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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 06.12/06.19.2013

DRUG SIDE EFFECTS: CRIMINALIZING POT IS RACIST, ACLU REPORT SAYS 22


EVENTS 6.14 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOURS The Warhol will close at 5pm due to a private event.

7.13 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: BELLE & SEBASTIAN WITH SPECIAL GUESTS YO LA TENGO Stage AE Co-presented with PromoWest North Shore & Opus One Productions Tickets: $35

7.19 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUERS Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

8.16 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: PSYCHIC TV / PTV3 New Hazlett Theater Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

GOOD FRIDAYS Every Friday

– 5-10pm

Half-Price Admission and cash bar

Summer’s different here. Enjoy three provocative exhibitions under one roof.

GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE/CALDWELL LINKER/NICK BUBASH /june 15 - sept 15.2013/

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

www.warhol.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013


Over 21 • 9pm - Midnight

ROCK & BOWL! {EDITORIAL}

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 24

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers AMYJO BROWN, LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns TRACEY HICKEY, OLIVIA LAMMEL, KIRA SCAMMELL

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers MICHAEL ARTMAN, SHEILA LETSON, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

[TASTE]

38

“I’ve seen my energy level stay through the roof by doing fresh juicing.” — Bar Marco’s Bobby Fry on opening a new eatery focused on raw foods

[MUSIC]

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“Any place a social worker might work, it may be possible to find a music therapist there.” — Dr. Elaine Abbott, of Duquesne University, on where one might find a music therapist

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Marketing and Promotions Interns JODI SHERER, SHELBEY SURGENT Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

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STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

“My friends are all doing really interesting things and nobody was documenting it.” — Caldwell Linker on photographing Pittsburgh’s LGBTQ scene

[LAST PAGE] of the time, people cry — 79 “Most men, women, it doesn’t matter who they are. There’s a tissue box over there.”— Herbalist Ola Obasi on her holistic approach to medicine

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 24 EVENTS LISTINGS 60 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 69 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 71 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 78 +

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[ARTS]

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

DJ NIGHT + PRIZES

Sunday

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

film is rated R — for weed, 52 “This endless profanity and graphic demon

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DJ & KARAOKE

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Wednesday

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“Pretty soon, the whole nation is probably going to be puffing.” — Pittsburgh Police Lt. Daniel Herrmann, on the future of marijuana laws

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“The way some doctors communicate about trans patients is demeaning … there’s not a respect or understanding or an acceptance.” — Dr. Stacy Lane on the difficulties facing transgender individuals in need of health care

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INCOMING

TRANSGENDER PATIENTS “HAVE TO GO THROUGH THINGS THAT OTHERS DON’T FOR BASIC HEALTH CARE.”

Letter to the Editor I was so mad to learn about the financial and educational ruin that is the Duquesne School district (“The Neverending Story,” June 5). Paul Rach should be ashamed to compare the school district to a joke since he’s retiring and getting a nice pension I’m sure. His lengthy résumé didn’t seem to fix any of the problems for which he was hired. That area has so much rich history and it’s a shame to hear about their situation. Good work on the article. — Mike Jax, Churchill

John Hanger wants to be the progressives’ choice for governor (June 5)

HEALTH BARRIER From insurance coverage to simply finding a doctor, health care presents challenges for the transgender community

“There may be a lot of candidates but John here won’t be getting my vote until he stops sucking off the gas industry no matter how liberal he is otherwise.” — Web comment from “Don Orkoskey”

Budget cuts from federal sequester taking toll on local social programs (May 22) “Senior citizens happen to be someone’s parents. They have a right to live and eat on this planet as well as all of you. They’ve worked in this country ... let them live and eat. Don’t cut social programs for the elderly. It’s unfair. Remember this when your parents are elderly!!!!” — Web comment from “happinessloveoneanother”

Mastro Ice provides cold comfort to local mixologists (May 29) “A top-shelf ice program demands cubes of pure water with maximum surface area.” False. The correct answer you were looking for is ‘minimum’ surface area. Maximum surface area would resemble a sheet of paper. Minimum surface area, a sphere. The latter is what you want.” — Web comment from “Forrest Gump”

“Feel free to toss in some coins. The mayor tells me all the money goes to Committee for a Better Pittsburgh, which I’m sure does great work.” — June 7 tweet from “Fake Fountain 412” (@fountainparody) on the reopening of the fountain at Point State Park

{BY LAUREN DALEY}

T

HREE HOURS before Michael David

Battle starts his day, he begins thinking about binding his breasts, and the questions he might face. What shirt will best conceal his chest? What if someone addresses him by the wrong pronoun? “It’s much different than ‘I really hate my body,’” says Battle. “It’s that constant fear and dysphoria that goes with you every single day of your life.” Battle, who identifies as a black man of transgender experience, binds his chest daily and has taken hormones for two years. On Aug. 29, he will have chest reconstruction surgery. He’ll pay for the procedure — all $6,738 of it — with money from fundraising and his own savings. That’s because for Battle and many others, most insurance policies don’t cover transition-related health care — and in some cases even standard health care — for transgender patients. And even if they did, a patient has to find a friendly doctor, something advocates and transgender residents say can be hard to do. “It’s a highly stigmatized issue,” says Sandra Soloski, program director at Persad, a Garfield-based counseling center for LGBTQ and HIV-positive people. The center provides referrals for trans clients and has a trans team that coordinates resources, which can be hard to find. “Some doctors are not clinically competent because they’ve just never looked in that direction,” Soloski says. “Some may have attitudes themselves about it.” Indeed, despite living in a city known for its “eds-and-meds” culture with health-

{PHOTOS BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Dr. Martin Seltman gives Shane Collins a hormone shot at Metro Family Practice.

care giants UPMC and West Penn Allegheny Health System, the transgender community often gets left out. While the Allegheny County Health Department provides services to whomever comes through its doors, it doesn’t offer specialized services for transgender patients. And while some UPMC/WPAHS physicians do work with trans patients, the lion’s share of medical support is being picked up by a small group of physicians and advocates, many of whom work in community-health

clinics. Among them, the best-known is Metro Family Practice in Wilkinsburg. Trans care “[is] not part of people’s consciousness,” says Metro’s Dr. Martin Seltman. “[Doctors] aren’t conscious about it and patients have to be pretty comfortable to reveal it.” FINDING A trans-friendly doctor in Pitts-

burgh often relies on word-of-mouth referral, with friendliness defined both by clinical competency — knowledge about medial CONTINUES ON PG. 08

6

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013


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HEALTH BARRIER, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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issues like hormone therapy — as well as cultural competency. Do intake forms include transgender or gender-non-conforming status? Are the pamphlets and waitingroom materials sensitive to trans concerns? Protocols for providing informed, empathetic care for trans patients have been issued by a number of organizations, including the World Professional Association for Transgender Health. But that doesn’t mean every doctor uses them — or even knows about them. “The way some doctors communicate about trans patients is demeaning — the wording people use, there’s not a respect or understanding or an acceptance,” says Dr. Stacy Lane, a physician who provides primary care to transgender patients, among others, at West End Health Center. Lane recalls that in one patient’s file, for example, a physician described a patient has “a 35-year-old male who wants to be called a woman.” “The refusal to call a person by their preferred pronoun is discriminatory,” Lane says. And such behavior is “probably a lot of the reason why [transgender people] don’t embrace the medical community.” According to 2011’s National Transgender Discrimination Survey Report on Health and Health Care, discrimination is a real concern. Nineteen percent of survey respondents reported being refused care because of their transgender or gender nonconforming status; 28 percent reported harassment in medical settings, while half reported having to teach their providers about medical care. Such barriers can have serious health effects. Some trans people resort to buying hormones online and taking them without a physician’s guidance, which Seltman and Lane note can be very dangerous: Transgender men are more at risk for liver function problems, for example, while transgender women could be more susceptible to blood clots. “Making the transition is hard — but satisfying and good,” says Seltman. And having a support team that includes an understanding, knowledgeable medical professional can be vital. “It’s really helpful to go through it with someone who understands and can be supportive. It can be isolating. There’s a lot to be said to have that support.” And transgender health care isn’t strictly for transition. Chronic asthma has sent Lawrence Dykeman, a transgender man from the South Hills, to the emergency room multiple times. Each visit presents

Shane Collins receives care for an ear infection from Dr. Martin Seltman.

a similar scenario: “If you’re perceived as a man, the first thing they do is ask you to take your shirt off,” Dykeman says. “I’m not going to take off my shirt because of my chest binder.” Some providers understand and work around it. Others don’t. “It’s kind of a gamble,” he says. Dykeman acknowledges he needs to see a pulmonary specialist. But he hasn’t done so “because it’s hard to figure out how to find someone who’s trans-friendly.” Dykeman is also uninsured — one of the biggest barriers for care for transgender patients. Many insurers consider trans-related medical care as cosmetic, and elective. And because trans people often suffer economic discrimination as well, it can be a challenge to get even rudimentary coverage. “I end up spending all of my money and time on trans issues and ignoring other health problems,” Dykeman says. Community clinics do pick up some of the slack. Project Silk, Planned Parenthood and the GLCC, for example, all provide community resources. And it’s partly why Battle founded the Garden of Peace Project, a community organization for the gay community and HIV-positive individuals that emphasizes the exploration of self. In addition to developing community awareness, the group has a fund to help pay the legal cost of name changes. “We have a misconception that the ‘LGB’ community understands what the ‘T’ community goes through — that’s not always the case,” says Battle. “And there are a lot

“I END UP SPENDING ALL OF MY MONEY AND TIME ON TRANS ISSUES AND IGNORING OTHER HEALTH PROBLEMS.”

of resources out there, but the community doesn’t know about them.” Among them is Metro Family Practice, a nonprofit that provides care regardless of a person’s ability to pay. Metro primarily serves three groups: Wilkinsburg and East End residents who lack adequate insurance, LGBT patients, and those interested in holistic/integrative medicine. Being so well known has its drawbacks, though. The wait time to get a first-patient appointment at Metro, Seltman says, is about two to three months. Even so, Metro clients come from as far away as West Virginia, Ohio, Harrisburg and Erie. “I always offer, ‘If your [hometown] doctor wants to do this, I’ll talk them through it,’” Seltman says. “Maybe one has taken me up on it. Some aren’t comfortable. For others, it’s extra work.” That often leads to patients advocating for themselves, which can lead to mixed results. Some have had positive experiences. Battle, for example, printed standardof-care guidelines to present to his doctor. “She responded to it and we started hormones,” he recalls. “We have to advocate for ourselves.” But such advocacy can be draining. “Sometimes I’m tired of knowing more than my doctor about trans issues,” says Rayden Sorock, a local transgender advocate. “But to be fair, there’s not a lot of information out there.” Sorock, a transgender man, recalls having to educate his college health-care provider on hormones and the effects of testosterone on the female reproductive system. Such burdens, some observers say, magnify the discrimination that the community faces already. “It puts transgender individuals in an unfair spot,” says Aaron Arnold, services CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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HEALTH BARRIER, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

coordinator for the Pittsburgh AIDS Task Force. “They have to go through things that others don’t for basic health care.” Presents:

THERE ARE SIGNS that things are changing, however. Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, for example, recently started a Gender and Sexual Development program within the Department of Adolescent Medicine, to work with patients 8 to 17 years old. “It became increasingly clear to us we needed to have a more systematic way of taking care of gender-fluid and transgender youth in our community,” says Dr. Elizabeth Miller, chief of the department of Adolescent Medicine at Children’s. Thanks to longstanding partnerships with Persad, the Gay and Lesbian Community Center, Family Link and Health Care for the Homeless, “We recognized a major gap in care for adolescents and children.” Since starting the specialized program a year-and-a-half ago, “we’re seeing more and more new patients,” says Dr. Selma Witchel, director of pediatric endocrinology at Children’s Hospital. “The greatest challenge is getting hormone blockers for these patients.” The blockers delay the onset of puberty, which “allows them time to process what else is going on.” “Part of normal adolescent development is trying to figure out who you are in terms of sexual identity, and who you are, where you are, how male you are and how

female you are,” Miller says. “The genitalia do not define your gender identity.” But insurance companies often won’t cover the blockers, which “are very expensive,” Witchel says. “We are encouraging families and parents to help put together talking points to approach insurance companies.” The message: “This is a standard care and actually appropriate care for adolescents with gender fluidity.” Children’s also collaborates in operating a Wednesday afternoon drop-in clinic for homeless and underserved youth at the Gay and Lesbian Community Center, Downtown. While it’s not a trans-specific clinic, Miller says, “If a young person walked in and wanted service related to trans-related issues, we’re absolutely capable to connect them.” Though advocates and providers agree the Pittsburgh region needs to be more trans-friendly and have more competent professionals, awareness has been growing. This week, for example, Philadelphia hosts its annual Trans-Health Conference. Persad’s Soloski notes that her organization is working with the state to ensure the state childwelfare system deals competently with LGBT youth. They’ve also set up safe zones in rural communities, and implemented a resource center in Erie County. “There’s a small pocket of individuals who do this work,” says Michael Battle. “But that pocket is growing.”

“IT’S KIND OF A GAMBLE.”

Sample all the Sandwich Week sandwiches and vote for your favorite! Tickets $25 Includes sandwich samples & 2 Penn Brewery Beers http://sandwichweek. pittsburghnorthside.com Must be 21 or older to consume alcohol. This is a non-smoking event.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013

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{PHOTO BY AL HOFF}

HIGH TIMES The new Go Ape! adventure course in North Park delivers a tree-top work-out {BY AL HOFF}

GO APE!

NORTH PARK IS now home to Go Ape!, an adventure fran-

Sav Sa avve 25% % offf bi birth rthday rth rthday dayy pa parrty ttyy ro room oom m re ren eennttal all wh when whe en you yo pl plan ann a birt birt irthd hdday hda d y at Sandca San dca dc c stl sttle. e. Cannot annot ot bee comb coombi mbined w mb wiithh any oth othher ot eer oofffffers. ers. Mus Must Mu ust pres esent es sentt coupon cou pon to reece po pon ceive dis cei di count. couunt.t.. Ca C llll 41 412-462-6 412 -46 46622-6 2--6666 6666666 x6 x6305 305 fo 30 forr more more det e ail ails. s. s.



10000 SANDCASTLE DRIVE • PITTSBURGH, PA 15120 sanddcasstlewaterpark..com

chise that offers participants a chance to monkey about high up in the trees. Clamber up rope ladders — and descend via zip line! In between, “apersâ€? make their way across various tree-top obstacles 30 to 40 feet in the air that include: tightropes, hanging bridges, and hoops, planks and nets that swing wildly. Oh, it’s a blast, as well as a satisfying mental and physical challenge. Even securely tethered, you’re still a couple of stories up in the air at all times. As the course progresses through ďŹ ve set-ups, the obstacles get trickier: no guideline for your hands, or leap of faith off a tree as you “zipâ€? back to the ground. It’s a surprising workout, too. Apers move at their own pace and the overall experience is leisurely and jolly. But ďŹ ghting to retain your balance on a mid-air “walkwayâ€? made of swinging metal rings, or hauling yourself up a net “wall,â€? will stretch plenty of usually dormant muscles. AH O F F @P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013

North Park’s Go Ape! offers five ziplines, two longer than 400 feet.

303 Pearce Mill Road (just beyond boat house), North Park, Allison Park. Open daily through summer; extended weekends through fall. $55 adults; $35 kids ages 10-17. 800-971-8271 or www.goape.com. Only 14 apes allowed per half-hour, so reservations are strongly recommended; completing the course takes 2-3 hours.

CONTINUES ON PG. 14


NEW PATIENTS WELCOME 412.281.3546 same-day emergency appointments www.polisheddentalpgh.com 355 fifth ave. | suite 1500 | downtown

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Discussion / Book Signing Monday, June 17th, 7PM 100 West Bridge Street Homestead (412) 462-5743 From serving the best charcuterie to knitting the perfect gift, the bestselling author of My Fair Lazy explains how she tried to improve herself, her marriage, and her home by following Martha Stewart’s advice for one year—and nearly drove herself crazy doing it.

Get more info and get to know your favorite writers at BN.COM/events All events subject to change, so please contact the store to confirm.

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HIGH TIMES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

Join us for our Annual {PHOTO BY AL HOFF}

Ride For A Wish JUNE 22nd

Steel City Harley-Davidson® would like to remind everyone to drive responsibly, and ride safe this season.

Registration 9AM-11AM

RIDER $25 PASSENGER $10

No special skills are required: You arrive with only your willingness. (Pro tip: Bring a pair of gloves.) Staffers rig apers with a body harness, and provide handson training in various colorcoded safety tethers and cables. The aper pictured to the left prepares to take a perfectly safe flying “Tarzan leap” through mid-air (via a steel cable) into a waiting net.

IN JULY WE ARE RIDING TO MILWAUKEE For a tour of the Harley Museum and Miller Brewing! Call Lisa for more Details.

SAVE $5 PRE-REGISTER STER NOW NOW! W! STEEL CITY RIDE BENEFITS ENE NEFITS FIT T

• • • • •

LIVE MUSIC with

Free Cook Out Free Beverages Silent Auction Raffles 50/50

1 3 7 5 WA S H I N G T O N R O A D - WA S H I N G T O N , PA

SAM BUSH

JOE PURDY - BUCKY COVINGTON N Broke Stranded and Ugly - Meredith Holliday - National ional Pike Pickers Corn Liquor Saints String Band - Gypsy and His Band of Ghosts - Garrett Heath Jim Platts Rhythm Innovation - Truckster - Great Ancient Trees - The Unknown String Band

The course is designed around existing trees, with minimal impact on the environment or park. Here, apers between obstacles rest on small wooden platforms attached to the trees, while below, a walker enjoys the park’s ground-level attractions.

{PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

724-225-7020 - WWW.STEELCITYHARLEY.COM

REVEREND PEYTON’S BIG DAMN BAND LARRY KEEL & NATURAL BRIDGE - THE LAST BISON - RISING APPALACHIA Aaron “The Uke Slinger” Jones - Allegheny Rhythm Rangers- Exports - Broken Fences City Dwelling Nature Seekers - Jeremy Flynn of the Fledgelings - Jeremy Christofer The Lone Pine String Band - Marty Zundel - Matt Kilroy

This is an all ages show. Children ages 11 and younger are admitted for free! Children must be accompanied by a parent or guardian at all times. Entrance with valid ticket only.

For more information and the get your tickets, go to www.7Springs.com/StillsintheHills TM

777 Waterwheel Drive, Seven Springs, PA 15622 | 800-452-2223 CONTINUES ON PG. 16

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{PHOTO BY AL HOFF}

HIGH TIMES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 14

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Gasland 2 director Josh Fox presents a hot topic.

A CONVERSATION with JOSH FOX {BY CHRIS POTTER} JOSH FOX’S 2010 debut film, Gasland, is best

known for the image of homeowners setting their own tapwater on fire. And with that footage, Fox, a native of eastern Pennsylvania, provided the match for a nationwide movement of “fracktivists” — environmentalists who oppose the use of hydraulic fracturing to release natural gas deep inside the earth. In Pennsylvania and other fracking hotspots, the film’s popularity has persisted despite, or perhaps partly because of, a ferocious gas-industry campaign attacking it. (The industry notes, for example, that methane — the gas homeowners were lighting on fire — can occur naturally in water supplies.) Now Fox is unveiling a sequel, Gasland 2, with a series of screenings around the country, including a stop in Pittsburgh on June 20. HBO will air the film July 8. An extended version of this interview appears on www.pghcitypaper.com.

what is happening out there.” This film goes into two areas that I think are very new. One is looking at all these wellfailure problems, which sounds a little dry but it’s actually really fascinating. … We have Pennsylvania’s Department of Environmental Protection saying that 6 percent of the wells failed in 2009, that 6 or 7 percent of them failed in 2011, and in 2012, 8.9 percent of these wells have gas-migration issues — that is to say that gas is migrating into aquifers. But the real focus of Gasland 2 is the government. We have one of the most controversial issues in the history of Pennsylvania, and the governement has done nothing to protect people. So the question is: Why? Gasland 2 investigates the contamination of government. And that’s every bit as shocking and revelatory as the part about the water and air pollution.

“THERE’S ACTIVISM EVERYWHERE. THE QUESTION IS WHETHER THERE’S HOPE.”

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HOW WILL GASLAND 2 WILL DIFFER FROM THE FIRST ONE? DOES IT RESOLVE ALL THE UNANSWERED QUESTIONS LEFT AT THE END OF GASLAND 1? The first Gasland was a survey of what was happening to people on the ground. It was, “Let’s listen to the citizens and

ARE WE TALKING ABOUT GASINDUSTRY CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS TO TOM CORBETT HERE? That’s part of the backdrop, but you’ll actually see how regulatory agencies are trying to solve these problems, and fall apart in the face of the gas industry. … In the film, Pennsylvania has a very central focus. From Ed Rendell to Tom Ridge to Gov. Corbett — three governors in a row who are all carrying water for the gas industry. … You’ve got Gov. Ed Rendell, with conflict of interests and CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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JOSH FOX, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

JUNE 15 &29

actual financial ties to the gas industry through the firm that he works for, being a proponent of drilling. And you have Tom Ridge, taking $900,000 from the Marcellus Shale Coalition to be its chief spokesman. … And you have Gov. Tom Corbett being a wholly owned subsidary of the gas industry. You’ve gotta wonder: What the hell is going on in Pennsylvania?

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AN INDUSTRY SPOKESGROUP, ENERGY IN DEPTH, HAS ARGUED THAT CORBETT OPENLY CAMPAIGNED AS A CHAMPION OF THE GAS INDUSTRY AND WON — SO DOESN’T THAT PROVE DEMOCRACY WORKS? The primary issue we have in our politics is money in politics. And if the gas industry wanted a fair fight, it would stop outspending the citizens of Pennsylvania. Gov. Corbett right now is … the most endangered governor in the United States, and it’s because of his policies. He passed Act 13, which overturned local bans, where citizens democratically said, “We don’t not want this industry in our town.” …

GASLAND 2

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The state Supreme Court has to weigh in on that, and it’s basically the Oil and Gas Act [which Act 13 amended] versus the Pennsyvalnia constitution, which says Pennsylvanians have a right to clean air, clean water and healthy environment for future generations to come. You have the state constitution on the line, and the governor trying to overthrow it. So if you want to talk about democracy — it amazes me. … We know and love the basic quality of life in Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania is the founding place of democracy. These are the things that the gas industry is contaminating, either by injecting their chemicals in the ground and emitting them into the air, or by injecting money into the political system. SEVERAL DEMOCRATS ARE LINING UP TO CHALLENGE CORBETT IN NEXT YEAR’S ELECTION. DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE? I haven’t seen any of the current positions. I do know that there is no suitable position except to say, “We have to stop this and figure out a different economic-

development strategy.” … From any standpoint, selling out the state’s resources to multinational corporations that would harm the citizens and leave behind the mess — that can’t be the policy of any of the Democrats in this race. [They] have to respond the same way [city councilor and likely future mayor] Bill Peduto and [former city councilor] Doug Shields responded [by passing a citywide ban on drilling], which is to say, “This is an exploitation model that the gas industry has done in developing countries to their great detriment, and we’re not going to turn Pennsylvania into Nigeria.” YOU’VE BEEN TRAVELING AROUND THE COUNTRY SCREENING THIS FILM. HOW WOULD YOU COMPARE THE LEVEL OF ACTIVISM IN WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA WITH WHAT YOU’RE SEEING ELSEWHERE? There’s activism everywhere. The question is whether there’s hope. In Pittsburgh you have public officials who saw this coming and went after it [but elsewhere] in Pennsylvania, you see a lot of depression. And one of the things that I want to put out there as a possibility is the fact that we can get rid of Tom Corbett. To me, that’s where we’ve gotta focus. In the Delaware River basin [where Fox lives and where drilling was been stopped because of water agreements with adjoining states], we fought them off and won. But if we hadn’t had New York in the mix, and Delaware saying no? We wouldn’t have stood a chance … and I would be in the same incredibly depressing situation so many other people are. WHAT DO YOU HOPE TO ACCOMPLISH WITH YOUR VISIT TO PITTSBURGH? We want to have a rocking time in Pittsburgh. The last time we did this, we were at the Byham Theater, and it was one of the most thrilling experiences. … We’re gonna have a great discussion after the screening, where we start to hash out a lot of the questions that you asked: Who are we supporting for governor? How will we do that? What are our demands? Pittsburgh has been very strong in saying, “We don’t live in Gasland, we live in Pittsburgh.” So we want to have a great screening with as many people as we can get in that door. Things are very dark and depressing in Pennsylvania, and we need to come together and show that we’re stronger than the things which would corrupt our government. C P OT T E R@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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{BY CHRIS POTTER}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013

abuse problem, they say, is admitting you have one. But when it comes to our archaic pot laws, that isn’t enough. Americans are realizing that criminalizing pot is a terrible idea. Colorado and Washington have legalized pot; 18 other states permit medicinal use. Even in Pennsylvania, a Franklin & Marshall College poll last month found, 38 percent favored legalizing pot outright — up from 22 percent in 2006. But as for enforcing the pot laws? We can’t seem to break the habit. According to a recent American Civil Liberties Union report, marijuana-related arrests have risen by roughly 15 percent since 2001, to nearly 890,000 arrests in 2010. Nearly 90 percent of those busts were for simple possession, the least serious offense. And the report, “The War on Marijuana in Black and White,â€? suggests the addiction has a painful side effect: “[T]he War on Marijuana has [allowed] police to target communities of color.â€? Nationwide, the study found, blacks are nearly four times as likely as whites to be cited for pot ‌ even though both races report similar rates of marijuana use. The ACLU reports that in Allegheny County, blacks are 5.7 times more likely than whites to be arrested for pot, while in Pittsburgh, which accounted for 40 percent of Allegheny County’s pot busts that year, blacks made up two-thirds of arrestees, despite representing less than one-third of the population. Pittsburgh Police Lt. Daniel Herrmann, the acting commander in charge of the narcotics division, doesn’t contest those numbers, but says racial animus isn’t to blame. “We don’t just go out there and arrest people for marijuana,â€? he says. “If we did, the numbers would be a lot more even, I think.â€? Police often ďŹ le pot charges when they discover the drug while handling another crime, says Herrmann — which makes pot busts more common in low-income communities with higher crime rates. Alternately, Herrmann says, ofďŹ cers “will be out on the street, and they’ll smell pot on someone. If they’ve been smoking, it’s like, ‘Here’s a citation, see you in court.’â€?

