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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 06.26/07.03.2013

GAME OVER: NEW CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED VIDEO GAME FEATURES POST-APOCALYPTIC PITTSBURGH 06


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013


OUT OF THE BOX TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUERS

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Join Time Capsules Cataloguers Erin Byrne, Marie Elia and Elaina Vitale in the Warhol theater as they take the first look inside one

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013


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Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers AMYJO BROWN, LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns TRACEY HICKEY, OLIVIA LAMMEL, KIRA SCAMMELL

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 26

{ART}

{COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

“In 2033, infrastructure is crumbling faster than the bridges on PennDOT’s structurally-deficient bridge list.” — Charlie Deitch on the video game version of post-apocalyptic Pittsburgh portrayed in The Last of Us

[VIEWS]

“Instead of trying to rein in the frat boys of Carson Street, let them round themselves up, and concentrate themselves in areas far removed from where civilized folks dwell.” — Chris Potter on what Kenny Chesney can teach us

not easy to build customers.” 26 “It’s — Istanbul Grille owner Coskun Gokalp, on losing his Downtown location

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“I just wanted a bar with craft beers, good food and music; I just made about every mistake possible along the way.” — Smiling Moose owner Mike Scarlatelli, on the venue’s trials and tribulations

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Marketing and Promotions Interns JODI SHERER, SHELBEY SURGENT Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO STEEL CITY MEDIA

[ARTS] choreograph anymore. I direct.” 42 “I—don’t Pearlann Porter on her evolving role heading dance troupe The Pillow Project

[LAST PAGE] must be made affordable. And 63 “College it also must be financially sustainable.” — Saxifrage School founder Timothy Cook on the future of higher education

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AL bowl.com ARSEN

{EDITORIAL}

06.26/07.03.2013

06

at the world-famous

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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INCOMING

WELCOME TO PITTSBURGH — OR AT LEAST NAUGHTY DOG GAMES’ POST-APOCALYPTIC VISION OF IT

At Local Premiere, Gasland II Widens the Frame (June 21, online only) “This movie, like the first one, is nothing but liberal hogwash. Josh Fox does not know how to report factual information about natural-gas drilling, and only wants to ban it, though there are countless people who support it and can live comfortably from the proceeds of their lease.” — Web comment from “Anvil” Yeah, you’re so right. Josh Fox probably hooked up faucets to the gas line just to make the water flame up. What a ditz huh! What a … tree hugger.” — Web comment from “John Reagan”

In the midst of redevelopment, East Liberty loses two more eclectic venues (June 19) “Glad to see the neighborhood redeveloping to make room for more sound, community-driven spaces like the East Liberty Place building and Bakery Square. Oh, wait.” — Comment on City Paper’s Facebook page by “Anthony Fabbricatore”

Pittsburgh Film Office head says uncapped tax credit would be boon to Pittsburgh and the entire state (June 20, online only) “I think they mean it would be a BOOM to Pittsburgh and the state, and help make us the movie capital of the World! India can have musicals, California can have prostitution films, and WE will make Feature Films to entertain the World!” — Web comment from “Brian Stead”

Editor’s note: This article contains spoilers for the Playstation 3 game, The Last of Us

ROAD TRIP

“A boon is a benefit. How would it be a ‘boom’ to Pittsburgh? More explosions?” — Web comment from “John Fedele”

Pride of Place: John Colombo captures the scene at weekend Pride events (June 19) “I wanted to go see Adam Lambert but when I heard that he had a keytar player in the band I just couldn’t do it. Some prejudices are still alive.” — Web comment from “Dave Buzzard”

“If you guys think Pittsburgh’s treatment of Heinz Field during a Kenny Chesney concert is bad, you should see Kennywood on Penn Hills Day.” — June 24 tweet from “Bryan Wood (@bryanwx)

You thought your commute was rough: Pittsburgh, as depicted in The Last of Us video game.

A

S YOU approach Pittsburgh in the new video game The Last of Us, you’ll immediately feel at home: You find yourself stuck in a traffic jam on a highway that can only be the Parkway East. You’re forced to exit into an area that vaguely reminds you of Second Avenue, with a rail trestle and elevated roadway above you. You and Ellie, your young traveling companion, had no intention of entering the city; you only wanted to pass through on your way west. But when you’re road-tripping during the end of the world, there’s no easy way to get from point A to point B. As you move deliberately down the street a man approaches you, doubled

over screaming for help. But you’re no fool. You know he’s likely either infected with the cordyceps fungus and wants to rip out your trachea with his teeth, or a “hunter” who wants to rob you blind and shoot you in the back of the head.

We spend a weekend traveling through post-apocalyptic Pittsburgh in The Last of Us {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} So you pound the gas pedal and race ahead. The man has now pulled a gun: He bounces over the hood of your pick-

up, but his comrades emerge from cover and open fire. You escape them, only to see a Port Authority bus rolling down a hill toward you. The bus strikes your vehicle, immobilizing it, and the hunters close in … Welcome to Pittsburgh — or at least Naughty Dog Games’ post-apocalyptic vision of it. RELEASED JUNE 14, The Last of Us involves

two survivors, Joel and Ellie, trekking from Boston to Salt Lake City. And the fate of the entire world — or what’s left of it — hangs in the balance. Last of Us comes from the minds of Naughty Dog creative director Neil Druckmann and game director Bruce CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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Joel and Ellie enter the city.

Straley; Druckmann received his master’s degree in 2005 from Carnegie Mellon University’s Entertainment Technology Center. (An interview with Druckmann can be found on page 10.) Since the city was on prominent display, City Paper decided to take a trip into The Last of Us and post-apocalyptic Pittsburgh to see how the city makes it through the end of the world. The story begins in modern-day Austin, Texas. Joel, a single father, lives with his teenage daughter, Sarah. One evening, Sarah wakes to find her father gone, and hears talk on the news about a strange infection sweeping across the country. Joel returns home only to find the neighbors have become infected with cordyceps, a real-life fungus which infects the brains of insects. In the game, the fungus affects humans too, controlling their minds and turning them into rampant killers. Father and daughter take off to find a safe haven, with Joel’s brother, Tommy, in tow. After several near misses with the infected, they come upon a soldier who receives orders over the radio to shoot Joel and Sarah, even though they don’t appear infected. In the resulting gunfire, both the soldier and Sarah are killed. Flash forward 20 years and the world is a much different place. In 2033, infrastructure is crumbling faster than the bridges on PennDOT’s structurallydeficient bridge list, and vegetation and

water have begun to creep in and create literal concrete jungles. The government has declared martial law and sealed off select cities. Joel is now a smuggler; he and his partner Tess bring weapons, food and other essentials in and out of Boston. The government is opposed by a militant protest group known as the Fireflies, who want martial law lifted and the original form of government restored. Through a series of events, the pair is tasked by a Firefly leader with bringing a 14-year-old girl, Ellie, to her compatriots miles away in the Boston Capitol Building. Along the way they find out why Ellie is so important: She is immune to the infection and the Fireflies want to use her to find a cure. But after a harrowing trek through Boston, they find the Fireflies have been killed, Tess has been bitten and the military is closing in. Tess forces Joel to take Ellie to Wyoming, where Tommy, a former Firefly, now lives. Along the way, Joel and Ellie must find their way through the Steel City. And they begin to form a bond that is only strengthened as they fight to flee the heavily occupied city and learn to depend on one another. The Last of Us is more than a road game hitting exotic locales like Pittsburgh and Salt Lake City. At its core, it’s a game about relationships — and how we’d all sort of be in a post-apocalyptic wasteland without them.

“INFRASTRUCTURE IS CRUMBLING FASTER THAN THE BRIDGES ON PENNDOT’S STRUCTURALLYDEFICIENT BRIDGE LIST.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013


IN THE GAME, Pittsburgh has undergone

what its leaders probably called a Fourth Renaissance: After the government sought to lock the city down, ’Burghers rose up in opposition, and turned the city into a giant trap, where all who enter are beaten, robbed and left for dead. Pittsburgh’s complicated street grid, though it isn’t copied precisely in the game, makes it a perfect locale for players to wend their way through a dangerous maze. Though you won’t specifically find a Primanti Brothers or Crazy Mocha, the Fort Duquesne Bridge looms large in most every exterior scene because reaching the bridge is your ultimate goal. And throughout, you have the feeling of being trapped, almost hopelessly, in Pittsburgh. The most obviously Pittsburgh view is one that appears to be a mashup of several locales. You arrive at the mouth of a flooded road that appears to be Sixth Street. The historic Warner Centre (called the Warren Centre in the game) is on your left; a luxury high-rise hotel — a cross between the William Penn and the Renaissance — is on your right; and the Fort Duquesne Bridge is in the background. Last of Us is not the first time Pittsburgh has been featured as a locale for the end of the world. George Romero and his zombies took over the city and surrounding areas in a couple of films, and the film adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road was shot in the area. Pittsburgh has been used as a locale in other games as well: In 2009, Bethesda Softworks created a post-nuclear Pittsburgh called “The Pitt” in its game Fallout 3.

At the heart of the game is the relationship between Joel and Ellie.

veloping the storyline for those characters. While walking up what appears to be Ross Street, Ellie asks Joel why the government turned on so many of its own people. Why were so many killed and not let into the quarantine zone? “You can’t let everyone in,” Joel tells her matter-of-factly. “It’s the good of the many over the good of one.” Walking down the streets of Pittsburgh, Joel may actually believe that. But by the game’s final reel, it’s a choice he will have made many times over.

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HOW DOES this newest entry shape up? While it’s tough to compete with Romero’s Pittsburgh, Last of Us certainly comes in a close second. If you’re worried that being depicted as a home for savage killers isn’t a great tourist draw, take solace: Pittsburgh is a setting in what will probably be ranked as one of the great video games of not only this year, but the past five years. “The Last of Us seamlessly intertwines satisfying, choice-based gameplay with a stellar narrative. It never slows down, it never lets up, and frankly, it never disappoints,” writes Colin Moriarty of IGN.com, who also compares it to McCarthy’s The Road. “Like The Road, The Last of Us is perpetually dangerous and unpredictable, and like The Road, what happened to get society to a point of rapid decay isn’t the focus. It’s the story of the characters at hand.” And Pittsburgh plays a key part in de-

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2013 ALLEGHENY COUNTY

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A conversation with CMU grad and video-game developer Neil Druckmann on the revolutionary The Last of Us {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

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Editor’s note: This interview may contain spoilers. If you don’t want to know anything about the game, you may want to turn to the music section now.

As a student at Carnegie Mellon University’s Education Technology Center, Neil Druckmann was taken by the city’s history and architecture. Now, eight years later, as creative director for Naughty Dog Games, Druckmann has created an homage to the Steel City in the post-apocalyptic Playstation 3 game The Last of Us. Druckmann, who received his master’s degree from the ETC in 2005, is the creative director for TLOU, and was responsible for crafting the intricate story as well as directing the live-action characters whose voices and actions were transferred into the game. The game — which sold 1.3 million copies in its first week — features the cross-country journey of a man named Joel and Ellie, the teenage girl he is paid to protect and transport through a world that has been decimated by a mutant infection caused by the cordyceps fungus. Their journey brings them to Pittsburgh, where they encounter uninfected survivors known as hunters. (A full review and synopsis of the game can be found on Page 6.) City Paper sat down with Druckmann to talk about the game, the city’s role in it and why Pittsburgh always seems to be a great place to ride out the apocalypse.

CMU grad and Naughty Dog games creative director Neil Druckmann

it’s flooded. It’s a gorgeous picture but you can’t help but think about death. It’s nature reclaiming its domain.

THIS GAME FORCES THE PLAYER TO ADDRESS A LOT OF MORAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES, AND A LOT OF THOSE ARE BASED ON THE LENGTHS JOEL IS WILLING TO GO TO PROTECT ELLIE. Right, that’s one of the main questions the game raises — is the life of one person more important than 10 lives, or potentially millions of lives? Does the end justify the means? In this game you will encounter groups of people who are handling the infection NORMALLY WHEN GAMES GO E and the lack of supplies in FOR THAT POST-APOCALYPTIC READ THION RS different ways. As you play FEEL IT’S A LOT OF FULL VEHIS this game, the stakes are OF T BROWNS AND GRAYS, W INTERVIEwww. raised higher and higher, and BUT THIS WORLD IS LUSH, at for Joel and Ellie, they form ONLINE paper GREEN AND BEAUTIFUL. ty ci h g p a father-daughter bond that WHERE DID THAT VISION .com by the end is tested by the COME FROM? sacrifices and the choices that must We came up with the idea while be made. watching the [BBC television series] Planet Earth. We learned about this fungus PITTSBURGH IS FEATURED called cordyceps, and what’s intriguing about PROMINENTLY IN THIS GAME. the fungus is it burrows into the minds of insects, like ants, and causes them to do weird WHAT WAS IT ABOUT THIS CITY IN PARTICULAR THAT MADE YOU THINK things. The fungus takes over and [the insect] IT HAD TO BE INCLUDED? eventually will crawl up to the top of a blade It’s got this interesting mix of old-style of grass, attach itself and the fungus then buildings and new-style buildings that we grows out of its head, the wind carries it and knew would make a great backdrop. We also it then infects other ants. We saw this and wanted to create a little homage to George we were like, “Zombie ants! Why has no one used this before?” So the world we’ve created Romero and his Night of the Living Dead film that was shot in Pittsburgh. I also know a little is an interesting contrast. It’s very lush and about the city thanks to my time spent at green and also super creepy. You see a street Carnegie Mellon. that’s usually bustling with people, but now CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013


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THE END, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

WHAT WENT INTO THE CITY’S DESIGN? When you’re putting a city like this into a game, you want to find out what the unique characteristics of the city are and include them, but at the same time you don’t want to be a slave to the map either. You want landmarks like the rivers and the bridges so people will say, “Oh yeah, that’s Pittsburgh,” but you also have to have a layout that’s conducive to the flow of game play. We loved the look of the Downtown business district, so you want to make sure you capture a feel — how the street signs look, for example — rather than create an exact replica.

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PITTSBURGH HAS LONG BEEN FEATURED AS THE BACKDROP FOR POST-APOCALYPTIC GAMES AND FILMS — FROM NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD AND THE ROAD TO FALLOUT 3 AND NOW THE LAST OF US. WHAT IS IT ABOUT OUR CITY THAT MAKES IT PERFECT FOR THIS KIND OF PROJECT? I think there is just a certain feel to the city. When I lived there I noticed, it’s not a fancy-looking city but it has a lot of character. It has theaters and museums and universities, but at the same time it’s a blue-collar, working-class town. And then when winter comes, it does feel a little oppressive and gray. Put a little vegetation on top of it and I think it really turned out beautifully in the game. ELLIE IS A YOUNG BUT VERY STRONG FEMALE CHARACTER, SOMETHING THAT A LOT OF PEOPLE FEEL VIDEO GAMES ARE MISSING. WERE YOU SPECIFICALLY LOOKING TO BREAK STEREOTYPES TO ADDRESS THAT ISSUE? Not initially, no. We wanted to simply tell a great story. But we did want to take the

stereotypes you find in a lot of action games — the typical action hero and the weak woman or girl you have to escort and watch over — and flip the stereotype. Joel is a very vulnerable character and Ellie is extremely capable and strong-willed. One of the things you don’t see a lot of in this industry is a strong, tough, non-sexualized female character. WHERE DID ELLIE’S INFLUENCES COME FROM? Many places. For example, the actress who plays Ellie, Ashley Johnson, definitely influenced the direction of the character. When Joel and Ellie arrive in Pittsburgh, Ellie is grabbed by a hunter and was supposed to be rescued by Joel right away. Ashley said, “I’m feeling a bit helpless; I feel like Ellie would hit him.” So I said, “Then hit him.” We also had a lot of women working on this project, and I think that very much influenced the character you find in this game. THIS INDUSTRY HAS LONG BEEN A BOYS’ CLUB — FROM THE DESIGNERS MAKING THE GAMES TO THE CHARACTERS THEY DESIGN. THERE ARE MORE WOMEN WORKING IN THE INDUSTRY NOW; DO YOU THINK THAT’S MADE A DIFFERENCE? I think so. If you look on the shelves, you don’t see many games with leading women protagonists, so when it comes to gender and race diversity in this industry there’s not been a whole lot to look up to. But things are changing and I think it’s a chicken-and-an egg-type scenario. Are there more women working in the industry influencing the products, or is it that there are fewer products focusing on male empowerment fantasies that are inspiring more women to enter the field? Either way, it’s changing. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

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don’t drink & drive. 12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013

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AFTER DOWD 4 F EN T ERTAIN ME N T & H I G H M A R K S TAD I U M P R E S E NT

Officials say constituents won’t suffer when councilor leaves District 7 post {BY AMYJO BROWN}

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WHEN PITTSBURGH City Councilor Patrick Dowd formally resigns his District 7 seat this summer, as he announced he would last week, the area he’s represented for six years will be temporarily disenfranchised. Dowd announced on June 18 that he will be resigning his seat sometime in July to take a job as executive director of a newly formed nonprofit, Allies for Children. That will leave District 7, which encompasses Bloomfield, Highland Park, Lawrenceville, Morningside, Polish Hill and parts of the Strip District, without a formal voice on city council until a special election for his replacement is held in November. “I’m sure there will be issues that come forward legislatively,” Dowd says, adding that it will be the council committee chairs and council president’s responsibility to ensure that District 7 voters are heard. “I don’t think there is anything that will suffer.” There are no written policies about how a district should be represented when a seat is vacant, says City Clerk Linda JohnsonWasler. Instead, the details of the transition period are left to the discretion of the council president, currently Darlene Harris. “We’re still crossing t’s and dotting i’s,” says Dowd, who met with Harris last week to discuss the transition. “I’m not going to submit my letter of resignation for awhile now — probably not until the day before I actually resign.” Council President Darlene Harris declined to discuss specifics of that conversation, saying she is still waiting for Dowd to submit his resignation. But she notes “[t]his has happened in numerous districts” over the years, and says she doesn’t plan to stray from those precedents. No one will step in as a proxy vote for Dowd, she says. Instead, council will officially be made up of eight members, and will still need five votes to pass legislation. Day-to-day operation of District 7’s office, meanwhile, will likely continue to be carried out by its current staff. Two fulltime and one part-time staffer will handle constituent calls and local issues like zoning notifications and liquor-license approvals. “We’re generally pretty autonomous,” says Nate Hanson, Dowd’s communications manager. “There won’t be any large projects while the seat is vacated.” Several community leaders are being

Pittsburgh City Councilor Patrick Dowd

rumored as possible contenders to replace Dowd. Among them are Tony Ceoffe, son of District Magistrate Tony Ceoffe; state Sen. Jim Ferlo; and Lauren Byrne, executive director at Lawrenceville United. As of press time, Ceoffe especially seemed to be considering a run, but none of the three would either confirm a bid or rule one out. Many neighborhood leaders say they aren’t terribly worried about the transition. “I think we’re going to be OK,” says Joey Vallarian, president of the board for the Bloomfield Development Corporation. Bloomfield was added to District 7 as part of the city’s redistricting — a change Vallarian says parallels his organization’s own. “We are in the process of revamping our entire organization,” he says, adding that it will take awhile for any new initiatives to reach the council level. “We’re really just getting started.” Lisa Schroeder, CEO and president of RiverLife, says she isn’t concerned about anything falling through the cracks. Dowd had been a strong advocate for the group, especially in a debate related to a Buncher Company proposal to redevelop parts of the Strip District along the river. “Our plan is to keep working with the entire council,” she says. “We expect the whole area will remain a priority for all elected officials.” As for Dowd, he says he feels good about leaving such projects in the hands of his colleagues — particularly now that Bill Peduto is the Democratic nominee for mayor. Dowd and Peduto were sometimes at odds during Dowd’s stint on council, but Dowd endorsed Peduto’s mayoral bid, and the two have been allies on some high-profile issues. “There’s now a stronger voice in town,” Dowd says.

“I THINK WE’RE GOING TO BE OK.”

