic fandance homage to shadings of camp, goth and Weimar Republic. Expect a little of each at A Night of Burlesque, presented at Cavo Nightclub by locally based designer and performer Nicolette Romero. Performances by Romero, Countess Von Tella, Kandi Licious and Lita D’Vargas complement the champagne atmosphere at Cavo, but tonight’s secret weapons might well be the Boilermaker Jazz Band, bringing the traddy-jazz sounds. A press release says, “Guests are asked to dress for the theme of decadence and glamour.” BO 8 p.m.-2 a.m. 1916 Smallman St., Strip District. $20 (VIP cocktail hour: $75). www.cavopgh.com

personality. OL 5-8 p.m. Exhibit continues through Sept. 14. 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-687-8858 or www.boxheartgallery.com

confines of small-town life and the desperation of its outliers.” Braffet, who now lives in upstate New York, will visit Mystery Lovers for Coffee & Crime, a series of author events where the bookshop provides attendees with coffee and pastries. OL 10 a.m.noon. 514 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. Free; reservations required. 412-828-4877 or www.mysterylovers.com

AUG. 24

Kelly ll Braffet ll B ff t

Bike-curious? Whether you don’t know a recumbent from a fixie, or you’re simply jonesing to try a range of pedal-powered vehicles, the third annual Try a Bike Jamboree is for you. Advocacy group Flock of Cycles hosts this free, all-day fair where you can ride loaner bikes around the car-free Bud Harris Cycling Track: unicycles, electric bikes, tandems, bikes with baskets, commuter bikes with panniers and more. You can even learn how to load your bike on a Port Authority bike rack. The Jamboree is part of this year’s BikeFest. BO 10 a.m.5 p.m. Washington Boulevard near Allegheny River Boulevard, Highland Park. Free. www.flockofcycles.org

OL 10:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Continues weekends (and Labor Day) through Sept. 29. 112 Renaissance Lane, West Newton. $8-$16.95 (kids under 5 free). 724-872-1670 or www.pittsburghrenfest.com

{ART} As a principal dancer for the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, Julia Erickson has danced roles including Odette/Odile in

Swan Lake and the Sugar Plum Fairy in The Nutcracker. Now, she stars as herself in the exhibition titled Julia, at Box Heart Gallery. Local artist Sonja Sweterlitsch has created more than a dozen oil portraits of the dancer, who is about to enter her 13th season with the PBT. The painter says using the same subject lets her more fully capture different aspects of Erickson’s

Storytelling Barbecue: One Dream, Our Stories is nearly as simple as it sounds. To mark the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, the community-building folks at the Union Project invite people of all ages to come tell how they’re working to improve the world around them. But this testimonial is also part picnic: While you’re listening to both invited, seasoned storytellers and everyday neighbors, sit outdoors eating free barbecue from Union Pig and Chicken. There will even be some diversions courtesy of Obscure Games. BO 5:30-7:30 p.m. 901 N. Negley Ave., Highland Park. Free. 412-363-4550 or www.unionproject.org

{FESTIVAL}

{WORDS} Kelly Braffet lived in the Pittsburgh area for a number of years, but today is her first time as a guest author at Mystery Lovers Bookshop. Braffet will read from Save Yourself, her latest psychological thriller, which is told from the perspective of two outcasts. Salon said about the book, “Braffet expertly captures the suffocating

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The Renaissance Festival is back and this weekend, lords and ladies will dust off their ornate velvet garb to kick off the annual festivities. Knights will joust, the bells of the carillon will ring out and court jesters will entertain. There will be sword-fighting, storytelling and belly-dancing. The Washing Well Wenches will turn their laundry into a comedy show, Wilsome Fire will eat flames and hypnotist Rick Stratton will manipulate minds, all on the bucolic West Newton fairgrounds.

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Play by Tennessee Williams. Presented by The Summer Company. Thu-Sat. Thru Aug. 31. Peter Mills Theater (Duquesne, Rockwell Hall ), Uptown. 412–243-6464. CRIMES OF THE HEART. Tragic comedy feat. 3 sisters in a dysfunctional family. Thu-Sat and Sun., Aug. 25. Thru Aug. 31. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN. A comedic & prehistoric look at the battle of the sexes. Wed-Sun. Thru Oct. 20. Pittsburgh CLO, Downtown. 412-456-6666. DON JUAN COMES BACK FROM THE WAR. Duncan Macmillan’s new adaptation presented by Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre. Thru Aug. 31. Henry Heymann Theatre, Oakland. 412-561-6000. IN THE HEIGHTS. Story of

a vibrant community in Manhattan’s Washington Heights neighborhood. Presented by Front Porch Theatricals. Thu-Sun. Thru Sept. 1. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-320-4610. IT’S MY PARTY & I’LL DIE IF I WANT TO. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Sat., Aug. 24, 7 p.m. Gary’s Chuckwagon, West Newton. 724-872-8920. ON GOLDEN POND. Play by Ernest Thompson. Thu-Sat. Thru Aug. 31. Apple Hill Playhouse, Delmont. 724-468-5050. PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS FESTIVAL. Staged readings to open the festival. Sun. Thru Aug. 25. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 412-489-5840. RABBIT HOLE. The story of a couple coping with the accidental death of their son. Fri-Sun. Thru Aug. 25. New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-657-9369.

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

$4.00 27 oz. “BIG JOHN” American Lager Draft During Pittsburgh Football Honestly Fresh. Fiercely Independent.

FRI 23

RENT. Fri., Sat. Thru Sept. 7. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. #1 PARTY SCHOOL. Fri, 724-591-8727. 10 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Steel RETRO NUNS. Cabaret City Improv Theater, Shadyside. dinner theater. Presented 412-404-2695. by Pohl Productions. BEST OF THE BURGH Fri., Sat. Thru Aug. 24. COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel 8 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Park. 724-746-1178. Side. 412-488-2995. TUESDAYS WITH DAY BRACEY, MORRIE. Based on PARRIS KNIGHT, the book by Mitch MATT LIGHT, Albom. Thu-Sun. Thru ALEX STYPULA, Aug. 24. South Park STACY KEENE, www. per Theatre, Bethel Park. BIG GYPSY. pa pghcitym 412-831-8552. .co Hosted by Amy Capiross. 10 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950. THE END OF THE WORLD CHUCK KRIEGER, MIKE SHOW. Feat. Brett Goodnack, WYSOCKI, TOMMY KUPIEC, Tessa Karel, Krish Mohan, TONE BOCK, RAY ZAWANDI. Jamison Linz, more. Fri, The Steel City Comedy Tour. 10 p.m. Thru Sept. 13 7 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. Arcade Comedy Theater, 412-431-4950. Downtown. 412-339-0608. COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ IMPROV W/ SHEETCAKE. DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Thru Aug. 29 Hambone’s, Theater, Downtown. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. 412-339-0608. THE RESTAURANT SHOW. 2-hour event. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THAT’S WHAT JEANNE SAID! LIVE. The Restaurant Show. 7:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FULL LIST ONLINE

COMEDY THU 22

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Weddings, Nightclubs, Proms, Corporate Events... We’ll do our part to make it perfect.

FRI 23 - SAT 24

KEVIN NEALON. Aug. 23-24 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233. THE SECOND CITY: HAPPILY EVER LAUGHTER. Chicago’s famed comedy troupe. Aug. 23-24 O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600.

SAT 24

CAGEMATCH. Sat, 9 p.m. Thru Aug. 31 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THE LUPONES: MADE UP MUSICALS. Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 31 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. OXFORD COMA, COUPLES THERAPY. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. REAL TRUE HISTORY. 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. SKETCH MIX-TAPE. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. CONTINUES ON PG. 66

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013


GET CREATIVE. GET STARTED.

GET TRAINING. GET NOTICED.

MAKE TELEVISION. MAKE MOVIES. MAKE A DIFFERENCE. DIFFERENCE

PAUL GREEN FITNESS INSTRUCTOR/ EKG TECHNICIAN/CANCER SURVIVOR

Paul uses his PCTV show to get you moving.

ART

VISUAL

What will you do with your show? Take our FREE on-line orientation now at www.PCTV21.org

WATCH:

Paul Eugene Fitness

PITTSBURGH COMMUNITY TELEVISION

SATURDAYS AT 5PM

412-322-7570

COMCAST 21, VERIZON 47

{PHOTO COURTESY OF STEPH TSONG}

From Steel Wool at The Mr. Roboto Project

NEW THIS WEEK

CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Beauty at the Edge of the Unreal. Pop art by Stephane Pedno. Opening reception: Aug. 24, 5-8 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. TOUCHSTONE CENTER FOR CRAFTS. Patrick Daugherty: Influenced by the Right People™. Oil paintings. Opening reception: Aug. 24, 5-9 p.m. Farmington. 724-329-1370.