Most such cases are dropped down to a disorderly-conduct offense, payable with a ďŹ ne. Enforcing pot laws may not be “racist in intent, but that’s the effect,â€? says Patrick Nightingale, a defense attorney and former prosecutor on the legal committee for prolegalization advocacy group NORML. “It’s not that ofďŹ cers are targeting marijuana per se, but they’ll look for guys smoking blunts as an excuse to check for weapons or other drugs.â€? For example, the ACLU numbers suggest that in 2010, lily-white Upper St. Clair had just one pot arrest, a white juvenile. Having been a white juvenile in USC, I can tell you the cops could’ve found more violators than that just in my third-period shop class. But as Nightingale says, “Where marijuana users are behind closed doors, you won’t see the same [enforcement] as in an urban environment,â€? where there’s a stronger police presence to begin with — and “where consumption may be more out in the open.â€? Of course, it’s tempting to suggest urban potheads should just go inside, or drive out to USC and blaze up at a Rotary Club meeting (or wherever the kids hang out nowadays). But that’s missing the point. When police enforce arbitrary and ham-ďŹ sted laws, it inevitably makes them look, well, arbitrary and ham-ďŹ sted. And that doesn’t help police/community relations. And not every pot arrest ends up with a ďŹ ne: A drug conviction can mean the loss of college aid, public housing and other aid that helps people in struggling communities. Blame Wiz Khalifa if you want, but pot use doesn’t carry the kind of stigma that justiďŹ es the laws on the books (assuming those laws are on the books where you live). While Herrmann, for one, opposes legalization — “It’s just another drug to make you not normalâ€? — he adds that “alcohol is a more destructive thing.â€? Yet an ofďŹ cer responding a domestic disturbance likely won’t arrest anyone just for having a ďŹ fth of gin on the kitchen table. In any case, Herrmann says somewhat ruefully, based on national trends, “Pretty soon, the whole nation is probably going to be pufďŹ ng.â€? Let’s just hope we’re not all in handcuffs at the time.

ENFORCING POT LAWS MAY NOT BE “RACIST IN INTENT, BUT THAT’S THE EFFECT,� SAYS ATTORNEY PATRICK NIGHTINGALE.

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


As leaders of the Breathe Project, we are committed to pulling the Pittsburgh region out of the nation’s dirtiest-air ranks and into the top tier — to match where we are in many other categories.

THE ROADMAP TO CLEANER AIR

We are now charting our journey to cleaner air through four sectors that promise significant improvement: more efficient public transit and vehicular traffic management; cleaner emitting school bus fleets; more energy-efficient and health-promoting buildings; and more projects from business and industry that improve air quality. The path has been laid and now the journey begins. Join our Breathe coalition — 160 businesses and civic groups; 1,500 individuals and 20,000 followers through social media. Our lives — and way of life — depend on clean air.

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Leaders in action: Clockwise from top left, Group Against Smog and Pollution Executive Director Rachel Filippini at press event for school bus retrofit program; U.S. Steel Corp. Chairman and CEO John Surma commissions a new coke battery in Clairton; Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald at a building energy savings workshop; and PNC Financial Services Executive Chairman James Rohr praises traffic signal technology.

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S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS @ E ART HL I NK . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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The Food and Drug Administration proposed recently to limit the quantity of tiny “mites” that could occupy imported cheese, even though living, crawling mites are a feature desired by aficionados. (“Cheese is absolutely alive!” proclaimed microbiologist Rachel Dutton, who runs the “cheese laboratory” at Harvard University.) In fact, cheese is home to various molds, bacteria and yeasts, which give it flavor, and sellers routinely use blowers to expel excessive critters, but the FDA now wants to limit them to six bugs per square inch. However, according to a May report on NPR, lovers of some cheeses, especially the French Mimolette, object, asserting both an indifference to the sight of mites creeping around — and a fear of taste-loss (since the mites burrow into the hunk, aerating it and extending the flavor).

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Energy West, the natural gas supplier in Great Falls, Mont., had tried recently to raise awareness of leaks by distributing scratch-and-sniff cards to residents, demonstrating gas’ distinctive, rotten-egg smell. In May, workers cast aside several cartons of leftover cards, which were hauled off and disposed of by crushing — which released the scent and produced a massive blanket of odor over downtown Great Falls, resulting in a flurry of panicked calls to firefighters about gas leaks.

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The Ypsilanti, Mich., City Council voted in May on a resolution that would have required the members always to vote either “yes” or “no” (to thus reduce the recent, annoying number of “abstain” votes). The

resolution to ban abstaining failed because three of the seven members abstained

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Doctors told a newspaper in Stockholm in April that at least one of Sweden’s premier modeling agencies, looking for recruits, had been caught passing out business cards adjacent to the country’s largest eating-disorder clinic, forcing the clinic to change its rules on patients taking outside walks.

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Unclear on the Concept: (1) Ruben Pavon was identified by surveillance video in Derry, N.H., in April snatching a grill from the front porch of a thrift store. Pavon explained to police that the store’s name, “Finders Keepers,” indicated to him that the objects were free for the taking and admitted that he had previously taken items from the porch. (2) In May, Los Angeles police bought back 1,200 guns in one of the periodic U.S. buy-back programs, but they declined to accept the pipe bomb a man said he wanted to sell. “This is not a pipe-bomb buyback,” said Chief Charlie Beck. “Pipe bombs are illegal ...” The man was promptly arrested.

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John Casey, 51, was caught by security staff at an Asda supermarket in Washington, England last October after allegedly stealing a slab of beef. He was convicted in May even after offering the compelling explanation that he had concealed the beef underneath other purchases not to avoid paying for it, but only because the sight of the raw meat gave him “flashbacks” to his dead grandmother, who had passed away of a blood clot when Casey was a child.

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Keith Judd filed a lawsuit in Iowa in May, in essence to invalidate the 2012 election by having President Obama officially declared a Kenyan and not an American. Judd filed the papers from a federal penitentiary in Texas, where he is serving 17 years for threatening a woman he believed to be a “clone” of the singer Stevie Nicks, because Nicks (or the clone) had tried to sabotage his home-improvement company. (Bonus Fact: In the 2012 Democratic presidential primary in West Virginia, Judd, a write-in candidate, defeated President Obama in nine counties and lost the state by only 33,000 votes.)

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In May, the Florida House of Representatives adjourned for the year without assessing themselves even a nominal increase in health-insurance premiums for their own taxpayer-funded deluxe coverage, which will remain at $8.34 per month for individuals ($30 for families). Several days earlier, the House had voted to reject several billion dollars in federal grants for extending health insurance coverage to about a million more poor people in the state’s Medicaid program. The House premiums are even lower than those of state senators and rank-and-file state employees, and lower than the premiums of Medicaid recipients who have the ability to pay.

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Apparently running out of space on his body (which is two-thirds tattooed), Brazilian Rodrigo Fernando dos Santos has moved on to his eyeballs. According to the body-modification website BME.com, eyeball-tattooing is safe if done correctly, which involves the artist injecting the ink precisely

between the conjunctiva and the sclera layers —with the main risk, of course, that the client can go blind. In April, Sao Paulo tattoo artist Rafael Leao Dias, who said he had studied eyeball work for two years, successfully turned dos Santos’s eyes into pools of dark ink. “I cried ink for two days,” he told a local blogger. BME. com said eyeball tattoos have been reported for nearly 2,000 years.

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Paul Gardener and Chad Leakey were arrested in Tempe, Ariz., in May and charged with a spree of car burglaries. According to police, the men were trying various cars’ doors, looking for any that were unlocked, when they inadvertently opened the back door of an unmarked police car. The men had apparently not noticed (until too late) that two uniformed officers were sitting in the front seat and had also failed to notice that cage wiring separated the back seat from the front seat.

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Timothy Adams, 24, was charged with home invasion in May in Gardner, Mass., but only after resident Michael Salame slammed him into the floor. Salame is 70 years old, has had eight heart stents, and is forced to wear special coverings on his arms at night because of nerve damage — yet Adams apparently went down easily and at one point offered Salame “thousands of dollars” to let him up before police arrived.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013


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Skip the traffic and parking, take the bus or T and bring your bike. BikePGH is offering a free bike valet at the entrance to Point State Park. Port Authority and BikePGH have you covered. All of Port Authority’s buses are now equipped with bike racks. Whether it’s your everyday commute or a weekend ride, we’re ready to help you get your bike on. Bikes can now be used on Port Authority's Light Rail System (T) seven days a week. Bikes may also be taken on the Monongahela Incline at any time with no restrictions. It doesn't have to be Friday to go car free.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013

There are no bike racks on the T or incline. Bikes must be stowed in the designated wheelchair spaces on the T and incline. Persons in wheelchairs have priority over bicycles.

public transit

Make getting to the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival a work of art.


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ADVERTISEMENT SUPPLEMENT

FRIDAY JUNE 14-15-16 PITTSBURGH AIDS CENTER FOR TREATMENT (PACT)

For more information on the following events visit www.pittsburghpride.org

PROVIDING WORLD-CLASS HIV MEDICAL CARE SINCE 1989

SPLASH - Thursday June 13 • 7 pm

As a patient at our outpatient clinic, you will have on-site access to: ›?@Mgi`dXipZXi\ ›GX`edXeX^\d\ek ›>pe\Zfcf^`ZZXi\ ›Elki`k`feXcZfejlckj

›G_XidXZpj\im`Z\j ›=i\\Xe[ZfeÔ[\ek`XcgXike\ik\jk`e^ ›?@Mjg\Z`XckpZXi\ ›8eXc[pjgcXj`XZXi\

›D\ekXc_\Xck_ZXi\ ›D\[`ZXcZXj\dXeX^\d\ek ›GXk`\ekjlggfik^iflgj ›GXik`Z`gXk`fe`eZc`e`ZXcki`Xcj

HIV medical care is provided for the uninsured on a sliding fee scale. For more information, or to schedule an appointment, call 412-647-7228. Falk Medical Building, 3601 Fifth Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Pittsburgh’s Independent

Herforth & Karlovich Party Palace – Mount Washington Splash is one of Pittsburgh’s hottest parties at the home of Steve Herforth and Peter Karlovich. Bring your bathing suit for the pool and hot tub! Don’t forget your dancing pants for the inevitable dance party. Limited tickets available.

PUB CRAWL - Friday June 14 • 8 pm Hop on a chauffeured tour of the city and get something free at each club, bar and lounge you stop at. Drop-off and pick-up is every 20 minutes from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m.

TREAT YOUR FAMILY TO COMFORT ... DISCOVER THE VALUE OF INSULATION!

CITIZEN POLICE REVIEW BOARD Proudly promoting responsible citizenship and professional law enforcement through mutual accountability since 1997 by protecting good citizens from bad cops and good cops from bad citizens. DR. EMMA LUCAS-DARBY, CHAIR MS. ELIZABETH C. PITTINGER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MS. LOURDES SANCHEZ RIDGE, ESQ., SOLICITOR MR. ROBERT J. RIDGE, ESQ., SOLICITOR

816 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh PA 15219

TIPLINE 412-255-CPRB • www.CPRBpgh.org PHONE: 412-765-8023 • FAX 412-765-8059

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013

Insulating your home will make it more comfortable year-round and can reduce your utility bills substantially ... it could be one of the wisest investments you’ll ever make.

Call USA Insulation Today For a FREE In-Home Energy Consultation!

412-492-SAVE Usainsulation.net Lic.# PAO52228


ADVERTISEMENT SUPPLEMENT

FRIDAY JUNE 14 - PUB CRAWL SATURDAY JUNE 15 - pride in the street sunday june 16 - pride march PRIDE IN THE STREET - Saturday June 14 • 6 pm Rusty Dory Pub Liberty Ave. between 9th & 10th St. Performing acts include: Joe McElderry, Sharon Needles, Ryan Amador & Jo Limpert, David & Devine, DJ Digital Dave and FEATURED ENTERTAINER ADAM LAMBERT!

Proudly presents our newly renovated alternative bar

Under the Rainbow

PRIDE MARCH - Sunday June 16 • 12 pm

located downstairs of the Rusty Dory

Join an anticipated 130 LGBT organizations as they march from the corner of Grant St. & the Blvd. of the Allies and end on Liberty Ave.

Hours of operation Thur thru Sun from 7p.m. till close. Entertainment nightly.

PRIDEFEST - Sunday June 16 1:00 – 6:00 pm

Private parties are welcome.

Go to Liberty Ave. between 6th & 10th St to enjoy this day-long event. There will be over 150 vendors, street performers and a beer garden.

Monday thru Wednesdays. Clean, safe and intimate! 850 Ohio River Blvd. in Avalon Pa. 15202 Call us at 412-761-1258

GET TESTED. BE SAFE. BE HEALTHY. LOVE LIFE.

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Dayton Enciso, pc Darcy Monteverde Dayton • Jennifer L. Enciso • Amy E. Peck 4517 LIBERTY AVENUE 412-918-1845 DEKLEGAL.COM

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Sunday: noon - 4pm Mon-Tue, Friday: 9am - 5pm Wed, Thu: 9am - 7:30pm

Hope will never be Silent. -Harvey Milk

5913 Penn Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412-345-7456

And neither will We.

For more information: www.patf.org N E W S

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ADVERTISEMENT SUPPLEMENT

OPTIONS NOW RESEARCH STUDY FOR MEN AND WOMEN Magee Womens Research Institute is looking for HIV-negative men and women (who are not pregnant or breast-feeding) between the ages of 18 and 45 to participate in a research study.

This study will assess the safety and acceptability of an investigational medication given as an injection. In the future, it is hoped that this medication will be developed to help prevent HIV infection.

For more information and to see if you qualify for this study, please call 412-463-9053 or 412-852-0390. You may be compensated up to $2,550 (females) or $1,775 (males) for your time.

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ADVERTISEMENT SUPPLEMENT

FRIDAY JUNE 14 - PUB CRAWL SATURDAY JUNE 15 pride in the street sunday june 16 - pride march

For whatever your taste is.

Harris GrilL 5747 Ellsworth Ave. harrisgrill.com

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DE

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GUMBO WAS OUTSTANDING: THICK, RICHLY FLAVORED AND SPICED ASSERTIVELY

A GOOD FIT {BY LAUREN DALEY} Over the past two weeks, Danielle Mashuda has spent hours visiting and researching local farms. That’s because as an owner, with Tina Grindeland, of Skinny Pete’s Kitchen in Avalon, she wants the food to be as locally sourced as possible. So far, that means local vegetables, pizza dough from Sunseri Brothers and meats from Pasture Perfect Beef in Grove City, to name a couple of ingredients. And while there’s not much technically skinny about the joint (the café’s namesake, Grindeland’s husband, is “of average stature, stout” says Mashuda), its breakfast, lunch and dinner options are committed to making diners feel good about themselves. The restaurant’s interior is bright and vibrant. There’s no fryer on site, and the food is fresh, never frozen. (Glutenfree, vegan and vegetarian options are also on the menu.) There’s a wood-fired oven, for pizza, plus a full menu of flatbreads, pasta dishes and “Pete-wiches.” The adventurous can use the build-yourown menu for all of the above. Special events include a weekend brunch and an acoustic happy hour every other Saturday. Mashuda wants the restaurant to feed the community’s spirit as well as its stomach: She’s displaying and selling wares from local artists, and works with several neighborhood groups for events. “The community [support] has been unbelievable,” she says. “We may not be making money yet, but when we see the same faces, that’s what matters.” LDALEY@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

538 California Ave., Avalon. 412-415-0338 or www.skinnypetes.com

the

FEED

Craft beer, like comic books and vinyl records, too often seems the realm of obsessive guys. But the ladies love — and make — good beer, too! Alison Grayson’s recent documentary, The Love of Beer, which looks at women working in the craft-beer world, gets a local screening — at a beer joint, natch. 4 p.m. Sun., June 23. Rivertowne Pourhouse, 312 Center Road, Monroeville. $15. Tickets at www. showclix.com

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NEW ORLEANS UP NORTH {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

A

S A GENERAL rule, the farther one

gets from the bustling metropolis .— spiced as it is with immigrant traditions, emerging trends and innovative experiments — the narrower and more predictable one’s restaurant choices get. Suburban country clubs have a reputation for serving some of the most conservative fare of all. Of course, every rule has its exceptions, and we found a delicious one on a golf course in Natrona Heights. Tables on the Green occupies the baronial brick clubhouse of the former Brackenridge Heights Country Club, now renamed the Brackenridge Heights Golf Course. Its spacious dining rooms have picture windows overlooking the manicured emerald expanse of the green, where you can watch bunnies gambol adorably while you dine, while paintings of the Big Easy on the walls underscore the menu’s theme: “New Orleans Cuisine with a Pittsburgh Flair.” We must admit that at first, we were skeptical. After all, “Pittsburgh Flair” is so often code for creative pierogie fillings

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Pan-seared scallops with andouille grit cake, with mirliton slaw and asparagus

and all manner of ingredients that should never be mixed with French fries and piled atop salad. Fortunately, executive chef and New Orleans native Chad Radecker is better than that. From straight-up bayou classics like

TABLES ON THE GREEN 1299 Lane Ave., Natrona Heights. 724-226-0955 HOURS: Tue.-Sun. lunch 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Tue.-Thu. and Sun. dinner 5-9 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. dinner 5-10 p.m. PRICES: Soups, salads and appetizers $5-10; entrees $15-35 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED blackened Gulf shrimp with Creole butter to elegant takes on local standards like seared hanger steak with truffle frites, Radecker serves sophisticated versions of favorite dishes from Louisiana and Pittsburgh with straightforward confidence. A couple of Italian pasta entrees even acknowledge Pittsburghers’ fondness for this cuisine. But the

emphasis is on the Cajun and Creole, and on the assumption that that’s what Radecker does best, that’s what we ate. We started with shrimp and stoneground grits. The grits’ coarse grind formed a rustic counterpoint to the shrimp, which were big and succulent but still refined. Angelique appreciated the kitchen’s consideration in removing the shrimps’ tails before serving them, sparing her the choice between greasing her fingers or botching the job with her knife and fork. We wished only for a little more Louisiana hot sauce to kick the subtle spicing up a notch. Fried green tomatoes were firm and sweet-tart within their crunchy, lightly seasoned coatings, but it was the crawfish cream that took this dish from good to great. Finely minced crawfish, peppers and aromatic herbs enriched the silky sauce with flavor notes from savory to sweet in every bite. Gumbo, too, was outstanding: thick, richly flavored with chicken, sausage and vegetables, and spiced assertively enough to make our taste buds tingle. Zydeco crab cakes packed lump crab


together with corn and andouille sausage and coated it with crispy panko. Such extensive fillings can threaten the essential character of crab cakes, but these were remarkably light and tender, even as the flavors were bold and perfectly in harmony. Tarragon-mustard cream added pungent top notes, while mirliton slaw, made from capellini-fine threads of chayote and carrot, offered a suitably fresh, bright counterbalance. Pecan-crusted red fish with Creole meuniere sauce was an inspired variation on the French tradition of sole meuniere — fish sautéed in a lemony browned-butter sauce — and its Creole cousin, trout amandine, in which the fish is crusted in almonds and served with meuniere sauce. Red fish, a member of the snapper family, is another mild white fish, slightly steakier than sole or trout, and its pecan coating gave it a robust, meaty crunch. It held up well under a modified meuniere sauce that was more like a gravy and chockfull of juicy minced onion.

Chef Chad Radecker

Seared pork tenderloin and a duck breast special bore surprising resemblances to each other. Each featured rosy pink meat of extraordinary tenderness and depth of flavor, bearing out the important distinction between “mild” and “bland.” Wedges of poached peach highlighted the duck’s sauce, while the pork held its own in a sweet bourbon barbecue glaze. The pork was marvelously accompanied by chipotle grits, a little creamier than what accompanied the shrimp. Full of the pepper’s signature smoky flavor, these grits were among the highlights of a superb meal. Tables on the Green serves expertly prepared, authentic New Orleans cuisine in an almost incongruously genteel setting. We may never be members of the country-club set, but fortunately, Tables on the Green is open to all. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

OPEN KITCHEN New North Side bar allows you to order off someone else’s menu As restaurant-goers know, the BYOB eatery is a staple of the local dining scene. But the owners of The Beer Market — now open across from PNC Park — have turned the tables on the concept. They’ll provide the bottles … while you can bring your own food. “We don’t have our own kitchen here,” says general manager Tim Conti. But he hopes patrons won’t see that as a shortcoming. “It’s a simpler operation here because we don’t cook food. We focus on the beer.” A look at the beer menu proves his point: There are 50 beers on tap and several hundred in bottles. And what’s more, Conti says, the absence of a kitchen allows you more food options as well. While customers are invited to bring their own food, they can also order out from nearby restaurants, whose menus are enclosed in binders at the table. “All you have to do is look through the menus, select a place nearby and they’ll bring it right to you,” says Conti. Nearby restaurants include Giovanni’s, Mullen’s, Doubleday’s and BZ’s Bar and Grill: Together, they offer a full range of options including pizza, burgers, hot dogs, sandwiches and even upscale American bar classics. The neighboring establishments serve their own booze as well, but BZ’s chef Garrett Akans says area bars share a spirit of camaraderie rather than competition. The additional food orders also help boost his restaurant’s bottom line. “It’s a symbiotic relationship,” he says. Conti says that although he expects an occasional complaint, the general reaction to the concept is positive. “Let’s say we had one menu, and it had a pizza and a burger: You might get sick of it,” he says. “This way, you have a bunch of places to choose from.” In a nod to one of Pittsburgh’s burgeoning food trends, Conti is also contemplating another idea: “Maybe I can get a few food trucks parked nearby.”

“LET’S SAY WE HAD ONE MENU, AND IT HAD A PIZZA AND A BURGER: YOU MIGHT GET SICK OF IT.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

110 Federal St., North Side. 412-322-2337 or www.the-beer-market.com

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

HAS

SKINNY

PATIO NOW OPEN!

-----Vote for us for -----

BEST BURGER

in City Paper’s Best of Pittsburgh Poll!

