Page 1

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 06.05/06.12.2013

UPBEAT OUTLOOK FOR THIS YEAR’S JAZZLIVE INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL 22


2

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013


EVENTS 

 6.6 – 8pm

SOUND SERIES: THE UNCLUDED (KIMYA DAWSON & AESOP ROCK) Tickets $15/$12 Members FREE parking in The Warhol lot

6.14 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOURS The Warhol will close at 5pm due to a private event.

7.13 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: BELLE & SEBASTIAN WITH SPECIAL GUESTS YO LA TENGO Stage AE Co-presented with PromoWest North Shore & Opus One Productions Tickets: $35

7.19 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUERS Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

8.16 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: PSYCHIC TV / PTV3 New Hazlett Theater Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

Summer’s different here. Enjoy three provocative exhibitions under one roof.

GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE/CALDWELL LINKER/NICK BUBASH /june 15 - sept 15.2013/

N E W S

+

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

www.warhol.org

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

3


4

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013


Over 21 • 9pm - Midnight

ROCK & BOWL! at the world-famous {EDITORIAL}

06.05/06.12.2013

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers AMYJO BROWN, LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns TRACEY HICKEY, OLIVIA LAMMEL, JOHN LAVANGA

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 23

{ART}

06

[NEWS]

12

“John Hanger has a Gasland problem.” — Keegan Gibson of PoliticsPA on the Democratic gubernatorial candidate and former DEP secretary

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Marketing and Promotions Interns JODI SHERER, SHELBEY SURGENT Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

a win-win for poor people, 20 “It’s affluent people, farmers and the communities.” — Just Harvest’s Ken Regal, of new EBT terminals at farmers’ markets

[MUSIC]

22

“We’re in this world where the recontextualization of South Indian classical music sounds like King Crimson.” — Saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa, who plays the Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival

AND

i n revitalize revitalizedd Lawrenceville WWW.ARSENALBOWL.COM

EVERY

Wednesday

DON’T BITCH UNLESS YOU VOTE

ROCK AND BOWL $ 8 A L L YO U C A N B O W L + L I V E BA NDS 6/5> THE MO NELSON EXPERIENCE •6/12> BARBARA PERFECT

'80S/'90S NIGHT

W/DJ MOCKSTER

$ 8 A L L YO U C A N B O W L 6 /6 > ' 8 0 S NI G H T • 6 /1 3 > ' 9 0 S NI G H T

Friday

DJ & KARAOKE

Afternoon

SUPER SATURDAY

EVERY

TOP SHELF saturday night

$9.95 ALL YOU CAN BOWL WI TH DJ & KARAOKE

EVERY SAT

Saturday

$7 ALL YOU CAN BOWL, 12-3PM

$9.95 ALL YOU CAN BOWL • $1 OFF ALL TOP SHELF DRINKS

BEST OF PITTSBURGH

fternoon

EVERY SUN 50¢ SUNDAZE 50¢ BOWLING, A SHOES, HOT DOGS AND SODAS • 1- 4PM

EVERY

Sunday

DJ NIGHT + PRIZES

EVERY

SERVICE INDUSTRY NIGHT

VOTE NOW

W/ THE MOCKSTER • $8 ALL YOU CAN BOWL

Monday

www.pghcitypaper.com

$8 ALL YOU CAN BOWL • $1.00 DRAF TS

COLLEGE NIGHT

EVERY

Tuesday

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[TASTE]

AL bowl.com ARSEN

EVERY

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, JEANNE MUMFORD, EMILY POZZUTO, MICHAEL RANALLO Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

KEEP CALM

412-683-5992 44TH AND BUTLER ST.

Thursday

{ADVERTISING}

“I don’t know that the state has ever known what to do with Duquesne.” — Daniel Carey, of the Pennsylvania State Education Association, on the state takeover of Duquesne Schools

FRE E WI- FI

EVERY

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers MICHAEL ARTMAN, SHEILA LETSON, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

[NEWS]

BOOK YOUR S PARTIE NOW!

50¢ BOWLING • 50¢ DRAF TS

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

[SCREEN]

Gerwig is a wry and 33 “Greta engaging comic actor bordering on the adorkable.” — Harry Kloman, reviewing Frances Ha

[ARTS]

illusions are compelling, while 36 “The the mini-tales they tell range from the delightful to the quasi-political to the kinda gross.” — Robert Raczka, reviewing the exhibit Gregory Barsamian: Memento Mori

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 40 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 48 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 50 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 53 N E W S

+

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

5


“I DON’T KNOW THAT THE STATE HAS EVER KNOWN WHAT TO DO WITH DUQUESNE.”

INCOMING Re: Dems’ Mayoral Nominee in Comedy Show (Online only, May 31) “Moreover, are we ready for a mayor who can legally drink alcoholic beverages, and doesn’t have to be in bed by 9 p.m. on school nights?” — Web comment from “John H Sieverts”

RE: BREAKING: State Rep. Jesse White might be a troll (Online only, May 30) “I wonder if a personal reason is involved in his dislike for Range [Resources]. Interesting that at first he denied making the comments and said essentially he was being framed for political reasons.” — Web comment from “Scotch/Irish”

“Turns out, he was exactly that dumb.” — Web comment from “Crayon Frog”

“pittsburgh (penguins) bans boston (bruins) beer. hm, if US banned chinese products one day ... we’re totally hosed.” — June 3 tweet from “C.D. Chang” (@choccobo)

“After spending time in Pittsburgh, I don’t want to be in Arkansas.” — June 3 tweet from “Kenny Cudi” (@AmeriKEN_Idiot)

6

T

HE OFFICE OF the acting superintendent of the Duquesne City School District is clearly temporary, barren of the personal artifacts and personal touches one typically finds in such offices. Instead, posted on the wall next to the door is a quote printed on plain white paper: “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” Paul Rach, who was brought on board in August 2010, is one of the most recent of more than a dozen administrators the state Department of Education has rotated through the district since 2000, when it took control of the district’s budgetary and educational policy. In that time, the state

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

closed Duquesne’s high school, in 2007, and its junior high last year. Yet despite such cost-cutting measures, the Duquesne City School District remains wracked with

It’s been 13 years since the state took over the failing Duquesne school system. So why haven’t things gotten better? financial difficulties. The state expected to subsidize about 76 percent of next year’s proposed operating budget of nearly $18 million.

Last month, an Allegheny County Common Pleas judge ordered the school into receivership under the direction of another state-hired administrator, Paul B. Long, giving him the sole authority to decide the fate of the district’s remaining 350 students in kindergarten through sixth grade. Long says keeping the school open as it is “does not appear to be financially viable in the long run.” It’s not just the money he’s concerned about. In 2000, Duquesne’s academic performance was ranked among the lowest in the state, according to the results of the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) tests. That year, 72 percent of CONTINUES ON PG. 08


Presents:

Sample all the Sandwich Week sandwiches and vote for your favorite!

Tickets $25 Includes sandwich samples & 2 Penn Brewery Beers http://sandwichweek. pittsburghnorthside.com Must be 21 or older to consume alcohol. This is a non-smoking event.

Northside Sandwich Week

Allegheny Elks Lodge # 339 • Atria's Benjamin’s • Bistro to Go • Deli on North El Burro • James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy Little Deli/Modern Café • Max’s Allegheny Tavern Monterey Pub • Penn Brewery • Peppi's Rumerz Sports Bar & Grill

#SandwichWeek

TASTE THEM ALL! N E W S

Stop in these restaurants to get signature sandwiches all week long:

+

TA S T E

+

http://sandwichweek.pittsburghnorthside.com M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

7


THE NEVERENDING STORY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

In emergency

PofE T the

and trauma care

WEEK we aren’t just experts.

We wrote the books.

Litty Litty, a pretty Pitty, is happy, affectionate and waiting for someone to adopt her from Animal Friends. She also likes to go for rides in the car. She’d love to ride home in yours!