ONGOING

179 STUDIO. Group Art Show. Closing reception Aug. 24, 5-9 p.m. Call for a private showing. Lawrenceville. 412-621-1523. 707 PENN GALLERY. The Koraput Survivors Project. A photographic exhibition by Lynn Johnson & Jen Saffron exploring the destruction & recreation of a small community in Odisha State, India. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. Chris McGinnis: The Productive Machine. Multimedia exhibit. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. All Through the Night. LGBQT photography by Caldwell Linker. S/HE IS HER/E. Feat. over 100 works by Genesis Breyer P-Orridge,

dating from the mid 1970s to the present. The Patron Saint of White Guys That Went Tribal & Other Works. Work by Nick Bubash. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Art for a Hire Purpose. The Pittsburgh Society of Illustrators Exhibition Illustration Show. Downtown. 412-263-6600. BE GALLERIES. Miniatures. Work by Caitlyn Burroughs. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Multi-media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Norweigan Flow & Others, Spiritual Energy Unleashed. Paintings by Mary Ellen McShea & Elaine Bergstrom. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Julia. Paintings by Sonja Sweterlitsch. Artist reception: Aug. 24, 5-8 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. Seven Degrees of 7. Work by Distillery 7 Program artists Alexis Roberto, Cara Livorio,

Crystala Armagost, Josh Mitchel, Elizabeth Brophy, Kate Hansen & Terrence M. Boyd. South Side. 412-381-7767. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. COMMONPLACE COFFEEHOUSE. RELDmetal. Robust finger sculptures by Sarah Jane Sindler. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0404. EASTSIDE GALLERY. Donna Hollen Bolmgren. An estate sale of the artist’s works. Benefits the Master Visual Artists exhibition. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. EVOLVER TATTOO ARTS. Escape. Work by Delilah Spring, Laura Lee Burkhardt, Keith Caves, John Faust Jr., Emile Goss, & Sema Graham. South Side. 412-481-1004. CONTINUES ON PG. 66

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 64

6th Annual

Niagara Falls

808, WELL KNOWN STRANGERS. Mon, 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. PANIC, HOTEL NOWHERE. Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

Blues Festival LABOR DAY WEEKEND Friday Aug. 30 th Saturday Aug. 31st Sunday Sept. 1st

Performances by Eddy Clearwater • The Sauce Boss Mississippi Heat • Richard Ray Farrell Donnie Walsh • Cheryl Arena Mahajibee Blues Band

And SO MUCH MORE

TUE 27

YOUNG THE GIANT

PLUS MORE! FREE ADMISSION FOOD & ART VENDORS FREE MOTORCYCLE PARKING

www.niagarafallsbluesfest.org

VISUAL ART

MON 26

Visit PROMO tab at pghcitypaper.com for your chance to WIN PRIZES! Hint: Find the Left side of the Bottle

OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 28

STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI

CONTINUED FROM PG. 65

FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pigment & Silver. Photography by Ellen Bjerklie-Hanna, A. Jason Coleman, Danielle Goshay, Brenda Roger, & Cynthia Zordich. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. The Clayton Days, Revisited: A Project by Vik Muniz. Feat. his 65-photo collection. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Obscuro Bezango! Work by Thomas Rehm, Elmore “Buzz” Buzzizyk, & Maximum Traffic. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. RetroFRESH. Contemporary paintings by James Kennedy, Claire Hardy, Donald Deskey, Alexander Minewski, Louise Evans-Scott, Vladimir Naiditch, & Henri de Waroquier. By appointment. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Energetic Escapes. Work by Scott Hunter & Blake Anthony. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Ghost Feeding Arena. New works by Leslie Minnis. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Prelude & Fugue (A Game of Pairs). Photography by Richard Stoner. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. HILLMAN CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS. Low Tides & Bucolic Daze. Hand painted photography by Rosemary Pipitone. Fox Chapel. 412-968-3045. THE INN. The Spice Girls: Live at the Inn. Work by

VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. An eclectic showroom of fine art sculpture & paintings from emerging artists. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Roads of Arabia: Archaeology & History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Archaeological materials exploring the cultural history of the Arabian Peninsula. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs of pre World War II ironIn Their Time, more. Oakland. making technology. Rankin. 412-622-3131. 412-464-4020 x.21. CARNEGIE SCIENCE COMPASS INN. Demos and CENTER. BIKES: Science tours with costumed guides on Two Wheels. Feat. featuring this restored hands-on activities, stagecoach stop. demonstrations & Ligonier. a collection of historic, 724-238-4983. rare, & peculiar CONNEY M. bicycles. Ongoing: KIMBO GALLERY. Buhl Digital Dome www. per pa University of (planetarium), pghcitym .co Miniature Railroad Pittsburgh Jazz and Village, USS Requin Exhibit: Memorabilia submarine, and more. & Awards from the North Side. 412-237-3400. International Hall of Fame. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in Oakland. 412-648-7446. 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 DEPRECIATION LANDS are extremely rare examples MUSEUM. Small living

FULL LIST ONLINE

Terry Boyd. Lawrenceville. INTERNATIONAL IMAGES. The New Art of Wen Gao. Sewickley. 412-741-3036. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Automata, a Kinetic Art Show. Work by Zac Coffin, Nick Romero, Alberto Almareza, Katy Dement, T.R. Reed, Jeannie Holland, Sylvia Cross, more. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Perspective 2013: A Photography Exhibition. Robinson. 412-788-0816. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Glassweekend ‘13. Work by Rhoda Baer, John de Wit, Jon Goldberg, Mikyoung Jung, Catherine Labonte, Matthew Perez, Erica Rosenfeld, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Steel Wool. A show of rogue needlepoint. Bloomfield. PANZA GALLERY. Society of Sculptors Annual Exhibition. Juried by Carolina Loyola-Garcia. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Hand Tinted Vintage Photographs. Hand tinted black & white photographs on tin, paper & glass. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed

history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, comparing &

in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Carrie Furnaces: Contemporary Views. A collaborative exhibition curated from an open call for entries of images taken at the historic blast furnace. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Art Interprets Alzheimer’s. Work by George Roby & Herbert Ascherman, Jr. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE TOONSEUM. And The Winner Is... Six decades of Reuben Award winners feat. Charles M. Schulz, Walt Kelly, Mort Walker, Lynn Johnston, Jim Davis, more. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TOUCHSTONE CENTER FOR CRAFTS. On Uneven Ground. Abstract Mosaics by Rachel Sager Lynch. Opening reception: Aug. 24, 5-9 p.m. Farmington. 724-329-1370. TRUNDLE MANOR. The Insidious Collection. Paintings by Jamie Apgar. By appointment. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. U.S. POST OFFICE & COURTHOUSE. Whitehall Arts Courthouse Exhibit. Paintings by Whitehall Arts members. Downtown. 412-561-4000. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WILDCARD. Thrifted. Found vintage art show, benefiting the MGR-Youth Empowerment Program. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. data.tron. Installation by Ryoji Ikeda. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. CONTINUES ON PG. 68

66

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013


MELLON SQUARE SUMMER

August’s Featured Mixologist:

Congratulates August’s Featured Mixologist

CONCERT SE R I E S

BROUGHT TO YOU BY 96.9 BOB FM, Q929, AND PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

EVERY THURSDAY Now through August 29!

JENNA JEROME

LIVE MUSIC

LOCAL BAR + KITCHEN

BY LOCAL BANDS!

Jenna Jerome has been bartending for 10 years, and has been at Local since January. When not working, you can find her at her favorite bar, Local.

THIS THURSDAY AUGUST 22

THE WILLIAMS BAND

Her preferred drink of choice is anything with ABSOLUT Vodka in it. She works Wednesday through Sunday, so visit her and

JENNA’S FEATURED RECIPE:

The ABSOLUT Summer Squeeze

NEXT THURSDAY AUGUST 29

1 oz. ABSOLUT Hibiskus 1 oz. Pomegranate Liqueur Dash of Simple Syrup Soda Water Half of a fresh squeezed lemon

HIGHWAY 4

Mix the ABSOLUT Hibiskus, Pomegranate Liqueur and the Simple Syrup together in a serving glass with ice. Fill the rest of the glass with soda water. Shake and pour back into the serving glass. Squeeze the lemon, and serve.

