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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 07.03/07.10.2013

EQUAL TIME: STATE LGBT ADVOCATES HOPE TO BUILD ON SUPREME COURT WIN 06


EVENTS 7.13 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: BELLE & SEBASTIAN WITH SPECIAL GUESTS YO LA TENGO Stage AE Co-presented with PromoWest North Shore & Opus One Productions Tickets: $35

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Summer’s different here. Enjoy three provocative exhibitions under one roof.

GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE/CALDWELL LINKER/NICK BUBASH /through sept 15.2013/

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013


Over 21 • 9pm - Midnight

ROCK & BOWL! at the world-famous {EDITORIAL}

07.03/07.10.2013

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers AMYJO BROWN, LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns TRACEY HICKEY, OLIVIA LAMMEL, KIRA SCAMMELL

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 27

{ART}

a bittersweet moment, because 06 “It’s both rulings by the court mean nothing for Pennsylvania.” — Ted Martin of EqualityPA on last week’s SCOTUS rulings on same-sex marriage

[VIEWS] “Highmark can’t have it both ways.” — State Sen. Jim Ferlo on why it may be time for UPMC and Highmark to part ways

18

“The pizzas are still huge; they still come with a puddle of amazing grease underneath.” — Andy Mulkerin reports on the re-opening of Vincent’s Pizza Park

[MUSIC]

23

“He’s a big, 6-foot-tall Rasta man. You’ll see him somewhere in Pittsburgh.” — English Beat toaster Antonee First Class, on his father, musician Militant Barry, with whom he lived in Pittsburgh in the ’90s

[SCREEN]

the cannibalistic villain, Johnny 32 “Excusing Depp’s Tonto is the twist designed to juice up this golden oldie.” — Al Hoff, reviewing The Lone Ranger

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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Day: Just in time for July 4, our 55 Banner very own Al Hoff looks at Pittsburgh’s impromptu flag displays

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 38 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 47 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 49 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 52 +

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INCOMING

“DOMA IS UNCONSTITUTIONAL AND THAT’S GREAT, BUT IT OPENS UP A PANDORA’S BOX OF QUESTIONS.”

Letter to the Editor In his 26 June editorial referencing the debacle of the latest visit of Kenny Chesney to Heinz Field, Editor Chris Potter is long on explanation and short on condemnation of the abominable behavior engaged in by many of the attendees. Let me first be clear: I do not challenge the assertion that most of the individuals that attended this concert are decent human beings that behaved in a civilized manner. To them, I say, “bravo.” There were a sufficient number of other fans, however, whose conduct was disgraceful, much of it alleged to have been criminal. Whether the perpetrators were from West Virginia or the city of Pittsburgh is of little relevance. As Mr. Potter notes, there were ten major fights and an inordinate amount of trash left behind, including waste. Additionally, police officers noted assaults including indecent assault in the stadium concourse, public urination, disorderly conduct, underage drinking, drunken driving, ticket scalping and a robbery. This was not just another Saturday in the city of Pittsburgh. Excuse me for living, but I believe that individuals have a responsibility to act like civilized human beings at all times, and I do not accept the excuse of “alcohol made me do it” to wash away behavior that falls below that standard. If the justice system dealt sternly with those that come to a concert area to destroy it, there would surely be fewer miscreants. I agree with one argument made in Mr. Potter’s essay: That it is fortunate the debauchery was confined to a non-residential area. — Oren Spiegler Upper Saint Clair

Legislative process often compared to watching sausage being made. In #Pennsylvania it’s like watching it regurgitated. #transportation — June 27 tweet from Jon Schmitz (@pgtraffic) of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

AFTER THE

WIN

DOMA’s demise is a huge victory for the LGBT community, but what does it all mean? {BY LAUREN DALEY}

A

S ONE MAN put it as he sprang . around Liberty Avenue sprinkling . glitter, June 26 was “a great day to be gay.” Indeed, the Supreme Court of the United States delivered two major victories for LGBT rights. In a 5-4 ruling, it dismissed a case concerning the constitutionality of California’s anti-same-sex-marriage referendum, Proposition 8. That decision allowed the state to resume issuing samesex marriage licenses on June 29. And in another landmark 5-4 ruling, the justices invalidated a section of the Defense of Marriage Act, which had previously denied federal recognition and benefits to legally married same-sex couples. As those decisions were announced, the joy among the 500 or so spectators along Liberty Avenue Downtown was palpable. Cheers erupted as a speaker on stage blurted out the announcement. Rainbow flags waved vigorously in the street. City Councilor Natalia Rudiak took the stage and, with tears in her eyes, stated what the crowd on Liberty Avenue already knew: “Love is love,” she shouted. There were tears. There were highfives. There were hugs. And then there were questions. What did the rulings mean for samesex couples married in one of the 13 states

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Bystanders react with tears to the Supreme Court’s ruling to strike down part of the Defense of Marriage Act during a June 26 rally on Liberty Avenue.

plus Washington, D.C., that allow it? What do they mean for couples who live in a state where their marriage isn’t recognized? What benefits, if any, will there be for LGBT Pennsylvanians? The answers aren’t so clear, at least not yet. The DOMA decision “is a good step forward, but I think people have to realize there is a lot of baggage that goes with that step forward,” says Anthony

Infanti, a professor of law at the University of Pittsburgh. “DOMA is unconstitutional and that’s great, but it opens up a Pandora’s Box of questions.” THERE ARE MORE than 1,100 places in fed-

eral law where a person’s marital status can determine legal protections or responsibilities. That means there are conceivably 1,100 places where there will be questions on what rights legally married same-sex couples are entitled to. The list CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013


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AFTER THE WIN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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of benefits is broad: from Social Security benefits and student aid to immigration rights and spousal benefits for veterans. At the heart of the DOMA case were taxes: Petitioner Edith Windsor had to pay $363,053 in taxes after the 2009 death of her wife, Thea Spyer, because Windsor was denied a tax exemption for surviving spouses. Windsor sought a refund from the IRS and was denied. She sued, questioning DOMA’s constitutionality. “DOMA’s principal effect is to identify and make unequal a subset of state-sanctioned marriages,” Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote in the majority opinion, supported by justices Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer. “It contrives to deprive some couples married under the laws of their [s]tate, but not others, of both rights and responsibilities, creating two contradictory marriage regimes within the same state. It also forces same-sex couples to live as married for the purpose of state law but unmarried for the purpose of federal law, thus diminishing the stability and predictability of basic personal relations the [s]tate has found it proper to acknowledge and protect.” But it seems same-sex couples are likely to face similar uncertainty for some time to come. “What [the DOMA ruling] says is we’ll

defer to the state in determining who’s married,” says Infanti. But that raises a new question: “Which state when? … You can come up with all sorts of different scenarios.” A Massachusetts couple married in their home state, for example, conceivably would receive state and federal benefits, Infanti says. But Kennedy’s majority opinion did not affect DOMA’s Section 2, which allows states to ignore same-sex marriages performed legally elsewhere. So what if that Massachusetts couple moves to Pennsylvania, where a statewide Defense of Marriage Act invalidates any same-sex marriage performed beyond state borders? Such a couple’s marital status could be “off and on,” Infanti says. “How’s the federal government going to treat that marriage?” Who answers that question remains to be seen. “Different federal programs have different standards for how they determine whether your marriage is valid,” says Kate Paine, a litigation Associate at Buchanan, Ingersoll and Rooney PC who covers DOMA and Prop 8 issues for the firm’s Non-Traditional Couples and Families blog. Some rules are determined by “place of celebration” — where the marriage license was actually issued. Others look at

“IT’S A BITTERSWEET MOMENT, BECAUSE BOTH RULINGS BY THE COURT MEAN NOTHING FOR PENNSYLVANIA.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013


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AFTER THE WIN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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the place of domicile or residence. “There is no one rule across all federal agencies,” notes the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force in a series of fact sheets. Some policy changes may have to be carried out by Congress, Infanti notes. Others could be mandated by the executive branch. On the day of the decision, President Barack Obama welcomed the decision and pledged that his administration would “review all relevant federal statutes to ensure this decision, including its implication for federal benefits and obligations, is implemented swiftly and smoothly.” But Infanti says same-sex couples may have to continue pressing for their rights in court. When it comes to securing marriage benefits, he says, “The question is who’s going to do the heavy lifting. In the past, it’s been the samesex couples.”

“Any day that a really bad, discriminatory, mean-spirited law gets struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court is a good day,” agrees Ted Martin, executive director of Equality Pennsylvania. “It’s a bittersweet moment, because both rulings by the court mean nothing for Pennsylvania.” If anything, he adds, the decisions “highlight how little we actually have here.” Indeed, while state Rep. Dan Frankel (D-Squirrel Hill) says marriage rights in Pennsylvania “are inevitable,” they are far from imminent. Even basic protections have been kept out of reach: Pennsylvania has no law prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity and expression. Frankel, who co-chairs the state House’s LGBT Equality Caucus, has been trying to pass House Bill 300, a bill that would bar LGBT discrimination in the same way state law already prohibits discrimination based on race or gender. Even in famously conservative Pennsylvania, Frankel notes, an anti-discrimination measure polls high “in every region.” “People are just incredulous you can fire someone [because of] sexual orientation,” he says. And equality advocates are using the DOMA moment as leverage to point out that injustice. “We’ve suddenly been handed the perfect podium to talk about it,” says Martin, who’s helping push Frankel’s legislation. They’ve already gotten some unintentional help from equality’s biggest foes. When openly gay state Rep. Brian Sims (D-Philadelphia) attempted to speak about the Supreme Court rulings on the House floor last week, arch-conservative Daryl Metcalfe (R-Cranberry) blocked him from doing so. Later, Metcalfe said that

“IT WAS STILL A MOMENTOUS DAY. NO ONE CAN TAKE THAT AWAY.”

ONE AREA in which Penns ylva n i a c o up l e s c an benefit almost immediately is immigration, legal observers note. “The federal government will allow the American citizen to sponsor the foreign partner’s immigration status based on where you’re married,” says Paine. “So if someone from Pennsylvania has a same-sex partner from Brazil and they go to New York to get married … it doesn’t matter if they live in Pennsylvania.” But beyond that, same-sex couples are being advised to consult attorneys and accountants until the ramifications became clearer. And at least for now, equality advocates are viewing the DOMA and Proposition 8 rulings as symbolic. “It was still a momentous day,” says Jim Sheppard, president of the Steel City Stonewall Democrats. “No one can take that away.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 12


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AFTER THE WIN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013

comments in support of gay marriage would violate “God’s law.â€? Metcalfe, who has repeatedly sought to place same-sex marriage bans in the state constitution, came under ďŹ re from Republicans and Democrats alike. And by press time, Frankel said that since June 26, 10 more co-sponsors — including two Republicans — signed onto the bill. Both the Supreme Court decisions and Metcalfe’s remarks have “added energy to this,â€? Frankel says. “I think Daryl helps our cause to some extent. ‌ Daryl represents an extreme and certain level of hatefulness, you might even call it bigotry, and helps diminish his standing as an opponent and helps diminish those like him.â€? Frankel has yet to formally introduce House Bill 300. Ordinarily, such a measure would be assigned to the State Government committee, which is chaired by ‌ Daryl Metcalfe. But Frankel hopes Speaker of the House Sam Smith will assign it to another committee “so it will get a fair shake.â€? Equality advocates are working on a host of other LGBT protections at the state level, including a bill to eliminate inheritance tax for domestic partners. Another bill would classify as hate crimes any crime targeting a victim based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Such crimes are punished with stiffer penalties.

{PHOTO BY LAUREN DALEY}

There’s even a marriage-equality bill circulating, sponsored in the Senate by state Sen. Daylin Leach (D-Montgomery County) and soon to be introduced in the House by Sims and Steve McCarter (DPhiladelphia). Although such bills have failed in the past, Frankel says reintroducing them helps build momentum for eventual passage. “It’s an important statement to make that there is a vehicle in the House and Senate for people who support marriage equality,â€? he says. “It’s at least one tool we can use to make elected ofďŹ cials accountable. It’s a marker for the future.â€? L D A L E Y @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013

AFTER A year-long remission, Western Penn-

sylvania is due for a relapse of Health Care Derangement Syndrome, thanks to Highmark’s acquisition of the Western Pennsylvania Allegheny Health System (WPAHS). The state’s Insurance Department approved that deal this spring, and one symptom — nausea-inducing statements from healthcare giant UPMC — has already appeared. A new TV spot features UPMC board chair G. Nicholas Beckwith III (though the ad identiďŹ es him as “Nick,â€? ’cause he’s one of us) making his case. “Highmark has said it will deny patients the care of UPMC by pushing them into Highmark’s new hospital network,â€? he warns. UPMC suspects Highmark of pulling a bait-and-switch, promising access to UPMC but shunting patients to its own facilities. And if anybody’s gonna push patients away from UPMC, it’s gonna be UPMC itself. “UPMC cannot sign a contract with Highmark that limits your access,â€? Beckwith says. Limiting your access by not signing a contract, meanwhile, is apparently fair game. Faced with the same feverish rhetoric we saw in 2011, it’s tempting to reach for the same cure. Last year, Gov. Tom Corbett compelled UPMC to extend its contract, ensuring its services would be “in networkâ€? for Highmark customers through 2014. Yet the politics may be shifting. Corbett’s own Insurance Department signed off on Highmark’s plan, while making this acknowledgement: “In order for Highmark’s ‌ strategy to work, it must: (i) incentivize patients to select West Penn and other aligned hospitals instead of UPMC; and (ii) incentivize physicians to use [those] hospitals instead of UPMC.â€? Otherwise, the department ruled, “It is unlikely that Highmark can attract sufďŹ cient numbers of patients to West Penn to make the afďŹ liation successful.â€? And it’s not just Corbett ofďŹ cials echoing Beckwith’s reasoning. “I never thought I would say this,â€? state Sen. Jim Ferlo (D-Lawrenceville), one of UPMC’s sharpest critics, said in a statement, “but I appreciate UPMC’s being up front ‌ about its intent to not renew its contract.â€? Was Beckwith’s fever contagious? Not at all, Ferlo told me. Now that Highmark’s acquisition was approved, he says, “People need to understand the new sandbox we’re playing in.â€? While the Insurance Department took no ofďŹ cial position on renewing Highmark’s

contract with UPMC, it added that “continuation of such a contract may, based on [Highmark’s] projections, delay West Penn’s ďŹ nancial recovery.â€? If that’s true, Ferlo wonders — and if we care about preserving health-care jobs and choice in providers — how badly should we want the contract to be renewed? “Highmark can’t have it both ways,â€? he says. I asked Highmark spokesman Aaron Billger about that, and about how the healthcare landscape had changed since the last UPMC/Highmark battle. “[O]pen access to all community assets — regardless of a patient’s insurance card — forms the proper basis of customer-focused competition,â€? his emailed statement read in part. “UPMC professes to support competition, but it really wants its own selfserving brand of competition.â€? Highmark’s brand of competition is just as self-serving, naturally. How many insurers who don’t own hospitals, after all, espouse a utopia where your insurance card doesn’t matter? While no fan of Highmark either, Ferlo wants to make a UPMC/Highmark duopoly work, by ensuring WPAHS gets the patient volume it needs. He also wants to make the system accountable. “Obamacareâ€? reforms, he notes, require hospitals to meet numerous requirements — involving charity care and other needs — or lose their non-proďŹ t status. That, says Ferlo, gives the community badly needed leverage. Currently, says Ferlo, “it’s not clear there’s a vehicle for the community to dialogue with Highmark and UPMC.â€? The solution is creating “a concerned-citizens’ group,â€? to demand the providers address, say, the region’s above-average infant mortality. It would be nice if patients were no longer just pawns. But will injecting some democracy into the health-care system be enough to cure the disease? Highmark and UPMC act like rivals, but they grew up as a pair of conjoined twins. Nearly one-third of UPMC’s net patient revenue came from Highmark, while UPMC provides nearly half of the region’s hospital services — including those Highmark subscribers rely on. Given UPMC and Highmark’s dependence on each other, and our dependence on both, separating them seems risky. Especially because, while they have two brains between them, there only seems to be one heart.

“PEOPLE NEED TO UNDERSTAND THE NEW SANDBOX WE’RE PLAYING IN.�

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Nice Glass! ENJOY YOUR DRAFT AT THE FOLLOWING:

NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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The executive in charge of the electronic infrastructure of Facebook confirmed to London’s information-technology website The Register in June that when the company inaugurated its first “cloud” data-storage facility in Prineville, Ore., in 2011, the equipment was “drenched” when an actual cloud formed inside the building. (Facebook had only “hinted” previously at a Prineville “humidity event,” according to The Register.) The building’s cooling units use an electricity-saving system that takes air from the outside (rather than re-circulated indoor air) and subjects it to various humidity levels to cool the heat coming from the aisles of computer servers. Apparently, engineers had not accurately anticipated the vapor condensation profile of the new system, and rain guards were promptly installed.

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In May, two states away from last year’s mass shooting at an Aurora, Colo., movieplex, the Goodrich Capital 8 Theaters in Jefferson City, Mo., hired a man dressed in full tactical gear and carrying guns resembling M-4 rifles and 9 mm pistols (as “S.H.I.E.L.D.” operatives) to greet patrons for the opening of the new Iron Man movie. Police were not pleased by the barrage of frightened 911 callers who were fearful that Aurora was happening all over again. Capital 8 manager Bob Wilkins said that “hundreds” of customers were entertained by the publicity stunt and that “only a few” were upset.

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Since Rozie, a pregnant Asian elephant at Albuquerque’s ABQ BioPark Zoo, stands a better chance of a healthy birth if she is strong, the “elephant manager” and staff have been putting her through twice-a-day, Pilates-type exercises (featuring leg lifts, squats and other calisthenics). (Rozie is due sometime between August and November.) Lest anyone worry that Rozie is being mistreated, the elephant manager noted in a May press release that her participation “is completely voluntary.”

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The founder of the Beauty Park Medical Spa in Santa Monica, Calif., has introduced a 45-minute procedure called the “Male Laser Lift,” known colloquially as “tackle tightening,” involving the removal of hair and wrinkles on the scrotum, along with laser treatment to remove “discoloration.” Co-owner Jamie Sherrill (“Nurse Jamie”) told London’s Daily Mail that sales are up this year; some might credit a joke comment made by actor George Clooney that the latest Hollywood craze was “ball-ironing.”

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Recently, parents in Texas and New York City have pointed out that when children commit sex offenses against classmates, educational policy (and sometimes, the law) seeks to give light punishments and second chances to the perpetrators, thus posing risks to their classmates. A Texas child, raped at age 4 by a 13-year-old, recently was forced to endure the perpetrator’s return to class after only 45 days away at an “alternative” program — because federal law requires the child’s prompt return to ordinary classroom settings if a “disability” played a role in the incident. A New York City mother filed a $6 million lawsuit in May against the city’s Education Department after her son was allegedly forced to perform oral sex on a

group of classmates, one of whom had already been involved in a sex assault — for which he received a five-day suspension.