Our innovative emergency and trauma approaches are leading care worldwide.

THE STATE HAS brought in plenty of experts over the past 13 years to turn Duquesne’s situation around. It began with a Board of Control, appointed by the state education secretary in 2000. The board’s membership changed every few years, as did the management team the board appointed to run the district. Pittsburgh Public Schools operated the district for one year; the Allegheny Intermediate Unit did so for four. The district was led by six different superintendents before Rach was hired, to say nothing of frequent changes in principals, teachers and support staff. Some left of their own accord, while others were laid off over the years as the district wrangled with its budget problems. Such changes in leadership, as well as the uncertainty about the district’s future, have exacted “a great, great emotional impact on the staff,” says Principal Sharon McIntosh, who was hired in 2009 as an assistant principal. “Everyone has résumés out and are looking for employment elsewhere,” Carey says. Duquesne’s teachers are the lowest-paid in Allegheny County, he says: Five years ago, when their contract was last negotiated, teachers would have needed a 19 percent increase just to match the next lowest-paying district in the county, Clairton. Long says the district has no extra money to put into improving the students’ education. In fact, more cuts would be necessary for the district to continue operating without deficits. Some of Duquesne’s problems — like increasing health-care and pension costs, as well as charter-school expenses — are faced by districts across Pennsylvania. But Duquesne’s situation is exacerbated by the fact that tax revenues have been dropping as

“PEOPLE CAME IN HERE, TOOK A PAYCHECK AND DIDN’T HAVE A VESTED INTEREST IN THE SCHOOL.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

Call Animal Friends today!

412-847-7000

UPMC.com/Leader

Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, UPMC is ranked among the nation’s top 10 hospitals by U.S. News & World Report.

8

the student population scored below basic proficiency in average combined reading and math scores. And its 2012 PSSA tests show no improvement. According to a recovery plan Long filed with the state this year, more than two-thirds of the elementary students scored below proficient in math; more than 80 percent were below proficient in reading. If the school must close, however, it’s unclear what the alternative will be: Long has proposed transferring the students to another school district or converting the district into a charter school. But all but two of the 11 school districts he approached earlier this year, facing their own tight budgets, rejected the idea of taking on the students voluntarily; negotiations are ongoing with Pittsburgh Public School officials and West Mifflin. The charterschool option may also be unworkable. Under current state rules, the cash-strapped district would have to bear the cost of tuition — and Duquesne already struggles to cover payments for children attending charters. That cost is expected to eat up 16 percent of next year’s budget. It’s possible state legislators may have to force a solution, Long says. “We’re hoping for reform of the charter-school law. We would be open, too, to a legislative mandate” ordering another district to accept the students.” Duquesne’s travails under state oversight are being watched with concern by educators. “Duquesne makes everybody real nervous,” says Daniel Carey, region field director for the Pennsylvania State Education Association, which represents teachers and other public-school employees. When it comes to financial distress, he says, “There is a whole line of other districts that aren’t too far behind.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013


SUMMER SELL DOWN EVENT 20 013 13

20 013 13

20 013 13

20 013 13

ALL ALLS AL L LLS LS LSTA LS ST TAR TAR TA AR

NO MONEY DOWN

$

NO FIRST PAYMENT

149

NO SECURITY DEPOSIT**

NO MONEY DOWN

NO FIRST PAYMENT

$

199

PER MONTH *

NO SECURITY DEPOSIT**

NO MONEY DOWN

NO FIRST PAYMENT

$

169

PER MONTH *

NO SECURITY DEPOSIT**

NO MONEY DOWN

$

NO FIRST PAYMENT

299

PER MONTH *

NO SECURITY DEPOSIT**

PER MONTH *

39 9 MONTH O LEAS LLEASE S

39 M 39 MO MONTH ON O ONTH N TH T H LLEAS LEASE E S EA

39 9 MONTH O LLEASE LEAS S

39 9 MONTH O LEAS LEASE LLE S

10,000 MILES PER YEAR

10,000 MILES PER YEAR

10,000 MILES PER YEAR

10,000 MILES PER YEAR

*Tax, title, license, acquisition fees additional and due at signing.** Includes competitive lease conquest rebate.

*Tax, title, license, acquisition fees additional and due at signing.** Includes competitive lease conquest rebate.

*Tax, title, license, acquisition fees additional and due at signing.** Includes competitive lease conquest rebate.

*Tax, title, license, acquisition fees additional and due at signing.** Includes competitive lease conquest rebate.

ALWAYS $500 LESS

ALWAYS $500 LESS

ALWAYS $500 LESS

ALWAYS $500 LESS

TO GUARANTEE OUR QUALITY WE BACK IT

WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. SEE DEALER FOR LIMITED WARRANTY DETAIL

P O W E R T R A I N WA R R A N T Y

CHEVROLET ROUTE 286 I MONROEVILLE I 724.327.0900

WWW.DAYCHEVROLET.COM

Scan for a Special Video from Debbie Flaherty

Automotive Group

Proud supporter of Animal Friends

DayAuto.com N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

9


THE NEVERENDING STORY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

S D N U O S E TH

r e m m u S of

A IN M E N T IN E N T E R T S E M A N T ES TEL! T T H E B IG G S IN O & H O W E ’V E G O EGANY CA L L A A C E AT SEN

B.B. KING

PAUL REISER

THIS WEEKEND!

SAT., JUNE 22 · 7 PM TICKETS START AT $20

SAT., JUNE 8 · 7 PM TICKETS START AT $40

ALABAMA

HOWIE MANDEL

SAT., JULY 27 · 7 PM TICKETS START AT $80

FRI., AUG. 16 · 7 PM TICKETS START AT $35

HUEY LEWIS AND BUY YOUR TICKETS NOW THE NEWS Get your tickets at any Seneca Casino Box Office or Ticketmaster location.

SAT., AUG. 31 · 7 PM TICKETS START AT $35

EXCLUSIVE NEW MEMBER PROMOTION

SHOW US S YOURS. WE’LL L GIVE YOU OURS.

the population dwindles. In 2000, U.S. Census figures show, the city had about 7,500 people. In 2010, only 5,565 lived there. The median household income in Duquesne was $21,714 compared to $51,651 statewide, according to the 2010 Census. About 99 percent of the school population qualifies for free or reduced lunches, according to a May 2012 report to the state legislature. As a result of those trends, local property and income tax are only enough to cover the roughly $1.6 million debt service on the district’s lone school building. “Those of us who stay, we can’t carry the district,” says Cedric Robertson, who serves on the school board, which remains as a token body. “You can’t get gold from a silver mine. You can’t drink champagne with beer money.” “I DON’T KNOW that the state has ever known what to do with Duquesne,” says Carey, of the PSEA. “They go back and forth with being concerned about the educational program and the test scores, and they’ll put resources in. And then next year they get concerned about the money, and they cut back on the money and resources, and the test scores suffer. It’s been this back-and-forth, up-and-down thing for the past 12 years.” Sarah McCluan, spokeswoman for the Allegheny Intermediate Unit, which oversaw the district for a time, says it’s hard to answer questions about

management decisions. “None of us were here,” she says of herself and the current administration. “And even our predecessors were not there, and even their predecessors were not there.” “It was a poor decision the state made,” says Robertson, who has a son in kindergarten and a daughter who went through the closing of the high school, graduating last year from West Mifflin. “People came in here, took a paycheck and didn’t have a vested interest in the school because they didn’t live in the community.” Rach, for one, was optimistic when he first came to Duquesne. Four years earlier, Rach had been named a “Distinguished Educator” by the Department of Education; he has decades of experience in education, as both teacher and administrator. He also serves as board chairman of the nonprofit Consortium for Public Education, which helps design strategies and brings support to struggling Mon Valley school districts. But Rach’s contract with the state ends this summer, and he says he doesn’t plan to stay to see the district’s elementary grades through what might be their last year in the city of Duquesne. “I am retired, and I’m not interested in coming out of retirement,” he says. Asked if he sees a light at the end of the tunnel for the district, he responds resignedly, but not unkindly. “What’s the old joke?” he asks. “Just hope it’s not an oncoming train?” A B ROW N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

SHOW US YOUR VALID PREMIUM CARD FROM ANOTHER CASINO* AND

WE’LL L UPGRADE DE YOU TO SEL SE LEC CT CLU LUB ST TA ATUS US!