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[POTTER’S FIELD]

SHORE LEAVE

The downside of being an urban destination {BY CHRIS POTTER} BACK WHEN the city was creating the socalled North Shore, some of us groused about how isolated the new developments were from the traditional North Side. Separated by railroad tracks and dimly lit tunnels, it was as if the whole sports-and-entertainment complex had been designed to shield visitors from the rest of us. Even the geographically dubious new name — rivers have banks, not shores — seemed like an effort to distance the area from nearby urban neighborhoods: You wouldn’t want visitors to worry about encountering violent behavior and substance abuse in town, after all. Funny how things work out, isn’t it? After this past weekend’s Kenny Chesney concert, quarantining the North Shore doesn’t seem like such a bad idea. As you may have heard, Chesney drew more than 50,000 people to Heinz Field, many of whom spent hours tailgating on sun-baked parking lots for hours before the show even began. Not surprisingly, at least 10 large fights broke out, according to police spokeswoman Diane Richard; police carried out more than 70 arrests and Tased at least one person. Media accounts, meanwhile, made much of the trash Chesney’s fans had left behind: a Post-Gazette review referred to the damage wrought by “Hurricane Kenny,” while WPXI’s cameras captured an abandoned recliner, lying forlornly amid the refuse. (“We’re not quite sure what that’s about,” anchor Jennifer Abernathy said in her best amusednewscaster voice.) Social media was shocked too, with a Facebook page calling for a ban on future Kenny Chesney concerts, among other online protests. On news sites, comments stereotyped Chesney fans as “white trash,” and surmised that everyone involved must have come from, like, West Virginia. No real Pittsburgher would act this way, surely. Personally, I don’t think the socioeconomic status, or the ZIP code, of Kenny Chesney fans are the issue. Some of the trucks in the parking lots, not to mention the boats moored along the river, look like they cost far more than the down payment on my house. And the behavior wasn’t that different from what we’ve seen on the streets of Oakland after a

Super Bowl win, or Downtown during St. Patrick’s Day. Those people can’t all be from Morgantown. The issue is the mindset you create by transforming whole swaths of your city into urban funzones — or “entertainment districts,” as urban planners like to call them. Developing destinations like Heinz Field and PNC Park, we were told, would generate “vitality” and help with “youth retention.” And it was supposed to be easy money: Many of the people such destinations attract leave as quickly as they came, so you don’t have to invest much in schools or other longterm capital. The problem, though, is that they don’t have much of a long-term investment in you, either. And some percentage of that crowd is guaranteed to act like morons. And if you have to have urban funzones, the North Shore may be the best Pittsburgh can hope for — in part because of the very qualities that make it so problematic the rest of the year: its oceanic parking lots, its relative isolation from real neighborhoods, even the gentrifying name. At least when those Chesney fans got into fistfights, the people getting hurt were other Chesney fans. At least when they urinated in public, it was on each other’s pick-up trucks, not on some hapless retiree’s doorstep. Other neighborhoods are dealing with the excesses that come with being an entertainment district. Over on the South Side, a “Responsible Hospitality Initiative” is being tested as a model for balancing the needs of residents and business owners with the rampaging hordes of Carson Street. But maybe the Chesney concert provides another option: Instead of trying to rein in the fratboys of Carson Street, let them round themselves up, and concentrate themselves in areas far removed from where civilized folks dwell. Put them in a nice, open area where there is nowhere to hide. Have lots of cops on hand. And if the revelers get out of line, take a page from the G-20 conference and hit them with the deafening siren of the LRAD. And if they happen to be fans of country music, you might even be doing them a favor. Along with everybody else.

AT LEAST WHEN CHESNEY’S FANS GOT INTO FISTFIGHTS, THE PEOPLE GETTING HURT WERE OTHER CHESNEY FANS.

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Nice Glass! ENJOY YOUR DRAFT AT THE FOLLOWING:

NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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Chengdu, China, barber Liu Deyuan, 53, is one of the few who still provide traditional “eye-shaving,” in which he holds the eye open and runs a razor across the lids’ inner surfaces. Then, using a thin metal rod with a round tip, he gently massages the inside of each lid. Liu told a reporter for the Chengdu Business Daily in April that he had never had an accident (though the reporter apparently could not be enticed to experience the treatment himself, preferring merely to observe), and a highly satisfied customer reported afterward that his eyes felt “moist” and his vision “clearer.” A local hospital official said eye-shaving can scrape away scar tissue and stimulate the eyes to lubricate the eye sockets.

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One of April’s most popular Internet images consisted of face shots of the current 20 contestants for Miss South Korea — revealing that all 20 appeared eerily similar, and Westernized. Commented one website, “Korea’s plastic surgery mayhem is finally converging on the same face.” Wrote a South Korean commenter, “Girls here consider eye surgery just like using makeup.” Wrote another, “I loved this episode of the Twilight Zone.” The country has the highest rate of cosmetic surgery per capita in the world.

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Michinoku Farm of Tokyo finally agreed in May to withdraw its whale-meat dogchews, but only after angering environmentalists for having favored the country’s pampered canines over endangered North Atlantic fin whales, which were the source of the chews. The meat was purchased from Iceland, which openly defies the international moratorium on whale meat. (Japan officially disagrees with world consensus on which species are endangered.)

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A marriage-encouraging initiative in the Sehore district of India’s Madhya Pradesh state awards gifts and financial assistance to couples agreeing to wed in mass ceremonies, but the country also suffers from a notorious toilet shortage. Consequently, the district announced in May that to qualify for the government benefits, the groom must submit to officials a photo of himself beside his own toilet to prove that he and his wife will have home sanitation.

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Closer to God Than You Are: (1) Crystal McVea, author of a recent book chronicling her near-death experience, told a Fox & Friends TV host in April that among her most vivid memories of the incident was getting so close to God that she could “smell” him. (2) In May, Anna Pierre, a candidate for mayor of North Miami, Fla., announced on her Facebook page that she had secured the endorsement of Jesus Christ. That would be doubly fortunate for her because a month earlier, she had complained that unknown people had been leaving bad-luck Vodou-ritual feathers, food scraps and candles on her doorstep. (Jesus’ stroke is apparently not what it used to be: She finished seventh in the race.)

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Expectant North Carolina parents Adam and Heather Barrington (who is due in July) have disclosed that they will accept under-

water midwifing from the Sirius Institute of Pahoa, Hawaii, which arranges for the mother to swim with dolphins pre- and post-natally. “It is about reconnecting as humans with the dolphins so we can ... learn from one another,” said Heather. Said Adam: “Dolphins are very intelligent and healing, which … calms mother and baby.” Biologists writing for the Discovery Channel, however, reminded readers that underwater births are extraordinarily dangerous and that dolphins are “wild animals” that gang-rape female dolphins and “toss, beat and kill small porpoises.” Said another, the Barringtons’ plan is “possibly the worst idea ever.”

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Local Governments at Work: (1) Washington, D.C., began registering its dogs this year by their primary breeds and, faced with many owners who claimed not to know their dog’s heritage, quixotically settled on the Mexican hairless dog, or “xoloitzcuintli” (pronounced “show-low-eats-QUEENT-lee,” according to The Washington Post) as the breed that will be listed in city records for those dogs. An official said the decision might encourage owners to learn more about their dog’s breed. (2) Of all the businesses that could fall out of favor with a local government, it was the restaurant Bacon Bacon that was shut down in May by the city of San Francisco — because of neighbors’ complaints about the bacon smell. A petition to overturn the ruling was underway at press time.

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More than 50 Iowa sex offenders have open-carry gun permits, thanks to a 2-year-old state law that requires any disapproving sheriff to demonstrate, in advance, “probable cause” that a sex offender will use a gun illegally in order to reject his application. Before that, a sheriff could use a sex offender’s previous felony conviction as sufficient cause. Said Washington County Sheriff Jerry Dunbar, “[J]ust the presence of a gun on a hip could be a threat to get [sex-crime victims] to cooperate.”

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Congress established the Interagency Working Group in 2009 to set guidelines on advertising healthy foods to children, and public comments on the guidelines are now being posted. General Mills appeared among the most alarmed by the IWG proposals, according to its comments on the Federal Trade Commission website (as disclosed by Scientific American in May). Of the 100 most commonly consumed foods and beverages in America, GM asserted, 88 would fail the IWG standards, and if everyone in America started following the health recommendations, General Mills would lose $503 billion per year in sales — unless, of course, it altered part of its product line.

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Dennis Gholston, 45, with outstanding traffic warrants in Pennsylvania, decided in May that, even though alone in his car, he could not resist using a high-occupancy vehicle lane (HOV) on the New Jersey Turnpike near Carteret. His decision was even more unsound because, according to the officer who stopped him for the HOV violation, Gholston was hauling about $4,000 worth of heroin in the car, and he was charged with intent to distribute.

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS@E A RT HL I N K . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

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HEAPING PORTIONS OF SIMPLE, SATISFYING FOOD TO GET YOU THROUGH THE LONG HAUL

WEED EATER {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} While our cultivated backyard garden keeps expanding, I’m a bigger fan than ever of the “weed” called lamb’s quarter. Spinach and lettuce must be planted and tended, and still they get stripped by mysterious insects. Lamb’s quarter, by contrast, grows on its own, everywhere, in profusion, from late spring into fall, and nothing seems to eat it (except gophers). Chenopodium album tastes like spinach and is super-nutritious. The USDA’s nutritional website says it’s full of calcium and vitamins A, C and K, and even packs significant iron and protein. Its green leaves are diamondshaped and roughly serrated, the lighter-colored undersides having a powdery feel. While lamb’s quarter bushes can reach several feet in height, this annual, non-native species’ leaves are perhaps half-dollar-sized. But they’re easy to harvest. And don’t worry about pulling a whole plant up by the roots for lunch; another one’s probably already growing nearby. My salads this June have had more lamb’s quarter than any other green, its mild flavor complemented by bitter arugula. But it also steams and sautées nicely. Use it any way you would spinach. If such a wild plant is so great, why bother cultivating greens? Variety’s sake aside, that’s a good question. Like fellow edible weeds dandelions and purslane, lamb’s quarter reminds us of how permaculturalists are working to grow food in ways that mimic nature, with perennial or self-seeding plants. Someday, perhaps, we can all eat this well, for free. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

the

FEED

A new documentary,

A Place at the Table, examines the rise of hunger and food insecurity in the United States and hits shelves this week. Kristi Jacobson and Lori Silverbrush’s film checks in with some high-profile concerned citizens (from actor Jeff Bridges and Top Chef’s Tom Colicchio, to food-policy analysts like Marion Nestle and Raj Patel), but the more troubling footage is the vignettes of families struggling to eat fully, and healthfully.

DINER STYLE

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

P

ERHAPS NOWHERE in Pittsburgh do the past and the present intersect more fluidly than in the Strip District, whose current character as an open-air market and general wonderland of ethnic, imported and specialty foods derives from its history as a produce shipping hub. And produce shipping, even in the days of trains rolling down Smallman Street, meant trucks and their drivers. Thus, the corner of Smallman and 24th streets was occupied by a repair shop and next by a quick-fare café — businesses serving first the trucks, then their drivers. As of last year, a new diner has moved in to the little corner shop, and it tweaks diner-decor clichés while paying tribute to the area’s industry. That signature diner material, chrome, is represented by shiny metal tread cleverly reinterpreted as wainscoting, and union seals instead of 45s are displayed in the vestibule alongside pictures of union members at work.

Veggie eggs Benedict

The food is mostly gimmick-free. Kelly O’s — a jaunty abbreviation of the name of its owner, Kelly O’Connor — opened first in a strip mall in the North Hills, and this second location has reproduced the original menu. It’s a mash-up of local favorites (Mancini bread, haluski and kielbasa) and the full panoply of American diner standards. And for those

KELLY O’S

100 24th St., Strip District. 412-232-EGGS (3447) HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 6 a.m.-3 p.m., Sun. 7 a.m.-3 p.m. PRICES: $3-14 LIQUOR: None

whose palates are more Cadillac than Mack truck, there are even a couple of items that seem to have dropped in from a hotel brunch: crab Benedict and a craband-asparagus omelet, for example. Our meal straddled breakfast and lunch, allowing us to sample sweet and

savory, fork and finger foods. Blueberry pancakes were as big as dessert plates, chockfull of juicy blueberries in the center but disappointingly devoid of them at the edges, and not quite as fluffy as we like. Both scrambled and sunny-side-up eggs, however, were cooked to perfection, as was the bacon, which attained a rare and wonderful combination of crispy and chewy. A sausage-and-cheese omelet was fluffy and substantial, though a bit scant on the Swiss. The yolks of the sunny-side-up eggs helped to moisten the hash browns, which were on the dry side. Potatoes were also offered as home fries, but Jason was happy to see the hash browns, which have become harder to find, perhaps because it’s a challenge to achieve a palatable balance between dryness and greasiness. If Kelly O’s fell on the drier end of the spectrum, at least there were plenty of crispy, brown bits. Home fries were better, both well browned and suitably moist. CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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DINER STYLE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

Browning was an important component of the corned-beef hash, too. We were impressed that our server delayed bringing this dish out until he thought it was browned enough; in general, our service at Kelly O’s was highly competent, friendly and efficient. And in this hash of finely chopped beef and diced potato, the tasty browned bits were the best part, bearing out our server’s instincts and initiative. Also, unlike so many corned-beef hashes, its saltiness level was just right. From the lunch side of the menu, a hamburger patty was not too big and not too flavorful on its own, but grilled onions — soft, but not melted — added appealing texture and some sweet, juicy notes to each bite.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

PACKING A WALLOP

Long obscure, ‘Super Punch’ may be poised for the big time

Meatloaf came coated, practically shellacked, in gravy that was alarmingly glossy. We suspected a heavy hand with thickener, but the flavor was clean, and the meatloaf itself was wonderfully beefy-flavored. All too often, binders and seasonings get in the way of the meat flavor in this classic diner dish, but here the meat’s robustness shone through. A couple minutes on the griddle added overtones of rich char. Fries were pale, verging on undercooked, perhaps a symptom of an overworked kitchen, as it took a long time for all of our dishes to make it to the table. Kelly O’s offers a classic diner experience, updated just enough to feel modern but not so much that it loses sight of the essential pleasures: the casual atmosphere, the polished chrome and boomerang Formica, and heaping portions of simple, satisfying food to get you through the long haul.

The D’Andrea family of Penn Hills has been importing wine and spirits for more than 30 years. John D’Andrea, who now runs the business with his brothers Frank and Henry, says they’ve seen a lot of brands come and go. But one libation’s appeal has remained consistent: Jannamico Super Punch. And it may be poised for a breakout. Company patriarch Joseph D’Andrea began importing the amaro early in the company’s history. “He drank it all his life,” says John D’Andrea. “It was big.” Super Punch stands out on the liquor shelf: It’s housed in an extra-large bottle — a full litre compared to the standard 750 ml — and its label is a blaze of bright greens and fire-engine red on a jet-black background. The punch itself is thick and syrupy, the flavor an unexpectedly appealing mix of tutti-frutti, flowers and molasses. It’s best mixed with sparkling water — or, as D’Andrea recommends, with a pinch of salt to cut the pungency. For the last 30 years, Super Punch has enjoyed a niche popularity, mostly among the region’s large Southern Italian population. “They all had it in their houses; still do,” says D’Andrea. Italian restaurants are big customers too, he says. But now, cocktail-focused bartenders are beginning to embrace Super Punch as well. After guest bartending at Tender Bar + Kitchen recently, Abraham Hawkins even took a few bottles home to New York, where he is head bartender at the amari-focused Dutch Kills bar. “I’m obsessed with amari, and it was amazing to find one I’ve never heard of before,” Hawkins says. “Plus, the label [a rough Italian-to-English translation] is pure poetry. It’s pretty awesome stuff.” He’s now serving a Super Punch, pineapple juice, lemon juice and sodawater aperitif. John D’Andrea says he’s thrilled that a new generation of bartenders is embracing Jannamico. But he credits older fans with preserving its legacy. “Ten years ago I tried to drop it,” D’Andrea recalls. “I couldn’t, because all the old Italian guys went crazy.”

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“I’M OBSESSED WITH AMARI, AND IT WAS AMAZING TO FIND ONE I’VE NEVER HEARD OF BEFORE.”

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

AWARD-WINNING CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN CUISINE

THE BLIND PIG TAVERN. 2210 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-5936. This South Side bar, whose name derives from Prohibition slang, offers a satisfying, pig-centric menu of pub grub. Look for the pig in pulled-pork sliders and pepperoni rolls. Or branch out with pizza, grilled cheese sandwich (add bacon!) and other popular bar fare. Wash it all down with legal beverages. JE CAFÉ DU JOUR. 1107 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-9695. This Euro-style bistro is “openkitchen cozy” with a quaint courtyard for intimate outdoor dining. A modestly sized yet thoughtful menu offers smallto-large plates, highlighting Mediterranean- and Europeaninfluenced California cooking with an emphasis on fresh, seasonal produce and excellently prepared meats. KF DORMONT DOGS. 2911 Glenmore Ave., Dormont. 412343-0234. This is an actual hotdog (and veggie-dog) restaurant, with an emphasis on top-quality frankfurters, local bakery buns and fresh, innovative toppings. Try the Texas Avenue Dog, topped with chili sauce, cheddar, sour cream and Fritos, or the Bruschetta Dog, with marinated tomatoes, pesto and parmesan. J

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412.471.4000

The Blind Pig Tavern {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} little jewel-box of a diner offers authentic, home-style Korean cuisine, including in-house chili sauce and various kimchis. The brief menu includes traditional appetizers such as dumplings and gimbop (sushilike rolls), as well as entrées ranging from bulgogi (beef stirfry) to spicy marinated chicken and Korean pancakes. KF HYEHOLDE. 1516 Coraopolis Heights Road, Moon Township. 412-264-3116. Half cottage, half castle, Hyeholde is housed in a little fantasy building dating to the 1930s. The splendidly landscaped grounds host outdoor pig roasts, clambakes and picnics in the summer. Unusual meats — elk, ostrich — are combined with fresh, local ingredients in preparations that join classic and contemporary … and offer the exquisitely rare experience of eating art. LE

inventive appetizers such as sashimi ceviche, traditional and creative sushi, dim sum and Chinese-American entrees both familiar (Peking duck) and less so (dan dan noodles). KE LOS CHILUDOS. 325 Southpointe Blvd., Suite 300, Canonsburg. 724-745-6791. This casual neighborhood taqueria offers classic MexicanAmerican fare sprinkled with more authentic options such as tinga (saucy stewed pork) and sopes, thick cornmeal cakes. Los Chiludos excels with Americanized Mexican dishes, imbuing them with authentic ingredients and preparations that recalls the fresh, flavorful fast food as it’s prepared in Mexico. JF

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MISS SAIGON 88. 256 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-802-6388. This restaurant offers a full sushi bar and some Thai curries, e hcitypap g p IBIZA. 2224 E. Carson but its Vietnamese .com St., South Side. 412specialties are the 325-2227. An urbane real reason to go. For wine bar and tapas restaurant, appetizers, try shrimp miniIbiza is the sister restaurant to crepes or banh uot, a chicken its next-door favorite, Mallorca. and noodle dish. The salted Ibiza’s menu starts in Spain lemongrass tofu entrée is a but includes delicacies from standout, as is the Spicy Miss Portugal, Argentina and other Saigon soup, a wonderfully countries. Accompanied by a flavored pho. KF wide international selection of wines, Ibiza offers a transportive OVER THE BAR BICYCLE dining experience. KE CAFÉ. 2518 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-3698. JIMMY WAN’S. 1337 Old This two-wheel-themed café Freeport Road, Fox Chapel and bar offers a creative (412-968-0848) and 1686 pub-grub menu (with many Route 228, Cranberry (724offerings named for bicycle 778-8978). This upscale eatery parts). The salads are more delivers what Americans expect impressive than those you’ll from a Chinese restaurant, find at most bars, and the plus fare with a modern, menu features vegetarian and pan-Asian approach, complete vegan options. Try the battered with Japanese and French zucchini planks wrapped around influences. Wan’s offers melty cheeses. JE