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As John Jacobson, 20, was being booked into jail in Portland, Ore., in May (for allegedly trying to steal a case of beer from a Plaid Pantry grocery), police discovered a live mouse in his pocket. Jacobson had his father come down to the jail and take custody of the mouse.

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Christie’s auction house in New York City reported that a painting of the late actress Bea Arthur — nude from the waist up — by the artist John Currin in 1991 had sold for $1.9 million on May 15. Currin said that he made the painting from a photograph of Arthur clothed, and Arthur, known for her roles in TV’s Maude and Golden Girls, appears younger in face and body in the painting than on the TV shows.

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Maryland state troopers caught sight of a drummer rocking out on the shoulder of Interstate 695 near Windsor Mill Road in Baltimore on May 21, at about 10:30 a.m. According to the troopers, the man had run out of gas and had decided to set up his drum kit to practice while he waited for assistance. When a utility truck arrived, supplying gasoline, the drummer packed up and resumed his travels.

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The web sites OpposingViews.com and the Jewish Daily Forward, sweeping through all of the 2013 news accounts that two reporters could find, added up the fatalities so far this year (through May) of Americans killed by domestic “terrorist” attacks, compared to the number of Americans killed with guns fired by toddlers (aged 2-6). Terrorism’s total: 4 (all from the Boston Marathon bombing). Gun deaths by toddlers: 11. (During the same period, 10 additional Americans were merely wounded by toddlers firing guns.)

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The Aristocrats! New York state Assemblyman Vito Lopez of Brooklyn was briefly a candidate for New York City mayor but withdrew in May, shortly after a state ethics commission accused him of various “unbecoming” behaviors, including pressuring female assistants to massage him, and at least one to feel the cancer-stricken Lopez’s tumors on his neck, shoulder, and armpit.

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The Classic Middle Name: Arrested recently and awaiting trial for murder: Nicholas Wayne Smith, Leland, N.C. (January); Jonathan Wayne Broyhill, Raleigh, N.C. (April); James Wayne Ham, San Jacinto County, Tex. (May); Kenneth Wayne Welch, San Diego County, Calif. (June); Bryan Wayne Brackbill Jr., Carroll Township, Pa. (June). Indicted for murder: Darrell Wayne Parker, Belton, Tex. (March). Convicted of murder: Stanley Wayne Robertson, College Station, Tex. (February). Sentenced for murder: Derral Wayne Hodgkins, Dade City, Fla. (April); Jacob Wayne Smith, Tulsa, Okla. (June). Murder conviction upheld: Michael Wayne Fenney (also known as Michael Wayne), Janesville, Minn. (June). Re-sentencing for murder demanded: Dale Wayne Eaton, Cheyenne, Wyo. (June) (now allegedly ineligible for execution because of low IQ).

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS@ E A RT HL I N K . N E T OR WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013


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SERVERS ROAM PROFFERING INDIVIDUAL SPITS OF A VARIETY OF GRILLED MEATS

RETURN OF THE VINNIE PIE {BY ANDY MULKERIN} Growing up, pies from Vincent’s Pizza Park were forbidden food for me: My mom didn’t care for its huge, greasy pizzas. When I had some, it was contraband from a friend or sibling. When the original shop on the North BraddockForest Hills border shut down last year amid ownership and management disputes, it was disheartening. (A second location in Plum remained open.) But lo! The original location, renovated but still quintessentially Vincent’s, reopened on June 17. The current pizza-maker, Dave Miller, worked under original proprietor Vincent Chianese. The shop is brighter and cleaner, but maintains the old vibe. Vincent’s chef shirt hangs on the wall above one booth; the pans illustrating the sizes of the different pies hang above Miller’s pizza kitchen, which is behind glass so you can watch. There are two salads on the menu: salad, and salad with cheese. The pizzas are still huge; they still come with a puddle of amazing grease underneath; and the pepperoni is still piled on in shreds. The ovens are new, so the pizza doesn’t have quite the “character” of Vinnie pies of old (oft attributed, perhaps apocryphally, to Vincent’s cigarette ash falling off into the pizza). For now, Vincent’s is open from 4-10 p.m., Wednesday through Sunday. On the first Saturday after opening, the dining room was nearly full at 4 p.m., and a line stretched almost out the door by 5 p.m. There were multiple customers wearing Vincent’s T-shirts; that’s the kind of fandom this place engenders. And it’s safe to say very few of those fans will be disappointed in the new Vincent’s. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

998 Ardmore Blvd., North Braddock. 412-271-9181

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{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

W

HOUSE OF MEAT HAT COULD BE better than an

all-you-can-eat buffet? How about an all-you-can-eat buffet that comes to you? Considering Americans’ penchants for both big eating and red meat, it’s amazing that the Brazilians beat us to inventing the churrascaria, a restaurant in which servers roam from table to table proffering individual spits of a variety of grilled meats. (Churrasco means, roughly, barbecue.) Diners signal their readiness for another slice, chop or wing by means of a wooden peg: Green means “more,” and red means “stop.” There’s also a walk-up buffet of salads, pastas and veggies, but to optimize ad your dollars-to-appetite ratio, you want to yo filll up on the most protein-packed items. We also find it surprising that the Pittsburgh region has for decades hosted Pi just one of these temples of carnivorism. ju But recently, two new Brazilian steakBu

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Gauchos Anthony Wannamaker, Jr. (left) and Marchello Giallorenzo (right) serve cuts of roasted meat tableside.

houses have opened within months of each other. One of these is a chain, but the other, Palms Brazilian Steakhouse, is a homegrown offering located in a cavernous strip-mall space in Aliquippa, just west

PALMS BRAZILIAN STEAKHOUSE 3113 Green Garden Road, Aliquippa. 724-378-8308 HOURS: Tue.-Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, salads and sandwiches, $6-11; entrees $30-35; gaucho service $40 per person (children 9-12 half price, 8 and under free) LIQUOR: Full bar

of the airport. A long bar in front offers a view of a large parking lot, while in back are an almost-as-large main dining room

as well as a smaller one for private parties. This is important, as the churrascaria is ideally suited for dining in groups. Socializing is the perfect accompaniment to the indulgence invited by the all-you-caneat tableside “gaucho service.” Even vegetarians, who will want to skip the gaucho service, will find plenty to sustain them at the buffet. And Palms does have a limited regular menu. From this, we ordered a combo platter of empanadas, a Latin American appetizer that can be likened to savory deep-fried turnovers. Our three were filled with buffalo chicken, steak in chimichurri sauce and smoked mozzarella and roasted tomato, respectively, and served with Brazilian seasoned rice and black beans. The deep-fried wrapper overwhelmed the simple cheese and tomato filling, though the chicken and steak held up. Which brings us to the meat of the


matter. Since Palms calls itself a “steakhouse,” we found it odd that marinated steak tips were the only beef we were served. When we inquired, we were told that after 7:30 p.m., items stop being replaced. We had plenty else to choose from, but beef-lovers, take note. In any case, the steak tips were a cut well suited to the churrasco: beefy, mildly flavored by the marinade, like a giant shish kebab, and thus rosy within. However, a later round revealed too much time over the flame, such that medium rare had faded to medium. Sausages were Western Pennsylvaniastyle, not Brazilian. Hot and sweet Italian were unremarkable, but cherry-glazed kielbasa was a smart update, the jammy sweetness of the glaze playing off the intense savor of the smoked pork. Plump shrimp, on the other hand, were overwhelmed by their bourbon sauce. Unsauced shrimp were available from the cold seafood bar at the buffet, along with oysters and crab legs, but we found them not cold enough for our optimal enjoyment.

Crab legs, roasted pork, bacon-wrapped chicken, and lamb

Chicken wings boasted tasty, crisp skins, but the meat within was just a touch dried out. Chicken wrapped in bacon was made from white meat that stayed surprisingly moist. Although quality varied, again, from skewer to skewer, overall this item was a big success with everyone in our party. Two lamb preparations came around. The first was lamb chops that were agreeably seasoned, if not tender enough. The second was leg of lamb, whose gamey flavor unfortunately betrayed the promise of its lovely, rosemary-flecked crust. Pork loin was even more gorgeously encrusted — it looked as if ours had started with a nice cap of fat — as well as tender and moist within, a triumph over the tendency of this cut to dry out at the mere suggestion of heat. Brazilians tend to favor a late dinner hour. But here, it is best to get to Palms when the sun is still high in the sky, the meat is still fresh off the churrasco, and — if beef is your protein of choice — when the varieties are still plenteous. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

VINTAGE ROCK Local musician Tim Gaber brings urban winery to Pittsburgh

In the industrial hinterland between Lower Lawrenceville and the Strip, Pittsburgh Winery has been producing wine for nearly a year. The winery is relatively new to the local scene, but vintner Tim Gaber — who runs the facility with his fiancée — has a winemaking history that spans several decades. Formerly a member of local rock bands Brownie Mary and Buzz Poets, Gaber previously partnered with photographer Duane Rieder to open the boutique label Engine House 25 Winery. But he and the photographer split, and Gaber decided to strike out on his own. So he moved out of the basement of the Roberto Clemente Museum, where Rieder’s winery was housed, and rehabbed a former bank building just down the street. Upstairs, customers can sample and purchase any of the winery’s six styles in the small, dark-wood tasting room (wines are also for sale at more than 25 area bars and restaurants). All six wines are pleasantly quaffable, and the Malbec is a real standout: juicy, soft and rounded with hints of coffee. Downstairs, Gaber tips a hat to his musical background with an expansive performance space/party room. It’s also where the wines are made. Imported grapes are hand-cranked in a vintage wine press, and then left to ferment either in back-room tanks or the scores of oak barrels that line the sides of the room. “It’s backbreaking work, but we get a lot of help,” says Gaber. Five of the wines are made with imported California grapes, and the Malbec is produced with Chilean grapes. With so much focus on “locally grown” these days, why use air-freight grapes instead of buying from Pennsylvania vineyards? For Gaber, it all circles back to “terroir,” that old French winemaking word which refers to the geography and climate that shape the way grapes taste. “You have to work with what the fruit gives you,” he says. “And you’re not going to get a California-style Cab with Pennsylvania grapes.”

“IT’S BACKBREAKING WORK, BUT WE GET A LOT OF HELP.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

2815 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-566-1000 or www.pittsburghwinery.com

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013

ALL INDIA. 315 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-681-6600. With more than 200 items, All India’s menu is both epic and exciting, including novel choices such as Goan coconut shrimp and green jackfruit curry alongside the old denizens, chicken curry and the tandoor. Here, a thali, or combination platter, is a great option for the culinary explorer who wants the experience of multiple tastes. KF AVENUE B. 5501 Centre Ave., Shadyside. 412-683-3663. This intimate corner restaurant has only a brief, seasonal menu, but its offerings are all tantalizing, each combining several pedigreed ingredients. Such selections have included piquillo-pepper lasagna with a different filling in each layer; green-bean and sweet-potato tempura; and fresh pasta topped with beef short ribs, chard and crisped cipollini onions. LF BOCKTOWN BEER AND GRILL. 690 Chauvet Drive, The Pointe, North Fayette (412-788-2333) and 500 Beaver Valley Mall Blvd., Monaca (724-728-7200). Beer is the essence of Bocktown. Many of the dishes are less than $10, and designed to complement beer. The friendly staff creates a neighborhood atmosphere. JE

Join us

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ACOUSTIC HAP PY HOUR 3pm-6pm with host

Dine-In or Take-Out Monday 8a-3p Tuesday-Friday 8a-8p Saturday Brunch 9a-3p

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www.skinnypetes.com

CHICKEN LATINO. 155 21st St., Strip District. 412-246-0974. This quick-serve chicken joint serves up Peruvian-style, woodfired and deliciously seasoned rotisserie chicken. Besides the bird, hamburgers and the occasional special (pork, ceviche), sides include such southof-the-border staples as plantains, refried beans and fried yucca. J

HABITAT. 510 Market St., Downtown. 412-773-8800. Located in the handsome Fairmont Hotel, this restaurant — with a marvelously open kitchen — utilizes local and seasonal ingredients. The emphasis is on the kitchen’s ability to adapt and update traditional dishes from around the world, such as tandoori chicken tacos and rare-tunaand-avocado spring rolls. LE

FULL LIST ONLINE

Stop in for some local Pittsburgh fare!

J O H N C L AR K

THE CARLTON. 500 Grant St., Downtown. 412-391-4152. A mainstay of Downtown dining for two decades, The Carlton delivers the hallmarks of fine dining in an atmosphere refreshingly free of attitude or affectation. The menu is neither stodgy nor cutting-edge; while dishes may verge on the decadent — risotto with lobster and brie? — the flavor and ingredient combinations offer a classic Continental cuisine with contemporary inflections. LE

Pizza, baked in a wood-fired brick oven, comes with everything from Jamaican jerk chicken to hummus; entrees include glazed salmon and “truck-stop sirloin.” KE

ISABELA ON GRANDVIEW. 1318 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington. 412-431-5882. This fine-dining restaurant atop Mount Washington places as much focus on the food as on the skyline. There are a la carte dishes, but the selections are all from the seven-course, prix fixe dinner that is the heart of the Isabela experience. The cuisine is contemporary and www. per pa varies widely among pghcitym o .c European, American and Asian influences. LE

A Unique Luncheon and Gourmet Food Destination

BYOB and limited menu available

All India {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} mustard greens, a variety of meatballs and tofu. JF

The Carlton {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} BURMA-TOKYO RESTAURANT. 320 Atwood St., Oakland. 412-802-6163. This tiny restaurant run by two siblings offers sushi as well as a selection of cooked dishes from their native Burma and several neighboring countries. Among the intriguing selections: The Burmese shan tribe noodles, with a distinctive, intensely flavored sauce and varied vegetables; and the Kyae oae soup, with rice vermicelli,

DAVIO. 2100 Broadway Ave., Beechview. 412-5317422. Davio is a cozy restaurant (down to the family photos) with friendly service. The menu is classic Italian — no wacky ingredients or preparations — but only a few entrées seem lifted from the Standard Italian Restaurant Repertoire. Specialties are crab and veal. L

FUEL & FUDDLE. 212 Oakland Ave., Oakland. 412-682-3473. The ambience conjures the nostalgia of Route 66 road trips. Much of the reasonably priced fare is in the “goes well with beer” category, and the beer list includes a couple of house brews. But there’s plenty that’s new:

KALEIDOSCOPE CAFÉ. 108 43rd St., Lawrenceville. 412-6834004. This intriguing menu refracts contemporary trends in sophisticated casual dining while still offering an atmosphere of offthe-beaten-path funkiness. While some dishes emphasize unusual juxtapositions of ingredients, such as a lobster-and-white-bean purée alongside fish, or fig in a “rustic marsala sauce,” other dishes are of the moment, with pistachio dust atop duck cannoli or deepfried gnocchi. KF KAYA. 2000 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-261-6565. Kaya is a


local culinary mainstay, offering inventive Caribbean-inspired contemporary cuisine. The menu, much of which is vegetarian, changes frequently. But it remains divided into tropas — tropical tapas — and entrees. KE MENDOZA EXPRESS. 812 Mansfield Road, Green Tree. 412-429-8780. The décor is pure kitsch — sombreros on the walls, etc. — and the location is a bit obscure. But the menu is ample, and the food is as authentic as you’ll find in Pittsburgh. (Try the rebozo, a scramble of chorizo, peppers and cheese.) JF PENN AVENUE FISH COMPANY. 2208 Penn Ave., Strip District (412-434-7200) and 308 Forbes Ave., Downtown (412-562-1710). These two fish restaurants fill the gap between humble lunch counter and snooty steakhouse — modern, funky and moderately priced. Much of the restaurant’s menu is casual fare such as sandwiches, sushi and tacos, with a rotating selection of higherend dishes, particularly at the Downtown location. KF SEVICHE. 930 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-697-3120. This upscale Latin American-style tapas restaurant specializes in citruscured fish, while also offering a small selection of Latin-inspired tapas and finger sandwiches. And what better to wash down an empanada or mini taco than a refreshing capirinha cocktail? KE THAI CUISINE. 4625 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-688-9661. This Thai restaurant in the heart of Pittsburgh’s Little Italy serves up authentic dishes with warm, friendly service. The restaurant also offers an updated vegetarian menu that features mock duck, vegetarian pork and other meat substitutes, as well as the more familiar non-meat offerings of tofu and vegetables. KF WAI WAI. 4717 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-0133. Eschewing the epic list of dishes most Chinese-American restaurants proffer, this attractively decorated storefront venue sticks to a modest number of basics with a few less-typical dishes, such as Singapore mai fun (a dish of stir-fried rice noodles) or sha cha (a meat-and-vegetable dish from China’s Gansu province) JF YO RITA. 1120 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-904-3557. This venue offers Mexican-inspired cuisine, through a variety of tacos. Inventive fillings might include: beans-and-greens, artichokes or mushrooms, as well as more traditional meats (fish, pork, beef). Combine with a starter, like grits or potatoes, and a craft beer for a full meal. JE

offMenu

Little

BANGKOK IN THE STRIP

{BY AMYJO BROWN}

Authentic Thai Cuisine

TAKING ROOT

DRUE MILLER WASN’T thinking about adding a chicken coop or a beehive to the backyard of her Forest Hills home — until a neighbor began a movement to change the law prohibiting her from having either one on her property. “It sounded interesting,” she says, adding that now she and her husband are talking about both chickens and bees. “I’m more pro-chicken than he is at this point,” she says. “We’re [probably] more likely to get the hives because it’s less of a daily routine.” Urban farming, at least when it comes to honey and eggs, is gaining ground, local advocates say. Forest Hills Borough passed the new ordinance permitting up to four chickens and two beehives, with variation depending on lot size, late last month. Similar discussions are occurring in South Park, Findlay and Hampton townships. At the same time, many in Pittsburgh are hoping they can spark changes to urban agriculture rules written in 2011.

“IT’S A REALLY INTERESTING WAY OF FOSTERING CONNECTIONS WITH YOUR NEIGHBORS.” “What we’ve struggled with over the last couple of years is, the city code and city policy need to catch up to some of these new, sometimes unusual ideas for land use in the city,” says Julie Butcher Pezzino, executive director of Grow Pittsburgh. The organization is creating a task force to lobby for reforms, including allowing chicken coops on smaller lots (lots now need to be a minimum of 2,000 square feet) and revising a process that requires the approval of the city’s zoning board. “Not many people have gone through with applying for these permits,” Pezzino says. Indeed, says Stephen Repasky, president of Burgh Bees, a nonprofit advocate for beekeepers: “What the city has done is push us further underground.” Forest Hills, by contrast, has benefited from other municipalities’ experiences. The local permitting process mirrors that required of dog owners — but the law also requires that beekeepers be registered with the state and be regularly inspected, and that chicken coops be aesthetically pleasing. “We got a very good ordinance [in Forest Hills] that is fair,” Repasky says. Although just getting started, Miller is ready to share the resulting bounty and have a reason to talk over the backyard fence. “It’s a really interesting way of fostering connections with your neighbors,” she says. ABRO WN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Local communities seeing a surge in urban agriculture

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LOCAL

“WE DECIDED TO STAY RIGHT THERE IN WILKINSBURG AND SET UP SHOP.”