PLUS, A $100 FREE SLOT PLAY SIGN-UP BONUS. *Offer only applies to new Seneca Player’s Club members. New members will be upgraded to Select Club status upon enrollment. Management reserves the right to change or cancel this promotion.

200 MORE ROOMS NOW OPEN! * *

$95

FROM

SUN - THU

$245

FROM

CORNER SUITE

NOW THROUGH JUNE 30, 2013 *WHEN EN YOU USE PROMO CODE CODE: “STAY “STAYandPLAY.” AY dPLAY AY ” RATES MAY VARY. V BOOK NOW! Online at SenecaAlleganyCasino.com or call 1-877-8-SENECA (873-6322) Fridays, Saturdays and select dates are available at a higher rate.

I-86, Exit 20 Salamanca, NY 1-877-8-SENECA SenecaCasinos.com

10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

{BY MATT BORS}

IDIOTBOX


You care. You listen. You laugh. You reassure. You serve. You believe. And you give. UPMC employees make an impact every day — not only at work, but in communities near and far. Your impact is easy to see as you have gone above and beyond to raise a milestone $2 million for United Way. It’s a first for any organization in the region. And it’s why your strength of character and generosity are an inspiration to us all.

“UPMC employees demonstrated their commitment to United Way by becoming the largest contributor in the 2012 campaign. We are grateful for their caring spirit.”

— Randy Dearth, President and CEO, Calgon Carbon; 2012 United Way Campaign Chair

N E W S

+

TA S T E

“Our employees amaze me with their endless dedication and generosity. I am proud of their commitment and personally honored to work alongside them. Thank you for all you do and for supporting United Way!” — Rob DeMIchiei, Senior Vice President, UPMC, and CFO; 2012 United Way Executive Campaign Sponsor

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

“It is heartwarming to see UPMC employees stepping up during tough times in caring, compassionate and smart ways to help neighbors in need. I love it!”

— Bob Nelkin, President and Chief Professional Officer, United Way of Allegheny County

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

11


APPLY LIBERALLY John Hanger wants to be the progressives’ choice for governor; unfortunately for him, he’s not alone {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} THE FIRST TIME Democrats prepared to take

Sav aavve 25% % offf bi birth rrth thday thday dayy pa parrty ttyy ro room oom m re ren eennttal al wh when en you you o pl plan ann a birt birt irthd r hda hdd y at Sandca San dca dc c stl sttlee.. Can Cannott bee coomb mbinedd wi with th any oth th othher ot eer oofffffers ers. Mus Mus Mu ustt pres essent ntt coupon cou pon to reecei po pon ce vee di ce di couunt.t.. Ca dis C llll 41 412-462-6 412 -46 46622-6 -6666 6666666 x6305 x630 30 fo forr more more det etail ails. s.



10000 SANDCASTLE DRIVE • PITTSBURGH, PA 15120 sanddcasstlewaterpark..com

on Tom Corbett, back in 2010, liberal voters had an unenviable choice. The party’s frontrunners, Dan Onorato and Jack Wagner, both skewed moderate-to-conservative. The most progressive Democratic candidate, Montgomery County Commission Joe Hoeffel, ďŹ nished fourth in the primary. More than a year away from Corbett’s reelection battle, things are shaping up much differently. But what’s good for liberals — a ďŹ eld heavy on progressive choices — may be bad for the candidate who jumped in ďŹ rst: John Hanger. Hanger, who headed the Department of Environmental Protection under former Gov. Ed Rendell, was the ďŹ rst candidate to enter the ďŹ eld — weeks after the 2012 Presidential election. And he has campaigned as an unabashed progressive. Hanger, who was the founding president of environmental group PennFuture, backs gay marriage and is pro-choice. He also favors legal marijuana for medical use, and wants to repeal the death penalty. “I will sign a bill repealing the death penalty, I’m the only one who has said that. I’m out there speaking about climatechange science all the time and I’m for moving over time to a single-payer [health system],â€? says Hanger. “There are real differences here that people will see.â€? He’s also already talking about policy speciďŹ cs. Last week Hanger proposed a plan designed to put more than 280,000 Pennsylvanians to work and raise more than $8 billion, thanks partly to a higher tax on natural -gas drilling. And in an interview with City Paper, Hanger said he’ll restore $1 billion in education funding that lapsed on Corbett’s watch, instead of pressing forward with corporate tax breaks Corbett is seeking. Hanger also pledged that charter schools which fail to meet federal test standards would lose state funding — a move he says could bring back $700 million to public schools. In 2010, such a platform would have put Hanger on the fringe. Now, he’s in danger of being lost in the crowd. Other Democrats pondering a gubernatorial bid include: Allyson Schwartz, a Philadelphia-area congressional representative who previously managed women’s-health clinics; state Treasurer Rob McCord; Kathleen McGinty, who preceded Hanger as DEP secretary in Rendell’s ďŹ rst term; and former Revenue Secretary Tom Wolf. “All of these candidates are classic liberal Democrats,â€? says G. Terry Madonna, director of the Center for Politics and Public

Affairs at Franklin and Marshall College. To win the primary, “It won’t be enough to say that you are pro-marriage and in favor of gun control.â€? “The thinking in the Democratic Party is that Tom Corbett is vulnerable, period,â€? says Keegan Gibson, managing editor of political website PoliticsPA.com. “It’s not like you need a Bob Casey to win. So what you have — particularly since most of the candidates are out of the more liberal southeast — is a race to the left.â€? That’s a race Hanger may have trouble winning. Gibson says Hanger sets out with “a very low public identiďŹ cation and he has no fundraising baseâ€? — key in a race where Madonna estimates Hanger needs $10 million to $12 million “to really get your name out there.â€? Schwartz, with her base in voterich Philly, “is much more well known,â€? Gibson says. In addition, Gibson says, “John Hanger has a Gasland problem.â€? In that 2010 documentary, which has become a touchstone for anti-drilling activists, Hanger is depicted as being out-of-touch with environmental concerns in drilling sites like Dimock, Pa. At one point, ďŹ lmmaker Josh Fox challenges Hanger to drink water from a well there. (Hanger refuses.) Hanger, who has denounced Gasland’s “selective, distorted view of gas drilling,â€? says he was a more zealous regulator than Corbett’s administration has been. Gas, Hanger says, “must be very highly regulated and taxed to appropriately address the fact that there are winners and losers.â€? But he says natural gas still beats options like coal. “I wish we were 100 percent renewable,â€? says Hanger, who’s also served on the state’s Public Utility Commission, where he helped to deregulate utilities, allowing customers to choose greener electricity suppliers. “But there’s a rising opinion that all fossil fuels are evil ... and that’s just not true.â€? Still, Gibson says that not calling for an outright drilling ban, as New York state has done, is “a tough sell.â€? He likens it to “being the head of a gay-rights organization and saying that you’re OK with civil unions and not gay marriage.â€? But Hanger says the ďŹ eld is wide open ‌ and for progressive voters, there are worse things than having options. “My pitch to Democratic voters is, check us all out,â€? Hanger says. Even Schwartz only had 15 percent support in a recent poll, he notes: “There’s no [obvious candidate like Ed] Rendell in this race. A candidate with the right policies can catch ďŹ re.â€? C D E I T C H@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013


FROM THE VINE

TO THE GLASS!