OPTIONS

ALL- NATURAL

HORMONE-FREE CHICKEN BREAST VEGETARIAN? SALADS• •GRAPE LEAVES• HUMMUS MARKET

SQUARE

412-261-GYRO (4976)

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

CAFÉ NOTTE. 8070 Ohio River Blvd., Emsworth. 412-761-2233. Tapas from around the globe are on the menu at this charmingly converted old gas station. The small-plate preparations are sophisticated, and the presentations are uniformly lovely. Flavors range from Asian-style crispy duck wings and scallopsthree-ways to roasted peppers stuffed with ricotta. KE CAFFE DAVIO. 2516 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1119. By day, a tiny store-front diner, serving omelets and pancakes, and by evening, an authentic and delightful Italian restaurant. The menu — both prix fixe and a la carte — focuses on the authentic flavors of Sicily, such as pasta Norma and veal alla Palermitana, while occasionally invoking the short-order tradition, as with the hash of potatoes, peppers and onions. KF GRAN CANAL CAFFÉ. 1021 N. Canal St., Sharpsburg. 412-7812546. The menu here is classic coastal Mediterranean. Even dishes rarely seen at other Italian restaurants — such as snails and penne stuffed with seafood — are traditional, not made up to satisfy eclectic contemporary tastes. The cannelloni alone merits a visit to one of Gran Canal’s cozy, familyfriendly dining rooms. KE

Pino’s Contemporary Italian {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} empanada or Pittsburgh’s own “city chicken”(skewered pork). KE JOSEPH TAMBELLINI RESTAURANT. 5701 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-665-9000. The menu at this convivial white-linen Italian restaurant straddles the ultra-familiar — the five choices in the chicken and veal section are trattoria staples — and the more unusual. There’s a strong emphasis on fresh pasta and inventively prepared seafood, such as crusted Chilean sea bass in an orange buerre blanc and berry marmalade. LE

with a menu of classic pub grub and Irish standards (such as “bangers and mash”) But there is also the occasional Asian flourish or unexpected ingredient mash-up, such as Thai red curry wings, fried green beans, an Irish-Cuban sandwich and a BLT with salmon. JE

PINO’S CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN. 6738 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-361-1336. The menu at this Italian eatery spans from sandwiches that hearken back to its pizzeria days, through pastas of varying sophistication, to inventive, modern entrees. Some LOLA BISTRO. 1100 Galveston dishes pull out the stops, including Ave., Allegheny West. 412-322seafood Newburg lasagna and 1106. This is a neighborhood bistro veal with artichokes, peppers, with an atmosphere you’d like olives and wild mushrooms over to experience every night risotto. But don’t forgo the and food good enough flatbread pizzas, many with to do the same. The gourmet options like menu here offers prosciutto and sweet“contemporary pea pesto. KE comfort cuisine” — it www. per pa hews toward the PORK-N’ NAT. 8032 pghcitym .co familiar (meat and fish, Rowan Road, Cranberry. pot pie, pasta Bolognese) 724-776- 7675. This while applying up-to-the family-run BBQ joint does minute sensibilities to the details: two things right: There’s a lot house-cured meats, infused oils, of smoke flavor in their meat, coconut milk in the Moroccan and the kitchen takes its rub vegetable stew. LF seriously. The ribs, for instance, are studded with cracked pepper MARISQUEIRA. 225 Commercial and intensely flavored with Ave., Aspinwall. 412-696-1130. This spices — spicy and crusty without, fine-dining restaurant perfectly moist and tender offers the bold flavors and within. Add in: four sauces, plus confident preparations of classic traditional sides such as macPortuguese cuisine — from thick, and-cheese or baked beans. JF meaty Iberian octopus tentacles, broiled with Portuguese bleu SELMA’S TEXAS BARBECUE. cheese, to sausage, flambéed 9155 University Blvd., Moon. en route to the table. Entrees 412-329-7003. The decor suggests include steak in a red-wine sauce, humble and down-home, but the chicken cooked with Portuguese ingredients and preparation seem peppers, pork with clams and, of tailored to appeal to foodies, course, fish. LE with everything from lemonade to tartar sauce and baked beans MONTEREY PUB. 1227 Monterey made in-house. Best of all, each St., North Side. 412-322-6535. meat has its own custom rub A welcoming neighborhood bar and dry-smoked for hours, then

FULL LIST ONLINE

Selma’s {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

$5.00 includes bread and soup or salad! 26TH & SMALLMAN STREETS, IN THE STRIP • 412-261-6511 WWW.MEATBALLS.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013

IO. 300A Beverly Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-440-0414. The revamped Io’s (formerly Iovino’s) new simplified menu seems a near-perfect distillation of tasty, trendy and traditional. Some dishes are sophisticated classics, like pan-seared flounder with fresh tomato and asparagus. Others are ever-popular workhorses like the BLT and fish tacos, or reinventions such as a Thai

CONTINUES ON PG. 38


the

Wooden Nickel R e s t a u r a n t

&

L o u n g e

Authentic Thai Cuisine

Enjoy! 2 Outdoor Patios Live Music Every Fri & Sat Night!

DAILY DRINK

SPECIALS

ENJOY A CASUAL LUNCH AWAY FROM YOUR DESK.

MARTINI MONDAYS DRAFTS TUESDAYS WINE WEDNESDAYS THIRSTY THURSDAYS

This weeks offerings include: Roast Turkey BLT - $9 | Italian Flat Bread - $11 Light & Simple - $10 - Choice of: Half Turkey BLT,

VOTED BEST TMAGHAAZIINE

Half Chicken Sandwich and Cup of Soup, Half Caesar or Half Garden Vegetable Salad

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½ Off Lounge Menu from 9-10pm 4006 Berger Lane - Monroeville 412-372-9750 TheWoodenNickelRestaurant.com

PITTSBURGHr several 2011, fo ing years runn

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Pittsburgh Marriott City Center 112 Washington Place, Downtown 412-471-4000 for Reservations www.thesteelhead.com

MONDAY-FRIDAY 11:30AM-3:00PM

5846 Forbes Ave., 2nd Floor • SQUIRREL HILL • 412.521.0728

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Scan to View Steelhead Menus

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PATIO NOW OPEN Dine in outdoor splendor Now serving Sunday Brunch

Happier Hours: Sunday – Thursday 4-6:30 p.m. Appetizer and Drink Specials South Hills, 1835 Washington Road, Upper St. Clair 15241 • 412-835-3239 www.bonefishgrill.com N E W S

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 36

Little

BANGKOK

served unsauced so that diners can choose from the six different styles on offer. KF

IN THE STRIP

Authentic Thai Cuisine UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP

AWARD-WINNING CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN CUISINE

VOTE FOR US FOR BEST RESTAURANT WINE LIST IN CITY PAPER’S

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THE LOCAL PRODUCE FROM THE STRIP Mon 11:30-3:00 Tue-Thu 11:30-9:00 Fri-Sun 11:00-9:00

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS AVAILABLE

Dine in / Take Out BYOB

TOAST!

1906 Penn Avenue Strip District 412-586-4107 GOUTDOOR DINING F

KITCHEN & WINE BAR

5102 BAUM BLVD. SHADYSIDE www.toastpgh.com 412-224-2579

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Sunday, June 16 MAKE YOUR RESERVATION TODAY!

412 683 1448 DEL’S IS

DECKED OUT FOR THE SUMMER New Healthy Options! i ! Pet Friendly Patio 4428 LIBERTY AVE BLOOMFIELD delsrest.com 38

PATINO ES OP DOG ED ALLOW

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24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

412.390.1111

100 Adams Shoppes “New Mars Location”

724-553-5212 doublewidegrill.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013

THE SMILING MOOSE. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-4668. The Carson Street bar and nightclub now offers a top-notch sandwich and salad menu, by bringing creativity, quality preparation and a knack for well-selected ingredients to the burgers, sandwiches and appetizers. Options include: shrimp skewers with smoked peppers, corn-andblack-bean fritters and a roster of inventive sliders. JE TRUTH LOUNGE. 51 S. 12th St., South Side. 412-381-9600. A Mediterranean-inspired menu spans cocktail-hour noshes and light meals to full entrees. Pleasing appetizers include saganaki (Greek flaming cheese) and the novelty, “lambsicles.” Flatbreads fill the spot for upscale pizza, with hearty meat and pasta dishes, such as short-rib ragu, rounding out the entrees. LE UP MODERN KITCHEN. 5500 Walnut St., Shadyside. 412688-8220. This contemporary restaurant offers a sophisticated sensibility and eclectic approach to fresh, local and seasonal cuisine. The globally influenced menu ranges from “bites” to “small plates” to entrees, as well as soups, salads and sandwiches. The variety is such that it’s hard to imagine a diner unable to find something enticing. KE

Father’s Day 10:30AM-2PM

SEWICKLEY SPEAKEASY. 17 Ohio River Blvd., Sewickley. 412741-1918. This little restaurant has the charm of a bygone era and old-fashioned food whose pleasures are worth rediscovering. The Continental menu offers chestnuts like duck á l’orange and Virginia spots, as well as more distinctive dishes, such as tournedos dijon bleu and French Acadian porterhouse. LE

NEW HOURS Monday 8am to 3pm Tuesday-Friday 8am to 8pm Saturday Brunch 9am to 3pm

VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. 424 S. Main St., West End. 412-458-0417. This warm, welcoming, and satisfying Italian restaurant is a reason to brave the West End Circle. The menu offers variety within a few narrowly constrained categories: antipasti, pizza and pasta, with the pasta section organized around seven noodle shapes, from capelli to rigatoni, each paired with three or four distinct sauces. KE YAMA SUSHI. 515 Adams Shoppes, Rt. 228, Mars. 724591-5688. This suburban eatery offers honest, straightforward Japanese cooking without hibachi theatrics or other culinary influences. Besides the wide sushi selection and tempura offerings, try squid salad or entrees incorporating udon, Japan’s buckwheat noodles. KF

offMenu {BY AMYJO BROWN}

GOOD CHOICES East Liberty eatery’s focus will be on raw, healthy cuisine IT WASN’T UNTIL after college, while working on

Wall Street, that Pittsburgh native Bobby Fry fell in love with food. “I was the only one in my 20s on the trading desk, and we would take our customers out to dinner,” he says. “We’d go to these high-end restaurants, and everywhere I was like, ‘This is food?’ This is what food tastes like?’” Fry, a partner in the Strip District’s Bar Marco restaurant, is about to open a second location in East Liberty, in the spot formerly occupied by the Waffle Shop, at 124 S. Highland Ave. To be called Livermore, the restaurant’s menu will feature raw foods, juices and baked goods. But don’t think carrots and celery. Think duck-liver mousse crostini with pickled ramp and radishes; salads with shaved fennel, frisee, pomegranate and citrus vinaigrette; or roasted peanuts with garlic and rosemary.

“YOU SHOULDN’T HAVE TO STARVE YOURSELF OR EAT ENGINEERED FOODS JUST TO GET THROUGH YOUR DAY.” “The menu is going to consist of small snacks and dishes, much like one would find in a European cafe,” says Justin Steel, another partner in the business. Even the cocktails that will be served at the bar will be light — made with sherry, gin or champagne, for example. Describing himself as “an extremely overweight kid,” in high school and college, Fry’s move into the restaurant business was motivated by the discovery in New York that he could eat well without compromising. “I didn’t have to cut my diet back. I was eating good food and being exposed to good food,” he says. “It made me a healthier person, got me to care about what I was eating.” That realization is what will be guiding Livermore’s offerings, he says. “I’ve seen my energy level stay through the roof by doing fresh juicing,” Fry says, adding that he also tries to eat raw foods for two of his meals each day. A focus on flavor and the right combinations of ingredients are what make such meals exceptional, he says. “You shouldn’t have to starve yourself or eat engineered foods just to get through your day.” A B ROW N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


LOCAL

“IT’S A COMBINATION OF A CREATIVE MUSICIAN AND SOMEONE GOING INTO HEALTH CARE.”

BEAT

{BY KATE MAGOC}

There are parties — and then there’s LazerCrunk. The premise: Take lasers, of course, and add energetic party music of no one single genre. It’s a formula that the monthly dance night’s founding resident DJs Keeb$ and Cutups have perfected. Having both started out in breakcore — a genre known for making chaotic sounds danceable — they applied the loose philosophy to LazerCrunk. They play whatever they want and pick whomever they want to guest. It’s organized chaos, and it makes for a bangin’ party. To celebrate the night’s five-year anniversary, they’re bringing in a guest producer who understands musical chaos theory better than just about anyone. Starkey is co-owner of the popular Philly-based dance music labels Seclusiasis and Slit Jockey. The labels cover everything from hip hop with heavy bass to darker, grime-tinged tracks. But Starkey and his partner, Dev79, simply like to call the sound “street bass.” Starkey, too, began his musical evolution in the madness of breakcore. “My early stuff was a little more spastic in terms of structure,” he says. “There’s some gabber kicks every once in a while. And there’s some breaks, I guess.” In dance music, a DJ’s transformation can often be hard to chart. Genre words get slippery and most artists like to avoid being pigeonholed anyway. As Cutups and Keeb$ developed the word LazerCrunk to sum it up, Starkey and Dev79 did the same with street bass. “It’s urban-centric music with heavy bass,” Starkey explains. “I don’t confine myself to any musical genre. Unless I’m writing for something very specific, I just let the music do what I think it should naturally do.” Starkey, like the LazerCrunk guys, favors the heavy-bass realm, and his music could be described as space-influenced and futuristic (hence one of his nicknames, “Starkbot”). But he’s released tracks everywhere from London-based Civil Music — a purveyor of bass music that edges into the orchestral — to Ninja Tune, known for all things electronic that are pretty, weird and fascinating. It’s safe to say that Starkey’s got range, which is perfectly appropriate for LazerCrunk’s big birthday celebration. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LAZERCRUNK with guest DJ STARKEY. 10 p.m. Fri., June 14. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net N E W S

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Starkey is LazerCrunk’s guest for the dance night’s fifth anniversary.

LASER FOCUS

MORE THAN

JUST TUNES {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

Michelle Montgomery Muth demonstrates a music-therapy drumming exercise, with an assist from the photographer’s nephew, Sebastian Mull.

M

ICHELLE Montgomery Muth took the long way from her hometown of St. Paul, Minn., to Pittsburgh. The Center Township resident went to college in Boston and got a degree in piano — then took several marketing jobs in Boston and Seattle, while performing on the side. But it was only after moving to Pittsburgh that she settled into what she’d come to find was her calling: music therapy. “What I really loved was music, and working with children. So I went back to school at Slippery Rock,” one of three nearby universities that offer programs in music therapy. (Seton Hill, in Greensburg, and Duquesne University are the other two.) “Sometimes it takes us a while to find what our place is, but I found my place.” Music therapy has existed formally as a discipline since the 1940s, though its antecedents stretch back to the early 1900s. It can be used in a number of different clinical situations: with children with autismspectrum diagnoses, older people with Alzheimer’s, those in correctional facilities,

and those with chronic pain, among others. The goals are as varied as the clients, but the common thread is that music is used as the main therapeutic tool. Muth works largely with children, many on the autism spectrum; the difference between her role as a music therapist and that of a music educator is that her goal in having a child play music isn’t just to teach the child a scale. “Take a song, like ‘Row, Row, Row Your Boat,’” Muth says. “They learn that song; it has a beginning, middle and end. It has a specific duration in time. They know what’s going to happen. Then I decide to change the words one day. That’s bringing change into their life, but within a context they’re used to. The goal is that that will go smoothly. It’s a simple way of introducing change.” Music therapy can involve making music — either improvising or playing alreadywritten songs — or listening. It might be used with Alzheimer’s patients by playing music the client would have listened to as a child, to help activate brain activity. For

those with chronic pain, music therapy can be used to help alleviate pain by providing something else to concentrate on. Last year, former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords credited music therapy for the speed with which she recovered her speech after being shot. Some music therapists, like Muth, work independently with clients — she runs her own business, called M3 Music Therapy, and often travels to clients’ homes. Others work in educational, correctional or hospital settings. “Any place a social worker might work, it may be possible to find a music therapist there,” says Dr. Elaine Abbott, chair of the music therapy department at Duquesne University. “But there are only about 6,000 board-certified music therapists in the nation.” Music-therapy programs in colleges are for the most part housed in music schools; music therapists generally are musicians by training before they pursue therapy. (Abbott, like Muth, played piano and is trained as a vocalist — though both also use other CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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music +art 10 days of free

%NVIRONMENTAL2ESPONSIBILITY We believe that caring for our environment, our Festival grounds, not only makes our event a comfortable place to be, but it sustains our footprint for future use and sets a standard for large outdoor events worth emulating. Since 2009, the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust has produced the Festival with intent to reduce, reuse, and recycle in more ways each year to lessen the impact on the environment.

(OW9OU#AN0ARTICIPATE Be on the lookout for our new Reduce-Reuse-Recycle emblem throughout the Festival. Every time you see it, you know you have an opportunity to make an impact! The Green Team, our environmentally-friendly support staff, will be nearby to answer your questions! s4RAVEL'REEN Bike, take the T, a PAT Bus, or carpool to reduce emissions. s2EUSEWHENEVERPOSSIBLE Bring a water bottle to ďŹ ll up at free Water Stations. s#AREFULWITHTHATCOMPOST Help us turn waste into nutrient-rich soil for local farms! s"ESMART Use your smart phone to access a daily schedule and event descriptions. These initiatives are made possible with generous support from Colcom Foundation.

(EADLINE-USIC $OLLAR"ANK3TAGE

*UNEs'LEN(ANSARD

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MORE THAN JUST TUNES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

instruments in their work.) There are 72 undergraduate music-therapy programs in the country — western Pennsylvania, therefore, is somewhat overrepresented in terms of music-therapy education, if not practice. The Music Therapy Certification Board lists 45 certified music therapists in Allegheny County, and a number more in surrounding counties. “The … programs like Duquesne and other close by make it an above-average [rate] for a city of its size,” says Al Bumanis, director of communication for the American Music Therapy Association. “[Pennsylvania] is always in the top four in the U.S. in numbers of members and therapists.” But that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s easy to be a music therapist in Pittsburgh. Both Muth and Abbott say perceptions of music therapy here aren’t always accurate, or positive. “There are different attitudes depending on where you are located geographically,” says Abbott. “And I honestly can’t speak to what motivates those different attitudes. I know that there are a lot more jobs in the Philadelphia-New York-Boston corridor than in the Pittsburgh area.” And misconceptions about music therapy abound anywhere. The biggest that Muth often hears: “Thinking it’s just doing music. ‘You’re just singing to them, entertaining them.’ I go somewhere to present now and I’ll ask people, ‘How many of you have heard of music therapy?’ and threequarters of the room usually raise their hands. Then I’ll ask, ‘How many of you really feel like you know what it is?’ And usually no one raises their hand. But that’s fine; 10 years ago, they would have said, ‘What therapy?’” Musical talent is one prerequisite for becoming a music therapist; the personal touch that’s common to social workers and the like is another. “Being open to, if not already possessing a wide taste in music,” is important, says Muth. “You could end up working with people in their 80s and 90s, so you have to know what was going on in their childhood. Having compassion [is another essential quality]. It’s a combination of a creative musician and someone who’s going into health care. The scientific and creative being blended together.” And another thing — music therapists have to be ready to deal with that “What therapy?” question. “Since I’ve worked with start-up companies in marketing,” says Muth, “I was always educating people — and that’s part of music therapy, too. I think a lot of students go into music therapy and are thrown by how much you have to explain what it is. But to me, that’s just what you do.” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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NEW RELEASES

THE SPARROWS MAGNOLIA SESSIONS (SELF-RELEASED)

Full-length from the local rootsy trio. Good country-rock that at times recalls Jackson Browne (both in the songwriting and in T.C. Davis’ vocal delivery). With these chops, The Sparrows could easily pick up fans of bands like The Old 97s and Drive By Truckers — it’s that rare record you and your cousin from Clarion County could agree on. BY ANDY MULKERIN

THE SPARROWS CD RELEASE (also features SCOTT REYNOLDS of ALL). 6:30 p.m. Fri., June 14. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 ALLIES/GERMAN SHEPHERD 7-INCH SPLIT (LOCK & KEY)

Adrenaline-pumping stuff from both parties, with driving rhythm sections and relentless guitars. Much of both sides is pretty triumphant — “Medicine Man,” on the Allies side, sounds like a sinister version of a tune that could have come from Pikadori, the band’s antecedent. German Shepherd’s Jason Jouver recorded all of the tracks, and they sound impeccable; the German Shepherd side is especially brutal in its low end. BY ANDY MULKERIN

ALLIES/GERMAN SHEPHERD 7-INCH SPLIT RELEASE. With THE LOPEZ, BARONS. 9 p.m. Fri., June 14. Howlers, 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412-682-0320 GNETICZ FOREIGN OIL (SELF-RELEASED)

A return to the rough and rugged sound of ’90s-era East Coast hip hop. Upon listening, it should come as no surprise that Wu-Tang Clan is one of the Washington, Pa.-based rapper/producer’s biggest influences. He shares poverty-stricken street tales of perseverance, as heard on “Raw Oats” and “Sick Man of Asia.” His raps are accompanied by an assortment of hypnotic sample loops in original production by former Wu affiliates 4th Disciple and Bronze Nazareth, among others. Foreign Oil is his first solo release since 2002’s Japaneticz. BY RORY D. WEBB


OPUS ONE PRESENTS

06/21 SON VOLT 06/14 CONCERT FOR A CURE FT. SCOTT REYNOLDS

(OF THE ALL/DESCENDENTS FAMILY), LUCA BRAZI & MORE

06/14 KEVIN FINN (LATE) 06/15 TEAMMATE 06/16 CHARLES ROCHA, GYPSY FROM GYPSY AND HIS BAND

OF GHOSTS, JOHN ROBINSON & CHRIS HANNIGAN TRIO

06/18 GUGGENHEIM GROTTO 06/19 BEN SHANNON & BARNABY BRIGHT 06/23 ROGUE WAVE

06/25 TWO GALLANTS 06/26 ELEANOR FRIEDBERGER

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF LEIGH RIGHTON}

Vests and roses: Japandroids (from left, David Prowse and Brian King)

NOT QUITTING YET {BY JOHN LAVANGA} IN 2008, Vancouver two-piece Japan-

droids had a plan all laid out. After several years of playing to small crowds and failing in their attempts to get some buzz going, guitarist Brian King and drummer David Prowse were going to bring their musical project to a dignified end and move on with their lives. First, they would record and self-release a full-length album of the songs that they had been working on. Then they would part ways, and that would be it. After Post-Nothing, there would be, well, just nothing. Thankfully for fans of the band and its triumphant style of fuzzy rock ’n’ roll, things didn’t go according to plan. “It just kind of snowballed,” says King. First, the small Canadian record label Unfamiliar offered to release the record on vinyl, an offer Japandroids accepted with some trepidation. “We were like, ‘Yeah, OK, but you should know we’re not gonna play any more shows. We’re totally done.’” But things kept growing, much to the surprise — and even mild irritation — of the band. King says that when the song

“Young Hearts Spark Fire,” made a splash on the Internet, he found the timing to be a bit inopportune. “Oh, finally, after three years of being in a band and [then] breaking up, people are starting to hear about us.” The band’s path to fame was less a product of embracing newfound success, and more a matter of getting roped into an endless series of opportunities that were previously unimaginable. There wasn’t any time to process any thoughts on the band’s future.