NOON TO 1PM FOR ALL THE DETAILS

www. BOBFM969.com www.BOBFM969 .com www.QBURGH www .QBURGH.com .com

1515 EAST CARSON STREET SOUTH SIDE 412-431-1125 www.localpgh.com To learn more about Local Bar + Kitchen and Jenna’s ABSOLUT Summer Squeeze, click on the CPTV Player on pghcitypaper.com or scan the QR code

[ENJOY WITH ABSOLUT RESPONSIBILITY®.] ABSOLUT® VODKA. PRODUCT OF SWEDEN. 40% ALC./VOL. DISTILLED FROM GRAIN. ©2012 IMPORTED BY ABSOLUT SPIRITS CO., NEW YORK, NY.

NEWS

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order Jenna’s ABSOLUT Summer Squeeze. Has she ever been given anything other than money as a tip? Once, a patron gave her a Bob Evans gift card as a tip. Jenna has a tip when it comes to getting a bartenders attention, “Tip well the first time you order, if you do that, then you have my undivided attention for the rest of the night.”

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 66

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. EVENT: Tours of a restored 19thcentury, middle-class home. installation, Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Andy Warhol Bridge, Collection includes jade Downtown and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well CRITIC: as Meissen porcelain. Butler. , 724-282-0123. 69, a retiree from MCGINLEY HOUSE & Fox Chapel MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for WHEN: tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. I see a lot of beautiful parts, many hours of NATIONALITY ROOMS. work put into this. The colors, the combinations, 26 rooms helping to tell the patterns are just extraordinary. I think it’s so the story of Pittsburgh’s interesting because over here we have white, immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. lavender and a multi-colored pastel yarn, then you 412-624-6000. have oranges and yellows and purples. There are OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer no colors that are left out and the way they’re put church features 1823 pipe together, it’s really quite spectacular. I like the way organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. they’ve done the posts and the rail in black to set OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. everything off. When you look down, all you see This pioneer/Whiskey are these bright splashes of color along the way. Rebellion site features log Knitting is my love and I’ve been knitting for about house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 50 years, so I really appreciate how much work has 412-835-1554. gone into this. I don’t think the average individual PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY has any idea how long it takes to knit a row or MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes to have anything so perfect. So a whole bridge is displays, walking tours, beyond my comprehension. gift shop, picnic area and B Y OL I V I A L A M M E L Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY through artifacts & personal of her life & work. Springdale. & BOTANICAL GARDEN. 724-274-5459. mementos. Oakland. Butterfly Forest. Watch RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL butterflies emerge from their 412-621-4253. HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits chrysalises to flutter among ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. on the Homestead Mill. Steel tropical blooms. Summer Features 5,000 relics of industry and community Flower Show. Glass art Catholic saints. North Side. artifacts from 1881-1986. surrounded by colorful 412-323-9504. Homestead. 412-464-4020. blooms. Feat. work by ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN SENATOR JOHN HEINZ Daviea Davis, Jason Forck, CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo HISTORY CENTER. Steven Sadvary, Lisa Platt, Vanka Murals. Mid-20th Pennsylvania’s Civil War. more. 14 indoor rooms & century murals depicting In-depth look at Pennsylvania’s 3 outdoor gardens feature war, social justice and the significant contributions exotic plants and floral immigrant experience during the Civil War feat. displays from around the in America. Millvale. artifacts, military encampments, world. Oakland. 421-681-0905. life-like museum figures, 412-622-6914. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. more. From Slavery to PINBALL PERFECTION. Learn about distilling Freedom. Highlight’s Pinball museum & and coke-making in this Pittsburgh’s role players club. West pre-Civil War industrial village. in the anti-slavery View. 412-931-4425. Scottdale. 724-887-7910. movement. Ongoing: PITTSBURGH www. per Western PA Sports GLASS CENTER. a p ty ci h g p Museum, Clash of Lifeforms. Exhibition .com Empires, and exhibits of natural imagery on local history, more. in lampworked glass. ART IN THE PARK. Food, Strip District. 412-454-6000. Curated by Robert music, vendors, more. Thu, SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS Mickelsen. Friendship. 6-8:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 29 Penn HISTORY CENTER. Museum 412-365-2145. Avenue Parklet, Wilkinsburg. commemorates Pittsburgh PITTSBURGH ZOO & 412-727-7855. industrialists, local history. PPG AQUARIUM. Home Sewickley. 412-741-4487. to 4,000 animals, including SOLDIERS & SAILORS many endangered species. BIKEFEST. Various rides & MEMORIAL HALL. Military Highland Park. 412-665-3639. activities citywide. Benefits Bike museum dedicated to RACHEL CARSON Pittsburgh. bikepgh.org Thru honoring military service HOMESTEAD. A Reverence Aug. 25 412-325-4334. members since the Civil War for Life. Photos and artifacts

Knit the Bridge

Betsy Grzymkowski Thu., Aug. 15

FULL LIST ONLINE

FESTIVALS THU 22

THU 22 - SUN 25

CONTINUES ON PG. 70

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 68

FRI 23 - SUN 25

5TH ANNUAL BREWERS FEST. Sample over 100 different home brews, corn hole tournament, keg toss, more. Aug. 23-25 Cooper’s Lake Campground, Slippery Rock. 724-368-8710.

SAT 24 - SUN 25

BLACK & GOLD HEADQUARTERS ALL GAMES

$10 BUCKETS OF BEER (mix and match)

SIX PACKS TO-GO for the walk to the stadium

HAPPY HOUR MON-FRI 5-7PM

WEDNESDAYS FREE POOL 6-10PM

709 EAST ST. (412) 979-5075 CORNER OF E. OHIO / EAST ST.

16TH ANNUAL ART FESTIVAL ON WALNUT STREET. Paintings, photography, glass, jewelry, ceramics, more. Aug. 24-25 Shadyside. SEVEN SPRINGS WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL. Aug. 24-25 Seven Springs, Champion. 1-800-452-2223. UMOJA AFRICAN ARTS IN THE PARK FESTIVAL. Feat. musicians, children’s actives, vendors, more. Aug. 24-25 Point State Park, Downtown. 412-471-0235.

DANCE FRI 23

CAVO CABARET PRESENTS: HOT AUGUST NIGHT EDITION. Burlesque show, live music, more. 8 p.m. Cavo, Strip District. 412-918-1068.

SUN 25

WORLD KALEIDOSCOPE: JAYA MANI. Indian dance performance. 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

FUNDRAISERS SAT 24

ALEX’S LEMONADE STAND. Benefits Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation. 12-4 p.m. Norman Centre Shoppes, Bethel Park. BEER GARDEN BASH. Over a dozen craft beers, picnic food, live music, more. 6-8:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOOGIE W/ THE BUDDHA: A BENEFIT CONCERT & PICNIC. Live music, potluck dinner, more. 4 p.m. Zen Center of Pittsburgh, Sewickley. 412-741-1262. RAINBOW PARTY. Food, drinks, karaoke, more. Benefits the Renaissance City Choir. 1-5 p.m. 5801 Video Lounge and Cafe, Shadyside. 412-345-1722. TOYS FOR TOTS GOLF OUTING. 9 a.m. Aubrey’s Dubbs Dred Golf Course, Butler. 724-287-4832.

SUN 25

4TH ANNUAL FARM DINNER. 5-course dinner, benefiting Friends of Grandview Park. 5:30-8 p.m. Grandview Park, Mt. Washington. 412-589-9586. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em!

Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. COW-A-BINGO RAFFLE FOR AUTISM. A cow will determine the winner of a cash prize on a grid in the park. Benefits the Thomas Enzerra Autism Project. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Canton Twp. Park, Washington. 724-712-5452.

MON 26

A CELEBRATION OF WOMEN’S EQUALITY DAY. Feat. special guest, Susan B. Anthony. Benefits In Sisterhood: the Women’s Movement in Pittsburgh. 6-8 p.m. be galleries, Lawrenceville. 412-621-3252.

WED 28

HOPS TO SUSTAINABILITY. Beer pairing dinner & reception benefiting the AiP scholarship fund. 5:30 p.m. The Art Institute of Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-263-6600.

Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

WED 28

CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Discussing Just Saying by Rae Armantrout. 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-481-7663.