MMER WAY TO KICK OFF SU THERE IS NO BETTER NDS. LA GH HI THE LAUREL THAN WITH A TRIP TO enjoy to ily with friends or fam Plan a relaxing weekend eries win 6 tertainment at any of the tastings, tours and live en s... rie mo Create unforgettable me in the Laurel Highlands. away today! plan a weekend winery get SCAN, CALL OR CLICK

FOR

SUMMER GIVEAWAYS. COUPONS, PACKAGES &

hlands.org

800.333.5661 | laurelhig

SAM BUSH

JOE PURDY - BUCKY COVINGTON N Broke Stranded and Ugly - Meredith Holliday - National ional Pike Pickers Corn Liquor Saints String Band - Gypsy and His Band of Ghosts - Garrett Heath Jim Platts Rhythm Innovation - Truckster - Great Ancient Trees - The Unknown String Band

REVEREND PEYTON’S BIG DAMN BAND LARRY KEEL & NATURAL BRIDGE - THE LAST BISON - RISING APPALACHIA Aaron “The Uke Slinger” Jones - Allegheny Rhythm Rangers- Exports - Broken Fences City Dwelling Nature Seekers - Jeremy Flynn of the Fledgelings - Jeremy Christofer The Lone Pine String Band - Marty Zundel - Matt Kilroy

This is an all ages show. Children ages 11 and younger are admitted for free! Children must be accompanied by a parent or guardian at all times. Entrance with valid ticket only.

For more information and the get your tickets, go to www.7Springs.com/StillsintheHills TM

777 Waterwheel Drive, Seven Springs, PA 15622 | 800-452-2223 N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

VISIT

ura.org /everywhere

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

13


ENJOY

BUCKET SPECIALS AT THESE FINE LOCATIONS

MCMINN’S CASTLE SHANNON

5 Corona or Corona Light for $10 Each & Every Tuesday

NORTH PARK LOUNGE BAMBOO BAR CRANBERRY

10 for $10 Coronita Buckets

NORTH PARK DECKHOUSE

MT LEBO SALOON

CRANBERRY

MT LEBANON

10 Coronita’s for $10 All Day Every Day

$7.50 Coronita Buckets All Summer

BEER NUTZ BOTTLE SHOP

CUPKA’S 2 SOUTHSIDE

FOX CHAPEL

$13.95 Corona Buckets

$2 Corona & Corona Light Bottles Mix & Match Buckets 5 for $10 All Day Every Day

PICANTE

GORMAN’S PUB BRENTWOOD

5 for $10 Each & Every Saturday

DELMONT

$5.00 Coronita Bucket Wednesdays

SUNNY JIM’S CAMP HORNE ROAD

BETHEL PARK

7 Coronita’s for $7.00 from 7-9pm on Fridays

$10 Corona Buckets Saturday & Sunday All Day

MICKEY’S PLACE

DUKE’S STATION

NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

+

Five self-proclaimed devout, conservative Muslim women host the TV series Building Bridges on channel A9, presenting the seemingly contradictory case against both the female headscarf and Turkey’s turn to secularism. A report on Slate.com in May noted that the five are “mostly bottle blonds … [with] neon lipstick” wearing “brightly colored satin pantsuits and T-shirts with designer brand names ... stretched over their chests.” Building Bridges in principle supports interfaith dialogue, but guests (noted Slate) “often appear … with their eyebrows arched in the manner of a serious person certain he is the victim of a practical joke.”

+

Abdullah Riyaz, 50, was arrested at the Rajiv Gandhi International Airport in Hyderabad, India, in April after he appeared to be uncomfortable sitting in the waiting area. Officials found four “biscuits” of solid gold in his socks but obviously thought there might be more, and after nature took its course, found Riyaz to be one of those rare humans with the ability to brag that he once excreted gold (eight more “biscuits”).

+

A report circulated in April that an apparently Orthodox Jewish man (likely a “Kohen”) had tied himself up, head to toe, in a plastic bag while seated on an airline flight — likely because his teachings told him that flying over a cemetery would yield “impurities.” Airlines have made accommodations in the past, even in the face of criticism that a man in a plastic bag is a safety hazard. (Exceptions to the Kohen belief: Accidental tears in the bag are excused, but pre-punched air holes not; Kohenim unaware of the cemetery overflight in advance do not need protection; and deceased family members yield no impurities.)

+

5 Corona’s for $15

The chairman of the National Showcaves Center in a Welsh national park, aiming to halt a recent downturn in tourism business, threatened in April to sue the U.K. National Weather Service for its “all too [frequent] … gloom and doom reports.” The NWS had called for snow and cold weather over Easter weekend, but no snow fell, and the cold weather was tempered by sun and blue skies. (He also suggested adding “health”-type warnings to forecasts, e.g., beware that weather reports might be wrong.)

CAFÉ SAM

+

PINE HOLLOW ROAD

Corona Buckets 5 for $12 All Weekend

REDFIN BLUES HERRS ISLAND

BLOOMFIELD

7 Coronita’s for $12

In New Haven, Conn., in March, police had trapped two car-theft suspects in a multifamily building whose occupants were hiding from the suspects. Officers ordered a K-9 unit but were told it would be delayed. In a tactic departments occasionally employ, officers still threatened to release the dogs immediately, and to make the threat credible, available officers began barking. The suspects quickly surrendered rather than face the vicious canines.

+

Herbert and Catherine Schaible, members of the First Century Gospel Church in Philadelphia and believers in faith-healing rather than medical care, were convicted in 2011 in the bacterial-pneumonia death of their 2-yearold son, Kent. As a condition of probation, they promised medical care for their remaining eight children, but in April 2013, their youngest son, Brandon, died after severe diarrhea and

pneumonia, again treated only by prayer, and they were arrested — and the other children removed from the home. The medical examiner called Brandon’s death a homicide, and the couple also face five to 10 years in prison for violating probation.

+

News of the Weird first learned of kopi luwak in 1993 — coffee beans sold as gourmet because they had been swallowed by certain Asian civet cats and recovered from feces and washed. Since then, as Internet news of kopi luwak has spread, it has become no longer obscure, and in April, the environmental-activist website MongaBay.com warned that, based on increased demand, civet “farms” had sprung up in Indonesia and that civets were being caged for their entire lives solely for access to their poop. While none of the main kopi luwak civet species is formally “endangered,” activists warned that populations are dwindling for, said one, “the most ridiculous threat … to any wildlife I have seen yet.”

+

In one of the more prominent recent “that’s my story, and I’m sticking to it” cases, Vicky Pryce, 60, finally gave up in March and admitted to a judge that her husband, not she, was driving their speeding car in 2003. She was married at the time to high-ranking British government official Chris Huhne, whose license would have been suspended had he been driving — and thus, she volunteered. The couple’s 10-year ruse had inspired two trials ending without decision. (Huhne “rewarded” Pryce for her loyalty in 2010 by having an affair. The couple are divorced and will be imprisoned separately for perverting justice.)

+

Briton James McCormick caused the deaths of hundreds of Iraqis after convincing a Baghdad police official that his “electronic” wands could detect bombs at 400 security checkpoints (in spite of U.S. officials’ many warnings that they were useless). (In October 2009, for example, suicide bombers walked past two wand-equipped checkpoints into a neighborhood and killed 155.) McCormick, who sold 6,000 of the devices to Iraq and the country of Georgia at prices of up to $40,000 each, was convicted of fraud in April. According to London prosecutors, he also claimed that his wands were programmable to ferret out drugs and paper money and to detect them from high above or up to a kilometer underground.

+

Catholic nun Megan Rice, 83, and two other peace activists were convicted in May of breaking into the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tenn., last year — with “intent to harm national security.” Sympathizers lauded the activists’ motives and asked whether national security was actually “harmed,” but somehow the intruders’ stealth “attack” was treated seriously. That is, three amateurs cut through numerous fences undetected, then bypassed several sensors and alarms (either malfunctioning or unmonitored) before being stopped by a lone guard. (While Israel currently frets over Iran’s accumulation of up to 500 pounds of highly enriched uranium for building one bomb, Y-12 houses an estimated 400 tons.)