FULL LIST E N O wLwIN w. r

Ramen Bar {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} FAT HEADS. 1805 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-7433. This place seems to expand every few years, with reason: terrific beer selection, chicken wings and industrial-sized sandwiches. There’s outdoor eating on the “fatio,” but timing is everything: No matter how many tables they add, you may end up waiting for one. JE GOLDEN PIG. 3201 Millers Run Road, Cecil. 412-220-7170. This

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013

900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

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FORCED OUT

Customers rallying behind soon-tobe-evicted Istanbul Grille

RAMEN BAR. 5860 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-5138. What’s not to love about a big steaming bowl of wheat noodles, flavorful homemade broth and plenty of meat and vegetable add-ins? Besides the traditional offerings, Ramen Bar also has an intriguing penchant for applying the ramen technique to a variety of classic dishes from across Asia, such as Chinese ground-pork dishes. JF ROSE TEA CAFÉ. 5874 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-4212238. This bubble-tea café has broadened its offerings to include high-quality, authentic Chinese cooking. The menu is dominated by Taiwanese dishes, including a variety of seafood items. In place of the thick, glossy brown sauces which seem all but inevitable at most American Chinese restaurants, Rose Tea keeps things light with delicate sauces that are more like dressings for their freshtasting ingredients. KF SAVORY HILL. 988 Brodhead Road, Moon. 724-457-7109. This “eclectic bistro” offers a fortifying menu of locally sourced, creatively prepared fine dining. The starters span rarefied (scallops) to comforting (nachos), and include truly memorable salads. Entrees include a Southwest surf-n-turf with chipotle peppers, and slowbraised short ribs with risotto and multi-colored carrots. LE SUN PENANG. 5829 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-4217600. Sun Penang’s aesthetic is Asian — simple but not austere — and to peruse its menu is to explore the cuisines of Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore. The Pangan ikan is a house specialty, and the Malaysian kway teow (practically the country’s national dish) may be the best you ever have without a tourist visa. JE TRAM’S KITCHEN. 4050 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412682-2688. This tiny family-run storefront café packs in the regulars. Most begin their meal with an order of fresh spring rolls, before moving on to authentic preparations of pho, noodle bowls and friedrice dishes. The menu is small, but the atmosphere is lively and inviting. JF

COSKUN GOKALP — known as “Josh” to his customers

Coskun Gokalp works at Istanbul Grille. {PHOTO BY AMYJO BROWN}

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PIGS-2-PEACHES. 100 Wises Grove Road, New Brighton. 724-581-4595. It’s not just barbecued meats and sides at this diner, but also breakfast, sandwiches and burgers for lunch, and homemade desserts aplenty. The barbecued meats are juicy (sauce on the side), and fried okra, fried green tomatoes and biscuits round out the Southern-style comfort-food experience. KF

— won’t let you leave hungry. “You’re too thin!” the owner of the Downtown Istanbul Grille told me, weeks ago when it was just his Turkish specialties and not his story drawing me in. He piled my container, the “meat dish,” high with chickpea salad, kisir and dolma; far more than I suspect the $8 price tag covered. That’s Josh, says Jen Meyercheck, a regular. She, too, has often benefited from his generosity. “His food is his passion, and it is totally evident,” says Meyercheck. Now she — and many of his customers — are organizing to show how much they care. Gokalp’s month-to-month lease is up after five years at 643 Liberty Ave. He received notice that he must move; the 7-Eleven convenience store next door is expanding. In response, Meyercheck launched a “Save the Istanbul Grille” Facebook page that has driven recent lines outside the restaurant that snake around the corner, and grabbed the attention of the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership and the city’s presumptive mayoral-elect, Bill Peduto. All are trying to find a way to help Gokalp remain Downtown. “He’s the picture of diversity in the middle of the Cultural District,” Meyercheck says, adding that local businesses are also valuable. “They are what make Pittsburgh unique.” No date for the eviction is set. The building’s representatives are still negotiating with the national chain, says Jim Lamanna, NDC Real Estate Management’s director of real estate. Gokalp, 45, moved to the U.S. from Istanbul, Turkey, in 1998 to pursue the “American Dream.” He is reluctant to move his restaurant but not, he says, because he is worried about the cost of relocating or paying higher rent. (He owns two other restaurants, in Lawrenceville and in Ross Township.) What worries him most is any break that takes him away from feeding his Downtown customers each day. “It’s not easy to build customers,” he says. Meyercheck says she hopes the support generated encourages Gokalp and reassures him that they’ll follow. “At the end of the day, if he has to leave the Liberty Avenue store, he has a whole community behind him,” she says. “We don’t want [him] to quit, to close up shop.” A B ROW N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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LOCAL

BEAT

“I GOT SWEPT INTO HANGING OUT IN RECORD STORES WITH PEOPLE TELLING STORIES.”

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

A RETURN TO ROCK When the members of Old Head started jamming together a little more than a year ago, singer/guitarist Phil Boyd brought out a box of old posters he’d collected through high school and college. “When we go to our practice space, there’s a black-light Jimi Hendrix poster and a Smashing Pumpkins poster,” he says with a laugh. Practice is usually dovetailed with someone putting on a record by Neil Young, or Can, or David Bowie. This is a band that loves its rock music. Saturday, the band releases its first record — a split with another relatively new band of rock ’n’ roll devotees, Outsideinside. Singer/guitarist Dave Wheeler and bassist Jim Wilson of local classic rockers Carousel started Outsideinside about a year ago, along with drummer Panfilo DiCenzo. “There was a more stripped-down style of rock ’n’ roll that we wanted to do,” Wheeler explains. “We were curious about exploring this other direction, with a more swinging rhythm section.” While Wheeler does the bulk of the songwriting for Carousel, Outsideinside’s songs are the result of jamming during practice, which gives them a loose, heavy groove, not dissimilar from Blue Cheer, after whose second album the band got its name. Old Head, on the other hand, is a return to guitar for Boyd, who in recent years has explored electronic music with his projects Hidden Twin and TM Eye. He had been playing with his former Modey Lemon bandmate Jason Kirker, and separately with Mike Layton and Bill Wehmann of Frizz. It made sense to combine the two; the result is a kind of catchy, psychedelic Krautrock Crazy Horse. Machine Age Studios co-founder Preslav Lefterov, who’s releasing the record on his label, suggested the pairing after the two bands played a show together last year. “[Lefterov] has an interest in releasing Pittsburgh-based music, and I just think he’s excited about the idea of releasing a rock record,” Boyd says. Hearing the split now, the pairing of these two bands — both relatively new, guitar-driven projects by established members of the Pittsburgh music scene — seems like a no-brainer. Or, as Boyd puts it: “Without too much thought, it seems like a good match.” MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

OLD HEAD/OUTSIDEINSIDE SPLIT RELEASE. 9:30 p.m., Sat., June 29. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

28

KEEPER OF THE RECORDS {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

S

OME KIDS DREAM of becoming professional athletes, or getting signed to a record label. Mike Seamans was called up to the majors, in a manner of speaking, when he was still just a teenager, and it was a dream come true — but it was a very limited sort of stardom. He had developed a habit of hanging out in record stores around Pittsburgh — places like Jerry’s, and especially Paul’s CDs, in Bloomfield. When one Paul’s employee was leaving town, he told Seamans that owner Paul Olszewski wanted to talk to him. “When I think about it, this literally changed the course of my life,” Seamans says. “I went down on a Friday afternoon, and I went up to Paul and said, ‘Randy said you wanted to talk to me?’ And he said, ‘Yeah, do you wanna come down on Sunday, just hang out? I’ll pay you.’ And I said ‘Sure!’” What started as a Sunday-afternoon gig turned more serious over the summer, and soon enough, Seamans realized this was where he wanted to be. That’s what set him on the path toward running Mind Cure Records, his Polish Hill vinyl-oriented

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013

Records with a side of history: Mind Cure’s Mike Seamans

shop, which celebrates its third anniversary this weekend. “The thing I got swept into,” says Seamans, “which I still really love, and has dictated what I do, is hanging out in record stores with people telling stories. Talking about bands that I wish I could have seen; people telling you about the Electric Banana. There was always this mythical way in which people talked about stuff that had happened.”

MIND CURE RECORDS THIRD ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Noon-8 p.m. Sat., June 29. Mind Cure Records, 3138 Dobson St., Polish Hill. 412-621-1715 or www.mindcurerecords.com

After years of working at Paul’s, studying urban planning at Pitt and moving to Washington, D.C., for a few years with his now-wife, Seamans doubled down on the idea of opening his own shop in the late ’00s. “When I lived in D.C.,” he says, “there

were a few new record stores that had just opened up, about the size of [Mind Cure], and I thought, ‘Maybe I can do this!’ I’d fantasized about owning a record store before, but I always figured it would be something like, Paul would sell the store.” Upon his return to Pittsburgh, he started to work on finding a spot for the store, at first planning to buy a building. Then, he found the Dobson Street building where the shop currently is, and worked out a deal in which he splits the space with Lili Coffeeshop (on the first floor) and Copacetic Comics (on the third). Mind Cure focuses on vinyl — both new and used — and largely on a few genres. Seamans says at first he set out to be allencompassing, like Paul’s was. “I realized really quickly that it’s really hard to do,” he says. “One of the reasons Paul’s was amazing, and one of the reasons he kept us all around, was that we all had our own different interests. And when it’s just me, it’s hard — the stuff I’ve known really well is more punk, heavy metal, rock stuff and some weirder things that are tangential to that: noise records, CONTINUES ON PG. 30


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KEEPER OF THE RECORDS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

that kind of thing.” The other thing Seamans is focusing on more is history. In keeping with the idea of the record store as a place to hang out and swap stories, he’s begun a few projects to help keep local music history alive. He revived Mind Cure Records — the store’s namesake, a punk label run out of Pittsburgh in the ’80s by Dave Martin and Half Life’s Mike LaVella. He’s planning a series of reissues, the first of which was the first original Mind Cure release, the LP by LaVella’s band Real Enemy. Upcoming are reissues of records by Savage Amused and The Battered Citizens. He’s also working on a documentary series about the punk era in Pittsburgh, interviewing figures like LaVella, Mind Cure Records’ Dave Martin, Johnny Banana of The Electric Banana, and touring musicians, including members of Black Flag. It’s like a film version of the record-store experience: people who were there when something big (or something they think was big) happened, all telling their slightly different versions of how it went. Of course, it’s not all about the past: Mind Cure Records is also looking ahead with a year-long series of monthly 7-inch releases featuring current local bands; each will contribute one original song and one cover. Zeitgeist will be featured on the first, released in tandem with the store’s third anniversary. Each single will also have an accompanying online video about the band. “There are all these teeny micro-scenes in Pittsburgh, and I’ve gotten to know a lot of people through the store who I wouldn’t otherwise know,” says Seamans. “The idea isn’t to say Pittsburgh’s the most important place or whatever. It’s just to show that these things are happening. I think we aren’t always the best at checking out things that are outside of our circle.” As someone who studied urban planning, Seamans, who bought a house in Polish Hill years before the store ever opened, understands the role a record store can play in creating and sustaining community — both among neighbors and among those with an interest in music. Mind Cure, as part of the Dobson Street complex with Lili and Copacetic, provides a place to gather and chat, just like record stores everywhere have done for years. And as an entity that’s preserving history and archiving the current music scene, it’s filling what might even be a more important role. “None of this happened in a vacuum,” Seamans notes. “The history of it is very important. Say this is the first hardcore band in Pittsburgh — well, why did it happen then? I’ve always been interested in that kind of music history.” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013

NEW RELEASES

THEIA COLLIDES FRAGMENTS (SELF-RELEASED)

Five-track EP from the local four-piece that emerged from the breakup of The Hitchcock Curse. These tunes are effects-laden, proggy and sprawling, sometimes calling to mind Muse, sometimes leaning more toward metal (as on the upbeat and driving “Highway to Middle Earth”). The rhythm section here is especially strong — Ben Chiarini’s bass work is masterful, yet he’s able to rein it in when necessary. I’m not sold on the vocals throughout — the louder George Stevens’ bellows get, the better, but on the quieter tunes, they can start to feel same-y and a bit put-on. But they’re a far cry from bad, and for a first EP, so is Fragments. BY ANDY MULKERIN

THEIA COLLIDES CD RELEASE. 9 p.m. Fri., June 28. Perrytowne Drafthouse, 1002 Perry Highway, North Hills. Free. 412-367-6910 SHAD ALI ALL FOR THE LOVE (SELF-RELEASED)

The smoothflowing, mellowvoiced rapper offers rhymes about the hardships of his Wilkinsburg upbringing while introducing his ambitious persona on this debut album. On “Forbes Ave.,” Ali shares his story of finding solace while walking along the road that spans many of Pittsburgh’s eastern neighborhoods. While reflecting on some less-fortunate life experiences, the MC preaches aspirations on “Pioneer,” rapping: “Acquainted with the struggle but I can’t embrace poverty / generate funds and build my hood up properly.” In addition to Ali’s introspective lyrics, the album includes great production from Baka, Depo Shot, PLAN and Sven Diamond. BY RORY D. WEBB


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SMILING AGAIN {BY ANDY MULKERIN} IF YOU HAVEN’T been to the Smiling Moose

in five or six years, you likely wouldn’t recognize the place today — and as far as owner Mike “Scarfo” Scarlatelli is concerned, that’s for the better. In the late’00s, there were times when Scarlatelli wanted to do away with the bar altogether, but instead, he cleaned house, brought in a chef and contracted with Drusky Entertainment to produce most of the bar’s music programming. “This is what I always wanted it to be,” says Scarlatelli. “But I didn’t think it would be.”

SMILING MOOSE ANNIVERSARY SHOW FEATURING JOE GRUSHECKY AND THE HOUSEROCKERS, GERMAN SHEPHERD, THE COMPOSURE 9 p.m. Wed., July 3. The Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

In its early years, the Moose, on East Carson Street in the heart of the South Side, garnered a reputation as a rough-and-tumble place. “People thought it was all gutter punks and bikers,” says Scarlatelli. “And it

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013

mostly was.” He blames former employees for the bad associations; three years ago, he fired a number of staff and started anew. And now, while the Moose is gearing up to celebrate its 10-year anniversary, “It’s more like a three-year anniversary to me,” Scarlatelli says. Scarlatelli, a South Hills native, opened the Moose in 2003, naming it for a bar in Minnesota, where he went to school. He’d worked bar jobs and played semi-pro hockey before coming back to town to open the bar. “I just wanted to have a bar that was a venue for rock shows,” he says. He’s also a veteran of punk and indie bands in town, from ’90s ska-punk outfit Bunjie Jambo to current rock band German Shepherd, and did a stint drumming for punk legends Submachine. In its early years, the Smiling Moose hosted mostly punk and metal shows, on a stage tucked away in the back of the first floor. It was dark and not entirely hospitable. It wasn’t making much money. For a while, Scarlatelli says he simply avoided the problem; the bar was staying afloat, and he was dealing with other issues, like the death of his mother. But in 2009, he began to turn the bar

around, remodeling it so that shows could take place upstairs. Anti-Flag played a release show at the venue, which began the bar’s relationship with promoter Drusky Entertainment. Scarlatelli bought a pointof-sale system with hidden cameras that he can control from an app on his phone, and figured out that some employees were furnishing free drinks. He fired them. (“Maybe that’s why I like that show, Bar Rescue,” he says. “I did it myself, before that show existed!”) In time, he brought in chef Christopher Cook, who had been working at Café du Jour. The downstairs of the Moose is now much more welcoming, and the upstairs is a good spot to find an indie-rock show, and sometimes a local hip-hop showcase. Sean Cho, veteran of Plus/Minus Studios, runs sound. It’s a far cry from when bands were crammed into the corner of the first-floor bar — and having the stage out of the way allows for more space for dining tables downstairs. It’s been a long journey for Scarlatelli and the Moose, but it’s one that’s ended up where it was meant to. “I just wanted a bar with craft beers, good food and music,” says Scarlatelli. “I just made about every mistake possible along the way.”

“MAYBE THAT’S WHY I LIKE THAT SHOW, BAR RESCUE: I DID IT MYSELF.”

A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


{PHOTO COURTESY OF DENISE TRUSCELLO}

CRITICS’ PICKS

[TROPICÁLIA] + THU., JUNE 27

collaboratively. The result is a full-length album heavy with swanky brass sounds that complement Clark’s soft, feminine voice and Byrne’s unmistakable one. The set features songs by Byrne, St. Vincent and Talking Heads, in addition to the collaborative album. Catch them at Greensburg’s Palace Theatre tonight. KS 8 p.m. 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg. $59-79. All ages. www.thepalacetheatre.org or 724-836-8000

Since its resurrection in 2006, Brazilian psych band Os Mutantes has been churning out fresh progressive-rock songs that diverge from — but are still in line with — the music the band put out when it was originally active throughout the ’60s and ’70s, at the advent of the Tropicália movement. Of the original members, Sérgio Dias remains with the group. Check them out tonight at Club Café. Kira Scammell 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $20. www.clubcafelive.com or 412-431-4950

[YACHT ROCK] + SUN., JUNE 30 {PHOTO COURTESY OF LASZLO KONRATH}

Remember those old Gateway Clipper commercials where they sang the song about how it’s rivertainment time? If you weren’t enticed by the Dixieland band and showgirls they featured back then, maybe you’ll be more into this afternoon’s local indie-rock event. Round Black Ghosts, Grand Piano, Chet Vincent and the Big Bend, and Josh Verbanets will be playing on the fleet’s Princess boat, plus Shelf Life String Band will be leading a bluegrass jam on the upper deck. It’s billed as a “three-hour tour,” but don’t ask us who’s the Ginger of this crew and who’s the Mary Ann. Andy Mulkerin 2 p.m. 350 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square. $22. All ages. www.pittsburghthreehourtour.com

[INDIE ROCK] + SUN., JUNE 30 The Front Bottoms aren’t a joke, but they’re also far from serious. The New Jersey four-piece recently released its latest, Talon of the Hawk, on the venerable Bar/ None label, in May. It’s a mix of catchy pop hooks, fun guitars, and a delivery that sometimes recalls Atom and His Package — all lighthearted, good stuff. Tonight, the band plays the Smiling Moose along with A Great Big Pile St. Vincent of Leaves and The and Artless. AM 6 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., David Byrne South Side. $10. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smilingmoose.com

[BLUEGRASS] + MON., JULY 01

[POP] + SUN., JUNE 30 Annie Clark, a.k.a. St. Vincent, and David Byrne, of Talking Heads, are rolling through the area this weekend, performing songs from their collaborative album Love This Giant. After seeing Bjork and Dirty Projectors play a show together in New York City in 2009, the pair decided to try their hand at writing music

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While Steve Martin has always been a banjo player, it wasn’t considered his stock-in-trade throughout most of his career; he was, of course, best known as a wild and crazy guy. But in recent years, he’s returned to bluegrass, playing with his band, The Steep Canyon Rangers, usually without an arrow through his head. In April, he released Love Has Come for You, an album on which he collaborated with Edie Brickell; the former New Bohemians frontwoman accompanies him tonight at Heinz Hall. AM 6:30 p.m. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $45-150. All ages. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

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Natural American Spirit® is a registered trademark of Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Co. © SFNTC 2 2013

Os Mutantes

get your trial offer. TryAmericanSpirit.com 1-800-435-5515 CODE: 92425 Trial offer restricted to U.S. smokers 21 years of age or older. Offer void in MA and where prohibited. Additional restrictions may apply.