JAPANDROIDS

WITH THE CROCODILES 8 p.m. Sun., June 16. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $15. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

“It was one thing after another, and then we got out on the road and we were playing shows every day,” King says. “It became this thing where we just kept saying yes to everything and not really talking about it.” During this unexpected run of success, and a surprise tour, Japandroids’ reputation as one of the most exciting live acts in music grew. The combination of Post-Nothing’s inspired, last-hurrah-

style anthems and the band’s onstage exuberance created a sense of urgency that had attendees raving. In 2011, things seemed to wind down again. After more than a year of jumping on every chance they were given, the pair had become beloved at venue after venue for spirited showmanship and lyrics that could be remembered by even the drunkest of fans. King and Prowse, however, had become burnt out on playing an album they had never intended for live performance in the first place. “We got to the point where we had kind of exhausted everything we could do on Post-Nothing,” King says. Now, the two rockers who had never expected to go on another tour, much less dozens, were finally forced to make a choice: stick with the original plan — to quit — or not? “The idea of now giving it up and going back to our old jobs seemed insane,” says King. For the first time, he and Prowse were forced to acknowledge that they were, in fact, a band, and as such they would have to keep making music. With this revelation, the pressure

set in immediately. Prior to its sudden explosion onto the national music scene, Japandroids hadn’t even had a record deal, never mind a fan base — both of which brought a new dimension to the writing process. “We didn’t have to worry about a fan base or that our record was gonna get reviewed or that a record label was gonna put it out.” King says. “All of these things that you didn’t have to think about when you sat down to play guitar in your bedroom, you now had to think about before you even played your first guitar chord.” When they finally sat down to write and record the follow-up, it was their experiences on the road that guided their writing process, specifically the way they saw their music inspire packed crowds. “When we first got on tour and got a taste of what it was like to see people respond to certain kinds of songs,” King says, “we just sort of got addicted to it.” That eventually pushed the band toward making an album that took the most uplifting elements of Post-Nothing and pushed them further, creating the fittingly titled sophomore album Celebration Rock. King admits that, like so much along their path to musical success, Celebration Rock did not turn out as Japandroids had planned. “We were gonna make a record that was 20 songs and they were all two minutes long, and we totally failed. We ended up making another record like Post-Nothing, where there’s eight songs and they’re all six minutes long,” he muses. In doing so, however, Japandroids succeeded in creating an album that simply built upon all the strengths of their previous work, a move that thrilled fans and critics alike. The album was oft-mentioned in discussions of the best albums of 2012, and has only helped to build their reputation. The real key to the album is the way that it doesn’t shy away from morose topics, but manages to find a way to broach them with an infectious positivity that makes these tracks all the more touching, and the live performances of them unforgettable. As King puts it: “There’s a way to write music where you can write something about subject matter that’s sad, and that people who are going through those kinds of things can identify with — and the songs or the album can be triumphant and bring them up from the place.”

“THE IDEA OF NOW GIVING IT UP AND GOING BACK TO OUR OLD JOBS SEEMED INSANE.”

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF JENNIFER CHURCH}

Like a groove machine: Swans (Michael Gira, foreground, in cowboy hat)

GOING DEEP {BY MARGARET WELSH} WHEN SWANS released its 12th studio record,

The Seer, last year, I emailed my dad a video of one of its live performances. He replied, “I didn’t think I was into it, but at the end, I realized my heart was racing.” It’s hard to think of a more fitting description of the band: Challenging, raw, often punishingly heavy and sometimes intensely beautiful, Swans’ music gets under your skin. Founder and frontman Michael Gira spoke with CP via Skype, using as his avatar a picture of Samuel Beckett — to whom, come to think of it, he bears some resemblance. I UNDERSTAND YOU’VE BEEN DEVELOPING NEW SONGS IN YOUR LIVE SHOWS. WHAT DIRECTION IS THAT TAKING? I suppose they’re focused more on grooves. There are large sonic events that happen, of course, but we’re trying to really work into a groove machine. I don’t mean that in a typical way: It’s not like we’re white boys trying to play funk or something. It starts out with a simple idea, and through playing repeatedly each night, it starts moving and changing, and by the end of the tour it’s unrecognizable from where it began.

at us. It developed into this pattern of antagonism which kind of perversely fed our desire to keep doing what we were doing. But it’s a bad habit to get into. SOUNDS PRETTY PUNK. I think it was even more extreme than that. Nowadays, the kind of experience we’re creating, it seems to kind of envelop everyone, including us. It becomes a kind of a communal experience of which we’re a part. When the music’s working, it’s almost like we’re not playing; it’s just happening sort of beyond our control. It’s the closest I get to any kind of religious experience. I’VE ALWAYS WONDERED IF YOU WERE INFLUENCED BY ANY RELIGIOUS MUSIC. Sure. Not anything specific, but the kind of ever-escalating choral aspects of gospel music, for instance, are truly inspirational. Tibetan ritual music, I love that. Music that goes for the back of your skull — you know, just a deep place — interests me. [Our music is] very secular, though.

8:30 p.m. Fri., June 14. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $16-20. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

WHAT IS PERFORMING LIKE FOR YOU? It’s a great, uplifting thing to be inside of. Every set that we play is crafted towards that trajectory, for that kind of vehicular movement of our bodies up into space. [Laughs.] It happens sometimes, and other times it’s just a struggle. I think it’s a good thing to aspire to, and audiences seem to get a lot from the music, which is encouraging and satisfying.

YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR AUDIENCE SEEMS TO HAVE SHIFTED A LOT OVER THE YEARS. I think what we did in the early days … it seemed to shock people in certain ways. We’d get rabid responses, usually very negative, and most people would walk out, others would be just kind of stunned, and other people would yell and scream things

DOES IT EVER FEEL LIKE TOO MUCH? Often we’re utterly and absolutely exhausted from doing the amount of shows we do. You’re half-asleep by the time you go onstage, and you’re not sure you can do it, but once the music starts, things kick into place. Then at the end, we get in our wheelchairs and go put on our adult diapies and get on the bus.

SWANS

WITH MICHAEL TAMBURO

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CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF CLAYTON HAUCK}

We buy all day-every day LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

WE KNOW

GUITARS

BUY, SELL & TRADE NEW AND USED!

JC Brooks FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

[ALT-COUNTRY] + THU., JUNE 13

as well as classical interpretations of fanfavorite Grateful Dead hits. The Garcia family is curating a series of performances with some of the country’s most respected symphonies, kicking off the series with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra tonight at Heinz Hall. KS 7:30 p.m. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $30-78. All ages. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburgh symphony.org

Heather McEntire and Jenks Miller have gotten their aggression out through other channels — she in mid-’00s rock band Bellafea, he with his Relapse-repped solo black-metal and drone project Horseback. So when they got together for Mount Moriah, they could concentrate on the pretty stuff. The Durham, N.C.-based trio recently released its latest, Miracle Temple, via Merge, and it’s a beauty; the band plays Club Café tonight. Jesse Sykes and Ex.Planets open. Andy Mulkerin 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10-12. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

Most bands struggle to create a distinctive sound that will set them apart from other “indie-rock” groups, but Sonny and the Sunsets don’t worry about such things. The band is always striving to evolve, with an emphasis on finding the right elements to match the inspiration for the music. The latest release, Antenna to the Afterworld, incorporates elements typical of electronic music, such as synthesized sounds, but retains the humble, easy feel that’s characteristic of the band. You can catch the group tonight at the Smiling Moose; Jonathan Warner opens. Kira Scammell 6:30 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

The Grateful Dead lives on through a symphonic celebration of Jerry Garcia. The performance — with special guest Warren Hayes, a friend of the Garcia family — will feature some of Garcia’s original compositions

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BUY • SELL • TRADE GUITARS • DRUMS • AMPS PRO SOUND • KEYBOARDS

BAND INSTRUMENTS 4341 Old William Penn Hwy, Monroeville 412-85-MUSIC Monday-Saturday 10am-8pm

1305 E. CARSON ST.

SOUTH SIDE 412.431.0700

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So much of Low’s quiet and contemplative music moves at such a slow pace, it’s little wonder the band’s been around for 20 years — it’s certainly not burn-outand-break-up stuff they do. It also helps that the band’s two principals, Alan Sparhawk and Low Mimi Parker, are married with kids. The three-piece is on tour now with another stalwart of the ’90s alt scene, Mike Doughty, whose post-Soul Coughing solo career has quite the cult following. They play Altar Bar tonight. AM 8 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $18-20. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

[SOUL] + WED., JUNE 19 J.C. Brooks and the Uptown Sound represents that rare new soul act that sounds classic but not hokey; the Chicago-based band recently released its latest, Howl, on Bloodshot, a label that values both old sounds and raw authenticity. Brooks himself has a velvety voice that sails over the band’s grooves; a showman as much as a soul man, he’s known for a fierce live show. Tonight, the band plays the Smiling Moose. Semi-Supervillains open. AM 7 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $12-14. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) With more than forty hits on the Hot Country Songs charts, including five number ones, Travis Tritt and his full band perform his favorite country, blues, and southern rock songs.

FRIDAY JUNE 28 · 8PM Orchestra $65, $52; Loge $65; Balcony $52, $40

The Palace Theatre 724-836-8000

ow Folls! U

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www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS!

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 13 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Mount Moriah, Jesse Sykes, Ex.Planets. South Side. 412-431-4950. CRANBERRY COMMUNITY PARK. St. Level. Cranberry. 724-776-4806. PALACE THEATRE. Wicked. Greensburg. 724-836-1123. POINT STATE PARK. Lucius. Dollar Bank Theater. Downtown. 412-471-0235. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Ultraviolet Hippopatamus. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 14

The City’s Hottest Live Music Scene! UPCOMING NATIONAL SHOWS

SHOWS THIS WEEK Thu Fri Sat Sun

6.13 6.14 6.15 6.16

KEY OF X // rock // 9 pm // no cover DANCING QUEEN // 70’s and 80’s covers // 9 pm // $7 WALK OF SHAME // 80’s and 90’s covers // 9 pm // $7 JAZZ CONSPIRACY BIG BAND with swing lessons // 7 pm // $5

103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086 48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013

CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Gene Stovall Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Scott Reynolds, Luca Brazi, The Hunks, The Sparrows (Early). Proceeds Benefit The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Kevin Finn, Samantha McDonough, The Turpentiners (Late). Poetry by Kris Collins. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE D.A.P. CO-OP. Mike Medved. Carnegie. 412-403-7357. LINDEN GROVE. Nightlife. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Baroness, Coliseum. Millvale. 866-468-3401. OBEY HOUSE. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. Crafton. 412-922-3883. PALACE THEATRE. Queensryche. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PARK HOUSE. Locks & Dams. North Side. 412-224-2273. SAINT BRUNO’S CHURCH. The Holidays, Southside Jerry. Greensburg. 724-836-0690. SMILING MOOSE. Firestarter, Coming Clean, August Ruins, Golden Gate. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Big Mean Sound Machine. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

HARVEY WILNER’S. Alter Ego. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. LIBERTY AVE, DOWNTOWN. Adam Lambert, Joe McElderry, Sharon Needles, Ryan Amador & Jo Limpert, more. Pride in the Street. Downtown. THE LOOSE MOOSE. Gone South. Baldwin. 412-489-5631. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Second Empire, Stark, Klaymore, Xander Demos Band, Forever In Fear. Second Empire CD release party. Millvale. 866-468-3401. MULLEN’S BAR & GRILL. The Old E. Allstars, Jimbo & the Soupbones. North Side. 412-231-1112. PIZZA DADDIES. The GRID. Gibsonia. 724-443-0066. POINT STATE PARK. The Airborne Toxic Event. Dollar Bank Stage. Downtown. 412-471-0235. THE R BAR. The ROCK-IT Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882. SMILING MOOSE. Swingin Utters, Face to Face, Teenage Bottlerocket, Blacklist Royals, Joshua Black Wilkins, Goddam Gallows Rule of Two, Divine Tragedy, Wizard Bomb. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPEAL’S TAVERN. T.K. & George. New Alexandria. 724-433-1322.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Fletchers Grove. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. VERONA EAGLES. Daniels & McClain. Verona. 412-828-9938.

SUN 16 CLUB CAFE. Charles Rocha, Gypsy from Gypsy & His Band of Ghosts, John Robinson, Chris Hannigan Trio TeamMate, Triggers, The Wreckids. South Side. 412-431-4950. IRWIN PARK AMPHITHEATRE. Tres Lads. Irwin. 724-864-3100. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Japandroids, The Crocodiles. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Clear Plastic Masks, Vertigo go’s. Weather Permitting series. Shadyside. 412-363-5845. SMILING MOOSE. Sonny & the Sunsets, Jonathan Warner Burial Mounds, Havoc Theory, Old Lords. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Mount Carmel, Carousel, Lost Realms. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

MON 17 MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Boxer Rebellion, Fossil Collective, The Artless. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

MP 3 MONDAY JON QUEST

SAT 15 ALTAR BAR. Face To Face. Strip District. 412-263-2877. THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Drew Schofield. Harmony. 570-294-6450. CIP’S. The Dave Iglar Band. Dormont. 412-668-2335. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Nyodene D, Compactor, 8 Cylinder, Requiem/ Porcelain Maggot (early) Genghis Khan, Skell, Deflowered (late). Garfield. 412-361-2262. GOOSKI’S. Travesty, Liebestod, Cultivator. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658.

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from Jon Quest; download “Keep On” (featuring Beedie) for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


TUE 18 31ST STREET PUB. Karma to Burn, Cultivator, Dope Lake. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Low. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Tony Janflone, Jr. North Side. 412-322-1850. CLUB CAFE. The Guggenheim Grotto, The Tilt Room. South Side. 412-431-4950. FRANKIE’S. The House Band. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Chrome Sparks, Mrs. Paintbrush, Middle Children. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HEINZ HALL. Warren Haynes w/ Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Jerry Garcia Symphonic Celebration. Downtown. 412-392-4900. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Dawes, Shovels & Rope. Millvale. 866-468-3401. REX THEATER. Aoife O’Donovan. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Owen, Slingshot Dakota, Brightside. South Side. 412-431-4668.

top 40 hits. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3730. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

Stillborn Identity, Apostropheus. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

BLUES THU 13 MOONDOG’S. Rick Estrin & the Nightcats. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

SAT 15

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. JX4 Jeff Justus. North Side. 412-224-2273.

BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. The Shattered Shaabi Hafla bellydance dance party. Bloomfield. CAFE SUPREME. Bobby 412-621-4900. Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Irwin. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday 724-861-0990. Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. Bubs McKegg. Canonsburg. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. 724-746-4227. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. HARD ROCK CAFE. Fabulous 412-431-8800. Booze Brothers Showband THE NEW AMSTERDAM. & Revue. Station Square. Tracksploitation. Lawrenceville. 412-481-7625. 412-904-2915. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Dance/ & SPEAKEASY. Billy Price & top 40 hits. Mt. Washington. the Lost Minds. North Side. 412-431-3730. 412-904-3335. REMEDY. Push It! NOLA ON THE DJ Huck Finn, SQUARE. Olga Watkins DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Band. Downtown. www. per Lawrenceville. 412-471-9100. pa pghcitym 412-781-6771. SOUTH PARK .co ROWDY BUCK. Top AMPHITHEATER. 40 Dance. South Side. Tommy Castro, Shot O’ Soul. 412-431-2825. South Park. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. BUTLER ST., ETNA. Shot O’ Soul. Etna Firemen’s Street Fair. Etna. RIVERS CASINO. DJs Bill Bara DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Billy Price & Digital Dave. North Side. & the Lost Minds. Robinson. 412-231-7777. 412-489-5631. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. Electro, post punk, industrial, MONONGAHELA AQUATORIUM. new wave, alternative dance. Jill West & Blues Attack. South Side. 412-431-4668. Monongahela. NORTH PARK. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Teamster AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Open Horsemen Pig Roast & Poker Run. Turntable Night. East Liberty. Allison Park. 724-290-5252. 412-363-8277. UNCL’ CHUCK’S. .32-20 Blues Band. Rochester. 724-775-0210. THE WOODEN NICKEL. The AVA BAR & LOUNGE. When Life Witchdoctors. Monroeville. Gives You Lemons.DANCE. East 412-372-9750. Liberty. 412-363-8277. WOOLEY BULLY’S. Sweaty Betty. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. New Brighton. 724-843-4702. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Vex. BROOKLINE PUB. Yoho’s Yinzide Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. Out. Brookline. 412-531-0899. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day MINERAL BEACH. Bobby Hawkins chill. House music. aDesusParty. Back Alley Blues. Finleyville. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

FRI 14

HIP HOP/R&B

WED 19 ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Johnny Angel’s All Star Jam Band. North Side. 412-322-1850. BRILLOBOX. Night Beds, Jenny O. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. HEINZ HALL. Megan Hilty. Luck Be a Lady: Sinatra & More. Downtown. 412-392-4900. SMILING MOOSE. JC Brooks & The Uptown Sound. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Everclear, Live, Filter, Sponge. North Side. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Deadstring Brothers, Unknown String Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

DJS THU 13

AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Summer Fling Fridays. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BRILLOBOX. Lazercrunk. w/ Cutups & Keebs. Bloomfield. 412-320-1476. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Reggae Fridays. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. LAVA LOUNGE. 80’s New Wave Flashback. w/ DJ Electric. South Side. 412-431-5282. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Ray Lugo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Dance/

N E W S

FRI 14

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 15

SUN 16

MELLON SQUARE

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Neon Swing X-Perience. North Side. 412-904-3335. LA CASA NARCISI. Kenia. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SUMMER

SAT 15 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. The Horn Guys. Strip District. 412-642-2377. HEINZ HALL. Kenny G. Downtown. 412-392-4900. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jessica Lee Trio. North Side. 412-904-3335. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Greensburg. 724-850-7245. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Bridgeville. 412-370-9621.

CONCERT S E R I E S

MELLON SQUARE PARK (DOWNTOWN)

EVERY THURSDAY Starting June 20 - August 29 Noon to 1PM

LIVE MUSIC BY LOCAL BANDS!

SUN 16 FOX CHAPEL YACHT CLUB. The Etta Cox & Al Dowe Band. O’Hara. 412-963-8881. HEINZ HALL. Kenny G. Downtown. 412-392-4900. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Eric Johnson & the Fabulous “A” Team, Johnny Boyd, CONTINUES ON PG. 50

TUE 18

WED 19

SUN 16

WED 19 THE R BAR. Jimmy Adler, Yinzide Out. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

THU 13 ALTAR BAR. Big Boi. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

FRI 14

JAZZ THU 13

720 RECORDS. ZO!, Deborah Bond. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592.

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. The Boilermaker Jazz Band. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. HEINZ HALL. Kenny G. Downtown. 412-392-4900. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

MON 17

FRI 14

SMILING MOOSE. Overdost, MattOmatic, Yung Bru, Tha 317, Morbid Sikosis, Klark Kentt, The Burnah Blaze, Young Cave. South Side. 412-431-4668.

SAT 15

GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Brandon Brains, B. Done, Lukey Cage,

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

LOCAL TWEETS

The Boilermaker Jazz Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. UP MODERN KITCHEN. Dave Roth. Jazzed-up brunch. Shadyside. 412-688-8220.

Recent dispatches from the music Twittersphere @ChrisDos (Chris #2)

MON 17

That was all very exciting hockey. Tim Thomas won’t have to visit Obama this time around. Who gives a shit. Rask is the man.

AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Interval Jazz Mondays. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. ROYAL PLACE. Jerry Lucarelli, Vince Taglieri, Sunny Sunseri. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000.

TUE 18 PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Elevations, Velvet Heat. Oakland. 412-622-6914. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series feat. Colter Harper. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

@HughShows Hugh Twyman

I wish I was a razor salesman outside the #Pens locker room right about now.

WED 19 720 RECORDS. James Johnson, Paul Thompson, Cliff Barnes. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, HOMEWOOD. Salsamba Latin Jazz Group. Jazz On The Steps. Homewood. 412-441-2039. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Hopewell Community Big Band. Benefits the DARE2XL After School Program. Midland. 724-576-4644.

ACOUSTIC

Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. NORTH COUNTRY BREWING. Bluegrass Night. Slippery Rock. 724-794-2337.

THU 13

WED 19

BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Rick Revetta. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000.

FRI 14

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Weds. North Side. 412-321-1834. CLUB CAFE. Ben Shannon, Barnaby Bright. South Side. 412-431-4950. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FULL LIST E ONwLwIN w.

BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Malcolm Holcombe & paper pghcitym Nic LandonHarmony. .co 724-452-0539. POINT STATE PARK. CAFE NOTTE. Acoustic Cafe Jontre, Red Baraat. w/ Bucky. Emsworth. 412-761-2233. World Music Day. Three Rivers DOWNEY’S HOUSE. John Arts Festival. Dollar Bank Stage. Wiatrak. Robinson. 412-489-5631. Downtown. 412-471-0235. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin the Troubadour. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. FRESCO’S RUSTIC EUROPEAN CUISINE & WINE BAR. Lenny PENN BREWERY. The Flow Band. Smith, Jeff Conner, David Wells. North Side. 412-237-9400 x120. Wexford. 724-935-7550. SOUTHSIDE WORKS. Brad Yoder. South Side. ST. CLAIR PARK. Rosco Bandana. SummerSounds Concert Series. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Greensburg. 724-838-4324. Jackson T. Gardner. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.

WORLD FRI 14

REGGAE SAT 15

COUNTRY THU 13

SAT 15

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013

BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. The Squirrel Hillbillies. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

FRI 14

MON 17

SAT 15

HAMBONE’S. Monday Night

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Toby

W. NEW CASTLE ST. PLAZA. Noble Hops Band, Shriners, Mo Nelson Band. Butler. 724-256-5769.

Keith, Kip Moore. Burgettstown. 724-947-7400. NIED’S HOTEL. Molly Alphabet & Her Country String Band, Mark Cyler. W/ host: Slim Forsythe. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

SUN 16 POINT STATE PARK. The Blind Boys of Alabama. Dollar Bank Stage. Downtown. 412-471-0235.

CLASSICAL SAT 15 THINGNY, GEMINI DUO. Presented by Alia Musica. The Inn, Lawrenceville. 201-410-9107.

WED 19 THE TENORS. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 14 MT. ARARAT BAPTIST CHURCH. Curtis Lewis, Anita Levels, Jordan Welch, more. Make A Joyful Noise Gospel Extravaganza. East Liberty. 412-471-8722.

SAT 15 PITTSBURGH PUBLIC MARKET. Friends in Harmony. Strip District. 412-281-4505.

MON 17 HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 19 SEVEN SPRINGS. Latshaw Pops Orchestra: Viva Las Vegas. Champion. 724-853-4050.


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

June 12 - 18 WEDNESDAY 12

Ultraviolet Hippopotamus

RIVERS CASINO North Shore. For more info & tickets call 412-566-4555. 2p.m. & 7p.m.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

Three Rivers Arts Festival

FRIDAY 14

The Lettermen

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH. For more info & festival schedule visit 3riversartsfest.org. Free event. Through June 16.

Stills in the Hills - An Appalachian Jamboree

BRANDI CARLILE TUESDAY, JUNE 18 STAGE AE

SEVEN SPRINGS MOUNTAIN RESORT Seven Springs. 800452-2223. Tickets: 7Springs. com/StillsintheHills. Through June 16 ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Swingin Utters, Teenage Bottlerocket, Blacklist Royals & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

TRAX FARMS Finleyville. 412-835-3246. Free event. For more info visit traxfarms.com. 10a.m. Through June 16.

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests Back to the Good Stuff. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

T. Mills ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Choo Jackson, Ze Martinez & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

THURSDAY 13

Kevin Finn CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guests Samantha McDonough and the Tupentiners & more. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone.10:30p.m.

Kenny G

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through June 16.

Japandroids

Pittsburgh Power vs. Philadelphia Soul

PENN AVE Garfield. For more info visit pennavenue.org. Free event.12a.m.

Downtown. Tickets: consolenergycenter.com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests The Crocodiles. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Penn Ave Arts In Motion CONSOL ENERGY CENTER

MONDAY 17

The Boxer Rebellion MR. SMALLS THEATRE

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ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guest Mike Doughty. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Brandi Carlile STAGE AE North Side. With special guest The Lone Bellow. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 newbalancepittsburgh.com

PITTSBU RG H’S L ARG EST SELECTI O N O F N EW BAL AN CE SH O ES I N SIZES AN D WI DTHS +

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Featuring Warren Haynes. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 7:30p.m.

WEXFORD

Stop by the New Balance® store and get the footwear, apparel and accessories that help Dad reach greatness. We’ve got the fits, styles and expertise to help you find gifts that will keep him moving.

N E W S

Jerry Garcia Symphonic Celebration

Low

SUNDAY 16

SATURDAY 15

Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Fossil Collective and The Artless. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 18

Face to Face

22nd Strawberry Festival

Ramble On: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin

newbalancepittsburgh.com

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LOVE HURTS {BY AL HOFF}

THIS FILM IS RATED R — FOR WEED, ENDLESS PROFANITY AND GRAPHIC DEMON NUDITY

Traditionally, the “happy” resolution for romantic stories is marriage. But as Richard Linklater’s Before Midnight posits, marriage is the hard part and the earlier falling-in-love story is a lot more fun. In Before Midnight, we catch up with Celine (Julie Delpy) and Jesse (Ethan Hawke), who met in Vienna in Before Sunrise (1995), and reunited nine later in Before Sunset. Now, another decade later, the pair are married (more or less), live in Paris and are raising twin daughters. They’re on a Greek vacation, but there are undercurrents of tensions. “This is how people start breaking up,” Celine jokes (but not really) early on.

Enjoying the daylight: Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke

CP APPROVED

This film is broader than the previous two-man affairs — there is a lively dinner with other couples who debate relationships, and more scenery. But it all builds to Celine and Jesse alone in a hotel room having the kind of button-pushing argument that is an unwelcome result of familiarity. It’s ugly, but the concerns are real, if mundane: how to balance the self with the couple, while also juggling careers, families and life’s inevitable disappointments and frustrations. Linklater’s film is a bit gimmicky conceptually, some dialogue is too onthe-nose and he’s still romanticizing sunny Europe. The final reel is good work by the actors, but its passive-aggressive intensity isn’t exactly entertaining. Elucidating, sure, if you needed any reminder that movies’ happy endings are anything but. Starts Fri., June 14. Manor AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PRIDE DE WEEK SHORT LMS. Take a FILMS. break from rom the Pride crowds wds on Liberty Avenue nue and duck into to the Harris Theater ater to catch some e short films presented nted by the Lesbian n and Gay Film m Society. 1-4 p.m. m. Sun., June ne 16. Free

THE {BY AL HOFF}

S

LAST LAUGH

Worst slumber party ever: (from left) Jonah Hill, Seth Rogen, James Franco, Danny McBride, Craig Robinson and Jay Baruchel

TARS — THEY’RE just like us. So

when the apocalypse hits Hollywood, they freak out, hunker down, ration food and drop the “I love you, man” veneer to tell each other what they really think. That’s the premise of This Is the End, a comedy written and directed by Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg. All your favorite young comic actors are partying at James Franco’s house when the End of Time breaks out. Most are killed, leaving Rogen, Franco, Jay Baruchel, Craig Robinson, Jonah Hill and Danny McBride boarded up in the house and trying to salvage the nightmare. “Just because a bunch of people fell into a hole outside doesn’t mean we can’t have fun,” explains Hill. Just as last year’s Seven Psychopaths rewarded fans for all the post-modern crime films they’d watched, so too does End give back to devotees of recent Rrated comedies, many of which featured these actors. (This film, too, is rated R —

for weed, endless profanity and graphic demon nudity.) So there are in-jokes and extended riffs on earlier works. (A film-within-thefilm is a Pineapple Express sequel.) Similarly, each actor plays his best-known on-screen version — Rogen is lovable,

THIS IS THE END DIRECTED BY: Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg STARRING: Seth Rogen, Jay Baruchel, James Franco, Craig Robinson, Jonah Hill and Danny McBride

Baruchel high-strung, Hill obsequious, McBride obnoxious — and all are called out on it. (“Seth Rogen, you play the same guy in all your movies.”) Besides vulgar comedy, the filmmakers shoehorn in mini-bites of other genres, such as the confessional cameras of reality TV; the hangout vibe of a talky indie; a rave; a POV from a severed head;

disaster-pic special effects; and a selection of manly-film tropes. But the spine of the comedy is the troubled bromance between Rogen and Baruchel. Their friendship, rooted in Canada, has suffered since Rogen moved to L.A. and began flirting with a new, trendier BFF, Franco. The apocalypse tests their relationship, as well as the bona fides of the others. As the crisis continues, the increasingly desperate crew even falls to debating morality and theology; the Bible is consulted, and there is an exorcism. This all sounds more clever in the abstract than what I actually experienced watching the film. The movie has dead air, jokes that fall flat, too much McBride and too many f-words. But because this is a meta-comedy, those very same complaints came up in the film. Boom! They got me! If you loved these guys in their other movies, you’ll love this one. And if you thought the previous films were dumb, well, this one is somewhat smarter. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013


Mandarin, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 13, and 4 p.m. Sat., June 15. Harris. Free (AH)

FILM CAPSULES CP

THE PITTSBURGH INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL. This round-up of film presents more than 60 works from around the world — features, shorts, documentaries, animated films, music videos — as well as filmmaker Q&As. Among the films with local connections are: Grounded, Sean Patrick Crowell’s doc about Pittsburgh-area marijuana smugglers in the 1970s and 80s; the blue-collar drama There Are No Goodbyes, from John C. Lyons; and Camille Guichard’s Duane Michals: The Man Who Invented Himself, about the groundbreaking Pittsburgh-native photographer. Fri., June 14, through Sun., June 16. Ryan Event Center, 420 Chartiers Ave., McKees Rocks. $10 one-day pass, $15 two-day pass and $20 festival pass. www.pghindie.com

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW MAN OF STEEL. Henry Cavill dons the cape, and becomes Superman. Zack Snyder’s actioner re-tells the superhero’s origin story. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., June 14. THE PURGE. In the near future, the United States has solved a lot of its problems, but not rampant crime. To facilitate “fixing” this, the government sets up The Purge, an annual 12-hour period in which killing is legal and citizens are urged to go out and clean up the streets. Or stay home safely. That’s the plan for James Sandin (Ethan Hawke) and his family, who hunker down in their secure McMansion, in James DeMonaco’s horror thriller. If you’ve ever seen a movie, you know this is gonna be a long night for the Sandins. Sure enough, his son lets in a homeless man fleeing from marauders, the power goes out, and now there are threats from within and without. Kill or be killed. Thou shalt not kill. Save your family by killing. Set an example for your family by not killing. Where is that extra flashlight? When not skulking about the pitchdark house (a home so big that even the kids can’t be found when they take off on sulks), the besieged occupants kind of debate these moral questions. There are some provocative ideas that flicker in the shadows (the rich are literally killing the poor without consequence, for instance), but there isn’t anything of substance here: It’s a dark-house, jump-out-scare flick, with freaky masked killers and a baker’s dozen of gruesome kills. And, I might add, plenty of set-up for The Purge 2. (Al Hoff) WHAT MAISIE KNEW. Maisie (Onata Aprile) is a bright and lively 6-year-old whose otherwise enviable life in Manhattan — fabulous apartment, fun school — is continually disrupted by her self-absorbed and selfish parents. Mom (Julianne Moore) is a fading rock diva, alternating wildly between smothering and neglect; dad (Steve Coogan) is simply too wrapped up in his art business. Their final screaming match ends in a break-up. Now poor Maisie is shuttled back and forth, a pawn in a battle for control, and increasingly under the care of her parents’ respective new spouses — the former nanny and now dad’s wife (Joanna Vanderham) and a kindly bartender (Alexander Skarsgård). Scott McGehee and David Siegel’s drama is a modern adaptation of a Henry James story. It is presented from the point of view of Maisie, who is surprisingly agreeable given the turmoil of her life. But she is not untouched, and young Aprile gives a winsome, unmannered performance that conveys all her heartbreak in her sad saucer eyes and the casual shrug of her shoulder. The slim story ultimately ends up in a place that feels both wonderful and inauthentic. Like Maisie’s life, the film is a bit of a rocky journey, but well acted throughout and an interesting low-key entry in the often overwrought domestic-melodrama canon. Manor (AH)

REPERTORY CINEMA IN THE PARK. The Amazing Spider-Man, Wed., June 12 (Schenley) and Sat., June 15 (Riverview). Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted, Thu., June 13 (Brookline); Fri., June 14 (Arsenal); Sat., June 15 (Grandview); and Sun., June 16 (Schenley).

ONE DAY IN THE LIFE OF ANDREI ARSENEVICH. One renowned filmmaker — Chris Marker — pays tribute to another, the late Andrei Arsenevich Tarkovsky (Stalker, Solaris), using film clips, journal entries and musings. Screens as part of the Three Rivers Arts Festival. In various languages, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Fri., June 14. Harris. Free

The Purge Hook, Mon., June 17 (Highland Park); Tue., June 18 (West End/Elliott Overlook); and Thu., June 20 (Brookline). Men in Black 3, Wed., June 19 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-422-6426 or www.citiparks.net. Free BERT STERN: THE ORIGINAL MAD MAN. Shannah Laumeister’s recent bio-doc recounts the life and career of the influential and prolific photographer. In the 1950s and ’60s, Stern’s bold, artistic photographs, such as his work for Smirnoff vodka, made him a star in the ad world, before he branched out into fashion and the artistic pursuit of beautiful women. Screens as part of the Three Rivers Arts Festival. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 12. Harris. Free

study the “colony-collapse disorder” that is killing bees worldwide. In various languages, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 13. Hollywood AI WEI WEI: NEVER SORRY. Chinese artist and political activist Ai Wei Wei is lauded in the West while frequently harassed in his homeland. Alison Klayman’s recent doc looks at the artist courting controversy, using his 2008 Sichuan earthquakerelated exhibit as a primary example. Screens as part of the Three Rivers Arts Festival. In English, and

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CAVE OF FORGOTTEN DREAMS. Werner Herzog persuaded the French government to let him film in Chauvet Cave — site of the oldest known human art, animal paintings dating back

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ANIMAL HOUSE. Toga! Toga! Toga! Party like it’s 1962, as the brothers of Delta House unleash alcoholfueled academic mayhem. John Landis directs this 1978 National Lampoon comedy starring John Belushi as everybody’s favorite college cut-up, Bluto. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 12. AMC Loews. $5 MORE THAN HONEY. Marcus Imhoof’s new documentary looks at bee colonies in California, China, Switzerland and Australia, in particular, to

Ethan Hawke Julie Delpy

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ROAD HOUSE. Sure, Patrick Swayze can dance, but he can also kick ass, as evidenced by this cult-fave about a bouncer working to keep order at a rough bar. Like the poster said: “The dancing is over. Now it gets dirty.” Rowdy Herrington directs this 1989 brawl-o-rama. 7 p.m. Fri., June 14 ($10 with live heckling by Cream Stain Comedy), and 10 p.m. Sat., June 15. Hollywood

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Photo courtesy of Casa Mañana Theatre

A Timeless Love Story June 21 - 30

412-456-6666

pittsburghCLO.org Groups 412-325-1582

At the Benedum Center

What Maisie Knew 32,000 years. Inevitably, Cave raises more questions than it answers, but that’s beautiful, too. Screens as part of the Three Rivers Arts Festival. 8:15 p.m. Fri., June 14, and 7:15 p.m. Sat., June 15. Harris. Free (Bill O’Driscoll) BETTER OFF DEAD. Savage Steve Holland directs this 1985 comedy starring John Cusack, as a teen who suffers a break-up and more. 10 p.m. Fri., June 14, and 10 p.m. Sat., June 15. Oaks

Wed., June 19; 9 p.m. Fri., June 21; and 4 p.m. Sun., June 23. Hollywood BATMAN. Tim Burton’s 1989 adaptation of the popular comic finds Bruce Wayne, a.k.a. Batman (Michael Keaton), brooding, and battling The Joker (Jack Nicholson) for control of Gotham. Signaling a new, darker era of superhero films, Burton’s film features fantastic urban sets by Anton Furst. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 19. AMC Loews. $5

BRAZIL. Terry Gilliam’s gloriously quirky, dystopian 1985 adventure finds a fantasy-driven government drone (Jonathan Pryce) crashing into reality after a Big Brother-ish computer malfunctions. Michael Palin and Robert DeNiro co-star. 10 p.m. Fri., June 14; 7 p.m. Sat., June 15; and 3 p.m. Sun., June 16. Hollywood MAXO VANKA’S MASTERPIECE: THE MURALS AT ST. NICHOLAS CHURCH. This documentary from local filmmaker Ken Love tells the story of Croatian immigrant Maxo Vanka and the murals he painted at St. Nicholas Church, in Millvale, in the 1930s. The works combine religious imagery with searing indictments of war and capitalism. Screens as part of the Three Rivers Arts Festival. 6 p.m. Sat., June 15. Harris. Free HIGH NOON. Gary Cooper stars in Fred Zinneman’s 1952 Western, about a small-town marshal who must face a criminal he once put away, who is now out and seeking revenge. 11 a.m. Sun., June 16, and 2 p.m. Thu., June 20. Hollywood THE QUIET MAN. In John Ford’s 1952 romance, John Wayne stars as a disgraced American boxer, who relocates to Ireland and finds love with a local girl (Maureen O’Hara). The film continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of films featuring legendary screen couples. 8 p.m. Sun., June 16. Regent Square

JUNE 13-16 | HEINZ HALL FOR TICKETS, CALL 412.392.4900 OR VISIT PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG GROUPS OF 10+ CALL 412.392.4819 TITLE SPONSOR

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WAITING FOR GUFFMAN. In Christopher Guest’s series of mockumentaries spoofing the arts, this one takes on community theater in a small town. Guest stars as the hopeful theater director, along with his regular cohorts Eugene Levy, Catherine O’Hara, Parker Posey and Fred Willard. Mon., June 17, through Thu., June 20. Harris TOUCH OF EVIL. Orson Welles directed this baroque, south-of-the-border noir that plunges newlyweds Mike Vargas (Charlton Heston) and his bride, Susan (Janet Leigh), into a shadowy nightmare of crime and degradation. 7:30 p.m.

Touch of Evil GASLAND 2. Filmmaker Josh Fox has made a sequel to his controversial 2010 documentary Gasland, which looked at some of the problems created by the rush to mine natural gas, particularly through the use of hydrofracturing. His follow-up is set to premiere on HBO on July 8, but Fox will present a sneak preview here on June 20. To be followed by a Q&A. 7 p.m. Thu., June 20. Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall, 4141 Fifth Ave., Oakland. Free. www.gaslandthemovie.com/screenings THE GOOD SON. Jesse James Miller’s documentary looks at the life and career of boxer Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini, with particular emphasis on the tragic 1982 bout between Mancini and Deuk-Koo Kim. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 20. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org


[DANCE]

IT FEEDS YOU DRAMA WITH ONE HAND, AND SLAPS YOU IN THE FACE WITH THE OTHER

RAINBOW COLLECTION

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PITTSBURGH PRIDEFEST 2013 DANCE SHOWCASE 1:30-5:45 p.m. Sun., June 16. Liberty Avenue between Sixth and 10th streets, Downtown. Free. www.pittsburghpride.org N E W S

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INTIMATE Dancer Jasmine Hearn {PHOTO COURTESY OF A. GLEASON}

A highlight of Pittsburgh’s annual PrideFest celebration is its dance showcase, curated each year by local dance aficionado Richard Parsakian. The showcase offers an eclectic mix of local professional dance talent, from ballet to belly dance. This year’s showcase, part of PrideFest’s free June 16 street fair on Liberty Avenue, Downtown, highlights seven troupes on two stages (at Sixth Street and 10th Street). One of five troupes that appeared in 2012’s PrideFest dance showcase, Maddy Landi’s aerial-based kNOTDance, returns with its ongoing exploration of what is considered dance. The group’s new 15-minute work has the theme of marital commitment. Also returning are belly-dance-fusion queens Hot Metal Muses with “Silk Road Musings,” a 15-minute work blending folkloric and classical belly-dance movement and music with modern stylization. And dancer/choreographer Jasmine Hearn rolls out part deux of her four-part series “that’s what she said: installment #2.” Texture Contemporary Ballet reprises three repertory works, including the playful “Ice Ice,” choreographed by Texture’s Kelsey Bartman and Alan Obuzor. It’s a work for a trio of dancers, each wearing a pointe shoe on one foot and a combat boot on the other. A solo excerpt from Obuzor’s “Can Reality Acutely Create Knowledge?” and Bartman’s solo work “Hurts Like Heaven” round out the nationally recognized company’s contributions. The Pillow Project’s Pearlann Porter uses costumes for inspiration for her latest creation, “Combat Boots, Boxing Gloves & Prom Dresses.” Set to what Porter calls “space-age bachelor-pad music” by Pink Martini and Esquivel, the 15-minute comedic work features two male and two female dancers, all outfitted in combat boots, boxing gloves and prom dresses circa 1950s and ’60s. Porter says the work thumbs its nose at gender stereotypes, with performers adopting a contentious “This is who I am, you got a problem with that?” attitude. New to this year’s dance showcase is the Staycee Pearl Dance Project. The troupe will perform “Grrrls and Boyz,” an excerpt from the troupe’s recent production “… on being …”; the work considers gender identification and the complexity of personal relationships. Finally, Pittsburgh breakdance pioneer Brian “BWEAR” Starks’ The Mechanical Wizards reprise one of the crew’s bestknown b-boy/boogaloo dance skits, “The Waiter,” with music by DJ Jon Starks.

[ART]

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY MICHELLE FRIED}

Photographer Caldwell Linker at home. Linker has a new exhibit at The Warhol.

P

EERING INTO artist Caldwell Linker’s

LGBTQ-centered photographic world is like borrowing the eyes of a professional spectator who has just fallen deeply in love. On June 15, The Andy Warhol Museum opens Linker’s solo exhibition All Through the Night, featuring 50 documentary photographs of the local LGBTQ scene. Offering a range of people, emotions and places — from public performances to bedrooms — the collection pays affectionate homage to an adventurous and thriving subculture incubated in Pittsburgh. Linker, originally from North Carolina, is heavily influenced by feminist and queer political movements. However, “there’s been lots of times that I have read about people, or groups of people or events … and there weren’t pictures,” says Linker (who prefers not to be identified by gender). Linker’s passion for documentary photography goes back 15 years, predating a 2007 relocation here from the Pacific Northwest. “My friends are all doing really

interesting things and nobody was documenting it,” says the photographer. “Interesting,” indeed: The Haus of Haunt, Pittsburgh’s premier drag troupe, is enjoying a center-stage moment thanks to RuPaul’s Drag Race competitors Sharon Needles (who won two seasons ago) and

CALDWELL LINKER: ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT runs Sat., June 15-Sept. 15. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. 421-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

Alaska Thunderfuck (last season’s runnerup). Riding the buzz, Linker released a selfpublished photography book, The Haus of Haunt: Watch Children, which also features drag queens Cherri Baum and Veruca la’ Piranha. Watch Children captures the domestic lives of these drag queens, sans fards, but doesn’t shy from their darker,

edgier and, at times, controversial drag style, highlighting some of the nation’s best drag performances. Both Watch Children and All Through the Night illustrate Linker’s dual vantage points as observer and insider/collaborator — roles that can suggest either gentle detachment or genuine engagement. Similarly, Linker’s unintimidating shooting style blends rapid-fire camerawork with assisting stiletto-clad queens off stage and hugging friends at venues like Lawrenceville’s Blue Moon. Linker is seemingly never without a camera: “People don’t even notice I’m holding a camera or snapping photos anymore.” The results are spontaneous, intuitive and direct. “I don’t take pictures of folks unless they are my close friends, and obviously are expecting to be photographed all the time,” says Linker. Linker’s friends, often opulent beauties, appear to love being photographed. They’re aware of not only the pleasure, but the power, immediacy and reproducibility CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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[ART REVIEW]

WATERFRONTS {BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

KEEP CALM AND

BEST OF PITTSBURGH VOTE NOW www.pghcitypaper.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

“Sharon (Headquarters),” by Caldwell Linker

images have in our digital age. Some poses might offend tender viewers. One subject pees in a tub (“Sena (My Bathroom)”); a masked nude crosses Butler Street (“Alaska (Butler St.)”); panties are candidly flashed (“Rachel, Five, Elli (Party At Black Street)”). Linker doesn’t create shock, but instead delivers it from pros who leverage it for political pride by jubilantly setting themselves apart from the mainstream.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

“Cara and Sarah (Gay Prom, Operation Sappho),” by Caldwell Linker

Though the work deals with sensitive material — nudity, people making out (you never know who is dating who), inebriety and unflattering poses — “I try to be respectful about people’s privacy,” says Linker. “I always listen when people ask me to take down pictures [from the Internet]. I try really hard to only put pictures that I think are flattering on the Internet.” Access seems cultivated through Linker’s membership in, and commitment to, the LGBTQ community. “It takes a truly trusted person to be able to take photographs of people with their guard down so that they read as real,” says Warhol director Eric Shiner, who was taken by Linker’s “honest imagery.” “Read as real”: That evaluation doesn’t

merely acknowledge the insider’s goal of “realness.” It also illuminates how characters like Alaska and Sharon are constructed on reality television. Linker’s oeuvre fills the gaps left by sensationalized, low-attention-span spectatorship with domestic moments — less competitive sport, more family dynamics. And the shit definitely got real for Gregory Labon (Veruca la’ Piranha) back in 2010, on the night he was attacked, in an alleged hate crime, outside a Bloomfield bar. A few days later, Linker photographed Labon’s bruises. The series “Veruca After Getting Beat Up (Veruca’s Shower)” carries this collection’s one overt political statement by highlighting violence against queer people and the urgency for equality. The message can ambush aesthetic preoccupation, with an image at once voyeuristic and punishing: It feeds you drama with one hand, and slaps you in the face with the other. Linker’s visual and conceptual antecedents include Nan Goldin, whose 1980s snapshot diaries of friends and lovers are built from frayed emotional obsessions; and Brassaï’s erotic 1930s Parisian cabaret and café night scenes of prostitutes, lovers and transvestites. Among young contemporary photographers, Mike Brodie’s depictions of his fellow freight-hoppers romanticize American 21st-century vagabondage. For decades, documentary’s standing in the art world has been diminished by debates about representation — about whether social realism is attainable by the artist or is infinitely (mis)interpreted by audiences. Nonetheless, Linker and Brodie are among those imperative imagemakers whose work distinguishes human diversity flourishing just under the mainstream radar. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Chang-Jin Lee’s “Floating Echo,” under the portal bridge in Point State Park {PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

DON’T BITCH UNLESS YOU VOTE

Last month, Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman’s 54-foot inflatable rubber ducky could be seen floating in Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbor. Its presence delighted viewers and demonstrated how urban waterways offer dramatic views and public space. This year’s Three Rivers Arts Festival highlights Pittsburgh’s waterfront with the re-opening of the Point State Park fountain. Sitting dramatically at the confluence of three rivers, it offers the perfect opportunity for eye-catching public art along the waterfront or in the rivers. Alas, while the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust-run festival is showing more public art this year, the overall effect is a little too understated. Based on advanced description, it sounded like Chang-Jin Lee’s “Floating Echo” would be situated on the river, as it had been in New York City. There, this large transparent inflatable Buddha was animated by the weather, the natural landscape, the architecture of Manhattan in the distance and the rippling water. It functioned as both a meditation on spirituality and a commentary on kitsch. In Pittsburgh, “Floating Echo” instead occupies a cramped space beneath the Point State Park Portal Bridge. Barely floating in shallow, still water, the piece loses much of its ethereal quality. Accentuated at night by a backdrop of changing colors, the Buddha tips decidedly away from the meditative and towards an oversized trinket. The colored laser beams that descended dramatically from the top of PPG place to fall on the fountain, however, were more appropriate. Scheduled for the first three nights of the festival, “Pittsburgh: Spectral Ascending,” was designed by Lightwave International with Yvette Mattern. Currently, only two other public artworks occupy festival grounds. Hugh Hayden’s “American Hero #4” sits on a lawn painted white at Gateway Center. It is a classic Ford Mustang, also painted white and decorated with two black racing stripes made of hair braided into cornrows. Hayden’s use of hair as commentary on cultural identity builds on work by more established artists such as David Hammons. And Vanessa German’s “Art House” is a hands-on space of creativity and imagination, located in the Creativity Zone. Two more public works are scheduled for the festival’s closing weekend (June 14-16). “Instabiles,” by Andrew Hieronymi and Ian Brill, will be an interactive installation, and “The Drift” will be a collaborative performance space that actually floats on the river. Looking ahead, in September, the Cultural Trust is bringing Hofman’s ducky here, which portends positive developments in river-based public art. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


{PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH PUBLIC THEATER}

John Patrick Hayden (left) and James DeMarse in the Public’s Other Desert Cities

[PLAY REVIEWS]

OFF BALANCE {BY TED HOOVER} HAD YOU BEEN seated near me at Pitts-

burgh Public Theater’s production of Other Desert Cities, you’d have noticed a puzzled look on my face. Here’s why: Edward Albee won the 1967 Pulitzer for A Delicate Balance, a brittle comedy/drama about a meticulous suburban husband and wife — and her alcoholic sister houseguest — whose angry, divorced daughter comes home for a visit. In 2012, Jon Robin Baitz almost won the Pulitzer for Other Desert Cities — a brittle comedy/drama about a suburban couple and alcoholic sister welcoming home an angry daughter. Oh, and both plays feature a dead brother, too. And just in case we’ve missed it, at one point the mother actually describes their family system as “a delicate balance.”

OTHER DESERT CITIES continues through June 30. Pittsburgh Public Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $23-55. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

Iraq War or Dubya or Vietnam. I admire Baitz’s politics, but was less impressed with his dramaturgy. The Public production features five solid actors — I particularly enjoyed John Patrick Hayden’s bitchy underplaying of the youngest brother — but something seems a bit off-kilter. Rob Ruggiero directs Helena Ruoti and James DeMarse to play the parents as obviously broken and already disintegrating. So when Pilar Witherspoon attacks as the angry daughter, she mows them down. Ruggiero wants us to have sympathy for the parents from the start, a not-indefensible choice. But it makes Witherspoon seem monotonously whiney and ungrateful, giving the three of them nowhere to go dramatically. As the drunk sister, Susan Cella has a clutch of very funny lines and plays them impeccably. And I’m saving the best for last: Michael Schweikardt’s set design for the Palm Springs family living room. As a model of mid-century modern it is, quite simply, a masterpiece.

JERRY GARCIA

SYMPHONIC CELEBRATION FEATURING

WARREN HAYNES WITH THE

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

TUES, JUNE 18 | 7:30PM HEINZ HALL

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

PREACHMENTS

So what the hell is Baitz’s point? If you’re going to, um, borrow so heavily from another work, borrowing from an alltime great can’t help but invite unflattering comparisons. Delicate Balance is about ineffable loneliness and the existential void. Other Desert Cities is a family drama with uninteresting secrets and more than a touch of melodrama. Baitz supplies a political undercurrent — the parents are right-wing, the children are lefties — but it feels extraneous. In a heated exchange about family dynamics, someone suddenly chirps in about the

{BY ROBERT ISENBERG} ON THE BRIGHT side, The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail is another solid show by Throughline Theatre, and if you have an unconditional love for Henry David Thoreau, this little pageant should satisfy your transcendental needs. Joseph Ryan Yow directs a breezy production on a simple set (co-designed with Jesse Poole-Van Swol), and the 12-actor cast swirls briskly about the stage. The play’s anchor is Jordan Matthew Walsh, who plays Thoreau as an animated, quickwitted soothsayer. Walsh shoulders most

FOR TICKETS, CALL 412.392.4900 OR VISIT PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG GROUPS OF 10+ CALL 412.392.4819

CONTINUES ON PG. 58

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of the script, gushing monologues like a fountain of youthful wisdom. As for the play, Thoreau is laughably sanctimonious, more treatise than drama —indeed, more treatise than Walden, Thoreau’s actual manifesto. Robert Edwin Lee and Jerome Lawrence composed the script in 1970, and their antiwar agenda has all the subtlety of a Weathermen bomb. The era was already producing a host of crafty, eccentric, anti-establishment heroes, such as Patrick McMurphy, Cool Hand Luke and Hawkeye Pierce, so why not another? Like the pair’s more famous play, Inherit the Wind, Thoreau is outrageously one-sided. Thoreau is the only voice of reason, and a vociferous voice at that. All the other characters are stuttering hypocrites, largely because they don’t pick berries in the forest. Emerson is a sellout. Sweet little Ellen is an obedient prude. The schoolteacher is a veritable Nazi. Thoreau’s highfalutin’ moralizing gets annoying early on, then embarrassing by Act II. In the Vietnam era, this remixed Thoreau must have seemed offbeat and virile. Today, he sounds like a naïve contrarian, who believes disagreement with all others amounts to philosophy.

THE NIGHT THOREAU SPENT IN JAIL continues through Sat., June 15. Throughline Theatre at Grey Box Theatre, 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $12-15. www.throughlinetheatre.org

FRIDAY, JUNE 21 8:00 PM

SATURDAY, A A JUNE N 22 2:30 PM

Experience Pixar in Concert performed live by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. See visually stunning movie clips from all 13 Pixar movies played on a giant screen while the Symphony performs the PXVLFPDGHPHPRUDEOHE\WKHVHEHORYHGÀOPVDQGFKDUDFWHUV

FOR TICKETS, CALL 412.392.4900 OR VISIT PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG GROUPS OF 10+ CALL 412.392.4819 PRESENTING SPONSOR

Presentation licensed by Disney Concert Library © Disney / Pixar

(I hesitate to even mention Thoreau’s interaction with Henry Williams, a runaway slave. Thoreau proclaims that there is “slavery in the North” as well, implicitly comparing overworked white laborers to the whipped, raped, homeless, dehumanized, bought-and-sold bondsmen of the South. I’m sorry, but: No, he didn’t.) Yet as literature, Thoreau is now part of history, like Walden, and I commend Throughline for revisiting its version of things. If the play itself is dated, Thoreau’s sentiments are timeless, and the play should provoke some thoughtful conversation. From what I gather, this is Throughline’s through-line — low budgets, proud works and plenty to talk about on the ride home. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

SELECTORAL {BY F.J. HARTLAND} CAN AN HONEST person be elected Presi-

dent of the United States? Industrialist and idealist Grant Matthews is full of plans to go to Washing-

ton and fix what’s wrong with America. But will he be willing to compromise his views to become the Republican candidate in 1948? That is the premise of State of the Union, the 1946 Pultizer Prize-winning drama by Russel Crouse and Howard Lindsay, and the season’s first offering from the Summer Company at Duquesne University.

THE PERFORMANCE TO WATCH IS JAY KEENAN’S AS THE JADED WASHINGTON INSIDER JAMES CONOVER. Brad Sadler certainly has the looks and the voice to play Grant Matthews. His ringing tones fill the Peter Mills Auditorium, and his sincerity and passion make you believe a better America is possible. I’d vote for him! In the quieter and emotional moments, he isn’t quite hitting the mark — but no Presidential candidate is perfect, right? As Matthews’ wife, Mary, Juliette Mariani plans a full emotional arc. In her first scene, she is a somewhat shrewish woman trapped in a lackluster marriage. But by the final scene, the audience will be rooting for her. As the Matthews campaign starts to ignite, so does Mary’s rekindled passion for Grant. Still, the performance to watch in State of the Union is Jay Keenan’s as the jaded Washington insider James Conover. Conover has the power to make (or break) Matthews’ bid for the nomination, and Keenan plays the master manipulator to perfection. He is able to make Conover’s backroom negations and smoke-filled-room dirty deals seem perfectly logical. Conover uses people like pawns, but it is an iron fist in a velvet glove. Keenan’s scenes with Mariani are some of the best in the show.

STATE OF THE UNION continues through Sat., June 15. The Summer Company at Duquesne University, Duquesne campus, Uptown. $10-15. 412-243-6464

Victor Vrabel and Naomi Grodin bring comic relief as a blustering Southern judge and his very tipsy wife. John E. Lane Jr. pulls triple duty: direction, scenic design and cast member. Lane’s pacing keeps the three-act play moving smoothly. His utilitarian set represents three different locations, utilizing some lovely furniture pieces to make that happen. And he garners laughs in a small role as an over-dressed dinner guest. Sex, dirty deals and intrigue — it’s American politics as usual. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Tickets on sale at mattress.org Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you.

All proceeds support museum programs & exhibitions. Mattress FactorZtSampsonia WaZt Major support:

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Additional support provided by Avaya, ConsultUSA, Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield, NACR, PNC Bank, PPG Industries Foundation, Allegheny General Hospital, H.J. Heinz Company, National Financial, A Fidelity Investments Company, The Pittsburgh Steelers, Schell Games and Xerox

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FOR THE WEEK OF

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+ FRI., JUNE 14 {COMICS} A few years back, The ToonSeum recruited local cartoonists to create a visitors’ guide to the North Side. Now that charming publication has a sequel celebrating the neighborhood that’s home to landmarks from The Original Hot Dog Shop to Phipps Conservatory (not to mention vanished wonders like Luna Park). Tonight, Phantom of the Attic Comics hosts a release party for Oakland, edited by Harold Behar and featuring talents like DC veteran Christopher Moeller and newer names like Nate McDonough and Jessica Heberle. Bill O’Driscoll 7 p.m. 405 S. Craig St., Oakland. Free. 412-682-6290

+ SAT., JUNE 15 {ART} Over the decades, Genesis Breyer P-Orridge has been a performance artist, industrialmusic pioneer (Throbbing Gristle, et al.) and essayist. While the artist’s first solo museum exhibition includes more than 100 diverse works dating to the 1970s, Genesis Breyer P-Orridge: S/HE IS HERE focuses on the Pandrogyne Project — P-Orridge’s attempt with his wife, Lady Jaye Breyer

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P-Orridge, to merge their identities through plastic surgery, hormone therapy and cross-dressing. (The project continued after Jaye’s death, in 2007). The exhibit opens today at The Andy Warhol Museum, as do two shows by Pittsburghbased artists: photography

JUNE 19 Taylor Stevens

exhibit Caldwell Linker: All Through the Night (see preview on page 55) and Nick Bubash: The Patron Saint of White Guys That Went Tribal and Other Works. BO 10 a.m.5 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $10-20. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

{EXHIBIT} Today is the opening of BIKES: Science on Two Wheels, a new exhibit at the Carnegie

Science Center. Bikers and science geeks can explore helmet aerodynamics, Newton’s laws of angular momentum and torque, and other scientific concepts behind two-wheeled travel. The Science Center built the exhibit with borrowed bikes from The Bicycle Museum of America and the North Side’s own Bicycle Heaven. Starting at noon, along the riverfront trail, the I Made It Market will sell bicycle-themed art and accessories. On select Saturdays through September, the Center offers bike-related outdoor activities. Olivia Lammel 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. $11.95-17.95. 412-237-3400 or www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

{OUTDOORS} Venture Outdoors’ Summer Backpacking Intro is a oneday class geared toward beginning backpackers with plans to hit the trails this summer. Participants will learn basics of safety, packing,

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ALYSSA SKYES}

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

water purification and cooking. Students can take their new know-how into the sort-of wilderness on a beginner’slevel hike through South Park. This program is strongly recommended if you’re joining one of nonprofit VO’s backpacking trips this summer. OL 11 a.m. (register by 5 p.m. Fri., June 14). Meet at Bright Star Pavilion, South Park. $20. 412-255-0564 or www. ventureoutdoors.org


sp otlight With marriage equality being debated by the U.S. Supreme Court, state after state adopting same-sex marriage, and Pennsylvania considering (again) a non-discrimination bill, it’s a banner time for LGBT rights. Celebrate it with Pittsburgh Pride, whose motto this year, naturally, is “I Wanna Marry You.” The annual celebration lasts through June 16, and includes a slew of advocacy and social events. Performances include Dreams of Hope’s youth stage show, Department of Hope (7 p.m. Thu., June 13; Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty; free). Want to check out local watering holes? Sign up for the city-wide Pub Crawl ($27-32), which starts at 8 p.m. Fri., June 14, and includes a chauffeured tour of bars, restaurants and clubs. But the main party takes place on the weekend, when Grammy nominee and former American Idol star Adam Lambert headlines at Pride in the Street ($35-45), a series of performances running from 5:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. Sat., June 15. On Sunday, let your rainbow flag fly during the Pride March from noon to 1 p.m.; it starts at the corner of Grant Street and Boulevard of the Allies. Then check out PrideFest, a free street fair from 1-6 p.m. on Liberty Avenue between Sixth and 10th streets, with entertainment, vendors and performers, plus a children’s activity area. Lauren Daley Pittsburgh Pride continues through Sun., June 16. Full schedule and info at www.pittsburghpride.org.

{FESTIVAL}

6:45 p.m. pre-reading concert; 1410 Monterey St., North Side). 412-323-0278

+ WED., JUNE 19 {WORDS}

JUNE 14

Oakland

because it’s usually during the work week, here’s your chance. Today is Pittsburgh’s 25th annual take on this international holiday marking the date on

{SCREEN} The annual Americans for the Arts Convention brings perhaps 1,000 arts administrators to town this weekend to discuss funding, demographic trends, and even, you know, art. While attendees will also be treated to performances by local talent, most of the shows are private. The lone exception is tonight’s screening of the first three episodes of gay web series The Outs. The screening, in Downtown’s Westin Pittsburgh hotel, is followed by a live, in-person Q&A with director, writer and lead actor Adam Goldman. BO 8 p.m. Westmoreland Room, Westin Pittsburgh, 1000 Penn Ave., Downtown. $10. www. AmericansForTheArts.org

+ SUN., JUNE 16 {WORDS} If you always miss Bloomsday

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which James Joyce’s Ulysses is set. Starting at 10 a.m., with Bloomfield’s Crazy Mocha playing the Martello Tower, through Regent Square’s Map Room hosting Molly Bloom’s

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famed closing soliloquy, follow Leopold Bloom on his mythic perambulation around Dublin. Other stops include Homewood Cemetery and the Frick Art & Historical Center; organizers promise “mainly Irish voices” as readers of appropriate sequences. The complete schedule’s at www. bloomsdaypittsburgh.org. BO 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Free.

Pittsburgh’s Terrance Hayes and Angela Jackson. On Thu., June 20, City of Asylum/Pittsburgh holds a tented outdoor reading with widely acclaimed Nigerian-born poet Chris Abani; Pittsburgh’s Toi Derricotte; Cornelius Eady (with musicians Concetta Abbate and Charlie Rauh); and Harryette Mullen. BO 7:30 p.m. (Pitt-Greensburg). Also 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 20 (with

{WORDS} Every year, Cave Canem, the premier foundation supporting and promoting black poetry, hits Pittsburgh for a series of free readings by both emerging poets and big names. The first, tonight at the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, features Thomas Sayers Ellis (performing with saxophonist James Brandon Lewis),

New York Times best-selling author Taylor Stevens visits Mystery Lovers Bookshop tonight. She will discuss The Doll, her latest thriller and the third installment of the Vanessa Munroe series. Readers seem to be in love with Munroe, a fierce “information specialist” with a damaged past. She has been compared to Stieg Larsson’s bad-ass tattooed heroine Lisbeth Salander. In her latest appearance, wrote Publishers Weekly, Munroe “remains as compelling as ever.” Stevens’ breakthrough thriller The Informationist is slated to hit the big screens, directed by James Cameron. OL 7 p.m. 514 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. Free. 888-800-6078 or www.mysterylovers.com

+ MON., JUNE 17

+ THU., JUNE 20

{WORDS}

{WORDS}

After writing six self-help memoirs, best-selling author Jen Lancaster is still trying to get her act together. This time, she set out to find happiness in dried flower arrangements and potpourri bowls. For a year, she lived her life according to domestic know-it-all Martha Stewart. She documents the “Martha Way” in The Tao of Martha: My Year of LIVING, or Why I’m Never Getting All That Glitter Off of the Dog. Tonight, she tells the tale at the Waterfront’s Barnes & Noble. OL 7 p.m., 100 W. Bridge St., West Homestead. Free. 412-462-5743 or www.barnesandnoble.com

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Fans of the Unblurred gallery crawls can see another side of Penn Avenue’s arts corridor — the outside — at Penn Avenue Arts in Motion. Today, the Bloomfield-Garfield Corp. closes a block of Penn for an afternoon of music, art and food. Performers include Gene Stovall (acoustic R&B), Vox Lumina (tribal folk), the Turpentiners (bluegrass), Mega-Def (hip hop) and nationally known indie electropop band The Van Allen Belt. The food’s by food trucks and neighborhood restaurants; nearby galleries are open; and a family area includes activities by the Carnegie Museum of Art, Assemble and the Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. BO Noon-6 p.m. Penn between Atlantic and Pacific, Bloomfield/Garfield. Free. 412-389-5521

Tonight, a slew of slam poets will take the mic in the June Steel City Slam. Twelve poets will compete for a cash prize and recognition as a slam champ. Between rounds, tonight’s featured poet, Paulie Lipman, will perform. Lipman is a musician, writer and slam pro from Worchester, Mass. Slams take place on the third Thursday of each month at 720 Music Café. The sign-up sheet goes out at 7 p.m., and the slam starts as soon as enough judges and poets have volunteered. OL 7 p.m. 4405 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5. info@pghpoetry.org or www.pghpoetry.org

JUNE 15 S/HE IS HERE

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER BARRYMORE’S GHOST. A show

OFFIC OF THE P IAL DJ ITTS CELEBRAT BURGH ION!

PROUD PARTNER

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exploring the mythology of the Barrymore family. Presented by The Baldwin Players June 14-15. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576. BROADWAY FLASHBACK. Cabaret dinner theater. Presented by Pohl Productions. Sat and Fri., June 14. Thru June 15. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. DISNEY’S BEAUTY & THE BEAST. June 14-29. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-773-9896. JULIUS CAESAR. Presented by Food for Groundlings Theatre Company. Thru June 15. CCAC South Campus, West Mifflin. 412-469-6219. THE KREUTZER SONATA. A tale of love, loss & betrayal, inspired by Beethoven’s sonata for piano & violin. Thru June 22. Henry Heymann Theatre, Oakland. THE NERD. An odd character wears out his welcome when he visits a fellow veteran he saved

SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN in Vietnam. Presented by Saint BROTHERS. Presented by Vincent Summer Theatre. Tue-Sat. Pittsburgh CLO. Thru June 16. Thru June 15. St. Vincent College, Benedum Center, Downtown. Latrobe. 724-537-8900. 412-456-6666. OTHER DESERT CITIES. The SIDE BY SIDE BY SONDHEIM: Palm Springs life of a movie star/ A MUSICAL CELEBRATION. politician & his wife is upset Collection of songs from by the arrival of unruly Company, Follies, A relatives. Presented Little Night Music, by Pittsburgh Public A Funny Thing Theater. Tue-Sun. Happened on the Thru June 30. O’Reilly . www per Way to the Forum, Theater, Downtown. a p ty pghci m more. Wed-Sun. 412-316-1600. .co Thru Aug. 18. Cabaret RADIO GOLF. August at Theater Square, Wilson’s play about Downtown. 412-325-6769. Harmond Wilks, an Ivy-League STATE OF THE UNION. A educated real estate developer 1946 political satire surrounding who aspires to redevelop the selection of a Republican the Hill District & become presidential candidate. Presented the first Black mayor of by The Summer Company. Pittsburgh. Wed-Sun. Thru Thu-Sat. Thru June 15. Peter Mills June 29. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theater ( Duquesne, Rockwell Theatre, Downtown. Hall ), Uptown. 412–243-6464. SAME TIME, NEXT YEAR. THE TEMPEST, OR THE Doris & George, each married to ENCHANTED ISLE. Presented other people, rendezvous once by Unseam’d Shakespeare a year. Thu-Sun. Thru June 22. Company. Wed-Sun. Thru South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. June 29. Studio Theatre, 412-831-8552.

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

ALL IN THURSDAYS

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Weddings, Nightclubs, Proms, Corporate Events... We’ll do our part to make it perfect.

Cathedral of Learning, Oakland. TO TELL A STORY: A VARIETY SHOW. Presented by The Heritage Players. Fri., June 14, 7 p.m. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633. THE WEDDING FROM HELL. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Sat., June 15, 7 p.m. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640. THE WIZARD OF OZ. Presented by the Actors & Artists of Fayette County. June 13-16. Geyer Performing Arts Center, Scottdale. 724-887-0887.

COMEDY THU 13 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru June 27 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

THU 13 - SAT 15 SEBASTIAN MANISCALCO. June 13-15 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 14 PITTSBURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE W/ MIKE WYSOCKI. Fri, 9 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995.

FRI 14 - SAT 15 DAVE BURLEIGH. June 14-15, 9 p.m. Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 15 THE DEATH SHOW: AN IMPROVISED FUNERAL. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-805-2130. THE LUPONES: MADE UP MUSICALS. Sat, 8 p.m. Thru July 27 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 323-401-0465.

MON 17 TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 18 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 19 STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. CONTINUES ON PG. 64

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THUR, JUNE 13 • 9PM JAM/FUNK

ULTRAVIOLET HIPPOPATAMUS FRI, JUNE 14 • 9PM AFRO BEAT/FUNK/JAZZ

STONE COLD GROVE PRODUCTIONS, LLC

BIG MEAN SOUND MACHINE

PRESENTS

SAT, JUNE 15 • 9PM FUNK/ROCK/JAZZ

Saturday, June 15 JIMBO AND THE SOUPBONES

FLETCHERS GROVE SUN, JUNE 16 • 9PM AFRO BEAT/FUNK/JAZZ

VISUAL

MOUNT CARMEL

ART

“Psyche,” by Dorion Barill, from Rustbelt Romanticism at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art

NEW THIS WEEK ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. All Through the Night. LGBQT photography by Caldwell Linker. The Patron Saint of White Guys That Went Tribal & Other Works. Work by Nick Bubash. S/HE IS HER/E. Feat. over 100 works by Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, dating from the mid 1970s to the present. Opens June 15. North Side. 412-237-8300. LOCUS. Sustaining Systems. Work by Rose Clancy, Amara Getten, Constance & Thomas Merriman, Tom Sarver, more. Artist reception: June 15, 7-10 p.m. & by appointment. Part of the Americans for the Arts Convention. Bloomfield. 412-688-0417. OUTLAW STUDIOS. Spooktacular Art Show. Work by Arvin Clay, Brian Holton, Chuck Amok, Melanie Stone, Nat Chamberlin, Radu Plucinsky, & Terry Callen. Opens June 14, 7-10 p.m. Strip District. 412-471-1085. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Art Interprets Alzheimer’s. Work by George Roby & Herbert Ascherman, Jr. Opens on June 15 w/ roundtable discussion, 3-4 p.m. Downtown. 412-261-7003.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Talus. Paintings by Lindsay Merrill and Paul Rouphail. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. Abstract Jazz Works. Abstract oil paintings created during live performances with Jesse Dandy, Art Blakey, Winton Marsalis, Jimmy

Owens, & others. Downtown. 412-471-6070. 937 LIBERTY AVE. Confluence. New works presented by the Society of Sculptors. Downtown. 412-901-7760. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. North Side. 412-237-8300. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. SOLO Exhibits. Work by Leslie Ansley, Jo-Anne Bates & Tina Brewer. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BE GALLERIES. The Latest Works. Work by Vivian Fliegel. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Richard P. Rauso, Leslie Sorg, Christina Roselle, Laura Tabakman. Watercolors, batiks & oils, designer handbags & jewelry design. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Marshes, Mountains, & Fields. Paintings by Crista Pisano. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. Botanizing the Asphalt. Site-specific work by Edith Abeyta. South Side. 412-381-7767. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. The 102nd show from the oldest continuously exhibiting visual arts organization in the country. One & the Same. Sound installation by Susan Philipsz. Japan is the Key: Collecting

Prints & Ivories, 1900–1920. Collections from the early years of the Carnegie Institute. The Playground Project. A richly illustrated exhibition exploring the history of postwar playground design & highlighting important examples of playgrounds from the 20th century. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Melanie Werner Collection. Feat. 18th-Early 19th Century Fine European Antique Art as well as modern art pieces. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Selected Works by Christian Wolfgang Breitkreutz. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EASTSIDE GALLERY. MCG Invitational Scholarship Winners. Work by Lauren Brown, Adam Linn, & Aaron Kandel. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. E Block. Photography by Mark Perrott. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. A Kind of Alchemy: Medieval Persian Ceramics. A look at the diversity of ceramics made in ancient Persia, now present-day Iraq, Iran, & Afghanistan. Feat. 10thcentury splashware, buffware, slip-painted ware, lusterware & 14th-century fritware, more. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. RetroFRESH. Contemporary

WITH CAROUSEL AND LOST REALMS TUES, JUNE 18 • 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES FT. COLTER HARPER CD RELEASE SHOW WED, JUNE 19 8PM • EARLY SHOW ROOTS/COUNTRY/ROCK

& THE OLD E. ALLSTARS Starts at 7:30pm Upcoming Shows: JULY 27 BIG ATLANTIC at Mullens, North Shore SEPT 14 TOM BROWNE AND FRIENDS at Kelly Strayhorn

DEADSTRING BROTHERS 11PM • LATE SHOW REGGAE/FUNK/DANCE

SPIRITUAL REZ

ullens M Bar & Grill

OPEN FOR LUNCH Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41

N O RTH

S H O R E

( A C R O S S F R O M P N C PA R K )

2.682.0177

Tickets $5 in advance showclix.com and $7 at the door stonecoldgroove.net for all the info.

FInd us on Facebook at StoneColdGrooveProductions

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SAT, JUNE 15 vs PHILADELPHIA SOUL

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 62

Pizza & Beer Night tuesdays $15 large pizza & pitcher domestic beer FREE POOL all night

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$2 Miller Lite Drafts til 12am FREE POOL all night ½ off Select Appetizers 9-11pm

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06.15 (lower level) Spectrum dance party 146 44th Street Lawrenceville PA 15201 412.687.2157 www.cattivo.biz Open Tues-Sat 4-2am Check our website & Facebook page for more events

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013

AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic rollplayed musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. The Playground Project. Survey exploring the history of post-war playground design & highlighting important examples of playgrounds from the 20th century. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Tlingit Totem Pole. Carving & installation by Tommy Joseph. BugWorks. Feat. beautiful photography of insects, amazing specimens, & live bugs! Garden of Light: Works by Paula Crevoshay. Feat. nearly 70 fine art jewelry pieces. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II ironmaking technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. Ligonier. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. I N V E N T O R Y: The Orgone Archive, Pittsburgh 13 (20022013). Feat. a decade’s worth of promotion & propaganda in the form of posters, stickers & bits of paper created by The Orgone Archive. Downtown. 412-325-7037. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. What We Collect: Recent Art Acquisitions, 2007–2012. Botanical illustrations from the early 19th

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 63

paintings by James Kennedy, Claire Hardy, Donald Deskey, Alexander Minewski, Louise Evans-Scott, Vladimir Naiditch, & Henri de Waroquier. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Passion. Work by Chris Visgitis & Todd Sanders. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Sweet Mortality. Recent works by Scott Hove. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG GARDEN AND CIVIC CENTER. Norwin Art League Annual Membership Show. Greensburg. 724-836-1123. HOMESTEAD PUMP HOUSE. The Landscape of Steel. Photographs by Kevin Scanlon. Munhall. 412-464-4020. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Copper Foil Portraits 1940s1970s. Work by Irma Freeman. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. James Gallery Group Exhibition. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MAKE YOUR MARK ARTSPACE & COFFEEHOUSE. Steel City Medley. Photographs by Jay Ressler. Point Breeze. 412-365-2117. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169.

century through the present. Oakland. 412-268-2434. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Silk Road. Photo exhibition of images taken along the Silk Road in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal & India in 1972 by Albin & Virginia Curtze. Downtown. 412-391-4100. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over

MENDELSON GALLERY. Expressive Forms. Work by Anire Mosley & Jonathan Shapiro. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Somebody, Anybody… Everybody. New work by David Grim & Mark Panza. Garfield. 412-362-0274. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. ZA. Group show feat. pizza-themed art. Bloomfield. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Regional MultiMedia Art Show. Juried art show feat. amateur & professional artists. Ross. 412-364-3622. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The Civil War. A collection of rare and historic images printed from original glass plate negatives that survived the harrowing travels of Civil War Photographers. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Fiberart International 2013. Juried exhibition of contemporary fiber art. Presented by the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh. 30:2. Group exhibition presented by Associated Artists of Pittsburgh.Coming Home. Fabric installation by Kay Healy. Friday Nights at Guitar Center. Work by Allison Kaufman. Rites of Passage. Oil paintings by Maggie Mills. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Consciousness. Flameworked glass by Eunsuh Choi. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REMEDY. Voodoo Velvet.

200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and

Paintings. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. SHAW GALLERIES. Gettysburg Landscapes. Paintings by Diane Grguras. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Continuum. Work by Doug DuBois & Aaron Blum. South Side. 412-431-1810. SPACE. Thad Kellstadt: On the Glass Surf. Video, installation & sound create a haunted paradise on the border of fracture & utopia. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Tattoo Works III. A juried exhibition of new & innovative artwork from local tattoo artists. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TRINITY GALLERY. Adrienne Borkowski: A Solo Exhibition. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2458. TRUNDLE MANOR. Serendipity! A Trundle Manor Art Event. New work by Donnie Toomer. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Open studio. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. U.S. POST OFFICE & COURTHOUSE. Whitehall Arts Courthouse Exhibit. Paintings by Whitehall Arts members. Downtown. 412-561-4000. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work Rustbelt Romanticism. An exhibit of paintings, drawings, & film by Mark & Dorion Barill. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WILDCARD. Craft Hard: Art Inspired by Action Movies. Work by Andrew O. Ellis, Tara Goe, Elliot McNally, & Mario Zucca. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Memento Mori. Sculpture by Gregory Barsamian. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Glass art surrounded by colorful blooms. Feat. work by Daviea Davis, Jason Forck, Steven Sadvary, Lisa Platt, more. Oakland. 412-622-6914.


PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. Scottdale. 724-887-7910.

FESTIVALS THU 13 ART IN THE PARK. Food, music, vendors, more. Thu, 6-8:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 29 Penn Avenue Parklet, Wilkinsburg. 412-727-7855.

THU 13 - SAT 15 SAXONBURG VFC CARNIVAL. Water battles, raffle, pageants, fireman’s parade, more. Thru June 15 Main St., Saxonburg, Saxonburg. 724-321-1761.

THU 13 - SUN 16 DOLLAR BANK THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Music, visual art, arts & craft booths, more. Thru June 16 Downtown Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FRI 14 - SUN 16 3RD ANNUAL BANTAM JEEP HERITAGE FESTIVAL. History exhibit, vendors, demos, more. June 14-16 Cooper’s Lake Campground, Slippery Rock. 724-234-2291.

SAT 15 JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION. Ujamaa marketplace, children’s activities, gospel presentation, more. 12-6 p.m. Hill House Kaufmann Center, Hill District. PENN AVENUE ARTS IN MOTION. Art & food vendors, live music, children’s activities, more. Penn Ave., between Atlantic & Pacific Ave. 12-6 p.m.

SAT 15 - SUN 16 STILLS IN THE HILLS. Appalachian jamboree feat. live music, whiskey tasting, children’s activities, organic marketplace,

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Sean Jones Quartet at the Pittsburgh Jazzlive International Festival, Downtown

23, a student from Shadyside

THU 13

WHEN: Sun.,

LITERARY

June 09

THU 13

Four great artists all came together on this stage. I don’t know the drummer [Obed Calvaire] so well, but Orrin Evans is an amazing pianist, the trombonist Sean Jones is a great guy in the area. Then we have Luques Curtis, who’s amazing, he was on the bass. I came here for Sean Jones. I didn’t know that Luques was coming — I was so happy. They’re all amazing. I like how Sean can tell a story with all of his songs. The one song was called “Dark Days,” and I knew exactly what it was going to sound like before he even played it. It sounds like a day where it’s sunny and all of a sudden the rain comes down and it’s a storm. He was having a bad day and that’s exactly what it sounds like; it all makes sense. B Y O L IV IA L AMME L

WED 19

LIVE

POLITICS GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

CRITIC: Alycia Washington,

more. June 15-16 Seven Springs, Champion. 1-800-452-2223.

LUNCHTIME

Shakespeare in the Parks. 6:30 p.m. Piccolo Forno, Lawrenceville. 412-404-8531.

AT

SCHENLEY PLAZA

SCHENLEY PLAZA (OAKLAND)

ART & INSPIRATION W/ WILLIAM ROCK PRESENTS AN EVENING W/ HUANG XIANG. Poetry reading & live music. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

EVERY TUESDAY Starting July 9 - October 8 Noon to 1PM

ACOUSTIC SETS BY LOCAL BANDS! UNDER THE TENT

FRI 14

GAYLE REED-CARROLL, M. A. SINNHUBER & ANNE PICONE. MOMS. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside Mad Fridays Reading Series. Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. Delanie’s Coffee, South Side. 412-682-4300. 412-927-4030. JOAN E. BAUER, JAY CARSON. Poetry reading 5K FOAM FEST. Obstacle race & book signing. 7:30-9 p.m. benefiting Operation Walk South Side Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh. http:// South Side. 412-431-0118. www.5kfoamfest.com/ 8 a.m. WRITERS’ OPEN MIC NIGHT. Camp Lutherlyn, Butler. All genres of written/ MILES AGAINST spoken word MELANOMA 5K welcome. Second RUN/WALK. Benefits Fri of every month, the University of 7-9 p.m. Reads Ink Pittsburgh Cancer Bookshop, Vandergrift. www. per pa Institute. 9 a.m. South 724-567-7236. pghcitym o .c Park, South Park. 412-901-2078. KAREN LILLIS, SCOTT SILSBE, TAYLOR GRIESHOBER. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO Poetry reading, Versify Reading PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Series. 7:30-9 p.m. East End Read & code letters, pick books, Book Exchange, Bloomfield. pack ‘em or database ‘em! 412-224-2847. PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. of every month Springdale Free 412-361-3022. Public Library, Springdale. FREE TO BREATHE 5K & 1-MILE 724-274-9729. WALK. Benefits the PA Lung Cancer Partnership. 8:30 a.m. North Park Boathouse, Allison BLOOMSDAY IN PITTSBURGH. Park. 215-525-0466. Readings of Ulysses by James Joyce across the city. Location information at LIFE’S WORK GOLF http://www.bloomsday INVITATIONAL. Benefits pittsburgh.org/ 10 a.m. Life’s Work of Western PA. Valley SLASHER CHIC THRILLER Brook Country Club, McMurray. BOOK SWAP. Call for reservation. 412-281-8090. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Mystery MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S Lovers Bookshop, Oakmont. REVELS. Dinner, silent auction, 412-828-4877. more. Benefits Pittsburgh

SAT 15

TROY HILL SUMMER FESTIVAL. Games, raffles, live music, more. June 19-22 Most Holy Name of Jesus Parish, Troy Hill. 412-231-2994.

DANCE

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 14 ART IN A BOX. Dance performances, photo exhibit, artist market, more. 7 p.m. The D.A.P. Co-Op, Carnegie. 412-403-7357.

SAT 15

FUNDRAISERS THU 13 NORTH HILLS COMMUNITY OUTREACH’S DESSERT THEATRE. Rick Abbott’s comedy-mystery But Why Bump off Barnaby? & a full buffet of delicious desserts. Thru June 13 St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, Allison Park. 412-487-6316.

FRI 14 SOUL TO SOLE. Live music, silent auction, prizes for outrageous footwear, more. Benefits the Family Hospice Future Fund. 6 p.m. J. Verno Studios, South Side. 412-572-8812. STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL. Live music, games, food, more. Benefits Sojourner House

SUN 16

E AMATEURNNEIT12 WED, JU

SUN 16

NEXT: Former Digital Playground XXX Contract Star

MON 17

RILEY JUNE 27-29 135 9th Street 412-281-7703 www.blushexotic.com DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

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MON 17

KEEP CALM AND

DON’T BITCH UNLESS YOU VOTE BEST OF PITTSBURGH VOTE NOW www.pghcitypaper.com

BOOK SIGNING W/ JEN LANCASTER. Author of Tao of Martha: My Year of LIVING; Or, Why I’m Never Getting All That Glitter Off of the Dog. 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Waterfront. 412-462-5743. OUT OF THE GUTTER: GRAPHIC NOVEL DISCUSSION GROUP. Third Mon of every month, 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THIRD ON THIRD. Seated readings of screenplays written by local screenwriters. Every third Mon, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 19 3rd Street Gallery, Carnegie. 412-276-5233.

TUE 18 JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. LINDA CASTILLO. Discussion & book signing w/ author of Her Last Breath. 7 p.m. Mystery Lovers Bookshop, Oakmont. 412-828-4877. STEEL CITY POETRY SLAM. Third Tue of every month, 9 p.m. Shadow Lounge, East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

The August heat has morphed the daisies — or are they black-eyed Susans — into a thousand drooping yellow teepees. I’m learning what grows on backwater ponds & streams. It’s worth half-wrecking the tires, driving down this gravel road to find the smallest flowers in the world ... From “Duckweed,” by Joan E. Bauer

Joan E. Bauer appears with Jay Carson, for a poetry reading and booke signing at the Coffee House an at the South Side Presbyterian Church. 7:30 p.m. Fri., June 14. 1926 Sarah St., South Side. ll $5 suggested donation. Call ion. 412-431-0118 for information.

WED 19 THE SMITHFIELD CRITICS. Discussing Cider House Rules by John Irving. 12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. TAYLOR STEVENS. Discussion & book signing w/ author of The Doll. 7 p.m. Mystery Lovers Bookshop, Oakmont. 412-828-4877.

KIDSTUFF THU 13 - SUN 16 FATHER’S DAY CD CARD MAKING. Audio card workshop w/ the Saturday Light Brigade. Thru June 16, 1-4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 14 - SUN 16

TUE 18

THE HOUSE AT POOH CORNER. Christopher Robin has decided to run away w/ his friends Pooh, Piglet, Eeyore, & Tigger. Fri-Sun. Thru June 23 McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100.

PLAY W/ CLAY ON THE POTTER’S WHEEL. Ages 3+. Tue, 12-3 p.m. Thru June 25 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TUESDAYS WITH TESS. Tue, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

FULL LIST E ONwLwIN w.

SAT 15

ART LAB: MOTOWN MIXIN’. Re-purpose, re-vamp & re-beautify old record covers paper into new & imaginary pghcitym .co bands & songs. 1-4 p.m. Mattress Factory, North Side. 412-231-3169. ADVENTURES W/ CLIFFORD PRINCESS CRUISE. 11 a.m. THE BIG RED DOG. 9-foot tall Gateway Clipper Fleet, Station Clifford w/ tail slide, build a Square. 412-266-4268. sandcastle on T-Bone’s beach, YOUTH BEGINNING ARCHERY. play instruments in the Musical Ages 9-15. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Marina, more. Thru Sept. 1 Raccoon Creek State Park, Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, Hookstown. 724-899-3611. North Side. 412-322-5058. BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solarALL OVER ADORNMENTS. powered instruments, more. Wearable art workshop. Ongoing Children’s Museum June 15-16, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. of Pittsburgh, North Side. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, 412-322-5058. North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 13 - WED 19

Enter Promo Code CPTSTIX for a chance to

win a pair of tickets to see Taylor Swift Saturday, July 6 at Heinz Field

SAT 15 - SUN 16

FRI 14 CITIZEN SCIENCE CORPS: FIREFLY WATCH TRAINING. 8 p.m. Succop Conservancy, Butler. 724-586-2591.

66

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013

SUN 16 GREATER PITTSBURGH SOAPBOX DERBY. Eden Park Blvd., McKeesport. 9 a.m.

OUTSIDE THU 13 T’AI CHI IN MELLON PARK. Thu, 5:45-6:45 p.m. Thru June 27 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

FRI 14 - SAT 15 MINGO CREEK PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. June 14-15, 7 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory, Finleyville. 724-348-6150. WAGMAN PUBLIC STAR PARTYPresented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. June 14-15, 8:55 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Frazier. 724-224-2510.

TUE 18 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 19 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed


17th Annual

OTHER STUFF THU 13 BUGS IN YOUR BACKYARD. Learn about plant pests, pollinators, & other insects. Thu, 7-9 p.m. Thru June 27 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. CAR CRUISE ON THE RUNWAY. Runway Restaurant, Butler. 724-586-6599. CELEBRATING SUCCESS & LOOKING AHEAD. Inspire Speakers Series. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LUNCH & LEARN: ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF PITTSBURGH - GALLERY INTERACTIONS. 10:30 a.m.1 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3288. MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. POSITIVELY LIFE CHANGING SUMMER SERIES WORKSHOP. Thu. Thru June 27 Coach Monique, Ross. 412-400-2805. RAIN BARREL WORKSHOP. 6-8 p.m. City-County Building, Downtown. 412-488-7490 x 247. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. STACY INNERST TALKS BEATLES & BOOKS. The Post-Gazette cartoonist will introduce his latest illustrated work, The Beatles Were Fab (and They Were Funny). 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

THU 13 - FRI 14 ANNUAL USED BOOK SALE. Benefits Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. Thru June 14 Shoppes at Northway, Ross. 412-366-1300.

FRI 14 CARNEGIE CRAWL. Street performers, restaurant tastings, more. Second Fri of every month,

Great European Beerfest

PRIDE EVENTS

Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

June 29 & 30, 2013

THU 13

Sharp Edge Beer Emporium • 302 S. St. Clair St. • Pgh, PA 15206 2 Big Days, 3 Big Three-Hour Sessions:

DEPARTMENT OF HOPE FINALE SHOW. Through “secret agent” themed acts, the Dreams of Hope Youth Performance Troupe explores the idea of serving as agents of change. 7 p.m. KellyStrayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-361-2065.

SAT. JUNE 29 • 3pm–6pm, 7pm–10pm SUN. JUNE 30 • 2pm–5pm

Over 101 European & Belgian Beers: Lindeman’s • Delerium Tremens • Baltika • Affligem Piraat • Belgoo • Chimay • Scaldis • Duvel • Orval & Many More

FRI 14 BRIDGE DANCE PARTY. Andy Warhol Bridge. 8 p.m. JUJUBEE FROM RUPAUL’S DRAG RACE. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. PRIDE PUB CRAWL. Take a tour of the city’s coolest clubs, bars & restaurants. Buses drop off & pick up every 20 mins. PittsburghPride.org/ tickets for info. 8 p.m.

SAT 15

17

PRIDE IN THE STREET W/ ADAM LAMBERT. 5:30 p.m. Liberty Ave, Downtown.

SUN 16 PRIDE MARCH. Begins at Grant St. & Blvd of the Allies. 12-1 p.m. Downtown Pittsburgh. PRIDEFEST. Continuous entertainment on 2 stages, over 100 vendors, street performers, kids activities, more. www.pittsburghpride.org 1-6 p.m. Liberty Ave, Downtown.

For information, 412-661-3537 or www.sharpedgebeer.com. Must be 21 or Older. 5-8 p.m. Thru Aug. 9 Downtown Carnegie. 412-279-5456. DOWNTOWN’S BEST WALKING TOUR. Meet at Grant St. entrance. Fri, 10-11:30 a.m. Thru June 28 Omni William Penn, Downtown. 412-471-5808. MARKET SQUARE AREA FREE FRIDAY WALKING TOUR. Begins at 5th Ave. & Market St., Downtown. Fri, 12-1 p.m. Thru June 28 412-471-5808. OAKLAND NEIGHBORHOOD GUIDE RELEASE. Comicstyle guide to the Oakland neighborhood, published by the ToonSeum. 7 p.m. Phantom of the Attic, Oakland. 412-232-0199. SO BAD, IT’S GOOD: ROAD HOUSE. Film screening w/ rolling commentary by improv troupe Cream Stain. 7 p.m. Hollywood Theater, Dormont. 412-563-0368.

FRI 14 - SAT 15 AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS ANNUAL CONVENTION. Speakers, education sessions, arts venue tours, more. http://convention.artsusa.org/ June 14-16 David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-565-6000.

SAT 15 4TH ANNUAL REPTILE RALLY. Interact w/ various reptiles, children’s activities, more. 12-4 p.m. Waterfront PETCO, Homestead.

DOWNTOWN HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at City County Building, Downtown. Sat. Thru Aug. 31 412-302-5223. I MADE IT! MARKET. Local artisans present bike-themed art/accessories. 12 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-1637. INCLINE HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at the bottom of the Monongahela Incline. Sat. Thru Oct. 26 412-302-5223. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Korean grammar & basic conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MT. NEBO POINTE FATHER’S DAY CRUISARAMA. Car show, live music, cigar lounge, raffle, appearance by Pittsburgh Dad, more. 3 p.m. Mt. Nebo Pointe Shopping Center, Ross. 781-418-6254. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SILENT FILM NIGHT. Feat. 2 classic Charlie Chaplin films, w/ live music by composer Tom Roberts. 7 p.m. Oaks Theater, Oakmont. 412-828-6322. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108.

$3.00

$3.00 Jim Beam Ghost Whiskey

Devil’s Cut Whisky

Halfway to Halloween Party FRIDAY JUNE 14TH FR

$2.50 Miller Lite

7PM LIVE ACOUSTIC MUSIC 7 with BRAD EVANS 10PM DJ QWIK

COSTUME CONTEST AT MIDNIGHT

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Miller Girls $100 CASH PRIZE

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET

412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

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5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. SUMMER SPEAKER SERIES: June 15-16. Men/women, 2-min. D.L. CLARK COMPANY. 412-622-3151. Shakespearean monologue. Lecture w/ Joshua Scully. 2 p.m. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER Call for appointment. www. McKeesport Regional History & SUMMER LECTURE SERIES. pooryoricksplayers.org Tall Trees Heritage Center, McKeesport. Nancy Callan & Kathy Gray. Amphitheater, Monroeville. 412-678-1832. Pittsburgh Glass Center, 412-277-2226. SWING CITY. Learn & practice Friendship. 412-365-2145. THE THEATRE FACTORY swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW KIDWORKS. Auditions for Myth Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. OFFS. A meeting of jugglers Adventures, Five Greek Classics. 412-759-1569. & spinners. All levels welcome. June 15. Males & females 12 & over. VECHERINKA BALKAN Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Cold readings. Email tfauditions@ DANCE PARTY. Live Project, Highland Park. gmail.com or call for information. music, dance lessons, 412-363-4550. The Theatre Factory, Trafford. more. Third Sat SEEDS OF FREEDOM 724-454-7193. of every month, FILM SCREENING 7:30 p.m. Thru June 15 & WORKSHOP. www. per Bulgarian-Macedonian ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF Discussing the pa pghcitym National Education and BUTLER COUNTY. Seeking importance of .co Cultural Center, West submissions for outdoor sculpture educating consumers Homestead. 412-461-6188. contest. Artists must submit at least about genetically 2 quality photographs or digital modified food. 6:30 p.m. images for each piece entered that East End Food Co-op, Point AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL accurately represents 2 views of Breeze. 412-242-7726. HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. the sculpture. Deadline: June 15. SPANISH II. Geared toward Weekly letter writing event. Sun, More info at www.aabcartcenter. those who already have a 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. com/current-calls-for-artists2/ basic understanding of Spanish 412-683-3727. 724-283-6922. & are interested in increasing ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. BLAST FURNACE. Seeking proficiency. First and Third Wed Second and Third Sun of every submissions for Volume 3, Issue 2. of every month Carnegie Library, month Carnegie Library, Oakland. Theme is “travel.” Submit poetry Oakland. 412-622-3151. 412-622-3151. BELLYDANCE CLASS W/ JEMEENA. Sun, 10 a.m. [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] Thru June 30 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-337-1846. THE NATURE OF SHIFTING CONSCIOUSNESS. w/ Joe For 30 years, the GPLC has provided educational programs Turiano. Pittsburgh Theosophical — including basic literacy, GED prep and English as a Society. 1:30-3 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. second language — to adults and families in the Pittsburgh 412-462-4200. area. Volunteers are needed to tutor one-on-one or lead PFLAG GREENSBURG. Support, small classes, two to four hours a week, at the Downtown education & advocacy for Center or other locations throughout the city. For more the LGBTQ community, family & information, contact Jessamine Paul at 412-393-7600. friends. Third Sun of every month, 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. about physical travel/world travels, URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd RIVERS OF STEEL SUNDAY travels of the mind, travels outside floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna HERITAGE MARKET. Farm & of the box, etc. Submit no House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. artist market. First Sun of more than 3 of your best. WEST COAST SWING every month and Third Sun www.blastfurnacepress.com WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance of every month. Thru Sept. 15 THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, Homestead Pump House, performers & artists to participate South Side. 916-287-1373. Munhall. 412-464-4020. in First Fridays - Art in a Box. WORM COMPOSTING FOR For more information, email FAMILIES. 7 p.m. Mount thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. Lebanon Public Library, OLD ALLEGHENY COUNTY 412-403-7357. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. JAIL MUSEUM SELF GUIDED INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. TOUR. Mon, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Submit your film, 10 minutes or Thru June 24 Court of Common less. Screenings held on the second Pleas, Family Division, Downtown. COMTRA THEATRE. Auditions for RENT. June 15-16. Prepare a Thursday of every month. DV8 412-471-5808. modern rock or modern Broadway Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. PEOPLE’S UNIVERSITY: song. There will also be cold 724-219-0804. WILLPOWER UNWRAPPED. readings from the script. Ages THE PITTSBURGH Learn ways to reduce cravings & 18+. www.comtraplayers.com/ WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. make healthy choices. 6:30 p.m. Cranberry. 724-591-8727. Seeking entries for 67th Annual Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. International Aqueous Open 412-422-9650. Ongoing auditions for actors ages exhibition. www.pittsburghwater SAMOVAR: A MONTHLY 18+ for murder mystery shows colorsociety.com 412-731-0636. SALON FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS. performed in the Pittsburgh area. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM w/ exhibiting artist Aaron Blum. 412-833-5056. OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking 6:30-8 p.m. Silver Eye Center MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. individual artists & artist groups for Photography, South Side. Auditions for How to Succeed in for month-long exhibitions in 412-431-1810 x 11. Business Without Really Trying. a new transitional gallery June 16-17. Men/women age measuring. Artists will be 16-65, 16 bars of music, cold FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Farmers’ responsible for all aspects of reading, be prepared to dance. market. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. their exhibition. Send images & www.mckeesportlittletheater. Thru Oct. 30 Phipps Conservatory a brief introduction to the work & Botanical Garden, Oakland. com McKeesport. 412-673-1100. to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ 412-622-6914. POOR YORICK’S PLAYERS. a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice Auditions for Shakespeare in & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. conversational English. Wed, the Park production of Henry V. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUBMISSIONS

SUN 16

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MON 17

AUDITIONS

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a bisexual chick who just moved in with my girlfriend of 10 months. I love her very much, and this is a great relationship. Here’s the thing: I like to smoke pot, and pot makes her very uncomfortable. I’m responsible, and I don’t smoke that often. But I don’t like feeling guilty. I’ve considered banishing pot from my life, but I know some part of me would resent her for not letting me be who I am. To her credit, she doesn’t want me to stop smoking, but she gets angry and blames herself for the problem. I feel like I’m asking her to change a fundamental belief. Am I being an asshole? DISTRAUGHT KENTUCKY DYKE

What is it about lesbianism that renders a person incapable of taking yes for an answer? (Or maybe it’s cunnilingus? Does Michael Douglas have the same problem?) Your girlfriend isn’t asking you to stop smoking pot, she recognizes that she’s the one with a drug problem, and over time (it’s only been 10 months!) she’ll probably get over these panic attacks. She’s giving you a great big yes, and I think you should take it. But if you insist on being a couple of cliché lesbians who feel they have to operate their relationship on the consensus model or someone is being oppressed, this issue will be an endless source of anxiety and drama. Better to agree to disagree, smoke when the girlfriend isn’t around, and remember to return the favor, i.e., agree to let her enjoy something that you don’t without pitching fits about it.

weren’t exactly single, and you did a shitty thing … and another shitty thing … and another shitty thing. You can look on those three shitty things as unforgivable betrayals (and as prologue) or you can look at them as important life lessons before making a formal and (hopefully) final commitment to your fiancée. Resolve to stay away from booze, go get tested for STIs and stuff those experiences down the memory hole.