BEAT

{BY KIRA SCAMMELL}

GOING DEUTSCH The first annual Deutschtown Music Festival is this Saturday, and will showcase more than 40 local bands of various genres, at eight North Side venues, indoor and outdoor, starting at 2 p.m. “It’s not a complicated combination: cheap beer and free music,” says festival organizer Ben Soltesz. He estimates that mixture will draw some 800 to 1,000 attendees. Soltesz and partner Cody Walters hope that the festival raises awareness of the budding music scene in the neighborhood and encourages people to consider the North Side as a viable place to see live music. Why Deutschtown? There’s live music almost every night, though it’s sometimes under the radar. The Elks Club hosts the Pittsburgh Banjo Club each Wednesday, while Park House has bluegrass, and James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy offers live jazz and blues bands several nights a week. However, most Pittsburghers don’t take advantage of these opportunities — and when turnout is less than ideal, venues can’t host shows regularly. Some of the participating festival venues are not regular music venues, and that’s part of what will make the festival feel so neighborly. Son of Stedeford’s is a record shop, Artists Image Resource is a print-making facility, Peanutz is a bar and restaurant, and Max’s Allegheny Tavern will loan out its ratskeller (more or less German for basement) for the event. To make things even sweeter, all of the festival venues are within five blocks of one another, which gives bands breathing room, but doesn’t make attendees walk too far between venues. In addition to the North Side charm, the lineup is killer. “It’s one day for so many local bands that should be getting attention outside of Pittsburgh to get attention,” says Soltesz. Those playing include Bastard Bearded Irishmen, The Harlan Twins, Meeting of Important People, Mega Def and Chrome Baby Jesus. (In the interest of full disclosure, CP music editor Andy Mulkerin’s band, Neighbours, is playing one of the shows as well.) Admission is free; daytime activities are fit for families and the night performances are suited for adult tastes. Food trucks will be on site and drink tickets are available for purchase.

“IT’S NOT A COMPLICATED COMBINATION: CHEAP BEER AND FREE MUSIC.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DEUTSCHTOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL. 2 p.m. Sat., July 6. Multiple venues, North Side. Free. www.deutschtownmusicfestival.org N E W S

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OF THE

TOWN {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

F

OR OVER A decade, Antonee First Class has toured with classic English ska band The English Beat as the group’s toaster — but before that, the London-born artist spent much of the 1990s living in and around Pittsburgh. The budding solo artist — who recently released a full-length, Who You Are — talked with CP about his time here running a record store and label with his father, Jamaican-born musician Militant Barry.

HOW DID YOU END UP IN PITTSBURGH? After I left school, England was going through a phase, which I figure my mum and dad could see, and they were going to leave. With me just leaving school, I’m a big grown man, mum and dad leaving England, I’m about to take my music all the way now. It took them about a year for the paperwork to go through, and I was ripping and running, doing the usual young-guy stuff. Then I said to myself, “You know what? I can get a free vacation to America! Why don’t I go for three months? I’ve seen it on TV and all.” So I decided, I’m going. Stopped in New York: Everybody is there, got people 20 years ahead of me there. My grandma, etc., are in Pittsburgh; my mum and dad decided to go to Pittsburgh and I followed them. I was around 18 or 19 — 1989, ’90, around there. That’s where it all started.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CASPER PHOTOGRAPHICS}

Keeping the Beat: Antonee First Class

had a shop called Slate, then he moved on and we decided to stay right there in Wilkinsburg and set up shop, open a record store, DJ with a big full sound system, promotion of concerts. It was me and him that did the store together. That was about 10 years straight.

AND YOU RAN A RECORD SHOP? Me and my dad. My dad’s a musician, a reggae artist, producer. Everything I have, I’ve gotta give him the credit. We were first working with a guy in Wilkinsburg who

THE ENGLISH BEAT WITH THE HEAD

6 p.m. Thu., July 11. Bessemer Court, Station Square. Free. All ages. www.stationsquare.com

WHAT WAS THE ATMOSPHERE HERE LIKE FOR THAT KIND OF MUSIC? When I first came to Pittsburgh, it was like, more the live instruments, roots, versus the dance hall. They had a few Pittsburgh bands, like Chill Factor and The Flow Band: I used to go wherever they’d play, and we’d go up and toast, MC, rap with them. At that time, there were two kinds of reggae people: There was the people who knew reggae from Bob Marley, and there was the guys from the so-called “’hood,” who heard reggae but didn’t know it that well. And those guys liked the DJs. We came with the CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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TOAST OF THE TOWN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

Jamaican sound system: two turntables, big speaker, amplifier, whatever. And we used to just play music off that, to the urban crowd. And at the same time, we was rapping and toasting over the instrumentals on the records we was playing. You still got that, even with the DJ. There’s a Jamaican community in Pittsburgh. A lot of it is underground. That’s where we mainly stayed. There was restaurants, record stores at the time, there’s DJs, everything.

ON THE RECORD

with Wayne Coyne

of The Flaming Lips

{BY NICK KEPPLER}

WAS YOUR DAD OUT TOURING A LOT WHEN YOU WERE YOUNG? Oh yeah. And besides his music, he was road-managing for a lot of touring artists. He was out as much as I’m out. AND YOU KNEW FROM A YOUNG AGE THAT THIS WAS THE LIFE FOR YOU. Oh yeah. My house in England — it was like what Bob Marley had in Jamaica. Musicians in and out; my closet in my own bedroom was filled with records that was being sold. ARE YOU PARENTS STILL AROUND PITTSBURGH? Yeah, we frequent the area. Mum and Dad are in and out. You’ll probably see my dad; he’s a big, 6-foot-tall Rasta man. You’ll see him somewhere in Pittsburgh. I’ve got many family in Pittsburgh. Of all the places I get to, Pittsburgh is my home away from home. WHEN DID YOU HOOK IN WITH DAVE WAKELING AND THE ENGLISH BEAT? It was probably about the middle of 2000. He had a show in New York, and I was living there at that point. But you know what? Before that — Dave had a show in Pittsburgh, and it was called “The English Beat” — it was at the one next to Metropol back in those days. But in England they were called The Beat. So I saw it in the City Paper and I thought, “What kind of band is this? They’ve got the same logo, this ain’t the band!” So I didn’t even go to the show. Then while in New York, I seen a flier again, same logo, and I thought, “I gotta go see this band. They’re not the real thing, they’re making a run for it.” So I went to the show, then after I seen Dave Wakeling singing, I said, “What?” But he didn’t have a toaster at the time. And I knew all of those guys, Ranking Roger and them, from a kid growing up in England. I went and spoke to Dave: I said, “Dave, you’re doing your thing, but you know you need your toaster up there.” Plus my dad had contacted him before, I believe. But that’s how it happened — a couple weeks later, he was playing in New Jersey, he threw me on stage. After that, we was on tour. AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013

{PHOTO COURTESY OF GEORGE SALISBURY}

The Flaming Lips’ Wayne Coyne

The Flaming Lips are touring behind The Terror, the neo-psychedelic band’s 13th and darkest album, one seemingly obsessed with loneliness, futility and suffering. THE TERROR IS A PRETTY BLEAK ALBUM. WHAT INSPIRED IT? Life is about contemplating who you are and what you are about, and when we contemplated that, we created this sound that evokes that. That sound we hit on told us what to sing. We just make sounds that appeal to us and turn them into some structure. And I agree. When I hear The Terror as a whole piece of music I think, “That’s some bleak, powerful shit.” I don’t think that has to be bad. I don’t think music or art is supposed to just lay there. I think you are supposed to feel something from it. WAS IT INSPIRED BY A DARK PERIOD IN YOUR LIFE? I don’t really have dark periods and light periods. I have a little bit of darkness every day and a little bit of light every day. YOU’VE BEEN IN THE FLAMING LIPS SINCE YOU WERE IN YOUR 20S. DID BEING IN A BAND MAKE YOU MORE CONFIDENT WITH WOMEN BACK THEN? I don’t think I ever had a problem with that. In the entertainment business, you either find a way to do this thing I am doing right now, speaking without being self-aware, or you quit. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE FLAMING LIPS with SPIRITUALIZED. 6:30 p.m. Tue., July 16. Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $35$37. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com


MELLON SQUARE SUMMER CONCERT S E R I E S

BROUGHT TO YOU BY 96.9 BOB FM, Q929, AND PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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OPUS ONE PRESENTS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KAELA SPEICHER}

In transition: Coronado (from left: Brian Swed, Richard Stanley, Martin Connolly, Alexander Sands, Marc Martinka)

NORTH SIDE STORY {BY ANDY MULKERIN} CORONADO IS AT a bit of a crossroads. The

North Side-based five-piece lost its guitarist, Andy Carlson, earlier this year when he moved back to California, and the band also recently took on its fifth(!) new bass player, Marty Connolly. So it seemed like the right time to release an EP that would help transition from the old Coronado to the new — thus Past, Present, Future, which the band releases this month. “We’re planning to release a full-length in the fall,” explains keyboardist and vocalist Alexander Sands. “But we had songs recorded with Andy that we hadn’t released yet. So that’s the past, the present is where we are now, obviously, and the new lineup is the future.”

spent much of his college time in Chicago playing blues harp with other artists — talk about old-school.) Some of the others in the band are more in tune with today’s music — but “today’s music,” in ways, also echoes historical trends, with banjos and foot-stomping back in vogue. Coronado finds itself somewhere close to, but not in the middle of, all that. And locally Sands says the band feels “kind of like the black sheep” in a city that “has a strong metal scene, and a strong bluegrass scene. We don’t really fit in with those things.” Sands’ sweet piano- and organ-playing tends to put a country-rock sheen on everything it touches — and some of the songwriting fits with that. (“El Dorado” could be straight out of The Band’s catalog.) Coronado hasn’t given up the pop songwriting that characterized its first release, but it has, it seems, started to find its sound on the new EP. (The band originally got together via Craigslist musician ads, so it makes sense that it would take a little time to gel; the good news is that it’s worked.) To celebrate the release, the band decided not to have a show — but to have four shows. Each Friday night in July, Coronado will play along with a guest at the Park House on the North Side; Sands has played, and booked music, there since moving to the neighborhood upon his return from Chicago in 2008. The first show, on July 5, will be an acoustic set, but the remaining three will feature the full band. The July 5 guest is Robin Vote; July 12 is Emily Rodgers; July 19 is touring artist Daniel Lefkowitz; and July 26 features Randy Baumann.

CORONADO HAS STARTED TO FIND ITS SOUND ON THE NEW EP

08/10 ANDREW STOCKDALE (OF WOLFMOTHER) 08/15 MICKEY HART BAND

HOFFMAN ROAD BAND (EARLY) THE DRESSED FRETS (LATE) JILL SOBULE & JULIA SWEENEY THE DROWNING MEN VIENNA TENG THE BLACK LILLIES SHEAR SHAZAR (EARLY) SALLIE FORD & THE SOUND OUTSIDE (LATE) 07/13 CLUB CAFE POP-UP DINNER W/MARY FAHL (OF OCTOBER PROJECT) (EARLY) 07/13 BETHESDA (LATE)

07/05 07/05 07/06 07/07 07/09 07/11 07/12 07/12

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013

CORONADO CDRELEASE RESIDENCY Starts Fri., July 5; continues Fridays through July. Park House, 403 E. Ohio St., North Side. 412-224-2273 or www.parkhousepgh.com

The title could also be interpreted as something of an interpretation of what Coronado does in a more general sense. Sands is admittedly steeped much more in older music; he spent years plying the trade of a folk singer-songwriter before getting together with a rock band. (He also says he

A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


CRITICS’ PICKS Fitz and the Tantrums

weed references. But Lionize is pretty much a pioneer in mixing the two. The Maryland four-piece combines upbeats and organs with fuzzy guitars to sound like Clutch produced by Lee “Scratch” Perry. (Clutch guitarist Tim

[ALT-FOLK] + FRI., JULY 05

Rocky Votolato was with the Seattle band Waxwing for years, but it was with his solo work that he began to find more popularity. (His brother and Waxwing bandmate, Cody, also found breakout success elsewhere — as the guitarist in Blood Brothers.) Votolato’s simple, country-tinged singer-songwriter material, with its clear Dylan influences, landed him on Barsuk Records (and on Chuck Ragan’s Revival Tour this year). He’s currently on tour with Philly rockers mewithoutyou; that tour comes to Mr. Small’s tonight. Andy Mulkerin 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $15. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

Lionize

[FLAMENCO GUITAR] + FRI., JULY 05 Nothing says summer like al fresco concert time at the Frick Art and Historical Center: Tonight, Canadian-born, Italian-raised flamenco guitarist Robert Michaels headlines. The Junonominated artist has played with some of the greats, including Jimmy Page. Bring a picnic snack and the kids to King Coal’s lawn, and watch Michaels play with his touring rhythm section, in a format we’d hesitate to refer to as a “power trio.” AM 7 p.m. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. $5 donation. All ages. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrick pittsburgh.org

[STONER REGGAE] + SAT., JULY 06 It seems unexpected, but when you think about it, the real surprise is that no one did it earlier. Stoner rock and reggae are both generally bassheavy, jam-oriented, use minor keys a lot and heavily feature

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Suit is an on-and-off member of the band.) Lionize plays Altar Bar tonight with Alive in the Underground and Revolution Radio. AM 7 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $12-14. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

[NEW SOUL] + MON., JULY 08

Fitz and the Tantrums proved that an indie-pop band could do soul in a genuine way on its debut album, Picking Up the Pieces, in 2010. But on the latest Rocky album, More than Just Votolato a Dream, the band has added an electronic edge reminiscent of the 1980s to its signature style. You can catch them on tour this Monday, at Mr. Small’s with special guests Saints of Valory and Ivy Levan. Kira Scammell 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $23.50. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013

31ST STREET PUB. Die Sektor, Rein[Forced], Frontal Bound. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Skullface, Cx.Fx., Forced, Bit Mummy, Cerebral Apophysis. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Geen Stovall Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. The Dressed Frets, Dan Getkin and the Masters of American Music, Mike Suley (Late) Hoffman Road Band, Douglas & the Iron Lung (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Brazilian Wax, Grumpy, MegaWolf, Bunny Five Coat. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LINDEN GROVE. Nightlife. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MOONDOG’S. Bill Deasy. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. mewithoutYou, Rocky Votolato, Auctioneer. Millvale. 866-468-3401. REX THEATER. Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo, Don Strange & the Doosh Bears, Los Monster Trucks. Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo EP release. M.C.’d by Derek Minto. South Side. 412-381-6811. ST. CLAIR PARK. Brother Joscephus & The Love Revolution. Greensburg. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Dirty Charms, Chip Dimonick, Mother’s Little Helpers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 06 31ST STREET PUB. Doctor Smoke, Mother Hawk, The Devil’s Cut. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Lionize. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Jill Sobule & Julia Sweeney. South Side. 412-431-4950. DAVID LAWRENCE CONVENTION CENTER. Matthew Ebel. Downtown. 412-565-6000. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Rule of Two, Shutterdown, Action Camp. Aliquippa. 724-375-5080. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Jack Klatt, Cheers Elephant. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Jones for Revival. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. The Pure Zeppelin Experience. South Side. 412-381-3497. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Grand Piano, The Red Western. North Side. 412-904-3335. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Tom Watt & the Fruitcakes. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. KOPEC’S. Water District, Sulla, The Beauregards, A Prior I. Lawrenceville. 412-452-2054. LA CASA NARCISI. The Elliotts. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. LEAF & BEAN. Adam Marsland. Strip District. 412-434-1480. MOONDOG’S. Norman Nardini. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PENN BREWERY. Derek Davis & the Tasty Groove. North Side. 412-237-9400. PIZON’S. Candy Store Rock, Lize. Perryopolis. 724-677-2737. SMILING MOOSE. Under Indictment, Tappin Deep, Simply Chillin. South Side. 412-431-4668.

SUN 07 ALTAR BAR. The Maine. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. The Drowning Men, Household Stories, The Brushfire. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. One Hit Wonder Spaktacular. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MONROEVILLE COMMUNITY PARK. Tres Lads. Monroeville. 412-856-1006. REX THEATER. The Big Beatles Show. Beatles tribute by local musicians. Benefits the Pittsburgh Guitars Music Education Scholarship Fund. South Side. 412-431-0700. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. The Armadillos, Allegheny Rhythm Rangers. Weather Permitting Concert Series. Shadyside. 412-251-6058. SMILING MOOSE. Filligar,

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip! CLEVELAND {TUE., JULY 09}

Kurt Vile Grog Shop

PHILADELPHIA {SAT., JULY 13}

Wire

Union Transfer

COLUMBUS {FRI., AUG. 23}

Bat for Lashes Newport Music Hall


The 4onthefloor. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Kobo Town, Truth & Rites. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

MON 08 222 ORMSBY. Japanther, Unstoppable Death Machines, Nic Lawless & his Young Criminals, Shisa. Mt. Oliver. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Jesse Denaro, Julian, The Dumplings, Worn Colors. Garfield. 412-361-2262. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Fitz & The Tantrums. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. Johnny & the Razorblades, Super Fun Time Awesome Party Band, Draw Blood, Brothers Gross. South Side. 412-431-4668.

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Salsa Friday. Downtown. 412-325-6769. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Reggae Fridays. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. LAVA LOUNGE. 80’s New Wave Flashback. w/ DJ Electric. South Side. 412-431-5282. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Good Vibes Coalition. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Dance/ top 40 hits. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3730. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 06

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. CLUB CAFE. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. Vienna Teng, Alex Wong. CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals South Side. 412-431-4950. & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. FRANKIE’S. The House Band. 412-687-2157. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. HOWLERS COYOTE 412-431-8800. CAFE. Jayke Orvis & The THE NEW Broken Band, Wreck AMSTERDAM. Tom Loose. Bloomfield. Cox, Jwan Allen, ww. r w 412-682-0320. Preslav. Lawrenceville. pe ghcitypa p SMILING MOOSE. Real 412-904-2915. .com Friends, Candy Hearts, REDBEARDS. DJ Stickup Kid, Trophies. South Kayoss. Dance/top Side. 412-431-4668. 40 hits. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3730. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. South Side. 412-431-2825. The Love Letters. Lawrenceville. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-683-5992. 412-481-7227. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Math The Band, Mustache Required, Sneaky Mike. Garfield. 412-361-2262. RIVERS CASINO. DJs Bill Bara HARD ROCK CAFE. Passafire, & Digital Dave. North Side. Stick Figure. Station Square. 412-231-7777. 412-481-7625. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage THE R BAR. The Bill Ali Band. Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Dormont. 412-942-0882. Electro, post punk, industrial, new SMILING MOOSE. Phone Calls wave, alternative dance. South From Home, Rain Audio. South Side. 412-431-4668. Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Open Exchange Series feat. Silencio. Turntable Night. East Liberty. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. 412-363-8277.