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS@E A RT HL I N K . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013


VOTED BEST KIDS PARK IN THE WORLD!

$3K

BLACKJACK CHALLENGE!

1 ON 1 NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED

THURSDAYS IN JUNE | 6PM - 9PM WIN UP TO $1,500 EACH CHALLENGE DAY

N

Registration begins at 5:45pm next to Levels. • • • • •

OR 2013 F EW

A

B

y

+

TA S T E

+

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

IDLEWILD.com N E W S

HAPPY 5PM - 7HOUR PM

Must present your Rush Rewards Players Club card. May only play once per day. No buy-in required. Registration closes when capacity is reached. Management reserves the right to change or cancel promotion.

at

F

$10,000 in challenge chips. 10 hands of blackjack. Top 6 scorers win cash. No experience required. No buy-in required.

M U S I C

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

15


a dance theater production created on internationally & nationally renowned performers over the age of 40.

5 NIGHTS ONLY! JUNE 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

The New Hazlett Theater, Northside FOR TICKETS ONLINE: www.showclix.com OR CALL: 1.888.718.4253; FOR INFO: 412.320.4610 www.corningworks.org

Choreography & performance by BETH CORNING, created in collaboration with, and directed by, Tony Award winning DOMINIQUE SERRAND.

After loss, after dinner, after youth – the ever-changing geography of one’s life.

A ONE WOMAN SHOW

BUS SERVICE TO THE NEW HAZLETT THEATER, NORTHSIDE

1-2-4-6-8-11-12-13-15-16-17-54 FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO:

16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013


DE

SI

the

ON

WELL-PRICED VEGETARIAN ENTREES COMPRISE ABOUT HALF THE MENU

FRESH AND FROZEN

EGYPTIANDELIGHT

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH} Growing up in Indiana, Pa., Joe Bier and his wife, Jodi, ate so much Meadows Frozen Custard that they often joked that “we should just open one of our own.” After moving to Pittsburgh, the Biers did just that. In March, they opened their own Meadows Frozen Custard on Route 19, in Cranberry. The Meadows brand has been around since 1950, when the first store opened in Duncansville, south of Altoona. There are several shops across Pennsylvania, but until the Cranberry shop opened, the closest location for Pittsburghers was Greensburg. Bier says he was worried initially because the product isn’t well known in the area, but he was soon surprised. “We have been blown away with the warm response that our customers have given us.” The creamy custard comes in four flavors: chocolate, vanilla and two rotating flavors that have recently included blueberry, raspberry, birthday cake and cookie dough. The shop also offers frozen yogurt, sundaes, shakes and 12 flavors of Italian ice. Bier says that “die-hard customers will tell you that it is the special mix and flavors that only The Meadows uses that sets us apart.” But he adds that his product is also different from other frozen treats because it’s always fresh. “Our frozen custard is made fresh not just every day, but every few hours,” Bier explains. “Anytime a customer stops at our shop, they are receiving a product that is never more than an hour or two old.” CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Meadows Frozen Custard, 20635 Route 19, Cranberry. 724-779-6800

the

FEED

Read With Food: Salt, Sugar, Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked d Us, by Michael Moss.. A sober, but mind-blowing exposé from the e Pulitzer Prize-winning g journalist about why y we drink gallons of Coke, give our kids Lunchables and need 20 flavors of Doritos. Moss digs through research, but also gets many food-industry insiders on record.

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

W

HEN YOU think of the most inter-

national neighborhoods in Pittsburgh, you probably don’t think of Brookline. But maybe you should. Due to its ridgeline perch between Routes 51 and 19, Brookline Boulevard has never emerged as a bustling through route. Instead, it’s held its own as a classic neighborhood main street, anchored by its handsome old fire station and populated by small businesses that cater to residents’ daily needs and wants. Yet among these banks, bakeries and beauty salons thrives an array of the city’s most diverse international dining. There’s an intimate Italian trattoria, a Greek restaurant, a Mexican grocery complete with sidewalk taco stand, and a venerable Lebanese market, which has just debuted a café. Now add to this mix a warm and welcoming Egyptian restaurant, run by a pair of young brothers and their mother, who cooks in her homeland tradition. Isis’ decor is a charming hodgepodge of mismatched tables and chairs — as though furnished by a thrift-shopper with a good

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Arnabeet (fried cauliflower)

eye — and Egyptian bazaar finds. The overall effect is casual and quirky. While Mediterranean cuisine from the pillars of Atlas to the Levant is a recognizable theme, we quickly realized that Isis’ menu offers much more than just another rehash of hummus and kebab. Those stalwarts are present,

ISIS CAFE

815 Brookline Blvd., Brookline. 412-207-2485 HOURS: Tue.-Fri. lunch 11 a.m.-2 p.m., dinner 4-8 p.m.; Sat. 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sun. brunch 10 a.m.-2 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups and salads $2.50-4.50; entrees $6.50-16.50 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED but Egypt’s ancient culture and millenniaold identity as a global crossroads comes through in dishes like stewed jute (the leaves, not the carpet fibers) and samboussa, the Ethiopian answer to samosas. The samboussa came directly from the fryer, ultra-hot and still dripping oil. The phyllo dough was golden, flaky, thin and

crisp, and when we bit in, we found lightly spiced ground beef, crumbly rather than formed into a patty. We passed over hummus for besara, a pureed fava-bean dip that was topped with slightly crisp caramelized onions. The legume purée had a family resemblance to hummus, but the greener fava beans had a less creamy texture and an earthier flavor than chick peas; the only drawback was that the onions were oversalted, and we were torn between the temptation of their rich flavor and the need to temper their influence. Of the vegetarian entrees which comprise about half the menu, we sampled bamia, a tasty dish of okra stewed in tomatoes, herbs and spices, and kusharie masri, consisting of rice, pasta and brown lentils, topped with tomato-garlic sauce. The tomato-garlic sauce was astringent, pungent and delicious, but more lentils would have made this dish even more salutatory; the combination of pasta and rice outweighed the sprinkling of lentils and made the entire dish too heavy on carbohydrates. We also ordered kusharie asfar, red CONTINUES ON PG. 18

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

17


EGYPTIAN DELIGHT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

lentils with rice and cauliflower, which came with a “fried egg.” The egg was not fried in the American fashion — cracked into an oiled skillet — but was in fact a whole boiled egg that had been dipped in batter and fried to obtain a delicate coating. Koufta, sausage-like grilled cylinders of ground lamb and beef, was neither dry like some we’ve had, nor juicy and tender like the best. Furthermore, the spicing was indifferent; not bland, exactly, but neither was it bold with garlic or pepper. The spices stepped up in macarona bechamel, which we took from the menu description to be akin to Greek pastitsio: beef and pasta layered with a creamy sauce. But Isis’ version, using penne, had an intriguing flavor that we couldn’t quite pin down. Perhaps it was warm, Middle Eastern spices (pastitsio often uses cinnamon but otherwise gestures broadly toward Italy with tomatoes and herbs), or perhaps the bechamel itself had uniquely Egyptian ingredients. We liked that even a dish we thought we knew could surprise us.