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

THU 27 ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. Two Wheel Pass. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. ALTAR BAR. The Jaggerz, Joe Grushecky, The Granati Brothers, PGH, No Bad Ju Ju, Billy Price, Johnny Angel, more. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. El Reys. North Side. 412-322-1850. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Os Mutantes, Tuff Sunshine. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Invisible Things, T-Tops, Triangle & Rhino, Brown Angel. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LAVA LOUNGE. Doomsday Initiative, Kid Durango, Been Through Fire. South Side. 412-431-5282. THE SHOP. Laughing Eye Weeping Eye. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. SMILING MOOSE. Impending Doom, The Great Commission, The Overseer, Maesion Balto, Turpentiners. South Side. 412-431-4668. UNION PROJECT. The Evens. Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

FRI 28

JULY 18, 2013 | 7:30 PM HEINZ HALL FOR TICKETS, CALL 412.392.4900 OR VISIT PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG GROUPS OF 10+ CALL 412.392.4819

34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013

MEDIA SPONSOR

31ST STREET PUB. The Jim Dandies, Atlas, The Long Knives. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. The Composure, Blue of Colors. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Geen Stovall Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Ben Hackett, Dustin Hook (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Crosstie, Katie Danielle. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GOOSKI’S. Thunder Vest, Chest, Bottle Rat. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HAMBONE’S. Don Strange & The Doosh Bears. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Samantha Harlow, Zach Schmidt Band , Hey Mavis, Elli Perry. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. Sohnic, Astro Kinetic, Nifty Breed. South Side. 412-381-3497. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. My Way: A Musical Tribute to Frank Sinatra. Presented

by Liberty Theatre. Midland. 724-643-9004 x 2. LINDEN GROVE. Dancing Queen. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MOONDOG’S. Crossfire. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Niki O’Brien, Nick Africano, The Redlines, Brewer’s Row. Millvale. 866-468-3401. OBEY HOUSE. Lenny Smith & The Ramblers. Crafton. 412-922-3883. PERRYTOWNE DRAFT HOUSE. Theia Collides. CD release. McCandless. 412-979-9201. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Gone South. Ross. 412-364-8166. ROY’S BY THE TRACKS. The Bill Ali Band. Finleyville. 724-348-7118. SMILING MOOSE. PigPen Theatre Co Stinking Lizaveta, Invader, Liquified Guts. South Side. 412-431-4668. SONNY’S TAVERN. Chance Wayne & The Working Poor. Bloomfield. 412-683-5844. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Girls Guns & Glory, City Dwelling

Nature Seekers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. W. NEW CASTLE ST. PLAZA. Dizzy Woosh. Butler. 724-256-5769. WOLCOTT PARK. Chris Vipond & The Stanley Street Band. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

SAT 29 31ST STREET PUB. The Redlines, Bunny Five Coat, The Awful Waffles. Strip District. 724-355-3494. ALTAR BAR. After The Fall, Fist Fight in the Parking Lot, Rokbot, Skell, Zilch, Zion Cross. Zoe’s New Beginnings Present: Mayhem “For The Minis.” The Wallflowers. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BARNEY’S BAR & GRILLE. Daniels & McClain. Aliquippa. 724-375-9851. BRILLOBOX. Outsideinside, Old Head. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Brooke Annibale, Sam Brenner (Early) Sun Hound, Sugapablo (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950.

MP 3 MONDAY SECOND EMPIRE {PHOTO COURTESY OF KAELA SPEICHER}

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

ROCK/POP

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from Second Empire; download “Birth of the Empire” for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Trainwreck. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Whiskey Rebellion, 50 Caliber Dream, Splitsound. Aliquippa. 724-375-5080. FRANKIE’S. theCAUSE. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. California Wives, My Gold Mask, I Am A Sea Creature. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GATOR’S LOUNGE. EMT Freakshow, Results May Vary, Xander Demos, Vicious Hands, Rain Audio. Benefits the Humane Society of Westmoreland County. Jeannette. 724-837-1220. HAMBONE’S. Lani Nash, Sue Powers & Burr Beard of Devilish Merry. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. Through These Walls. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Strangers & Liars, Jenny Morgan, Modern Nature. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JOEY D’S. Badd Newz. Harmarville. 412-828-0999. LA CASA NARCISI. Antz Marching. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. LEMONT. Groove Doctors. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. My Way: A Musical Tribute to Frank Sinatra. Presented by Liberty Theatre. Midland. 724-643-9004 x 2. THE LOOSE MOOSE. Black Sunday. Baldwin. 412-655-3553. MILLERSTOWN INN. The Dave Iglar Band. Unknown. 724-445-2157. MONONGAHELA AQUATORIUM. Oh What A Night! A Tribute to Frankie Valli & the Four Seasons. Monongahela. 724-258-5905. PARK HOUSE. Andre Costello. North Side. 412-224-2273. REX THEATER. Grandchildren, Mega Def, Chrome Baby Jesus, Mr. Owl. Summer Solstice Showcase, presented by Touchfaster. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROCK ROOM. DeathCrawl, The Osedax, Meth Quarry, Slaves BC. Polish Hill. 412-452-2054. RUNWAY RESTAURANT. The Austin Drive Band. Butler. 724-586-6599. SMILING MOOSE. Ladies of Acoustic Grammar, Buffalo Rodeo Disobey. South Side. 412-431-4668. ST. THOMAS A BECKET CHURCH. The Holidays, Southside Jerry. Jefferson Hills. 412-655-2885. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Doug Khorey & his Band of Broken Hearts, The Honeyriders. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 30 BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Tom Watt & the Fruitcakes. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. CLUB CAFE. The Soul Rebels. South Side. 412-431-4950. CLUB ZOO. Jimmy Eat World, X Ambassadors. Strip District. 412-201-1100.

EWING PARK. The Holidays, CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Southside Jerry. Ellwood City. Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. 724-758-5501. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. 412-224-2273. Hiding Scarlet, Little War Twins, Court IV, The Wire Riots. Garfield. 412-361-2262. AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Summer GATEWAY CLIPPER FLEET. Fling Fridays. East Liberty. Josh Verbanets, Chet Vincent 412-363-8277. & The Big Bend, Round Black BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE Ghosts, Grand Piano. Station SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Square. 412-355-7980. Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Jetty Downtown. 412-456-6666. Boys, DeeCracks, Playoff Beard, CABARET AT THEATER Lady & the Monsters. Bloomfield. SQUARE. Salsa Friday. Downtown. 412-682-0320. 412-325-6769. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Reggae ARTS CENTER. My Way: A Fridays. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. Musical Tribute to Frank Sinatra. LAVA LOUNGE. 80’s New Presented by Liberty Theatre. Wave Flashback. w/ DJ Electric. Midland. 724-643-9004 x 2. South Side. 412-431-5282. MR. SMALLS THEATER. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Bohdi Watts, 30 Realm, Harry Lurker. Lawrenceville. Act of Pardon, Fortified 412-904-2915. PhonetX, Pet Clinic, ONE 10 LOUNGE. Romeo Harp, Black DJ Goodnight, Market Diary, Niki DJ Rojo. Downtown. www. per O’Brien. Millvale. 412-874-4582. a p pghcitym 866-468-3401. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. .co PALACE THEATRE. Dance/top 40 hits. Mt. David Byrne & St. Vincent. Washington. 412-431-3730. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. SMILING MOOSE. The Front South Side. 412-431-2825. Bottoms, A Great Big Pile of Leaves, RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ The Artless 2 Fisted Law, Michael Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. Marks. South Side. 412-431-4668.

FRI 28

FULL LIST E N O LIN

SAT 29

MON 01 GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Sleepy Kitty, Sun Ray Shining Light, Netizen, The Awful Waffles. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HEINZ HALL. Steve Martin & the Steep Canyon Rangers, Edie Bricknell. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

TUE 02 BYHAM THEATER. Gregg Allman, Joe Grushecky. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CLUB CAFE. Dax Riggs, LO-FI EYED. South Side. 412-431-4950. CONSOL ENERGY CENTER. Bruno Mars. Uptown. 412-642-1800. FRANKIE’S. The House Band. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Ezra Furman. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MALL AT ROBINSON. Terrence Vaughn. Robinson.

WED 03 ALTAR BAR. 28 North. Strip District. 412-263-2877. AVONWORTH COMMUNITY PARK. Daniels & McClain. Ohio Township. 412-766-1700. CLUB CAFE. Nude Beach, Jet Set Vapour Trails, The Beauregards. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Kristen Ford, Steelesque, Udu Girl, Leslie Addis. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. SMILING MOOSE. Joe Grushecky & the Houserockers. South Side. 412-431-4668.

DJS THU 27 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555.

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Dance/ top 40 hits. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3730. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 29

FRI, JUNE 28 • 9PM CLASSIC COUNTRY/FOLK ROCK

MEADOWS CASINO. The O’Jays, Gladys Knight. Washington. 724-503-1200.

GIRLS GUNS AND GLORY

SUN 30

AND CITY DWELLING

NATURE SEEKERS

ALTAR BAR. Mike Stud. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

SAT, JUNE 29 • 9PM R&B/SOUL

BLUES

JUNE 27

DOUG KHOREY AND HIS BAND OF BROKEN HEARTS

THU 27 ZIGGY’S TAVERN. Still Not Sober. Wexford. 412-837-2688.

FRI 28 EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The Southside Groove Squad. South Side. 412-431-4090. LARGE HOTEL. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Clairton. 724-384-9950. PARK HOUSE. Still Not Sober. North Side. 412-224-2273.

DOOMSDAY INITIATIVE

JULY 4 SCVM (LOS ANGELES), DJ HUCK FINN

PLUS THE HONEYRIDERS

JULY 11

MON, JULY 1 • 9:30PM

OPEN STAGE

DEREK WOODZ BAND, SUPPER BREAK STRING BAND

WITH CRAIG KING TUES, JULY 2 • 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES

SAT 29

FT. DAVID THROCKMORTON

BOBBY D’S SWING CITY. Sweaty Betty Blues Band. Squirrel Hill. FRANK’S PUB & GRILL. The Blue Bombers, Pat Scanga. Bethel Park. 412-833-4606. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. MOONDOG’S. Mahajibee. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE R BAR. Felix & The Hurricanes. Dormont. 412-942-0882. SEVEN SPRINGS. Guitar Zack. Foggy Google Blues Series. Champion. 1-800-452-2223. SPEAL’S TAVERN. The Breadline Preachers. New Alexandria. 724-433-1322.

OPEN FOR LUNCH

Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41

$2 PBR Drafts Everyday 9-11

$5 PBR Drafts & Fireball Shot All Day ‘till Midnight

2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

SUN 30 BROOKLINE PUB. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Brookline. 412-531-0899.

SUN 30 ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. DJ Zombo. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Give A Man a Break Sunday Night Soul Sessions w/ DJ Soulful Fella. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. RIVERS CASINO. DJs Bill Bara & Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 02 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Open Turntable Night. East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

WED 03 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. When Life Gives You Lemons.DANCE. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Brotha Mike & DJ Skooze. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day

JAZZ THU 27 CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. HARMONY MUSEUM. Allegheny Brass Band. Harmony. 888-821-4822. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PALACE THEATRE. Joshua Ben Trio. Greensburg. 724 836-1123.

ALL IN THURSDAYS

FRI 28 ANDYS. Kenia. Downtown. 412-773-8884. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo, Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235. ST. CLAIR PARK. David Bach Consort. SummerSounds Concert Series. Greensburg. 724-838-4324. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. The Boilermaker Jazz Band. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

1.50

$

BLUE MOON ALL DRAFTSS DA Y! UNTIL MIDNITE

1811 EAST CARSON SOUTHSIDE

SAT 29 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

CJ’S. The John Hall Band, The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. RIVERVIEW PARK. Roger Humphries. Stars at Riverview Jazz Series. North Side. 412-255-2493. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo, Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

EARLY WARNINGS

SUN 30

The City’s Hottest Live Music Scene!

UPCOMING NATIONAL SHOWS

J&D CELLARS. Stranger Convention. North Strabane. 724-579-9897. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. UP MODERN KITCHEN. Dave Roth. Jazzed-up brunch. Shadyside. 412-688-8220.

Gogol Bordello

MON 01 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Interval Jazz Mondays. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. PARK BRUGES. Slide Worldwide. Highland Park. 412-661-3334. ROYAL PLACE. Jerry Lucarelli, Vince Taglieri, Sunny Sunseri. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series feat. David Throckmorton. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

{SUN., JULY 28}

Gogol Bordello Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side {WED., SEPT. 11}

Savages Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale

TUE 02

{THU., SEPT. 19}

Saves the Day

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Rick Matt & Friends. North Side. 412-904-3335.

Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District

ACOUSTIC THU 27 BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000.

FRI 28

SUNDAY

DOGS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME ON THE PATIO!

Available Sundays starting at 1pm

SHOWS THIS WEEK Thu 6.27 SCOTT, ROB & GREG OF THE CLARKS // 9 pm // $5 Fri 6.28 HOUSE OF SOUL // funk; r&b; soul // 9 pm // $7 Sat 6.29 PHASE IV // 80's; pop; rock // 9 pm // $7 Sun 6.30 PITTSBURGH JAZZ SOCIETY WITH DONNA BAILEY // 7 pm // $5

36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013

Rooster. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

SUN 30

PALACE THEATRE. Travis Tritt. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

PITTSBURGH PUBLIC MARKET. Jordan Auth. Strip District. 412-281-4505.

MON 01 NORTH COUNTRY BREWING. Bluegrass Night. Slippery Rock. 724-794-2337.

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Jason Kendall Acoustic ALLEGHENY ELKS Duo. Downtown. LODGE #339. 412-456-6666. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. www. per a p ty DOWNEY’S HOUSE. pghci m Wednesdays. North .co Tom Terling. Robinson. Side. 412-321-1834. 412-489-5631. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin Jam w/ The Shelf Life String the Troubadour. Cheswick. Band. North Side. 412-224-2273. 724-265-1181. FRESCO’S RUSTIC EUROPEAN CUISINE & WINE BAR. Pete Hewlett. Wexford. 724-935-7550. NATIONAL CARPATHO-RUSYN CULTURAL & EDUCATIONAL CENTER. Egyptian Surf Cabaret a BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. Gina Go-Go. Munhall. 412-337-1846. Rendina Acoustic Duo. Bridgeville. 412-257-9877. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Tracy Drach, Eve Goodman. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. The FRESCO’S RUSTIC EUROPEAN Pressure. Weather Permitting CUISINE & WINE BAR. Edgell series. Shadyside. 412-363-5845. Brothers. Wexford. 724-935-7550. HAMBONE’S. Lani Nash, Sue Powers, Burr Beard of Devilish Merry. Lawrenceville. ELWOOD’S PUB. Midnight 484-694-3566.

WED 03 FULL LIST E ONLIN

Special Pup Menu IS PUPDAY at Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086

OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

FRI 28

CLASSICAL SUN 30 MERCURY DUO. Mansions on Fifth, Shadyside. WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. St. Clair Park, Greensburg.

TUE 02 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Patriotic tribute concert. Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center, Midland. 724-643-9004 x 2.

WORLD

OTHER MUSIC

SAT 29

THU 27

SAT 29

REGGAE SUN 30

COUNTRY THU 27

CLUB COLONY. Mark Venneri. Scott. 412-668-0903.

FRI 28 CLUB COLONY. Take Two. Scott. 412-668-0903. LEMONT. Rebecca Kaufman & David Crisci. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

SAT 29 CAFE NOTTE. Maddie Georgi. Emsworth. 412-761-2233. CLUB COLONY. John Sarkis. Scott. 412-668-0903.


KEEP CALM AND

DON’T BITCH UNLESS YOU VOTE BEST OF PITTSBURGH VOTE NOW www.pghcitypaper.com Enter Promo Code CPTSTIX for a chance to

win a pair of tickets to see Taylor Swift Saturday, July 6 at Heinz Field

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What to do June 26 - July 2 WEDNESDAY 26 Social Distortion

STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Cheap Time and Dave Hause. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000 Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Alesana MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. With special guests The Color Morale, Upon This Dawning & more. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 6:30p.m.

THURSDAY 27 Stroll the Strip

STRIP DISTRICT. Over 21 event. For more information & tickets visit neighborsinthestrip.com/ StrollTheStrip. 4:30p.m.

Man Up Jam for Prostate Cancer ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Featuring the following bands: The Jaggerz,

IN PITTSBURGH

Joe Grushecky, The Granati Brothers & more. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

FRIDAY 28

DVE Comedy Festival BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: dve.com & trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Travis Tritt THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 8p.m.

Big Butler Fair BIG BUTLER FAIRGROUNDS. 724-865-2400. For more information visit bigbutlerfair. com. Through July 6.

The Composure / Blue of Colors ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Instead of Sleeping, Paper States & Nevada Color. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

SUNDAY 30

16th Annual WYEP Summer Music Festival SCHENLEY PLAZA Oakland. Free event. For more info visit wyep.org. 4p.m.

SATURDAY 29

Mike Stud

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Kurt, MJS and Quinntac. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

GREGG ALLMAN LIVE TUESDAY, JULY 2 BYHAM THEATER

Pittsburgh Power vs. New Orleans VooDoo

David Byrne & St. Vincent

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: consolenergycenter.com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. All ages show. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 8p.m.

Matchbox 20

MONDAY 1

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. With Goo Goo Dolls and Kate Earl. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster. com or call 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

17th Annual Great European Beerfest SHARP EDGE BEER EMPORIUM Friendship. 412-661-3537. Over 21 event. For info visit sharpedgebeer.com. Through June 30.

Steve Martin and The Steep Canyon Rangers

Through These Walls HARD ROCK CAFÉ Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests Before You. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10:30p.m.

guests Trapper Schoepp and Johnny Miller and the Back Slidin Fools. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special

TUESDAY 2

Gregg Allman Live

Jam On Walnut The Wallflowers

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. With special guests Edie Brickell. All ages show. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 7:30p.m.

WALNUT STREET Shadyside. Featuring Dancing Queen & Kelsey Friday. Free event. 7p.m.

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. With special guest Joe Grushecky. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m.

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com BEAT THE HEAT! CHOOSE FROM OUR SPORT,CASUAL,DRESS AND PERFORMANCE COLLECTIONS..FOR MEN AND WOMEN 38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013

Facebook.com/GordonShoes


MOMMA’S BOY {BY AL HOFF}

ON THE BUMMER SIDE, A SMALL DOG IS IMPERILED AND THE BODY COUNT IS IN THE BILLIONS

Xavier Dolan’s semi-autobiographical debut, I Killed My Mother, depicts the troubled relationship between a gay Montreal teen named Hubert (Dolan) and his single mother (Anne Dorval). They share a cramped apartment, where the high-strung Hubert is tormented by his mother’s tacky style, and her insistence on caring for him. They bicker, make up and secretly fear losing the other’s love. (Hubert bemoans: “If my mother and I were strangers, I’m sure we’d get along.”)

MAN VS. ZOMBIES

Hubert (Xavier Dolan) can’t stand his mom.

CP APPROVED

Dolan was only 20 when the film was made, in 2009. (It is only now receiving U.S. distribution.) But he shows confidence in presenting a typical story in an atypical fashion. The film deftly switches from narrative to blackand-white confessionals to still photography, with digressions into philosophy and literature. Dolan also wrote the script. While some of Hubert’s ruminations seem a bit too erudite for a 16-year-old, the mother-son arguments feel natural, escalating out of “nothing” (the volume of the radio news, for instance) and grow increasingly ugly. But equally well done are their more subdued and awkward reconciliations. The road these two are on is rocky, but beneath the rubble is a great deal of love and longing. In French, with subtitles. Starts Fri., June 28. Harris AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE HEAT. Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy star in this mismatchedcops buddy comedy: One’s an uptight FBI agent, the other is a loudmouth Boston cop. Guess who is who, and what might happen! Paul Feig’s film opens Fri., June 28.

{BY AL HOFF}

Zombie-hunter Gerry (Brad Pitt) ponders his next move in saving the planet.

I

T’S FAIR TO SAY that among the per-

sistent scourges of the past halfcentury are various forms of zombie. At least in popular entertainment. Now, in Marc Forster’s World War Z, the undead acquire true global dominance, running amok in all four corners and forcing the few living humans left to end the madness ASAP. Forster borrows the title, the central concept and a scene or two from Max Brooks’ book, but the tale has been rewritten. (The book, an oral history compiled from hundreds of witnesses, is largely unfilmable.) The story is now one globe-trotting man’s experience searching for the cause of, and solution to, a planet full of voracious people-eaters That man is Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt), a former U.N.-danger-zone dude. He is a multifaceted hero: a great dad, husband (he calls home even when fighting zombies), field medic, co-pilot, amateur public-health expert, schmoozer (a little

Mossad name-dropping never hurts), and so on. He looks great in an artfully tossed man-scarf, his hair highlights are perfect, and thus, it seems perfectly plausible he can single-handedly save the world.