TUE 09

FULL LIST ONLINE

WED 10

SUN 07

TUE 09

DJS

WED 10

THU 04 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. LAVA LOUNGE. DeeJay Spaed, SCVM, Huck Finn. South Side. 412-431-5282. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FRI 05 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Summer Fling Fridays. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. Global/ Tropical Bass party. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900.

AVA BAR & LOUNGE. When Life Gives You Lemons.DANCE. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. QUIET STORM COFFEEHOUSE RESTAURANT. Beats n’ Eats. Midday dance party feat. house DJ, menu specials, more. Friendship. 412-661-9355. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 05 SMILING MOOSE. LEC, Gene Stovall, Fortified PhonetX. South Side. 412-431-4668. ST. CLAIR PARK. Brother Josephus & The Love Revolution.

Pizza & Beer Night tuesdays

SummerSounds Concert Series. Greensburg. 724-838-4324.

$15 large pizza & pitcher domestic beer FREE POOL all night

BLUES FRI 05

Wind Up wednesdays

FRI, JULY 5 • 9PM

$2 Miller Lite Drafts til 12am FREE POOL all night ½ off Select Appetizers 9-11pm

ROCK N ROLL

PENN BREWERY. The Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-237-9400.

THE DIRTY CHARMS

SAT 06 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. .32-20 Fully Loaded Blues. Robinson. 412-489-5631. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Bill Toms. South Side. 412-431-4090. THE R BAR. Kings Ransom feat. Craig King. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

SUN 07 BROOKLINE PUB. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Brookline. 412-531-0899.

JAZZ

PLUS MOTHERS LITTLE HELPERS AND CHIP DIMONICK

Thirsty thursdays

$7 Yuengling Pitchers til 12am Karaoke 9:30-1:30am

SAT, JULY 6 • 9PM JAM ROCK

JONES FOR REVIVAL

Happy Hour

SUN, JULY 7 • 8PM ALTERNATIVE/CALYPSO

6-8pm

Tues-Fri

07.06 (lower level) BridgeCity Bombshells

KOBO TOWN

Annual Burlesque Birthday Bash www.facebook.com/events/378951972226218/

PLUS TRUTH & RITES MON, JULY 8 • 9:30PM

OPEN STAGE

THU 04 ANDYS. Ronnie Weiss. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. FOX CHAPEL YACHT CLUB. Etta Cox & Al Dowe Band. O’Hara. 412-963-8881. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

WITH CRAIG KING

Now Booking Events, Parties & more

TUES, JULY 9 • 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES

Open 7 days a week for special events contact cattivo44@comcast.net

FT.

SILENCIO

146 44th Street Lawrenceville PA 15201 412.687.2157 www.cattivo.biz Open Tues-Sat 4-2am Check our website & Facebook page for more events

OPEN FOR LUNCH Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

FRI 05 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Robert Michaels. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries’ RH Factor. North Side. 412-904-3335. LA CASA NARCISI. The Etta Cox Trio. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. LITTLE E’S. The Ken Karsh Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

TOUR

SAT 06 ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. FRESCO’S RUSTIC EUROPEAN CUISINE & WINE BAR. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Wexford. 724-935-7550. HARRISON HILLS PARK. Tania Grubbs. Natrona Heights. 724-295-3570. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Al Dowe, Etta Cox. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Dr. Zoot. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. Jared Wilson & The Vibe. Downtown. 412-392-2217. RIVERVIEW PARK. Eric Johnson. North Side. 412-255-2493.

JULY 4 SCVM (LOS ANGELES), DJ HUCK FINN

station square

ALL AGES / GATES OPEN AT 4PM

JULY 11 DEREK WOODZ BAND, SUPPER BREAK STRING BAND

JULY 18 BURLESQUE SHOW

$2 PBR Drafts Everyday 9-11

$5 PBR Drafts & Fireball Shot

Lovebettie, Mercury & Music from Another Room

All Day ‘till Midnight

CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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Pittsburgh’s Best Indoor/Outdoor Patio

$13.95 Corona Buckets ALL SUMMER LONG!

10FT HIGH DEFT PROJECTOR SCREEN Book your next private party here! 2314 East Carson Street • Southside • 412-431-9691

*on your computer!

LYNN CULLEN LIVE TALK RADIO without all the static

ONLINE MONDAYFRIDAY 10-11am

only on www. pghcitypaper. com

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WEDNESDAY JULY 3

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS 6:3 0PM to 9PM

GET FOXY WITH US FOR LADIES NIGHT VENDORS • DRINK SAMPLES

Tons of Giveaways! Sponsored by:

Iron City, IC Light, IC Light Mango and Skinny Girl

8000 McKnight Road, Suite 2002 Pittsburgh, PA 15237 www.foxandhound.com | 412.364.1885 HOURS 11:00 AM - 2:00 AM DAILY

30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013

Pittsburgh City Paper editor Chris Potter, every Wednesday and former Andy Warhol Museum director Tom Sokolowski, every Thursday

CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

EARLY WARNINGS

SUN 07 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Four of a Kind. North Side. 412-904-3335. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Etta Cox & Jeff Lashway. Shadyside. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

MON 08 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Interval Jazz Mondays. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. ROYAL PLACE. Jerry Lucarelli, Vince Taglieri, Sunny Sunseri. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000.

TUE 09

Joan of Arc {PHOTO COURTESY OF DIMA ROGOVIK}

Featuring

talk (and bitch and moan and laugh until your cheeks hurt) radio*

ANDYS. Ken Karsh. Downtown. 412-773-8884. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Marty Ashby & Jeff Grubbs. Shadyside.

{FRI., AUG. 16}

WED 10

Psychic TV

ANDYS. Mozik w/ Kenia. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, HOMEWOOD. Jazz Workshop, Inc. Jazz Enssemble. Jazz On The Steps. Homewood. 412-441-2039. CJ’S. Gene Stoval. Strip District. 412-642-2377. RODEF SHALOM CONGREGATION. Boilermaker Jazz Band. Oakland. 412-621-6566.

New Hazlett Theater, Allegheny Square, North Side

{SAT., AUG. 31}

Joan of Arc

Garfield Artworks, 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield

{Fri., Sept. 27}

Stars

Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale

ACOUSTIC THU 04 BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000.

FRI 05

MON 08

Wilkins Twp. 412-825-6510.

HAMBONE’S. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. NORTH COUNTRY BREWING. Bluegrass Night. Slippery Rock. 724-794-2337.

COUNTRY

WED 10

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Weds. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & North Side. 412-321-1834. TAVERN. Lenny & Jeff. Richland. BUHL COMMUNITY PARK. 724-444-7333. AppalAsia. www.solarconcertseries. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. John org. North Side. Raymond. Regent Square. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ 412-999-9009. The Shelf Life String Band. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. North Side. 412-224-2273. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631. FRESCO’S RUSTIC EUROPEAN CUISINE www. per & WINE BAR. pa pghcitym HAMBONE’S. Rich Purcell & Shari .co Choro No Vinho, Charlie Richards. Wexford. Rappaport. Lawrenceville. 724-935-7550. 412-681-4318. MULLANEY’S HARP & FIDDLE. Tim & John. Strip District. 412-642-6622. PITTSBURGH PUBLIC MARKET. W. NEW CASTLE ST. PLAZA. Vince Burns. Strip District. Matuto. Butler. 724-256-5769. 412-281-4505.

FULL LIST ONLINE

WORLD FRI 05

SAT 06

SAT 06

MARS BREW HOUSE. Brad Yoder. Mars. 724-625-2555. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

SUN 07 HAMBONE’S. Calliope East End Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

REGGAE FRI 05 KELLY’S RIVERSIDE SALOON. The Flow Band. Bridgewater. 724-728-0222.

SAT 06 BREWSTONE. The Flow Band.

WED 10 OUR LADY OF THE MOST BLESSED SACRAMENT PARISH. Steeltown. Natrona Heights. 724-226-4900.

CLASSICAL SUN 07 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-767-9200.

WED 10

AEROLIN WINDS. Avonworth Community Park, Ohio Township. 412-766-1700.

OTHER MUSIC THU 04 LEMONT. Judi Figel. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

FRI 05 LEMONT. NiteStar. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. MEADOWS CASINO. Mercedez. Washington. 724-503-1200.

SAT 06 MEADOWS CASINO. Airborne. Washington. 724-503-1200.

MON 08

HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz standards & showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

July 3 - 9 Independence Day Celebration

HIGHMARK STADIUM Station Square. Free event. For more information visit highmarkstadium.com. 6:30p.m.

28 North ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Black Market Diary & Act of Pardon. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

Nude Beach CLUB CAFÉ South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guests Jet Set Vapour Trails & The Beauregards. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 4 43

Blondes Have More Fun - Rod Stewart Tribute Live On The River RIVERS CASINO North Shore.

DISNEY’S THE LITTLE MERMAID

Over 21 show. Free event. For more information visit riverscasino.com 7p.m.

TUESDAY, JULY 9 BENEDUM CENTER

Westmoreland Arts and Heritage Festival

PHOTO BILLY BUSTAMANTE

WEDNESDAY 3 32

newbalancepittsburgh.com

TWIN LAKES PARKS Greensburg. Free Event. From more information visit artsandheritage.com. Through July 7.

FRIDAY 54 5

The Amazing Acro Cats THE GREY BOX THEATRE Lawrenceville. For more information & tickets visit circuscats.com. Through July 9.

Stay Gold for Gumba: A Benefit for the Center of Victims ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With Paradox Please, Real Deal, Mike Wysocki & more. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

mewithoutYou MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special

Oakland. 412-326-9687. For more information visit otsummerfest.org. Through July 21.

SUNDAY 7 76 The Maine

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests A Rocket to the Moon, This Century & Brighten. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

The Drowning Men guests Rocky Votolato & Auctioneer. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

SATURDAY 6 65

show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

HEINZ FIELD North Shore. With special guests Ed Sheeran & Austin Mahone. Tickets: 800745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. 6:30p.m.

Jill Sobule

Taylor Swift

The Dressed Frets CLUB CAFÉ South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guests Dan Getkin and the Masters of Music & Mike Suley. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 10p.m.

Lionize ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Alive in the Underground & Revolution Radio. All ages

CLUB CAFÉ South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guest Julia Sweeney. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 7p.m.

Opera Theater Summer Fest TWENTIETH CENTURY CLUB

CLUB CAFÉ South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guests Household Stories and The Brushfire. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticket web.com/opusone. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 98 Disney’s The Little Mermaid

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghclo.org. Through July 21.

4TH OF JULY SALE SELECT STYLES 30-50% OFF

OPEN JULY 4TH 10AM-5PM

WEXFORD

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

y a d h t r i B s ’ a c i r Celebrate Ame burgh!

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

ts with New Balance Pit

PITTSBU RG H’S L ARG EST SELECTI O N O F N EW BAL AN CE SH O ES I N SIZES AN D WI DTHS N E W S

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OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 newbalancepittsburgh.com

FACEBO O K.CO M / N EWBAL AN CEPG H +

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WORLD WAR {BY AL HOFF}

A MATINEE-STYLE WESTERN INTO WHICH A PREENING JOHNNY DEPP HAS INSERTED HIMSELF

Rock Rowley’s film Dirty Wars follows investigative journalist Jeremy Scahill through the shadows — from a coveredup U.S. Army night raid in Afghanistan to the current off-the-books actions of the super-secret Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC) in Yemen and Somalia. The film is part investigative report, part docu-drama and part meditation on the long-term costs of clandestine U.S. military actions overseas. “The war on terror,” Scahill summarizes, “has transformed into a self-fulfilling prophecy.”

WAY OUT

Jeremy Scahill works in the dark.

WEST

CP APPROVED

Scahill writes for The Nation, and also penned the influential exposé Blackwater, about the titular military contractor. A lot of the shocking detail is buried in mountains of data, and that’s the value of a yard dog like Scahill. Before JSOC came to light, Scahill would find photos, often buried in foreign press or overlooked reports, of U.S. military commanders wearing uniforms missing key insignia. He converts military numerical charts of enemy kills into the names of women and children killed by secret strikes in Yemen. It’s a story, he says, of the “seen and the unseen, and what’s hidden in plain sight.” The rub with black ops, of course, is that it’s hard to find independent sources to verify one’s claims. But if only a fraction of what Scahill posits is happening, it’s disturbing enough. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

In English, and various languages, with subtitles. Starts Fri., July 5. Harris

MAYBE IT’S MAYBELLINE: 10 YEARS OF REMAKES WITH JOHNNY DEPP IN KOOKY MAKEUP.

Pirates of the Caribbean (2003), Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005), Pirates of the Caribbean bean 2 (2006), Pirates of the Caribbean 3 (2007), Sweeney weeney Todd (2007),, Alice in Wonderland rland (2010), Pirates rates of the Caribbean bbean 4 (2011), Dark Shadows (2012) 012) and The Lone Ranger (2013) 2013)

{BY AL HOFF}

T

HERE ARE THOSE who find Johnny Depp’s cartoonish, heavily made-up pantomimes an amusing and welcome addition to a remake, and those who don’t. Depp’s latest round of bewigged mannerisms in The Lone Ranger is sure to put even more daylight between the two camps. Gore Verbinski’s reboot — which, at 150 minutes, takes almost as long as it took to win the West — is an origin story for the masked hero (Armie Hammer) and his Comanche partner, Tonto, as they join forces to address a checklist of issues. These include: Tonto’s vengeance for a long-ago “bad trade”; capturing the outlaw who killed the Ranger’s brother; throwing a wrench into the expansion of the transcontinental railway; rescuing the perennially imperiled woman and child; and setting up a new movie franchise devoted to the continuing adventures of the Lone Ranger and Tonto. This is a Disney movie, produced by cinematic-mayhem master Jerry Bruckheimer for maximum megaplex impact,

Who are these masked men? Tonto (Johnny Depp) and the Lone Ranger (Armie Hammer)

so it’s as bloated and formulaic as you’d expect. (Wrecks-and-effects count: three train derailments and four explosions.) Which brings us back to Depp, who plays — and I do mean plays — Tonto. Excusing the cannibalistic villain, Depp’s Tonto is the twist designed to juice up this golden oldie.

THE LONE RANGER DIRECTED BY: Gore Verbinski STARRING: Armie Hammer, Johnny Depp, William Fichtner, Tom Wilkinson

And here’s where things get odd. Without Depp, you have a fair old-school Western, with a dashing hero, a pair of bad guys — one grubby and violent (William Fichtner), the other unctuous and urbane (Tom Wilkinson) — some kicky action scenes, a laugh or two, and magnificent Southwest scenery. But that’s presumably not entertaining enough for today’s post-ironic audiences, and thus Depp (who’s also an

executive producer) jumps in, indulging his full range of patented shtick. Here’s a white guy with mud on his face playing an Indian; he’s got Jack Sparrow’s hairdo and a dead bird on his head. (You will never ever stop staring at this bird.) Add a random pidgin-English accent, a mincing walk, much eye-rolling and mugging, and it’s … Johnny Depp. Some will love it; others, like myself who are weary of Depp’s similar characters, will find Tonto/Depp a constant distraction. Thus, The Lone Ranger is a matineestyle Western into which a preening Johnny Depp has inserted himself. (Depp plays a second, even more made-up role, in the film’s incomprehensible framing device, in which a super-old Tonto comes to life in a carnival diorama labeled “The Noble Savage.” It’s in the running for the worst scene of 2013.) Early on, Tonto tells the Lone Ranger, “There come a time, kemosabe, when good man must wear mask.” Hey, Johnny Depp: “There come a time when good actor must not wear mask.” A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013


FILM CAPSULES CP

that they will conquer Earth in less than 60 days in Fred Sears’ 1956 sci-fi classic. Science eventually saves the day, but not before the aliens wreak much destruction on Washington, D.C., in the film’s famous Ray Harryhausen stop-motion animation sequences. Yikes! The Washington Monument just got sliced in half! The film opens a month-long, Sunday-night series of films featuring the late Harryhausen’s work. 8 p.m. Sun., July 7. Regent Square

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW AT ANY PRICE. In a departure from his earlier, lightly plotted, micro-budget New York Citycentric indies like Chop Shop and Man Push Cart, director Ramin Bahrani offers this family melodrama, set in rural Iowa, starring big Hollywood names. Dennis Quaid portrays a struggling corn famer battling big ag and his layabout son (Zac Efron), who would rather drive stock cars than work the farm. Quaid gives a great performance as the glad-handing but not-very-nice farmer, who doubles as seed salesman. There are some trenchant bits about the tough new economic landscape, where family farming is a dying myth and the American Dream has scrambled into the realm of fantasy. (The son dreams of a NASCAR shortcut.) But as the story comes to a head over twin conflicts of seeds and sons, the plot shifts into predictable crises, which would be more at home in a TV movie than in a thoughtful study of real-life tough choices. The overall subject matter is worthy — the collapsing middle class rarely get its due, even on film — but the execution is unnecessarily juiced up. Starts Fri., July 5. Regent Square (Al Hoff) DESPICABLE ME 2. The first Despicable Me, about a villain derailed by family duties, was a surprisingly fresh animated comedy, and introduced the world to the adorable, jabbering minions. Thus, it’s inevitable that this sequel should feel more calculated to double down on the success of the original. So we get a very slim plot: The reformed villain Gru (voice of Steve Carrell) is recruited by an antivillain-squad agent (Kristen Wiig) to hunt down a bad guy with a dangerous potion. It’s mostly an excuse for some groovy set pieces and gadgets; jokes and sight gags galore; and minions, minions, minions. It’s clear filmmakers Pierre Coffin and Chris Renaud know which side of their marketing toast is buttered — it was the rare scene that didn’t feature minions doing something cute or funny. To my jaded eyes, it looked like overkill. But the kids at the screening went simply mad with delight for every single minion moment. The people have spoken: Just give us minions! In 3-D in select theaters (AH)

CP

THE KINGS OF SUMMER. Frustrated that their boring summer is being persecuted by well-meaning parents in a small Ohio town, three teenage boys run away. Not very far — they simply move into the woods near town, build a fort from salvage and generally just really, really enjoy being free. That’s the slim plot for first-time director Jordan Vogt-Roberts’ comedy, which will play like a fantasy for today’s endlessly managed kids (and a nostalgic look back for those of us old enough to have enjoyed roam-around-free summers). The main story is predictable, but some of the trappings are fresh and quirky. One boy is a delightful oddball, and everything Nick Offerman and Megan Mullally