Two of Isis Café’s three owners: Salwa Youssef and her son, Ahmed Fathi

Ferakh mehamara, pan-seared chicken marinated in yogurt and orange spice, sounded more exotic than it tasted, but still delivered extremely good, grilled, boneless thighs. The marinade surely contributed to the meat’s moist tenderness, but the spice was only hinted at where the flame had browned the edges, creating delicious peaks of flavor. Isis brings the tantalizing nuances of the Nile delta to the landscape of Pittsburgh’s Middle Eastern dining, even as it further broadens the already surprisingly varied menu of Brookline Boulevard. The vegetarian dishes in particular — which are all only $6.50 — stand out for rich flavors and distinctive combinations. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

RAISING THE BAR With new bar, Soba keeps pace with trends it helped establish As higher-end cocktail bars become more commonplace in Pittsburgh, one of the city’s trendsetting stalwarts — Soba — is stepping up its game. “Things were starting to get dated,” says longtime Soba barman Rob Hirst. The bar in Big Burrito Restaurant Group’s Shadyside restaurant hasn’t been updated since 2002, he notes. Although Hirst’s cocktail menu is contemporary (he’s president of the Pittsburgh chapter of the Bartender’s Guild), the bar wasn’t set up for current cocktail-making trends. Today’s cocktail bars demand a lot more real estate, necessary to house their expanded array of herbs, bitters, syrups and infusions. And as Hirst admits, “The challenge [I’ve had] over the last five years is that these old-school bars were set up in a way that weren’t conducive to cocktail culture.” So when a vacant storefront adjacent to Soba became available, management decided to build a new bar from the ground up. The new Soba bar is bright and airy, with floor-to-ceiling windows that open to Ellsworth Avenue. And the bar’s working space is designed with bartenders in mind, with features like an easily accessible cooler to hold an array of herbs, syrups and infusions. By keeping the most important ingredients close at hand, Hirst says, “You don’t have to go looking, bending or searching.” That’s especially important for Soba, which does a larger volume of service than many other local restaurant-linked cocktail bars. “Speed, efficiency and accuracy in getting quality cocktails out to the tables is the big challenge,” Hirst says. In order to bring an expanded bar staff up to speed, Hirst has pared down the cocktail list — although, with a respectable 16 drinks on the menu, there are still plenty to choose from. Bottled and draft cocktails will likely be added in the near future. It’s not as if regulars won’t recognize their favorite hangout. “I’ve been slowly getting my clientele more and more interested in craft cocktails,” Hirst says. But now, he says, “we’re starting fresh.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

5847 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412362-5656 or www.bigburrito.com/soba


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

Little

BANGKOK IN THE STRIP

DINING LISTINGS KEY

Authentic Thai Cuisine

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

BIGELOW GRILLE: REGIONAL COOKING AND BAR. Doubletree Hotel, One Bigelow Square, Downtown. 412-2815013. This upscale restaurant offers fine foods with Steeltown flair, like “Pittsburgh rare” seared tuna (an innovation borrowed from steelworkers cooking meat on a blast furnace). The menu is loaded with similar ingenious combinations and preparations. KE

Café Delhi {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} THE BLACK BEAN. 239 Atwood St., Oakland. 412-621-2326. Though geared more for takeout than dining in, this little storefront is a great bet for quick, inexpensive Cuban fare: combination of beans, pork and plantains; the island’s signature ham and pork pressed sandwich, among others; empanadas; gumbo; and mixed grill. JF CAFÉ DELHI. 205 Mary St., Carnegie. 412-278-5058. A former Catholic church in Carnegie now

Outdoor Seating! BYOB! players and coaches will be available for pictures and autographs

Dine-In or Take-Out M-F: 8a-3p Sat Brunch 10a-2p

We Support Local!

Fathers Day

All Lunches

BRUNCH DINNER BUFFET

$

7 - $9

OR

freshest

Twisted Thistle {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} houses an Indian café, with a menu ranging from dosa to biryani to palak paneer. From a cafeteria-style menu, order street snacks (chaats, puris), or the nugget-like, spicy fried “Chicken 65.” Hearty fare includes chickpea stew, and a kebab wrapped in Indian naan bread. FJ

GREEN PEPPER. 2020 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill 412-422-2277. At this family-run restaurant, diners will find authentic Korean recipes refreshingly not reconstituted for timid Americans — no egg rolls or ChineseAmerican stir-fries. Dumplings contain kimchi, and the soup is pumpkin. Entrees include the more-familiar bulgogi (barbecued beef), as well as bibimbap, in which meat and veggies are mixed with rice. KE

THE CAMBOD-ICAN KITCHEN. 1701 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-6199. Having made the jump from street truck to modest sitdown venue, the owners retained their menu, so popular with the late-night crowd, HOKKAIDO SEAFOOD of fresh-cooked BUFFET. 4536 Browns . w w w Cambodian cuisine. Hill Road, Squirrel aper p ty ci h g p Kabobs, fried wontons, Hill. 412-421-1422. This .com chicken, shrimp cakes, buffet-style restaurant curried vegetable bowls rises above the scourge of and fried noodles are among the steam table to offer some the restaurant’s staples, as is its true gems among its panoply distinctive in-house “moon sauce” of East Asian offerings. There’s and fresh limeade. FJ standard Chinese-American fare, but also sushi, hibachiCURRY ON MURRAY. 2121 style Japanese cooked to order, Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412popular offerings such as crab 422-3120. The menu here is fairly legs and roast Peking duck, standard Thai, featuring your and even frog legs. KF favorites but also offering few surprises. So alongside satay, NAKAMA JAPANESE. 1611 E. larb salad, pad Thai and the Carson St., South Side. 412-381popular street-food noodle dish, 6000. Pittsburghers are crazy pad see ew, look for moo dad about this sushi bar/steakhouse, deaw, a fried pork appetizer or and every weekend pretty people crowd inside to watch the knifea pumpkin-tofu curry. KF wielding chefs. Presentation is key for customers and restaurant FUKUDA. 4770 Liberty Ave., alike: The interior is smart, the Bloomfield. 412-567-5050. chefs entertaining, and the food This neo-traditional Japanese is good, if pricey. LE restaurant excels at re-invention, with a menu that is inspired NICKY’S THAI KITCHEN. 856 as much by modern American Western Ave., North Side (412cuisine as it is by ancient 321-8424) and 903 Penn Ave., Japanese tradition. Here, roasted Downtown (412-471-8424). This beets are powdered, kale is restaurant offers outstanding crisped, and pork belly gets its Thai cuisine — from familiar own entrée. It offers a tapasoptions to chef’s specials that are like, a la carte approach, ideal truly special, such as gaprow lad for sampling a menu that spans kao (a Thai stir-fry) and salmon traditional sushi, charcoal-grilled

THE LOCAL PRODUCE FROM THE STRIP

Dinner Hours Coming June 3rd!

skewers, ramen soup and neatly prepared, sliced proteins. FL

Mon 11:30-3:00 Tue-Thu 11:30-9:00 Fri-Sun 11:00-9:00

412-415-0338 538 California Ave. Pittsburgh, PA, 15202

LITTLEBANGKOK INTHESTRIP.COM

www.skinnypetes.com

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

Sunday, June 16 MAKE YOUR RESERVATION TODAY!

Dine in / Take Out BYOB

1906 Penn Avenue Strip District 412-586-4107 GOUTDOOR DINING F

412­683­1448

Pet Friendly Patio! 4428 LIBERTY AVE BLOOMFIELD delsrest.com

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us

FULL LIST ONLINE

CONTINUES ON PG. 20

N E W S

MONDAY JUNE 10TH - 6PM

A Unique Luncheon and Gourmet Food Destination

AJI PICANTE. 1711 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0220. There is no mistaking the Latin and Spanish themes on the menu of this Peruvian restaurant: Fried banana, guacamole, even paella are all on offer. Yet all the preparations are unique, from ceviche served with Andean fried corn kernels to a mildly Asianinfluenced steak stir-fry. Distinctly native flavors include potatoes, quinoa and white-bean cake. KF AZUL BAR Y CANTINA. 122 Broad St., Leetsdale. 724-2666362. Colorful and convivial, Azul dishes up Southern California-style Mexican cooking in a festive atmosphere. The menu offers the familiar fajitas, tacos and burritos — to be washed down with margaritas — as well as quirkier fare such as crunchy sticks of jicama and fried ice cream. JE

MEET THE

PITTSBURGH POWER

2nd place Best Chinese in Pittsburgh

PATINO ES OP DOG

China Palace Shadyside Featuring cuisine in the style of

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

LOWED

AL

ERS E B T F A R 40 C N TAP! O

100 VEGETARIAN

ENS FOR E R C G S I B 8 ES PENS GAM

DISHES!