KEEP CALM

My girlfriend of one month is a professional dominant. I was OK with it because I assumed all her clients were men. (We are lesbians.) It turns out that three different straight couples are regular clients. I feel she should have proactively disclosed this information to me. Can I insist that she stop seeing male/female couples?

AND

DON’T BITCH UNLESS YOU VOTE

THE ONLY WOMAN IN HER LIFE

You can insist on anything you like, and your girlfriend can decide whether she’s willing to sacrifice six established clients for a controlling, insecure girlfriend that she’s known for only a month. Since building a regular clientele represents financial and physical safety to many sex workers, brace yourself for the dump that’s very likely coming your way.

WHAT IS IT ABOUT LESBIANISM THAT RENDERS A PERSON INCAPABLE OF TAKING YES FOR AN ANSWER?

I’m a lost little lesbian. I have been with my partner for four magical years. My girlfriend deployed to Afghanistan, and I was an angel for the first four months. But after an argument on Skype, I went to confide in a friend — seriously, confide, that was it. The next thing I knew, it was 5 a.m. and I was on the couch half-dressed. I never told my girlfriend. The moment she got off the plane and dropped to one knee, I knew I’d be keeping my indiscretion a secret. Seven months after my slip-up, we found out that she’d be leaving again. During her second deployment, I ended up out on the town with friends and was heavily intoxicated. I slept with a random person. I did the same thing again five months later. So I have cheated three times. None of these people meant anything to me. My girlfriend is back, and this is the happiest I’ve ever seen her. We are planning a wedding, and I can’t bring myself to break her heart. Many nights I find it impossible to sleep. I have identified that drinking is a major problem and I am finished with it. I know the things I have done will never happen again. How do I get past the mistakes I’ve made so that I can love her the way she deserves to be loved? ARMY WIFE IN TRAINING

By giving yourself a break. You were drunk, you were lonely and you were unmarried. OK, you

Whiny dyke here! I’m queer and mostly into women, but with a severe attraction to one particular guy. We’re close friends and hang out all the time. A few weeks ago, we made out for 15 minutes before he said that he’s not really attracted to me. We made out a little more. A few days later, he told me again that he’s not attracted to me. We have always been really touchy, we’re shirtless around each other a lot, and I’m struggling to believe he’s not attracted to me. How do you make out with someone you don’t find attractive? There have also been two recent instances in which he moved in on a woman I had expressed an interest in. I told him off about this, and he said he won’t do it again, but doesn’t that say something about him?

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This guy sounds like a narcissistic douchebag who enjoys toying with people who are attracted to him. Now, I’m sure this guy has lots of wonderful qualities — most narcissistic douchebags have some cause to be narcissists — and you don’t have to cut him out of your life. But you do need to be less open with him. Don’t give him any more opportunities to toy with you — no touchy-touchy, no make-out sessions, no partial disrobing — and don’t point out girls you’re interested in. Or, hey, get your revenge by “expressing an interest” in girls you don’t think are hot.

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This week on the Savage Lovecast: Are shrinks good for your love life? Also, how should you comport yourself when you’re the Dungeon Master and you have to watch your ex-girlfriend be some other guy’s slave? Find out at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

06.12-06.19

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Long after the artist Amedeo Clemente Modigliani died, his paintings sold for millions of dollars. But while alive, he never got rich from doing what he loved to do. He expressed frustration about the gap between his ambitions and his rewards. “I do at least three paintings a day in my head,” he said. “What’s the use of spoiling canvas when nobody will buy anything?” I hope you don’t arrive at a comparable conclusion, Gemini. It’s crucial that you NOT keep your good ideas bottled up in your imagination. You need to translate them into practical actions, even if there’s no immediate or obvious benefit in doing so. Expressing yourself concretely has rarely been more important than it is right now.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In 1967, dissidents dreamed up a novel way to protest America’s horrific Vietnam War. They marched to the Pentagon, the military’s headquarters, and performed an exorcism to purge the place of its evil. With the power of songs and chants, they invoked magic spells designed to levitate the 6.5 million-square-feet building into the air. Their plan didn’t quite work in a literal way — the Pentagon remained firmly fixed to the ground — but the legend they spawned was potent. When I heard about it years later, it inspired me to become an activist. I see mythmaking as a worthy goal for you right now, Cancerian. Dream up an epic task or project that will fuel your imagination for a long time.

the awe. Allow astonishment to seep in. (More: tinyurl.com/morfordjoy.)

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): From an astrological perspective, now would be a good time to go on a meditation retreat for a few days or make a pilgrimage to your ancestral homeland. You would generate just the right shifts in your brain chemistry by doing something like that. Other recommended adventures: reviewing the story of your entire life from your first memory to the present moment; writing a brief letter to the five people you have loved best, telling them why you’ve loved them; spending a day outside of time, when you don’t consult a clock or use electronic media for the duration.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 1926, surrealist artist Max Ernst painted “The Blessed Virgin Chastising the Infant Jesus in Front of Three Witnesses.” It shows Mary vigorously spanking her son as he lies on her lap. Nowadays, the image doesn’t seem nearly as scandalous as it did when it first appeared. Even some Christians I know find it amusing, welcoming the portrayal of Jesus as a genuine human being with lessons to learn. What would be your equivalent of creating a cheeky image like this, Leo? How could you achieve cathartic release by being irreverent toward something or someone you respect? I recommend it. (See the image: tinyurl.com/SpankingJesus.)

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): It’s prime time to promote cross-cultural liaisons and interspecies relationships, Virgo. I encourage you to experiment with hybrids and facilitate the union of diverse interests. You will be working in alignment with cosmic trends if you strengthen the connections between influences that belong together, and even between influences that don’t know they belong together. So see what you can do to facilitate conversations between Us and Them. Negotiate peace treaties between Yes and No. Look for legitimate ways to compare apples and oranges.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Gonzo columnist Mark Morford wrote a list of liberated behaviors he wants to cultivate. Since you’re in the emancipatory phase of your yearly cycle, I invite you to try some of his strategies. (1) Have a gentler grip. Let go of tight-assed attitudes. (2) Make deeper penetration. Don’t be satisfied with surfaces. (3) Raise the vibration. Isn’t it a waste of precious life energy to mope around in a sour and shriveled frame of mind? (4) Appreciate appreciation. Treat gratitude as an emotion of the same caliber as joy. (5) Cultivate ecstatic silliness. Develop a blissful ability to take everything less seriously. (6) Drink

Sagittarius comedian Steven Wright says he took a class in speed waiting. “Now I can wait an hour in only 10 minutes,” he brags. I think you will have the same knack in the coming days, Sagittarius. Your patience is likely to be much more effective than usual. Results will come faster and they’ll be more intense. The only catch is that you will really have to be calm and composed and willing to wait a long time. It won’t work if you’re secretly antsy and only pretending to be imperturbable.

usual. Allow yourself to be filled with poignant thoughts about life’s paradoxical mysteries. Give yourself permission to be overwhelmed with emotions that are midway between lamentation and reverent amazement. For even better results, indulge in some free-form moaning during your five Sigh-Days. That’ll help you release your full backlog of tension and give you more appreciation for the crazy beauty of your fate. (P.S. Try not to whine, though.)

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Irish poet Richard Brinsley Sheridan didn’t confine his lyrical wit to well-crafted poems on the printed page. He used it to say things that would advance his practical ambitions. For example, when he first met the woman who would eventually become his wife, he said to her, “Why don’t you come into my garden? I would like my roses to see you.” That’s the kind of persuasive power I hope you will summon in the coming days, Aries. According to my analysis of the omens, you should have it in abundance. So what’s the best use of this mojo? Is

there anything you would really like to sell? What new resources do you want to bring into your sphere? Who do you want to convince?

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In The Book of the Damned, Charles Fort revealed one of the secrets of power. He said that if you want power over something, you should be more real than it. What does that mean? How do you become real in the first place, and how do you get even more real? Here’s what I think: Purge your hypocrisies and tell as few lies as possible. Find out what your deepest self is like — not just what your ego is like — and be your deepest self with vigorous rigor. Make sure that the face you show the world is an accurate representation of what’s going on in your inner world. If you do all that good stuff, you will eventually be as real and as powerful as you need to be. Homework: Send news of your favorite mystery — an enigma that is both maddening and delightful — to Freewillastrology.com.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Let the boundaries blur a bit, Capricorn. Don’t stick too rigidly to the strict definitions. Play around with some good old-fashioned fuzzy logic. The straight facts and the precise details are important to keep in mind, but you shouldn’t cling to them so ferociously that they stifle your imagination. You need to give yourself enough slack to try open-ended experiments. You’ll be smart to allow some wobble in your theories and a tremble in your voice. Magic will happen if there’s plenty of wiggle room.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “One should be light like a bird, and not like a feather,” said French poet Paul Valery. How do you interpret that thought, Aquarius? In the book The Science of Self-Control, here’s how Howard Rachlin expands on Valery’s idea: “We need to be spontaneous, but only in the context of some framework that allows us to attain higher levels of spontaneity; a feather is a slave to the wind, while a bird uses the wind.” Take heed, Aquarius! Your creative flights will go further and last longer if you have a solid foundation to take off from.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Let’s call today Sigh-Day. Tomorrow, too, and the next day, and the two days after that. During these five Sigh-Days, you should feel free to let out big, deep sighs at a higher rate than

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

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Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com(AAN CAN) Advertise Here Today!

GENERAL SERVICES We are a professional concrete company concrete done right at the right price. We can replace or just repair - don’t trust your driveway to any handyman, you need a concrete company!! Licensed and bonded - GREAT REFERENCES CALL TODAY!!! 412-223-2512 Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper! Choose Mutual Builders Corporation for the most professional roof repair, roof replacement, and new roof installation in Pittsburgh, Whitehall, Bethel Park, Monroeville, and McKeepsport, Pennsylvania. Call today for a free estimate at (412) 3539904 in Pittsburgh, PA. Mutual Builders Corporation PO Box 5174 Pittsburgh, PA 15206 (412) 353-9904

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YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE TO PARTICIPATE IN A RESEARCH STUDY! Looking for couples (married or living together) with one partner diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in the past two years. Qualified couples (ages 18+) may receive up to $400.00 upon completion. CONTACT: Pamela R. Snyder for more information. Ph: 412-268-2784; email: ps3x@andrew.cmu.edu

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Smokers who want to try new cigarettes that may or may not lead to reduced smoking are wanted for a research study. This is NOT a treatment or smoking cessation study. Compensation will be provided. For more information please call The Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab at

412-624-9999

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 72

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013


People with Current Cold Sore or Canker Sore needed for a Research study (UPMC Oakland) This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions. Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart. Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100. Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

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Sodexo University of Pittsburgh Now Accepting applications for the 2013-2014 School Year.

Positions will begin in August. Cooks, Prep Cooks, Utility Workers, Dishwashers, Baristas, Dining Room Attendants, Line Servers, Cashiers, Bakers, Resident Dining, Retail, Production Supervisors, Taco Bell positions and Einstein’s Brother’s positions.

Administrative Positions Also Available for Immediate Hire: Human Resources Support Specialist Human Resources Administrative Assistant Marketing Coordinator Catering Sales Coordinator Banquet Captain Pastry Chef

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andreaj@steelcitymedia. com

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goodwillswpa.org/ job-postings www.panerabread.jobs

Reserve your space now for the next Career Corner Recruitment Section in July!

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Full and Part time positions available. FT benefits include medical, dental, vacation, paid holidays. Applications are accepted Monday through Thursday 9am-4pm in the HR Office located in McCormick Hall at the University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. Please contact sodexoupitt@gmail.com or 412.624.2347 for more information. Sodexo values workforce diversity- EOE, M/F/D/V


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NOW HIRING If the answer is YES then we have a position for you!!! We are NOW HIRING for the position of Classified Advertising Representative. Previous inside sales/customer service experience is preferred. Pittsburgh City Paper offers a competitive wage and incentive package, medical + 401K. If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding career opportunity please forward resume to Andrea James. N E W S

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Full-Time and Part-Time Associate Positions Applications available at the following locations Greensburg - Westmoreland Mall Shadyside - Centre Ave Cranberry - Next to Joanne’s Allison Park - Home Depot Plaza Fox Chapel - Waterworks Plaza Settlers Ridge - Ridge Rd Parkway Exit Murrysville - Walnut Plaza Blvd of the Allies - Across from Magee Hospital Penn Center - Across from Sheetz

Steel City Media Classified Advertising Manager Pittsburgh City Paper 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222

E-mail: andreaj@steelcitymedia.com

Fax: 412-316-3388 Pittsburgh City Paper is an equal opportunity employer.

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WEIGHTLOSS TREATMENT Bariatric Weightloss, LLC No Long Term Contract No Start Up Fee

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Flexible Hours Including Mornings

Health Services

JADE Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE

MIND & BODY

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy

SUBOXONE We treat:

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Addictions

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Advertise Here Today! Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

SELF-ESTEEM WORKSHOPS

Chinese Bodyworks

412-400-7159

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

selfesteemworkshops.com

Aming’s Massage Therapy

;;;;;;;;;;;;

Zhangs Wellness Center

MIND & BODY

412-401-4110 $40/hr

massage Therapy

DOWNTOWN 322 Fourth Ave.

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

(1st Floor)

412-319-7530

Phoenix Spa

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

• VIVITROL -

• NOW Treating Pregnant Women

~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

COUNSELING

;;;;;;;;;;;;

Wellness Center 355 Fifth Ave Suite 1120 Pgh, PA 15222 412-680-2064

WELLNESS

New Young Professional Free Table Shower w/60 min. Open 10-10 Daily 4309 Butler Street

STAR Superior Chinese Massage Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

China Massage

(Lawrenceville)

724-519-7896

(across from Eat n’ Park)

4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

412-595-8077

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

412-621-3300

Your ad could be here

$50/HR Free Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

Therapeutic Massage

412.316.3342

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others 76

WE have been there. WE know your pain. Don’t Wait Any Longer!

Now Hiring for LPC/LCSW MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013

Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116


LIVE

GRAND OPENING!

TIGER SPA

Judy’s Oriental Massage

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

FULL BODY MASSAGE

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

$40/hr Now with Vichy Shower 4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Accepting All Major Cards

ROOMMATES

MOVING SERVICES

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

ABC SELF STORAGE5x10 $45, 10x10 $65, 10x15 $95. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

G

Asian OPENRIANNGD ! Massage 4376 Murray Ave. Pgh, PA 15217

412-421-0800 www.metrospapgh.net

Real Estate & Public Auction Saturday June 22, 9am Perfect for Artist &/or Family w/kids LARGE House at 338 Cherrydell Dr., 15220 Contents include furniture, collectibles, & household items; Real Estate sells at Noon Info and photos at www.auctionzip.com, http://arlacherryoak.wordpress.com Contact David Kearns, LIC # AU2464L 724-239-2050

SOUTH FOR RENT Immediate sublease available through November. 1br/ 1ba in the Flats @ SouthSide Works. $1,460/month, PARKING INCLUDED, credit check necessary. Contact: info@littlearth.com or (412) 471-0909

BUY and SELL

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

“LIVE” section

your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the

of the City Paper

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others. N E W S

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Ink Well

FULL TITLES

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

get your

yoga on! There is light at the end of the tunnel. We offer classes 7 days a week! Call for class schedule or visit www.clayyoga.com 4519 Liberty Ave, Bloomfied 412-335-1332

Find your next job in the City Paper’s “WORK” section. 78

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.12/06.19.2013

ACROSS

1. Yank making $30 million for sitting on the DL 5. “I ___ bad, bad thing ...” 9. Horsemeat meatball big box 13. Perino of Fox 14. Recent Angelina Jolie piece 15. Type of line dance from Cuba 17. Velvet Underground ode to an ironic English novelist? 20. Woman of station 21. Corner store, often, in New York 22. Genetic carrier 23. Worthy successor to Ponzi 25. Michael Jackson song dedicated to a prickly conservative/ droning actor? 28. Eminem song about a Marvel Comics magnate? 30. Pre-credits words 31. Queer 32. Linux alternative 35. Sailing 36. With 48-Across, Ramones song about how the author of “Blubber” doesn’t give a fuck? 39. “Sounds like ___” 42. Writer Kingsley or his writer son Martin 43. Besides 46. Destroy dramatically, as a contract 48. See 36-Across 51. With 59-Across, old Marvelettes tune about the resilience

of the 42nd president? 54. Cleaned out 55. “What’s the rest of the story?” 56. Bigiwig about campus 58. Critic who influenced Ebert 59. See 51-Across 64. “Nifty” 65. Party on sand, say 66. One likely to vote against a strike? 67. Austin music/movie/ ideas/etc. festival 68. Soul label with a museum in Memphis 69. Computer image standard

DOWN

1. They pop up now and then 2. Unprocessed information 3. Name in multivitamins 4. Mailer-___ (bounce message source) 5. Holder heads it, briefly 6. Galaxy competitor 7. Star in the constellation Cygnus 8. “Skyfall” singer 9. Place where people get hooked up at the hospital, briefly 10. Daily ___ (political blog) 11. Main courses 12. Like Michael Jackson when he signed with Motown 16. Key disciple of Buddha 18. Instructional program for many a student traveling abroad: Abbr.

19. Isn’t, casually 23. Much-feared (but not actually known to be harmful) Asian food additive 24. Beef 26. Misrepresentation 27. The cerveau is inside it 29. Her “Orinoco Flow” has a macabre role in “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” 33. Company that invented the ATM and the UPC 34. Super Bowl at which Eli Manning was MVP 36. Discontinued brand-name lawn dart, familiarly 37. Word on a penny 38. State for which “Animal Farm” is an allegory

39. When much crowing occurs 40. Asian flowers 41. Burden on property 43. Jersey Shore garment 44. Frat standard with the lyric “let’s get together and feel all right” 45. Green-lighted 47. Mani/___ 49. Golf Hall of Famer Isao 50. Brown bag item 52. Hawks 53. “To Pierre and Brigitte!” 57. Frozen Four org. 60. Brooklyn ___, NY 61. One may be taken after a concert 62. Illumination unit 63. Give poor feedback to, online

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


POWER PLANTS

After traveling the world from Kenya to Columbus, an herbalist puts down roots in Pittsburgh {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} GROWING UP, Ola Obasi was a city kid, educated at a British boarding school while living mostly in Kenya, Tanzania and South Africa. But it was while visiting her grandmother’s Kenyan village, at age 9, that she first learned about herbal healing. “This man was chopping branches off a tree,” she says. The tree was a eucalyptus, the man a traditional healer making an inhalant to treat malaria. “That’s how I started to learn there is more magic in this world,” says Obasi. Today, Obasi runs Ola’s Herb Shop amid the barber shops and pizza joints of Morningside. In an unassuming storefront, she does consultations for her 130 or so clients and sells products like Native American White Sage Sacred Blessing. While Obasi speaks freely of the healing magic in plants, she’s also built her practice on a good deal of formal training. Born in the U.S. (while her mother was attending college in Columbus, Ohio), Obasi returned here as a teen-ager in the early 1990s. She actually started out studying pharmacy — the career her father wanted for her. But alternative treatments kept presenting themselves: in the echinacea a University of Dayton classmate brought her when she was sick and, later, in the herbal remedies favored by the Rastafarian father of her two daughters.

a tissue box over there.” “If someone comes in with a stomachache, I ask them about their headaches,” she says. “I ask about the swelling in their ankles.” The roots of a stomachache, she says, are probably elsewhere in the body. Or even in the spirit. “There’s no difference to me between the physical and the spiritual,” says Obasi. “There’s no herbalist who doesn’t have a spiritual base.” Obasi makes her own shea butter — the traditional African skin-care treatment that’s her biggest seller — and compounds custom remedies, some with herbs she grows herself. Her practice also includes twice-weekly SynergyDance classes. These are exercises in healing movement that are done in dim light, suggesting low-impact yoga crossed with New Age meditation. “It’s very inspirational. It’s energetic,” said client Tonya Magwood, of Edgewood, last September. “I came to the first class and I was hooked.” Obasi’s holistic approach impresses Michelle Czolba, a client of Obasi’s who is also a trained herbalist and runs an online naturalskin-care business. Herbal medicine isn’t nearly as common in Pittsburgh as it is, say, on the West Coast. But Czolba says it’s growing here, and Obasi is one reason. “She brings a lot of energy to the scene,” says Czolba, of Bloomfield.

“THERE’S NO DIFFERENCE TO ME BETWEEN THE PHYSICAL AND THE SPIRITUAL.” “That’s how I got to learn about herbs. I would treat myself, treat my family,” says Obasi. “People would come to me. I just had a knack for it.” Later, she worked as a pharmacy technician in Chevy Chase, Md. She learned a lot about compounding medicine from the pharmacist, himself a big believer in herbal medicine. “It’s not about being a doctor,” he told her. “It’s about being a healer.” Further training followed at the Tai Sophia Institute (now the Maryland University of Integrative Health) and Case Western Reserve University. Obasi, who wears short braids and a tiny gold dragonfly in her left nostril, moved to Pittsburgh in 2011. She is friendly and assertive, and her practice is pointedly not merely about dispensing herbs as if they were conventional little white pills. Rather than simply treating the symptom, as she believes Western medicine typically does, Obasi first gets to know her clients in sessions of two hours or more. “I say, ‘Tell me your story.’ … Most of the time, people cry — men, women, it doesn’t matter who they are. There’s

Save for the occasional recommendation of chamomile for upset stomachs, or cranberry for urinary-tract infections, Western medicine tends to be agnostic at best about herbal remedies. But Obasi tells stories of her own experiences — herbal help with pregnancy and nursing, healthy kids raised on herbal cures — and those of clients she aided with everything from chronic nosebleeds to yeast infections. Christina Springer, a performance artist from Point Breeze, says Obasi once helped her with digestive troubles. But Springer’s greatest praise is for Obasi as educator. Springer’s son, Winston, has taken Obasi’s summer class titled Herbal Alchemy; now 10 years old, he makes his own skin lotion. Last year, when his father suffered a bee sting, Winston successfully treated it with a plant he pulled from the yard. “It was some weed!” says Springer. “The seriousness with which [Obasi] guides youth into exploring this speaks volumes about who she is as a healer,” says Springer. “I think that’s her message: how to be a participant in your health and well-being.” DR ISC O L L @ S T E E L C I T Y M E D I A . C OM

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June 12, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 24

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