KIDSTUFF THU 22

DOG DAYS OF SUMMER W/ WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA HUMANE SOCIETY. Discover the world of dog training & learn about therapy dogs. 1-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. RADIO IN THE www. per pa ENGLISH STUDIO. w/ pghcitym o .c LEARNERS’ BOOK Saturday Light Brigade. CLUB. For advanced ESL Children’s Museum students. Presented in of Pittsburgh, North Side. cooperation w/ the Greater 412-322-5058. Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. CIRCUS OF THE KIDS. 412-531-1912. Circus acts performed by kids THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY & teens. Aug. 22-23 Jewish HOUR WRITING WORKSHOP. Community Center, Squirrel Hill. All genres welcome. Every 412-521-8010. other Thu The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. ADVENTURES W/ CLIFFORD 412-874-7191. THE BIG RED DOG. 9-foot ON POINT: STORIES OF tall Clifford w/ tail slide, BALANCING ACTS. Feat. build a sandcastle on T-Bone’s David Newell, Justin Strong, beach, play instruments in Kelly Flanagan Dee, more. the Musical Marina, more. Presented by Moth Mainstage. Thru Sept. 1 Children’s Museum 8 p.m. Byham Theater, of Pittsburgh, North Side. Downtown. 412-622-8866. 412-322-5058. SPANISH CONVERSATION BACKYARD EXHIBIT. CLUB. Second and Fourth Musical swing set, sandbox, Thu of every month, 6 p.m. solar-powered instruments, Carnegie Library, Oakland. more. Ongoing Children’s 412-622-3151. Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. UMOJA POETRY SLAM. 7-9 p.m. Father Ryan Arts Center, COOK IT! Interactive cooking McKees Rocks. 412-771-3052. demos w/ Chef Angelo. 1 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. THE ZINE EXCHANGE. Zine 412-322-5058. swap w/ readings by Jude Vachon, Erin Oh, Lucy Goubert, & Sarah LaPonte. 6-9 p.m. THE MONSTER UNDER THE Future Tenant, Downtown. BED. A boy & the monster 412-325-7037. under his bed swap lives for a day. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. BOOK SIGNING W/ GARY ROGERS. Author of All Aboard, A Historical Your FLIGHT PARTY. Paper of Verona. 1-4 p.m. Railroad airplane workshop w/ Park, Verona. D.S. Kinsel. 12-3 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. SCREEN PRINTING W/ LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! GARBELLA DESIGN. Make Practice conversational English.

LITERARY THU 22

FULL LIST ONLINE

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THU 22 - WED 28

FRI 23

FRI 23

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FRI 23 - SAT 24

SUN 25

SAT 24

TUE 27

your own screen printed bicycle art. 12 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. SUPERHEROES CRUISE. 1 p.m. Gateway Clipper Fleet, Station Square. 412-266-4268. YOUTH BEGINNING ARCHERY. For kids ages 9-15. Registration required by Aug. 22 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park, Hookstown. 724-899-3611.

SAT 24 - SUN 25

MIDNIGHT RADIO JR.: MAD SCIENCE LAB. Live sketch/variety show for kids ages 6-12. Sat, Sun. Thru Sept. 1 Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999.

SUN 25

APPLES & HONEY FESTIVAL. Apple sack races, beeswax candle-making, honey tasting, crafts, more. 1-4 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-992-5204. PLAY W/ CLAY ON THE POTTER’S WHEEL. Ages 3+. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. ROOKIE OF THE GEAR PINBALL. Try out a DIY baseball-themed pinball machine made from recycled materials. 10 a.m.3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. SNOWBALL DAY. Snowthemed activities. 9-11 a.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-1637.

MON 26

FAMILY GAME NIGHT. Last Mon of every month, 5-8 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. PLAY W/ CLAY AT THE HANDBUILDING TABLE. Ages 3+. Mon, 12-2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

WED 28

LEGO CLUB. Ages 7-12. Registration required. 4 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. WATER, WATER EVERYWHERE. Explore ponds, streams, rivers & the animals that live in & near the water. Ages 3-6. 10:30 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

WED 28 - THU 29

SOUND INSTALLATION. Explore how to take sound, and turn it into a visual art form. Aug. 28-29 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. CONTINUES ON PG. 72

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013


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[EXHIBITS]

Russell Maroon Shoatz’s 70th birthday. Feat. speakers, live music, more. 7-9 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-654-9070. SINGING IN THE RAIN SUMMER SOCIAL & SCREENING. 7 p.m. KellyStrayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. TCHAIKOVSKY: HIS LIFE & MUSIC. Multi-media lecture on the life & music of Peter Tchaikovsky. Fri, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

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www.livelinks.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013

HIKING CLUB OF RACCOON CREEK. Register at www. meetup.com/Hiking-ClubOf-Raccoon-Creek-StatePark. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park, Hookstown. 724-899-3611. SUMMER SALADS PADDLE. Paddle & picnic w/ Venture Outdoors. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Moraine State Park, Butler. 412-255-0564.

SAT 24 - SUN 25

FRI 23 - SAT 24

KAYAKING DISCOVERY COURSE. Presented by L.L.Bean. Sat, Sun, 10-11:30 a.m. Thru Oct. 13 North Park, Allison Park. 412-318-1200.

INGRID ULLRICH: THE MAIN EVENT. An evening of music, dance & comedy. Aug. 23-24, 8 p.m. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 1-888-718-4253.

SUN 25

BUTLER-FREEPORT TRAIL RIDE. 40-mile ride w/ Venture Outdoors. Butler-Freeport Trail, Butler. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 412-255-0564. ECO-TOUR W/ VENTURE OUTDOORS. Paddle tour. Ages 12+. 9-11:30 a.m. Moraine State Park, Butler. 412-255-0564.

TUE 27

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 28

WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 22

BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. COLLEGE, INC. Documentary screening about the pros & cons of the for-profit higher education model. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. GOOD BEER/BAD MOVIE. w/ complimentary beer, popcorn & other refreshments. 7:30 p.m. The ToonSeum, Downtown. 412-232-0199. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/international

SAT 24

“Crimson-haired slave girl … desired by a man of destiny! Together they shared the thrills of the most daring spectacle DeMille ever filmed!” So claims one tagline from Unconquered, Cecil B.’s adventure-romance, set at Fort Pitt during Pontiac’s Rebellion. In commemoration of the 250th anniversary of the rebellion, the Fort Pitt Museum hosts Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. The exhibit features authentic 18th-century artifacts, as well as original props and costumes used by Gary Cooper, Paulette Goddard and others in the 1947 film. Exhibit continues through Aug. 3, 2014. 601 Commonwealth Place, Downtown. 412-471-1764 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MENTAL HEALTH FIRST AID CERTIFICATION. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg. 724-837-1808 x 1712. PAST TO PRESENT: AN EVENING W/ RON BARAFF. History discussion, part of the Carrie Furnaces: Contemporary Views exhibit. 6-8 p.m. Silver Eye Center for Photography, South Side. 412-431-1810. PLUM FARMER’S MARKET. Thu, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Plum Senior Community Center, Plum. 412-795-2339. PREVIEW PARTY AT THE PUBLIC. Sneak peek at the upcoming Masterpiece Season, live music, refreshments, more. 6-8:30 p.m. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600.

RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. WILKINSBURG FARMERS’ MARKET. 732 Ross Ave., Wilkinsburg. Thu, 3-6 p.m. Thru Nov. 21 412-727-7855.

FRI 23

BLACK AUGUST B’EARTHDAY CELEBRATION. Honoring

AVELLA & LILLY: LOCAL HISTORY REVISITED. Presentation by Maria Stockman & Jim Hohman. 1:30 p.m. Homestead Pump House, Munhall. 412-831-3871. CRAFT & VENDOR FAIR. Benefits the North Hills Art Center. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Bruster’s Real Ice Cream, Ross. 412-366-9899. DOWNTOWN HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at City County Building, Downtown. Sat. Thru Aug. 31 412-302-5223. INCLINE HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at the bottom of the Monongahela Incline. Sat. Thru Oct. 26 412-302-5223. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Korean grammar & basic conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. A NIGHT OF BURGHLESQUE. Drag show, comedy, more. Hosted by Kierra Darshell. 10:30 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. PRIDE OF PITTSBURGH AMATEUR BOXING EVENT. 6:30 p.m. Linden Gymnasium, Sharpsburg. 412-527-4518. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.


SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE STEEL CITY BOWLING CLUB. Free Scrabble games, LEAGUE REGISTRATION all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. NIGHT. 6 p.m. Noble Mount Lebanon Public Manor Lanes, Green Tree. Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-922-4622. 412-531-1912. WISHCRAFT: HOW TO GET SPANISH CONVERSATION WHAT YOU REALLY WANT. GROUP. Friendly, informal. Support group for life goals. At the Starbucks inside Sun, 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-371-1707. Target - East Liberty. 412-362-6108. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. SWING CITY. Learn & A support group for women practice swing dancing 30+. Second and skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Fourth Mon of every Wightman School, month Anchorpoint Squirrel Hill. Counseling Ministry, 412-759-1569. North Park. VOICES GALLERY . w w w THE DEN. Second TALK: QUEER paper ty ci h g p and Fourth Mon & BROWN IN .com of every month STEELTOWN. w/ Raquel Carnegie Library, Rodriguez & Ayanah Oakland. 412-622-3151. Moor. 2 p.m. Andy Warhol MORNING SPANISH Museum, North Side. LITERATURE & 412-237-8300. CONVERSATION. Mon, WINDGAP-CHARTIERS 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon CITY COMMUNITY DAY. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Live DJ, food, children’s 412-531-1912. activities, more. 12-7 p.m. SAHAJA MEDITATION. Chartiers City Playground, Mon, 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 26 Sheraden. 412-465-0579. Mount Lebanon Public Library, YOUTHPRENEUR. Business Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. networking event. 11 a.m. SCOTTISH COUNTRY Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. 3RD ANNUAL IRWIN No partner needed. Mon, RIB RALLY. 2 p.m. Irwin 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Park Amphitheatre, Irwin. Grace Episcopal Church, 724-864-3100. Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL SPELLING BEE WITH HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Weekly letter writing event. Lava Lounge, South Side. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, 412-431-5282. Oakland. 412-683-3727. ART CLUB OF RACCOON CREEK. 2-5 p.m. Raccoon PORKY OLDIES DANCE. Creek State Park, Hookstown. First Thu of every month 724-899-3611. and Last Tue of every month CANONSBURG SUNDAY Brentwood VFW Post 1810, CAR CRUISE. Sun, 1-5 p.m. Brentwood. 412-881-9934. Thru Sept. 22 The Handle Bar & Grille, Canonsburg. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT 724-746-4227. GROUP. For Widows/ GARFIELD COMMUNITY Widowers over 50. Second and DAY. Games, line dancing, Fourth Wed of every month, food, more. Presented 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, by the Garfield Jubilee Ross. 412-366-1300. Association. 1-7 p.m. St. COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE. Maria Goretti Activity Center, Seeking new players, Garfield. 412-665-5214. no experience necessary. KNIT THE BRIDGE PARTY. Wednesdays, Squirrel Hill. Welcoming booths, history 412-422-7878. of yarn-bombing, more. CREATIVE CONNECTIONS. Andy Warhol Bridge, For Seniors only. Wed, 2 p.m. Downtown. 3-7 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 Mount Lebanon PITTSBURGH’S HIDDEN Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. TREASURES: AN ANTIQUES 412-531-1912. APPRAISAL SHOW. Bring DETROIT STYLE URBAN family heirlooms & meet BALLROOM DANCE. w/ professional appraisers 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. as KDKA-TV cameras roam Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. the museum. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 412-242-4345. Senator John Heinz ENGLISH CONVERSATION History Center, Strip District. (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount 412-454-6000. Lebanon Public Library, RED, RIPE & ROASTED. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. Annual tomato & garlic FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Farmers’ festival. Benefits the Greater market. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Community Food Thru Oct. 30 Phipps Conservatory Bank. Phipps Conservatory & & Botanical Garden, Oakland. Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. 412-622-6914.

MON 26

FULL LIST E N O LIN

SUN 25

TUE 27

WED 28

FITNESS CONSULTATIONS. Wed RDL Fitness, McCandless. 412-407-0145. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. METAMIXER. Vendor mixer feat. Lawrenceville businesses. 6 p.m. Metamorphosis Salon & Day Spa, Lawrenceville. 412-781-1262. NEW ADVANCEMENTS IN DENTAL MEDICINE. w/ Dr. Eric Kern. 1:30 p.m. St. Barnabas Health Care System, Gibsonia. 724-443-7231. NO FLY ZONE. Artist talk w/ D.S. Kinsel. 7-8:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. PFLAG WASHINGTON. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Fourth Wed of every month First Presbyterian Church, Downtown. 412-471-3436. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373. YOGA FOR YOU. Wed, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 28 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

FOOTBALL SEASON IS HERE! COME WATCH THE BIG GAMES!

DISCOUNT AT DOOR WITH GAME TICKET!

FREE DRINKS! FREE LIMO PICKUP TO THE CLUB! CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM 18 AND OVER

824 Island Ave. McKees Rocks

(412) 771-8872

cluberoticapittsburgh.com

AUDITIONS BACH CHOIR OF

PITTSBURGH. Auditions for 2013-2014 season. Aug. 24. Interested singers (especially tenors & basses) contact auditions@ bachchoirpittsburgh.org for appointment. Prepare a song of your choice & bring a copy of the music for accompanist. Purnell Center for the Arts, Oakland. 412-241-4044. CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY’S DEPT. OF THEATRE & DANCE, MON VALLEY DANCE COUNCIL. Auditions for Miracle on 34th St. Sept. 7. Male/female singers & dancers, ages 6-adult. California University, California. 724-938-4220. CITY THEATRE COMPANY. Auditions for plays in the Young Playwrights Festival. Sept. 4. Non-equity actors, 2-min. contemporary monologue. auditions@ citytheatrecompany.org. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. GEYER PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Auditions for Man of LaMancha. Aug. 25-26. Men ages 20+, 12-16 bars of a CONTINUES ON PG. 74

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classic musical theater piece & age 13-70, cold readings. email thedapcoopzumba@ cold readings. www.geyerpac. McKeesport. 412-673-1100. hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. com. Scottdale. 724-887-0887. NEW CASTLE PLAYHOUSE. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. HOPE ACADEMY. Auditions Auditions for the musical version Submit your film, 10 minutes for Hope Academy’s of A Christmas Carol. Aug. 25-26. or less. Screenings held on the Teen Theater Company. Prepare a vocal selection. Visit second Thursday of every month. Applications due Aug. 23, www.newcastleplayhouse.org. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, audition times to follow. for information. New Castle. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. Looking for singers, 724-654-3437. INSISTENT LIGHT POETRY dancers, actors & musicians. PRIME STAGE. Auditions for COMPETITION. Submit 2 of your cathedralofhope.org/ Turn of the Screw. Sep. 7-8. best poems, no themes or hopeacademy/hat-co.html. Seeking adult non-equity actors restrictions. cathleenbailey. East Liberty Presbyterian for the roles. SAG-AFTRA actors blogspot.com/2013/08/insistentChurch, East Liberty. are also encouraged to audition. light-first-annual-poetry.html 412-441-3800 x 11. Prepare a 2-minute dramatic KELLY STRAYHORN THEATER. THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN monologue using a British Accepting applications for the CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. dialect. To schedule a time & KST Photography Fellowship. Fall auditions for talented for more information visit Submit resume, cover letter, & 8th grade-12th grade www.primestage.com. The link to online portfolio to singers for the 2013 season. Oakland School, Oakland. david@kelly-strayhorn.org. Aug. 26-27. Email or call MaryColleen. mcseip@ themendelssohn.org. [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] Westminster Presbyterian Church, Upper St. Clair. 724-263-5259. LATSHAW PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for male singers Looking for something fun to do with the rest of your & female dancers, ages 18+ summer? Why not help out at the Children’s Museum of to perform in 2 upcoming touring shows, “American Pittsburgh? Exhibit volunteers are needed to engage Bandstand” & “Christmas visitors, monitor visitor safety, and otherwise help to Memories.” Aug. 25. maintain the museum’s permanent and seasonal exhibits. latshawauditions@yahoo.com. Experience with children is preferred; a background check 724-853-4050. and orientation are required. Call 412-322-5058 or email LINCOLN PARK volunteer@pittsburghkids.org for information. PERFORMING ARTS CENTER DANCE COMPANY. Auditions for The Nutcracker. STEEL CITY IMPROV THE NEW YINZER. Online Sept. 8. Dancers ages 8-18, THEATER. Auditions for Fall magazine seeking book combinations in ballet & 2013 House Team. Ages 18+, reviewers, writers & artists to pointe. centerauditions.org/ be familiar w/ the long form submit original essays, fiction, index.php/dance-company/ improv structure “Harold.” poetry, artwork, & photographs the-nutcracker. Auditions steelcityimprov.com/auditions/ as well as pitched ideas for for Peter & the Wolf. Sept. 8. Shadyside. 412-404-2695. possible contributions. Visit Dancers ages 12-18, WCCC BAND & CHOIR. Seeking www.newyinzer.com for combinations in ballet & singers & instrumentalist current issue. Email all pointe. centerauditions.org/ musicians for its community submissions/inquiries to index.php/dance-company/ choir & band. Open to newyinzer@gmail.com. peter-and-the-wolf individuals of all ages PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY Lincoln Park Performing & musical experience ORCHESTRA. Seeking young Arts Center, Midland. levels. Current composers to submit new 724-259-6443. members are high works for annual Reading LINCOLN PARK school & college Session. pso.culturaldistrict.org/ PERFORMING ARTS www. per a p students & community event/6236/10th-annualCENTER STUDENT pghcitym o .c members. No reading-session. 412-392-4828. COMPANY. Auditions audition, fees or tuition THE POET BAND COMPANY. for Seussical the Musical. are required to join. Email Seeking various types of Aug. 26-27. Actors/singers in bookerr@wccc.edu or call for poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ grades 7-12, 1-min. monologue information. 724-925-5976. hotmail.com & 32 bars of a Broadway-style WESTMORELAND YOUTH SILVER EYE CENTER FOR song. Bring sheet music, SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking accompanist provided. PHILHARMONIC. Auditions submissions for Fellowship 14. centerauditions.org/index.php/ for fall season. Aug. 21 & 25. Submit a 1-page Artist’s student-company/seussical-theOpen to area high school & Statement in PDF format, a musical. Auditions for Emma. college string, woodwind, biography/CV in PDF format, Aug. 26-27. Actors/singers in brass & percussion players. & work sample to silvereye. grades 9-12, 1-min. monologue www.westmorelandsymphony. org/f14-submit. Email jzipay@ & 32 bars of a Broadway-style org Seton Hill University, silvereye.org for information. song. Bring sheet music, Greensburg. 724-837-1850. 412-431-1810. accompanist provided. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM centerauditions.org/index.php/ OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking student-company/emma. Lincoln BLAST FURNACE. Seeking individual artists & artist Park Performing Arts Center, submissions for Volume 3, Issue Midland. 724-259-6443. groups for month-long 3. Theme is “prized possessions,” MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. exhibitions in a new transitional tangible or otherwise. Submit no gallery measuring. Artists will Ongoing auditions for more than 3 of your best poems. actors ages 18+ for murder be responsible for all aspects of http://blastfurnace.submittable. mystery shows performed their exhibition. Send images & com/Submit in the Pittsburgh area. a brief introduction to the work THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking 412-833-5056. to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. performers & artists to a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org participate in First Fridays - Art Auditions for The Westing & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Game. Aug. 25-26. Men/women in a Box. For more information, Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

My 14-year-old stepson has been stealing, wearing, soiling and hiding his toddler sister’s pull-ups. I’ve found them after he hides them in his closet, which also serves as a general storage area. After discussions with him, I’m certain that wearing them is a pleasure thing. (He says “curiosity,” but this has been going on so long that he knows what it feels like.) He has even stolen some of the neighbor girl’s doll diapers to wear and soil. We’ve told him he has to stop stealing diapers — because stealing is wrong, and these things are expensive. We are grossed out by it, despite being open-minded. I believe we have a fetish growing here, and I don’t think a parent needs to be involved, but he’s stinking up the joint. PARENT IS SERIOUSLY STUMPED

Is your stepson a diaper perv? Maybe he is, maybe he isn’t. “This may only be a case of ‘curiosity,’ just as his stepson says,” said Jesse Bering, Ph.D., a research psychologist who regularly contributes to Slate, Scientific American and other publications. “Young teenagers can’t express their overwhelming urges easily. We provide no ‘socially appropriate’ sexual outlets for 14-year-olds, masturbation aside — which, let’s face it, can get monotonous. So his stepson may simply be exploring the available materials that he, ahem, comes across.” Bering, who just finished his second book about human sexuality, remembers doing some freaky stuff himself at age 14. “I recall some exciting moments involving peeing in the bathroom sink,” said Bering. “The idea of pissing in the sink with an erection while looking at myself naked in the mirror isn’t particularly arousing to me these days.” Since it’s share time: I remember stealing panty hose when I was 14 — I’ve never told anyone about this — and I enjoyed some exciting moments looking in a mirror while wearing them. I didn’t grow up to be a pantyhose-in-the-mirror fetishist. That said … “Even if his stepson is really into diapers, it’s a pretty harmless fetish,” said Bering. “As with any paraphilia, it would be next to impossible to ‘cure,’ even at his young age. It’s just something he’ll need to learn how to handle responsibly. You may be grossed out and, yes, a festering pile of discarded diapers would be a sanitary problem, but never underestimate the power of a frank conversation grounded in truly unconditional love.” Start that conversation by reassuring your stepson that you love him. Tell him most humans are a little perverted — that’s what Bering’s new book is about — but our kinks are private, and you’re only talking to him about his thing for diapers because he hasn’t been keeping it private. Then cut him a deal: If he makes an effort to discreetly dispose of diapers he soils, you won’t go looking for them and you’ll keep your mouth shut if you find one or two in the trash bin. “On the theft problem,” said Bering, “a 14-year-old diaper fetishist can’t just buy erotic

supplies out of his own paycheck. So let him earn enough money to buy a few pairs of pull-ups by doing chores. And while the stealing is definitely worrisome, it does provide a convenient, less awkward way to address the fetishism issue. Stealing from the neighbors is the main reason, you can tell your stepson, that you’ve decided to bring him to a therapist. A good psychologist can explore the reasons for his kleptomania and lend a sympathetic and nonparental ear for him to talk about any taboo feelings.” Bering’s new book, Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us, will be released Oct. 8, but it can (and should!) be preordered now. Follow him on Twitter — @jessebering — to read his highly entertaining #DailyDeviant posts. I’m a 19-year-old male. I lost two-and-a-half fingers on my right hand in an accident when I was 13. I am otherwise good-looking and in shape — but what does that matter? A counselor once told me, “A lady of class will love you for who you are.” Bullshit. I’m disfigured, not stupid. Children fear me! And what sort of woman would look at me when whole men can be found everywhere? Don’t tell me to go to counseling. I go to counseling. Do not give me the link to some useless “support” group’s website. What is there to do?

“WE PROVIDE NO ‘SOCIALLY APPROPRIATE’ SEXUAL OUTLETS FOR 14YEAR-OLDS, MASTURBATION ASIDE — WHICH, LET’S FACE IT, CAN GET MONOTONOUS.”

DON’T INSULT MY INTELLIGENCE

Here’s something you can do: Get the fuck over yourself. I know that’s harsh, but I’m thinking harsh is what you came to me for. If it isn’t, you might wanna skip the rest of my response. There are people with missing limbs, who were badly burned in fires, with disfiguring birth defects. One day volunteering in a burn ward might put your hand in perspective. And burn victims and people with missing limbs or birth defects? Lots of them are getting laid and finding partners despite the cruel looks they sometimes get from thoughtless children. Some women will be turned off by your hand, and that sucks. But some won’t care. There might be women who’ll find you more attractive as a result of your accident — I’ve never received a letter from a woman with a fetish for missing fingers, but I’ll doubtless hear from at least one after your letter runs. I can tell you this, though: No one is attracted to self-pity. Each of us moves through life covered with scars, some more visible than others. All we can do is make the best of what we have, or what we have left. So get over yourself, get out of the house, and go meet women. If you’re worried your hand is the first thing a woman notices, get a prosthesis or wear a glove. And remember that very few people your age — people with 10 intact fingers — have met with much romantic success. I’m sorry about your accident, I really am. Good luck. On this week’s Savage Lovecast: Dan chats with OKCupid cofounder Christian Rudder about strategies in online dating, at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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ACROSS

1. Pace choice 5. Moralizing opportunities for David Brooks 10. Cons’ opposites 14. “Wonderfilled” brand 15. Foley artist’s concern 16. The “I” in I. M. Pei 17. Military haircut that doesn’t leave a mark on the scalp? 19. Tart fruit used for gin 20. In control, in a way 21. Saltine brand 23. Parthenon architectural feature (and an anagram of “Poet? Me?”) 27. “Au contraire” 30. Mocking nickname for Dr. J, in reference to his mediocre jump shot? 32. There are rumors of one soon for Twitter: Abbr. 34. Matter of confidence? 35. “Always and again” alternative 36. “Sit,” “stay,” or “shake,” e.g. 38. Grassy ___ 40. Valley that’s the site of the Reagan Presidential Library 41. Star-related 43. “Va-va-___!” 45. Jiffy

46. Transport area with a zero-tolerance policy for bunnies? 49. Invite to crash, say 50. “Later” 51. Year of Jesus’s conception, according to some 53. Bowery punk club, familiarly 57. Cash for a cab, say 59. Frat where you can only write with chalk or coal? 63. One-named gay icon 64. In check 65. Priceless? 66. Niger’s neighbor 67. Magazine unit 68. Noted gun owner of cartoons

DOWN

1. Like most of Phil Spector’s recordings 2. Prepare, as briefs? 3. In the event that 4. Asian telecom giant 5. Ancient propulsive tool 6. Site of some quizzes 7. Academia.___ 8. English rapper Rascal 9. “The Usual Suspects” villain Keyser ___ 10. Old Spanish coins 11. One for whom many angles may be right?

12. Hugs, in a letter 13. Tyler, the Creator single of 2011 18. Copycats 22. Swedish snuff 24. Bring down, as a Giant 25. Lipstick ___ elephant 26. “E.T.,” e.g. 28. “Really, what’s the harm?” 29. “Hamlet” courtier 30. Country that recently “built 500 objects contributable to raising the level of modernization,” per its website 31. Wreck 32. A Trump wife 33. Old Spanish coins 37. “Fargo” setting

39. Old stories 42. Secretary of Education Duncan 44. Bum 47. Neckwear choices for Fred of “Scooby-Doo” 48. Transfer, as luck 52. ___ B’rith 54. Half of Gang Starr 55. Mansplained, perhaps 56. Future plant 57. Org. responsible for keeping assholes off of television? 58. “Finally, relaxation” 60. “Baking with Julia” network 61. ___ de parfum 62. “Science Guy” once on 60-Down

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

08.21-08.28

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “My story isn’t sweet and harmonious like invented stories,” wrote novelist Herman Hesse. “It tastes of folly and bewilderment, of madness and dream, like the life of all people who no longer want to lie to themselves.” As interesting as Hesse’s declaration is, let’s not take it as gospel. Let’s instead envision the possibility that when people reduce the number of lies they tell themselves, their lives may become sweeter and more harmonious as a result. I propose that exact scenario for you right now, Leo. There might be a rough adjustment period as you cut back on your self-deceptions, but eventually your folly and bewilderment will diminish as the sweet harmony grows.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

Novelist James Joyce once articulated an extreme wish that other writers have probably felt but never actually said. “The demand that I make of my reader,” said Joyce, “is that he should devote his whole life to reading my works.” Was he being mischievous? Maybe. But he never apologized or issued a retraction. Your assignment, Virgo, is to conjure up your own version of that wild desire: a clear statement of exactly what you really, really want in all of its extravagant glory. I think it’ll be healthy for you to identify this pure and naked longing. (P.S. I’m not implying that you should immediately try to get it fulfilled, though. For now, the important thing is knowing what it is.)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

Now and then a British Libra named Lloyd Scott dresses up in funny costumes while competing in long-distance races. He does it to raise money for charity. In the 2011 London Marathon, he wore a 9-foot snail outfit for the duration of the course. It took him 27 days to finish. I suggest you draw inspiration from his heroic effort. From a cosmic perspective, it would make sense for you to take your time as you engage in amusing activities that benefit your fellow humans.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

What will you do now that you have acquired more clout and visibility? Will you mostly just pump up your self-love and bask in the increased attention? There’s nothing wrong with that, of course. But if those are the only ways you cash in on your added power, the power won’t last. I suggest you take advantage of your enhanced influence by engaging in radical acts of magnanimity. Perform good deeds and spread big ideas. The more blessings you bestow on your fellow humans, the more enduring your new perks will be.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

You’ve been pretty wild and uncontained lately, and that’s OK. I’ve loved seeing how much permission you’ve given yourself to ramble free, experiment with the improbable and risk being a fool. I suspect that history will judge a majority of your recent explorations as tonic. But now, Sagittarius, the tenor of the time is shifting. To continue being in alignment with your highest good, I believe you will have to rein in your wanderlust and start attending to the care and cultivation of your power spot. Can you find a way to enjoy taking on more responsibility?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

“The person who can’t visualize a horse galloping on a tomato is an idiot,” said the founder of Surrealism, writer André Breton. I wouldn’t go so

far as to call such an imagination-deprived soul an “idiot,” but I do agree with the gist of his declaration. One of the essential facets of intelligence is the ability to conjure up vivid and creative images in one’s mind. When daily life has grown a bit staid or stuck or overly serious, this skill becomes even more crucial. Now is one of those times for you, Capricorn. If you have any trouble visualizing a horse galloping on a tomato, take measures to boost the fertility of your imagination.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

“I want to be with those who know the secret things, or else alone,” wrote the eccentric ecstatic poet Rainer Maria Rilke. That wouldn’t be a good rule for you Aquarians to live by all the time. To thrive, you need a variety of cohorts and allies, including those who know and care little about secret things. But I suspect that for the next few weeks, an affinity for those who know secret things might suit you well. More than that, they may be exactly the accomplices who will help you attend to your No. 1 assignment: exploratory holy work in the depths.

tive, like “It’s not something I can change overnight” or “I don’t think I can change overnight.” But there’s one Google link to “I can change overnight.” It’s a declaration made by Taurus painter Willem de Kooning. He was referring to how unattached he was to defining his work and how easy it was for him to mutate his artistic style. I wouldn’t normally advise you Tauruses to use “I can change overnight” as your battle cry. But for the foreseeable future you do have the power to make some rather rapid and thorough transformations.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

“The artist is by necessity a collector,” said graphic designer Paul Rand. “He accumulates things with the same ardor and curiosity with which a boy stuffs his pockets. He borrows from the sea and from the scrap heap; he takes snapshots, makes mental notes, and records impressions on tablecloths and newspapers. He has a taste for children’s wall scrawling as appreciative as that for prehistoric cave painting.” Whether or not you’re an artist,

Gemini, this would be an excellent approach for you in the coming days. You’re in a phase when you can thrive by being a gatherer of everything that attracts and fascinates you. You don’t need to know yet why you’re assembling all these clues. That will be revealed in good time.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

Can you remember the last time you bumped up against a limitation caused by your lack of knowledge? What did it feel like? I expect that sometime soon you will have that experience again. You may shiver with worry as you contemplate the potential consequences of your continued ignorance. But you may also feel the thrill of hungry curiosity rising up in you. If all goes well, the fear and curiosity will motivate you to get further educated. You will set to work on a practical plan to make it happen. Do you have a liability that could be turned into an asset with a little (or a lot of) work? Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

To launch your horoscope, I’ll steal a line from a Thomas Pynchon novel: A revelation trembles just beyond the threshold of your understanding. To continue your oracle, I’ll borrow a message I heard in my dream last night: A breakthrough shivers just beyond the edge of your courage. Next, I’ll use words I think I heard while eavesdropping on a conversation at Whole Foods: If you want to cook up the ultimate love feast, you’re still missing one ingredient. And to finish this oracle, Pisces, I’ll say that if you want to precipitate the trembling revelation, activate the shivering breakthrough and acquire the missing ingredient, imitate what I’ve done in creating this horoscope. Assume the whole world is offering you useful clues, and listen closely.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

An Indian student named Sankalp Sinha has invented the “Good Morning Sing N Shock.” It’s an alarm clock that plays you a song and gives you a small electrical jolt when you hit the snooze button. The voltage applied is far less intense than, say, a Taser, and is designed to energize you rather than disable you. I encourage you to seek out wake-up calls like the kind this device administers, Aries: fairly gentle, yet sufficiently dramatic to get your attention. The alternative would be to wait around for blind fate to provide the wake-up calls. They might be a bit more strenuous.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

If you Google the statement “I can change overnight,” most of the results that come up are nega-

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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Our skilled, Rehab and Personal Care facility located in Allison Park has the following openings:

Physical Therapists Physical Therapy Assistants (Per Diem) To apply, please visit or submit application to 3746 Cedar Ridge Road Allison Park, PA 15101 Phone: 724-444-0600 Fax: 724-444-6621 or email: lemert@rebeccaresidence.com EOE 82

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(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Xin Sui Bodyworks

(Lawrenceville)

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TIGER SPA

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

412-401-4110 $40/hr

$50/HR Free Table Shower

724-519-7896

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Zhangs Wellness Center

Superior Chinese Massage Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

MIND & BODY

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Xie LiHong’s

STAR

MIND & BODY


get your yoga on!

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

WEIGHTLOSS TREATMENT

Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Adipex based weight loss No Long Term Contract

JADE

No Start Up Fee

Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

355 Fifth Ave Suite 1120 Pgh, PA 15222 412-680-2064

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

Flexible Hours Including Mornings

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL NOW IN SQUIRREL HILL!

Call Today to Advertise Your Business in Pittsburgh City Paper!

Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

J&S GLASS

Water Pipes And Glass W lass For All Your Smoking Needs

Health Services

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

NO WAIT LIST

SUBOXONE

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

MONROEVILLE, PA

Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop 1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

412-380-0100

Addictions

www.myjadewellness.com

LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116

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LIVE

SERVICES EAST FOR RENT

REAL ESTATE SERVICES 20 ACRES FREE! Buy 40-Get 60 Acres. $0 down, $198/ month. Money back guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/Surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www. sunsetranches.com (AAN CAN) ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

STORAGE ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

NOW LEASING final units in the new Walnut on Highland building located at 121 S Highland in the revitalized East End neighborhood. Steps to Shadyside, Whole Foods and bus line. This property features unique floor plans, parking, gourmet granite kitchens, and energy efficient building materials. Limited spaces available. See full listing at www.walnutcapital. com or call 412-683-3810.

SOUTH FOR RENT Southside Flats- 2BR, office, eq.kit, porch, crtyrd, w/d hkups, Avl 10/1 $895+ utils. dmttei@aol.com, 412366-9177

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

VARIOUS LOCATIONS Luxury apartments available. Various locations. Call 412-983-3810 Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper! 0

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7750 Steubenville Pike, Oakdale PA 15071 12 Miles West Of PGH, 7 Miles From Airport

Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

Looking for your next tenant? Advertise in City Paper’s “LIVE” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds! Call 412316-3342 TODAY!

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE! REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! A whole-home Satellite system installed at NO COST. Programming starting at $19.99/mo. New Callers receive FREE HD/DVR upgrade! CALL: 1-877-342-0363 (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION

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Featuring Heart Shaped Whirlpool Tubs Private Balcony or Patio & Gas Fireplaces Savings on Sundays thru Thursdays Ask about parent daycare special

412-788-9960 • 412-788-4592

Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

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PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 Void in Illinois/New Mexico

A beautiful, secure, life of love awaits your newborn through the gift of adoption. Danielle 888-386-9998 Exp. Pd.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.21/08.28.2013

Pittsburgh Lawyers

Need N eed a Lawyer? Lawye yer?

GENERAL FOR SALE

Meet M eet Bob! Bob!

KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Buy a Harris Bed Bug Kit. Complete Treatment Program. Odorless, Non-Staining. Available online at homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES) Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section. KILL ROACHES! Buy Harris Roach Spray/ Roach Trap Value Pack or Concentrate. Eliminate RoachesGuaranteed. Effective results begin after spray dries. BUY ONLINE homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES)

SERVICES Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Become a volunteer tutor and help an adult learn to read. Contact Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council at 412.393.7600 or gplc.org Open up a Life We have a waiting list of 200 adults who need your help.

SPECIALIZES IN: Criminal Defense, Civil Litigation, Personal Injury and more!

Call for a FREE CONSULTATION. Law Offices of

Robert Goldman

412-531-6879

We are looking for articulate, motivated customer service representatives with a background in fundraising, activism, and/ or customer service. If you are looking for a job which benefits political, environmental, and social causes, consider Public Interest Communications. Qualifications: * Outstanding reading, interpersonal, and listening skills * Ongoing awareness of current events * Proficient computer skills * Ability to follow through when given instructions * Ability to maintain a goal-oriented attitude We Offer: * Hourly guarantee $11 office avg * Paid training * Flexible hours * Wide variety of bonus opportunities * Supportive atomoshphere Located in North Oakland, on bus line, near universities. Plenty of parking. Call 412-622-7370 to schedule an interview. PUBLIC INTEREST COMMUNICATIONS Background check required. www.facebook.com/picpgh pubintcom.com/

Attorney Robert Domenick Experienced , Dedicated, Affordable

Accepting new divorce clients Flat Rate for Uncontested Divorces

(724) 523-9530 Westmoreland County

advertise your business in pittsburgh city paper 412.316.3342


OUT OF THE WOODS? Can Brentwood put its past behind it? Will we let it? {BY FRANCES SANSIG}

A FEW YEARS AGO, I ran into a former neighbor at the grocery store. “I haven’t seen you around in a while,” I said. “What’s new?” “We moved,” he said. “Too many niggers moving into Brentwood.” I guess that was his way of describing a demographic shift documented in U.S. Census Bureau figures. In this leafy inner-ring suburb I call home, the number of folks identifying as African-American or part African-American has grown — from 75 in 2000 to 275 in 2010. Combined with the fact that Brentwood’s overall population declined from 10,466 to 9,650, blacks have gone from being 0.7 percent to almost 3 percent of its population. Community leaders are much happier about that trend than my former neighbor. “I want Brentwood to be all-inclusive,” says Dennis Troy, a self-described “open-minded” Republican who won a write-in campaign in the mayoral primary, and who seems poised to be the borough’s next mayor. What would he say to an African-American family moving to Brentwood, given its history? “The same thing I’d say to a white family: Welcome.”

his girlfriend and two daughters. “My girlfriend had family who lived in this area before, and they liked it a lot,” Harris says. “And I feel a lot safer here than I did in the Hill District. It’s a convenient location and it’s quiet.” When I asked about the Gammage incident — Harris was a kid at the time — he told me he’d learned about it in history class. “We learned about how racism is still prevalent today,” he says. “My friend warned me about the police here,” Harris acknowledges. “But I think profiling is everywhere.” Charlene Berger has a similar perspective. Berger is black, and a former city police officer: While she lives in Mount Oliver, she lived in Brentwood a few years ago and still comes there to shop. “I never trusted the [Brentwood] police, and I still don’t,” she says. “The people here were very good to me. I didn’t feel like Brentwood was any more racist than anywhere else.” That’s the message many Brentwood residents want you to hear: The police were responsible for Jonny Gammage, not the people.

WHEN A NEWCOMER LIKE JARREAU HARRIS IS WILLING TO GIVE OUR COMMUNITY THE BENEFIT OF THE DOUBT, WE HAVE A SPECIAL BURDEN NOT TO DISAPPOINT HIM. Of course, a shift of 200 people is the tiniest of trends, the kind that doesn’t make headlines. But that’s at least partly because it doesn’t fit the headlines that have already been written. Early last February, when a Monessen basketball team alleged that “Brentwood” was hurling racial slurs at players during a game, local media outlets swarmed on the accusations like hipsters on bacon night … all because of a huge pockmark in Brentwood’s history: the death of black motorist Jonny Gammage. Eighteen years ago this October, Gammage was followed by white Brentwood Police Lt. Milton Mulholland for “erratic driving.” During the ensuing traffic stop, Brentwood officer John Vojtas arrived at the scene, along with three other white officers from nearby communities. Gammage died, the victim of “positional asphyxia,” stemming from police actions the officers said were necessary to detain him. Mulholland’s case ended in a mistrial; he’s now deceased. Vojtas was acquitted of manslaughter and later promoted to sergeant. He’s still on active duty. But 30-year-old Jarreau Harris, at least, refuses to dwell on that history. Harris, one of Brentwood’s newest African-American residents, moved to Brentwood just over a month ago with

“I don’t think you can label a community racist,” is how Jeff Healy, a former PTA president and Brentwood resident for 45 years, put it. “I don’t think you can label 10,000 people with one name.” But as much as Brentwood might like to forget — the Gammage incident isn’t even included on its Wikipedia page — it’s not quite that easy. In the wake of Gammage’s death, too many Brentwood residents kept their mouths shut, demanding little in the way of accountability from their police. Nor did they complain when standards were relaxed so that Vojtas could receive his promotion. That makes us culpable. So when a newcomer like Jarreau Harris is willing to give our community the benefit of the doubt, we have a special burden not to disappoint him. But if Harris is willing to give Brentwood the benefit of the doubt, maybe everyone else — including the local media — ought to do the same. While Brentwood’s history has earned it additional scrutiny, that doesn’t mean any other community would look any better beneath the microscope. Because after all, that former neighbor of mine, the one who left Brentwood? He could be living in your neighborhood. INF O @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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