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

Delivery Hours

11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

412.390.1111

100 Adams Shoppes “New Mars Location”

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE www.chinapalaceshadyside.net

724-553-5212 doublewidegrill.com

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

19


Daily Lunch Service Begins Promptly at 11:31 AM

PATIO Now Open!

--------- TUESDAY ---------

HALF OFF

all BOTTLES of WINE

{BY AMYJO BROWN}

PUSADEE’S GARDEN. 5321 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412781-8724. Traditional Thai sauces and curries from scratch are among the reasons to stop by this charming eatery, which boasts an outdoor patio. Don’t miss the latke-like shrimp cakes, the classically prepared tom yum gai soup, perfectly prepared tilapia or the spicy duck noodles. KF

GETTING CARDED Local farmers’ markets again accepting food stamps AT LEAST TWO of Pittsburgh’s Citiparks farmers’ mar-

THE QUIET STORM COFFEEHOUSE AND RESTAURANT. 5430 Penn Ave., Friendship. 412-661-9355. Bike punks, young families and knowledge-workers can all use a cup of joe, lunch or some homemade pastry. The Quiet Storm’s laid-back, familiar vibe welcomes all to chill. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and Sunday brunches cater to vegetarians and vegans. JF

Don’t be late.

Shiloh GrilL

123 Shiloh Street, Mt. Washington

412.431.4000

theShilohGrill.com

the

Wooden Nickel R e s t a u r a n t

&

L o u n g e

Enjoy! 2 Outdoor Patios Live Music Every Fri & Sat Night!

DAILY DRINK

SPECIALS

MARTINI MONDAYS DRAFTS TUESDAYS WINE WEDNESDAYS THIRSTY THURSDAYS

LATE NIGHT BITES

½ Off Lounge Menu from 9-10pm 4006 Berger Lane - Monroeville 412-372-9750 TheWoodenNickelRestaurant.com 20

offMenu

mango curry. The flavors here are best described as intense, yet without overwhelming the fresh ingredients. KF

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

ROOT 174. 1113 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 412-243-4348. The foundation of the menu is also a basic formula: fresh, local and seasonal ingredients. To this, add an adventurous selection of meat products, such as bonemarrow brûlée and smoked salmon sausage. Dishes have lengthy ingredient lists, but it all comes together in satisfying and surprising ways. LF SALT OF THE EARTH. 5523 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-4417258. Salt embodies a singular vision for not just eating, but fully experiencing food. The ever-changing but compact menu reflects chef Kevin Sousa’s hybrid style, combining cuttingedge techniques with traditional ingredients to create unique flavor and texture combinations. Salt erases distinctions — between fine and casual dining, between familiar and exotic ingredients, between your party and adjacent diners. LE TOMATO PIE CAFÉ. 885 East Ingomar Road, Allison Park. 412-364-6622. Located on the verdant edge of North Park, Tomato Pie is more than a pizzeria. It offers other simple Italian specialties including pasta and sandwiches, and the chef uses plenty of fresh herbs grown on the premises. FJ TWISTED THISTLE. 127 Market St., Leechburg. 724-236-0450. This cozy restaurant, set in a restored 1902 hotel, offers above-average fare, reasonably priced. Alongside the contemporary American flavors are numerous Asianinspired dishes, such as soup made from kabocha pumpkin. From po’boy oyster appetizers to crab cakes and over-sized short ribs, each dish is carefully conceived and prepared. EK

North Side farmers’ market {PHOTO BY AMYJO BROWN}

LET’S DO LUNCH

DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

kets — the East Liberty and North Side locations — will accept food stamps this season. “It’s a win-win for poor people, affluent people, farmers and the communities,” says Ken Regal, executive director of Just Harvest, a local nonprofit that helped acquire several free Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) terminals for the city from the state. The markets stopped being able to accept food stamps in 1994, when the EBT cards replaced the paper coupons. Since then, markets have struggled to find a way to make it work. “The technology was unreliable, and that was a big barrier. It’s also expensive,” says Emily Schmidlapp, manager of the Farmers@Firehouse market in the Strip District. The terminals, she says, cost about $1,000 each. In addition to making the market accessible to those using food stamps, the terminals also accept credit and debit cards, allowing all customers to benefit. The Strip District market, which is outside the seven city-run farmers’ markets, received a free terminal from the state last year. Because it focuses on organic foods, the prices can still be a deterrent to food-stamp recipients. The market sold about $350 worth of market goods through the food-stamp program, compared to $6,000 in credit-card transactions. Schmidlapp says she hopes to offset that difference this year through a “double-value program,” in which someone using $10 worth of food stamps would be issued $20 in tokens to spend. Schmidlapp, who also works for Just Harvest, says the benefits of extending food stamps to markets “go in every direction.” As of April, there were 161,787 people issued food stamps in Allegheny County, totaling more than $20.94 million in benefits, according to Regal. “That’s a huge amount of business for small family farmers,” Schmidlapp says. Regal says the goal is to get terminals in the other markets “as quickly as we are logistically able to do that.” “There has been this false stereotype of food-stamp users as people who waste their money on food that isn’t good for you, even though there is no data to support that,” Regal says. But “if we want people to use their food stamps to get the best, most nutritious food for that dollar, farmers’ markets are one of the best ways of doing that.” A B ROW N @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


PRESENT THIS AD FOR A

h” urg e “OLLB SONeeLENth S UR ZNER TR EY TO

20% DISCOUNT

AWARD-WINNING CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN CUISINE

For up to 4 people. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Expires October 31, 2013

“Toast can serve as an upscale bar for after-work drinks or late-evening conversation. It’s casual and inexpensive enough to go to “just because,” but also serious enough to be a special occasion destination”

www.toastpgh.com 412-224-2579

$

25

STATION SQUARE NTOWN HOTELS AND PICKUPS FROM 6 DOW 42-2349 L -3 CAL 00 NS 1-8 RESERVATIO

Pittsburgh Marriott City Center 112 Washington Place, Downtown 412-471-4000 for Reservations www.thesteelhead.com

TR

Half Chicken Sandwich and Cup of Soup, Half Caesar or Half Garden Vegetable Salad

AX

FARM

S

5102 BAUM BLVD. SHADYSIDE

25

This weeks offerings include: Roast Turkey BLT - $9 | Italian Flat Bread - $11 Light & Simple - $10 - Choice of: Half Turkey BLT,

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS AVAILABLE

TOAST!

$

ENJOY A CASUAL LUNCH AWAY FROM YOUR DESK.

- China Millman, Pgh Post-Gazette

KITCHEN & WINE BAR

ds

Neiighhbborrhhoo t iic N Histor TOUR #1 H Neighborhoods TOUR #2 Heritage

®

Scan to View Steelhead Menus

OPTIONS NOW RESEARCH STUDY FOR MEN AND WOMEN Magee Womens Research Institute is looking for HIV-negative men and women (who are not pregnant or breast-feeding) between the ages of 18 and 45 to participate in a research study.

This study will assess the safety and acceptability of an investigational medication given as an injection. In the future, it is hoped that this medication will be developed to help prevent HIV infection.

For more information and to see if you qualify for this study, please call 412-463-9053 or 412-852-0390. You may be compensated up to $2,550 (females) or $1,775 (males) for your time.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

21


LOCAL

“PEOPLE THAT KNOW THIS MUSIC THOUGHT THE LINEUP WAS REALLY GREAT.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

SUNDAYS IN SHADYSIDE It was a bit of serendipity that led Pete Spynda — best known these days as the DJ behind the Pandemic worldmusic dance night at Brillobox — to start a weekly outdoor concert series at a plant nursery. “I’d been looking for a venue to do something outdoors for a while,” Spynda explains. “I happened to be walking in Bloomfield, and I ran into a buddy of mine [Bill Brittain] who runs the Shadyside Nursery.” Spynda was specifically looking for a place to put on a show for Italian Gypsy-folk band Taluna. Brittain was looking for activities to complement a Sunday visit by Fukuda restaurant’s food truck. The result: Weather Permitting, a new Sunday-night series featuring local (and sometimes touring) bands, outdoors at the nursery. The idea is to feature music in a family-friendly atmosphere, early in the evening, before folks head to the bar — or send the kids to bed. “It’s kind of like a Hartwood Acres-style series, but in the city,” Spynda says. “They do great programming at Hartwood Acres, but it can be a hike, especially if you live in the city, and have to pack up the kids and all that.” It’ll of course be on a smaller scale than Hartwood: Spynda and the folks from Shadyside Nursery are building a stage to fill some space where the plants don’t sit in the afternoon because of sun exposure. They’ll rent a PA and have food trucks and drinks. (It’s also BYOB.) Spynda’s hope is to involve nearby businesses and bring foot traffic to the nursery’s end of Shadyside on Sunday evenings. (Shadyside Nursery is on Maryland Avenue, just off Ellsworth.) Local bands booked for the future include The Beagle Brothers, The Harlan Twins and The Pressure. And … if it rains? “That’s, I guess, to be determined,” Spynda says with a laugh. “That’s one reason I’m reluctant to book many touring bands. Mostly we’ll just cross our fingers.”

WE JAZZ JUNE

“IT’S KIND OF LIKE A HARTWOOD ACRES-STYLE SERIES, BUT IN THE CITY.”

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

WEATHER PERMITTING featuring LUNGS FACE FEET, TALUNA. 5 p.m. Sun., June 9. Repeats every Sunday through the end of August with different bands. Shadyside Nursery, 510 Maryland Ave., Shadyside. $10. All ages. www.facebook.com/ weatherpermittingpgh

22

{BY MIKE SHANLEY}

I

T STARTED with a conversation at a

barbecue. Janis Burley Wilson, vice president of education and community engagement and director of jazz programs with the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, was talking with a group of local jazz musicians about the need for a jazz festival in the city. The Mellon Jazz Festival had dried up in the early ’00s. But Wilson had initiated the Jazz at Katz Plaza summer concert series, which expanded to year-round with the opening of the Backstage Bar/ Cabaret Theater. So there must be something she could do, her friends said. After a think-tank meeting, grant proposals and trips to other festivals, Wilson launched the Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival in 2011. In that time, it’s already drawn attention beyond the city limits for an impressive list of national acts, and a vibe that that no less than Downbeat magazine called “intimate, laid back and inviting.” A quick look at the bills of some national festivals shows that many have “jazz” in the name, but a schedule that leans more toward R&B. Wilson is careful to avoid

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JIMMY KATZ}

Rudresh Mahanthappa plays the main stage of the Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival.

that. “When I think about jazz, I think about improvisation, so any kind of music that has any improvisation, as far as I’m concerned, is inspired by jazz,” she says. “But we will never get to the place where we have just a little bit of jazz here and then something else to get this huge crowd. I don’t want to

PITTSBURGH JAZZLIVE INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL Fri., June 7-Sun., June 9. Various outdoor and indoor venues, Downtown. Main stages: Penn Avenue and Ninth Street. Rudresh Mahanthappa performs 3 p.m. Sat., June 8. Performances free, all ages. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghjazzlive.com

do that.” This year’s bill runs from popular acts like bassist Marcus Miller and vocalist Chaka Khan — who is known for her R&B hits, but who has also crossed over into jazz — to more progressive players like saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa and drummer Allison Miller. The three-day festival also avoids focus-

ing heavily on past and present Pittsburgh natives, which would make the event an insular salute to the city. “It’s a Pittsburgh festival,” Wilson says, “but we reach out and get other people from other places that have large networks of people and influence, so that we can get this festival on a national scale, and ... able to measure up to these festivals all over the world.” When there is a salute to a native son, it’s done with a modern twist. Trumpeter Sean Jones, the festival’s artist-inresidence, has been commissioned each year to premiere a new work with a local theme. This year, he’ll salute drummer Roger Humphries, in a band that includes Humphries, who has been a mentor in the city for decades. “I’ve charged Sean with making [Humphries] do something a little different,” Wilson says. Al Bright, a nationally known painter from Youngstown, Ohio, who has created canvases inspired by jazz for more than four decades, will create a piece during the Humphries performance as well. (Bright currently has an exhibition at 709 Penn Gallery.) Wilson has been encouraged by the


feedback she’s received in past years, especially from musicians. “What makes me feel really good is that people that know this music thought the lineup was really great,” she says. “So that made me feel like we’re doing a good thing.” The entire schedule — featuring a Jazz Crawl on Friday, and jam sessions each night — can be found at www.pittsburghjazzlive.com. ALTO SAXOPHONIST Rudresh Mahanthappa last visited Pittsburgh in 2008, during the Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts. He debuted Samdhi, a progressive blend of South Indian music, electric and acoustic jazz, which was released on CD two years ago. For his latest album, Gamak, he takes a broader view on how to approach melody. “In the West, melodic ornamentation is kind of secondary [in a composition] in a lot of ways, but that’s what gives music its personality,” he says. “That’s how we know Beyoncé is Beyoncé and how we know Hendrix is Hendrix. It’s something that permeates how a melody is communicated. And it’s something that occurs in music from all over the world. “I just wanted to make a fun record. So the field was a lot more wide open for what could happen,” he explains. “That’s why there’s a tune that sounds like a heavy metal or punk thrash tune. Or there’s a tune that sounds like a country tune. There’s one that sounds like Indonesian gamelan.” One track, “Waiting Is Forbidden,” has been compared to King Crimson for its angular layers of twisted time signatures. He likes the comparison, although the song was inspired by South Indian classical music. “We’re in this world where the recontextualization of South Indian classical music sounds like King Crimson. If that can happen, anything can happen,” he says. Much of Gamak’s strength comes from the musicians. Longtime collaborators François Moutin (bass) and Dan Weiss (drums) navigate the challenging grooves and still swing hard. Guitarist David Fiuczynski adds to the sound with a double-necked guitar that allows him to jump from blues slides on the fretted neck to scales closer to Indonesian music on the fretless neck. He often does this in the space of one track. On top of that, Mahanthappa plays with an often staggering technique, able to execute lines of great complexity at impressive speeds. The crisp opening of “Waiting Is Forbidden” sounds like nothing less than a call to arms. When asked how he feels about his chops, Mahanthappa remains modest. “I think it’s a matter of perspective,” he says. “I’m trying to figure out how to find a balance and … how to pace myself.” INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

N E W S

+

PENN HILLS GAME EXCHANGE 431 Rodi Rd • Penn Hills • 412-371-0386

Buy/sell/trade from our selection of hundreds of classic video games! NINTENDO! SEGA! XBOX! PLAYSTATION! AND MUCH MORE! Imports & other hard-to-find titles!

Play over 75 classic arcade games on our giant projection screens! Try some pinball in our game room! Just $5/hour!

www.pennhillsgames.com MONFRI: 5:30P  10P • SAT AND SUN: NOON  10P

36th Annual PITTSBURGH PARTS-A-RAMA LLC

BUTLER FAIRGROUND, PA I-79 TO EXIT 99, RT. 422 EAST

JUNE 14, 15, 16 2013 Auto Parts Flea Market Cars, Parts, Toys

(412) 366-7154 Box 11102, Pittsburgh, PA 15237

www.pittsburghparts-a-rama.com

BEER DIST. INC.

402-406 SEMPLE STREET OAKLAND

ock it, If we don’t stfo r you! it r we’ll orde

b gh’s 1st IMPORT ttsbur PiPitt and craft Beer Distributor and still the best! With over 550 Beers in stock, how could you go wrong? + $ TAX for All Molson 12OZ Cans

16.99

including Molson Golden, