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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 08.07/08.14.2013

DRAWING TO A CLOSE: CARNEGIE MUSEUM ENDS LONG-LIVED STUDIO-ART CLASSES 06


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013


EVENTS 8.16 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: PSYCHIC TV / PTV3, FEATURING THE DEBUT SCREENING OF PSYCHIC TV: DREAMS LESS SWEET New Hazlett Theater Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

8.17 – 2pm ARTIST TALK: GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

8.24 – 2pm VOICES GALLERY TALK: QUEER AND BROWN IN STEELTOWN WITH RAQUEL RODRIGUEZ AND AYANAH MOOR Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

8.30 – 8pm FILM SCREENING: CREATING THE PANDROGYNE: CELEBRATING BREYER P-ORRIDGE WITH GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE IN PERSON Tickets $10

8.31 – 2pm VOICES GALLERY TALK: TROUBLING THE LINE: AN EXCERPT – POETRY READING AND CONVERSATION WITH JENNY JOHNSON AND ARI BANIAS Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

9.7 – 8pm TRANS-Q LIVE! Tickets $10/$8 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot.

Summer’s different here. Enjoy three provocative exhibitions under one roof.

GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE/CALDWELL LINKER/NICK BUBASH /through sept 15.2013/

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

www.warhol.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013


“IT’S LIKE THE RUG WAS PULLED FROM UNDERNEATH US.”

INCOMING The cost of ignorance: Supreme Court ups the ante for bigotry (July 31) “I’d love to see marriage equality here. But we can’t even privatize beer, wine & liquor (like they do in normal states) in all big-box, grocery & convenience stores, let alone enact the freedom to marry. …[N]ot being a pessimist, just saying.” — Comment on City Paper’s Facebook page from “J.R. Graff”

The planning commission approves a sketchily detailed project by Point Park University (July 31) “This is an atrocity. We can’t ever get those old buildings back. They won’t even use the facades on the new building. It is going [to] be an inaccessible blank wall. ... Anyone involved with urban geography and architecture like I am should be appalled.” — Comment on City Paper’s Facebook page from “Christopher Michael Bever”

CLASS DISMISSED Carnegie pulls plug on adult studio-arts program

DJ Terry Lee passes away (Aug. 2, online only)

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

“We’ll miss you, Terry. Your soft & romantic voice brought so many young lovers together.” — Web comment from “John Bartolovich” “I started listening to Terry Lee’s ‘Music for young lovers’ in high school, and his Internet broadcast reminds me of those days. He will be sadly missed by all.” — Web comment from “Patty15206”

A review of Judith Robinson’s orange fire (July 31) “Your review is as penetrating as the depth and grandeur of Robinson’s offering in orange fire.” — Web comment from “Agefsky”

I caught Christ (July 31) “PURE GENIUS — I give this 2 crucifixes up!!” — Web comment from “RG”

“Daryl Metcalfe should move to Russia. Sounds like his kind of place.” — July 31 tweet from “Timothy Havener” (@timothyhavener) about the conservative state rep’s stance on marriage equality

“J

OIN A CLASS act,” read the web page touting the Carnegie Museum of Art’s adult studioarts program. “Let us become your art studio. … A draw-what-you-see class in the middle of the great Hall of Architecture. A portraitures class. Or a study in watercolors. Our studio classes have something for everyone.” The page, since deleted, was still available on July 9 — about the time the museum told instructors and students that, after August, it was ending its venerable program of semester-long studio classes for adults. (The museum’s popular children’s classes are unaffected.) The museum says the move reflects a new philosophy about how best to educate the public about art. But students and instructors — some of whom have been taking or teaching the classes for years — were quick to express their anger and sense of betrayal. “It’s like the rug was pulled from underneath us,” says Janet Jourdan, who recently took a Creating With Clay class at the museum. “We thought we were going back to class [in the fall].”

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Carol Zisowitz, among the students protesting the Carnegie’s cancelation of adult studio-arts classes, poses with one of her paintings

“It really is a great loss,” says Joan Gordon, a longtime volunteer docent at the museum who recently studied watercolors there. “An art museum without classes is diminished in its significance to the community.” ADULT STUDIO classes at the Carnegie in

their current form date to the late 1940s. By 1975, according to research by writer David Berger (an occasional CP contributor who volunteers with the Carnegie’s

program), some 3,700 students were enrolled. Over the decades, classes have covered not just painting, sculpture and pottery, but everything from modern dance and interior decorating to metalworking, jewelry-making, fly-tying and taxidermy. Such offerings were gradually pared back. Last year, the program served 422 adult students, including repeat enrollees, in its five- to 10-week classes, says Marilyn Russell, who heads the CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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CLASS DISMISSED, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

museum’s education department. Still, the classes, which typically cost museum members $ 75 to $ 100, were “always very full,” says Carol Zisowitz, a Squirrel Hill psychiatrist who’s taken painting classes for the past eight years. “Usually people can’t get into them.” Comparable classes at the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts cost at least twice as much. Moreover, Zisowitz adds, “On the whole, I think it’s more prominent artists who are teaching at the museum.” Carnegie instructors include Robert Bowden, who has works in the museum’s own permanent collection. Of her fellow students Zisowitz says, “We’re serious artists. We belong to galleries. We sell our work.” The benefits to art appreciation even reached museum volunteers. “I feel [the classes] helped me a lot as a docent,” says Gordon, an Oakland retiree who’s volunteered at the museum for 25 years. In April, the Carnegie moved art classes from a high-ceilinged, marblecolumned basement room to a smaller space. The idea was to make room for office staff displaced from another, leased building. But the Carnegie said classes would continue in some form. It wasn’t until July that Madelyn Roehrig, the part-time employee who’s overseen adult classes for 21 years, was told she’d be out of a job at the end of August. The Carnegie speaks well of the classes it has canceled. “[W]e know that those taking studio classes received excellent instruction from skilled instructors, and … we care deeply about enrollees,” museum director Lynn Zelevansky wrote in a July 18 blog post explaining the move. However, she said, a task force of museum staffers had determined that for many would-be students, multi-week classes were too much of a commitment. Moreover, the classes left educationdepartment staff little flexibility or energy for doing more inventive programming that might reach a wider public. Museum spokesperson Jonathan Gaugler adds that the decision had nothing to do with space at the museum — “There’s actually plenty of space down there” — or with budgetary concerns. Couldn’t the museum have hired more staffers, or raised fees, to con-

tinue the classes? Russell says the question misses the point: “It’s really about broader vision.” The Carnegie’s mission, she says, is to enhance appreciation of the museum’s artworks. “Perfecting someone’s artistic vision may not be the best way to do that,” she says. “Learning how to paint isn’t as central to our mission and the opportunity to make sense of your world as [are] experiences with great works of art.” Instead, the museum plans to hold workshops based on individual temporary exhibits. Some workshops might be hands-on, but many could be lectures. The first scheduled is a week-long drawing workshop early next year with artist Nicole Eisenman, as part of the upcoming Carnegie International. Multi-week classes are a possibility, too, says Gaugler, “if it makes sense.” Defenders of traditional adult classes — some of whom have registered protests online and are circulating a petition to reinstate the program — don’t buy such arguments. “I never heard anyone say, ‘Can’t we do a one-day class?’” says Linda Wallen, a longtime painting and drawing instructor. Critics also say it’s impossible to learn basic art skills in shortrun workshops. Asked about the museum’s plan to hold workshops tied to specific exhibits, Robert Bowden, who’s taught watercolors and drawing at the Carnegie for more than a decade, says, “I don’t see why they can’t do both. … I think the faculty is there and the interest from the public is there.” Dropping the current roster of classes “eliminates the real local connection as far as the artists and teachers,” Bowden adds. Some critics suspect the Carnegie’s talk of serving a “broad public” is code for “appeal to younger people.” Many of the Carnegie’s current students, after all, are retirees. But Wallen, for one, says half her students were under 30. Casey Droege, who’s taught drawing at the Carnegie as recently as 2011, says the program “was bringing in younger folks already and I think they could have built on the program instead of breaking it down.”

“LEARNING HOW TO PAINT ISN’T AS CENTRAL TO OUR MISSION AND THE OPPORTUNITY TO MAKE SENSE OF YOUR WORLD AS [ARE] EXPERIENCES WITH GREAT WORKS OF ART.”

A CARNEGIE without regularly scheduled adult studio classes might be CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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somewhat unusual among large urban museums. The Cincinnati Art Museum, for instance, offers monthly sketching and crafting workshops, and even the financially troubled Detroit Institute of the Arts offers one-day workshops in various media. Yet art museums with multi-week versions of such classes year-round, as the Carnegie had till now, also appear exceptional. The Baltimore Museum of Art, for instance, has an “interactive gallery” that only sometimes includes hands-on activities. Even New York’s mighty Metropolitan Museum of Art offers only informal, twice-monthly “Drop-in Drawing” sessions in the galleries, and other workshops running one to three days each, more or less monthly. Some museums that run multi-week classes are either also accredited art schools — like the Art Institute of Chicago — or institutions rather larger than the Carnegie. One big museum with a large adult program is the Cleveland Museum of Art, which last year served 3,100 enrollees. “Art appreciation is our goal, and education is in our mission, and one way people learn is by doing,” says that

museum’s director of intergenerational learning, Seema Rao. “To get this appreciation might be about honing their own skills.” “We really value the art-making process,” says Karen Satzman, who leads adult studio programs at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Students, for instance, can learn the finer points of the “hand” of a great artist by studying the museum’s works, she says. “What better way to get your mind into it than by having that experience [of making art] yourself?” “When you start taking a class at the museum, you are making so many connections to the museum” and its artworks, Satzman adds. Satzman says that while 10-week classes have limited appeal, the museum’s five-week courses are popular: “It’s a commitment for students but not too much of a commitment.” LACMA also holds oneday, exhibit-specific workshops of the type the Carnegie now favors. Rao acknowledges that many museums don’t offer multi-week classes because “[i]t takes a lot of work.” On the other hand, she says, “We’re really lucky, because people really like them.”

“AN ART MUSEUM WITHOUT CLASSES IS DIMINISHED IN ITS SIGNIFICANCE TO THE COMMUNITY.”

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GIVING A VOICE “Queer and Brown” podcast sparking conversation for a marginalized community {BY NICK KEPPLER}

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a cozy living room, big enough for a cocktail party but small enough to keep all its occupants in listening range. A compact loveseat sits before a coffee table, and a glass breakfast table stands in a corner. Some of the art on the walls is from students taught by Moor, an associate professor of art at Carnegie Mellon. The scents of sandalwood incense and tea filter through the air. A toy Manchester terrier, Pepper, approaches guests with a tennis ball, and two cats sometimes make an appearance. The Highland Park couple is careful to put down a coaster before offering visitors a drink. The atmosphere of the living room is so critical to their podcast, “Queer and Brown in Steeltown,” that for the only episode not recorded there, they took their rug and coffee table, along with a stack of books to adorn it, and reassembled the setup at the Rhinestone Steel music festival. “We don’t want to turn this into a news show,” says Rodriguez, a freelance graphic designer. “We want it to be conversational. The goal is to put out there the kinds of conversations we were [already] having, to provide an outlet for voices that are often marginalized.” Most of the 17 episodes feature a guest who is — like the hosts — a Pittsburgher who falls under the LGBT and person-ofcolor umbrellas. But this podcast is not strictly about queerness and brownness; it’s about queer, brown people. Artists, academics, musicians and others discuss their crafts and vent their frustrations. In one of its most interesting moments, Pitt librarian Elvia Arroyo-Ramirez shared her ambiguity about a field she loves but which puts her in the service of a “privileged class.” In another episode, aspiring graphic designer Briizy Maraj spoke gushingly for 30 minutes about the Port Authority buses he longs to redesign. Yet for the podcast’s guests, the political is never far from the personal. ArroyoRamirez recalled her immigrant, meatpacker parents’ lessons on social mobility. (“They instilled in me, ‘If you bust your ass in school so you don’t have to do this unskilled labor and you don’t have to endure this physical exhaustion we go through every day to put food on the table, then that is success.’”) Maraj recalled his fear of coming out as a Homewood teenager.

{PHOTO BY NICK KEPPLER}

Raquel Rodriguez, left, and Ayanah Moor create their podcast in their Highland Park living room.

(“I played video games just to keep my mind off of everything. I stayed inside the house and barely went outside.”) And DJ/ guitarist Theo George revealed his anxiety about profiling as he transitions from a black woman to a black man. (“When I was in the car with my black male friends, we were pulled over non-stop. We couldn’t even drive anywhere.”)

EPISODES OF THE PODCAST “QUEER AND BROWN IN STEELTOWN“

CAN BE FOUND ONLINE AT WWW.QUEERANDBROWN.COM

From immigration to bullying to stopand-frisk to Trayvon Martin to same-sex marriage, the major news issues of the ’10s are probably more likely to impact someone who is queer and brown than someone who is neither, and that helps make “Queer and Brown in Steeltown” effortlessly topical. Moor and Rodriguez started the show

in May 2012 in response to the profusion of magazine and Internet stories declaring Pittsburgh one of the country’s most livable cities. “I thought, ‘Most livable for who?’” says Moor. “You can’t call one of the most segregated cities in the U.S. one of the most livable!” They point to East Liberty as a representation of that disconnect. Target, Staples and Trader Joe’s stand as beacons of “revitalization” for some, while the small businesses on Penn Avenue struggle and neighborhood stand-bys, like Shadow Lounge, go under. “That’s gentrification,” says Rodriguez. “We move some people elsewhere and call that ‘livability.’” The podcast was meant to provide alternative narratives to that of Forbes-defined “livability,” but that’s not the only reason its hosts keep their living room open and equipped with a microphone. “The heart of the podcast is a love of queer people of color,” says Moor. “Gentrification could end tomorrow and we’d still do the podcast.” I N F O@ S T E E L C I T Y M E D I A . C OM

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BURNING DOWN THE HOUSE Nobody home on police residency requirement {BY CHRIS POTTER} ON ONE LEVEL, you can’t blame the Fraternal Order of Police for wanting to end the city’s residency requirement: Like most of us, police want to choose where they live, and where their kids go to school. But they seem to be in such a hurry to leave town, they’re running yellow lights to do it. Police are taking advantage of legislation, Senate Bill 1572, signed by Gov. Tom Corbett last October. The bill changed a half-century-old state law requiring Pittsburgh police to live in the city. The law now says only that the city “mayâ€? require residency, and the FOP is challenging that requirement before a threemember panel of arbitrators. Such panels often decide contract disputes, but several legislators — including some who voted for the law — say they never intended that to happen here. “My belief is that we were giving city elected ofďŹ cials the ability to determine for themselves whether they wanted their ofďŹ cers to live in the city,â€? says state Sen. Jay Costa (D-Forest Hills), the Democrats’ Senate minority leader. “I don’t think our intent was to have arbitrators make that decision. And I don’t think we’ve done that.â€? “I wanted to get a consensus of what the mayor and council thought, and the residents too,â€? agrees state Sen. Wayne Fontana, who represents the city’s South Hills. Looking back, though, it seems ominous that SB1572 was sponsored entirely by Republicans who don’t live in the city either. Lifting the requirements was a hobbyhorse for that noted champion of law and order, convicted former state Sen. Jane Orie (R-SCI Muncy). Last year’s effort was similarly sponsored by Republicans including Randy Vulakovich of the North Hills, and John Rafferty, who represents Philadelphia suburbs. (Not surprisingly, Vulakovich is a former police ofďŹ cer from Shaler; Rafferty is a former deputy attorney general who has long been tight with police.) It’s also strange how little public discussion SB1572 got during the ďŹ ve months it took to become law. There were, for example, no public hearings. “We didn’t try too hard to ďŹ nd out what council or the mayor thought,â€? acknowledges Fontana — because as he

saw it, the bill allowed city ofďŹ cials to ďŹ ght it out among themselves. “In some cases, it’s best to let local ofďŹ cials make these decisions,â€? he says. The measure passed the Senate with only one Democrat, Mon Valley’s Jim Brewster, voting “no.â€? But in the House, Democrats began having doubts: Could union arbitration help police escape not just the residency requirement, but the need to debate it in public? “Our staff thought there was too much ambiguity in the bill as written,â€? says state Rep. Dan Frankel. On Oct. 16, Frankel and other Dems sought to amend the bill, to make it clear residency should not be up for arbitration. But that effort failed, and the bill passed with unanimous support from Republicans. Only two Pittsburgh Democrats, Jake Wheatley and Joe Preston, voted yes. That won’t be the last word. Pittsburgh City Council wants to hold a public referendum this November asking voters whether a residency requirement should be inserted into the city’s charter. Costa and Fontana say such a process is more like what they had in mind from the outset. Arbitration rulings have trumped city charters elsewhere, but if arbitrators do side with the FOP (a ruling is due later this year), the city could seek to overturn the decision in court. “I think the city would have grounds for a challengeâ€? based on the legislature’s intent, says Costa. If police do win the ďŹ ght to move outside the city, they may ďŹ nd they’ve made it harder to put a sleeper-hold on city politicians in the future. Several political observers have told me that overturning residency may be like zapping yourself with your own Taser: a use of juice that ends up paralyzing you. Local ofďŹ cials may feel less beholden to a union whose members vote somewhere else, and voters may feel less than sympathetic to a union that runs roughshod over a public referendum. As police should know better than anyone, the interstates leading out of town have speed limits too. Ignoring them can be dangerous ‌ even if you have state ofďŹ cials willing to ďŹ x your ticket.

CITY POLICE SEEM TO BE IN SUCH A HURRY TO LEAVE TOWN THAT THEY’RE WILLING TO RUN SOME YELLOW LIGHTS.

C P OT T E R@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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The Guns of Brixton The Only Clash Tribute Band That Matters!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013

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For more information contact Recruiting@PittsburghHarlequins.org

www.PittsburghHarlequins.org


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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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Pro-nationalism English Defence League activists seemed to be itching for a street brawl to break up a scheduled antinationalist demonstration in downtown Birmingham, England, on July 18, causing the city to mobilize more than 1,000 police — when officials arrived at a solution. Police shepherded “hundreds” of rowdy EDL operatives into the popular Bar Risa pub at 11 a.m., confining them for three hours, until the anti-EDL rally had dissipated. (Given British habits, many EDLers decided to enjoy their confinement with a brew.) As a result, police reported only sporadic street scuffling. (Bar Risa, perturbed by police pressure to host alleged “fascists,” donated its profits to the Midlands Air Ambulance service.)

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For “beach season” in Qingdao, China, recently, middle-aged ladies returned to the shore of the Yellow Sea sporting their relatively revealing (though age-appropriate) bathing suits — but wearing distinctive cloth hoods with tiny holes only for the eyes, nose and mouth. To many in China, dark skin still signals laborers and fair skin the indoor “leisure” class, according to a July report on the business website Quartz.

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In Shenzhen, China, one of the country’s richest cities, services are being openly advertised by “wet nurses” to supply adults with breast milk, either directly from the source or after pumping (and purchased by either the infirm or just rich people overconcerned with nourishment). These milk “suppliers” can earn at least four times the average personal income, with healthy, attractive

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women earning even more, of course, according to a July Agence France-Presse dispatch. Comments on China’s social media ranged from “It’s just a business” to “People become perverts when they are too rich and tire of other forms of entertainment.”

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Because Zimbabwe is reputedly among the world’s most corrupt countries, bribery is normal and makes the news only when innovators go above and beyond. The anti-poverty organization Transparency International reported in July that one hospital in Harare had recently been imposing a $5 charge on mothers each time they screamed during childbirth (in addition to the $50 delivery fee). Furthermore, it has long been rumored that hospitals in Zimbabwe (and other countries) may detain mothers and their children at the hospital if they cannot pay the fees. (Transparency International reported several days later, after finally obtaining a meeting with a government official, that the per-scream charge will be lifted.)

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Satan was thrust into the recent Texas legislature debate with pro-choicers shouting, “Hail, Satan!” at the right-to-life faction. However, whom Satan had endorsed was not clear. A British organization called UK Church of Satan appeared to criticize the pro-choicers (according to Twitter comments) while the New York-based Church of Satan (founded in 1966 by Anton LaVey) insists on a woman’s right to choose, said its High Priest Peter Gilmore — although he acknowledged that shouting “Hail, Satan” to anti-abortion activists was “ludicrous and meaningless.”

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Megachurch bishop Ira V. Hilliard told his Sugarland, Texas, congregation (New Light Christian Center) in June that one of his two private aircraft — a helicopter valued at about $1 million — needs new blades, but rather than pay it himself, he asked parishioners to each find it in their hearts to send him $52 “favor seeds” for the blades. (His ministry also owns a $2 million Hawker jet and a $3 million hangar.) To sweeten the deal, he virtually promised that a donor’s gift would be met by a “breakthrough favor” from God in the form of a car repair or their very own “dream” car either 52 days or 52 weeks later (according to a church letter described by the Christian Post).

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Inexplicable: (1) In May, a 24-year-old man accidentally shot a teenage boy in the leg with a high-caliber gun at a home in Santa Fe, Texas, in front of the boy’s mother, whose first reaction was to look up “gunshot” on WebMD — and then not to take her son to Mainland Medical Center until seven hours later. Deborah Tagle was charged, along with the shooter, for injury to a child. (2) Carole Longhorn, 66, struck a metal object in her garden in Norfolk, England, in June, and, though it looked like a projectile bomb, she said she decided to take it inside and wash it off in the sink before calling police (who later detonated the World War II-era munition in a controlled explosion). (Said her husband later: “You can imagine what I said to her.”)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013

began releasing his previously classified document cache), the American Civil Liberties Union released its own attempts to learn some of the same information from the FBI under the Freedom of Information Act. Two of the documents, totaling 69 pages, were completely “redacted” — solid black boxes covering the entirety of every page except for page numbers and document title.

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A June performance-art street demonstration in Glastonbury, England, got out of hand when a spectator took offense at one of the characters, who was dressed as a giant penis to promote a show by the troupe Nomadic Academy of Fools. The bystander grabbed the penis’ costume, but the penis’ colleague, Joanne Tremarco, who was dressed as a giant vagina, went to his defense, trying to calm the bystander until police arrived.

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Ronald Rock, 31, was arrested in Malone, N.Y., in May after surveillance video convinced police that he was the man at a Sears store who told a female stranger that he loved her shoes and wanted to buy a pair for his mother — and asked if she would take one off to show him. Rock then appeared to stuff the shoe down his pants and masturbate vigorously. (Malone is within 25 miles of the small town of Massena, which was the site of the man caught on video stuffing the Hannaford’s pepperoni down his pants for the same purpose — reported in News of the Weird seven weeks ago.)

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SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

2013

UNITED STATES DISTRIBUTION NOTICE: SSB1667

RESIDENTS CASH IN: Pictured above are the Overstuffed Money Bags containing 10 individual Vault Bags full of money that everyone is trying to get. That’s because each Vault Bag is known to contain over 100 U.S. Gov’t issued coins some dating back to the early 1900s.

State zip codes determine who gets free Silver coins Vault bags loaded with U.S. Gov’t issued coins are up for grabs as thousands of U.S. residents stand to miss the deadline to claim the money; now any U.S. resident who finds their zip code listed below gets to claim the bags of money for themselves and keep any valuable coins found inside by covering the Vault Bag fee within the next 2 days The phone lines are ringing off the hook. That’s because for the next 2 days Vault Bags containing valuable U.S. Gov’t issued coins are actually being handed over to U.S. residents who find their zip code listed in today’s publication. “Now that the bags of money are up for grabs U.S. residents are claiming as many as they can get before they’re all gone. That’s because after the Vault Bags were loaded with over 100 U.S. Gov’t issued coins the bags were sealed for good. But we do know that some of the coins date clear back to the early 1900s, including: a 90% pure Silver Walking Liberty Half Dollar, an Eisenhower Dollar, some of the last ever minted U.S. Dollars, Kennedy Half Dollars, Silver Mercury Dimes, rarely seen Liberty ‘V’ Nickels, nearly 100 year old Buffalo Nickels and unsearched currently circulating U.S. Gov’t issued nickels, dimes and quarter dollars, but there’s no telling what you’ll find until you sort through all the coins.” said Timothy J. Shissler, Chief Numismatist for the private World Reserve. The only thing residents need to do is call the National Claim Hotline before the 2-day order deadline ends. Everyone who does is being given the 90% pure Silver Walking Liberty coin for free just by covering the fee for each Vault Bag loaded with over 100 U.S. Gov’t issued coins for only $99 as long as they call before the deadline ends. So, if lines are busy keep trying, all calls will be answered. N

How to claim the bags of U.S. Gov’t issued coins: Read the important information below. Then call the National Claim Hotline at: 1-888-282-6742 I keep calling and can’t get through: This announcement is being so widely advertised because each Vault Bag is guaranteed to contain a free Silver Walking Liberty coin and just that one coin alone could be worth $15 to $325 in collector value. So thousands of residents are calling to claim as many Vault Bags as they can get before they’re all gone. In fact, since the Vault Bag fee is just $ 99 everyone is claiming as many bags as they can before the deadline ends. So if lines are busy keep trying, all calls will be answered. How much are the Vault Bags worth: Coin values always fluctuate and there are never any guarantees, but here’s why U.S. residents are claiming as many Vault Bags as they can get before they’re all gone. After the Vault bags were loaded with over 100 U.S. Gov’t issued coins including: Silver, scarce, highly collectible, and a big scoop of unsearched currently circulating U.S. Gov’t issued coins the bags were sealed for good. But we do know that some of the coins date back to the 1900s. That means there’s no telling what you’ll find until you sort through all the coins. So you better believe at just $99 the Vault Bag fee is a real steal since the free Silver Walking Liberty coin alone could be worth from $15 to $325 in collector value. Are the Silver Walking Liberty coins really Free: Yes. U.S. residents who beat the 2-day deadline are getting a Silver Walking Liberty coin minted between 1916-1947 free with each Vault Bag they claim. Why is the Vault Bag fee so low: Because thousands of U.S. residents have missed the deadline to claim the money the World Reserve has re-allocated Vault Bags that will be scheduled to be sent out in the next 2 days. That means the money is up for grabs and now any resident who finds the first two digits of their zip code on the Distribution List below gets to claim the bags of money for themselves and keep all the U.S. Gov’t issued coins found inside. Each Vault Bag fee is set at $149 for residents who miss the 2-day deadline, but for those who beat the 2-day deadline the Vault Bag fee is just $ 99 for as long as they call the National Claim Hotline before the deadline ends at: 1-888-282-6742.

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ENLARGED TO SHOW DETAIL. YEAR VARIES 1916-1947

STATE ZIP CODE DISTRIBUTION LIST Alabama 35, 36 Alaska 99 Arizona 85, 86 Arkansas 71, 72 California N/A Colorado 80, 81 Connecticut 06

Delaware 19 Florida 32, 33, 34 Georgia 30, 31, 39 Hawaii 96 Idaho 83 Illinois 60, 61, 62 Indiana 46, 47

Iowa 50, 51, 52 Kansas 66, 67 Kentucky 40, 41, 42 Louisiana 70, 71 Maine 03, 04 Maryland 20, 21

Massachusetts 01, 02, 05 Michigan 48, 49 Minnesota 55, 56 Mississippi 38, 39 Missouri 63, 64, 65 Montana 59 Nebraska 68, 69

Nevada 88, 89

North Dakota 58

South Carolina 29

New Hampshire 03

Ohio 41, 43, 44, 45

South Dakota 57

Virginia 20, 22, 23, 24 Washington 98, 99

Tennessee 37, 38

West Virginia 24, 25, 26

New Jersey 07, 08 New Mexico 87, 88

Oklahoma 73, 74

New York 00, 10, 11, 12 13, 14

Oregon 97

Texas 75, 76, 77 78, 79, 88

Pennsylvania 15, 16, 17, 18, 19

Utah 84

North Carolina 27, 28

Rhode Island 02

Vermont N/A

Wisconsin 53, 54 Wyoming 82, 83 Washington DC 20 P6463A OF17342R-1

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THE WORLD RESERVE MONETARY EXCHANGE, INC. IS NOT AFFILIATED WITH THE U.S. MINT, U.S. GOV’T, A BANK OR ANY GOV’T AGENCY. IF FOR ANY REASON WITHIN 10 DAYS (OR 30 DAYS FOR NV RESIDENTS) OF RECEIVING YOUR PRODUCT YOU ARE DISSATISFIED WITH YOUR PURCHASE, RETURN THE PRODUCT FOR A REFUND LESS SHIPPING AND RETURN POSTAGE. NO RETURNS IF SEAL IS BROKEN. INSURED MAIL IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED. THE WORLD RESERVE IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR LOST RETURN SHIPMENTS. 8000 FREEDOM AVE., N. CANTON OH 44720

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013

SSB1667


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THE REQUEST OF “VERY SPICY” WAS WELL MET BY THE KITCHEN

TOWN FRYER {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} Don’t pass by Quik It Chicken too rapidly. This North Side eatery, which incongruously shares a building with a Valero gas station/convenience store and a wig-and-beauty shop, might look unimpressive. But inside there’s good food and a good story, too. Owner Eugene Thomas, a Manchester native, launched Quik It as a Federal Street storefront in the 1980s. Forced out by redevelopment, in 1996 he built his current headquarters, and until recently ran the gas station himself. (The wig store came later.) In the early 2000s, he ran seven Quik It outlets, as distant as Zelienople and Penn Hills — and as near as PNC Park’s Chicken on the Hill stall. Thomas says he lost the PNC contract two years ago. Meanwhile, financial troubles forced him to scale back to one location, though he’s looking to expand again. For now, the cheerful fellow with long braids serves his homemade soul-food fare 10:30 a.m.-11 p.m. seven days a week, with eat-in options. (He caters, too.) The fried chicken is lightly breaded, firm and juicy, and a threepiece serving ($4.69) and a side of spicy collard greens ($2.39) makes a nice lunch. Thomas’ newly revamped menu adds chicken strips, fish sandwiches and salads to his smoked ribs and sides like mac-and-cheese, potato salad, coleslaw, and red beans and rice. Blink and you might miss Quik It Chicken. But try not to. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

820 Pennsylvania Ave., North Side. 412-321-1535

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FEED

So many green tubes coming out of the garden! If you can’t bear to eat another cucumber, consider drinking one. Simply fill a pitcher with water, and add sliced cucumber. (Seeds and skin are fine, though give the skin a scrub first.) Let sit in the fridge for a couple hours, then enjoy the refreshing, cool cucumberinfused water.

TRIED AND TRUE {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

A

LL THE YEARS we’ve been eating

out in Pittsburgh have taught us to view certain streets as dining destinations. Corridors like Craig Street, in Oakland, East Carson Street on the South Side, and the nexus of Forbes and Murray Avenues, in Squirrel Hill, are places you might go to window-shop for your supper; they can be counted upon to offer new restaurants alongside the old favorites that have flourished in these locales for years. Butler Street is emerging in this regard, as is Brookline Boulevard. But, curiously, “flourishing commercial thoroughfare” does not necessarily equal “rife with restaurants,” at least of the non-take-out variety. Such is the case along Fifth Avenue in Oakland, though it strikes through the heart of the University of Pittsburgh and the sprawling UPMC complex. Maybe this is because even the sit-down places seemed more geared toward students and personnel in

Gai grapao

a hurry; maybe it’s just because you can’t park on Fifth. Thai Hana seeks to buck the trend on Fifth with a combination of Thai and Japanese standards in an attractive, full-service setting. Walls painted deep red, leaf green and spice orange beckon diners to settle in and get com-

THAI HANA 3608 Fifth Ave., Oakland. 412-621-1100 HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. PRICES: Soups, salads and appetizers $2.50-10, entrees $12-14 LIQUOR: BYOB

fortable, while signage and menu graphics suggest ambitions greater than serviceable food for people on the go. “Hana” means “flower” in Japanese, and at least half the menu is dedicated to Japanese food. We can vouch for the chicken teri-

yaki, which transcended the clichés of this oft-abused dish. Thai Hana’s featured extraordinarily tender morsels of slightly smoky chicken in a translucent sauce that was light and well balanced, a far cry from the typical sugary soy glaze. The usual suspects of stirfry vegetables — paper-thin slices of mushroom, broccoli, carrots, green pepper and baby corn — were present, but took a back seat to the succulence of the chicken. The same vegetables, minus the broccoli, reappeared in a Thai “spicy basil” noodle stir-fry, which was not particularly spicy or basil-flavored. The sauce tasted mostly like soy-inflected brown sauce, and the generic vegetable medley didn’t help overcome this impression. However, the tofu Angelique opted as her protein was excellent, lightly crisped on the outside and creamy inside. In the “curry corner” of the menu, at least, vegetables were assigned for CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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TRIED AND TRUE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

their appropriateness to each individual curry. Jason ordered Panang curry, which contained green beans instead of broccoli, although bamboo (listed for red and green curries) was absent. The beef he selected was somewhat chewy, but the quality of the curry itself made this dish a candidate for best of the night. His request of “very spicy” (4 on a 5-point scale) was well met by the kitchen, with plenteous dried chili apparent in the thick, creamy sauce. The other contender was a salad, nam sod, which is similar to larb, a more common Thai restaurant dish of cold minced meat in a light, lime-based dressing over lettuce and herbs. Thai Hana’s nam sod featured additional ingredients such as more ginger, peanuts and some tomato chunks, while subtracting the heat that can make larb pretty fiery, for a cold plate. The ginger pushed the nam sod’s dressing in a more pungent direction, while the additional components made it heartier.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

DRINKS ON THE HOUSE California-based homebrew supplier opens Ambridge warehouse

Our meal had its ups and downs, and unfortunately pad Thai was the latter. The textures were right: slightly chewy egg noodles, tender chicken, plump shrimp. But they came together in a sauce that was one-dimensionally sweet, bypassing the perfect pad Thai balance of tangy, salty and sweet, with the faintest suggestion of spice. Thai Hana presents few new directions in either Thai or Japanese cuisine, focusing instead on time-tested classics from the restaurant repertoire of each. The best dishes we had showed that Thai Hana can produce versions superlative enough to reawaken our appreciation for these menu standards. If the kitchen steps up its approach to the rest, Thai Hana could become known for serving the best of the best of Thai and Japanese classic dishes.

Pittsburgh homebrewers are now a mouseclick away from next-day delivery of malt, hops, yeast and a wide array of specialty brewing items. That’s because the Concord, Calif.-based MoreBeer! has just opened a 30,000-squarefoot warehouse in Ambridge. Distribution manager Ryan Barto, who moved here to oversee the new operation, says Pittsburgh was chosen over Baltimore and Memphis for the company’s first expansion because the city’s location is convenient to markets in both the Northeast and Midwest. “We want to grow our business in these regions. Now we’ll be able to get them our products in days rather than a week,” he says. A self-described “former bigcompetition homebrewer,” Barto says he’s already connected with members of TRASH and TRUB, Pittsburgh’s two major homebrew clubs. “Those guys are all terrific. We’re hoping to get them to have some of their meetings in our warehouse.” While distribution centers in other companies may be run by robots, MoreBeer! operations are decidedly analogue. “Robots don’t like homebrew,” assistant distribution manager Tim Yothers jokes. By contrast, all eight of the warehouse employees are either already avid homebrewers, or are learning how to brew their own beer. “We want everyone to be passionate about what we’re doing here,” Barto says. Barto notes that local nanobreweries will also benefit from the warehouse’s quick turnaround on wholesale orders. He says that while Pittsburgh isn’t unique in its burgeoning small-batch scene, the quality of the brew produced here is premium. Barto has a particular passion for Helltown’s Insidious IPA. “Man, that stuff can rival West Coast double-IPAs. It’s ridiculous,” he says. Regarding the region’s established homebrew supply stores, Barto is careful not to seem like the big bully moving in their market. “We still want people to go to their local stores,” he says. “People have relationships with them.” Then again, he says, “We’ll have fresher ingredients than most local stores because of our volume. Many of the homebrew stores buy from us already, so you’re getting it straight from us now.”

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

“ROBOTS DON’T LIKE HOMEBREW.”


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us

Night

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

at

ALI BABA. 404 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-2829. Service is quick at this Middle Eastern restaurant, designed to feed students and nearby museumstaff lunchers. It can get loud and close during busy times, but the atmosphere is always convivial. A wide-raging menu ensures that carnivores and herbivores alike leave satisfied. JE ALMA PAN-LATIN KITCHEN. 7600 Forbes Ave., Regent Square. 412-727-6320. This venue offers a vibrant spectrum of African-Latin American fusion cuisine, riffing on common elements (lime, legumes and chilies) while bringing out distinctive identities (the rich, stew-like meat dishes of Cuba against the simple, citrusy seafood of the Peruvian coast). Indulge your sweet tooth with a cake filled with dulce de leche. EK BISTRO 19. 711 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412306-1919. Bistro 19 fits within the upper echelon of the region’s dining scene, while keeping its cozy neighborhood feel. It offers a broad range of surf and turf, pastas and poultry. Its inventive preparations, and the kitchen’s attention to detail, make even now-familiar items such as pot-stickers and flatbreads exciting. LE

China Palace Shadyside Thursdays Reggae & Readings

Featuring cuisine in the style of

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

Steel Drum Music on the Deck Psychic Readings at the Bar Café Vita {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} CAFÉ RAYMOND. 2103 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-4670. A perfect place to catch lunch or a snack during Strip District shopping forays, this little café offers an array of artisan breads, French pastries, fine cheeses and refined delicatessen fare. The few tables up front — augmented by sidewalk seating in season — have the feel of a bright, cozy, Parisian café. J

CAFÉ VITA. 424 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. 412-8285506. Embracing the inherent dichotomies of brunch, this restaurant offers both traditional Italian, complete with panini, pasta, ratatouille and eggplant parmesan; and classic breakfast fare, such as omelets and French BRASSERIE 33. 5863 toast. Italian notes pervade Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. some of the breakfast 412-363-3090. The food options, too: You’ll find is unpretentious but French toast made not dumbed down with focaccia, and in this classic French omelets served with brasserie. The www. per Tuscan toast. JF appetizers offer a pa pghcitym .co greatest-hits collection CARMI’S. 917 Western of French food, from Ave., North Side. 412-231escargot and charcuterie to 0100. A soul-food restaurant rillettes of rabbit and Roquefort offers traditional home-style flan. Entrees, including New York Southern cooking on the North Strip steak, pork chops, coq au Side. On offer: waffles and fried vin and duck, are generously chicken; hearty chicken-andproportioned, with tasty dumpling soup; greens, studded vegetable and potato sides. KE with smoked meat; mashed potatoes; spare ribs; and a BRGR. 5997 Penn Circle South, stand-out Cajun shrimp paired East Liberty (412-362-2333) with creamy grits. KF and 20111 Rt. 19, Cranberry Township (724-742-2333). This THE CHELSEA GRILLE. 515 casual restaurant celebrates — Allegheny Ave., Oakmont. 412and in many cases, imaginatively 828-0570. The menu here covers re-creates — America’s signature mostly familiar ground, with contribution to global cuisine. red-sauce pasta, chops and an BRGR keeps its patties to a unusual predilection for Mornay reasonable size, which allows for a variety of gourmet toppings sauce. But that’s not to say that dinner here is rote. From the — plus room for excellent fried fritto baguette to the rarebit-ish sides (French fries, onion rings, pickles), or milkshakes (traditional Chicken Wisconsin, the classics prove quite surprising. JE or spiked). JE

FULL LIST ONLINE

N E W S

2nd place Best Chinese in Pittsburgh

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DELUCA’S. 2015 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-566-2195. DeLuca’s doesn’t have the White House cachet of Pamela’s, but the portions are large and the quarters are close. On weekends, it’s one of Pittsburgh’s great gathering places. Try the “Super Bowl” omelet. J

100 VEGETARIAN

Don Meunier on the Steel Drums Readings with Margaret White Cloud Barsh Tropical Drinks & Tropical pical p Bee Beerss

DISHES!

Delivery Hours

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11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

4428 LIBERTY AVE BLOOMFIELD 412-683-1448

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE www.chinapalaceshadyside.net

delsrest.com

CONTINUES ON PG. 26

Little

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7 - $9 Join us for comedian Shaun Blackham & magician Lee Terbosic for a night of

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

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DIAMOND MARKET. 430 Market St., Downtown. 412325-2000. The tavern-like décor provides a comfortable, unpretentious setting for socializing, and the menu bridges retro and au courant in a nowfamiliar way, with grownup comfort food and big burgers on brioche buns with fancy toppings. Try the excellent macand-cheese, accented with bacon and truffle oil, or the donutsized onion rings drizzled with balsamic vinegar. KE DINETTE. 5996 Penn Circle South, East Liberty. 412-362-0202. This refined California-inspired pizzeria and wine bar offers a small menu mostly featuring gourmet thin-crust pizzas. The focus here is on fresh, local and sustainable. Inventive pizzas include toppings such as wilted greens, littleneck clams, goat cheese and Brussels sprouts. Guests at the wine-bar counter get a front-row seat for the pizza-making. KE

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Spadafora’s {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

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412-682-3000

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013

EGGS N’AT. 8556 University Blvd., Moon Township. 412-2622920. This stylish and cheery diner offers a variety of pancakes, as well as sandwiches and combo platters of breakfast foods. The “Mama Evans” pancakes are filled with blueberries and bacon, a combination that is smoky, sweet and savory all at once. Also on offer: muffuleta, a New Orleans-style multi-layered and pressed sandwich. J

neighborhood café serves Neapolitan-style pasta and pizza, including the scandalously cheesy quattro formaggi pizza. The front room overlooks bustling Washington Avenue; in season, lucky diners can enjoy the rear garden courtyard. KE ISIS CAFÉ. 815 Brookline Blvd., Brookline. 412-2072485. The menu offers more than the Middle Eastern stalwarts of hummus and kebab, with less-common dishes such as stewed jute, samboussa (similar to samosas) and fava-bean dip. Vegetarian entrees, such as okra stew and a variety of lentil, comprise about half the menu; meateaters can savor pan-seared chicken or creamy meat-andpasta casserole. KF NINE ON NINE. 900 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-3386463. This elegant restaurant and lounge offers a maturation of contemporary American cuisine, effortlessly shifting from refined Continental to Asian fusion to ingredient-focused invention. Instead of showy creations, the kitchen produces dishes that instantly seem right, such as miso cod or thymeroasted Amish chicken with asparagus flan. LE NOLA ON THE SQUARE. 24 Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-9100. Offering a boldly refined take on straightup, traditional New Orleans food, NOLA’s menu is an invitation to kick back, relax and savor the flavors: cheesy griddle grits with a chunky tomato sauce and green beans; oyster stew; and catfish strips paired with spicy papaya. KE PALAZZO 1837 RISTORANTE. 1445 Washington Road, North Strabane. 724-223-1837. This restored mansion provides a charming setting for fine dining. The menu is primarily Italian, with traditional but thoughtfully considered dishes. The hearty, but refined, farfalle rustica pairs wild-boar sausage with wild mushrooms and a sherry sage cream sauce, while housemade crepes substitute for noodles in the crepe lasagna. LE

HARRIS GRILL. 5747 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-362THE PORCH. 5273. A neighborhood Schenley Plaza, bar and grill (with two www. per Forbes Avenue outdoor patios) where a p pghcitym and Schenley Drive, fun is as important as .co Oakland. 412-687the fresh food and the 6724. An attractive cold beer. What else to wood-and-stone structure make of a place that serves “Britney Spears” (chicken tenders set in the verdant heart of Oakland, The Porch offers on a stick), Cheeses of Nazareth cuisine that is modern without and The Wrongest Dessert Ever, being stark, homey without and offers free bacon at the bar being heavy. Consider a pizza on Tuesdays? JE dressed with butternut squash, pork belly atop roasted pumpkin, IL PIZZAIOLI. 703 Washington or lasagne with house-made Road, Mount Lebanon. chive pasta. KE 412-344-4123. This popular

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radio*

Carmi’s {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} SMILING BANANA LEAF. 5901 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-362-3200. At this absolute jewel-box of a restaurant, the menu emphasizes authentic Thai dishes rather than Thaiinflected Chinese food. Grilled meat appetizers are beautifully seasoned, and the pad Thai offers a lively balance of ingredients. The assertively spicy pumpkin curry features a special variety of Thai gourd. JF SPADAFORA’S. 3932 Route 8, Allison Park. 412-486-1800. Though little more than an unassuming concrete-block box on the outside, inside this is a warm, welcoming family-run trattoria offering Southern Italian specialties as well as Italian-American fare. Quality ingredients, thoughtful preparation and friendly service make this restaurant stand out. KE

Isis Café {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} STOKE’S GRILL. 4771 McKnight Road, Ross Township. 412-3695380. There is an art to making a really good sandwich, and the technique has been mastered here. The lengthy menu spans traditional sandwiches but also burgers, quesadillas and wraps, as well as salads and homemade soups. Originality is a hallmark: “Green fries” are shoestrings tossed with pesto, artichoke hearts and bits of brie. FJ TANA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE. 5929 Baum Blvd., East Liberty.

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412-665-2770. The menu offers a variety of stewed meats, legumes and veggies, all rich with warm spices. Order the sampler platters for the best variety of flavors, and ask for a glass of tej, a honey-based wine that is the perfect accompaniment. KE TASTE OF INDIA. 4320 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-681-7700. Yogi Berra groused about the restaurant nobody went to — because it was always too crowded. Taste of India is the opposite: Everyone goes there partly because you can always get a table. The atmosphere is almost surreally quiet, but the food is consistently good (try the paneer). Portions are ample, prices reasonable. JE TAVERN 245. 245 Fourth Ave., Downtown. 412-281-4345. Step into this Downtown fancy-casual pub, with smart looks and tasty, updated bar fare. “The Farm” entree featured sliders made with chicken, pulled BBQ pork and steak fillet, on a potato roll with red pepper and goat cheese. The fried calamari come with a basil-garlic aioli, and the robust Yuengling beer-cheese sauce was the perfect complement to “Pittsburgh potatoes.” JE TEPPANYAKI KYOTO. 5808 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1610. This Japanese restaurant offers fare drawn from the menus of lunch counters, train stations and family kitchens. From salads containing burdock root and rice balls to cabbage pancakes and stir-fried noodles, this diner-style venue lets casual eaters expand beyond sushi. KE

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UNION PIG AND CHICKEN. 220 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-7675. This lively familystyle BBQ venue hews closely to tradition. The smoked meats (ribs, brisket, pork shoulder and chicken) are “dry” (with sauces at table), and the sides are well-prepared classics: macand-cheese, baked beans, collard greens and coleslaw. Prices are higher than a roadside stand, but the quality is top-notch. KE

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123 Shiloh Street, Mt. Washington

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LOCAL

“I AM A FIRM BELIEVER IN ORIGINALITY AND BEING WEIRD.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

As of a few years ago, Frank Cunniff was known mostly for his bass work with Incommunicado (or singing with Hipsterdeathmachine). But more recently, it’s been words (and drawings) on paper that make the Polish Hill resident notable. Going from punk bands to comic books has been something of an adjustment, but it’s got its upsides — like the fact that instead of touring with a gaggle of guys, he now tours with his sole collaborator, his wife Sarah. “I really miss touring; that’s the big thing,” Cunniff says. “I miss traveling and playing shows. But with comics, it’s great, because I still get to do that, but it’s a lot less gear, and you don’t have to be in a van with a bunch of cranky, thirtysomething dudes. I get to travel with my wife, who’s a trooper; we sleep in the van, and have a nice time meeting people.” The Cunniffs’ latest, and biggest, foray into the comic world is the first edition of Doc Red, a series set in the Old West, starring a character based on a real-life family friend, Dr. Ellen Redinbaugh. The idea came to Frank while he was working at the family’s pub, Blue Dust, in Homestead. “She’s a really nice, kind of firecracker of a lady,” he says. “I’d write her name on the [point-of-sale system] and the way it stacks, it would say ‘Doc Red.’ And I thought of how funny it would be to have a muzzle in the ‘O,’ with Ellen behind the muzzle, pointing this long rifle.” “The image sort of cracked me up,” he adds. “Then I thought about how well Ellen would actually do in the Wild West.” In line with their DIY punk roots, the Cunniffs found a home for the comic series on Paper + Plastick, the record label and comic imprint run by Vinnie Fiorello of Less Than Jake. Frank recalled how friendly and charitable the guys from the legendary ska band had been once when Incommunicado was in Gainesville, and sent the comic when he was courting publishers. Paper + Plastick quickly bit on the series. A limited print run is available, and a free download of Doc Red #1 is available on the label’s site, www. paperandplastick.com.

Comic artists Frank and Sarah Cunniff

PUNKS WITH PAINTS

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LECTRONIC MUSIC is everywhere

right now, and with composition easier than ever thanks to laptop production and nontraditional instrumentation, everyone is trying their hand — leaving listeners to sift through Soundcloud to find the gems. Gems, that is, like Buku’s recent single “Booty Clapasaurus,” a track whose twerk-inducing rhythms conceal a surprising amount of classical composition and creativity. “It usually starts with something so minute, whether it be just a little lick like a lead, or a really tiny sample,” says Buku, a.k.a. Pittsburgh native Robert Balotsky. “Anything I do just starts from one idea and goes from there.” Balotsky is only a year out of college, and two years into his music career. But he’s already receiving recognition from big EDM producers like Diplo, who has predicted that Buku’s single “Janky” was “kind of where dubstep is going.” Diplo included the single on a mixtape for BBC Radio 1Xtra this past January.

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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Merci, Buku: Robert Balotsky performs.

{BY KIRA SCAMMELL}

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013

Balotsky started off playing as Buku at raves and small venues like Shadow Lounge. With support from Obvious Productions, a crew dedicated to serving the Pittsburgh music and art scene, he landed several large gigs opening for Datsik and Rusko. His accelerated rise to fame among the many trying to do the same may stem from his tendency to do what he wants, not just replicate what others are doing.

LIGHT UP THE TRAP FEATURING BUKU, FRZY, QUESTKAEY 7 p.m. Fri., Aug. 9. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $18-20. 18 and over. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

“I try to ignore the trend, and obviously I have my ears in the street, listen to what’s coming out, but I try to take in everything and nothing, if that makes sense,” he says. “I try to take influence from stuff I listen to like throughout my whole musical career,

spanning back to jam bands I played in [during] high school even, and taking into account modern trends. But I try not to play into any one specific thing that might be hot at the moment.” Still, anyone who has turned on the TV, attended a festival, or even tuned to a top40 station in the past few years, knows that electronic dance music, specifically dubstep, has been seeping into mainstream. EDM has been around for decades, with new sub-genres catching like wildfire every year. Trap is no exception: It’s a sub-genre born out of Southern hip hop and crunk, infused with elements of various dubstep and house music. Trap was first coined as slang for a place to deal drugs, but since its assimilation into everyday society (thanks to pushes from popular artists like Gucci Mane, T.I., Kanye West, and Diplo), the term has become representative of music that is dark, dirty, bassy, yet melodic. Typical trap composition includes kick drums (sometimes referred to as 808s because of the frequent use of the Roland CONTINUES ON PG. 30


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TR-808 in production), hi-hat cymbal sounds, synthesizers and heavy bass, but few setups include instrumentation apart from a keyboard. In Balotsky’s studio, you’ll ďŹ nd a full drum kit — and no keyboards. “I kind of just try to go to the studio and whatever happens, happens,â€? he says. “I don’t try to be like, ‘OK, well, this is going to be a big festival trap thing’; I just try to make my tune, make a song. And I like to think that all my inuences over the years have kind of molded a sound that’s different [from] people that may be just following trends.â€? Balotsky is well versed in music theory, thanks partly to his degree in music technology from Duquesne University. It’s no surprise that his musical career began with percussion, and his ďŹ rst encounter with composition and production came about while he was in high school. He recorded himself on drums ďŹ rst, but soon began to experiment with electronic and ambient sounds, taking inspiration from progressive rock band Umphrey’s McGee and electronicmusic duo Boards of Canada. “I am a ďŹ rm believer in originality and being weird and whatnot,â€? Balotsky says. “I encourage people to be themselves and be original, and whatever you think is right is probably right.â€? James Gyre, an Obvious crew member, has seen the process in action. “We were at an after-party,â€? he recalls, “just fucking around in the kitchen, banging on pots and pans. And even in that context, Rob made a point to explore the material as a percussionist, when it would have been easy to just be an animal. Found sound isn’t really his thing, but he has it in him. He’s open to ďŹ nding unique sounds

that turn him on.â€? While Buku has built a name for himself in the trap music scene, his motivation was never to get big for the sake of fame. Instead, he relies on his intuition, taste and compositional skills. A song isn’t ďŹ nished to him until he knows it inside and out, has heard it from every part of the room in the studio, listened through computer speakers, and in the car — just to make sure everything ows to his standard. Even songs like “Booty Clapasarusâ€? — whose title might suggest a silly throwaway — have compositional value, melody and balance, reecting Buku’s varied inspirational sources and the killer crew backing him up. And while trap is blowing up this year, next year, it’s unlikely Buku will disappear when it ceases to be trendy. His inuence already runs deeper than even his fan base might realize. “I cherish the track he’ll never release, things he’s given me just to sample from,â€? says Chris Mr. Owl, another Obvious crew member close with Buku. Buku will return to his hometown this Friday to headline what’s billed as the biggest UV glow party of the year: Light Up the Trap, at the Rex Theater. He says he couldn’t be more excited. “I just love Pittsburgh and a sort of pride that comes from Pittsburgh,â€? Balotsky says. “The way I got to this point was working through the Pittsburgh electronic scene. I feel that if you went to just about anyone in the electronic scene, I’ve probably met them. It’s another point of pride, because I’ve worked through the scene, and each of them has supported me as well. It has to do with me being grateful for those people, too.â€?

EVEN SONGS LIKE “BOOTY CLAPASARUS� HAVE COMPOSITIONAL VALUE, MELODY, BALANCE.

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013


NEW N PATIENTS P WELCOME W 412.281.3546 4 same-day d emergency appointments www.polisheddentalpgh.com 355 fifth ave. | suite 1500 | downtown

09/20/13

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YOUNG THE GIANT VISIT WWW.961KISS.COM/SILVERBULLETBASH FOR MORE INFO AND TICKET INFORMATION

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PA ID A D V E RT IS E ME NT

AUGUST 9TH - 25TH DISCLAIMER: Bike Pittsburgh assumes no legal responsibility for the events listed. We are merely advertising these events, not organizing them, unless noted in the schedule. If you participate in an event, you do so at your own risk, according to the terms of the event organizer. Discuss any concerns you have with the event organizer, or email us at bikefest@bikepgh.org 3OHDVHFRQĂ€UPDOOHYHQWVGHVFULSWLRQVORFDWLRQVGDWHVDQGWLPHVZLWKWKH)XOO2QOLQH&DOHQGDUDW%LNH3*+RUJ%LNH)HVW

BikeFest is BikePGH’s biggest fundraiser and annual celebration of all-things-bicycling in Pittsburgh. For 2013 we’ve expanded the fun to 17 days with bike-themed rides and events organized local organizations and by people like you.

Bike and Breakfast

Weather Permitting: Bikes & Bluegrass

8:30am-10:30am @ Boggs Trail Head - Montour Trail Join us at 8:30am for breakfast before a 25 mile ride at 9am. Friendly, no-drop, road ride.

5pm-9pm @ Shady Side Nursery Outdoor concert with the Mon-River Ramblers and the Shelf Life String Band $10 weatherpermittingpgh.com

Fri Aug 9, 2013

Wheelmen’s Brewvet

Mon Aug 12, 2013

Car Free Fridays Bikepool 8:00 @ Zeke’s Coffee in East Liberty 8:15 @ Friendship park 8:30 @Doughboy Sq. Join the bikepool to get to work in safety & style.

Women’s Mtn Bike Ride

Light-up Ride

6pm-8pm @ Frick Park Lower Soccer Field Parking Lot

Exploring Urban Appalachia

Coasting to Coca Cafe

9pm-11pm @ The Fountain at the Point Bring your lights. Decorate yourself and/or your bike. Ride around town.

8:30am-9:45am @ Coca Cafe, 3811 Butler St. Meet at Coca Cafe for breakfast, then bike to work.

Sun Aug 11, 2013

BikeFest Party! VIP

Mt. Lebanon Cycling and Caffeine Club Ride

6pm-8pm @ Pittsburgh Opera $125 Start the BikeFest Party off right with the VIP treatment catered by Pittsburgh’s own Kevin Sousa.

7am-10am @ Coffee Tree Roasters, 299 Beverly Rd, Mt Lebanon Weekly Cycle Event

Allen’s Ride C - hills and distance vary

BikeFest Party!

8:30am-11:30am @ Immel’s Bicycle shop, Rt. 8,Gibsonia These are true class “C� rides into southern Butler County varying in length and starting times. Weekly Ride

8pm-12am @ Pittsburgh Opera $20-$50 Grab your bike and dust off your dancing shoes. BikePGH’s BikeFest 2013 Kickoff Fundraiser Party is not to be missed

Car Free Fridays: Sidra Bell Dance 7pm-9pm @ The Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave For more info, go to http://kelly-strayhorn.org/events/

Sat Aug 10, 2013 Mt. Lebanon Cycing & Caffeine Club Ride 7am-10am @ Coffee Tree Roasters 299 Beverly Rd, Mt. Lebanon Weekly Cycle Event

Cycling Through Samsara 9am-12:30pm @ Highland Park main entrance 20-mile ride starting & ending in Highland Park, with yoga before & after. For Intermediate / experienced riders.

Sunday Morning Road Rides 9:30am-10:30am @ Trek of Pittsburgh - Robinson Conversational pace, slow ride, no drop.

Troubled Streams Tour

Church Ride Revised

10am-12pm @ Bakery Square - near Coffee Tree Explore the lost streams and hidden watersheds of Pittsburgh’s East End and the work being done to restore them.

8:45am-12pm @ OTB / Costco @ 9:15am Ride from SS. Explore the churches of Homestead & McKeesport.

Pinball Ride!

Lots of Green: Bike + Bus Tour

10:00am @ Thick Bikes Parking Lot 62 S. 15th Street 15203 Ride bikes, play pinball, get laid! (Hey, 2 out of 3 ain’t bad)

9am-2pm @ 6587 Hamilton Ave. Tour de community-greening projects around the ‘burgh. Cool off afterwards with food and East End Brews.

The Royal Rumball

Venture Outdoors Urban Bike Tour - Easy 9am-12pm @ Three Rivers Heritage Trail Go to www.ventureoutdoors.org for more information. $15 non-member $10 member

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10am-3pm @ Old canoe launch at the end of Jackson St. Harmony Ride to North Country Brewing in Slippery Rock and back.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013

11am-5:30pm @ Highland Park Entry Garden 50 miles, 5000 ft of climbing, mix of paved & dirt roads.

Bubbles on Bikes Jamboree Ride 4pm-5:30pm @ Highland Park Main EntranceBlow Bubbles while riding bikes! Delight passers by of all ages with a most surreal moment of glee!

6:30pm-8pm @ Pavilion in Millvale Riverfront Park Explore the hills and hollows of urban Appalachia on this challenging ride in and around the city with a Pgh native. All levels

BikeFest Moonlight Ride 11:45pm-3am @ Friendship Park at S Millvale Ride the deserted city - Moonlight Ride @ Friendship Park LIGHTS MANDATORY.

Tue Aug 13, 2013 ACA Crits Women and Beginners 6pm-8pm @ Bud Harris Cycling Track Women and Beginners http://acaracing.com/

Public Art Bike Ride 6pm - 8pm @ Langley Observatory Clock, by the Carnegie Science Center Take an art ride with the OfďŹ ce of Public Art! $7 pre-registrants / $10 on-site

Trees of Pittsburgh Ride 6pm-8pm @ The South Side Trail, below the Hofbrauhaus Ride with representatives from TreeVitalize and Tree Pittsburgh as we take a tour of interesting tree related sites around the city.

Wed Aug 14, 2013 4 Tunnel Tour From The OTB 6:30PM-8:30PM @ 2518 E Carson St Pittsburgh Come ride the 4 tunnels bike course including a secret tunnel

ACA Crits Intermediate and Advanced 6pm-8pm @ Bud Harris Cycling Track Intermediate and Advanced http://acaracing.com

Wednesday Mtn Group Ride Shadyside 6pm-8:30pm @ Trek of Pittsburgh Shadyside 12-20 mile intermediate mountain ride at Frick Park unless otherwise noted on Everybodybikeshop.blogspot.com/


PA ID A DV E RT IS E ME N T

Velomuse MTB Skills Demo @ Science Center

Bike-in-Movie: Premium Rush 9pm-11pm @ Pittsburgh Center for the Arts- Lawn Stars Joseph Gordon-Levitt as a bike messenger in New York City who picks up an envelope that attracts the interest of a dirty cop. Features high-octane action sequences. Begins at dusk.

Thu Aug 15, 2013 Venture Outdoors Beginner Bike Ride 6pm-7:30pm @ Millvale Riverfront Park Beginners- Go to www.ventureoutdoors.org for more info. $18 non-member / $12 member

Wmn’s Mtn Bike Clinic w Jacquie Phelan 6pm-8pm @ Frick Park, by Braddock Ave. tennis court parking Women’s Mountain Bike Clinic with Jacquie Phelan at Frick Park!

Sun Aug 18, 2013 PMTCC 3 State Tour

The Wheel Mill Jam Fest

7am-4:30pm @ Golden Triangle Bike Rental 60, 85, or 100 miles of scenic riding in West Virginia, Ohio, and back to Pittsburgh Pre-registration $15 / Event day registration $20

6pm-10pm @ The Wheel Mill indoor bike park 6815 Hamilton Ave Hit the jumps and trails with the regions best inside Pensylvania’s first indoor bike park! $10

PCRG Bike Ride

Casual Friday! MTB Ride

8am-11am @ Eliza Furnace Trail Parking (Greenfield/The Run) Join PCRG staff in a casual ride throughout the City!

6:30pm-9pm @ Frick Park, by Braddock Ave. tennis court parking. Casual group #mountainbike ride in #Frick. No-drop, all skill levels, relaxed wind-down for the wk. @Ds6Pax after

Sunday Morning Road Rides 9:30am-10:30am @ Trek of Pittsburgh - Robinson Conversational pace, slow ride, no drop

PGH Hash House Harriers BikeFest Bash

Allegheny Cemetery Bike Tour

Wheelin’ it to the Double Wide

6:30pm-11pm @ TBD Hare & hound bike ride with checkpoints, possible false trails & beverage stops

10am-12pm @ Allegheny Cemetery Gate House (Butler St. Centrance in Lawrenceville) Come enjoy a bike tour through Allegheny Cemetery, with Its beautiful landscape & rich history, it is one of Pittsburgh’s gems.

Fri Aug 16, 2013

Bike to Church Day Celebration

3HGDOOLQ·WR3DPHODV 7am-8:15am @ Pamela’s P & G Diner- Strip District Come by bike and meet at Pamela’s for breakfast, then bike to work. A pancake lover’s paradise. Don’t miss out!

Car Free Fridays Bikepool 8am @ Zeke’s Coffee in East Liberty 8:15 @ Friendship park, 8:30 @ Doughboy Sq Join the bikepool.

Northside Ride 6pm-8pm @ Fresh Fridays Farmers Mkt Allegheny Commons E. 14-mile ride through Northside neighborhoods. Trail & some hills. Also a shorter ride in the park & trail. NO RIVER CROSSINGS!

Pittsburgh Bike Party

Car Free Fridays Bikepool 8am-9am @ Zeke’s Coffee in East Liberty 8:15 @ Friendship park 8:30 @Doughboy square Join the bikepool to get to work in safety & style.

6:30pm-8pm @ OTB on East Carson Street. Hill District Hills

Hello, Hill District!

Fri Aug 23, 2013

12pm-2pm @ Trailside Carnegie Science Center Join trained @Velomuse ride leaders in learning new mountain bike handling skills

7pm-8:30pm @ Double Wide Grill, E Carson St Come by bike and meet at Double Wide Grill for a bite, then a short ride to Over the Bar for some beers around 8:30 PM.

Car Free Fridays: Singin’ in the Rain 7pm-10pm @ Kelly Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Avenue. Bike to this classic movie. http://kelly-strayhorn.org/events/

12pm-1pm @ Pittsburgh Mennonite Church, 2018 S. Braddock Ave, Swissvale Join people from around Pittsburgh biking to church on Aug. 18th!

Sun Aug 25, 2013

Mon Aug 19, 2013

9am-until you finish @ Coffee Tree, Walnut Street Inner city hilly ride through a few obscure neighborhoods with great, rarely seen views. The ride is ~25mile, no drop, but it is not for the faint of heart. Ride at your discretion.

Ode to the HIll

Monday morning trail ride in South Side 7am-8:30am @ Hot Metal Bridge Trail Head (by the metal sculpture on Hot Metal Street) Hot Metal to the Waterfront trail ride. At your own pace.

Snitger’s Group Ride 9am-12pm @ 399 3rd St, Beaver 15009 Friendly no drop ride, all skill levels. We regroup at the top of each climb as needed.

Frickn’ Ewreck Ride 6:00pm-8:30pm @ Beechwood & Nicholson - Frick Blue Slide Level 2-3 trail ride

3rd Annual Try-A-Bike

6pm-8:30pm @ Dippy the Dinosaur, 4100 Forbes. A welcoming, all-inclusive, FREE event consisting of a leisurelypaced bicycle ride ending with a post-ride party.

Tue Aug 20, 2013

10am-4pm @ Bud Harris Cycling Oval Come hang out at the Oval and try a new ride or three.

ACA Crits Women and Beginners

Ride to Yoga in The Park

Casual Friday! MTB Ride

6pm-8pm @ Bud Harris Cycling Track Women and Beginners http://acaracing.com

1:30pm-3pm @ Schenley Park Overlook. Bikram Yoga Squirrel Hill yoga class in the park. FREE if you ride a bike there! Bring a snack to share!

6:30pm-9pm @ Frick Park Tennis Courts. S Braddock & Biddle Casual group mountainbike ride in Frick. No-drop, all skill levels, relaxed wind-down for the week. @Ds6Pax after.

Wed Aug 21, 2013 6pm-8pm @ Bud Harris Cycling Track Intermediate and Advanced http://acaracing.com/

The Every Pittsburgh Neighborhood Ride 8am-6pm @ Corner of 34th and Penn Ave This is a fairly difficult 75 mile road ride touching every Pittsburgh neighborhood, with lots of hills.

Snitger’s Group Ride

PedalPGH 20th Anniversary

6pm-8:30pm @ Trek of Pittsburgh Shadyside 12-20 mile intermediate mountain ride at Frick Park unless otherwise noted on http://everybodybikeshop.blogspot.com

Thu Aug 22, 2013

Nature in your Neighborhood

6pm-8pm @ Schenley Park Visitor Center, Schenley Park, across from Phipps Conservatory Ride to rediscover the lost streams of 4 Mile Run

11am-1:30pm @ The Wheel Mill Join us as we ride from Homewood to Frick Park and see all the bike amenities your neighborhood has to offer!

12 Bridges, 3 Rivers, 21 Miles 11am-1:30pm @ Tazza D’Oro, 1125 N. Highland, Highland Park Hang your butt over the side of 12 bridges as you ride on this fun riverside adventure! #TeamDecaf

2013 Teutonia Männerchor Radler 11am-1pm @ Teutonia Männerchor $25 A day of riding, T-shirt, dinner and entertainment

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6:00am @ South Side Works $15 - $40 (save $5 and pre register) Riders will have fully marked courses that show off some of the City’s best bicycle friendly roads, scenic views and of course bike lanes. Full service rest stops along each of the routes will provide riders with gourmet snacks from our partner Whole Foods. Wrapping up your ride don’t forget to pick up your commemorative 20th Anniversary PedalPGH T-Shirt and enjoy Music and great food from one of Pittsburgh’s Mobile Food Trucks. Register today at PedalPGH.org

Wednesday Mountain Group Ride Shadyside

9am-12pm @ 399 3rd St, Beaver 15009 Friendly no drop ride, all skill levels. We regroup at the top of each climb as needed

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Sun Aug 25, 2013

ACA Crits Advanced and Intermediate

Sat Aug 17, 2013

Lost Streams of Four Mile Run

Venture Outdoors Butler-Freeport Trail Ride 10am-4pm @ Butler-Freeport Trail Moderate- Go to www.ventureoutdoors.org for more info. $15 non- member / $10 member

Team PHenomenal Hope GAP Ride 6pm-7:30pm @ UPMC Sports Medicine lobby, 3200 S Water St Relaxed 10 mile out-and-back trail ride along the riverfront

Sunday Afternoon Group Road Ride

Venture Outdoors Beginner Bike Ride 3

4pm-6pm @ Performance Bike Parking Lot Ride leaves from shop to McKees Rocks and back, utilizing the riverfront trail system.

6pm-7:30pm @ Millvale Riverfront Park Beginners- Go to www.ventureoutdoors.org for more info. $18 non-member / $12 member

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OPUS ONE PRESENTS

ROCK DOWN BUTLER

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

{BY ANDY MULKERIN} Last year was the inaugural ride of the Rock All Night Tour in Lawrenceville, an all-dayand-into-the-night free festival of local bands of all stripes. At the time, the festival — run by DJ Zombo and Mary Jo Coll (who books at Hambone’s, as well as Howlers in Bloomfield) — was a new idea, and largely an experiment. This year, it’s back, and beefed up a little. The music is once again all over the map, both literally and figuratively; the tunes stretch across 20 venues, from Dozen Bake Shop, way down at 3511 Butler St., up to the 5400 block of Butler. And showcases everything from folk to metal, jazz and hip hop. And this year, Coll and Zombo have organizational help from local musician Chet Vincent.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

The Harlan Twins, one of many, many bands playing R.A.N.T.

08/16 JOEY FATTZ'S 'BAZOOKA JOE'

OFFICIAL MIXTAPE RELEASE

09/05 MC CHRIS 09/10 NORTH MISSISSIPPI ALLSTARS 09/14 GWAR & HATEBREED 08/09 BATAMBA (EARLY) 08/09 THE SPRING STANDARDS (LATE) 08/10 AN EVENING OF COMEDY 08/13 08/15 08/17 08/20 08/21

FT. DAVON MAGWOOD (TWO SHOWS!) THE EASTERN SEA w/GRANDCHILDREN HEATHER KROPF BRAD WAGNER - CD RELEASE SHOW! FREEDY JOHNSTON FRANK FAIRFIELD

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013

There are more venues this time around: New spots this year include Wild Purveyors (5308 Butler St.), Allegheny Wine Mixer (5326 Butler St.) and Nied’s Hotel (5438 Butler St.). The main outdoor afternoon performances have been moved from Allegheny Cemetery down to Arsenal Park, presumably because of concerns over waking the dead. R.A.N.T. starts early this year. Dozen, Wild Purveyors and Embody Juice Bar (5400 Butler St.) all host tunes starting around 10 a.m. At noon, the outdoor shows — at Arsenal Park and Nied’s, and as part of a car cruise at Stinky’s Bar and Grill (4901 Hatfield St.) — begin. Several artists play at New Amsterdam (4421 Butler St.) starting at 2 p.m., and 5 p.m. is when Blackberry Studios (4814 Blackberry Way) opens for Chrome Moses and The 9th Ward. Evening is, of course, when the more traditional venues open up. Thunderbird Cafe, Hambone’s, Eclipse, Kopec’s, Cattivo and a host of others present shows of all stripes. All the bands playing are listed at www.rantlawrenceville.com. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ROCK ALL NIGHT LAWRENCEVILLE. 10 a.m.-2 a.m. Sat., Aug. 10. Various venues, Lawrenceville. Free. Some events all ages, some over-21. www.rantlawrenceville.com

MARIO DONES 10 SUMMERS (Self-released) New mixtape from the local MC, with an old-school vibe helped along by some production tricks from Nice Rec. While he subscribes to a largely old-school aesthetic, Dones starts off the mixtape evaluating the new school in a track that promises to be on his forthcoming album. At times, it gets a little long and repetitive (especially on that first track), but most of the tracks move quickly, involve deft and thoughtful lyricism and easy delivery, plus great backing tracks. Looking forward to the proper album.

LANDON THOMAS THE HEARTBREAKER EP (Self-released) Six sex jams from the young local R&B singer. How did I know they were sex jams? The first lines of the EP are: “Sex room / Welcome to my sex room.” Then later in the same song, he says “sex” three times in a span of 15 words. Basically, this kid’s got one thing on his mind. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. The subject matter can hold up even if it runs thin; when the production runs thin, which happens here and there, it’s less appealing. But there’s plenty of promise here, and the track “Bang” is the highlight of this one.

PITTSBURGH TRACK AUTHORITY NOW’S TOMORROW EP (The Harmony Society) Three-track vinyl-only EP release from the local dance-music supergroup. Expect nuance, beauty and dance-floor-ready rhythms from the trio. The A-side is one long slow-burn of a track, which builds from a simple rhythm section to horns and flutes; the two tracks on the flip are shorter, with more synths and vocal samples. (The third track abandons the disco flair of the first two in favor of more spacey house music.) AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


CRITICS’ PICKS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF GARY ISAACS}

Slim Cessna’s Auto Club

OVER

500+ BEER 50 SELECTIONS

[SOUL] + FRI., AUG. 09 Jesse Dee impressed in June at WYEP’s Summer Music Festival; tonight, the Boston-bred blueeyed-soul singer returns to the area for a show at Johnstown’s Peoples Natural Gas Park. The man’s got a set of pipes and a healthy respect for Van Morrison, which, in combination, can — and do — go a long way. If you missed him the first time, he’s worth the Friday-night jaunt; if you caught him earlier in the summer, you probably don’t need to be convinced of that. Andy Mulkerin Hannah 6:30 p.m. 90 Johns St., Aldridge Johnstown. $12. All ages. 814-539-1889 or www.floodcity music.com

[COUNTRY] + FRI., AUG. 09 Hannah Aldridge came up in an atmosphere conducive to becoming a country singer: Her father, Walt Aldridge, is a hit songwriter who worked with many of the biggest names in country music’s previous generation (Reba McEntire, Travis Tritt). Now the younger Aldridge has set out on her own — as both a singer and songwriter. The Muscle Shoals native is anticipating the release of her next fulllength, Born to Be Broken, in the fall, and is on tour now, stopping tonight at the Center of Harmony, in Harmony. AM 8 p.m. 253 Mercer St., Harmony. $15-20; under 16 admitted free. All ages. 570-294-6450 or www.thecentero9fharmony.com

Slim Cessna is one of Pittsburgh’s hidden gems: The leader of Slim Cessna’s Auto Club moved here about a decade ago, and occasionally plays shows solo, but largely flies under the radar day

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[ELECTRONIC] + SAT., AUG. 10

ROTATING TAPS

Woodchuck Draft available the entire month of August. 110 Federal St. • Pittsburgh, PA 15212 • the-beer-market.com • 412-322-2337

Belvedere’s gets a taste of New York City night life this weekend with a twopart show that will bump until the sun comes up. The Bunker, a community of EDM DJs dedicated to bringing stellar guest performers to Brooklyn, will make an appearance in Pittsburgh tonight. Resident DJs Derek Plaslaiko and Mike Servito are slated to perform, and Pittsburgher Aaron Clark, of Humanaut, will open up the evening. Kira Scammell 9 p.m. 4016 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-15. 412-687-2555 or www.belvederesultradive.com

[INDIE ROCK] + TUE., AUG. 13

[DOOM COUNTRY] + SAT., AUG. 10

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to day. Until he comes back with his full band — at which time all bets are off. The legendary doom-country-rock-gospel ensemble plays an unforgettable live show that keeps fans and newcomers alike on their feet. Tonight, the Auto Club plays the Rex Theater with Slim’s son’s band, The Sterling Sisters. AM 9 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $12-15. All ages. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

Old Baby has an impressive family tree: Members of Young Widows and Shipping News contribute to the sound of the Louisville, Ky.-based band. The outfit’s debut LP dropped just over a week ago, but you can check out its darkly melodic, hypno-grunge songs live tonight at Brillobox. Catherine Irwin of Freakwater and local DJ Matt Miller open this evening of bold tunes. KS 9 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THUR, AUGUST 8 • 9PM INDIE ROCK

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

NETIZEN

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

WITH BUTTERBIRDS AND THE DUMPLINGS

FRI, AUGUST 9 • 9PM ROCK/JAZZ

AUGUST 8

MIKE DILLON BAND

ROCK/POP

STEVE THOMPSON & THE PROFESSIONALS, ABACUS JONES, THE LEAFS

SAT, AUGUST 10 • 9PM INDIE/FOLK ROCK

ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Tony Janflone. Mt. Lebanon. 412-343-2411. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Totally 80s. North Side. 412-322-1850. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Joel Lindsey. Pleasant Hills. 412-714-8670. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Crucible Sound #4. Feat. Matt Aelmore, Rey Freme, Kenny Haney, Anthony Levin-Decanini, Ben Opie, tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE. Garfield. 412-362-0274. SMILING MOOSE. Poor Young Things, The Lucky Strikes. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Netizen, Butterbirds, The Dumplings. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

AUGUST 15 THESE LIONS

AUGUST 22 NEVADA MOUNTAINS, DOOMSDAY INITIATIVE, CRASH CITY

$2 PBR Drafts Everyday 9-11

$5 PBR Drafts & Fireball Shot All Day ‘till Midnight

THU 08

R.A.N.T. MUSIC FESTIVAL OUTSIDE INSIDE GRAND PIANO THE HARLAN TWINS CHET VINCENT AND BIG BEND TUES, AUGUST 13 • 9PM JAZZ

SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH

DAN BURGUN TRIO OPEN FOR LUNCH

Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

WIN TICKETS TO SEE… Visit PROMO tab at pghcitypaper.com for your chance to WIN PRIZES! Hint: Find the Right side of the Bottle

FRI 09

Friday, Aug. 9 | 6 –10 pm Learn the science of distilling with Wigle Whiskey! Discover the whiskeymaking process from grinding the grain, to fermentation, to distillation. 7KLVDGXOWVRQO\HYHQLQJLQFOXGHVIRXUçRRUV of exhibits, live music, and hands-on science demos. Cash bar and snacks available for purchase. Visit CarnegieScienceCenter.org for details and to register. Cost: $10 in advance / $15 day of the event

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013

ALTAR BAR. Ben Sollee. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Jenkins & Crum. O’Hara. 412-963-1514. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Joel Lindsey Duo. Richland. 724-444-7333. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Geen Stovall Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. The Spring Standards, InFLUX, Paint (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. CLUB COLONY. Groove Doctors. Scott. 412-668-0903. FRESCO’S RUSTIC EUROPEAN CUISINE & WINE BAR. Good Guys. Wexford. 724-935-7550. GOOSKI’S. Molasses Barge, Outside/inside, Resin, Admiral Browning. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HAMBONE’S. Moby & The Richards. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. The Bill Ali Band. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Toothgrinder, Horrid Ordeal, Disobey, Horse Drawn Death Machine, Irukndji. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. HULA BAR. Charlie Hustle, The Grifters. Verona. 412-828-6919. KOPPER KETTLE. Silkwood Shower. Washington. 724-225-5221. LINDEN GROVE. Switch. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687.

MEADOWS CASINO. PGH Band. Washington. 724-503-1200. REX THEATER. Buku. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Bad Rabbits, Air Dubai, 2PO Idle Drifters, The Tarants, Space Junk Crisis. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Gary Sinise & The Lt. Dan Band. Benefits Operation Doug. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Mike Dillon Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Lost Realms, Hunted Creatures, Slinky. Downtown. 412-456-2962. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Mark Shuttleworth Band. Monroeville. 412-372-9705.

SAT 10 31ST STREET PUB. 20 Shades, Lize, The Subnormals. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BRUSTER’S REAL ICE CREAM. Griffin Donley, Raven Clifton, Geoff Bland. Ross. 412-366-9899. CALIENTE PIZZA & BAR. Yu. Bloomfield. 412-682-1414. CIP’S. John Sarkis. Dormont. 412-668-2335. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Gary Belloma & The Blue Bombers. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Mavens. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. GATORS GRILLE. Antz Marching. Glenshaw. 412-767-4110. HARVEY WILNER’S. Tenigue. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Endless Mike & the Beagle Club, The Homeless Gospel Choir, The Maxipads, Hitodama. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THE KICKSTAND. The Dave Iglar Band. Elizabeth. 412-384-3080. LA CASA NARCISI. The Elliotts. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. LAWRENCEVILLE BUSINESS DISTRICT. RANT: Rock All Night Music Festival. More than 50 bands at 20 venues. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. MONONGAHELA AQUATORIUM. Jimbo & the Soupbones, Brotherhood Band. Monongahela. 724-258-5905. REX THEATER. Slim Cessna’s Auto Club, The Sterling Sisters. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Lenny Smith & The Ramblers. Shaler. 412-487-6259. ROYAL PLACE. Cherry Red. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000. SMILING MOOSE. Take One Car, We Must Save The Princess, Get the

MP 3 MONDAY HANDHOLD

Each week, we offer a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s track comes from Handhold; stream or download

“Whenever You’re Around Me” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


Picture, Anchors to Anchors (early) Le Shook, Brian Foye (late). South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. OutsideInside, Grand Piano, The Harland Twins, Chet Vincent & the Big Bend. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Bobby V. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273.

SUN 11

FULL LIST E N O LIN

MON 12

SAT 10

ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Tony Janflone. North Side. 412-322-1850. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Sparks The Rescue, Kingsfoil, Lion in the Mane, My Thoughts in Color, Our Family Portrait. Garfield. 412-361-2262. SMILING MOOSE. Fit For An Autopsy, Legion. South Side. 412-431-4668.

BELVEDERE’S. Humanaut Presents The Bunker. Feat. Aaron Clark & Mike Servito. Followed by Hot Mass feat. Derek Plaslaiko at 1139 Penn Ave. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. Motor City Shake. Motown & funk dance party w/ DJ Soulful Fella. South Side. 814-746-5060. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Billy Pilgrim. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Michael Joseph. Downtown. 412-471-2058. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Chuck Corby Trio. North Side. 412-322-1850. BRILLOBOX. Old Baby, Catherine Irwin, Matt Miller. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. The Eastern Sea, Grandchildren, Billy The Kid. South Side. 412-431-4950. SMILING MOOSE. Paradise Fears, Dinner & A Suit, Fourth & Coast, Take A Breath. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Dan Burgun Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 14 ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. MoJo GoJo Band feat. Johnny Angel. North Side. 412-322-1850. ATRIAS RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Nick Fiasco. Wexford. 724-934-3660. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Landing, Mike Tamburo, Emiy Forst, Coastal Remedy. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

DJS THU 08 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ

HIP HOP/R&B THU 08

ALTAR BAR. D Pryde. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

FRI 09

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BELVEDERE’S. Stackin Paper. ALTAR BAR. Crash Kings Megan & w/ Myrryrs, Cutups & Keebs. Liz. Strip District. 412-263-2877. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. BAJA BAR AND GRILL. King’s Ransom. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. BRILLOBOX. Lazercrunk. w/ Cutups & Keebs. Bloomfield. BEACH HOUSE RESTAURANT. 412-320-1476. The Dave Iglar Band. Finleyville. LAVA LOUNGE. 80’s New HARD ROCK CAFE. Magnets Wave Flashback. w/ DJ Electric. & Ghosts. Station Square. South Side. 412-431-5282. 412-481-7625. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. HOWLERS COYOTE Ray Lugo. Lawrenceville. CAFE. Continental, The 412-904-2915. Sablowskis, Scratch N’ ONE 10 LOUNGE. Sniffs. Bloomfield. DJ Goodnight, 412-682-0320. DJ Rojo. Downtown. IRWIN PARK . w w w 412-874-4582. AMPHITHEATRE. typaper ci h g p PERLE CHAMPAGNE Scott, Rob & Greg .com BAR. DJ Midas. from The Clarks. Irwin. Downtown. 412-471-2058. 724-864-3100. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. South Side. 412-431-2825. Mon River Ramblers, Shelf RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Life String Band. Shadyside. Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. 412-363-5845.

TUE 13

chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

SUN 11 SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 14 BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz!. Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. QUIET STORM COFFEEHOUSE RESTAURANT. Beats n Eats Midday Dance Party. Friendship. 412-661-9355. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day

BLUES FRI 09 LEGACY LANES. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Baldwin. 412-653-2695. TEDDY’S. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180.

SAT 10 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Blue Bombers, Pat Scanga. Robinson. 412-489-5631. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Ron & The RumpShakers. New Alexandria. 724-433-1322.

SUN 11 BROOKLINE PUB. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Brookline. 412-531-0899.

WED 14 ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Toney. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5992. THE BULLPEN. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Avella. 724-356-3000.

JAZZ THU 08 ANDYS. Maura Minteer. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PALACE THEATRE. James Boggs. Greensburg. 724-836-1123. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

FRI 09

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Boilermaker Jazz Band, Salsamba. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Bridgette Perdue Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY. Poncho Sanchez Latin Jazz Band. Presented by MCG Jazz. Moon. 412-322-0800.

$

PARADISE PUB

ALL DAY EVERYDAY TUES. ALL YOU CAN EAT CRAB LEGS

$

5 MILLER LITE PITCHERS

SAT 10 ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. Brother to Brother The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CLUB COLONY. John Sarkus. Scott. 412-668-0903. FRESCO’S RUSTIC EUROPEAN CUISINE & WINE BAR. Erin Burkett. Wexford. 724-935-7550. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. John C. Hall Band. North Side. 412-904-3335.

5 MILLER LITE PITCHERS

Talerico’s

ALL DAY EVERYDAY

BAR & GRILL

TUES. & THU. 40¢ WINGS 6P-10P

$

3 16oz LITE DRAFTS FOR ALL PIRATES GAMES

CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

Goodwill NOW HIRING Open House Wednesday, August 14th 10:00 am to 4:00 pm All interviews will take place at: 294 Lincoln Hwy, North Versailles, PA 15137

Managers will be on-hand to take applications and interview! Hiring for the following locations:

Murrysville North Huntingdon Banksville Mount Pleasant North Versailles East Liberty Monroeville South Side Greensburg North Hills Whitehall Lawrenceville North Side

LITTLE E’S. The Velvet Heat Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MEADOWS CASINO. Bo Wagner’s Rat Pack. Washington. 724-503-1200. RIVERVIEW PARK. Elevations. Stars at Riverview Jazz Series. North Side. 412-255-2493. RUE BOURBON BAR & GRILLE. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. Dormont. 412-651-4449. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

Donation Door / Utility Cashiers Production Processors Also hiring full-time truck drivers!

COLUMBUS

SUN 11 EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Stranger Convention. North Side. 412-904-3335. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Roger Humphries Quintet. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Eric Susoeff. Shadyside.

{THU., SEPT. 26}

On An On

Rumba Café

WASHINGTON, D.C. {SUN., OCT. 27}

Gary Numan Black Cat

TUE 13 ANDYS. Anthony Ambroso. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jazz Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335. KATZ PLAZA. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-456-6666. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Jessica Lee & Mark Strickland. Shadyside.

WED 14

Hiring for the following positions:

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CLUB COLONY. Rebecca Kaufmann. Scott. 412-668-0903.

ACOUSTIC THU 08

GLENSIDE, PA. {SAT., NOV. 02}

Colin Meloy Keswick Theatre

LEVELS. Gina Rendina. North Side. 412-231-7777. MARIO’S SOUTH SIDE SALOON. Michael Todd. South Side. 412-381-5610. ST. CLAIR PARK. The Black Lillies. Greensburg. 724-838-4324. W. NEW CASTLE ST. PLAZA. Jerry Lorenz, Solomon Crow & the Bourbon Valley Boys. Butler. 724-256-5769.

ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Lenny & Jeff. Murrysville. 724-733-4453. BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Matt Cavetti. GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. 724-934-1177. LEVELS. Gary Prisby. North DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Side. 412-231-7777. Jay Wiley. Robinson. OLIVE OR TWIST. The 412-489-5631. Vagrants. Downtown. MOUNT LEBANON 412-255-0525. PUBLIC LIBRARY. www. per Hardbark Sycamore. a p ty pghci m Mt. Lebanon. .co CLUB CAFE. Jimmy 412-531-1912. LaFave. South Side. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS 412-431-4950. BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. PENN AVENUE PARKLET. Pam HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Sovich & Friends. Wilkinsburg. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion 421-244-2900. Bluegrass Jam. Bloomfield. THE VENUE AT HARMONY 412-682-0320. RIDGE,. Christine Havrilla & Gypsy Fuzz. Ambridge. 724-266-8445.

SAT 10

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 11

MON 12

FRI 09 resumes (if applicable), and be prepared to interview. All job offers are contingent upon passing a drug and alcohol test and physical exam. Goodwill SWPA is an EEO Employer and a Drug Free Workplace.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013

THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Hannah Aldridge. Harmony. 724-272-3901. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin the Troubadour. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. LEMONT. Jason Miller & Steve Jackson. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

TUE 13

PAPA J���S RISTORANTE. Gene Stovall. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

WED 14 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD FRI 09 CLUB CAFE. Batamba (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950.

WED 14 BUHL COMMUNITY PARK. Members of Timbeleza. North Side. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. Timbeleza. North Side. 412-322-5058.

CLASSICAL SUN 11

ORGANIST DAVID TROIANO. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 09 WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Elite Show Band. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 10 KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. Gospel Xplosion. East Liberty. 412-363-3000. LEMONT. Vida. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. All Keyed Up. North Side. 412-231-7777.

MON 12

HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin Thomas. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.


What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

August 7 - 13 WEDNESDAY 7 71 The Black Crowes & Tedeschi-Trucks Band

STAGE AE North Side. With special guest The London Souls. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Doors open at 5:30p.m.

Fight or Flight ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Mindset Evolution, Chaos Killed & Inside Out. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Defending the Caveman CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghclo.org. Through October 20.

THURSDAY 8 85 D Pryde

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests GP, Dception, Choze & TK Kavi. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

newbalancepittsburgh.com

Mike Dillon Band

FRIDAY 96 9

1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

THUNDERBIRD CAFÉ Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. With special guest Downtown Brown. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

The Lt. Dan Band Benefit Concert for Cpl. Doug Vitale STAGE AE North Side. Presented by the Tunnel to Towers Foundation and the Gary Sinise Foundation. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Doors open at 6p.m.

Jimmy LaFave CLUB CAFÉ South Side. 412431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

SATURDAY 10

MONDAY 12

SOUTHSIDE WORKS. Featuring Any Way You Want It & Bon Journey. Free event. For more information visit southsideworks.com. 5p.m.

REX THEATER South Side. 412381-6811. With special guests Glitch, Ethan Polo, Snake Eyez & Charlie Slum. All ages show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 6:30p.m.

SUNDAY 11

TUESDAY 13

HARD ROCK CAFÉ Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests The Winter Brave & Daily Grind. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Sycamore, Famous Last Words & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

The Spring Standards

Magnets and Ghosts

The Eastern Sea

Jarren Benton

South Side Works Street Party

Ben Sollee ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Caleb Murphy & A.G. Levine. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Crash Kings | Nico Vega

The Clintones

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412431-4950. With special guests InFLUX & Paint. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 10:30p.m.

HARD ROCK CAFÉ Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests Athanasia & Coastal Remedy. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or

DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE

Our Last Night

CLUB CAFÉ South Side. 412431-4950. With special guests Grandchildren & Billy the Kid. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb. com/opusone. 8p.m.

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TRUTH AND CONSEQUENCES

“WE’RE FLYING AROUND AIMLESSLY, AND WE DON’T KNOW WHEN WE’RE GOING TO LAND.”

{BY AL HOFF} Thomas Vinterberg’s quiet, provocative drama, The Hunt, explores the devastating effects an accusation of child sexual abuse can have, both on those intimately involved and on the wider community. Lucas (Mad Mikkelsen) lives alone in a small Danish town; he’s divorced, with sporadic custody of his teenage son. But he enjoys the male company of the town’s hunting group, and is a lively, caring worker at a kindergarten. Then, one of the children — the daughter of his best friend — makes an accusation, and Lucas’ world falls apart under the growing suspicion of the townsfolk.

E H T UP IN AIR

Marked man: Lucas (Mad Mikkelsen)

CP APPROVED

Because we see that the accusation is false — it’s a blurted-out statement by a confused little girl that is then “verified” by wellmeaning adults — we’re free to analyze the reaction with no parsing of he-said-she-said. But then, The Hunt asks, what value does “truth” hold for Lucas against even the suggestion of such a reviled act? The film is uniformly well acted, with particularly good work from Mikkelsen (who is best known for his villain roles in Casino Royale and TV’s Hannibal). The title, of course, refers to the town’s group dynamic after the accusation, but also to the two deer hunts that frame the narrative, serving to underscore what’s changed irrevocably. In Danish, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Aug. 9. Manor AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PREMIUM RUSH. In this thriller from last summer, Joseph GordonLevitt plays a New York City bike messenger who attracts the attention of a dirty cop. This summer, see it for free, outside, in conjunction with the annual BikeFest. Bring your bike! Film begins at dusk. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts lawn, Shadyside

The singing stewards of Almodovar Airlines

{BY HARRY KLOMAN}

P

EDRO ALMODOVAR’S I’m So Excited! is a throwback to the livelier stuff he did in the late-early part of his career, after he became known for darker films like Matador and Law of Desire. Call this Passengers on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, where only sex, alcohol and tranquilizers can bring a sense of false (if spirited) serenity. The action happens aboard a Spanish airliner bound for Mexico City. Early in the flight, the pilots realize they’ll have to make an emergency landing — if they can find an airport to accommodate them. Word spreads thanks to a veracious gay steward — one of a trio of such sprites who camp it up — and soon the passengers get talkative with one another. There’s the famous dominatrix who videotapes her clients (including the King of Spain) and fears she’ll be assassinated; the psychic who sees death and plans to lose her virginity on the flight; a businessman whose botched corrupt air-

port project will lead to his arrest when he lands; the married pilot having an affair with the head steward; and the hunky co-pilot who swears he’s not gay (despite copious blowjobs from bunkmates in the Army).

I’M SO EXCITED! DIRECTED BY: Pedro Almodovar In Spanish, with subtitles Starts Fri., Aug. 9. Regent Square

“We’re flying around aimlessly, and we don’t know where or when we’re going to land,” a passenger says. It’s one of numerous metaphors — the plane finally lands at Aeropuerto de la Mancha, the businessman’s boondoggle — for the discombobulated-cum-dishonest lives of the people on this flight to gain integrity and self-awareness. But don’t worry: Nobody dies, they all learn valuable things about themselves and the opening

scene has a cameo by Antonio Banderas and Penelope Cruz, whose careers Almodovar launched. The film takes its English title from a flamboyant dance performed by the three gay blades as they lip-synch to the Pointer Sisters tune. “What makes you think all of this is funny?” an especially uptight hetero (is that redundant?) passenger asks after the routine. One of them answers: “It’s always worked for us.” So if you ever feel down, just ask a gay friend to entertain you. This is all sporadically amusing, but also fairly transparent, and more than a little contrived. Then again, what Almodovar film isn’t? Like most of his work, I’m So Excited! swings from tame titillation to quasi-tragedy, pausing quickly to make a point every half-dozen scenes or so. But there’s something a little adolescent about it, and you’d think Almodovar would have gotten over such stuff long, long ago. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013


white, perhaps to allow the words and performances to provide the color, as they ably do. Mon., Aug. 12, through Thu., Aug. 15. Harris (Harry Kloman)

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

DIRTY DANCING. The much-loved 1987 romance from Emile Ardolino is back on the big screen, for one night. Swoon anew as Baby (Jennifer Grey) learns about dance, love and heartbreak from local dirty-boogier Johnny Castle (Patrick Swayze) while vacationing in the Catskills. You just might have … the time of your life. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 14. AMC Loews. $5

NEW ELYSIUM. Matt Damon and Jodie Foster star in this sci-fi drama about a factory worker living on a wrecked Earth who tries to break into the fancy space station, known as Elysium, where the wealthy live. Written and directed by Neill Blomkamp (District 9). Starts Fri., Aug. 9. PLANES. This digitally animated family film from Disney tells the story of Dusty, a cropdusting plane who has to overcome his fear of heights in order to compete in an aerial race. Starring talking planes voiced by Dane Cook, Stacy Keach, Julia Louis-Dreyfus and others. Klay Hall directs. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., Aug. 9. 2 GUNS. The first 15 minutes of Baltasar Kormákur’s comic actioner aren’t bad: Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg, respectively an undercover DEA agent and an undercover Navy intelligence officer, get breakfast in a small Texas border town. The two have an easy, amusingly prickly chemistry; they spar about eggs and donuts, and leave the worst tip ever: They burn down the diner, as part of a plan to rob the bank across the street.

Much Ado About Nothing

REPERTORY CINEMA IN THE PARK. Lincoln, Wed., Aug. 7 (Schenley) and Sat., Aug. 10 (Riverview). Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax, Thu., Aug. 8 (Brookline); Fri., Aug. 9 (Arsenal); Sat., Aug. 10 (Grandview); and Sun., Aug. 11 (Schenley). Jumanji, Tue., Aug. 13 (West End/ Elliott Overlook) and Thu., Aug. 15 (Brookline). The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn — Part 2, Wed., Aug. 14 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-422-6426 or www.citiparks.net. Free THE STREET FIGHTER. Sonny Chiba stars in this 1974 martial-arts actioner about a mercenary fighter who runs afoul of some gangsters. Same old story, but you watch these old-school flicks for the fights, not the plot. Shigehiro Ozawa directs. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 7, and 7 p.m. Sun., Aug. 11. Hollywood PRETTY IN PINK. Molly Ringwald, Andrew McCarthy and Jon Cryer star in this 1986 comedy-romance about a high school girl who must choose between the new cute rich guy and her goofy pal, who has long been crushing on her. Howard Deutsch directs a script by John Hughes. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 7. AMC Waterfront

Inner Space (1966); 2:55 p.m. The Brain Eaters (1958); 3:55 p.m. The Frozen Dead (1966); 5:30 p.m. Yongray, Monster From the Deep (1967); 7:05 p.m. War of the Insects (1968); 8:30 p.m. 2+5: Mission Hydra (1966); 10:15 p.m. Without Warning (1980); and 11:45 p.m. Warriors of the Wasteland (1983). Sat., Aug. 10. $5 per movie or $13 all-day pass. Hollywood SUMMER OF LOVECRAFT. This afternoon of All Things Lovecraft includes: screenings of Call of Cthulhu (2005) and The Whisperer in Darkness (2011); vendors with Lovecraftian wares; and a presentation by Lovecraft scholar Sean Elliott Martin. Proceeds benefit the theater. 2 p.m. Sun., Aug. 11. Hollywood. $15 (tickets at www.showclix.com) THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE. It’s lawyer vs. outlaw in this classic Western from John Ford. The 1962 film stars Jimmy Stewart as the upstanding citizen and frequent Ford star John Wayne as the troublesome Valance. Continues a Sunday-night, month-long series of films featuring directors and their actor muses. 8 p.m. Sun., Aug. 11. Regent Square

But after this kicky, intriguing start, the film devolves into car chases, shoot-outs and an unimaginably inane plot. 2 Guns is a misnoner, because there are hundreds, seemingly all going off at once. What do you expect when everybody — our heroes, rogue DEA agents, rogue sailors, a Mexican cartel, a rogue CIA agent and assorted doublecrossers and protection details — are all packing? It’s a waste of bullets (nothing ever really gets resolved, just continued), and a waste of talent. Washington and Wahlberg are slumming. It’s their right and they’re likely paid handsomely for it — but we don’t have to pay to watch it. (Al Hoff) WE’RE THE MILLERS. A pot dealer, a stripper, a nerdy kid and a teenage runaway team up to pretend to be an all-American family in order to transport a huge quantity of weed across the Mexican border. Jason Sudekis and Jennifer Aniston star in Rawson Marshall Thurber’s comedy.

N E W S

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THE TRIALS OF MUHAMMAD ALI. This new documentary from Bill Siegel covers one of the internationally famous boxer’s biggest fights: not in the ring, but in the courts when Ali faced charges for refusing to be drafted during the Vietnam War. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 15. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

INCENDIARY.

BY FAR THOMAS VINTERBERG’S MOST ACCOMPLISHED WORK YET. MADS MIKKELSEN IS RIVETING.”

SAVANNAH. Annette Haywood-Carter directs this period drama, set in the early 20th century and based on a true story about a man who rejects his birthright as a plantation owner and, instead, enjoys a life of freedom on the river, joined by a former slave. Jim Caviezel, Chiwetel Ejiofor and Sam Shepard star. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 8. Hollywood

Lincoln at Cinema in the Park

EASY RIDER. Dennis Hopper’s wildly influential 1969 road flick depicts two motorcycle-riding drop-outs (Peter Fonda and Hopper) as they head out on the highway, checking out America in all its groovy and ungroovy forms, dealing a little dope and meeting up with crazy chicks (Karen Black, Toni Basil) and crazier dudes (Jack Nicholson, in his career-making performance). Both a celebration of iconoclastic freedom and a mordant reflection on its limits, Easy Rider became an instant classic (the lowbudget hippie film made nearly 20 million bucks at the box office), as well as becoming a touchstone for a new generation of audiences and filmmakers who demanded Hollywood dig their scene and the grave social concerns within it. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 14; 10 p.m. Fri., Aug. 16; 10 p.m. Sat., Aug. 17; and 7 p.m. Sun., Aug. 18. Hollywood. (AH)

CP

–Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times

★★★★

1/2

MIKKELSEN IS UNFORGETTABLE.”

–Lou Lumenick, New York Post

“THIS

IS FILMMAKING OF A HIGH ORDER.”

SHARKNADO. If you missed the recent airing of this much-buzzed-about new film — it screened on the SyFy cable channel — here’s your chance to see it with the full imprimatur of a theatrical setting. The plot is a terrifying harbinger of climate change, as a freak storm off the coast of California dumps angry, hungry sharks all over water-logged Los Angeles. Conversely, it is a non-stop hoot starring 90210’s Ian Zeiring and Tara Reid. 7 and 9 p.m. Fri., Aug. 9. Hollywood

–Joe Morgenstern, The Wall Street Journal

★★★★ ENGROSSING.

AN INDELIBLY POWERFUL FILM.”

–Claudia Puig, USA Today

EASILY VINTERBERG’S STRONGEST FILM SINCE ‘THE CELEBRATION.’”

THE WARRIORS. Walter Hill’s 1979 gangsploitation flick was set in the urban cesspool that was New York City, a dark Gotham ruled by take-no-prisoners youth gangs. When a summit of gangs goes bad, one group, The Warriors, must fight its way from the Bronx to a final showdown at Coney Island. Come out and play. 10 p.m. Fri., Aug. 9, and 10 p.m. Sat., Aug. 10. Oaks 13 HOURS OF SCI-FI. Horror Realm presents a halfday of vintage horror and sci-fi films, for the low price of $13. On-screen concerns run from murderous hands to crazed insects, mutated Communist children to parasites from deep beneath Earth, preserved Nazi heads to a giant Korean reptile. The full line-up is as follows: 11 a.m. The Gamma People (1956); 12:15 p.m. Hand of Death (1962); 1:15 p.m. Destination

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2 Guns MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING. In the canon of William Shakespeare, Much Ado is probably the most difficult work — to mess up: It’s charming and familiar, a diptych love story with two happy endings, albeit with a slightly dark middle as conflicts play out. Joss Whedon’s new filming takes place in the California present, but the language is all Shakespeare. The story revolves around Benedick, a playboy who vows never to marry, and Beatrice, the independent woman who banters with him. Their romance parallels that of the younger Claudio and Hero. Whedon’s deft direction makes thoughtful use of gesture and physical comedy, and most of his actors are spot-on. And it’s shot (needlessly) in black and

CP

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–Stephen Holden, The New York Times

THE LIE IS SPREADING.

THE HUNT A FILM BY

THOMAS VINTERBERG

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT PITTSBURGH

STARTS FRIDAY The Manor Theatre (412) 422-7729 AUGUST 9

E V E N T S

MAGPICTURES.COM/THEHUNT +

C L A S S I F I E D S

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[DANCE]

MORE NEW MOVES

“THEY ARE JAGS, AND WHEN I SEE A JAGOFF, I CALL THEM OUT.”

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SIDRA BELL DANCE NEW YORK presents a work-in-progress showing. 8 p.m. Fri., Aug. 9. Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. Pay what you can; limited seating, RSVP required. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

42

YEAH, [COMEDY]

HE SAID IT

Sidra Bell Dance New York dancers {PHOTO COURTESY OF STEPHANIE CROUSILLAT}

{BY ALEX GORDON}

Where there’s smoke: Davon Magwood fires it up.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Pittsburgh’s dance community over the past several years has had a love affair with New York-based choreographers. Artists such as Nora Chipaumire, Camille A. Brown and local transplant Kyle Abraham have all established an ongoing presence here through works that have engaged and delighted local audiences and presenters. Another New Yorker whose works have frequented local stages is Sidra Bell. Bell and her company, Sidra Bell Dance New York, introduced themselves to Pittsburgh in 2009, as part of the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater’s newMoves Contemporary Dance Festival. She followed with 2010’s Revue, then with commissions for Point Park University’s Conservatory Dance Company and the August Wilson Center Dance Ensemble. Now, capping this week’s artist residency at the Kelly-Strayhorn’s Alloy Studios, Bell and company will present a work-in-progress showing of a brand-new creation tentatively slated to worldpremiere at the KellyStrayhorn next April. Bell, 34, has become a hot commodity, crisscrossing the country creating new works, teaching and, most recently, acting as choreographer for the AIDS-themed dance film Test (www.testthefilm.com). Her company has also been touring more. It was at a recent residency in Philadelphia that Bell says she was inspired to make the work she and the company will create in Pittsburgh. The spark came during the dancers’ downtime at a pop-up beer garden, where they engaged in a storytelling game a la NPR’s “Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me!” Each of the company’s five dancers told three stories, and their colleagues had to guess which of them was true. Bell says she was struck by two of the stories told. One she describes as “epic,” with elements of romanticism and lyricism, and the other as “violent,” with religious overtones. Both are themes she plans to explore via the still-untitled new work during the Pittsburgh residency. “I want to push the boundaries of movement with each work and not repeat what I have done before,” says Bell, by telephone from New York. The venue that’s hosting the residency also plays a big role: Bell sees the KellyStrayhorn’s openness to artist experimentation as the perfect platform to explore such boundaries. “That kind of relationship is rare,” she says.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013

C

URSE HIS hometown

and Davon Magwood will not hesitate to hump you. And if the Westboro Baptist Church shows up to picket his homecoming show, on Aug. 10 at Club Cafe, he says, he’ll do just that. In May, the Pittsburgh comedian took on the homophobic Kansas-based group when he tweeted to his more than 33,000 followers, “I bet if you burned down the westboro baptist church the


tornados in the midwest would stop … I just have a feeling they will.” In response, WBC offshoot GodH8sTheWorld tweeted, “How’s Pittsburgh doing, btw? We’re praying for God to pls smack that evil city,” and WBC itself vowed to picket. In July, Magwood promised: “If this tweet gets 100 retweets, Augs 10th I will hump one member of the westboro baptist church @WBCSays in a thong!” It was retweeted 159 times. GodH8sTheWorld responded: “God will mock & curse you sir if you even try! #Perv.” Magwood’s anti-WBC message has gained momentum. He’s appeared in newspapers, radio programs and blogs nationally, including the Huffington Post. Commonwealth Press launched a line of T-shirts emblazoned with “God Hates Jags,” Magwood’s spoof of WBC’s infamous homophobic motto; some proceeds from T-shirt sales will benefit the Pittsburgh Gay and Lesbian Community Center. Magwood doesn’t expect any actual WBC picketers; at press time, the event was not listed on the group’s official picket schedule, and WBC has not responded to CP’s inquiries. But Magwood is happy that at least some good will come from the dispute. FOR MAGWOOD’S fans, the WBC exchange is no surprise: He’s all about controversial, uncomfortable subjects, and he has a keen skill for disarming them. One recent viral bit captures Magwood’s cynicism. “George Zimmerman’s gonna walk,” he says. “And I’m excited ’cuz I wanna loot.” He’s a silver-lining kind of guy.

AN EVENING OF COMEDY FEATURING DAVON MAGWOOD 7 and 10:30 p.m. Sat., Aug. 10 (hosted by Jordan Weeks). Club Café, 56-58 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

In February, Magwood self-released his debut comedy EP, Yeah I Said It. Then he booked his first headlining tour — from venues to openers — on his own, mostly hitting comedy clubs and dive bars. Magwood played 20 gigs in two months. His goal, he says, was to come home with stories, and he got them. Highlights included a Santa Convention in Kalamazoo, Mich.; a lengthy traffic stop in Arizona; and a new Batman tattoo, inked in Texas. Magwood, 27, has a casual, conversational style that shrugs off traditional setups and punchlines, in the vein of Hanni-

bal Buress (for whom Magwood opened at Mr. Smalls in February). Misdirection and off-tempo punchlines are some of his strongest tools. A joke might start with a late twentysomething’s rant about friends starting to have babies, and just as effortlessly end on the subject of baby dragons. It’s all in how you get there. Raised in Bloomfield, Magwood grew up interested in politics and social justice. In high school, he did marching band and youth politics: Magwood was class president his senior year at Schenley High, and was the 59th Youth Governor of Pennsylvania. Bullied in school, Magwood still sticks up for those who are bullied. And he enjoys confronting bullies like WBC. “They are jags, and when I see a jagoff, I call them out,” he says. Some argue that sparring with WBC only gives the organization publicity; most estimates place WBC’s total membership well under 100. Indeed, Magwood has 10 times the Twitter followers of GodH8sTheWorld — which once tweeted to thank him for “publishing our message for us.” But Magwood says numbers can deceive. “They’re getting support somewhere,” he says. Moreover, bigotry is bigotry: “It’s happening to people in our own city. [They] make it harder for the people we love.” DESPITE THE new audiences, new ad-

ventures and fresh publicity, this tour wasn’t easy for Magwood. He’s endured a breakup, canceled shows and the rigors of life on the road. And in mid-July, one of Magwood’s best friends, local comic Sean “Rudie” Rush, took his own life. He was 25. “He is a huge part of my comedy,” Magwood says. “[It] won’t be the same without him.” Like Magwood, Rush suffered from depression throughout his life, and he used that pain in his act. Look up his Skittsburgh set on YouTube; it’s painfully funny in a bone-dry, Mitch Hedberg kind of way. “I used to work for a funeral home, but that’s a dead business,” says Rush. The crowd responds with a mix of groans and chuckles, with a single “ha!” louder than the rest. That’s Magwood. Rush was scheduled to open for Magwood at Club Café. But now the show is more than a homecoming gig. It’s even more than a chance to stand tall with the LGBT community and flip the bird at WBC. This is Magwood’s opportunity to say goodbye to his friend, and work through the pain the way he always does: on stage.

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DRAG HIM TO A SHOW HE'LL ACTUALLY ENJOY!

Broadway’s Smash Comedy About the Sexes Written by Rob Becker

NOW - OCT 20

412-456-6666

CLOCabaret.com

Groups 412-325-1582

U.S. Premiere starring David Whalen as Don Juan. August 8–31 Henry Heymann Theatre in the Stephen Foster Memorial, Oakland

By Odon Von Horvath in a new English version by Duncan MacMillan

Tickets at picttheatre.org or call 412.561.6000 x207 T H E A T R E

Professional Theatre in Residence at the University of Pittsburgh

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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@rt

WESTMORELAND 30 MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

Visit us at our new location on Route 30 in Greensburg! The Westmoreland Museum of American Art building is going through a major renovation and expansion but for now we are open at 4764 State Route 30 in Greensburg, featuring pieces of our permanent collection, monthly pop-up exhibitions, American Marketplace Shop & Café, events, classes and more! Westmoreland @rt 30 Hours: Wednesday-Friday 12:00pm-7:00pm Saturday and Sunday 10:00am-5:00pm Art on Tap 5.2.7 is the second Friday of every month! For more information please visit us at wmuseumaa.org or call us at 724-837-1500 Robert Gwathmey (1903 - 1988), By the Sea, 1974, Oil on Canvas, Gift of Thomas Lynch Fund, Peter Moshein, Robert and Arlene Kendra, William H. Jamison Art Acquisition Fund. 2012.5

[ART REVIEW]

SURVIVORS {BY ROBERT ISENBERG} YOU DON’T HEAR a lot about mass violence in India. Poverty, yes. Floods and famine, yes. But we rarely see headlines about the kind of incident that took place in eastern India in 2008: a group of extremists attacking a village, destroying the houses and forcing the inhabitants to flee. Rarer still is the alleged cause: “a rising tide of religious intolerance.” The intolerant? Zealous Hindus. The intolerable? Indian Christians, also members of the Dalit, or “untouchable” class. Two Pittsburgh-based photographers documenting one community’s recovery present their portfolio, Lynn Johnson and Jen Saffron: The Koraput Survivors Project, now on display at 707 Penn Gallery.

An image from The Koraput Survivors Project

Most of the prints are black-and-white, arranged along the wall like a strip of negatives. They are grouped thematically, but the most provocative series shows workers in the open land. Koraput appears barren and inhospitable, and the villagers’ tools are medievally simple. As they toil in worn clothes beneath a bitter sun, the Koraputians have no automation to ease their labor. Rebuilding their lives is slow and grudging work, and Johnson and Saffron ably capture the backbreaking tedium of their days. What’s striking about the Project is the purity of its presentation: We see color portraits of men and women, children and grandparents, some arranged like a gridded dossier, others hugely blown up. It’s hard to say which photographer shot which photograph (all images are simply credited to “the Koraput Survivors Project”), and they refuse to editorialize their work. Meanwhile, they show only the From The Koraput Survivors Project villagers themselves — not the attackers, Johnson and Saffron are prolific shooters, not government officials, not even passbut they have paid particular attention ersby, eyeing them from a distance. For Saffron and Johnson, to a wrecked village in documenting the villagers’ the Koraput region and its routine is enough. 500 refugees. Johnson first In the era of Vice Meencountered the villagers dia, when photojournalwhile on assignment for ists often prove themselves National Geographic, and through daredevilry in war she and Saffron are advozones, this exhibit is a kind cates for the Koraput surof relief. Instead of fetishizvivors as well as documening the villagers’ suffering, tarians. Scores of portraits and landscapes illustrate the villagers’ the photographs show quotidian humandaily struggle to survive. Beyond the ity — people, just like us, taking life one hard day at a time. Koraput will never be front-page news, and the most we First THE KORAPUT Worlders can offer refugees are our monetary donations (thanks to a widget on SURVIVORS PROJECT continues thru Sept. 1. 707 Penn Gallery, the Project’s website, www.community707 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-456-6666 housepittsburgh.org/Koraput/). But Johnor www.trustarts.org son and Saffron have done us the service of showing their faces. And if you happen artists’ statement, there are no captions or to amble through 707 Penn Gallery one aflengthy descriptions. What we see is what ternoon, you will at least appreciate that they existed. we get.

WHAT’S STRIKING ABOUT THE PROJECT IS THE PURITY OF ITS PRESENTATION.

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[PLAY REVIEW]

CLASSICS RE-MIXED {BY TED HOOVER} IT’S A VERY tricky thing Chicago play-

wright Sean Graney has done with Oedipus and the Foul Mess at Thebes, now making its world premiere under the aegis of No Name Players. It’s not merely an adaptation of Sophocles’ “Oedipus Trilogy,” which I’m sure you remember comprises Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus and Antigone. He’s tossed in parts of Aeschylus’ Seven Against Thebes and Euripides’ The Phoenician Women, as well — the whole telling the story of one very screwed-up Greek family, in which Oedipus kills poppa, marries mom and blinds himself. Meanwhile his sons go to war against each other, both die, and sis gets in big trouble when she tries to bury one of them. Loopy doesn’t even begin to describe the source material, and it’s amazing how Graney’s managed to create such a compelling script while staying true to the original. He’s introduced humor but not parody, added relevance and given the entire

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SCOTT NICKLOS}

Tressa Glover, Cameron Knight and Colleen Pulawski in Oedipus and the Foul Mess in Thebes

enterprise propulsion and polish. It comes down, I think, to tone. Graney has informed classical style with contemporary theatricality in a way I’m not sure I’ve ever seen. And the fact that he makes this new technique seem so natural is his

OEDIPUS AND THE FOUL MESS IN THEBES

continues through Aug. 17. No Name Players at Off the Wall Theater, 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $15-20. www.nonameplayers.org

biggest trick of the night. Steven Wilson provides solid and forceful direction. It might be a bit too busy, but he deserves huge credit for the astonishing performances he’s drawn from this impeccably talented cast. Graney’s brilliance notwithstanding, this is an unbelievably silly, stupid story, and the cast has to do some very heavy lifting to get and keep it aloft. Thankfully, the bulk of that strain falls to Cameron Knight and Colleen Pulaski, as Oedipus and Jocasta/Antigone, and

these two could assail any barrier. Hitting the stage like hurricanes, they turn in definitive performances. Knight prowls like a wounded lion, generating emotional power with every beat. Pulaski’s Antigone is a thrilling blend of emotion battling intelligence. In a breathtakingly written scene where she digs her brother’s grave under her uncle’s baleful eye, she’s extraordinarily moving … with pitch-perfect support from Ricardo Vila-Roger, as Creon. Tressa Glover plays the Blind Seer, arguably Graney’s most interesting take on the Sophocles original. This plot-deviceof-a-character knows everything yet communicates the facts in needlessly recondite riddles. Usually I’m itching for this character to just spill the damn beans already! But Graney turns her into a fully realized character with flaws and frailties. For the first time, I actually buy her not telling all in the first scene. Glover fully inhabits the dimensions Graney has provided and creates a wonderfully complex theatrical figure. Todd Betker and Patrick Cannon are the warring brothers Polynices and Eteokles, with John Garet Stoker as Haemon, and the three are a hoot playing the blundering comedy of little boys suddenly stumbling into adulthood. No Name has a big, fat hit on its hands. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

bring your smartphone bring your opinions bring your bff With so much amazing art, there's tons to share.

Whether you've just moved to Pittsburgh, or are a regular at our openings and parties, there's always something new to see. And the only thing better than encountering great art is sharing it with your friends.

cmoa.org | 412.622.3131

guided tours daily | members visit free shop the museum stores for creative gifts one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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FOR THE WEEK OF

08.0808.15.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

AUG. 08

D Don on JJuan uan ua n Comes Back From the War

+ THU., AUG. 08 {ART} This month, national photography collective ADP moves into Unsmoke Systems Artspace for Making It Home. The exhibit showcases eight documentary artists exploring diverse concepts of “home.” Julie Reneé Jones, for instance, frames scenes in the suburban Midwest. John Francis Peters contributes a photo of men riding horses toward mountains in Qinghai, China. Other contributors include Matt Austin, Josh Birnbaum, Talia Herman, Kelly Kristin Jones, Ed Panar and Ben Rasmussen. This year’s workshop begins tonight and tomorrow, with artist presentations and discussions. The opening reception is Saturday. Olivia Lammel 7 p.m. Also 7 p.m. Fri., Aug. 9. Reception: 7-11 p.m. Sat., Aug. 10. 1137 Braddock Ave., Braddock. Free. 415-518-9921 or unsmokeartspace.com

{STAGE} It should be his dream: Don Juan returns from the Great War to a Berlin populated solely by women. But in Odon Von Horvath’s famous 1936

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF SUELLEN FITZSIMMONS}

{STAGE}

play, Don Juan Comes Back From the War, the legendary lover isn’t so lucky: Berlin’s not the same, and neither is he. Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre stages the U.S. premiere of award-winning British playwright Duncan Macmillan’s new adaptation

Organic Theater Pittsburgh brings you Scarcity. Lucy Thurber’s 2007 drama tells of an affluent, educated young woman who suddenly takes a keen interest in the potential of a teenage boy from a poor rural family. The premiere production’s admirers praised the play’s insight into domestic dynamics. Justin Zeno directs a cast including Matt Bonacci, Jaime Slavinsky and Michael Young. The show opens tonight at Pitt’s Studio Theatre; bring a pair of shoes to donate to sustainable-water nonprofit Water Step and save $5 on your ticket. BO 8 p.m. Show continues through Aug. 18. Cathedral of Learning, Forbes Avenue at Bigelow, Oakland. $15-20. www.organictheaterpgh.org

{ART}

It appears the public isn’t ready for the credits to roll on Craft Hard at Wildcard. To celebrate the extended run of this group show of crafts inspired by action movies, tonight there’s a free 7 p.m. screening of 1987 cult classic The Miami Connection. On Saturday, Wildcard welcomes Thrifted, a new show proving that one man’s trash is another man’s artwork. The Lawrenceville gallery AUG. 12 Ed Mazria will be decorated with vintage art, curated from thrift stores, flea markets and yard sales. All pieces will be for sale and all proceeds benefit the nonprofit group MGR-Youth Empowerment. OL Thrifted continues through Sept. 6. 4209 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651 or of this story of dislocation, www.wildcardpgh.com isolation and lost love. Alan Stanford directs PICT favorite David Whalen in the title role; the seven-member cast also includes Nike Doukas and {FESTIVAL} Karen Baum. The first perforBikeFest cycles ’round again. mance in the intimate Henry As usual, BikePGH’s 17-day Heymann Theatre is tonight. celebration of all things bike Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Show kicks off with a big fundraiser continues through Aug. 31. and party, tonight at the 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Pittsburgh Opera headquar$25-48. 412-561-6000 or ters. Then follows dozens of www.picttheatre.org themed rides, races, classes and

+ FRI., AUG. 09


sp otlight Rewatching Twin Peaks in recent years, Michael McGovern was reminded why the show was so refreshing when it premiered on network TV back in April 1990. “It pulls you in immediately. … It was a perfect show,” especially that first season, he says. “There was none of that formula feel.” David Lynch and Mark Frost’s series about a murder mystery in a small Northwestern town broke the mold with its oddball characters, unsettling scenes, surreal narrative and lush cinematography. On Aug. 10, the local playwright honors the critically acclaimed cult classic at his Beat Cabaret series. The Twin Peaks Show will be hosted by The Log Lady (Jennifer Schaup, pictured) and The Giant; ModernFormations Gallery will be remade as “a Twin Peaks playground.” Included are readings from the diary of Laura Palmer by actress Joanna Lowe and a reprise of one inspiration for the night: chanteuse Dessa Poljak singing “Crying,” from Mulholland Drive. (Poljak sings with Silencio, a local band inspired by music from Lynch films.) McGovern, Lowe and Richard Eckman recreate the audition scene from Mulholland Drive, and other performers (Lynch-themed or otherwise) include: poet Crystal Morgan; saxophonist Dale Mangold; and performance artist Smokifantastic. Meanwhile, Jocelyn Hillen performs as her character Candy Warhol — who, as McGovern notes, isn’t a David Lynch character, but “could be.” Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Sat., Aug. 10. 4919 Penn Ave., Garfield. $10 ($5 if you come in costume). www.modernformations.com

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more, all around the region. Highlights include the Aug. 10 Church Ride, in Homestead and McKeesport; the Aug. 11 Pinball Ride, to the PAPA championships; the Aug. 12 Exploring Urban Appalachia Ride; and rides about moonlight, public art, the Trees of Pittsburgh, the Lost Streams of Four Mile Run and more. Most events are free. BO Party: 8 p.m. (2425 Liberty Ave., Strip District; $50-125). Fest continues through Aug. 25. www.bikepgh.org

AUG. 10

{TALK}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF IAN SMITH, SURFSUP ADVENTURES}

S fS SurfSUP

+ SAT., AUG. 10 {OUTDOORS} Sorry — stand-up paddleboarding is so trendy right now that all three of today’s Venture Outdoors/SurfSUP programs are sold out. But other opportunities to explore this adventure sport are upcoming. The night of

Deer Creek Boat Launch, 2526 Wenzel Drive, Oakmont. $50. 724-989-7259 or surfsupadventures.com

{MAKING} In August, the last thing some kids want to hear about is learning. But Hive Pittsburgh

AUG. 11

is about making learning fun. At today’s Hive Pittsburgh Maker Party, you’re invited to “hang out, mess around and geek out” at Bakery Square’s TechShop. You’ll find learning stations for DIY projects in design, music, videos and more, not to mention free food and live music. Sponsors of

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Everybody likes to watch stuff blow up. So the pyrotechnists at the 2013 PGI Pyrotechnic Convention open the show to the public on four nights starting tonight. Each of the public displays at Cooper’s Lake Campgrounds includes three concerts, each starting at 4 p.m. The eclectic list of bands changes nightly and ranges from funk to folk. The music merely sets the stage, however, for each night’s extensive fireworks show, starting at 8 p.m. OL 4 p.m. Also 4 p.m. daily, Tue., Aug. 13, Wed., Aug. 14, and Fri., Aug. 16. 205 Currie Road, Slippery Rock. $35-40 per carload. 724-234-4619 or www.visitbutlercounty.com

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The 2030 District is among Pittsburgh’s more ambitious enviro-initiatives: Businessdistrict building-owners commit to reduce their usage of energy, water and transportation by half by 2030. Pittsburgh is one of just four cities with a 2030 District, and so far ours includes 100 Downtown buildings. Now, Pittsburgh’s Green Building Alliance hosts the inaugural 2030 Districts Summit. Tonight’s keynote address, at Point Park University, is open to the public, and it’s headlined by none other than Santa Fe, N.M.-based architect and 2030 Challenge founder Ed Mazria. BO 5:30-8 p.m. Lawrence Hall, 212 Wood St., Downtown. Free. Register at www.gbapgh.org.

Free. 412-622-3114 or www.carnegielibrary.org

+ THU., AUG. 15 {WORDS} In 1997, working as Human Equity through Art, poet Leslie Anne McIlroy and writer Don Morrow launched HEArt, a

AUG. 08

Making aki king ng IItt Ho H Home om m

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Photo by Matt Austin

{WORDS}

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOE MADZIARCZYK}

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+ SUN., AUG. 11

2013 3 PGI P Pyrotechnic Convention

Aug. 16, for instance, SurfSUP offers a stand-up paddleboarding yoga workshop for all skill levels. For those with more traditional cravings, SurfSUP also offers eco-tours and private instruction for whitewater SUP and creeksurfing. OL Paddleboard yoga class: 5:15 p.m. Aug. 16.

in the community in the planting and harvesting process. The walls, which are portable, are divided into planting cells. Each wall sprouts a different vegetable: The current gravitydefying crops include lettuce, Swiss chard, parsley and collard greens. Tonight, senior community organizer Jose Diaz will speak about edible walls

Operation Better Block, Inc. headquarters, in Homewood, has four edible walls. These walls are the product of the group’s urban-gardening initiative, which involves kids

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AUG. 13

Jose Diaz i and d Edible Walls

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Pittsburgh-based print quarterly devoted to wielding art for social justice. Though it published work by nationally known contributors, HEArt stopped publishing in 2002. Now it’s back, in expanded digital format. HEArt Online — “the nation’s only journal of literature and art devoted to fighting discrimination and promoting social justice” — goes live today with work by Pittsburgh’s own National Book Award-winning poet, Terrance Hayes, and poems, stories, essays, interviews, photos, visual art and music by the acclaimed likes of Tim Seibles, Jericho Brown, Sonia Sanchez, Denise Duhamel and more. A live, in-person HEArt reading series is set to begin in October, at the New Hazlett Theater. BO www.heartjournalonline.com

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN.

OFFIC OF THE P IAL DJ ITTS CELEBRAT BURGH ION!

PROUD PARTNER

www.pittsburghdjcompany.com itt b hdj

A comedic & prehistoric look at the battle of the sexes. Wed-Sun. Thru Oct. 20. Pittsburgh CLO, Downtown. 412-456-6666. FIDDLER ON THE ROOF. Thru Aug. 10. CCAC South Campus, West Mifflin. 412.469.6219. GREASE. Fri, Sat. Thru Aug. 17. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. HENRY THE V. Shakespeare’s play, presented by Poor Yorick’s Players. Aug. 9-11. Monroeville Community Park, Monroeville. 412-856-1006. ITALIAN AMERICAN RECONCILIATION. Huey Maximilian Bonfigliano wants his ex-wife back, & enlists his best friend, a confirmed bachelor, to help plead his case. Thu-Sat. Thru Aug. 10. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. JOSEPH & THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT. Thu-Sun. Thru Aug. 11. Geyer Performing Arts Center, Scottdale. 724-887-0887.

OEDIPUS & THE FOUL MESS IN THEBES. The Oedipus saga as told by Aeschylus, Sophocles & Euripides. Presented by No Name Players. Thru Aug. 17. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576. RABBIT HOLE. The story of a couple coping with the accidental death of their son. Fri-Sun. Thru Aug. 25. New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-657-9369. RETRO NUNS. Cabaret dinner theater. Presented by Pohl Productions. Fri, Sat. Thru Aug. 24. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. ROMEO & JULIET. Shakespeare in South Park. Bring blanket or lawn chair & picnic! Sat, Sun. Thru Aug. 18. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. SCARCITY. Play by Lucy Thurber exploring life on the wrong side of the tracks. Presented by Organic Theater Pittsburgh. www.organictheaterpgh.org ThuSun. Thru Aug. 18. Studio Theatre, Cathedral of Learning, Oakland. SUMMER BROADWAY REVUE. Presented by The Heritage

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

STRAUB SUNDAYS at PIPER'S PUB $2.50 12 oz. AMERICAN LAGER BOTTLES ALL DAY LONG

Traditional Sunday Supper featuring Roast Beef, Yorkshire Pudding, Pan Gravy on Whipped Potatoes and Vegetables!

WWW.STRAUBBEER.COM

Players. Aug. 14-15. Castle Shannon Borough Building, Castle Shannon. 412-254-4633. TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE. Based on the book by Mitch Albom. Thu-Sun. Thru Aug. 24. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552.

Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. TERRY JONES. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

COMEDY

SAT 10

THU 08 COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Aug. 29 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Thru Aug. 15 Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THE REVEREND BOB LEVY’S BIRTHDAY BASH! 8 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-431-4668.

THU 08 - SUN 11 PABLO FRANCISCO. Aug. 8-11 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 09

BARPROV. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Weddings, Nightclubs, Proms, Corporate Events... We’ll do our part to make it perfect.

CHAMPAGNE HIERARCHY. 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. DAVON MAGWOOD, JORDAN WEEKS, SEAN RUSH, OLIVIA TRAINI, FRANK CHEVRIER, JAKE MORISSEY (EARLY). 6 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950. DAVON MAGWOOD, JORDAN WEEKS, SHANNON NORMAN, ALEX STYPULA, OLIVIA GRACE TRAINI, BRETT JONES, JON PRIDMORE (LATE). 10 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950. HUSTLEBOT. Long-form improv from savvy veterans. 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. LIVE READ: BIG. Staged reading of the 1988 movie w/ Chris Preksta, Amy Staggs, Aaron Kleiber, Mike Rubino, more. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

MON 12 808 & WELL KNOWN STRANGERS. Mon, 9 p.m. Thru Aug. 26 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. PANIC & HOTEL NOWHERE. Mon, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 26 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 13 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 14 STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. CONTINUES ON PG. 49

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VISUAL

ART

FULL LIST ONLINE

“Devil Inside,” by Jamie Apgar, from The Insidious Collection at Trundle Manor

NEW THIS WEEK BE GALLERIES. Miniatures. Work by Caitlyn Burroughs. Opening reception Aug. 10, 5-8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. TRUNDLE MANOR. The Insidious Collection. Paintings by Jamie Apgar. Opening reception: Aug. 9, 6-11:30 p.m. & by appointment. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. WILDCARD. Thrifted. Found vintage art show, benefiting the MGR-Youth Empowerment Program. Opens Aug. 10. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

ONGOING 709 PENN GALLERY. Chris McGinnis: The Productive Machine. Multimedia exhibit. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. All Through the Night. LGBQT photography by Caldwell Linker. S/HE IS HER/E. Feat. over 100 works by Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, dating from the mid 1970s to the present. The Patron Saint of White Guys That Went

Tribal & Other Works. Work by Nick Bubash. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Art for a Hire Purpose. The Pittsburgh Society of Illustrators Exhibition Illustration Show. Downtown. 412-263-6600. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Norweigan Flow & Others, Spiritual Energy Unleashed. Paintings by Mary Ellen McShea & Elaine Bergstrom. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Mythical Tales, Flight Paths, & Figures of the Sky. Mixed media works by John Humphries. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. Seven Degrees of 7. Work by Distillery

7 Program artists Alexis Roberto, Cara Livorio, Crystala Armagost, Josh Mitchel, Elizabeth Brophy, Kate Hansen & Terrence M. Boyd. South Side. 412-381-7767. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. The Playground Project. A richly illustrated exhibition exploring the history of postwar playground design & highlighting important examples of playgrounds from the 20th century. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Off the Wall. Work by Marco Brun, Alice Winn, David Passafiume, Christopher Sprowls. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. COMMONPLACE COFFEEHOUSE. RELDmetal. Robust finger sculptures by Sarah Jane Sindler. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0404. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large India in 1972 by Albin & Virginia collection of automatic roll-played Curtze. Downtown. 412-391-4100. musical instruments and music MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection boxes in a mansion setting. includes jade and ivory statues Call for appointment. O’Hara. from China and Japan, as well 412-782-4231. as Meissen porcelain. Butler. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. 724-282-0123. Preserved materials reflecting MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY the industrial heritage of LOG HOUSE. Historic homes Southwestern PA. Homestead. open for tours, lectures and more. 412-464-4020. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home The Playground Project. Survey to more than 600 birds from exploring the history of over 200 species. With post-war playground classes, lectures, demos design & highlighting and more. North Side. important examples of 412-323-7235. playgrounds from the NATIONALITY 20th century. Oakland. ROOMS. 26 rooms www. per a p ty 412-622-3131. helping to tell the pghci m o .c CARNEGIE MUSEUM story of Pittsburgh’s OF NATURAL HISTORY. immigrant past. Garden of Light: Works by University of Pittsburgh. Paula Crevoshay. Feat. nearly Oakland. 412-624-6000. 70 fine art jewelry pieces. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church Roads of Arabia: Archaeology features 1823 pipe organ, & History of the Kingdom of Revolutionary War graves. Scott. Saudi Arabia. Archaeological 412-851-9212. materials exploring the cultural OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. history of the Arabian Peninsula. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion Ongoing: Earth Revealed, site features log house, blacksmith Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. shop & gardens. South Park. Oakland. 412-622-3131. 412-835-1554. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY BIKES: Science on Two Wheels. MUSEUM. Trolley rides and Feat. hands-on activities, exhibits. Includes displays, walking demonstrations & a collection of tours, gift shop, picnic area and historic, rare, & peculiar bicycles. Trolley Theatre. Washington. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome 724-228-9256. (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin CONTINUES ON PG. 50 submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. Ligonier. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. SUNDAY AUG 11 Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and DJ MASTER MIKE (96.9) American Revolution. Downtown. 50/50 • Miller Lite Girls 412-281-9285. Outdoor Grill • 5PM-? FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with EVERY SATURDAY classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the FRI & SAT 3-9PM surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. BABYBACK RIBS Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. BBQ CHICKEN • KABOBS KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, Best in da ‘Burgh! middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. The Silk Road. Photo exhibition of 412-646-4570 images taken along the Silk Road in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal &

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PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Glass art surrounded by colorful blooms. Feat. work by Daviea Davis, Jason Forck, Steven Sadvary, Lisa Platt, more. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Lifeforms. Exhibition of natural imagery in lampworked glass. Curated by Robert Mickelsen. Friendship. 412-365-2145. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pennsylvania’s Civil War. In-depth look at Pennsylvania’s significant contributions during the Civil War feat. artifacts, military encampments, life-like museum figures, more. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. Scottdale. 724-887-7910.

FESTIVALS THU 08

ART IN THE PARK. Food, music, vendors, more. Thu, 6-8:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 29 Penn Avenue Parklet, Wilkinsburg. 412-727-7855.

THU 08 - SAT 10 65TH ANNUAL BUTLER FARM SHOW. Farming exhibits, tractor pulls, crafts, rides, food, more. Thru Aug. 10 Butler Farm Show Grounds, Butler. 724-482-4000.

THU 08 - SUN 11

ST. RAPHAEL’S BAZAAR. Games, Polish & Italian foods, live music, flea market, Chinese auction, bingo, more. Thru Aug. 11 St.

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of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pigment & Silver. Photography by Ellen Bjerklie-Hanna, A. Jason Coleman, Danielle Goshay, Brenda Roger, & Cynthia Zordich. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. The Clayton Days, Revisited: A Project by Vik Muniz. Feat. his 65-photo collection. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Obscuro Bezango! Work by Thomas Rehm, Elmore “Buzz” Buzzizyk, & Maximum Traffic. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. RetroFRESH. Contemporary paintings by James Kennedy, Claire Hardy, Donald Deskey, Alexander Minewski, Louise Evans-Scott, Vladimir Naiditch, & Henri de Waroquier. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Energetic Escapes. Work by Scott Hunter & Blake Anthony. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Ghost Feeding Arena. New works by Leslie Minnis. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Prelude & Fugue (A Game of Pairs). Photography by Richard Stoner. Greensburg. 724-837-6791.

Raphael Church, Morningside. 412-661-3100.

FRI 09 - WED 14

BIKEFEST. Various rides & activities citywide. Benefits Bike Pittsburgh. bikepgh.org Aug. 9-25 412-325-4334.

DANCE FRI 09 SIDRA BELL DANCE NEW YORK. Residency performance. 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000.

FUNDRAISERS FRI 09 GENDER DANCES BENEFIT. Performances by drag queens & kings from across the region.

HILLMAN CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS. Low Tides & Bucolic Daze. Hand painted photography by Rosemary Pipitone. Fox Chapel. 412-968-3045. INTERNATIONAL IMAGES. The New Art of Wen Gao. Sewickley. 412-741-3036. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Automata, a Kinetic Art Show. Work by Zac Coffin, Nick Romero, Alberto Almareza, Katy Dement, T.R. Reed, Jeannie Holland, Sylvia Cross, more. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Graphically Popular. Wood panel paintings by David Wallace. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Perspective 2013: A Photography Exhibition. Robinson. 412-788-0816. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Dear Universe: New Encaustic Works by Benedict Oddi. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Glassweekend ‘13. Work by Rhoda Baer, John de Wit, Jon Goldberg, Mikyoung Jung, Catherine Labonte, Matthew Perez, Erica Rosenfeld, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Steel Wool. A show of rogue needlepoint. Bloomfield. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Hand Tinted Vintage Photographs. Hand tinted black & white

photographs on tin, paper & glass. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Fiberart International 2013. Juried exhibition of contemporary fiber art. Presented by the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh. 30:2. Group exhibition presented by Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Coming Home. Fabric installation by Kay Healy. Friday Nights at Guitar Center. Work by Allison Kaufman. Rites of Passage. Oil paintings by Maggie Mills. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Carrie Furnaces: Contemporary Views. A collaborative exhibition curated from an open call for entries of images taken at the historic blast furnace. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Art Interprets Alzheimer’s. Work by George Roby & Herbert Ascherman, Jr. Downtown. 412-261-7003. U.S. POST OFFICE & COURTHOUSE. Whitehall Arts Courthouse Exhibit. Paintings by Whitehall Arts members. Downtown. 412-561-4000. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. data.tron. Installation by Ryoji Ikeda. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

Benefits the Gender Dances documentary. 9 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-301-8242. SRU ALUMNI & FRIENDS GOLF OPEN. Benefits student scholarships. http:// www.rockalumnicafe.com/sruopen Oakview Golf Club, Slippery Rock. 724-738-2768.

Garfield. 412-361-3022. A CELEBRATION OF HAITI. Sale of art, handmade Haitian wares, more. Benefits the College Mixte DeVaise Pamphile, Haiti. 4-7 p.m. Christine Frechard Gallery, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888.

SUN 11

TUE 13

19TH ANNUAL ICE CREAM FUNDAE. Radio Disney broadcast, ice cream stations, VIP dinner, more. Benefits Pressley Ridge. 6:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, Highland Park. 412-872-9400. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center,

POLITICS GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

LITERARY THU 08 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK


CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITING WORKSHOP. All genres welcome. Every other Thu The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-874-7191. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Express Burlesque at Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown CRITIC: Taylor Couch, 25, a

BRIDGE: LIVE STORYTELLING W/ A SOUNDTRACK. Storytelling w/ a live band. Hosted by Derek Minto. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. LET’S READ ENGLISH. Book club for non-native English speakers. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SHAINA BAZYK & DEENA NOVEMBER. Mad Fridays Reading Series. Delanie’s Coffee, South Side. 412-927-4030. WRITERS’ OPEN MIC NIGHT. All genres of written/spoken word welcome. Second Fri of every month, 7-9 p.m. Reads Ink Bookshop, Vandergrift. 724-567-7236.

SAT 10 PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

MON 12 FINALLY BE FRIENDS BOOK TOUR. Poetry by Nick Sturm & Carrie Lorig. 5:30 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827.

WHEN: Sat.,

Aug. 03

B Y O L IV IA L AMME L

KIDSTUFF THU 08 DOG DAYS OF SUMMER W/ WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA HUMANE SOCIETY. Learn about therapy dogs. 1-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. LISTEN & RESPONSE. Listening experiments w/ music, noise & other sounds. Thru Aug. 8 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 08 - WED 14

FULL LIST E N O LwIN w.

FRI 09

WED 14

FRI 09 - SUN 11

PLAY W/ CLAY AT THE HANDBUILDING TABLE. Ages 3+. Mon, 12-2 p.m. Thru Aug. 26 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

WED 14

There was a troupe of five women on a stage and a live drummer, which was really fun. The rhythm was pounding the whole time. The music was modern, lots of modern club-style songs, and there were a couple of throwback songs, like they did “Roxanne,” by The Police, which is more of a classic. It was definitely a type of burlesque. There was a disco ball spinning and the lights were changing all the time and the dancers came into the audience and walked down the main aisle, you know, modern glamour. There are other types that are more retro, more like a vaudeville style of burlesque. This definitely gives it a 21st-century vibe. But I was impressed. They obviously were having a lot of fun and that’s really the point of burlesque, so it lived up to its name, I think.

ADVENTURES W/ CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG. 9-foot tall Clifford w/ tail slide, build a w r e p a p sandcastle on T-Bone’s HARD TIMES BLUES pghcitym o .c beach, play instruments TOUR. Readings by Elwin in the Musical Marina, Cotman, Dan Parme, & more. Thru Sept. 1 Children’s Jess Simms. 7 p.m. East End Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-322-5058. 412-687-1780. BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! swing set, sandbox, solar-powered Practice conversational English. instruments, more. Ongoing Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. North Side. 412-322-5058. MT. LEBANON WRITER’S GROUP. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. COOK IT! Interactive cooking 412-531-1912. demos w/ Chef Angelo. 1 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. MYTH ADVENTURES: FIVE 412-622-3116.

TUE 13

MON 12

nonprofit administrator from Bloomfield

FRI 09

2-5 p.m. Wingfield Pines, Upper St. Clair. 412-741-2750. MAKESHOP: BUILD A PITCHING MACHINE. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. PLAY W/ CLAY ON THE POTTER’S WHEEL. Ages 3+. Sun. Thru Aug. 25 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

GREEK CLASSICS. Presented by Theatre Factory KidWorks. Fri-Sun. Thru Aug. 11 The Theatre Factory, Trafford. 412-374-9200.

SAT 10 BACK-TO-SCHOOL BASH. Free haircuts, dental & vision screenings, fire truck tours, crafts, more. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Allegheny Valley Salvation Army, Brackenridge. 724-224-6310 x 2. BACK-TO-SCHOOL FASHION SHOW. Special guest: Calum Worthy 1-4 p.m. Mall at Robinson. 412-788-0819. GOSPEL XPLOSION. Gospel performance by Iron Cross Ministries, face painting, door prizes, more. 2-5 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. KINDERGARTEN..HERE I COME! Celebrate the transition from preschool to kindergarten w/ storytellers, activities, Mr. McFeely, more. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. PRINCESS CRUISE. 11 a.m. Gateway Clipper Fleet, Station Square. 412-266-4268. STAR WARS DAY. Make your own light saber, trivia contest, more. Costumes welcome. 12-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

SUN 11 LAST ROMP OF SUMMER. Mini hike, scavenger hunt, more.

NEVER SAY UGH TO A BUG. Puppets, stories, & learning fun about insects. Ages 3-6. 10:30 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. VIBRATION & ART. Aug. 14-15 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

OUTSIDE FRI 09 - SAT 10 MINGO CREEK PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. Aug. 9-10, 8 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory, Finleyville. 724-348-6150. WAGMAN OBSERVATORY PUBLIC STAR PARTY Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. Aug. 9-10, 8:25 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Frazier. 724-224-2510.

SAT 10 - SUN 11

Real hook ups, real fast.

KAYAKING DISCOVERY COURSE. Presented by L.L.Bean. Sat, Sun, 10-11:30 a.m. Thru Oct. 13 North Park, Allison Park. 412-318-1200.

SUN 11 BOOM & BLAST FIREWORKS EXTRAVAGANZA. Presented by Pyrotechnics Guild International. Tue, Wed, Fri, Sun, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 16 Cooper’s Lake Campground, Slippery Rock. 1-866-856-8444. PERSEID METEOR SHOWER VIEWING EVENT. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. 8 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory, Finleyville. 724-348-6150. SHRUB HIKE. Learn about folklore, history, uses & how to identify common shrubs. 2 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park, Hookstown. 724-899-3611.

Free

TRY FOR

TUE 13 - WED 14 BOOM & BLAST FIREWORKS EXTRAVAGANZA. Presented by Pyrotechnics Guild International. Tue, Wed, Fri, Sun, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 16 Cooper’s Lake Campground, Slippery Rock. 1-866-856-8444.

Try it Free!

412.566.1861

WED 14 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 Ahora en Español 18+

CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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U T E O G L N I S inner Club D

ADVENTURES IN DINING with the

GAY COMMUNITY Great Food t People Grea Great Fun Dont Miss This Remarkableience! Dining Exper osphere. Warm, Relaxed Atm

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OTHER STUFF THU 08 BUYING A HOME: FOR BEGINNERS. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. Interactive games, hosted by Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every

month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. WILKINSBURG FARMERS’ MARKET. 732 Ross Ave., Wilkinsburg. Thu, 3-6 p.m. Thru Nov. 21 412-727-7855.

[POETRY] OETRY]

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013

in increasing wolf. I want to rent out ves. your respiratory system with my airwaves. apes Call me a man and I’ll fill you with mixtapes until you dance the feedback out of me. arus! My actions are excessive! Ice cream in Belarus! October in a tree! Some precise blur

THU 08 - WED 14 THE ARTFUL GARDEN CRAFT SHOW. Handmade jewelry, paintings, photography, fabric & paper crafts, wood carvings, more. Mon-Sat, 12-4 p.m. Thru Aug. 17 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622.

FRI 09

CARNEGIE CRAWL. Street performers, restaurant tastings, more. Second Fri of every month, 5-8 p.m. Thru Aug. 9 Downtown Carnegie. 412-279-5456. GLOBAL DIVERSITY FEST. Live music, food, more. Hosted by Vibrant Pittsburgh. 6-10 p.m. South Park Amphitheater, South Park. 412-281-8600. NATIVE AMERICAN COOKING IN PENNSYLVANIA. Day-long cooking workshop. 11 a.m.4 p.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-532-1935. TCHAIKOVSKY: HIS LIFE & MUSIC. Multi-media lecture on the life & music of Peter Tchaikovsky. Fri, 10 a.m. Thru Aug. 23 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

instructs me. That’s how I wrote this, ssel. hovering above the desert in a motionless vessel. I put a giraffe in a boat and laugh. Thinking about it isn’t going to help. FROM “I FEEL YES,” BY NICK STURM M

Hear Nick Sturm read — along with Carrie Lorig — when they bring their Finally Be Friends East Coast book tour to Wigle Whiskey. Local poet Robert Yune also appears. 5 p.m. Mon., Aug. 12. 2401 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-224-2827

McCandless. 412-366-8100 x 108. INCLINE HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at the bottom of the Monongahela Incline. Sat. Thru Oct. 26 412-302-5223. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Korean grammar & basic conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ANTIQUE GUN SHOW. 9 a.m.KOREAN II. For those who already 4 p.m. Harmony Museum, have a basic understanding of Harmony. 724-452-7341. Korean & are interested in BOWKA FITNESS @ increasing proficiency. THE LIBRARY. 2:30 p.m. Sat Carnegie Library, Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. Downtown. SATURDAY NIGHT 412-281-7141. SALSA CRAZE. Free . w w w lessons, followed by THE CALIFORNIA r citypape h g p dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. MARKETS. Open-air .com La Cucina Flegrea, market. California Ave. Downtown. 412-708-8844. at Brighton Heights Blvd., SCOTTISH COUNTRY Brighton Heights. Second Sat of DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., every month, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Thru social dancing follows. No partner Sept. 14 215-828-9060. needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, DOWNTOWN HAUNTED 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, WALKING TOUR. Begins at City Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. County Building, Downtown. Sat. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE Thru Aug. 31 412-302-5223. EACH ONE TEACH ONE MUSIC & SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic RADIO CONFERENCE. Musicians, performances. Second Sat of every arts advocates, policymakers, technologists, media representatives month Spinning Plate Gallery, & industry figures discuss issues Friendship. 412-441-0194. at the intersection of music, SPANISH CONVERSATION technology, policy & law. 10 a.m.GROUP. Friendly, informal. At 4 p.m. BGC Community Activity the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, Center, Garfield. 412-731-0424. 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target - East Liberty, FOOD TRUCK ROUND-UP. East Liberty. 412-362-6108. Food party in the parking lot STEEL CITY ROLLER DERBY. vs. feat. Pittsburgh Pierogi Truck, The Ohio Roller Girls. 6 p.m. Romp Fukuda, BRGR, Franktuary, more. & Roll Skating Rink, Glenshaw. 12-5 p.m. Northland Public Library, 412-486-4117.

SAT 10

BUXOM XXX STAR

I want w to be delirious as a cheerleader full of candy! To express myself

FULL LIST E N O LIN

SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. THE TWIN PEAKS SHOW. Feat. readings from Laura Palmer’s diary, scene recreations from Mulholland Dr., musical performances, more. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274.

SAT 10 - SUN 11 CONFLICT ON THE VENANGO. Battle re-enactments, vendors, more. Aug. 10-11 The Old Stone House, Slippery Rock. 724-738-4964.

SUN 11 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES SALE. 7:30 a.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-532-1935. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. Sun. Thru Aug. 11 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. CANONSBURG SUNDAY CAR CRUISE. Sun, 1-5 p.m. Thru Sept. 22 The Handle Bar & Grille, Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. PITTSBURGH REPTILE SHOW & SALE. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Futules’ Harmar House, Cheswick. 724-516-0441.


SUMMER WINEFEST. Wine tastings, live music, food vendors, more. 12-5 p.m. Ripepi Winery & Vineyard, Monongahela. 724-292-8351. UKULELE GROUP. 5 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

MON 12

THE DEN. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

MON 12 - WED 14 NORTH COUNTRY TRAIL ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE. Hikes, workshops, caving, museum visits, more. Aug. 12-17 Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock. 724-290-4141.

TUE 13 PUBLIC ART BIKE TOUR: NORTH SHORE TO MILLVALE. 6-8 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-391-2060 x 237.

WED 14 AARP JOB RECRUITMENT EVENT. Ages 55+. 10 a.m.12 p.m. Eastside Neighborhood Employment Center, Garfield. 412-362-8580. CREATIVE CONNECTIONS. For Seniors only. Wed, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS GOTHAM ON STAGE. Auditions for ristretto stiletto. Aug. 10-11. Men/women age 30-40 & 1 African American bald man, 2-min. comedic monologue. auditions. ristrettostiletto@yahoo.com East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800. THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Fall

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auditions for talented 8th grade-12th grade singers for the 2013 season. Aug. 26-27. Email or call MaryColleen. mcseip@ themendelssohn.org. Westminster Presbyterian Church, Upper St. Clair. 724-263-5259. LATSHAW PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for male singers & female dancers, ages 18+ to perform in 2 upcoming touring shows, “American Bandstand” & “Christmas Memories”. Call for information. 724-853-4050. THE MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Fall auditions for all voice parts. Aug. 14-15. Those interested in scheduling an audition should review the audition criteria at www.the mendelssohn.org. Email Mary Colleen at mcseip@themendelssohn. org or call. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 724-263-5259. MON RIVER ARTS. Auditions for The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. Aug. 10. Ages 16+, cold readings & contemporary musical theater number. Call for appointment. monriverarts.org. Grand Theatre, Elizabeth. 412-384-0504.

musical experience levels. Current members are high school & college students & community members. No audition, fees or tuition are required to join. Email bookerr@ wccc.edu or call for information. 724-925-5976. WESTMORELAND YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PHILHARMONIC. Auditions for fall season. Aug. 21 & 25. Open to area high school & college string, woodwind, brass & percussion players. www.westmoreland symphony.org Seton Hill University, Greensburg. 724-837-1850.

SUBMISSIONS BLAST FURNACE. Seeking submissions for Volume 3, Issue 3. Theme is “prized possessions,” tangible or otherwise. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems. blastfurnace.submittable.com/Submit THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Seeking non-traditional 2-D &

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

ALLEGHENY AQUATIC ALLIANCE

In 2000, Connoquenessing Creek was rated America’s second-most polluted small waterway, and it remains clogged with refuse today. Volunteers are needed for Allegheny Aquatic Alliance’s Second Annual Connoquenessing Creek Clean-Up Celebration, on Sat., Aug. 10. The all-day clean-up — which runs from Zelienople to the Butler city limits — starts at 8 a.m., and finishes with music and food. For information, call 724371-0416 or email alleghenyaquaticalliance@hotmail.com. NEW CASTLE PLAYHOUSE. Auditions for Tick Tick .. BOOM! August 12-13. Seeking 2 males (age 25-33), 1 female (age 25-33). Call or email info@newcastleplayhouse. org New Castle. 724-654-3437. PRIME STAGE. Auditions for Turn of the Screw. Sep. 7-8. Seeking adult non-equity actors for the roles. SAG-AFTRA actors are also encouraged to audition. Prepare a 2-minute dramatic monologue using a British dialect. To schedule a time & for more information visit www.primestage.com. The Oakland School, Oakland. SOUTH HILLS CHORALE. Holding auditions for all singing parts starting August 19. Repertoire ranges from popular to classical selections. Concerts in December & April. Rehearsals are held Monday evenings in Mt. Lebanon. For information/ to schedule an audition time, call or email southhillschorale@gmail.com. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-780-9336. WCCC BAND & CHOIR. Seeking singers & instrumentalist musicians for its community choir & band. Open to individuals of all ages &

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3-D work for upcoming juried art exhibit Different Dimensions: The Unpainting Exhibit. CD submissions only. Prospectus at www.greensburgartcenter.org/. 724-837-6791. THE NEW YINZER. Online magazine seeking book reviewers, writers & artists to submit original essays, fiction, poetry, artwork, & photographs as well as pitched ideas for possible contributions. Visit www. newyinzer.com for current issue. Email all submissions/inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. wewuvpoetry@hotmail.com WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking individual artists & artist groups for month-long exhibitions in a new transitional gallery measuring. Artists will be responsible for all aspects of their exhibition. Send images & a brief introduction to the work to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

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advertise your business in pittsburgh city paper

412.316.3342

BOBblehead n.

A person who moves their head up and down to the music of BOB FM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a 25-year-old male. After a tragic set of circumstances, I am now the legal guardian of my 15-year-old brother. He’s gay. Fortunately, our parents took care of “the talk” and taught him how to use condoms. Unfortunately, he has started dating a senior who is about to turn 18 and is a fucking sleazeball. You know the type: entitled, narcissistic, drives a BMW paid for by rich parents. This asshole grabs my brother’s ass or says disgusting things like “You really look fuckable in those jeans.” I told him to stop, and he just replied, “Sorry, I can’t keep my hands off such a hottie.” My parents would probably know what to do, but they’re dead. I don’t think he’s mature enough to be in a sexual relationship, but I’m fairly sure he is sexually active. I told him that he couldn’t see his boyfriend anymore, but he has continued to see him behind my back and now doesn’t tell me anything going on with his life. As a parent yourself, what would you do? NEW PARENT NEEDS HELP

I’m so sorry about the tragedy that befell your family. You deserve nothing but praise for taking your brother in and taking him on. That said … You don’t need to round your brother’s boyfriend up to 18 — you don’t need to round him up to “statutory rapist” — to make him sound like an asshole. He sounds like a big enough asshole at age 17. But there’s nothing inappropriate about a 17-year-old dating a 15-year-old. You may be tempted to alert the authorities after your brother’s asshole boyfriend (BAB) turns 18, but your state’s age-of-consent laws treat sex between a minor and an adult differently if the adult is within three years of the minor’s age. It’s also entirely appropriate for a 17-year-old gay boy to grab his 15-year-old boyfriend’s ass, and to tell boyfriend that he looks fuckable in his jeans. But it is insanely inappropriate to do those things in front of his boyfriend’s parent or guardian. Speak up when BAB behaves like an asshole in front of you. If the asshole doesn’t listen, ask him to leave. It’s your house and you make the rules. But resist the urge to make unenforceable rules like “You may not see this guy.” That will only undermine your authority while driving them into each other’s arms. Worse, if your brother isn’t supposed to be seeing this guy, he won’t feel comfortable turning to you for advice if BAB is pressuring him to do anything dangerous. Your brother needs to be able to talk about his relationship with you. He can’t do that if he’s not supposed to be in that relationship. And take comfort: If BAB is as shallow as you make him sound, odds are he’ll tire of your brother soon enough and move on to the next hot piece of ass who’s impressed by his BMW.

about, but some things happened when we were so young that we’re not sure about. My bro says he’s had dreams throughout his life — many more of them lately — about a cock in his mouth. He’s hetero and has been married for more than 20 years. He wonders if other straight men have dreams like this or if it is some manifestation of the abuse. Do straight men ever have dreams of a cock in their mouth? Or is it odd? THE BROTHERS GRIM

“I am very sorry for TBG’s loss, as complicated as it is,” said Dr. James Cantor, a psychologist and editor-in-chief of Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment. “The quick answer to his question: Although it is unusual, having dreams like that does not, by itself, mean a man is gay or otherwise into penises. Although there haven’t been any formal surveys, gay men usually dream (and fantasize while masturbating) about men in general: muscles and faces, celebrities and crushes, favorite sex acts, etc. I haven’t heard a gay man — friend or client — describe dreams restricted lifelong to just penis-in-mouth.” Dr. Cantor offers a caveat: “For a long time, many folks believed that such dreams were repressed memories trying to surface. But there was never any good evidence for it. In fact, a great deal of harm has been done by well-meaning ‘therapists’ who wound up creating false memories of abuse and destroying whole families.” So for the record: “Having such dreams, by itself, does not mean a person was abused.” What is odd, however, is the long-standing, repetitive nature of the dreams. Dreams “can suggest that there is something on his mind,” said Dr. Cantor. “If life is going generally well, and this is just a harmless eccentricity, so be it. If, however, your brother is experiencing more general distress, then that distress — whether fallout from childhood abuse, from the death of your father or something else — could be targeted with a bona fide, licensed therapist. Complicated situations like yours almost always involve multiple strong and conflicting emotions. Because you say lots of stuff (other than these dreams) is coming up for you both, an objective outsider/listener can help in sorting it out.”

RESIST THE URGE TO MAKE UNENFORCEABLE RULES LIKE “YOU MAY NOT SEE THIS GUY.” THAT WILL ONLY UNDERMINE YOUR AUTHORITY

My dad just died. He was a pedophile. A lot of stuff is coming up for my brother and me now. There are things he did that we know

What do you say to a college-age brother who tells you more about his sex life than you want to hear? He was a late bloomer, he’s kind of insecure and I think he’s excited to be doing well socially and sexually. But I don’t want to hear about it anymore. BROTHERLY BOUNDARIES

“There are two kinds of guys in the world, bro. Guys who can’t stop talking about all the pussy they’re getting, and guys who’re actually getting all sorts of pussy.” This week on the Savage Lovecast, Dan interviews feminist blogger Amanda Marcotte on the hysteria surrounding female sexuality and hookup culture on college campuses. Find it at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE


Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

08.07-08.14

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Last year a young Nebraskan entrepreneur changed his name from Tyler Gold to Tyrannosaurus Rex Gold. He said it was a way of giving him greater name recognition as he worked to build his career. Do you have any interest in making a bold move like that, Leo? The coming weeks would be a good time for you to think about adding a new twist to your nickname or title or self-image. But I recommend something less sensationalistic and more in line with the qualities you’d actually like to cultivate in the future. I’m thinking of something like Laughing Tiger or Lucky Lion or Wily Wildcat.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): African-American jazz singer Billie Holiday was the great-granddaughter of a slave. By the time she was born, in 1915, black people in the American South were no longer “owned” by white “masters,” but their predicament was still extreme. Racism was acute and debilitating. Here’s what Billie wrote in her autobiography: “You can be up to your boobies in white satin, with gardenias in your hair and no sugar cane for miles, but you can still be working on a plantation.” Nothing you experience is remotely as oppressive as what Billie experienced, Virgo. But I’m wondering if you might suffer from a milder version of it. Is any part of you oppressed and inhibited even though your outward circumstances are technically unconstrained? If so, now’s the time to push for more freedom.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): What resounding triumphs and subtle transformations have you accomplished since your last birthday? How have you grown and changed? Are there

any ways you have dwindled or drooped? The next few weeks will be an excellent time to take inventory of these things. Your own evaluations will be most important, of course. You’ve got to be the ultimate judge of your own character. But you should also solicit the feedback of people you trust. They may be able to help you see clues you’ve missed. If, after weighing all the evidence, you decide you’re pleased with how your life has unfolded these past 10 to 11 months, I suggest you celebrate your success. Throw yourself a party or buy yourself a reward or climb to the top of a mountain and unleash a victory cry.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Monmouth Park in New Jersey hosts regular horse races from May through November. During one such event in 2010, a horse named Thewifenoseeverything finished first, just ahead of another nag named Thewifedoesntknow. I suspect that there’ll be a comparable outcome in your life sometime soon. Revelation will trump secrecy. Whoever is hiding information will

lose out to anyone who sees and expresses the truth. I advise you to bet on the option that’s forthcoming and communicative, not the one that’s furtive and withholding.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You have both a poetic and a cosmic license to stretch yourself further. It’s best not to go too far, of course. You should stop yourself before you obliterate all boundaries and break all taboos and smash all precedents. But you’ve certainly got the blessings of fate if you seek to disregard some boundaries and shatter some taboos and outgrow some precedents. While you’re at it, you might also want to shed a few pinched expectations and escape an irrelevant limitation or two. It’s time to get as big and brave and brazen as you dare.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): When I was 19, a thug shot me in the butt with a shotgun at close range. To this day, my body contains the 43 pellets he pumped into me. They have caused some minor health problems, and I’m always queasy when I see a gun. But I don’t experience any routine suffering from the wound. Its original impact no longer plagues me. What’s your own personal equivalent of my trauma, Capricorn? A sickness that racked you when you were young? A difficult break-up with your first love? The death of someone you cared about? Whatever it was, I suspect you now have the power to reach a new level of freedom from that old pain.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):    

  

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you. wyep.org

Want to take full advantage of the sexy vibes that are swirling around in your vicinity? One thing you could do is whisper the following provocations in the ear of anyone who would respond well to a dose of boisterous magic: 1) “Corrupt me with your raw purity, baby; beguile me with your raucous honesty.” 2) “I finally figured out that one of the keys to eternal happiness is to be easily amused. Want me to show you how that works?” 3) “I dare you to quench my thirst for spiritual sensuality.” 4) “Let’s trade clothes and pretend we’re each other’s higher selves.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Some people put their faith in religion or science or political ideologies. English novelist J.G. Ballard placed his faith elsewhere: in the imagination. “I believe in the power of the imagination to remake the world,” he wrote, “to release the truth within us, to hold back the night, to transcend death, to charm motorways, to ingratiate ourselves with birds, to enlist the confidences of madmen.” As you make your adjustments and reconfigure your plans, Pisces, I suggest you put your faith where Ballard did. Your imagination is far more potent and dynamic than you realize — especially right now.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “You have to participate relentlessly in the manifestation of your own blessings,” says author Elizabeth Gilbert. I recommend that you experiment with this subversive idea, Aries. Just for a week, see what happens if you devote yourself to making yourself feel really good. I mean risk going to extremes as you pursue happiness with focused zeal. Try this: Draw up a list of experiences that you know will give you intense pleasure, and indulge in them all without apology. And please don’t fret about the possible consequences of getting crazed with joy. Be assured that the cosmos is providing you with more slack than usual.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “I am not washed and beautiful, in control of a shining world in which everything fits,” writes Taurus author Annie Dillard, “but instead am wandering awed about on a splintered wreck I’ve come to care for, whose gnawed trees breathe a delicate air.” I recommend you try on her perspective for size. For now, just forget about scrambling after perfection. At least temporarily, surrender any longing you might have for smooth propriety. Be willing to live without neat containment and polite decorum. Instead, be easy and breezy. Feel a generous acceptance for the messy beauty you’re embedded in. Love your life exactly as it is, with all of its paradoxes and mysteries.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Studies show that when you’re driving a car, your safest speed is five miles per hour higher than the average rate of traffic. Faster than that, though, and the danger level rises. Traveling more slowly than everyone else on the road also increases your risk of having an accident. Applying these ideas metaphorically, I’d like to suggest you take a similar approach as you weave your way through life’s challenges in the coming week. Don’t dawdle and plod. Move a little swifter than everyone else, but don’t race along at a breakneck pace.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

The key theme this week is relaxed intensification. Your assignment, should you choose to accept it, is to heighten and strengthen your devotion to things that are important to you — but in ways that make you feel more serene and self-possessed. To accomplish this, you will have to ignore the conventional wisdom, which falsely asserts that going deeper and giving more of yourself require you to increase your stress levels. You do indeed have a great potential for going deeper and giving more of yourself, but only if you also become more at peace with yourself and more at home in the world. Make a guess about where you’ll be and what you’ll be doing ten years from today. Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013


FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 57 + STUDIES 59 + WELLNESS 60 + SERVICES 62 + LIVE 62

WORK

RN

HELP WANTED

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Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

Paid In Advance! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-station. com (AAN CAN)

• Current RN licensure • Experience with pediatrics/children • Strong verbal/written communication skills • Background checks (child abuse, criminal, FBI)

Carpenter Wanted for carpentry work, Drivers license required. 412-488-2811 Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. Call 412.316.3342

ARMOR SECURITY TRAINING INSTITUTE

Steel City Media, Attn: Chris Kohan, 650 Smithfield Street, Suite # 2200. PGH., PA 15222 or c.kohan@steelcitymedia.com No phone calls please. EOE.

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RESTAURANT

• Must have own transportation.

www.lethalweapons.state.pa.us

• Backgrounds will be checked.

State Police Approval Letter Required

• LOAD and UNLOAD trailers, scan boxes, etc.

ALL POSITIONS Apply In Person 125 W.Station Square Drive

Steel City Media is seeking F/T A.E. FOR WRRK and WLTJ radio. 2 yrs min. sales experience, possess excellent verbal skills & a self-starter. Requires own vehicle and auto insurance. Submit resume or email:

Looking for workers for warehouse

Now Hiring

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE WANTED!

Act 235 Courses September 14,15 and 26-28 Renewal Classes: September 26th

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

Position requirements include:

Please send resumes by August 23, 2013 to: COTRAIC HR 120 Charles St. Pittsburgh, PA 15238 Or email: tweimer@cotraic.org

CONSTRUCTION

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Early Head Start program in Allegheny County is seeking a health coordinator.

724-728-8029 3645 Brodhead Rd Monaca, PA 15061

Stafford St. Pittsburgh, PA 15204

Have You Always Wanted to Work For

We are NOW HIRING for the position of Classified Advertising Representative. Previous inside sales/ customer service experience is preferred. Pittsburgh City Paper offers a competitive wage and incentive package, medical + 401K. If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding career opportunity please forward resume to Andrea James. E-mail: andreaj@steelcitymedia.com Fax: 412-316-3388 Steel City Media

For more information please contact

704-430-7832 or 857-241-6495

Registration Necessary THREE WEEKS Prior to the First Day of Class

If the answer is YES then we have a position for you!!!

Classified Advertising Manager Pittsburgh City Paper 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222 Pittsburgh City Paper is an equal opportunity employer. mployer.

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

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STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

VAGINAL DRYNESS

CLINICAL STUDIES

(UPMC Oakland)

ENDOMETRIOSIS? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

HIGH CHOLESTEROL

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

People with Current Cold Sore or Canker Sore needed for a Research study

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

See what our clients are saying been very In the past two years, I’ve ads and our of ign des the satisfied with both n I know I have Whe ke. evo they e ons the resp subjects in the 24-35 to advertise for research k of using the City thin tely edia imm I p, age grou Paper.

This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions. Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart.

DO YOU HAVE A CHRONIC COUGH, SHORTNESS OF BREATH, OR DIFFICULTY BREATHING? Have you been diagnosed with chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) A research study is being conducted in your area for an investigational inhaled medication for COPD. If you are a current or ex-smoker and 40 years of age or older you may qualify to participate.

Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100. Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

For more information, please call 412-246-6367

— Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

All study-related care is provided at no charge, including physical exams, lab tests, and study medication. Compensation for time and travel may be available for those who qualify.

PLEASE CALL

412.650.6155

! ! ! R E M M U S H CAS IN ON

Novum Pharmaceutical Research Services, one of the leading research companies in the testing of generic medications, has a GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR YOU to earn up to $600 just by participating in our Outpatient Research Study!

YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE TO PARTICIPATE IF YOU ARE: • At least 18 years of age • In general good health • Drug-Free • Willing to make short visits to our facility (no overnight stays)

CALL OUR RECRUITING DEPARTMENT TODAY AT

1.800.586.0365

5900 Penn Avenue // Pittsburgh, PA 15206

Learn more at www.GoNovum.com N E W S

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WELLNESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

MIND & BODY Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Zhangs Wellness Center

New Young Professional Free Table Shower w/60 min. Open 10-10 Daily 4309 Butler Street

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

DOWNTOWN 322 Fourth Ave.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

(1st Floor)

massage Therapy

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(Lawrenceville)

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Chinese Bodyworks STAR

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

Superior Chinese Massage

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

China Massage $50/HR Free Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

724-519-7896

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

THIS SPACE! call 412.316.3342

Call Today to Advertise Your Business in Pittsburgh City Paper!

Credit Cards Accepted

GRAND OPENING!

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

Judy’s Oriental Massage

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr Now with Vichy Shower 4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

412-595-8077

Accepting All Major Cards

Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013

Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Xin Sui Bodyworks

412-316-3342

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GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

412-401-4110 $40/hr

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Phoenix Spa

TIGER SPA

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111


get your yoga on!

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

WEIGHTLOSS TREATMENT

Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Adipex based weight loss No Long Term Contract

JADE

No Start Up Fee

Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

355 Fifth Ave Suite 1120 Pgh, PA 15222 412-680-2064

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

Flexible Hours Including Mornings

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL NOW IN SQUIRREL HILL!

Call Today to Advertise Your Business in Pittsburgh City Paper!

Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

J&S GLASS

Health Services

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

NO WAIT LIST

Water Pipes And Glass W lass las For All Your Smoking Needs

SUBOXONE

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop

MONROEVILLE, PA

1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg

412-380-0100

FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

www.myjadewellness.com

We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug Addictions

LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116

412-316-3342 N E W S

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SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENTS Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) Advertise your business or product in alternative papers across the U.S. for just $995/ week. New advertiser discount “Buy 3 Weeks, Get 1 Free” www. altweeklies.com/ads (AAN CAN) NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

ANNOUNCEMENTS REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! A whole-home Satellite system installed at NO COST. Programming starting at $19.99/mo. New Callers receive FREE HD/DVR upgrade! CALL: 1-877-342-0363 (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION UNPLANNED PREGNANCY? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Open or closed adoption. YOU choose the family. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. Call 24/7. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

CLASSES

GENERAL FOR SALE

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkgreatpay.com (AAN CAN)

GENERAL FOR SALE KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Buy a Harris Bed Bug Kit. Complete Treatment Program. Odorless, Non-Staining. Available online at homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES) KILL ROACHES! Buy Harris Roach Spray/ Roach Trap Value Pack or Concentrate. Eliminate RoachesGuaranteed. Effective results begin after spray dries. BUY ONLINE homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES) Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Paid In Advance! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-station. com (AAN CAN) Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN) Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Pittsburgh Lawyers

LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES 20 ACRES FREE! Buy 40-Get 60 Acres. $0 down, $198/ month. Money back guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/Surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www. sunsetranches.com (AAN CAN) ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

STORAGE ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069 0

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EAST FOR RENT PT. BREEZE 1 Month Free Rent Townhouse with garage, 2 BR, 1.5 BA, C/A, Dishwasher, Laund, HW Floors $1195, 412-393-9910 Shadyside/Friendship1BR, 2nd flr., no smkg or pets, furnished, laun. $650+e & sec dep. 3rd flr, 1BR also available. No pets. $675+e & sec dep. Avl Immed. 412-661-2143 NOW LEASING final units in the new Walnut on Highland building located at 121 S Highland in the revitalized East End neighborhood. Steps to Shadyside, Whole Foods and bus line. This property features unique floor plans, parking, gourmet granite kitchens, and energy efficient building materials. Limited spaces available. See full listing at www.walnutcapital. com or call 412-683-3810.

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VARIOUS LOCATIONS

HOUSES FOR SALE

Luxury apartments available. Various locations. Call 412-983-3810 Need a job? Looking for a new employee? Call 31-MEDIA to place a Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper. Call today to speak with one of our Classified advertising representatives. Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

Montour School District $239,900— Kennedy Twp. Gorgeous 4-BR, 1.5 BA, log Cabin. Located in a very private setting. Comes with 3 extra lots. 25+ acres. Completely updated. MUST SEE. Call George E. Lucas! 412-771-8400

HOUSES FOR SALE

Sq. Hill- 6364 Caton. Beaut. 3BR brick. Fresh paint, Powder room 1st floor, formal DR, E-I-K, bay window in LR, finished gameroom, Integral gar, Covered side/front porches. $235,900 Phil 412-337-9494

Special Price! $174,900— Kennedy Twp. Gorgeous— 2-story, brick, 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath home with formal dining room. Lovely game room and a huge level lot. Convenient location, walk to bank, restaurants, drugstores and shopping. Call George E. Lucas today! 412-771-8400

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Campbell’s Fort Pitt Motel

Pittsburgh’s Pocono Touch 0

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Featuring Heart Shaped Whirlpool Tubs Private Balcony or Patio & Gas Fireplaces Savings on Sundays thru Thursdays Ask about parent daycare special

412-788-9960 • 412-788-4592 7750 Steubenville Pike, Oakdale PA 15071 12 Miles West Of PGH, 7 Miles From Airport www.fortpittmotel.com

FANTASTIC HOME! $249,900 South Fayette, GorgeousOne year young, stone & vinyl, bi-level home, located in a great school district. Features large BRs, 2 full BA’s, lovely eat-in kitchen and game room. Beautiful bamboo hardwood floor w/carpet and tile. Must see! Call George E. Lucas Today! 412-771-8400

Need N eed a Lawyer? Lawye yer? Meet M eet Bob! Bob! SPECIALIZES IN: Criminal Defense, Civil Litigation, Personal Injury and more!

Call for a FREE CONSULTATION. Law Offices of

Robert Goldman

412-531-6879

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.07/08.14.2013

PGHCityPaper


… AND A SIDE OF LIES The Highmark/UPMC PR war opens up a new front: diners! Prepare for indigestion — and not from the meatloaf {BY CHRIS POTTER}

“Highmark needs 41,000 patient admissions to leave UPMC and community hospitals to go to theirs,” this oddly knowledgeable diner patron tells us in a UPMC sspot. Indeed, when the state IInsurance Commissioner approved Highmark’s a acquisition of the ailing West a Penn Allegheny Health System, P its ruling said flatly that “for Highmark’s … strategy to work, it must incentivize patients to select [its] hospitals instead of UPMC.”

”No wonder UPMC can’t sign a contract with Highmark,” says this patron, who appears surprised to learn Highmark even owns a hospital. (Hasn’t he seen all the other ads?) As an earlier UPMC ad insists, “UPMC cannot sign a contract with Highmark that limitss your access to UPMC.” So UPMC C has decided to limit access by not signing a contract instead — apparently to avoid future misunderstanding. That’s a high-risk strategy for everyone: Financial statements show more than a quarter of UPMC’s revenue comes from Highmark premiums.

As City Paper reported last week, this ort rted ted online o ad was actually shot at a diner in Columbus, Ohio. But when you’re planning an oncology center in Kazakhstan, maybe filming ads in Columbus makes sense. “UPMC says it supports saving West Penn Allegheny Health System,” grouses this diner in Highmark’s ad. “Then Highmark saves West Penn Allegheny, and UPMC says in n retaliation, ‘We won’t sign a contract that allows Highmark health-insurance customers to use UPMC.’” Actually, UPMC’s lawsuit points out, Highmark will still be accepted at some facilities, including Children’s Hospital. But the irony remains: UPMC touts competition as the lifeblood of health care, and has said Highmark is the only entity in town that could save its ailing competitor, West Penn. But now that the patient is receiving a financial transfusion, UPMC wants to pull the plug on the donor.

As if to ensure these ads are inescapable, UPMC made headlines this week by suing Highmark for … false advertising. UPMC says it’s “misleading” for Highmark’s ads to claim UPMC wants to kick out patients: Highmark subscribers will be admitted, UPMC says, though at higher, out-of-network rates. Ironically, UPMC’s case relies on legal arguments Highmark used in a 2001 lawsuit against UPMC: Back then, “Highmark took the position … that it was false to represent that out-of-network access was tantamount to no access,” UPMC’s suit says — exactly the case UPMC’s making today. If UPMC and Highmark sound more like each other the longer this goes on, it’s not your imagination.

Letting customers pick their insurer and doctor is “exactly what Highmark’s doing,” says this chef. “They’re even willing to take UPMC insurance!” But while Highmark might want UPMC in its network, customers might pay a premium to use it: Insurance ccompanies use “tiering” — ccharging different rates at different facilities — to push d customers toward preferred providers. UPMC worries that we, like this short-order cook, might sign up with Highmark without realizing the strings attached. (Though if we’re all free to choose our insurer — as both these ads suggest — couldn’t customers simply drop Highmark over such tactics?)

Ironically, these geezers might have the least to lose in the Highmark/UPMC battle (another gripe in the UPMC lawsuit). Seniors covered by Medicare will be able to stick with the doctors they’ve got no matter what. Those of us in the private insurance market have less recourse, though that may change. In Harrisburg, state Reps. Dan Frankel (D-Squirrel Hill) and Jim Christiana (R-Beaver) are drumming up support for a bill requiring UPMC to contract with Highmark — like it or not.

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SUMMER IS IN THE AIR! OUTDOOR AMPHITHEATER CONCERTS Shows starting at 7PM

NEW DATE!

SAT AUG 24

JIMMY BUFFETT TRIBUTE (BEACH BUMZ) & BEACH BOYS TRIBUTE (BEACH PARTY BOYS)

SUN SEPT 1

EARTH WIND AND FIRE TRIBUTE (SHINING STAR) & MICHAEL JACKSON TRIBUTE (BEAT IT)

Visit RIVERSCASINO.COM or call 412-231-7777 for more upcoming shows.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.


August 7, 2013