WORLD WAR Z DIRECTED BY: Marc Forster STARRING: Brad Pitt, Mireille Enos In 3-D in select theaters

World War Z is the Brad Pitt Show. Mireille Enos (TV’s The Killing) has the thankless role of the hero’s wife who stands by looking worried and minding the children, but it’s pretty much an all-men-doing-things movie. There’s a kick-ass Israeli soldier (Daniella Kertesz), but she’s boyish enough to be genderneutral. A few familiar faces show up in what are extended cameos: James Badge Dale, Matthew Fox, David Morse

and Peter Capaldi. The film is rated PG-13, so in theory, it’s a zombie epic you can take the whole family to. It’s pretty low on gore, bone-gnawing and zombie eviscerating (the man-on-zombie violence is several notches below TV’s Walking Dead). On the bummer side: A small dog is imperiled and the body count is in the billions. For much-hyped features this summer, the bar is pretty low — and who doesn’t wish that bar was open? A few scenes do deliver the nervy thrills that viewers demand, even as they strain credulity: a crisis-establishing traffic jam (buh-bye, Philly!), the fortress of Jerusalem turned into a trapped-humans buffet, and the Worst Plane Trip Ever. World War Z is a fair popcorn-munching movie, but it doesn’t bring anything new to the cliché-ridden action and zombie genres it’s leaning on. Also, I saw it in 3-D and never even noticed: Save your cash for extra vaccines at the snack bar. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW DESPICABLE ME 2. Minions, minions, minions! Who even cares what this sequel is about? There’s another super-villain — and more minions! Pierre Coffin and Chris Renaud’s animated comedy features the voice of Steve Carrell. And minions! In 3-D in select theaters. Starts Wed., July 3. THE HEAT. Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy star in this mismatched-cops buddy comedy. Paul Feig directs. Starts Fri., June 28. JOURNEY TO ITALY. In Roberto Rossellini’s 1954 drama, a middle-aged English couple, Katherine (Ingrid Bergman) and Alex (George Sanders), travels to Naples to settle the estate of a dead relative. But perhaps because they are out of their comfort zone, the journey mostly illuminates the dissolution of their marriage. They pout and spat; she tours the ruins, he dabbles in Capri’s café society. Being British, they are generally having a miserable time in a foreign country with “spicy” food, lax work hours and too many nude statues on display. (By today’s standards, their sojourn, with private tours of the Pompeii excavations via luxury auto and lolling about a gorgeous villa, seems an unattainable dream vacation.) Each is attracted to, and discomfited by, Italy’s post-war vitality: Katherine counts the pregnant women in the street, while Alex flirts awkwardly with lively Italian women. A well-produced work that combines a neorealist documentary style with melodrama, the film’s content and tone wouldn’t be out of place as a contemporary arthouse feature. The conversations are halting, with more left unsaid than said; banal scenes are loaded with clues to the troubled relationship that the viewer must contextualize; and metaphors linking the once-vibrant-but-now-frozen past to the couple’s moribund present abound. Screens in a newly restored version. Starts Fri., June 28. Regent Square (AH)

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THE LONE RANGER. The masked hero of the Wild West rides again! Armie Hammer portrays the Lone Ranger; Johnny Depp is his Native American partner, Tonto. Gore Verbinksi directs. Starts Wed., July 3. WHITE HOUSE DOWN. For the second time in three months — at least on the big screen — the White House is under attack. To the rescue: Channing Tatum and Jamie Foxx. Roland Emmerich directs this actioner. Starts Fri., June 28.

REPERTORY CINEMA IN THE PARK. Jack Reacher, Wed., June 26 (Schenley), and Sat., June 29 (Riverview). Thunderstruck, Thu., June 27 (Brookline); Fri., June 28 (Arsenal); Sat., June 29 (Grandview); and Sun., Jun 30 (Schenley). Hotel Transylvania, Tue., July 2 (West End/Elliott Overlook). The Dark Knight Rises, Wed., July 3 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-422-6426 or www.citiparks.net. Free THE SEVENTH SEAL. In Ingmar Bergman’s gorgeously photographed 1957 classic, a weary knight (Max von Sydow) returning from the Crusades is waylaid by a cloaked Death (Bengt Ekrot). Refusing to submit, the knight challenges Death to a chess game — if he wins, he lives. As

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013

Journey to Italy they play a game that traverses a ravaged medieval countryside, the two debate God and the existence thereof. Here is a chance to catch (or re-visit) one of the landmarks of the arthouse, a film that made “European cinema” a perennial discussion topic (and affectation to be parodied): See it on the big screen and deconstruct it on the way home. In Swedish with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., June 26. Melwood. $2 (AH) DELIVERANCE. John Boorman’s 1972 backwoods thriller has been much mocked over the years, but despite the banjo jokes, this remains a disturbing film about privilege and power — and how easy it is to lose it. Also: worst canoe trip ever. Burt Reynolds and Jon Voight star. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 26; 10 p.m. Fri., June 28; 10 p.m. Sat., June 29; and 4 p.m. Sun., June 30. Hollywood WITH BABIES AND BANNERS: THE STORY OF THE WOMEN’S EMERGENCY BRIGADE. Lorraine Gray’s 1978 documentary tells the story of how women contributed to the 1937 General Motors strike in Flint, Mich. They provided food, but also picketed. The film screens as part of the Battle of Homestead Foundation’s monthly film series, featuring works related to labor and economic issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 27. Pump House, Homestead. Free. 412-831-3871 BROKEN. Tim Roth and Cillian Murphy star in Rufus Norris’ drama, set in a gritty part of London, about a young girl who witnesses a violent crime. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 27. Hollywood THE GHASTLY LOVE OF JOHNNY X. Paul Bunnel’s new film blends 1950s-style sci-fi, singing and dancing, horror and everybody’s favorite over-60 slacker, Creed Bratton from The Office. The story is something about being exiled from Earth and losing a “resurrection suit,” but the plot seems secondary to spectacle. The film is in black-and-white, shot with the last of Kodak’s Plus-X film stock. Local DJ Zombo will present the film; Martian Martini will play in the lobby before the screening. 7 p.m. Fri., June 28. Hollywood PULP FICTION. Quentin Tarantino’s nonlinear, darkly comic 1994 celebration of crime, coincidence and fastfood hamburgers has many noted players, quotable


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The Bling Ring lines and memorable scenes. (If you’ve never seen the film, you can’t go wrong with Christopher Walken’s soliloquy about the Vietnam War … or with Travolta’s bumbling.) Often imitated, Pulp Fiction still holds its own against the scores of pale pretenders that followed. 10 p.m. Fri., June 28, and 10 p.m. Sat., June 29. Oaks FIGHT CLUB. David Fincher’s darkly comic 1999 mindbender follows a depressed young man (Edward Norton) as he finds a savior in a new buddy, Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt) and a new hobby in the secretive underground world of bare-knuckles fighting. (Remember, if anybody asks — there is no Fight Club screening.) The Sat., June 29, screening is also a meat-and-a-movie event; dinner by Cain’s Saloon at 6 p.m. Tickets are $15 at www.showclix. com; film only, $7 at door. 7 p.m. Sat., June 29, and 7 p.m. Sun., June 30. Hollywood THE REP. Morgan White’s recent doc, which began as a web series, follows the year that three filmloving “misfits” open and try to maintain a rep movie house in Toronto. To be sure, they learn some hard lessons about running a business, but White also fills out the film with other rep-house owners and out the fragility of the business. managers talking about How do you fill that space between firstrun blockbusters at the megaplex and e ever made practically every movie being available for viewing in one’s living room? White eserving is so committed to preserving quirky, communal cinema ng indie spaces that he’s letting aks, that theaters, like the Oaks, show his film keep all the eening. proceeds from the screening. 7 p.m. Sat., June 29, and 7 p.m. Wed., July 3. Oaks BONNIE AND CLYDE. They’re young, they’re in nks. Faye love and they rob banks. en Beatty Dunaway and Warren star in Arthur Penn’s landmark ned with 1967 drama, leavened n makes comic relief. Penn roes of counterculture heroes air, even the dysfunctional pair, glorifying their brutall deaths in the infamous hail of bullets, depicted almost otion. lovingly in slow motion. es a The drama concludes month-long series of

films featuring legendary film couples. 8 p.m. Sun., June 30. Regent Square (AH) LA PLAYA, D.C. A Colombia teenager flees his coastal town to try his luck in the tough streets of Bogota, in writer-director Juan Andrés Arango Garcia’s drama. In Spanish, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 3. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

Surgeon General’s Warning: Quitting Smoking Now Greatly Reduces Serious Risks To Your Health

THE BLING RING. The so-called “Bling Ring” was a group of affluent teen-agers from the Los Angeles suburbs who, in 2008-09, robbed the homes of such TMZ-faves as Paris Hilton, Audrina Patridge and Lindsay Lohan. Sofia Coppola’s film is inspired by these real-life events –—the names are changed, but the gist remains the same. But Coppola’s languid style takes some of the verve out of the tale. It has its moments — there’s some comedy and a slender critique of our celeb-and-bling-obsessed state — but much of the film falls ba back on the hazy ennui of these kids’ Valley milieu. (AH)

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KEEP CALM AND DON’T BITCH UNLESS YOU VOTE

MON MONSTERS UNIVERSITY. Lear how the gang of Learn profe professional scarers came toget together in this prequel to the 200 2001 Pixar hit Monsters Sh Inc. Short answer: They met in college. co Billy Crystal and John Goodman once again prov provide voices for Mike and Sulley, respectively, in Dam Scanlon’s digitally anim animated comedy. Disney’s acqu acquisition of Pixar seems part particularly evident here: the unnecessary second film; the more generic plotline; and the distinct feeling that man many, many related toys are for sale. That said, this isn’ isn’t a bad film — the an animation is top-notch, th the balance of jokesto to-sentiment is about right, and who can’t help but root for a plucky green ball with one giant eye? (AH)

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[BOOK REVIEW]

JAZZ SONGS

“I LIKE TO DESCRIBE IT AS EXTREME BALLET.”

{BY MIKE SCHNEIDER} A Singer sewing machine — some of us grew up with one. In Hemming the Water (Four Way Books), Yona Harvey’s breakout poetry collection, she stitches, darns and hems with language as fabric. Inspired by the great jazz musician Mary Lou Williams, Harvey sews (and sows) sound patterns that sing. A professor at Carnegie Mellon, Harvey lives near East Liberty, where Williams grew up. Starting with the opening poem, “Sound — Part 1 (Girl with Red Scarf),” Harvey invokes Williams: “Sound was God, as she understood it, always poised to listen. What does a girl with a red scarf hear? Only she knows, approaching the world from the inside in.” The 72-page book is carefully structured: a concerto of water music in three movements, with Williams threaded throughout. The first section, “The Gate to the Water,” reflects on Harvey’s chosen artistic mother as well as her real mother: “To describe my body walking I must go back / to my mother’s body walking with an aimless switch / in this moment of baptismal snow or abysmal flurry.” Colors vibrate in these poems: “Blessing Blue Crabs,” “Rose Lassi,” “Chatterblue,” “Turquoise.” The second section, “Swimming Lessons,” concerns parenthood: A mother of two, Harvey voices anxieties about the world into which she brings children. This section ends with the book’s keystone poem, “Communion with Mary Lou Williams,” an homage that includes a tour-de-force catalogue of naming: “Dear Daughter of the Elusive, Dear Black Coffee … Dear Twelve Bars over Dishes Clanking …” The last section, “The Shape the Water Takes,” encounters brutal reality, war and loss. Often creating a sense of mystery while evincing meticulous craft, some of Harvey’s poems can make you feel as if dropped without orientation into a place you don’t know. One striking poem, “Turquoise,” is a counter-example, placing the reader in an easily legible domain. Like Williams’ music, these poems go where they go, modulating artfully, bristling with intelligence. Another famous Williams, the poet William Carlos, said that “a poem is a small (or large) machine made out of words.” At her best — such as “Rose Lassi” — Harvey creates a feeling of something put together as well as the best machines that sew and sing, every word a necessary part of the whole humming beauty. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

YONA HARVEY 6 p.m. Mon., July 1. Writers LIVE, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburgh lectures.org

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SWAN [DANCE]

OF A

DIFFERENT FEATHER {BY STEVE SUCATO}

F

OR NEARLY a decade, Pearlann Porter’s

Pillow Project has been on the leading edge of dance in Pittsburgh. Founded by Porter in 2004, the company created an instant buzz, bolstered by large-scale rock ’n’ roll dance extravaganzas like 2005’s Concept Album Tour, at Shadyside’s Hunt Armory. Then, the company transformed itself by producing intimate cutting-edge multimedia works such as 2008’s Twenty Eighty-Four and 2010’s Paper Memory at its own dance incubator/performance venue, The Space Upstairs, in Point Breeze. Since 2011, Porter and company have assumed yet another incarnation. They’ve been producing salon-style dance programs like the Second Saturdays series and the upcoming The Green Swan, both utilizing an unusual movement style Porter calls “Freejazz.” For Porter, 36, the Holy Grail long had been to have audiences “see the music” in the movement her dancers performed to.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CASSIE K. RUSNAK}

“Swamp creature”?: Dancer Lydia Rakov in The Pillow Project’s The Green Swan

The problem, she determined after years of experimentation, was that she needed to teach her dancers to listen to music and improvise the way she did — or like jazz musicians do.

THE PILLOW PROJECT PRESENTS

THE GREEN SWAN 10 p.m. nightly Fri., June 28-Sun., June 30. The Space Upstairs, 214 N. Lexington St., Point Breeze. $10-15. www.pillowproject.org

It’s a process that she says dates to her childhood in New Jersey, dancing and improvising to her own mix tapes. Then, Porter felt unbound by a reliance on proper dance techniques. And that’s something she says she never excelled at anyway, whether as a student at Clifton, N.J.’s Dance World Academy or as a dance major

at Point Park University. That youthful dancing was the seed that would years later blossom into Freejazz. Porter describes this form of improvisation as “using the body as the instrument playing visual notes. Not dancing to the music but dancing within it.” (Porter uses “jazz” as a verb, and emphasizes that the approach is unrelated to the specific traditional style known as jazz dance.) The idea of dancer as musical instrument is not a new one. Tap-dance great Savion Glover put forth that notion for years touring with a jazz band in which he fancied himself one of the musicians, tapping out notes with his feet as a trumpeter would on his horn. But Porter contends that the uniqueness of Freejazz lies in the viewer’s impression that he or she is actually “seeing the music” on the dancer. In other words, that the viewer is watching music rather than watching dance. This new direction for Pillow Project


developed his own form of improvisation called “Luminography.” He describes it as “an original video-projection methodology that is completely improvised.” The improv approach might be a hard sell to more traditional dance audiences. But Porter says she believes she could tour work like the company’s latest Freejazz production, The Green Swan. In the show, running June 28-30 at The Space Upstairs, Porter takes inspiration from the ballet classic Swan Lake. The hour-long solo is set to theremin music adapted from Tchaikovsky’s original score and performed by recent Point Park graduate Lydia Rakov. The show (which contains nudity) follows the metamorphosis of a beautiful white swan into a “disgusting” swamp creature. Rakov, 23, is a Montclair, N.J., native and is classically trained. She says that in the solo, she takes her dance training, and through Freejazz, pushes its look beyond what is considered normal. “I like to describe it as extreme ballet,” says Rakov. “Taking something so beautiful to a point where it ceases to be beautiful in the same way. How much more can I get out of a movement that may have been done the same way for a hundred years? How can I make it weirder?” I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

[ART REVIEW]

BRIGHT-NESS {BY ROBERT RACZKA}

Al Bright’s “Portals in Time”

has resulted in a sort of bohemian approach, where performances are now latenight happenings in which traditional theater trappings — such as rows of chairs and theatrical decorum — are replaced by couches and the freedom of audience members to roam during performances. The approach attracts an audience that wants that level of engagement, such as audiences the troupe found on recent trips to Paris, London, Dublin and Amsterdam. There, Porter says, the company performed in the streets, forming connections with those city’s jazz musicians and beat poets like Paris-based Moe Seager. Porter also now sees her role in the company differently. “I don’t choreograph anymore,” she says. “I direct.” “Our work has changed because it is not these designed pieces we present anymore,” she adds. “It is more these expressions we create that are unique to the moment.” Of course, anyone who does improvised dance says something similar. But for the Pillow Project, that embrace of spontaneity has spilled over into other areas of the creative process. For instance, longtime company videographer Mike Cooper, responsible for much of the Pillow Project’s visual-effects wizardry over the years, has

After World War II, as American culture was coming into its own, modern jazz, or bebop, and abstract expressionist painting were key areas of avant-garde activity, related in their use of spontaneous improvisation in pursuit of pure, unmediated expression. Bebop and abstract expressionism are now all grown up — senior citizens, in fact — but there’s still vitality in each. Al Bright’s practice of 40 years brings them together, translating the sound and energy of jazz into visual expression. Bright, a retired painting professor at Youngstown State University, is acclaimed for his paintings done to live jazz, including performances by such greats as Art Blakey and Wynton Marsalis. Al Bright: Abstract Jazz Works, an exhibit at 709 Penn Gallery (presented as part of the Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival), includes videos showing him paint live while also including footage of the musicians. It’s exciting to watch him work without a safety net, as did the crowd at the opening reception, when Bright painted to the live sounds of the Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra. Bright shares with the original abstract expressionists the use of physical gestures in

painting as a means of sidestepping the limitations of rational thought. Of course, such art is based on training and talent. But at the moment of truth, strategizing is subsumed to feeling — and Bright does appear to feel the music — often yielding vibrant expression. Still, Bright’s process isn’t random. His art displays consistency of style with recurring color choices, marks, techniques (washy, scraped, impastoed, squeezed right from the paint tube), and overall compositional structures. In “Portals in Time” (2012), we see Bright’s oft-favored palette of intense reds, toned-down yellows, and blues ranging from dark to light. Also present is his use of circles (painting some layers around a large lid that functions as a stencil), which emphasize the flatness of the picture plane while creating an illusion of looking into space. Strictly speaking, Bright is a thirdgeneration abstract expressionist, and his art is generally closer to the mellower imagery of Helen Frankenthaler than to the more abrasive Franz Kline. And while some of the more recent paintings feature lots of pastels and little dissonance — more smooth jazz than bebop — when Bright lets loose, the results still have the power to startle. And he deserves special notice for his pioneering practice. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

AL BRIGHT: ABSTRACT JAZZ WORKS continues through Sun., June 30. 709 Penn Gallery, 709 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-224-4651 or www.trustarts.org

bring your smartphone bring your opinions bring your bff With so much amazing art, there's tons to share.

Whether you've just moved to Pittsburgh, or are a regular at our openings and parties, there's always something new to see. And the only thing better than encountering great art is sharing it with your friends.

cmoa.org | 412.622.3131

guided tours daily | members visit free shop the museum stores for creative gifts one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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ONLINE MONDAY-FRIDAY 10-11am only on www.pghcitypaper.com WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

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[PLAY REVIEWS]

SHADOW PHANTOM {BY ROBERT ISENBERG} AS THE FIRST act in Kopit and Yeston’s Phantom nears its end, Christine Daeé and the Phantom of the Opera sing a song over a harpsichord. “You Are Music” is a soaring duet, an ode to both love and the resplendence of the human voice. The Phantom has given anonymous music lessons to Christine, and now he’s falling for her. Now at the Benedum, Kopit and Yeston’s Phantom has many such moments — beautiful songs, interesting dialogue, even some plot twists. And as the Civic Light Opera’s Phantom, Ron Bohmer alternates between muscle and tenderness; he matches his robust vocals with precise physical movements and manly oration. Erin Mackey plays Christine as a humble romantic, a farm girl with big dreams and no expectations. Their tentative love is a pleasure to watch, and “You Are Music” is Broadway at its best. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera is still superior, on every level, and far truer to Gaston Leroux’s Edwardian novel; if one of these versions was destined for fame, Webber deserved the Tonys. Yet underdogs Arthur Kopit and Maury Yeston created a completely original work, focusing on different aspects of Leroux’s story. Their version is messier, but in many ways more interesting.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MATT POLK}

Erin Mackey and Ron Bohmer in Kopit & Yeston’s Phantom, at Pittsburgh CLO

theater. This Phantom is surprisingly funny — far more so than Webber’s—and the comedy is sometimes odd. But Champlin embraces the schlock. Never mind which Phantom you prefer: Carlotta, a spoiled diva, is a fantastic role. If you’ve got it, flaunt it. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

ISN’T IT BLISS? {BY TED HOOVER} IS IT POSSIBLE, as Greta Garbo famously

KOPIT AND YESTON’S PHANTOM continues through Sun., June 30. Benedum Center, 803 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10-65.75. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

Everyone knows the basics: A hideous recluse haunts a Parisian theater; he trains a beautiful opera singer, but she rejects his adoration. Leroux’s novel is a snoozer, but his gothic story has inspired a dozen films and plays. If you know Webber’s Phantom well, this version should fascinate you: The scenes are rearranged, the music is much sweeter, and the finale is completely new. (Apparently no one likes how the book actually ends, with the Phantom’s pathetic, private death.) The show-stealer here is neither the Phantom nor the ingénue, but the villainess, La Carlotta. Donna Lynn Champlin is both an accomplished singer and a comic genius. She somehow channels the halfmumbled humor of Kristen Wiig and successfully delivers her jokes to a 2,800-seat

said in Queen Christina, to “feel nostalgia for a place one has never seen”? There was once a form of entertainment known as “supper clubs,” where you scarfed down choice vittles and chilled cocktails while singers sang songs as sophisticated as you were trying to be. Pittsburgh had a thriving supperclub scene which was gone by the 1980s; people changed, entertainment needs changed and, most importantly, music changed. For a few brief shining weeks, however, Pittsburgh CLO Cabaret lets you travel back to an era of stylish singers performing ultra-urbane material. Side By Side By Sondheim is a compendium of music and lyrics by — surprise! — Stephen Sondheim. CLO Cabaret has, of course, programmed many revues: shows featuring radio hits from the ’50s, ’60s, ’70s and ’80s. I think ticket-holders were expecting a similar evening, because at the beginning their inattention and low expectations were palpable. But as the evening progressed, they realized that this music, if given attention and

thought, provided huge rewards. What a joy to hear Billy Hepfinger, Daniel Krell, Lenora Nemetz and Caroline Nicolian perform material worthy of their considerable talents. Nicolian nails the furious panic of “Getting Married Today,” and Hepfinger brings his extraordinary voice to “Marry Me a Little.” The two of them combine for an exquisite “We’re Gonna Be Alright.” It comes as no surprise that Broadway veteran Nemetz can reduce an audience to helpless laughter with minimal visible effort with “The Boy From …” or the burlesque camping of “I Never Do Anything Twice.” But the evening reaches its emotional zenith when she and Krell perform a devastating medley of “Send in the Clowns” and “The Road You Didn’t Take.”

SIDE BY SIDE BY SONDHEIM continues through Sun., July 14. CLO Cabaret at The Cabaret at Theater Square, 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $34.7539.75. 412-325-6766 or www.clocabaret.com

Pianist Brent Alexander is so amazing you might almost forgive the CLO for not hiring additional musicians; singlepiano arrangements seem insulting to this music. As I was leaving, I heard the man behind me say to his wife, with something like confused awe: “That was really good.” It was as if he suddenly realized maybe Stephen Schwartz isn’t the highest musical theater has to offer. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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ORGANIZED BY

On View Now! Open your eyes to the cultural history of the Arabian peninsula. Explore 200 PRINCIPAL CO-SPONSORS OF THE US TOUR

archaeological objects only recently available for view in North America.

FURTHER GENEROUS SPONSORSHIP

SPONSORED LOCALLY BY

Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is organized by the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution in association with the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ExxonMobil and Saudi Aramco are gratefully acknowledged as principal co-sponsors of the tour of Roads of Arabia in the United States. Sponsorship is also provided by The Olayan Group and Fluor Corporation.

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one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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JUNE 29

Reset List

this Comedy Central It Girl will opine on Pittsburghers when she stops by the Byham Theater to headline the Second Annual WDVE Comedy Fest. On Shumer’s new series, Inside Amy Shumer, she tackles the nuances of sexting and tries a testicle-themed restaurant. The fest also features Matt Braunger, Iliza Shlesinger, Chris Porter and local talent Bill Crawford. OL 8 p.m. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $50. 412456-6666 or www.DVE.com

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+ FRI., JUNE 28 {GAMES} This weekend, at North Vandergrift’s Slovak Club, more than 30 pinball machines will light up and ding with the din of competition. The Pittsburgh Pinball Open 4 offers a main competition, a women’s tournament and two classic tourneys featuring machines made before 1990. Those who haven’t played since the ’90s can try out designated noncompetitive machines. But competitors, leave your quarters at home: Registration costs $5, and entry fees are $5-10. Watching is free. Olivia Lammel Noon1 a.m. Also Sat., Jun. 29, and Sun., Jun. 30. 1214 Lincoln St., North Vandergrift. pittsburgh. pinball@gmail.com or www.coinball.com/ppo

{ART} For six months, seven Pittsburgh-based visual artists have shared a studio at the Brew House. Alexis Roberto, Cara Livorio, Crystala Armagost, Josh Mitchel, Elizabeth Brophy, Kate Hansen and Terrence M. Boyd are the artists supported by this year’s Distillery 7 Program. Their styles vary, but collaboration, critiques and lectures bolster this Brew House Association program. Their creations are

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showcased in Seven Degrees of 7, an exhibit whose opening reception is tonight. OL 7 p.m. Exhibit continues through Aug. 28. 2100 Mary St., South Side. Free. 814-279-2261 or www.facebook.com/ thebrewhousepittsburgh

{COMEDY} Guesting on Letterman, Amy Shumer shared observations from her recent tour: Women in Miami resemble exotic birds; men in Philly are beautiful meatheads. Tonight, perhaps

Last year, Ron Tanner visited with From Animal House to Our House, his book about he and his wife turning a wrecked Victorian brownstone in Baltimore — a former frathouse — into a home and DIY showcase. With the paperback just out, and the couple running www. houselove.org, Tanner returns to explain “7 Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make in Your Old House.” (Old-house owners reply, “Just seven?”) Appropriately, the free event is hosted by Preservation Pittsburgh, and takes place at salvaged-supplies headquarters Construction Junction. Bill O’Driscoll 6:30 p.m. 214 N. Lexington, Point Breeze. Free. www.constructionjunction.org

{COMEDY}

JUNE 28 Ron Tanner

In the 1970s, breakout comedian Gilda Radner was among the few women in the field. The first performer cast for the original Saturday Night Live, she’s remembered for creating wacky characters like news commentator Roseanne Roseannadanna (“It’s always something!”). Radner died in 1989, at age 42, from ovarian cancer. But her legacy isn’t just Gilda’s Club, the network of cancer support centers; it’s laughs, too. Tonight — on Radner’s birthday — Arcade Comedy Theater presents Always Gilda, an all-female, two-show comedy event. “All women in comedy owe a debt to Ms. Radner,” says Arcade co-founder Abby Fudor. Performers include: improv


Free!Event

News cycles lately have been dominated by stories of the feds encroaching on our privacy. But the ACLU of Pennsylvania’s Greater Pittsburgh Chapter reminds us that we, the people, can demand access, too. On Thu., June 27, at the Homewood branch of the Carnegie Library, the ACLU presents YOUR Right to Know, a workshop on Pennsylvania’s Open Records Law. The law (revised in 2008) allows citizens to file a free right-to-know request to make sure that public but otherwise hidden information is exposed to the light of day, says ACLU community organizer Ngani Ndimbie. In 2010, the law was used to uncover documents from the state’s Office of Homeland Security and the Pennsylvania State Police that demonstrated that a government anti-terrorism contractor was improperly targeting an anti-fracking group as a terrorist organization. It has allowed the ACLU to learn that, despite the city’s large Latino population, Allentown, Pa.’s police force had just two fluent Spanish-speakers. The ACLU has also used the law to uncover reproductive-health policies in jails, and to help scuttle a planned private immigrant-detention center in Northeast Pennsylvania by revealing connections between developers and municipal authorities. The 90-minute June 27 workshop is presented by ACLU staff attorney Sara Rose. Bill O’Driscoll 7 p.m. Thu., June 27. Carnegie Library of Homewood, 7101 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. Free. RSVP at 412-681-7736 x322, or pghinfo@aclupa.org.

troupe Frankly Scarlett; Missy Moreno; and two cancersurvivor/comics, Linda Duty and Jennie Bushnell. There’s music by the band Carmelia Road, and the 10 p.m. set is headlined by local favorite Gab Bonesso. All proceeds, naturally, benefit Gilda’s Club of Western Pennsylvania. BO 8 and 10 p.m. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20. 412-339-0608 or www. arcadecomedytheater.com

T., JUNE 29 + SAT.,

launching We Can! Day. This “mucky, messy fun time for children of all ages” lets you play in a bubbling mud pit, make mud paintings and clay art, and sample mud-themed foods. (Really.) Dance and fitness activities include lessons in the Brazilian martial art/dance capoeira. We Can is cosponsored by UPMC Health Plan to encourage kids to eat better and move around more. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 1 Children’s Way, North Side. 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

the abstract paintings in The Way and the Wayfarers. It’s an exhibition of new work by locally based artist Joshua Hogan, all inspired by “On Crime and Punishment,” an essay from spiritual writer Khalil Gibran’s classic The Prophet. The show’s opening reception is today at Boxheart Gallery, the venue Hogan and his wife, Nicole Capozzi, founded 15 years ago. BO 5-8 p.m. Exhibit continues through July 20. 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-687-8858 www.boxheartgallery.com or www.boxheartga

{ART}

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Delicate shapes — some suggestive of blossoms — and Just two weeks ago, artist Mia Henry y hosted the opening earthily vibrant colors mark party for the Mine Factory, y a gallery and studio in a former Point int Breeze e industrial building. ng. Today, the Mine Factory welcomes elcomes the public to the Pittsburgh tsburgh Society of Artists’ third annual Art Day With PSA. Members will decorate the space with their work, photographs, phs, jewelry, paintings and mixed-media d-media pieces, forr perusal and purchase. hase. Artmaking demos emos are planned, and the day will be punctuated nctuated with live music performances, nces, including one by JUNE 28 folk duo South Amy Shumer at Wind. OL 10 a.m. Second Annual 201 N. Braddock addock WDVE Comedy Fest Ave., Pointt Breeze. Free. www. w. pittsburgh h societyof artists.org

{MUD}

JUNE 29

{WORDS} Lori Jakiela’s writing is both Hemingwaynuanced and Hemi universal blunt, her stories un particular but her details part hilarious). Her (and often hilarious new memoir, The Bridge B Things Get to Take When Thing tells about Serious (Illumis), tel the difficult stretch after she Pittsburgh returned home to P to take care of her terminally ill mother. Today, East Ea End Book Exchange e hosts a dual book-release party book-rele for Bridge e and The Slaughterhouse Poems. The latter is the th new collection by Jakiela’s Ja husband, Dave Newman, N who’s also both direct and sly. His poem “Bar “B Dreams” goes: “A man who w drank Bud drafts at the th Irwin Hotel / said / in all sad seriousness / ‘Kid, ‘Ki Ki I ought to buy me a bar’ b / then ba mooched bill mooche ed a dollar do from from my my pile.” BO 7:30 7:3 : 0 p.m. p.m. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Bloomfie Free. www.eastend www.ea bookexchange.com bookexchang

Art Day With PSA Art by Carolyn Pierotti breaks. Formed in 2009, the group is big in its hometown of Chicago and have played New York. Tonight, Reset List does two shows at Arcade Comedy Theater. Hint: Don’t yell for “Illiterate Tadpoles” or “Rhinestones on the Back

so new they haven’t been written yet.” That’s because this four-member troupe starts with song titles suggested by the audience and then improvises a complete rock concert, including lyrics, fourpart harmonies and dance

The Way and the Wayfarers

Rese Listt b Reset bills itself as “an improvised rock impro ’n’ roll extravae ganza with songs

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Looking to o celebrate International nal Mud Day? ? The Children’s Museum is

of My Belt”; those titles have already been taken. BO 8 and 10 p.m. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $5-10. 412-339-0608 or www. arcadecomedytheater.com

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Venture Outdoors offers an active take on a Fourth of July tradition. For those bored with the classic fireworks-viewing rituals (hot dogs, beer, lawn chairs), the group leads a leisurely pre-fireworks paddle upstream to watch the sunset. As the night sky settles in, float down to the Point and claim front-row seats to the sparkly action. The Fourth of July Paddle, which is a fundraiser for VO, requires some paddling experience. Participants under age 12 must partner up in a two-seated kayak. OL 7 p.m. Kayak Pittsburgh, under the Clemente Bridge, North Side. $95. 412-255-0564 or www.ventureoutdoors.org

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Weddings, Nightclubs, Proms, Corporate Events... We’ll do our part to make it perfect.

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER DISNEY’S BEAUTY &

OFFIC OF THE P IAL DJ ITTS CELEBRAT BURGH ION!

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THE BEAST. Thru June 29. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-773-9896. KIDULTS. An evening of one acts by FJ Hartland exploring relationships of adult children w/ their parents. Thu-Sat. Thru June 29. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. MOMENTS TO REMEMBER. Cabaret dinner theater. Presented by Pohl Productions. Fri-Sun. Thru July 14. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. NUNSENSE. Presented by The Heritage Players. Fri-Sun. Thru June 30. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633. OTHER DESERT CITIES. The Palm Springs life of a movie star/politician & his wife is upset by the arrival of unruly relatives. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Tue-Sun. Thru June 30. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600.

Company. Wed-Sun. Thru RADIO GOLF. August Wilson’s June 29. Studio Theatre, play about Harmond Wilks, Cathedral of Learning, Oakland. an Ivy-League educated real THERE GOES THE BRIDE. estate developer who aspires Comedy by Ray Cooney & to redevelop the Hill District & John Chapman. Presented become the first Black mayor by The Bobcat Players. of Pittsburgh. Wed-Sun. Thru Thu-Sat. Thru June 29. Beaver June 29. Pittsburgh Playwrights Area High School, Beaver. Theatre, Downtown. 724-494-1680. SIDE BY SIDE BY THE WEDDING FROM SONDHEIM: A MUSICAL HELL. Interactive CELEBRATION. murder mystery Collection of songs dinner theater. Sat., from Company, June 29, 7 p.m. Follies, A Little Night www. per Gaetano’s Music, A Funny Thing a p pghcitym Restaurant, Dormont. Happened on the Way .co 412-343-6640. to the Forum, more. WHITE GIRLS! A Wed-Sun. Thru Aug. 18. CABARET. Feat. non-identical Cabaret at Theater Square, twins Paula & Tessa White, & Downtown. 412-325-6769. Nathan Brewer. Sat., June 29, SYLVIA. When a dog named 8 p.m. Strand Theater, Zelienople. Sylvia follows Greg home, 724-742-0400. he’s instantly smitten. His wife YOU HAVEN’T CHANGED is not. Thu-Sun. Thru June 29. A BIT & OTHER LIES. The Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. adventures of aging are filtered 724-745-6300. through 3 married couples who THE TEMPEST, OR THE have known each other for 30 ENCHANTED ISLE. Presented years. Thu-Sun. Thru July 13. by Unseam’d Shakespeare

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT, JUNE 29 vs NEW ORLEANS VOODOO $ STRAUB CANS

3THE LEXUS CLUB

BEFORE THE GAME AT:

+ COMPLIMENTARY SNACKS

South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552.

COMEDY THU 27 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru June 27 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. WRITING ON THE FLOOR. Talk show-style live podcast feat. Rick Sebak, Derek Minto, Tim Ross, & music by New Victorians. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

THU 27 - SUN 30 TOMMY DAVIDSON. June 27-30 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 28 GILDA’S BIRTHDAY PARTY! An all-female comedy event for Gilda’s Club of Western PA. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. JEFF KONKLE, ED BAILEY, TIM ROSS, ISAAC KOZELL (LATE). Hosted by Alex Stypula. 10 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950. PITTSBURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE W/ MIKE WYSOCKI. Fri, 9 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995.

FRI 28 - SAT 29 JOEY VEGA. June 28-29 Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 29 GREG MORTON, CHUCK KRIEGER, DAVID KAYE. 5:30 p.m. Rostraver Ice Garden, Belle Vernon. 724-379-7100. THE LUPONES: MADE UP MUSICALS. Sat, 8 p.m. Thru July 27 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 323-401-0465. RESET LIST: THE IMPROVISED ROCK EXPERIENCE. Scream out the name of a song & Reset List turns it into chord progressions lyrics, harmonies, dance breaks, KAZOO solos & everything that goes on in between. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

MON 01 TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 02 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013


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The Grey Box Theatre 3695 Butler St., Lawrenceville

Friday, July 5 @ 7pm Saturday, July 6 @ 4pm & 7pm Sunday, July 7 @ 1pm & 4pm Monday, July 8 @ 7pm and Tuesday, July 9 @ 7pm

“Art of Noise #96,” by Susan Sparks, from In Good Company at Panza Gallery

NEW THIS WEEK BE GALLERIES. Summertime. Work by Atticus Adams. Opening reception June 29, 5-8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pigment & Silver. Photography by Ellen Bjerklie-Hanna, A. Jason Coleman, Danielle Goshay, Brenda Roger, & Cynthia Zordich. Opening reception: June 28, 6-8:30 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. 8th Annual Summer Gallery Exhibition. Featured exhibit by Don Nelson. Presented by the Midland Arts Council. Opening reception: June 28, 6-8 p.m. Midland. 724-643-9968. MINE FACTORY. ARTday w/ PSA. Prints, paintings, fiber art, jewelry, sculpture & more by Pittsburgh Society of Artists Guild members. Opens June 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Homewood. PANZA GALLERY. In Good Company. Group show feat. Zivi Aviraz, Lila Hirsch-Brody, Joel Kranich, Lilli Nieland, Phiris (Kathy) Sickels, & Susan Sparks. Opening reception: June 29, 6-9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-0959.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Talus. Paintings by Lindsay Merrill and Paul Rouphail. Downtown. 412-325-7017.

Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. The Way & The Wayfarers. Paintings by Joshua Hogan. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. One & the Same. Sound installation by Susan Philipsz. Japan is the Key: Collecting Prints & Ivories, 1900–1920. Collections from the early years of the Carnegie Institute. The Playground Project. A richly illustrated exhibition exploring the history of postwar playground design & highlighting important examples of playgrounds from the 20th century. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Melanie Werner Collection. Feat. 18th-Early 19th Century Fine European Antique Art as well as modern art pieces. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Selected Works by Christian Wolfgang Breitkreutz. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EASTSIDE GALLERY. MCG Invitational Scholarship Winners. Work by Lauren Brown, Adam Linn, & Aaron Kandel. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent

709 PENN GALLERY. Abstract Jazz Works. Abstract oil paintings created during live performances with Jesse Dandy, Art Blakey, Winton Marsalis, Jimmy Owens, & others. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. All Through the Night. LGBQT photography by Caldwell Linker. S/HE IS HER/E. Feat. over 100 works by Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, dating from the mid 1970s to the present. The Patron Saint of White Guys That Went Tribal & Other Works. Work by Nick Bubash. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. SOLO Exhibits. Work by Leslie Ansley, Jo-Anne Bates & Tina Brewer. Gallery Crawl: Downtown. 412-258-2700. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Richard P. Rauso, Leslie Sorg, Christina Roselle, Laura Tabakman. Watercolors, batiks & oils, designer handbags & jewelry design.

All tickets $18 • Advanced Tickets on Sale NOW at www.CIRCUSCATS www.CIRCUSCATS.com .com

STEEL CITY IS

ROCKIN’ JULY 6 TH 11AM-3PM

FREE& COOK OUT

CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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LIVE MUSIC Tony Janflone Jr.

Steel City Harley-Davidson® would like to remind everyone to drive responsibly, and ride safe this season.

S C R E E N

WITH SPECIAL GUEST

JASON DEAN

ALSO ON SITE:

Ride With Us JULY 28-AUGUST 3 Ride to Milwaukee Harley-Davidson® Museum and Miller Brewing via Lake Michigan Ferry followed by Indianapolis Speedway & AMA Museum – Call Lisa for more details

1375 WASHINGTON ROAD - WASHINGTON, PA

724-225-7020 - WWW.STEELCITYHARLEY.COM +

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 48

NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 03 STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. The Playground Project. Survey exploring the history of post-war playground design & highlighting important examples of playgrounds from the 20th century. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. BugWorks. Feat. beautiful photography of insects, amazing specimens, & live bugs! Garden of Light: Works by Paula Crevoshay. Feat. nearly 70 fine art jewelry pieces. Roads of Arabia: Archaeology & History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Archaeological materials exploring the cultural history of the Arabian Peninsula. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. BIKES: Science on Two Wheels. Feat. hands-on activities, demonstrations & a collection of historic, rare, & peculiar bicycles. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600.

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collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. RetroFRESH. Contemporary paintings by James Kennedy, Claire Hardy, Donald Deskey, Alexander Minewski, Louise Evans-Scott, Vladimir Naiditch, & Henri de Waroquier. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Passion. Work by Chris Visgitis & Todd Sanders. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Sweet Mortality. Recent works by Scott Hove. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG GARDEN AND CIVIC CENTER. Norwin Art League Annual Membership Show. Greensburg. 724-836-1123. HOMESTEAD PUMP HOUSE. The Landscape of Steel. Photographs by Kevin Scanlon. Munhall. 412-464-4020. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Copper Foil Portraits 1940s-1970s. Work by Irma Freeman. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MAKE YOUR MARK ARTSPACE & COFFEEHOUSE. Steel City Medley. Photographs by Jay Ressler. Point Breeze. 412-365-2117. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz,

FUTURE TENANT. I N V E N T O R Y: The Orgone Archive, Pittsburgh 13 (2002-2013). Feat. a decade’s worth of promotion & propaganda in the form of posters, stickers & bits of paper created by The Orgone Archive. Downtown. 412-325-7037. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. What We Collect: Recent Art Acquisitions, 2007–2012. Botanical illustrations from the early 19th century through the present. Oakland. 412-268-2434. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013

Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Expressive Forms. Work by Anire Mosley & Jonathan Shapiro. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Somebody, Anybody… Everybody. New work by David Grim & Mark Panza. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Glassweekend ‘13. Work by Rhoda Baer, John de Wit, Jon Goldberg, Mikyoung Jung, Catherine Labonte, Matthew Perez, Erica Rosenfeld, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. ZA. Group show feat. pizza-themed art. Bloomfield. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The Civil War. A collection of rare and historic images printed from original glass plate negatives that survived the harrowing travels of Civil War Photographers. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Fiberart International 2013. Juried exhibition of contemporary fiber art. Presented by the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh. 30:2. Group exhibition presented by Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Coming Home. Fabric installation by Kay Healy. Friday Nights at Guitar Center. Work by Allison Kaufman. Rites of Passage. Oil paintings by Maggie Mills. Shadyside. 412-361-0873.

REMEDY. Voodoo Velvet. Paintings. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Continuum. Work by Doug DuBois & Aaron Blum. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Art Interprets Alzheimer’s. Work by George Roby & Herbert Ascherman, Jr. Downtown. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Thad Kellstadt: On the Glass Surf. Video, installation & sound create a haunted paradise on the border of fracture & utopia. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Tattoo Works III. A juried exhibition of new & innovative artwork from local tattoo artists. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Juice Box Memories: The Best of Boy Mayor. Editorial cartoons by Rob Rogers. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TRUNDLE MANOR. Serendipity! A Trundle Manor Art Event. New work by Donnie Toomer. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. U.S. POST OFFICE & COURTHOUSE. Whitehall Arts Courthouse Exhibit. Paintings by Whitehall Arts members. Downtown. 412-561-4000. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Rustbelt Romanticism. An exhibit of paintings, drawings, & film by Mark & Dorion Barill. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WILDCARD. Craft Hard: Art Inspired by Action Movies. Work by Andrew O. Ellis, Tara Goe, Elliot McNally, & Mario Zucca. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19thcentury, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212.

OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/ Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among

tropical blooms. Summer Flower more. June 28-July 6 Butler Show. Glass art surrounded Fairground, Butler. 724-625-1977. by colorful blooms. Feat. work by Daviea Davis, Jason Forck, Steven Sadvary, Lisa Platt, ARTS IN THE PARK. Craft more. 14 indoor rooms & vendors, live music, children’s 3 outdoor gardens feature activities, more. 3-5:30 p.m. exotic plants and floral displays YMCA Camp/ARMCO Park, from around the world. Oakland. Slippery Rock. 724-287-4733. 412-622-6914. JAM ON WALNUT. Feat. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG performances by Dancing AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 Queen & Kelsey. Walnut Street, animals, including many Shadyside. endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON THE GREAT EUROPEAN HOMESTEAD. A Reverence BEER FESTIVAL. Over 100 for Life. Photos and artifacts Belgian & European beers, live of her life & work. Springdale. music, more. June 29-30 Sharp 724-274-5459. Edge Beer Emporium, Friendship. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ 412-661-3537. HISTORY CENTER. Pennsylvania’s Civil War. In-depth look at Pennsylvania’s LUCKY’S SOUTH SIDE significant contributions during DOG FESTIVAL. Carnival the Civil War feat. artifacts, games, bouncing house, military encampments, contests, dog adoption life-like museum figures, more. opportunities. 24th St., South From Slavery to Freedom. Side. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. ARTISTIC EDGE. Art show Strip District. 412-454-6000. & auction feat. work by SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS Dave DiCello, Luca Paganico, HISTORY CENTER. Museum & Jackie Inks. Benefits the commemorates Pittsburgh Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. industrialists, local history. 7 p.m. Cavo, Steubenville. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. 412-352-8859. SOLDIERS & SAILORS WE’RE ON A BOAT! Cocktail MEMORIAL HALL. Military party aboard Pittsburgh Luxury museum dedicated to honoring Cruises’ Fantasy. Benefits military service members since Attack Theater. Lockwall One the Civil War through artifacts Marina, Strip District. 5:30-9 p.m. & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-281-3305. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of WHITE PARTY. Tasting menu, Catholic saints. North Side. open bar, more. Benefits A 412-323-9504. Child’s Place, hosted by Manaic ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN Magazine & Lexus of North Hills. CATHOLIC CHURCH. 7 p.m. The Smart House, Maxo Vanka Murals. Mt. Washington. Mid-20th century 412-904-2281. murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience www. per BOOK ‘EM BOOKS pa in America. Millvale. pghcitym TO PRISONERS o .c 421-681-0905. WORK PARTY. Read & WEST OVERTON code letters, pick books, MUSEUMS. Learn about pack ‘em or database ‘em! distilling and coke-making Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. in this pre-Civil War Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. industrial village. Scottdale. 412-361-3022. 724-887-7910. PITCH FOR HOPE. Women’s baseball skills clinic benefiting A Glimmer of Hope. Email michelle.mejia@pirates.com for more information. ART IN THE PARK. Food, 8-10 a.m. PNC Park, North Side. music, vendors, more. Thu, 412-323-5000. 6-8:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 29 Penn Avenue Parklet, Wilkinsburg. 412-727-7855.

SAT 29

SAT 29 - SUN 30

SUN 30

FUNDRAISERS THU 27

SAT 29

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 30

FESTIVALS THU 27

LITERARY

THU 27 - FRI 28 RIB & WING FESTIVAL. Thru June 28 Seven Springs, Champion. 814-352-7777.

FRI 28 - WED 03 BIG BUTLER FAIR. Demolition derbies, concerts, games, rides,

THU 27

ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.


Pizza & Beer Night tuesdays

[FAMILY] Greensburg. 724-832-7464. PLAYFUL BAMBOO DAYS W/ STEPHANIE MAYERSTALEY. Create bamboo sculptures. Thru June 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

AN EVENING OF POETRY W/ PAOLA CORSO. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

PALS BOOK CLUB. Seniors only. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE RUST BELT RISING ALMANAC BOOK TALK. Story-telling & music by Nic Esposito & Todd Henkin. 7 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634.

SAT 29

MON 01 OPEN POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. First Mon of every month, 7-10 p.m. Brentwood Library, Brentwood. 412-882-5694. READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. plays from August Wilson & new works by up & coming playwrights. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700. YONA HARVEY. Poetry reading & signing w/ author of Hemming the Water. 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-8866.

TUE 02 JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

Wind Up wednesdays

$2 Miller Lite Drafts til 12am FREE POOL all night ½ off Select Appetizers 9-11pm

SAT 29

FRI 28

LORI JAKIELA & DAVE NEWMAN DUAL BOOK LAUNCH. Book signing & readings from The Bridge to Take When Things Get Serious & The Slaughterhouse Poems. Also feat. paintings by Lou Ickes. 7:30 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. POETRY AS MEMOIR: AN AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP. W/ writers Jane McCafferty & Laurie Arnold-McMillan. All levels of skill & experience welcome. Bring a lunch. Call or email Laurie: writelife1@hotmail.com 10 a.m.-3 p.m. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-337-4976. STARTING LINE ASSEMBLY. National poetry tour feat. readings & workshops. 7 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

$15 large pizza & pitcher domestic beer FREE POOL all night

Many who visited the Carnegie Museum of Natural History on school field trips have fond memories of the artifacts in the Discovery Room. In April, curators introduced Discovery Basecamp, a new hands-on learning center combining the now-closed Discovery Room and the temporary exhibit Exploration Basecamp. The 1,900-square-foot gallery features natural treasures new and old, and myriad opportunities to investigate rocks, plants and animals from far and wide, first-hand. Exhibit closes an hour before the museum. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Call 412-622-3131 or visit www.carnegiemuseums.org.

THE ROYAL PARTY: PRINCESSES & PIRATES. Fairytale craft stations, treasure hunt, photos at the Enchanted Castle, more. 8-10 a.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. SUPERHEROES CRUISE. 1 p.m. Gateway Clipper Fleet, Station Square. 412-266-4268. VARIETY OF PITTSBURGH. Learn about the process of building adaptive bicycles for children w/ disabilities. 12-5 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. WHAT’S IN THE WATER. Program feat. live animals & a nature walk. Presented by the Allegheny Land Trust. 9-10 a.m. Wingfield Pines, Upper St. Clair. 412-741-2750.

Thirsty thursdays

$7 Yuengling Pitchers til 12am Karaoke 9:30-1:30am

Happy Hour

Tues-Fri

06.29 (main level) Retro Night $2 well drinks 9-11pm (lower level) Pin Up Perfection Pageant www.facebook.com/events/309542629150457/

Now Booking Events, Parties & more Open 7 days a week for special events contact cattivo44@comcast.net

146 44th Street Lawrenceville PA 15201 412.687.2157 www.cattivo.biz Open Tues-Sat 4-2am Check our website & Facebook page for more events

MON 01 - WED 03 THE UGLY DUCKLING & OTHER TAILS. Children’s Theatre. Mon-Wed. Thru July 10 South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552.

OUTSIDE THU 27 T’AI CHI IN MELLON PARK. Thu, 5:45-6:45 p.m. Thru June 27 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

FRI 28 LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. TOI DERRICOTT, JUDITH R. ROBINSON, PHIL TERMAN. Poetry reading. 8 p.m. Hemingway’s Cafe, Oakland. 412-498-7876.

Marina, more. Thru Sept. 1 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solarpowered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

WED 03

AFTER HOURS SWAG FEST 3: SHARK ATTACK! Sharkthemed photo booth, scavenger hunt, fishing pond, sand art, music, more. 7-9 p.m. Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-6920. COOK IT! Interactive cooking demos w/ Chef Angelo. 1 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. YOUTH MAKER NIGHT. Experiment w/ Arduino, sewing, use a laser cutter, more. Ages 10-15. 5:30-8 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116.

KIDSTUFF THU 27 - SAT 29 PLAYFUL BAMBOO DAYS W/ STEPHANIE MAYERSTALEY. Create bamboo sculptures. Thru June 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 27 - WED 03 ADVENTURES W/ CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG. 9-foot tall Clifford w/ tail slide, build a sandcastle on T-Bone’s beach, play instruments in the Musical

FRI 28

FRI 28 - SAT 29 PETER PAN. Musical presented by Stage Right Summer Camp Teens. June 28-29 Harrold Middle School,

BATS & A BONFIRE. Campfire & short talk on bats. Presented by the Allegheny Land Trust. 6-10 p.m. Wingfield Pines, Upper St. Clair. 412-741-2750.

SAT 29 FREE KAYAK & STAND-UP PADDLE BOARD DEMOS. Presented by L.L.Bean. Sat, 12-2 p.m. Thru July 27 North Park, Allison Park. 412-318-1200. OUTDOOR DISCOVERY DAY. Lawn games, intro to fly casting, Bootmobile, more. Presented by L.L. Bean. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Schenley Plaza, Oakland. 617-520-7110.

3 NIGHTS ONLY! NEXT: XXX Superstar & 2013 AVN Performer of the Year

ASA AKIRA

SAT 29 - SUN 30 KAYAKING DISCOVERY COURSE. Presented by L.L.Bean. Sat, Sun, 10-11:30 a.m. Thru Oct. 13 North Park, Allison Park. 412-318-1200.

JULY 12-13

SUN 30 ART CLUB OF RACCOON CREEK. Practice art skills in any medium while enjoying the outdoors. 2-5 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park, Hookstown. 724-899-3611.

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK: Mon-Sat: Noon-2am, Sun: 3pm-2am

135 9th Street 412-281-7703 www.blushexotic.com DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

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52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

ECO-TOUR W/ VENTURE OUTDOORS. Paddling tour. 9-11:30 a.m. Moraine State Park, Butler. 412-255-0564.

TUE 02 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 03 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 27

Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-1511.

THU 27 - FRI 28 STEEL CITY CON. Toy, comic & pop culture convention. Special guests: Tracey Gold, Eric Roberts, Ernie Hudson, Marina Sirtis, Theodus Crane, more. Thru June 28 Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville.

DOWNTOWN HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at City County Building, Downtown. Sat. Thru Aug. 31 412-302-5223. GUN SHOOT AT BAY POINT: THE CIVIL WAR, PORT ROYAL EXPERIMENT & THE MAKING OF THE GULLAH/GEECHEE. Lecture by Edda L. Fields-Black. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Senator John

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

FOCUS ON RENEWAL

Since forming in 1969, Focus on Renewal has provided anti-poverty programs to the McKees Rocks community. Among its resources is the FOR Sto-Rox Library, which provides reading clubs, computer lessons and more. Volunteers are needed to help stock and organize shelves, 3-7 p.m., Monday through Thursday and noon-4 p.m., Saturdays. Call 412-771-6460 x. 230 or email scrotty@ forstorox.org for information.

BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. BUGS IN YOUR BACKYARD. Learn about plant pests, pollinators, & other insects. Thu, 7-9 p.m. Thru June 27 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. 7 MISTAKES YOU DON’T CHINESE CONVERSATION WANT TO MAKE IN YOUR CLUB. Second Thu of OLD HOUSE. w/ Ron Tanner, every month, 6-7 p.m. and author & DIY expert. 7 p.m. Fourth Thu of every month Construction Junction, Point Carnegie Library, Oakland. Breeze. 412-243-5025. 412-622-3116. COMMUNITY CREATIVE THE DEN: A SPECIAL SCHOOL: HOW TO SAIL PROGRAMMING SERIES AROUND PITTSBURGH’S FOR NEW ADULTS. Video POINT. w/ Join Norton, sailor/ games, board games, easy scholar. 12-1 p.m. Bruno Works, drop-in art projects, book Downtown. discussions, more. Second DOWNTOWN’S BEST and Fourth Thu of every month WALKING TOUR. Meet at Carnegie Library, Oakland. Grant St. entrance. Fri, 412-622-3151. 10-11:30 a.m. Thru June 28 INTERNATIONAL Omni William Penn, Downtown. WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION 412-471-5808. OF PITTSBURGH. Social, MARKET SQUARE cultural club of American/ AREA FREE FRIDAY international women. WALKING TOUR. Thu First Baptist Begins at 5th Ave. Church, Oakland. & Market St., iwap.pittsburgh@ Downtown. Fri, gmail.com. . w ww per 12-1 p.m. POSITIVELY LIFE a p ty ci h pg Thru June 28 CHANGING SUMMER .com 412-471-5808. SERIES WORKSHOP. TANGO & SWING Thu. Thru June 27 DANCING. 8-11 p.m. Christine Coach Monique, Ross. Frechard Gallery, Squirrel Hill. 412-400-2085. 412-421-8888. RENAISSANCE DANCE VASTU: SECRETS FOR GUILD. Learn a variety of A SUCCESSFUL LIFE. w/ dances from the 15-17th Michael Mastro. Presented centuries. Porter Hall, Room by Art of Living. 7 p.m. A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Nuin Center, Highland Park. Mellon University, Oakland. 724-396-4912. 412-567-7512. UNCOVERING “HIDDEN” HISTORIES OF JEWS & CONVENT CRAWL. Visit 4 MUSLIMS IN MEDIEVAL local convents. For women & MODERN EUROPE. ages 18+, presented by the Presentation by Michal Pittsburgh Religious Vocation Friedman. 6 p.m. Carnegie Council. Register at Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. prvc.info@gmail.com. 412-422-9650. June 28-29 412-635-5437. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh DOG GONE! SCAVENGER Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. HUNT. Test your animal WHISKEY REBELLION knowledge & follow clues to WARM-UP. Live music, collect treats & toys for your historic re-enactors, dog. 9 a.m. Shadyside, Shadyside. more. 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. 412-841-2433.

FRI 28

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 28 - SAT 29

SAT 29

Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6000. INCLINE HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at the bottom of the Monongahela Incline. Sat. Thru Oct. 26 412-302-5223. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Korean grammar & basic conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PIN UP PERFECTION PAGEANT. Feat. guest judges, raffle, vendors, more. Pageant winner will get to be on the cover of Pin Up Perfection Magazine. 9 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SUMMER EVENING ARTS. Art & craft exhibits, live folk music, food, more. 5-9 p.m. Touchstone Center for Crafts, Farmington. 724-329-1370. SUMMER SOLSTICE 2013. Live music, local food, art vendors, more. Presented by Touchfaster. 8 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-381-6811. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Cave Canem poetry reading featuring

SUN 30 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. BELLYDANCE CLASS W/ JEMEENA. Sun, 10 a.m. Thru June 30 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-337-1846. CANONSBURG SUNDAY CAR CRUISE. Sun, 1-5 p.m. Thru Sept. 22 The Handle Bar & Grille, Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. I MADE IT! MARKET. Nomadic indie craft market. Part of Independents Week. Ellsworth Ave, Shadyside. ITALIANO-ESPRESSO. Italian conversation club. Presented by Mondo Italiano. Sun, 11 a.m. Thru June 30 Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-478-3682. REGENT SQUARE GARDEN TOUR. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-244-8458.

Chris Abani, Toi Derricotte, Harryette Mullen and Cornelius Eady, North Side CRITIC: Bria Walker, 31, an actress and teaching artist from Highland Park WHEN: Thu.,

June 20 It was a Cave Canem event in partnership with City of Asylum/Pittsburgh and this is the fourth year. For me, Cave Canem is an organization that is all about promoting African-American poets and teaching and showcasing them as well. There are people here from New York who came to hear great work and to see them all do their thing. This was my first time ever seeing them read. Toi Derricotte read a piece that the teacher read in my poetry-workshop class. It was really cool to actually hear Toi Derricotte read it — that was wonderful. It was a great turn-out, I think; the audience was very diverse and it was packed, just packed. I mean it’s crazy that this is a poetry reading. It was very nice to see that people care.

MON 01 MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.

B Y OL I V I A L A M M E L

SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month DALCROZE EURHYTHMICS Carnegie Library, Oakland. CLASSES FOR SENIORS. Tue, 412-622-3151. Wed, 3-4:30 p.m. Thru July 10 TEA CLASS & TASTING. Carnegie Mellon University, History of tea, steeping Oakland. 412-251-0426. techniques, Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea samples & European ENGLISH CONVERSATION cookies will be served. (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. First Wed of every Mount Lebanon Public month, 7 p.m. Library, Mt. Lebanon. Margaret’s Fine 412-531-1912. Imports, Squirrel Hill. FARMERS AT PHIPPS. www. per a p 412-422-1606. Farmers’ market. pghcitym o .c WEST COAST Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. SWING WEDNESDAYS. Thru Oct. 30 Phipps Swing dance lessons. Conservatory & Botanical Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. South Side. 916-287-1373. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Oakland. 412-622-3151. Ongoing auditions for PITTSBURGH GLASS actors ages 18+ for murder CENTER SUMMER LECTURE mystery shows performed SERIES. Discussion of in the Pittsburgh area. contemporary glass art feat. 412-833-5056. Raven Skyriver, Martin Janecky, & Robert Mickelsen. 6-8 p.m. MCG JAZZ. Auditions for a Pittsburgh Glass Center, 2-show live concert appearance Friendship. 412-365-2145. at MCG Jazz. July 1-Aug. 1. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW Young male jazz vocalists, ages OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & 18-35. Submit video online via spinners. All levels welcome. YouTube, email to kfriedson@ Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, mcg-btc.org, or send a DVD. Highland Park. 412-363-4550. Details at mcgjazz.org/_wp/

TUE 02 - WED 03

WED 03

FULL LIST ONLINE

AUDITIONS

54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013

mcg-jazz-searching-for-the-nextjazz-superstar. 412-322-0800.

SUBMISSIONS THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Seeking non-traditional 2-D & 3-D work for upcoming juried art exhibit Different Dimensions: The Unpainting Exhibit. CD submissions only. Prospectus at www.greensburgartcenter.org/. 724-837-6791. THE PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 67th Annual International Aqueous Open exhibition. http://www.pittsburghwater colorsociety.com/ 412-731-0636. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking individual artists & artist groups for month-long exhibitions in a new transitional gallery measuring. Artists will be responsible for all aspects of their exhibition. Send images & a brief introduction to the work to: bljones@ wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I am a 54-year-old postmenopausal woman. My libido has diminished significantly, and it takes me much longer to climax. My husband is unable to maintain an erection as long as he used to; this makes it even more difficult for me to climax. I have taken up an activity I did in my 20s when I was single: giving myself enemas. The enemainduced orgasms are fantastic. Am I doing any harm to my body by doing frequent quart-size soapy enemas using a retention -balloon nozzle and holding it as long as possible and then masturbating as I expel? Will a doctor be able to tell what I’ve been up to when it’s time for a colonoscopy? I would die if a doctor figured it out. FRUSTRATED LADY EARNESTLY ENQUIRES TODAY

“Women need to understand that our sexualities change throughout life,” says Dr. Leah Torres, a general obstetrician/gynecologist with a special focus on family planning. “Menopause can be tricky, but one can adapt to changes that may occur. There are medications and lubricants and all sorts of tricks.” Yeah, yeah — but what about the freakin’ enemas, doc? “The enemas are not harmful as long as they are not painful, though this practice may change the balance of bacteria that normally live in the colon and may make one more susceptible to changes in bowel movements,” says Dr. Torres. As for your fear of being discovered, FLEET, “I have not seen many colonoscopies, so I would not know a physician’s ability to determine a person’s level of enema activity,” says Dr. Torres. “But as a physician who prides herself in building trust with patients, I would never disclose my knowledge of sexual activities that may make my patient uncomfortable or embarrassed unless there is a concern for her health or it directly affects her care.” If it would really kill you if your doc figured it out, how about a face-and-rump-saving white lie? Mention that you’re administering enemas to yourself, leaving the masturbate-as-you-expel bit out, and ask your doc if that’s a problem. “She can ask her doctor an ‘innocent’ question such as ‘When I feel constipated, I give myself an enema. Is that dangerous?’” says Dr. Torres. “No need to mention masturbation, and the doctor’s answer may allay her other concerns.”

as well as for the laxity of the vagina.” But “Women do not ‘lose’ their clitorises,” says Dr. Torres. “The majority of the clitoris is located inside the body, but women recognize the ‘clitoral glans’ as the clitoris. This may become smaller with age, making it seem as though the clitoris has disappeared. But the clitoris never goes away.” So your mom’s clit is down there somewhere. It’s just smaller and grayer than it used to be — just like your mom.

KEEP CALM

My husband and I both hit 40 this year. We have been together since high school. We were kinky right from the start, became involved in the BDSM community, and found ourselves in a poly relationship. I had a hysterectomy a couple of years ago, and I’ve had a hard time getting regulated with hormone replacement. There was a lot of extra bodily trauma with my surgery. I’m mostly happy with other parts of my life, but I have no interest anymore in kink, especially D/s. I wouldn’t say I’ve totally lost interest in sex, but I don’t have the driving need I used to. I haven’t had luck talking to my ob-gyns. If I’m not having hot flashes, in their opinion, I shouldn’t mess with it. My boyfriend has been supportive, but I’m having a hard time talking to my husband, since his girlfriend is menopauseage and as much of a nympho as ever. He sees my lack of interest in sex as a lack of interest in him.

AND

DON’T BITCH UNLESS YOU VOTE

IF YOUR DOCS ARE UNWILLING TO DISCUSS AND PRIORITIZE YOUR SEX LIFE, YOU NEED NEW OB-GYNS.

My mother cannot find her clit. She’s 80 years old, quite fit, and otherwise anatomically correct, but she noticed about a week back that she couldn’t find her clit. She went to her gyno and told him, and he didn’t seem shocked. She isn’t sexually active, but she’d like to keep as many of her original parts as she can. I searched online and couldn’t find much about missing clits. HELP MY MOTHER FIND HER CLIT

“It is normal for the vagina, and the parts within and around the vagina, to atrophy with age,” says Dr. Torres. “Women who have gone through menopause have very little estrogen. For the lady parts, estrogen is crucial in upkeeping the healthy, youthful appearance of vaginal and labial tissues

TOO YOUNG TO BE OLD

“Society makes talking about sex taboo, and that taboo can adversely affect the doctor-patient relationship,” says Dr. Torres. Dr. Torres is being polite. Allow me to translate: Your current ob-gyns suck santorumsmeared donkey balls. If your docs are unwilling to discuss and prioritize your sex life, you need new ob-gyns. “If a patient comes to me with changes in sexual function that concern her,” Dr. Torres continues, “it is the same as if she came to me with ‘it hurts right here, doc.’ It is something that needs investigating. Having a hysterectomy often includes removing the ovaries, which is equivalent to inducing menopause. No ovaries = no estrogen = menopause. Even if you still have your ovaries, their function may be affected by a hysterectomy. This can affect the libido or it may have no effect whatsoever. Also, after major surgery, particularly after a difficult and prolonged recovery, people may not enjoy sex the same way they used to. For this woman, pain may now be associated with the struggle to recover as opposed to what it used to be associated with: orgasm.” So what does the doctor recommend? “There are options other than female hormone-replacement therapy,” says Dr. Torres, “and it may be a good idea to consult a specialist in sexual health.”

BEST OF PITTSBURGH VOTE NOW www.pghcitypaper.com Enter Promo Code CPTSTIX for a chance to

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This week on the Savage Lovecast, Dan chats with Mollena Williams (a.k.a. the Perverted Negress) about meeting kinksters; find it at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

06.26-07.03

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “In order to swim one takes off all one’s clothes,” said 19th-century Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard. “In order to aspire to the truth one must undress in a far more inward sense, divest oneself of all one’s inward clothes, of thoughts, conceptions, selfishness, etc., before one is sufficiently naked.” Your assignment in the coming week, Cancerian, is to get au naturel like that. It’s time for you to make yourself available for as much of the raw, pure, wild truth as you can stand.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Gertrude Stein was an innovative writer. Many illustrious artists were her friends. But she had an overly elevated conception of her own worth. “Think of the Bible and Homer,” she said, “think of Shakespeare and think of me.” On another occasion, she proclaimed, “Einstein was the creative philosophic mind of the century, and I have been the creative literary mind of the century.” Do you know anyone like Stein, Leo? Here’s the truth, in my opinion: To some degree, we are all like Stein. Every one of us has at least one inflated idea about ourselves — a conceited self-conception that doesn’t match reality. It was my turn to confront my egotistical delusions a few weeks ago. Now would be an excellent time for you to deal with yours. Don’t be too hard on yourself, though. Just recognize the inflation, laugh about it and move on.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): When I close my eyes, I get a psychic vision of you as a kid playing outside on a warm summer day. You’re with friends, immersed in a game that commands your full attention. Suddenly, you hear a jingling tune wafting your way from a distance. It’s the ice-cream truck. You stop what you’re doing and run inside your home to beg your mom for some money. A few minutes later, you’re in a state of bliss, communing with your Fudgsicle or icecream cone or strawberry-lime fruit bar. I have a feeling that you will soon experience an adult version of this scene, Virgo. Metaphorically speaking, either the ice-cream man or the ice-cream woman will be coming to your neighborhood.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): During the past 10 months, you have been unusually adventurous. The last time you summoned so much courage and expansiveness may have been 2001. I’m impressed! Please accept my respect and appreciation. You’ve had a sixth sense about knowing when it’s wise to push beyond your limitations and boundaries. You have also had a seventh sense about intuiting when to be crafty and cautious as you wander through the frontiers. Now here’s one of your assignments for the next 12 months: Distill all you’ve learned out there in the borderlands and decide how you will use your wisdom to build an unshakable power spot back here in the heart of the action.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Michael Faraday (1791-1867) was one of the most influential scientists in history. He produced major breakthroughs in both chemistry and physics. Have you ever used devices that run on electricity? You can thank him for playing a major role in developing that wonderful convenience. And yet unlike most scientists, he had only the most elementary grasp of mathematics. In fact, his formal education was negligible. I propose that we name him your role model of the week. He’s a striking example of

the fact that you can arrive at your chosen goal by many different paths. Keep that in mind if you’re ever tempted to believe that there’s just one right way to fulfill your dreams.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “The only thing that we learn from history,” said the German philosopher Georg Hegel, “is that we never learn anything from history.” I’m urging you to refute that statement in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. I’m pleading with you to search your memory for every possible clue that might help you be brilliant in dealing with your immediate future. What have you done in the past that you shouldn’t do now? What haven’t you done in the past that you should do now?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): According to my analysis of the astrological omens, now would be a pretty good time to talk about things that are hard to talk about. I don’t necessarily mean that you’ll find it easy to do. But I suspect it would be relatively free of pain and karmic repercussions. There may even be a touch of pleasure once the catharsis kicks in. So try it if you dare, Capricorn. Summon the courage to express truths that have previously been hard to pin down. Articulate feelings that have been murky or hidden. For best results, encourage those you trust to do the same.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

time-wasting half-truths. Be wary for unreliable gossip that would cause an unnecessary ruckus.

“To know when to stop is of the same importance as to know when to begin,” said the painter Paul Klee. Take that to heart, Aries! You are pretty adept at getting things launched, but you’ve got more to learn about the art of stopping. Sometimes you finish prematurely. Other times you sort of disappear without officially bringing things to a close. Now would be an excellent time to refine your skills.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): French Impressionist painter Claude Monet loved to paint water lilies, and he did so over and over again for many years. Eventually he created about 250 canvases that portrayed these floating flowers. Should we conclude that he repeated himself too much? Should we declare that he was boringly repetitive? Or might we wonder if he kept finding new delights in his comfortable subject? Would we have enough patience to notice that each of the 250 paintings shows the water lilies in a different kind of light, depending on the weather and the season and the time of day? I vote for the latter view, and suggest that you adopt a similar approach to the familiar things in your life during the coming weeks.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it’s hard to determine whether or not they are genuine.” So said Joan of Arc back in 1429, right before she helped lead French troops in the battle of Patay. JUST KIDDING! Joan of Arc never had the pleasure of surfing the web, of course, since it didn’t exist until long after she died. But I was trying to make a point that will be useful for you to keep in mind, Taurus, which is: Be skeptical of both wild claims and mild claims. Stay alert for seemingly interesting leads that are really

Each of us has a secret ignorance. Can you guess what yours is? What will you do about it? Freewillastrology.com.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Are you familiar with Quidditch? It’s a rough sport played by wizards in the fictional world of Harry Potter. All seven books in the series mention it, so it’s an important element. Author J.K. Rowling says she dreamed up the sport after having a quarrel with her boyfriend. “In my deepest, darkest soul,” she reports, “I would quite like to see him hit by a bludger.” (In Quidditch, a bludger is a big black ball made of iron.) I bring this up, Aquarius, because I suspect that you, too, are in position to use anger in a creative and constructive way. Take advantage of your raw emotion to make a lasting improvement in your life.

   

  

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In his erotic poem “Your Sex,” Joe Bolton exults: “My heart simplified, I touch the bud of happiness — it’s in season. And whatever grief I might have felt before simply dies inside me.” You might want to write that down on a slip of paper and carry it around with you this week, Pisces. According to my understanding of the astrological omens, the bud of happiness is now in season for you. You have good reason to shed the undertones of sadness and fear you carry around with you. I’ll tell you the last lines of Bolton’s poem, because they also apply: “Sometimes I think it’s best just to take pleasure wherever we want and can. Look: The twilight is alive with wild honey.” (The full poem: tinyurl.com/JoeBolton.)

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you. wyep.org

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 58 + SERVICES 58 + STUDIES 58 + WELLNESS 61 + LIVE 62

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ADOPTION National Commercial Cleaning Company has

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Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

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VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013


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ONE PLUS ONE

Ink Well {BY BEN TAUSIG}

ACROSS 1. Band-Aid maker, briefly 6. Officer of the future 11. Orientation tool 14. Multiple choice choices 15. Gayle’s bestie 16. As (so-and-so) cooks it 17. Brothers on a classic Nick show 19. Media org. with lots of soothing voices 20. Nocturnal emission? 21. Visual 23. Bust 26. “No problem” 29. Likely to fail, as a student 31. Gas from beans, e.g. 32. Send out 33. Racer Protasiewicz or ex-prime minister Jaroszewicz (or a variant spelling of Tchaikovsky’s first name) 35. Blended whisky cocktail 41. Like Vikings 42. Roughly 44. Late 48. Half of a series couple 50. Consecutive games between two teams in their respective stadiums 53. Alternative to JFK or LGA 54. Conveyances generally only

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.26/07.03.2013

ridden downward 55. Blunted swords 57. One gone cray-cray, as it were 58. Coffee shop freebie 64. “Is that true about me?” 65. Jean Stapleton’s “All in the Family” role 66. Utah’s ___ Mountains 67. Delt neighbor 68. Some stereos 69. Place with mandatory communal meals, sometimes

DOWN 1. Slur you just kind of hope won’t come out when hearing WWII stories 2. 2012 Best Actorwinning role for Daniel 3. Sarcastic negation 4. ___ Scott v. Sandford 5. Paper inserts in cassette tape cases 6. Gene part 7. Cook’s corp. 8. “It’s On (Dr. ___) 187um Killa” (Eazy-E EP) 9. Fill up, in a way 10. Simon follower 11. Chinese steamed bun served with dim sum 12. French mountain goat 13. Unit of land 18. Barnes & Noble e-reader 22. Adobe image file 23. Scot’s uh-uh

24. Certain hold-up sites 25. Wheel brought to many a party 27. Dwelling 28. Minor quibbles 30. Rumored Xbox competitor from 7-Down 33. Removed the peel from 34. Networking connections 36. Minus signs 37. Spit or swallow, e.g. 38. 2012 Channing Tatum/Rachel McAdams drama, with “The” 39. Lake next to Cedar Point amusement park 40. Warning before a sexy clip 43. Twelfth-to-last

word before “play ball” 44. “You gonna let her talk to you like that?” 45. Knob on an amp 46. What alcohol works as, if you drink enough of it 47. Sore, say 48. Counterfeiter catchers 49. Hippie’s bus, casually 51. Full-figured 52. Colorful food fish 56. He plays Sam in “Transformers” 59. Craziness 60. Jeremy of a predictably brief media craze 61. Raggedy doll 62. Inc., abroad 63. Surviving Milli Vanilli member

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


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GRAND OPENING!

TIGER SPA

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ABC SELF STORAGE5x10 $45, 10x10 $65, 10x15 $95. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

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COURSE CORRECTION Where higher education sees trouble, a local initiative sees opportunity {BY ABBY MENDELSON}

THEY’RE HUNCHED over laptops, all hugger-mugger, in Voluto Coffee, Penn Avenue, Garfield. It’s well past closing time, but they’ve paid for the space, the sandwiches and the joe that keeps on coming. There are a dozen of them, bathed in computer glow, trying to unravel the Gordian knot of web design. Ages 19-50, female and male, they’re here each Tuesday night for three months, taking Saxifrage School’s Web Development 101: Theory and Practice. For intense instruction, plus Voluto grounds and grub, the fee is $350 — a fraction of what it would be at a traditional college. “Over the past 40 years,” says Timothy Cook, Saxifrage’s founder and guiding spirit, “college has become far too expensive. In real dollars, costs have tripled since 1970.” He shakes his head. “College must be made affordable. And it also must be financially sustainable without on government subsidies or constant charity. “This,” he gestures around him, “is a start.” “Let’s take 10,” says design instructor Natalie Robb and her students stand and stretch.

students were graduating from college with generic degrees that did not prepare them to find work. But for their substantial investment to be worthwhile, students must graduate with hard skills and employable credentials.” Cook is hardly alone with this concern. With college enrollments down, due in no small part to higher prices and less tangible return on investment, many academicians have begun to question not merely the worth of a college degree — but also the role of college itself. With the rise of online learning, and the real inability of many programs to find students in troubled economic times, an idea like Saxifrage might take hold. It’s no coincidence that the program is named after a plant that grows in difficult climates, and whose name in Latin means “stone-breaker.” Setting out to remedy his own situation, Cook signed on as exhibit builder at the Children’s Museum. Working, planning, thinking, he reasoned that with college prices — and student debt — skyrocketing, others would share his interest in low-cost practical coursework. To date, web design, carpentry and farming — all personal interests — have fueled Saxifrage’s growing enrollment.

“THEY COME BECAUSE THEY WANT TO LEARN THINGS. THERE’S INTENSE INTEREST.” Robb is one of a half-dozen Saxifrage instructors, although the roster fluctuates depending on course offerings. Cook says that when seeking out faculty, he stresses real-world, hands-on experience, more than an academic credential. “This is the model,” he adds, as the students wander about the premises, some ducking outside for a smoke. “We aim to lower the cost of education, in part by utilizing the nomadic campus.” Eschewing the desire to acquire real estate, Saxifrage seeks underutilized spaces — off-hour churches and coffee shops, taverns and town halls. Voluto, for example, usually closes at 7 p.m., but tonight’s web design begins at 6:30 and runs for three hours. “We lower costs,” Cook says, “and reconnect with the neighborhood.” Aside from web design, this semester Saxifrage is at the nearby Union Project for carpentry. On the North Side’s Community Farm for urban agriculture. And so on. If it sounds very hands-on, that’s deliberate. “For too long,” Cook says, “education disconnected theory and practice. When I graduated W&J six years ago I could read a lot of poetry. I could write a good essay on Transcendentalism. But I couldn’t build anything.” He found virtually everyone he knew in the same situation. “Despite a great expense of time and money,” Cook says, “many

“I began by asking hard questions,” Cook recalls, “and coming up with real solutions.” The students straggle back, settling in before their flat screens with Voluto cups in hand. “They come because they want to learn things,” Cook says. “There’s intense interest.” On the business side of the ledger, he’s looking for more partners, more opportunities. “There are 62 churches within a mile of where we are,” Cook says, “most of which are empty during the week. Every nonprofit organization has a large meeting or conference space they rarely use. And most of the 20-odd bars are closed until 5 p.m. We could turn a liability — underutilized space — into an asset for our students. And Saxifrage has no plans to operate any student services that should otherwise be provided by local businesses. Instead of a cafeteria and a coffee shop, we will direct students to local eateries and groceries. It’s a win-win.” Or it will be if Cook takes his model to his end-game: a full-scale, accredited college program with 50 teachers and 500 students — students who will become job-wielding graduates unburdened by debt. “We’re starting to work on a sustainable revenue stream,” Cook says. “We have all these big ideas.” INF O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

June 26, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 26

June 26, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 26