CP

N E W S

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The Kings of Summer (portraying two of the parents) say is comedy gold. In a summer of bombastic, CGI-heavy action pics, consider this smaller film the equivalent of a fun day throwing rocks in a stream. Starts Fri., July 5. AMC Loews (AH) WHITE HOUSE DOWN. For the second time in three months — at least on the big screen — the White House is under attack. Last time it was the North Koreans in Olympus Has Fallen; in Roland Emmerich’s actioner-with-laughs, it’s a group of rogue Beltway insiders. Like Olympus, the entire plot relies on the White House, with all its attendant security and infrastructure, and our military being utterly unprepared for when a couple of guys with guns stroll in and take over. And similarly, it’s too bad that White House Down the one guy (Channing Tatum) the White House invaders don’t kill is the one ass-kicker who’s gonna bring them down, and save the president (Jamie Foxx). Despite the grave subject matter, most of this film is played for laughs. I don’t know what these back-toback destroy-the-WhiteHouse movies say about our national psyche, but it’s probably something dark and disturbing. Still, why think about it when you can watch President Jamie Foxx shoot an RPG from the presidential limo while careening around the White House lawn? (AH)

July 11 (Brookline). The Vow, Wed., July 10 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-422-6426 or www.citiparks. net. Free LA PLAYA, D.C. A Colombian teenager flees his coastal town to try his luck in the tough streets of Bogota, in writer-director Juan Andrés Arango Garcia’s drama. In Spanish, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 3. Hollywood GHOSTBUSTERS. It’s been nearly 30 years since this crisis broke, but it seems we’re still no safer from pesky ectoplasm. Well, you know who to call! This popular 1984 comedy from Ivan Reitman, starring Bill Murray, Dan Ackroyd and Harold Ramis, explains it all. 7 p.m. Fri., July 5; 2 and 5 p.m. Sat., July 6; and 2 and 5 p.m. Sun., July 7. Hollywood

FILM KITCHEN. The monthly series for independent and local artists presents an evening of politically themed work. Highlights include “American Mayor,” filmmaker and comedian Travis Irvine’s 40-minute documentary about his 2007 run for mayor of his hometown of Bexley, Ohio, when he was a dreadlocked kid living with his parents. (The 2009 film made the festival rounds; a TV ad from the campaign was featured on The Tonight Show.) Irvine, now 29 and living in New York City, also screens three ads from his later run for Congress, as a Libertarian comedically criticizing federal spending. Also screening are shorts made for Healthy Artists, Pittsburgh-based artist and activist Julie Sokolow’s project advocating universal health care. Garret Jones and Anthony De Angelis’ 30-minute “Healthy Artists (the movie!)” explores the issue of artists who lack health insurance, as well as a poster contest Sokolow held to highlight the issue. Two shorter videos profile individual local artists, including painter Gabe Felice and musician, crafter and performance artist Jenn Gooch, whom medical bills forced into bankruptcy. State Sen. Jim Ferlo is also scheduled to speak on the fight for universal health care. 8 p.m. Tue., July 9. Melwood Screening Room, 477 Melwood Ave., North Oakland. $5. 412-681-9500 (Bill O’Driscoll) THE LAST WALTZ. Martin Scorsese brought his cameras to San Francisco’s Winterland Ballroom in

Despicable Me 2

REPERTORY THE REP. Morgan White’s recent doc, which began as a web series, portrays the year that three filmloving “misfits” open and try to maintain a rep movie house in Toronto. To be sure, they learn some hard lessons about running a business, but White also fills out the film with other rep-house owners and managers talking about the fragility of the industry. How do you fill that space between firstrun blockbusters at the megaplex and practically every movie ever made being available for viewing in one’s living room? White is so committed to preserving quirky, communal cinema spaces that he’s letting indie theaters that show his film, like the Oaks, keep all the proceeds from the screening. 7 p.m. Wed., July 3. Oaks CINEMA IN THE PARK. The Dark Knight Rises, Wed., July 3 (Schenley) and Sat., July 6 (Riverview). Hotel Transylvania, Fri., July 5 (Arsenal); Sat., July 6 (Grandview); and Sun., July 7 (Schenley). The Goonies, Tue., July 9 (West End/Elliott Overlook), and Thu.,

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VACATION. Clark Griswold (Chevy Chase) wants to take his family to Wally World, but the trip turns into a nightmare. Harold Ramis directs this 1983 comedy adapted from John Hughes’ National Lampoon short story. 9:15 p.m. Fri., July 5; 7:15 and 9:30 p.m. Sat., July 6; and 7:15 p.m. Sun., July 7, at Hollywood. Also, 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 10, at AMC Waterfront.

CP

JAWS. Steven Spielberg’s aqua-thriller terrified beach-goers in the summer of 1975, when it unspooled the tale of a great white shark eating swimmers along the Atlantic seaboard. Richard Dreyfuss, Robert Shaw and Roy Scheider hit the waves to capture the man-eater: They’re gonna need a bigger boat, and you should see this on a bigger screen. It’s still lots of scary fun. 10 p.m. Fri., July 5, and 10 p.m. Sat., July 6. Oaks (AH) EARTH VS. THE FLYING SAUCERS. Invaders from outer space land and warn disbelieving bureaucrats

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1976 to document the last performance of The Band. Captured for posterity in this 1978 film is a Who’s Who of 1960s and ’70s rock performers, plus a couple of hours of great music. Sharing the spotlight with The Band are Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, Emmylou Harris, Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Mavis and Pops Staples, Muddy Waters, Van Morrison and, yes, Neil Diamond. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 10; 9:15 p.m. Fri., July 12; 9:15 p.m. Sat., July 13; and 4 p.m. Sun., July 14. Hollywood COMPUTER CHESS. Andrew Bujalski’s comedy is set at a weekend tournament for chess-software programmers in the early 1980s, a.k.a. before nerds got cool. 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 11. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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[OPERA]

MAYBE SHE DATED A ROBOTIC MATHEMATICIAN, MAYBE SHE DIDN’T

FEST REPRISED

Last year, Opera Theater of Pittsburgh remade itself as a 17-day summer festival at Fox Chapel’s Shady Side Academy. The result was the 35-year-old company’s most financially successful season. Now Summer Fest returns, at a notable in-city venue. The Twentieth Century Club is a grand private structure neighboring Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall. And the Club, with its limestone Beaux Arts exterior, sits amidst the company’s core audience, two-thirds of whom live in Oakland, Shadyside or Squirrel Hill, says artistic director Jonathan Eaton. Eaton sounds as enthused about occupying the commodious landmark — “one of the hidden architectural jewels of Pittsburgh” — as he does about the diverse works to be performed there July 5-21. The largest Summer Fest production is The Tales of Hoffman Retold. This new adaption of the 1881 opera about German fantasy writer E.T.A. Hoffman’s love life features international star Robert Chafin and a 25-piece orchestra. Directed by Eaton with what he calls a 1930s surrealist feel, it’s staged in the Club’s Art Deco theater, which seats 500. (And, like all the company’s shows, it’s performed in English.) Also in that theater, with its chandeliers and theater boxes, are three performances of Stephen Sondheim’s classic musical comedy A Little Night Music, with Scott Wise directing top local talents Anna Singer and Daniel Teadt. The show reflects Eaton’s desire to engage audiences with programming besides grand opera. The other full productions are staged in what the company’s calling the Beaux Arts Ballroom. This 300-seat space hosts two showings each of: Shining Brow, Daron Hagen’s 1993 opera about Frank Lloyd Wright; The Secret Gardener, a rarely staged early Mozart comedy; and Peter Schickele’s comic Mozart take-off A Little Nightmare Music. Summer Fest also reprises Night Caps, the popular program of comic mini-operas. Night Caps International includes four newly commissioned 15-minute works, all set in the same hotel on different nights. The libretti are by Pittsburgh’s Rob Handel, and composers include Pittsburgh’s Roger Zahab and Chinese composer Guo Yanwa. Night Caps premiere individually; the full cycle is performed twice. And Summer Fest reprises its five-day Mozart Camp, with talks and concerts. Eaton suggests patrons make an evening of it. In-house catered dinners are available, or relax post-show with drinks at the Club’s bar or informal free cabaret performances by company vocalists. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

OPERA THEATER SUMMER FEST July 6-21. Twentieth Century Club, 4201 Bigelow Blvd., Oakland. $10-75. 412-326-9687 or www.otsummerfest.org

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Anna Singer and Daniel Teadt in Opera Theater’s A Little Night Music {PHOTO COURTESY OF AMY CRAWFORD}

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

VARIETY PACK [BOOK REVIEW]

{BY {B Y RO ROBE ROBERT BERT RT ISENBERG} ISEENB NBER ERG} G}

I

N THE SHORT story “The Disappear-

ance of Maliseet Lake,” a large body of water vanishes. It doesn’t dry up. It isn’t diverted. It just ceases to exist, without explanation. The people of Maliseet, Maine, start to panic, as their fishermen face financial ruin. Then, at a town meeting, they conjure up a great idea: Why not sell the lake-bed debris as religious relics? The disappearance was a miracle, right? Who wouldn’t spend good money for a mystical souvenir? No two stories in Aubrey Hirsch’s book read the same, and like many first collections, Why We Never Talk About Sugar flaunts a variety of voices and styles, proving her extraordinary range. But most of her tales share this absurd logic, like magical realism with bills to pay. Hirsch’s characters are generally masochists trapped in circumstantial prisons, but there’s always a trace of sarcasm and smirk, as if to mumble, Can you believe this bullshit? Tortured and bitter as these people can be, bleak humor trickles through, making the book 132 pages of hurtsso-good pleasure. Some stories are technically realistic, like “Leaving Seoul,” about an ESL teacher who falls for a lowrent scam. He meets a woman, they have lots of sex, she

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013

From funhouse mirrors to painfully credible realism: local author Aubrey Hirsch

claims to be pregnant, and pays for an abortion. The interactions and guilt are painfully credible, and because “Leaving Seoul” opens the book, you think you’ve pinned down Hirsch’s style. But wait: Here’s a story about the boy-puppet Pinocchio yearning for a sex-change operation. And here’s a

disgruntled man who will make love to his wife only in a hardware store. “The Borovsky Circus Goes to Littlefield” is about a Russian circus that goes bankrupt and gets stranded in Texas; the story has the ethe-

WHY WE NEVER TALK ABOUT SUGAR By Aubrey Hirsch Braddock Avenue Books, 132 pp., $16

real wonder of a Calvino novel, if Calvino had ever wrung his hands over the fiscal crisis. Bizarre as Hirsch’s plots can be, her


characters have firm motivations, usually involving money or commitment or freedom. Even in “Cheater,” the eeriest story in the bunch, the deluded protagonist wants something specific: She’s not married, but she wears a wedding ring, because she likes to mimic infidelity with random men. Sometimes the stories echo each other’s motifs, like awkward fathers with multiple sclerosis and quirky physicists. In such patterns, Hirsch hints at autobiography. But she doesn’t Xerox her own experiences, as many fiction writers do; if she references real life, she does so coyly. Maybe she dated a robotic mathematician, maybe she didn’t. The line between truth and fiction is too muddied to matter. The most disturbing piece is also Hirsch’s most daring achievement, a longer story called “The Specialists.” Here Hirsch takes her leave of anxious civilians and enters the world of boot camp. Her soldiers are rough and misogynistic, but they’re also strangers to each other; their brotherhood isn’t yet battle-tested. They behave more like new guys in prison, men with fresh nicknames and secret pasts, eager to rebuild identities. We realize that they’re all young, as enlistees are wont to be, and their teenaged misdeeds are still recent events. The standout is Jakewad, a trainee infamous (or maybe just famous) for evading a rape charge. The men ask questions, revealing their twisted admiration, but Jakewad’s machismo melts over time. A male writer might find this territory difficult, a female more so, but Hirsch dives in. Her dialogue is crass and backward: “Reserves is fucking bullshit,” posits one recruit. “You’re either a soldier or a pussy. You can’t be both.” Through the buzz of testosterone, Hirsch suggests that even maggots have souls, but she never sentimentalizes the crime or its consequences, and the resolution is decidedly male. Hirsch is a writing instructor at the University of Pittsburgh and Chatham University, and Sugar is her first volume. Appropriately, her publisher is Braddock Avenue Books, a press that is, well, hot off the presses. Many fiction writers start with this kind of compilation, and Sugar reminds one of Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Intrepreter of Maladies, or Alexandar Hemon’s The Question of Bruno, books that behaved like auditions, announcing to the world their authors’ broad abilities. The question now is where Hirsch will go: Hemon and Lahiri later settled on style and subject matter. Will Hirsch write about the real world, with all its plainspoken heartbreak? Or will she play with funhouse mirrors? Maybe she’ll alternate. Hirsch might not talk about sugar, but she seems geared to write about anything else. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[ART REVIEW]

THE CARPENTERS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Most “folk songs” aren’t. They’re tunes written for a contemporary commercial audience that by choice share the acoustic and melodic properties of actual folk songs — whose own creation predates mass audiences, and which sounded like that because they had to. But a real folk song, like the nightmarish one Susan Philipsz highlights in her Carnegie Museum of Art sound installation One and the Same, can still intrigue and move us. From three wall-mounted speakers comes Philipsz’ voice, unadorned and unaccompanied, singing three different versions of a ballad best known as “The House Carpenter.” It’s about a woman whose lover returns from sea to find she’s married, then lures her from her husband and children with promises of riches and wonders. But their ship abruptly sinks, and all indications are she’s bound for Hell. (Some versions are titled “The Demon Lover.”) Listen to one version at a time, or sit in the Forum Gallery’s center and hear all three sounding, ethereally, at once. In wall text, Philipsz suggests pondering how the three versions she sings differ. Because folk songs grew from the oral tradition, the fact that there are multiple versions of “Carpenter” isn’t odd. But it is worth asking, for instance, why in some versions the lover seems to be a human — or, perhaps, a ghost — whose boat merely “springs a leak,” while in others he’s the Devil himself (complete with cloven feet), who sinks the ship on purpose. And why does one version append a final verse in which the carpenter (who’s offstage in the other version) loudly grieves? “Carpenter” dates from 1685 or earlier, and is Scottish in origin; Scottish artist Philipsz’ lightly accented singing voice is welcome. And it’s among the best-known Western folk songs: Clarence Ashley’s 1930 version was featured on archivist Harry Smith’s landmark 1952 Anthology of American Folk Music, which kick-started the folk revival. The tune has since been covered dozens of times, by everyone from Dylan to Nickel Creek and Natalie Merchant. The society that birthed “House Carpenter” valued social controls rather more than ours does: An early subtitle was “A Warning for Married Women.” It’s a fever dream, a ghost story, lurid entertainment, cautionary tale. From a time and place with a tragic view of life, it’s a window into a foreign culture.

Opening Night

theater that moves you.

July

5

(runs through July 28)

Kirkwood Building in East Liberty 215 N. Highland Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15206

IT’S FEVER DREAM, GHOST STORY, LURID ENTERTAINMENT, CAUTIONARY TALE.

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SUSAN PHILIPSZ: ONE AND THE SAME continues through July 14. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

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For directions, dining options, special events, and tickets visit quantumtheatre.com To order by phone, call Quantum Theatre at 412.362.1713

7:00 PM VIP DINNER PARTY EXCLUSIVE LOCATION

IEGO 7/12/13 9:00 PM SSANAN DDIEGO

D ADAM SALTER, DJ R,,

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[PLAY REVIEW]

GOLDEN YEARS {BY TED HOOVER}

The last time we were at South Park Theatre, we stumbled across a play so dreary I couldn’t figure out why it had ever been produced … and then learned the playwright was Neil Simon’s daughter. Continuing its salute to theatrical nepotism, South Park presents You Haven’t Changed a Bit … And Other Lies. The book and lyrics are by Jerry Mayer, the music is by his son Steve, and the show’s premiere in L.A. was produced by his wife, Emily. But thankfully, You Haven’t Changed is light years ahead of the previous familial offering. Mayer is a television writer and producer of some of the most important TV comedies of the ’70s and ’80s: M*A*S*H*, All in the Family, The Mary Tyler Moore Show and The Facts of Life. This unassuming little piece of work — subtitled “A Musical About Growing Up at 60” — certainly shows Mayer’s flair for gentle, easy humor. There’s not a whole lot of insight informing this tale of three married couples in their 60s who decide to renew their vows. But there is a breezy, pleasant feel to Mayer’s observations on maintaining a decades-long relationship while, at the same time, maintaining an even older body which is changing more rapidly.

THIS UNASSUMING PIECE OF WORK SHOWS A FLAIR FOR GENTLE, EASY HUMOR.

The

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SOUTH PARK THEATRE}

South Park Theatre’s You Haven’t Changed a Bit … And Other Lies

Mayer writes in types, so the couples feel somewhat like stock characters. Steve Fine, played with loving amusement by Keller Lowman, is a bit of a mensch dealing with forgetfulness, while his wife, Sarah (beautifully sung by Mary Randolph), briefly considers an affair, the possibility of which nobody — not the creators, the characters nor the audience — takes seriously. Mike Dooley is the overbearing member of the crew, played with appropriate gusto by Phillip Bower. Joyce Miller brings a quiet nobility as his long-suffering wife, Liz. Eddie and Audrey Bellini feel the most like sitcom creations — subcategory “Wisecracking Sidekicks” — and from them, Bob Ference and Susan Haudenshield get plenty of laughs. If I’m honest, I should say I had only an OK time at You Haven’t Changed a Bit. This is a slender story that evaporates under the lights, and director Rick Campbell needs to imbue considerably more drive, energy and urgency to the production. But, still being honest, I have to say that the audience loved every single second. So if you’re for this kind of show, this kind of show is for you. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

YOU HAVEN’T CHANGED A BIT … AND OTHER LIES continues through July 13. South Park Theatre, Corrigan Drive and Brownsville Road, South Park. $15. 412831-8552 or www.southparktheatre.com

production of

1/2 Price

for Children 3-14!* Sponsored by

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pittsburghCLO.org Groups 412-325-1582

At the Benedum Center

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013


[STAGE]

TIME PIECES {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

SUCH WAS THE global reputation of British theatrical troupe Complicite that in 1999, Quantum Theatre’s Karla Boos arranged to attend the premiere of its show Mnemonic, in London. The work, a nonlinear exploration of memory and human interconnectedness, blew away the artistic director of then9-year-old, Pittsburgh-based Quantum. “I immediately asked them for the rights to do it,” says Boos. Complicite politely refused — fortunately: The technically demanding show “would have been incredibly beyond my scope in 1999,” Boos says. But Mnemonic stuck with her — even as Complicite revived it twice, including for a European tour — and Boos kept asking. Finally, Complicite co-founder and artistic director Simon McBurney said yes. This week, Quantum becomes the first U.S. company to perform this ambitious, deliberately fragmented work. (An email to Complicite seeking comment was unanswered at press time.) Mnemonic, winner of the London Drama Critics Award for Best Play, tells two interconnected stories set in the late ’90s. One

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Quantum Theatre’s Mnemonic

involves the discovery, based on a true story, of an unidentified human body frozen in

QUANTUM THEATRE’S

MNEMONIC

Fri., July 5-July 28. The Kirkwood Building, 215 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. $18-49. www.quantumtheatre.com

the Alps that proves to be 5,200 years old. The other concerns a man named Virgil, who’s trying to find his lover, Alice, who her-

self has suddenly gone to Eastern Europe to search for the father she never knew. A “mnemonic” is a memory aid. The play (collectively devised by the Complicite company) opens with a monologue in which “Simon” explains memory: We’re constantly “re-membering,” or reassembling, the fragments in our ever-shifting brains. “We offer you some of our fragments,” says Simon, before himself shifting into the role of Virgil. The 38 short scenes, for a cast of seven, overlap or bounce off one another

with sometimes-frantic action; the complex sound design (done for Quantum by Joe Pino) partly represents characters’ inner voices. Joe Seamans, who saw Mnemonic in New York and is creating the extensive video design for Quantum’s production, describes the play as “[Simon’s] dream at night — it’s almost like he fell asleep in the theater and had this whole unraveling experience.” Parallels between the play’s two narratives emerge. “The way [Mnemonic is] built opens your mind and senses to the way your own memory functions,” says Boos, who directs Quantum’s production. “All theater wants you to have a personal experience. I really had one when I saw Mnemonic.” The production is housed in a vacant commercial space in East Liberty’s Kirkwood Building, with the audience on risers and the L-shaped performance area featuring the deep upstage reaches Quantum likes. Virgil is played by British actor Malcolm Tulip (from Quantum’s John Gabriel Borkman), and Alice by Carolina Loyola-Garcia (Maria de Buenos Aires). The cast also includes Ken Bolden, Patrick Jordan, Antonio Marziale, Andy Nagraj and Katya Stepanov. Another theme of Mnemonic is human interconnectedness, even across time. Mnemonic, says Boos, “wants you to say, ‘I understand this ice man who lived 5,200 years ago.” D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FOR THE WEEK OF

07.0407.11.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. JULY 04

Pittsburgh Three Rivers Regatta

+ THU., JULY 04 {REGATTA}

Head down to Point State Park today to catch the final day of the 36th annual EQT Pittsburgh Three Rivers Regatta. Alongside the usual motorboat races, the Anything That Floats race, the live music and the carnival atmosphere, for the first time the schedule includes an adrenaline-soaked pogo-stick stunt exhibition called XPOGO. Also see the Marvelous Mutts Dock Dogs show, featuring rescued shelter dogs who perform airborne tricks, including a plunge into a 14,000-gallon tank of water. As always on Independence Day, regatta-goers can stick around to watch the climactic Zambelli fireworks show. Olivia Lammel 8 a.m.11 p.m. Downtown Free. www.threeriversregatta.net

fresh lenses. OL 5:30 p.m. Exhibit continues through July 27. 5831 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. Free. 412-441-6005 or www.galleriechiz.com

{WORDS}

Vouched Books is based in Indianapolis, Ind., but this group that promotes small presses knows that Pittsburgh

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013

We often take ambient sounds for granted; recall the shock of silence when the power goes out. In its Sound Project, Pittsburgh-based Murphy/ Smith Dance Collective explores what happens when our everyday soundscape

Kawaii ii Wa: The Code of Cuteness

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{DANCE}

JULY 06

+ FRI., JULY 05 Tonight Gallerie Chiz opens What We Saw: Foto Focus Five. This exhibit displays the work of four photographers and ceramic artist Susan Hale Kemenyffy, whose pieces seem to be imprinted with photos. All the work explores everyday photography with a twist. Brian Sesack displays a photo of a stop sign decorated with a defiant dent; from David Tufiño’s ominous airplanes to Michael Goswell’s take on the much-photographed Stonehenge, these artists offer ordinary landscapes through

doesn’t mind mixing literature and bars. Vouched holds its first-ever Pittsburgh event, and it’s at Remedy nightclub. The readings are by: distinguished local poet Sheryl St. Germain; Jeffrey Condran, a fiction writer and co-founder of Braddock Avenue Books; visiting author Salvatore Pane (Last Call in the City of Bridges); and West Virginia-based writer and musician Chris Lee. Afterward — of course — there’s a dance party. Bill O’Driscoll 7 p.m. 5121 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Free. www.vouchedbooks.com

Art by Hiromi


Free!Event Art by Benedict Oddi

We know it’s July 4 weekend and all, but if you can hit just one Unblurred this year, this would be a good one. On July 5, the monthly Penn Avenue gallery crawl boasts several notable openings. Working our way up Penn, the first is for Dear Universe: New Encaustic Works by Benedict Oddi, a collection of lively, almost street-art-ish abstracts by this Tennessee-based artist at ModernFormations Gallery. Garfield Artworks hosts Transformance, a show of documentary photography by Andy Johanson; the reception includes an original amibient soundtrack composed by members of The Van Allen Belt, plus refreshments from local eateries. At Most Wanted Fine Art, see Conversations: 5:10, a group show about the idea of the “conversation piece,” curated by Graham Shearing and featuring artists from the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh’s big annual show and other AAP members. Assemble has the timely Sesli/Sessiz: Voiced/Unvoiced, with firsthand written accounts of the current protest in Turkey. At Toro’s Tavern, there’s a comedy showcase with Norlex Belma, Ian Insect and Krish Mohan. And Pittsburgh Glass Center opens Lifeforms, a show inspired by the famous glass botanical models made for Harvard University starting in the 1880s. A jury selected more than 50 representations of biological life forms from submissions from around the world; one is an actual fish cast in glass. Bill O’Driscoll Most venues open at 6 p.m. 4100-5500 Penn Ave., Bloomfield/Friendship/Garfield. Free. 412-389-5521

changes. Choreographers Jamie Erin Murphy and Renee Danielle Smith are joined by collaborators like composer Gordon Nunn and five dancers. Audience participation in movement and sound games is part of the fun at KellyStrayhorn Theater’s The Alloy Studios. As part of Car Free Fridays, arrive by something other than car and get two vouchers for a future KST event. BO 8 p.m. 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. Pay-whatyou-can. RSVP required at 412-363-3000.

and-politics discussion series Capital’s End hosts La Roche College history professor Paul Le Blanc, co-author of the forthcoming book A Freedom Budget for All Americans: Recapturing the Promise of the Civil Rights Movement in the Struggle for Economic Justice Today. Amidst the evening’s music, art and poetry, Le Blanc speaks, and discussion follows. BO 6:30-9:30 p.m. 126 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. www.facebook.com/ events/413362162095453/

Art by Michael Gosnell

{MUSIC}

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What We Saw: Foto Focus Five

{EXHIBIT}

young women with big eyes and tiny pouts. Of course, the artist adds flowers and cuddling birds to emphasize the root of kawaii, the belief that there is life and soul, even in

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST}

Most displays at the Carnegie Science Center’s BIKES exhibit are of the two-wheeled variety. But today a group will rep one-wheeled travel. The local unicycle enthusiasts of The Butler Wobble visit the Riverfront Trail. Their passionate pitch will cover practical techniques, like mounting the unicycle and balancing, to the mathematics behind wheel size and speed. The group will also plug the North American Unicycle Convention & Championships, to be held this July in Butler County. OL Noon. River Front Trail, 1 Allegheny Avenue. Free with museum admission. 412-237-3400 or carnegiesciencecenter.org

{ART}

Hiromi’s exhibit at The Gallery 4 might have cracked the code of cuteness. This Tokyobased artist and former children’s-book illustrator is inspired by the concept of kawaii. In Kawaii Wa: The Code of Cuteness, Hiromi explores this Japanese notion of fragility and innocence in paintings of dainty, doll-like

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The rollicking notes of The Marriage of Figaro overture will ring out in the summer air when the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra takes the stage at Hartwood Acres. Mozart’s masterpiece will be followed by Tchaikovsky’s Concerto in D major, led by violinist Jennifer Orchard (pictured). Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 in A major will bring tonight’s free show to a close. This concert, conducted by Fawzi Haimor, is part of the 2013 Allegheny County Summer Concert Series. OL

JULY 09

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inanimate objects. Tonight is the opening reception. OL 7-11 p.m. Exhibit continues through July 27. 206 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. Free. 412-363-5050 or thegallery4.us.

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Year-round, the USS Requin — that Cold War-era Navy submarine docked outside the Carnegie Science Center — is open for self-guided tours. But on a handful of Sundays each year, Science Center staff lead all-access Tech Tours that go behind the scenes for a detailed look at what life was like on a military sub; you can even climb into the conning tower to see the periscope (which, let’s face it, is pretty much what everyone’s after anyway). Today is one such Sunday. The small-group tours are limited to those 15 and older. BO 9-11 a.m. Also July 21, Aug. 4 and 25, and Sept. 8. 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. $20. Reservations required at 412-237-1637.

Jr. and others for economic justice. That effort included A Freedom Budget for All, an ambitious 1966 plan published by civil-rights leaders to show how to end poverty in the U.S. within a decade. Tonight — with the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington looming — the monthly art-

JULY 07

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

{WORDS} A little-discussed aspect of the Civil Rights movement was the call of Martin Luther King

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8 p.m. 200 Hartwood Acres, Hampton Township. Free. 412-392-4900 or www.pso. culturaldistrict.org

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The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust continues to bet that you didn’t get enough jazz during last month’s jazz festival. The Trust’s Tuesday-evening series Jazz Live continues its outdoor, summertime incarnation with one of the city’s bestknown jazz vocalists. Maureen Budway, a veteran of the old Mellon Jazz Festival, has the chops for anything from Joe Negri’s The Mass of Hope to Salsamba’s Latinventions, to name two of her recent recordings. Budway sings at Katz Plaza tonight. BO 5 p.m. Seventh Street and Penn Avenue, Downtown. Free. 412456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

+ WED., JULY 10 {SCREEN} A year after the death of Levon Helm, catch up with The Last Waltz, the great concert film about The Band (who were once called Levon and The Hawks). Martin Scorsese’s 1978 film captures that legendary group’s final concert. And if the musicians who recorded “The Weight” aren’t enough of a draw, they invite such musical pals as Dylan, Muddy Waters, The Staples Singers, Joni Mitchell and Neil Young. During its Summer Concert Movie Series, the Hollywood Theater screens Last Waltz four times, starting tonight. BO 7:30 p.m. Screenings continue through Sun., July 14. 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $5-7. 412-563-0368 or www.the hollywooddormont.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER BARRYMORE’S GHOST. One man show about the life & after-life of John Barrymore. July 5-6. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. DISNEY’S THE LITTLE MERMAID. Tue-Sun. Thru July 21. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC. Adapted from Ingmar Bergman’s film, Smiles of a Summer Night. Presented by Opera Theater SummerFest. Fri, Sun and Sat., July 20. Thru July 12. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. MNEMONIC. Play examining the understanding of time, the capacity to interpret history, & attempts to retell the past. Presented by Quantum Theatre. Wed-Sun. Thru July 28. Kirkwood Building, East Liberty. 412-362-1713. MOMENTS TO REMEMBER. Cabaret dinner theater. Presented by Pohl Productions. Fri-Sun.

Thru July 14. Crowne Plaza Hotel, LAW PROV: MOCKING THE Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. MOCK TRIAL. 9 p.m. Steel SIDE BY SIDE BY SONDHEIM: City Improv Theater, Shadyside. A MUSICAL CELEBRATION. 412-404-2695. Collection of songs from PITTSBURGH COMEDY Company, Follies, A Little SHOWCASE W/ MIKE Night Music, A Funny Thing WYSOCKI. Fri, 9 p.m. Happened on the Way Corner Cafe, South Side. to the Forum, more. 412-488-2995. Wed-Sun. Thru Aug. 18. THAT’S WHAT Cabaret at Theater JEANNE SAID! 10 Square, Downtown. p.m. www. per a p 412-325-6769. Steel City Improv pghcitym o .c YOU HAVEN’T Theater, Shadyside. CHANGED A BIT & 412-404-2695. OTHER LIES. The WUNDERSTUDIES: FINAL adventures of aging are SHOW. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv filtered through 3 married Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. couples who have known each other for 30 years. Thu-Sun. Thru July 13. South COLIN KANE. July 5-7 Park Theatre, Bethel Park. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-831-8552. 412-462-5233.

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DANNY PALUMBO. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

SAT 06 THE DEATH SHOW: AN IMPROVISED FUNERAL. Sat, 9 p.m. Thru July 27 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. CONTINUES ON PG. 42

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Work by Atticus Adams from Summertime, at be Galleries

NEW THIS WEEK BOULEVARD GALLERY. Trips To Italy. Work by Pat Nigro & Ilona Ralston. Artists’ reception: July 6, 6-9 p.m. Verona. 412-828-1031. GALLERIE CHIZ. Foto Focus Five. Work by David Tufino, Brian Sesack, Michael Goswell, Melissa R. Aronson, & Susan Hale Kemenyffy. Opening reception: July 5, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Kawaii Wa. New works by HIROMI. Opening reception: July 6, 7-11 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. TRANSFORMANCE. Documentary photography by Andy Johanson. Opens July 5, 6-10 p.m. Part of Unblurred. Garfield. 412-361-2262. MENDELSON GALLERY. Remembering Glen Whittaker (1950-2013). Opening reception: July 12, 7-9 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Dear Universe: New Encaustic Works by Benedict Oddi. Opening reception: July 5, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-362-0274. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. No Future. New work by Gena Salorino. Opening reception: July 5, 7 p.m. Bloomfield. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. Residual Conditions: Impressions from Anatomy,

Industry & Ecology. Work by Christopher Cassady, Gianna Paniagua, & Ben Quint-Glick. Opens July 6, 6-9 p.m. & by appointment. Braddock.

ONGOING ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. All Through the Night. LGBQT photography by Caldwell Linker. S/HE IS HER/E. Feat. over 100 works by Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, dating from the mid 1970s to the present. The Patron Saint of White Guys That Went Tribal & Other Works. Work by Nick Bubash. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BE GALLERIES. Summertime. Work by Atticus Adams. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOXHEART GALLERY. The Way & The Wayfarers. Paintings by Joshua Hogan. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. Seven Degrees of 7. Work by Distillery 7 Program artists. South Side. 412-381-7767. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. One & the Same. Sound installation by Susan Philipsz. Japan is the Key: Collecting Prints & Ivories, 1900–1920. Collections from the early years of the Carnegie Institute. The

Playground Project. A richly illustrated exhibition exploring the history of postwar playground design & highlighting important examples of playgrounds from the 20th century. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Melanie Werner Collection. Feat. 18th-Early 19th Century Fine European Antique Art as well as modern art pieces. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Selected Works by Christian Wolfgang Breitkreutz. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EASTSIDE GALLERY. MCG Invitational Scholarship Winners. Work by Lauren Brown, Adam Linn, & Aaron Kandel. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pigment & Silver. Photography by Ellen Bjerklie-Hanna, A. Jason Coleman, Danielle Goshay, Brenda Roger, & Cynthia Zordich. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. RetroFRESH. Contemporary paintings by James Kennedy, Claire Hardy, Donald Deskey, CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013


GALLERY CRAWL DUM BENETER CEN

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Other Sponsors: Text “CRAWL” to SMASH (76274) to receive special exclusive offers and more!

601 Wood Street

2nd floor | Ryoji Ikeda: data.tron An audiovisual installation where each single pixel of visual image is calculated by mathematical principles, and composed from the vast sea of data present in the world. 3rd floor | Title Town Soul & Funk Party Resident DJ Gordy G. spinning rare and underground soul, boogie, electro-funk and disco grooves.

2. SPACE 812 Liberty Avenue

Crowdsourced Artists each create a large drawing directly on the walls of the gallery, which will be open to the public to both observe and suggest input into the artistic process. Music by DJ hi-top wrangler WYEP Music Station

809 Liberty Avenue

3LWWVEXUJK)LOPPDNHUVSUHVHQWVVKRUWÀOPVRQDORRS Tiny Harris Gallery | Tryps A group photography show focusing on triptychs.

6. Arcade Comedy Theater 811 Liberty Avenue

Pittsburgh’s best sketch, improvisational and alternative comedy year-round.

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928 Penn Avenue

Live Music by The Amigos Band

So You Think THAT’S Fair? We all think we know what’s fair—but is your idea the same as hers?

First Commonwealth Bank: Try your hand at Plinko!

14. Urban Pathways 6-12 Gallery

Highmark First Night® Ice: Free icy treats when you say “Highmark First Night Ice Is Nice.”

7th St. and Penn Avenue

Button-making with Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

212 Ninth Street

15. Future Tenant

655 Penn Avenue

819 Penn Avenue

Live Music by Tony DePaolis Group. 5:30pm to 7:30pm Magical Mystical Tour: Jay Ressler

Inspirations–an exhibition of cell phone images

INVENTORY: The Orgone Archive, Pittsburgh 13 (2002-2013) Showcasing a decade’s worth of promotion and propaganda created by The Orgone Archive for its cinema outings.

8. Amazing Books 929 Liberty Avenue

An independent bookstore. Open until 7pm.

9. 937 Liberty Avenue 2nd floor | Gold Standard presents: 15 Minutes of Shame Artists will present participatory and performative karaoke works throughout the night with the help of you, the viewer.

10. August Wilson Center for African American Culture

16. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council 810 Penn Avenue, Suite 200

carbon first, then light | Ivette Spradlin A photography survey of three projects, from Habana, Cuba to Philadelphia.

17. Bend Yoga 808 Penn Avenue, 2nd floor

980 Liberty Avenue

11. Tonic

805 Liberty Avenue

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Propel Pittsburgh Commission, Action Shots: Get your Pittsburgh-themed photo taken, and receive a free postcard.

5. Harris Theater

4. Shaw Galleries

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Middle School Regional Art Exhibition Featuring local middle school students’ artwork. Live Music by: Sounds of Steel Junior

Buffon: Argonaut of Our Natural World $QH[KLELWLRQH[SORULQJWKHZLGHVSUHDGLQÁXHQFHRI Georges Louis Leclerc.

Mary Mazziotti: Memento Mori A set of billboards reminding the viewer that life can be short and its end unpredictable. Cell Phone Disco | InformationLab

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7. Catholic Charities Susan Zubik Welcome Center

Handmade Arcade Join Handmade Arcade in celebrating a Decade of DIY. The Art of Elizabeth Catlett from the Collection of Samella Lewis Features more than 30 works. Still Feel Like Goin’ On Thirty photographs by students, depicting African American community heroes. Call & Response Paintings celebrating visual and performing arts by August Wilson Fellow Mariana Adele Vassar. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix

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914 Penn Avenue

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Presented by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust Department of Education and Community Engagement. All information and locations are subject to change.

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in the Cultural District Friday, July 12, 2013 5:30-10pm

Celebrate Bend Yoga’s 1st Birthday! Come for one of two 30-minute donation-based classes for charity and stay for cake. Classes at 6pm and 7:15pm.

18. 8th Street & Penn Avenue /LYH0XVLFE\0X]LÿND Night Market V An outdoor market that brings together some of Pittsburgh’s most creative independent vendors. 5:30pm to 11pm. 709 Penn Avenue

Chris McGinnis: The Productive Machine Paintings and a video installation explores American optimism seen through the lens of industrial culture.

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE

707 Penn Avenue

Breathe, Fly, and Think New and favorite works by Photographer Crystal Marie Acker. Live Music by Brittany Morganrose

Lynn Johnson and Jen Saffron: The Koraput Survivors Project This photographic exhibition explores the destruction and recreation of a small community in Odisha State, India.

12. August Henry’s City Saloon 946 Penn Avenue

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142 Sixth Street, Third floor

TOUCH Pittsburgh’s aerial dance company. 7:30, 8:30, 9:30pm

24. Arthur Murray Dance Studio 136 Sixth Street

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE

Free Dance Lessons and Demos: Rhumba / Fox Trot at 7:30pm. Club Swing / Jitterbug at 8pm. Salsa at 8:30pm.

25. Braddock’s American Brasserie 107 Sixth Street

Join our new Executive Chef for a cooking demonstration!

26. Boutique 208 208 Sixth Street

Meet local artists creating art for this handmade boutique.

27. PNC Legacy Project 600 Liberty Avenue

AFTER THE CRAWL Consol Energy Cosmopolitan Pittsburgh Byham Theater Presenting Sponsor: Consol Energy Event Sponsors: UPMC and UPMC Health Plan Tickets: $40-$125. Visit trustarts.org/cosmo for details. Ryoji Ikeda: test pattern-live set A ‘not to be missed’ performance by one of the major artists working today. Peirce Studio, 805-807 Liberty Avenue

10 p.m. / Tickets: $10 & $15

Magic by Peter Corbett

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23. kNOT Dance at Verve Wellness

An exhibit celebrating Pittsburgh.

19. 709 Penn Gallery

20. 707 Penn Gallery

971 Liberty Avenue, 2nd floor Gallery.

22. Backstage Bar

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Weddings, Nightclubs, Proms, Corporate Events... We’ll do our part to make it perfect.

OFFIC OF THE P IAL DJ ITTS CELEBRAT BURGH ION!

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 40

DEREK MINTO, MARK MAMMONE, NORLEX BELMA, TIM ROSS, AMBER SHEIFER. Hambone’s Comedy Riot III. 10 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. FIRESIDE CHAT W/ MARK & JONATHAN. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. IMPROV COMEDY DOUBLE FEATURE: HIPSTERPOTAMUS & MIDSEASON REPLACEMENT. 10:30 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6766. THE LUPONES: MADE UP MUSICALS. Sat, 8 p.m. Thru July 27 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 323-401-0465. THE WRITERS ROOM & DE LE CRÈME. Sat, 10 p.m. Thru July 27 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

MON 08 PROUD PARTNER

TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 09 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

EXHIBITS AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM.

www.pittsburghdjcompany.com itt b hdj

VISUAL ART

Alexander Minewski, Louise Evans-Scott, Vladimir Naiditch, & Henri de Waroquier. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG GARDEN AND CIVIC CENTER. Norwin Art League Annual Membership Show. Greensburg. 724-836-1123. HOMESTEAD PUMP HOUSE. The Landscape of Steel. Photographs by Kevin Scanlon. Munhall. 412-464-4020. THE INN. Disambiguate. Work by Stephanie Armbruster, Ron Copeland, Ryan Woodring, Leah Patgorski, Seth Clark, & Stephen Tuomala. Lawrenceville. 412-298-5703. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. 8th Annual Summer Gallery Exhibition. Featured exhibit by Don Nelson. Presented by the Midland Arts Council. Midland. 724-643-9968. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi,

A Stitch in Jewish Time: Provocative Textiles. Group exhibition feat. contemporary artists from the United States & abroad. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. An eclectic showroom of fine art sculpture & paintings from Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. emerging artists. North Side. Archaeological materials 724-797-3302. exploring the cultural history of AUGUST WILSON CENTER the Arabian Peninsula. Ongoing: FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Their Time, more. Oakland. Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, 412-622-3131. film & oral history narratives to CARNEGIE SCIENCE explore communities, cultures, CENTER. BIKES: Science & innovations. Downtown. on Two Wheels. Feat. 412-258-2700. hands-on activities, BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. demonstrations & Large collection of a collection of automatic roll-played historic, rare, & musical instruments peculiar bicycles. and music boxes in www. per a p Ongoing: a mansion setting. pghcitym o .c Buhl Digital Dome Call for appointment. (planetarium), O’Hara. 412-782-4231. Miniature Railroad and CARNEGIE MUSEUM Village, USS Requin submarine, OF ART. The Playground and more. North Side. Project. Survey exploring the 412-237-3400. history of post-war playground CARRIE FURNACE. Built in design & highlighting important 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are examples of playgrounds from extremely rare examples of the 20th century. Oakland. pre World War II iron-making 412-622-3131. technology. Rankin. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF 412-464-4020 x.21. NATURAL HISTORY. BugWorks. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL Feat. beautiful photography HISTORY. Explore the complex of insects, amazing specimens, interplay between culture, & live bugs! Garden of Light: Works by Paula Crevoshay. nature and biotechnology. Feat. nearly 70 fine art jewelry Open Fridays 5-8, Saturdays pieces. Roads of Arabia: 12-4 & Sundays 12-4. Garfield. Archaeology & History of the 412-223-7698.

FULL LIST ONLINE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013

CONTINUED FROM PG. 40

Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Glassweekend ‘13. Work by Rhoda Baer, John de Wit, Jon Goldberg, Mikyoung Jung, Catherine Labonte, Matthew Perez, Erica Rosenfeld, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. In Good Company. Group show. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The Civil War. A collection of rare and historic images printed from original glass plate negatives that survived the harrowing travels of Civil War Photographers. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Fiberart International 2013. Juried exhibition of contemporary fiber art. Presented by the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh. 30:2. Group exhibition presented by Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Coming Home. Fabric installation by Kay Healy. Friday Nights at Guitar Center. Work by Allison Kaufman. Rites of Passage. Oil paintings by Maggie Mills. Shadyside.

COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. Ligonier. 724-238-4983. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. I N V E N T O R Y: The Orgone Archive, Pittsburgh 13 (2002-2013). Feat. a decade’s worth of promotion & propaganda in the form of posters, stickers & bits of paper created by The Orgone Archive. Downtown. 412-325-7037. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and

412-361-0873. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Continuum. Work by Doug DuBois & Aaron Blum. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Art Interprets Alzheimer’s. Work by George Roby & Herbert Ascherman, Jr. Downtown. 412-261-7003. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Tattoo Works III. A juried exhibition of new & innovative artwork from local tattoo artists. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Juice Box Memories: The Best of Boy Mayor. Editorial cartoons by Rob Rogers. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TRUNDLE MANOR. Serendipity! A Trundle Manor Art Event. New work by Donnie Toomer. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. U.S. POST OFFICE & COURTHOUSE. Whitehall Arts Courthouse Exhibit. Paintings by Whitehall Arts members. Downtown. 412-561-4000. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WILDCARD. Craft Hard: Art Inspired by Action Movies. Work by Andrew O. Ellis, Tara Goe, Elliot McNally, & Mario Zucca. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Silk Road. Photo exhibition of images taken along the Silk Road in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal & India in 1972 by Albin & Virginia Curtze. Downtown. 412-391-4100. MARIDON MUSEUM. Beautiful Birds. Display of art from the museum’s study storage facility. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000.


PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Glass art surrounded by colorful blooms. Feat. work by Daviea Davis, Jason Forck, Steven Sadvary, Lisa Platt, more. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Lifeforms. Exhibition of natural imagery in lampworked glass. Curated by Robert Mickelsen. Friendship. 412-365-2145. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pennsylvania’s Civil War. In-depth look at Pennsylvania’s significant contributions during the Civil War feat. artifacts, military encampments, life-like museum figures, more. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Weather Permitting concert series featuring The Pressure, plus DJ Shawn Watson, at Shadyside Nursery, Shadyside

CRITIC: Harmony Sullivan, 33, a counselor from East Liberty

WHEN: Sun.,

June 30 The band that’s been playing is sort of a reggae/ska band, and the music is fun and danceable. It’s in a nursery, which is great because we’re surrounded by plants. And there’s a lot of grass and mud and sand for kids to play in. I have a little girl and she’s totally muddy. It’s a regular event and it’s our first time coming. We got some rice, beans and corn from the truck that sells Brazilian food. We tried the grilled cheese and cheesecake too; it’s all yummy. And beer: We also got a beer as part of the entrance fee, and it’s really good beer on tap. The combination of the dirty kids and the beer and the music and lots of nice people that we’ve met — it’s just a really nice way to spend an evening, such a good summer-evening activity.

DANCE FRI 05

SOUND PROJECT. Performance by the Murphy/Smith Dance Collective. 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000.

SAT 06

LET US EAT CAKE. The Bridge City Bombshells’ Birthday Bash. 9 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157.

FRI 05

THU 04 JULY 4TH FIREWORKS BLOWOUT. Access to exhibits, snacks during fireworks display, more. 6-11 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. ZELIENOPLE INDEPENDENCE DAY PARADE. 11 a.m. Main St., Zelienople, Zelienople. 724-452-0231.

FESTIVALS THU 04

ART IN THE PARK. Food, music, vendors, more. Thu, 6-8:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 29 Penn Avenue Parklet, Wilkinsburg. 412-727-7855.

THU 04 - SAT 06

BIG BUTLER FAIR. Demolition derbies, concerts, games, rides, more. Thru July 6 Butler Fairground, Butler. 724-625-1977.

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KEEP CALM AND DON’T BITCH UNLESS YOU VOTE

MEGHAN KLINGENBERG FOUNDATION GOLF OUTING. 9 a.m. Pittsburgh National Golf Club, Gibsonia. 513-381-4564.

SAT 06 9TH ANNUAL GARDEN PARTY IN THE COURTYARD. Wine, beer & hors d’oeuvres. 6 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ROYAL EGYPTIAN EXCELLENCE BALL. Buffet dinner, silent auction, dancing, more. Presented by The Shriners of Sahara Temple #2 & Daughters of Isis of Sahara Court #9. Benefits Sickle Cell Society Inc. & the Murray-Irvis Genetic Disease Center. 6-11 p.m. Syria Shriners Pavilion, Cheswick. 412-371-8742.

SUN 07 23RD ANNUAL GARDEN TOUR. Visit 9 Mt. Lebanon gardens &

participate in activities at the library. 12-5 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

WED 10 KARMA YOGA FUNDRAISER. Benefits Jeremiah’s Place. 7-8:15 p.m. Southminster Presbyterian Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-344-1799.

POLITICS SUN 07 CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT: JOBS & FREEDOM. Discussion, poetry, music, more. Presented by Capital’s End. AVA Bar & Lounge, East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

LITERARY THU 04 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

[CATS]

make a real connection Call Livelinks. The hottest place to meet the coolest people.

feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Third and First Thu of every month The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323.

SAT 06

OUTSIDE

OTHER STUFF

ANTIQUE CAR SHOW. Food, games, historic artisans, more. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Old Economy Village, Ambridge. 724-266-4500 x 114. ARABIC CALLIGRAPHY. 1-4 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-578-2571. DOWNTOWN HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at City County Building, Downtown. Sat. Thru Aug. 31 412-302-5223. INCLINE HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at the bottom of the Monongahela Incline. Sat. Thru Oct. 26 412-302-5223. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Korean grammar & basic conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target - East Liberty. 412-362-6108. STUDIO GARAGE SALE. Affordable work by a variety of artists. Artists Image Resource, North Side. 412-321-8664. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

THU 04

THU 04

FOURTH OF JULY PADDLE. 7 p.m. Kayak Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-969-9090.

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

SAT 06 - SUN 07

MON 08

THIRD ON THIRD. Seated readings of screenplays written by local screenwriters. Every third Mon, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 19 3rd Street Gallery, Carnegie. 412-276-5233.

WED 10 THE ZZZOMBIE BOOK REPORT. Give a zombie/monster book report in 5 minutes or less. Benefits Book ‘Em books-toprisoners project. Title suggestions at www.facebook. com/events/172868476208677/ 7:30 p.m. Schenley Plaza, Oakland. 412-945-0664.

KIDSTUFF THU 04

MASK WORKSHOP. Thru July 4 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013

THU 04 -WED 10 ADVENTURES W/ CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG. 9-foot tall Clifford w/ tail slide, build a sandcastle on T-Bone’s beach, play instruments in the Musical Marina, more. Thru Sept. 1 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solarpowered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 05

COOK IT! Interactive cooking demos w/ Chef Angelo. Fri, 1 p.m. Thru July 26 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 06

There are few animals more diva-like than the average house cat; one can imagine the demands of all-feline band The Rock Cats rivaling those of Van Halen. This week, the Grey Box Theatre hosts The Amazing Acro-Cats performance troupe. With trainer Samantha Martin — a feline-behavioral expert — the kitties ride skateboards, jump through hoops, walk tightropes and, yes, play live music. It is, essentially, the Internet come to life. Fri., July 5, though Tue., July 9. 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $18. 412-586-7744 or www.circuscats.com

FRI 05 BUTTERFLY MONITORING EVENT. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park, Hookstown. 724-899-3611.

FULL LIST ONLINE

THE BUTLER WOBBLE. Unicycle workshop. 12 & 5 p.m. Carnegie www. per pa Science Center, North BEGINNER pghcitym .co Side. 412-237-3400. PADDLES W/ VENTURE FAMILY FUN DAY: OUTDOORS. Ages 12+. GREEN GARDENS & 9-11 a.m. Moraine State Park, TOWERING TREETOPS. Butler. 412-255-0564. Fairytale-themed gardening & FREE KAYAK & STAND-UP craft workshop. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. PADDLE BOARD DEMOS. Frick Art & Historical Center, Presented by L.L.Bean. Sat, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. 12-2 p.m. Thru July 27 North Park, Allison Park. 412-318-1200. TREES OF THE WILDFLOWER SNOWBALL DAY. SnowRESERVE. 10-11:30 a.m. themed activities. 9-11 a.m. Raccoon Creek State Park, Carnegie Science Center, Hookstown. 724-899-3611. North Side. 412-237-1637.

SAT 06

SUN 07

MON 08 - WED 10 THE UGLY DUCKLING & OTHER TAILS. Children’s Theatre. Mon-Wed. Thru July 10 South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552.

SUN 07

NATURE’S NASTIES. Discuss ticks, chiggers, leeches, poison ivy, more. 2-3:30 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park, Hookstown. 724-899-3611.

FRI 05 RAINBOW RISING COFFEE HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and friends. Music, games, movies, entertainment and more. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Smithton. First Fri of every month 724-872-5056.

FRI 05 - TUE 09

THE ACRO-CATS. Cat show. July 5-9 The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 512-378-3952.

COLONIAL COURT DAYS. Historical re-enactments presented by The Westmoreland County Historical Society. July 6-7 Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-532-1935.

SUN 07 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. RIVERS OF STEEL SUNDAY HERITAGE MARKET. Farm & artist market. First Sun of every month and Third Sun of every month. Thru Sept. 15 Homestead Pump House, Munhall. 412-464-4020. VERONA’S CREATIVE MARKETPLACE. Arts & crafts vendors, live music, more. First Sun of every month, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thru Aug. 4 Verona Borough Building, Verona. 412-828-8080.

MON 08 ADULT STEEL BAND WORKSHOP. Learn steel band techniques, music theory essentials, & elements of


ensemble performance. Mon, 6-7 p.m. Thru July 22 The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry, North Park. THE DEN. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MEET THE ARTIST: LORA FINELLI. 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 09

GAGA/PEOPLE. Israeli dance class. Tue, 6-7 p.m. Thru July 23 The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000.

no experience necessary. Wednesdays, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-7878. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Farmers’ market. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 30 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. HOW TO AVOID INJURY WHEN STAYING HEALTHY: BASICS OF INJURY PREVENTION W/ CARDIOVASCULAR ACTIVITIES. Call to reserve a spot. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. IGNITE PITTSBURGH. Listen, share, debate, & deliberate w/ speakers including J.G. Bocella, Josh Lucas, Katherine Chamberlain, more. 7 p.m. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER SUMMER LECTURE SERIES. Granite Calimpong & Tim Drier. 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

ALLEGHENY CLEANWAYS

This summer, join Allegheny CleanWays in cleaning up alleyways, vacant lots and greenspaces. DumpBuster Crews help remove material from illegal dumping — everything from light litter to tires and appliances — around the Pittsburgh area. Volunteers of varying strength and abilities are welcome. Visit www.alleghenycleanways. org for information.

THE HISTORY & IMPACT OF FINANCIAL POWER: THE VAMPIRIC RISE, FALL & RISE AGAIN OF FINANCIAL CAPITALISM. Interactive program comparing the Great Depression to the Great Financial Crisis of 2008. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HISTORY OF DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY. Speaker: Tom White, University Archivist. Presented by the Squirrel Hill Historical Society. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707.

WED 10 BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP. For Widows/ Widowers over 50. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, Ross. 412-366-1300. COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE. Seeking new players,

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THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. MCG JAZZ. Auditions for a 2-show live concert appearance at MCG Jazz. July 1-Aug. 1. Young male jazz vocalists, ages 18-35. Submit video online via YouTube, email to kfriedson@mcg-btc.org,

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or send a DVD. Details at mcgjazz.org/_wp/mcg-jazzsearching-for-the-next-jazzsuperstar. 412-322-0800.

SUBMISSIONS CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. Accepting applications through July 4 for makers interested in attending the Pittsburgh Mini Maker Faire in August. More information at pghmakerfaire. com/call-for-makers. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Seeking non-traditional 2-D & 3-D work for upcoming juried art exhibit Different Dimensions: The Unpainting Exhibit. CD submissions only. Prospectus at www. greensburgartcenter.org. Thru Aug. 21. 724-837-6791. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Online magazine seeking book reviewers, writers & artists to submit original essays, fiction, poetry, artwork, & photographs as well as pitched ideas for possible contributions. Visit www.newyinzer.com for current issue. Email all submissions/inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. THE PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 67th Annual International Aqueous Open exhibition. http://www.pittsburghwater colorsociety.com. 412-731-0636. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail.com. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking contemporary photographs taken at the Carrie Furnaces for August exhibition. Email 1-5 works as .JPG attachments to submissions@silvereye.org w/ name of artist, title, date, & dimensions. Submit all entries by June 15. 412-431-1810. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking individual artists & artist groups for month-long exhibitions in a new transitional gallery measuring. Artists will be responsible for all aspects of their exhibition. Send images & a brief introduction to the work to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.03/07.10.2013


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a 24-year-old woman who just ended a five-year relationship. It was my first breakup, so I’ve felt insane for the last three months. Now I go out with people only to find that we have no physical chemistry. My mother says, “You’re just picky.” How am I supposed to enter my slutty years if I rarely have a physical connection with someone? I feel like I formed some sort of sexual block. How do I break the dam? BRING LASS OVERTLY CLEARER KNOWLEDGE

Here’s how: You get high, consume porn and read Daniel Bergner’s book What Do Women Want? Adventures in the Science of Female Desire. (“It should be read by every woman on earth,” Tracy Clark-Flory of Salon writes. “You want a female Viagra? This book is as close as we have to it.”) Don’t do all three at once, lest you grind the gears off your sex gaskets. But do all three over a long weekend, and try to relax and allow your erotic imagination to speak to you. And give yourself a break. Some folks need more than three months after ending a five-year relationship. Don’t force yourself to date if you’re not ready. And when you are ready to enter your slutty phase, hang on to your pickiness. In my experience, picky people are likelier to enjoy their slutty phases and to survive them.

I’m a straight woman living in San Francisco. I have an amazing boyfriend who I’m sure will be my partner for life. However, he confessed something the other night that has me in a daze. Years ago, when he was much younger, he appeared in a gay adult film. He thought he might be bi at the time, he said, but the experience made him realize that he’s not really attracted to men. I would never leave him over this, but I’m having a hard time processing it. When we have sex, I can’t help but think about it, and it’s made it hard for me to get in the mood.

KEEP CALM

CONFUSED ABOUT LOVER’S INDISCRETIONS

AND

You live in San Francisco. If you rule out as a potential partner any straight guy who’s appeared in gay porn, CALI, you might have to move. Here’s something that might be easier: Change your perspective on the meaning of sex between men. When a straight girl messes around with another girl, no one thinks of her as less feminine. But a straight guy who messes around with another dude is seen as less masculine. This particular kind of homophobia is killing your desire for your boyfriend. Willing yourself to see what was manly about your boyfriend’s porn experience — he wasn’t afraid to explore his sexuality because, hey, your boyfriend is one of those fearless manly man types — might help you get past it. Good luck.

DON’T BITCH UNLESS YOU VOTE

PICKY PEOPLE ARE LIKELIER TO ENJOY THEIR SLUTTY PHASES AND TO SURVIVE THEM.

I have some friends in the Pacific Northwest. They told me they sometimes go “clam digging” for their dinner. This phrase has to have a filthy double meaning. But Urban Dictionary had nothin’. Any ideas? CURIOUS LAD ASKING MASTER SAVAGE

A filthy double meaning did leap instantly to mind, CLAMS, but it involves so unspeakable a violation that squeamish readers might wanna skip to the next letter. Here goes: “Clam digging” is something you can find necrophiliacs who are into chicks doing with shovels in graveyards in the middle of the night. Moving on … I’m a bicurious woman newly wed to the man of my dreams. Before our wedding, I hooked up with my first lady-crush, and now I’ve opened a Pandora’s Box of potential threesomes. My husband is supportive and enjoys getting to fulfill his MFF fantasies. In addition, my cute gay male friend is attracted to my husband, and my husband is so confidently straight and GGG that he would consider a make-out romp with my gay friend for my pleasure. One of my fantasies has been a bi MMF, so this presents another Pandora’s Box. Am I getting in over my head? MARRIED LIFE IS AWESOME

If you go for it and it ends badly, then you were definitely getting in over your head. If you go for it and it doesn’t end badly, then you weren’t getting in over your head. The only way to find out for sure is to go for it. And send pics.

I’m a gay man with an etiquette question. I recently met a crazy-hot guy on an online dating site who seems like a great match. The one thing that has kept me from meeting him: He does porn. He doesn’t acknowledge that on his profile, but I am “familiar” with his work. I don’t mind that he does porn, but I am at a loss for how to broach the subject. I’m worried that if I let on that I recognize him from his work, he might think I’m some crazy stalker. But I also worry that if I play dumb and we hit it off, it could blow up in my face down the road. What’s the most graceful way to handle this situation?

BEST OF PITTSBURGH VOTE NOW

PONDERING ONLINE ROMANCE NETIQUETTE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Here’s how you handle it: Assume he’s not an idiot. A porn star on a gay dating site figures that most other guys on the site will be “familiar” with his work. So there’s no need to broach the subject. If you want to ask him out, ask him out. When he mentions his work, tell him you know it and you’ve enjoyed it, and let him steer the conversation from there. If he wants to hear about your favorite films, scenes, etc., he’ll ask.

Enter Promo Code CPKWTIX for a chance to win a pair of tickets to Kennywood!

Now that the Supreme Court has struck down the Defense of Marriage Act and California’s Proposition 8, what do you say to people who still think gay marriage should be illegal? CONGRATS TO YOU

“You lost; love won. You can get over it and come to the wedding and have some cake, or you can fuck the fuck off. Your choice.”

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

07.03-07.10

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Thomas Gray was a renowned 18th-century English poet best remembered for his “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard.” It was a short poem — only 986 words, which is less than the length of this horoscope column. On the other hand, it took him seven years to write it, or an average of 12 words per month. I suspect that you are embarking on a labor of love that will evolve at a gradual pace, too, Cancerian. It might not occupy you for seven years, but it will probably take longer than you imagine. And yet, that’s exactly how long it should take. This is a character-building, lifedefining project that can’t and shouldn’t be rushed.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

The 18th-century German philosopher Georg Christoph Lichtenberg accepted the possibility that some humans have the power of clairvoyance. “The ‘second sight’ possessed by the Highlanders in Scotland is actually a foreknowledge of future events,” he wrote. “I believe they possess this gift because they don’t wear trousers. That is also why in all countries women are more prone to utter prophecies.” I bring this to your attention, Leo, because I believe that in the coming weeks you’re likely to catch accurate glimpses of what’s to come — especially when you’re not wearing pants.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Were you nurtured well by caring adults in the first year of your life? If so, I bet you now have the capacity to fix whatever’s ailing your tribe or posse. You could offer some inspiration that will renew everyone’s motivation to work together. You might improve the group communication as you strengthen the foundation that supports you all. And what about if you were NOT given an abundance of tender love as a young child? I think you will still have the power to raise your crew’s mood, but you may end up kicking a few butts along the way.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Summing up his experiment in living at Walden Pond, naturalist Henry David Thoreau said this: “I learned that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. He will pass an invisible boundary; new, universal and more liberal laws will begin to establish themselves around and within him; or the old laws will be expanded, and interpreted in his favor in a more liberal sense, and he will live with the license of a higher order of beings.” Given the astrological factors that will be impacting your life in the next 12 months, Libra, you might consider adopting this philosophy as your own.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Thirteen thousand years ago, lions and mammoths and camels roamed parts of North America. But along with many other large beasts, they ultimately became extinct. Possible explanations for their demise include climate change and over-hunting by humans. In recent years a group of biologists has proposed a plan to repopulate the western part of the continent with similar species. They call their idea “re-wilding.” In the coming months, Scorpio, I suggest you consider a re-wilding program of your own. Cosmic forces will be on your side if you reinvigorate your connection to the raw, primal aspects of both your own nature and the great outdoors.

Who was Russia’s greatest poet? Many critics say it was Alexander Pushkin, who lived in the 19th century. His abundant creativity was undoubtedly related to his unruly libido. By the time he was 31 years old, he’d had 112 lovers. But then he met his ultimate muse, the lovely and intelligent Natalya Goncharova, to whom he remained faithful. “Without you,” he wrote to her, “I would have been unhappy all my life.” I half-expect something comparable to happen for you in the next 10 months, Sagittarius. You may either find an unparalleled ally or else finally ripen your relationship with an unparalleled ally you’ve known for a while. One way or another, I bet you will commit yourself deeper and stronger.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): It’s Grease Week — a time when you need to make sure everything is as well oiled as possible. Does your car need a quart of Castrol? Is it time to bring more extra-virgin olive oil into your kitchen? Do you have any K-Y Jelly in your nightstand, just in case? Are there creaky doors or stuck screws or squeaky wheels that could use some WD-40? Be liberal with the lubrication, Capricorn — both literally and metaphorically. You need smooth procedures and natural transitions.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

through phases when you have fewer good ideas than average, and other phases when you’re overflowing with them. The period you’re in right now is one of the latter. You are a fountain of bright notions, intuitive insights and fresh perspectives. Take advantage of the abundance, Taurus. Solve as many riddles and dilemmas as you can.

In his book The Fisher King and the Handless Maiden, Robert Johnson says many of us are as much in debt with our psychic energy as we are with our financial life. We work too hard. We rarely refresh ourselves with silence and slowness and peace. We don’t get enough sleep or good food or exposure to nature. And so we’re routinely using up more of our reserves than we are able to replenish. We’re chronically running a deficit. “It is genius to store energy,” says Johnson. He recommends creating a plan to save it up so that you always have more than enough to draw on when an unexpected opportunity arrives. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to make this a habit, Aries.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): No one knows the scientific reasons why longdistance runners sometimes get a “second wind.” Nonetheless, such a thing exists. It allows athletes to resume their peak efforts after seemingly having reached a point of exhaustion. According to my reading of the astrological omens, a metaphorical version of this happy event will occur for you sometime soon, Gemini. You made a good beginning but have been flagging a bit of late. Any minute now, though, I expect you will get your second wind.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the course of your long life, I estimate you will come up with approximately 60,000 really good ideas. Some of these are small, like those that help you decide how to spend your weekend. Some are big ones, like those that reveal the best place for you to live. As your destiny unfolds, you go

Where’s the place you’re half-afraid to travel to even though you know it would change your life for the better? Write Freewillastrology.com.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Two years into the War of 1812, British soldiers invaded Washington, D.C. They set fire to the White House and other government buildings. The flames raged out of control, spreading in all directions. The entire city was in danger of burning. In the nick of time, a fierce storm hit, producing a tornado and heavy rains. Most of the fires were extinguished. Battered by the weather, the British army retreated. America’s capital was saved. I predict that you, Aquarius, will soon be the beneficiary of a somewhat less dramatic example of this series of events. Give thanks for the “lucky storm.”

   

  

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Like the legendary Most Interesting Man in the World who shills for Dos Equis beer, you will never step in gum on the sidewalk or lose a sock in the coming weeks. Your cereal will never get soggy; it’ll sit there, staying crispy, just for you. The pheromones you secrete will affect people miles away. You’ll have the power to pop open a piñata with the blink of your eye. If you take a Rorschach test, you’ll ace it. Ghosts will sit around campfires telling stories about you. Cafes and restaurants may name sandwiches after you. If you so choose, you’ll be able to live vicariously through yourself. You will give your guardian angel a sense of security.

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you. wyep.org

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 50 + SERVICES 50 + STUDIES 50 + WELLNESS 53 + LIVE 54

STUDIES DIABETES? CALL TODAY!

ENDOMETRIOSIS? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

VAGINAL DRYNESS?

CONSTIPATION?

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

SmokING STUDY

SERVICES

University of Pittsburgh

LEGAL NOTICE

CLASSES

Smokers who want to try new cigarettes that may or may not lead to reduced smoking are wanted for a research study. This is NOT a treatment or smoking cessation study. Compensation will be provided.

LEGAL NOTICE Hearing to be conducted before the honorable Robert J. Colville, Courtroom 708, 7th Floor City-County Building, 414 Grant Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15219

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

For more information please call The Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab at

People with Current Cold Sore or Canker Sore needed for a Research study (UPMC Oakland) This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions. Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart. Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100. Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

For more information, please call 412-246-6367

412-624-9999

Order of Court And now, this 17th day of June, 2013, it is hereby Ordered that an argument/ hearing shall be conducted on July 31, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. The parties shall file and serve on opposing parties and counsel any briefs five (5) days prior to the argument/ hearing date

COMMUNITY First Harvest Wine Festival, Janoski’s Farm, 1714 Route 30, Clinton, July 20, 3-8 pm. $25/advance, $30/ gate, adults only, 724-899-3438, www.janoskis.com.

Advertise your business or product in alternative papers across the U.S. for just $995/ week. New advertiser discount “Buy 3 Weeks, Get 1 Free” www. altweeklies.com/ads (AAN CAN)

Your ad could be here

ANNOUNCEMENTS

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

2,000sq. ft/stage rehearsals/mtgs etc. $75/ hr. Play pool 4x8 Table Private Room $10/hr. 412-955-4005 pgr. Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

412.316.3342

UNPLANNED PREGNANCY? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Open or closed adoption. YOU choose the family. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. Call 24/7. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION Adoring married couple long to shower precious 1st baby with LOVE, Laughter, Music, Travel, Security.

Expenses Paid 1-800-816-8424

WORK HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkgreatpay.com (AAN CAN)

Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes

ADOPTION

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

Paid In Advance! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-station. com (AAN CAN)

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com National Commercial Cleaning Company has

immediate openings for PT cleaners to work evenings, 4 hrs/day, at our clients’ locations around Pittsburgh. $8.50/hr. Prior cleaning experience preferred and must pass a background check. If interested, please call Jim: (412) 448-1786, or our Recruiting Department: (855) 562-7367

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 50

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Ink Well

NOTHING MAJOR

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

ACROSS 1. Came back from the beach? 6. Lesbos lyrist 12. Fawn (over) 15. Wine taster’s consideration 16. Like tape, e.g. 17. Penguinlooking bird 18. Junior members of a lodge? 20. ___ Moneypenny 21. Hippie’s trip, perhaps 22. Time killers on a device 24. Longdistance hauler 25. Manager of oral hygienists of ill repute? 31. Ruler divisions: Abbr. 33. Boo-boo 34. It’s not hard rock 35. Aluminum giant 38. Like Munch’s “The Scream,” in 1994 and again in 2004 40. Puppy Bowl at which the Puppy Cam debuted 41. Certain independent, and an apt title for this puzzle 44. One might be bowled over 45. Masses 46. Sierra ___ 47. Noodle in tempura soup 49. Prime draft status 50. “What it do?” 51. Arthur Sulzberger, e.g.?

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54. Modern Nintendo consoles 58. Nintendo rival 59. Noted Barbadian pop star 61. Sn, on a table 62. Try to trademark your new invention? 67. Brad Paisley’s “___ de Toilet (The Toilet Song)” 68. Cover with diamonds, as it were 69. Tint in some nostalgic images 70. Home for un poisson 71. “Crocodile” of film 72. Equally influenced right now by Nam June Paik’s video work and Bedouin poetry, say

DOWN 1. Charles or Ray of modern design 2. Knee supporter 3. Bust 4. Typed expression 5. Paul of “Little Miss Sunshine” 6. “___ bleu!” 7. “I don’t care which one” 8. Kung ___ chicken (Americanized Chinese dish) 9. Grocery store sticker letters 10. Very attractive 11. Ancient Irish alphabet 12. Site of the 2012 G8 Summit 13. Moniker for Jesus

14. Approves 19. Certain guards against babies 23. Bro 26. Still competitive, potentially 27. Pod contents, in an analogy 28. Fox’s Roger 29. Look like a horndog 30. Its state berry is the blueberry 32. Road safety org. 35. Get hyped 36. Saved 37. Church key, e.g. 38. River to the Rhone 39. SeaWorld orca name 42. Word before comic or plane 43. Sink stuff 48. Pos.’s opposite

50. Word to denote the deleted portion of an email 52. Without warning, say 53. Hold forth 55. Ham-handed 56. Civil rights leader Roy 57. Grilled meat from Indonesia 60. “Andre the Giant ___ Posse” 61. Everyone’s first Myspace friend 63. Where a post-ER patient might go 64. Pearl Jam album with “Alive” and “Jeremy” 65. The oil in its liver is a source of omega-3 fatty acids 66. Coloration

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


WELLNESS MIND & BODY Massage by Donna Mature gentlemen by appointment. 412-758-5250 Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Phoenix Spa New Young Professional Free Table Shower w/60 min. Open 10-10 Daily 4309 Butler Street (Lawrenceville)

412-621-3300

MIND & BODY Place your Classified advertisment. Call 412.316.3342

MIND & BODY Zhangs Wellness Center

412-401-4110 $40/hr (1st Floor)

Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

Superior Chinese Massage

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

$50/HR Free Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

724-519-7896

Find your next job in the City Paper’s “WORK” section.

massage

STAR

China Massage

There is light at the end of the tunnel.

DOWNTOWN 322 Fourth Ave.

Chinese Bodyworks

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

MIND & BODY City Paper! We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

THIS SPACE! call 412.316.3342

Bariatric Weightloss, LLC No Long Term Contract

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

No Start Up Fee

Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

Aming’s Massage Therapy

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

412.246.8965, ext. 9

(across from Eat n’ Park)

www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Flexible Hours Including Mornings

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

412-316-3342

355 Fifth Ave Suite 1120 Pgh, PA 15222 412-680-2064

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

Health Services

JADE Wellness Center

Call Today to Advertise Your Business in Pittsburgh City Paper!

WEIGHTLOSS TREATMENT

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

SUBOXONE We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Addictions

LOCATIONS IN:

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

NO WAIT LIST

Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116 N E W S

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Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

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Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

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GRAND OPENING!

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Judy’s Oriental Massage Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

FULL BODY MASSAGE

There is light at the end of the tunnel.

$40/hr

LIVE MOVING SERVICES

EAST FOR RENT

ABC SELF STORAGE5x10 $45, 10x10 $65, 10x15 $95. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Heart of Shadyside1BR Condo w/covered pkng, newer fridge, range, disposal, d/w, carpeted living & BR areas, a/c, coin op laund, walk to everything, stor, busline, sec entry. Sorry, no pets. $850+e Avl 7/1 724-941-5515 or 724-713-2902 Tom

WEST FOR RENT

Now with Vichy Shower

Pennsbury: 3BR-1.5ba $1200/month includes most utls. Open House 7/6/13 1-4PM. 786 Carriage Circle,Pittsburgh 15205

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950 Accepting All Major Cards

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Find your next job in the City Paper’s “WORK” section.

Shadyside- Lg 2BR, h/w fls, high ceilings, pvt back porch, sml pet OK, $900 heat incl. 412-661-5921

412.316.3342

get your yoga on!

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STARS AND STRIPES

MORE PHOTOS ARE ONLINE AT PGHCITYPAPER.COM

For Fourth of July, a selection of flags seen around Pittsburgh {BY AL HOFF}

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SUMMER IS IN THE AIR! OUTDOOR AMPHITHEATER CONCERTS Shows starting at 7PM WED JULY 3

THUR JULY 4

THE BEATLES TRIBUTE

ROD STEWART TRIBUTE

(BEATLEMANIA MAGIC)

(BLONDES HAVE MORE FUN)

Visit RIVERSCASINO.COM or call 412-231-7777 for more upcoming shows.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

July 3, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 27

July 3, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 27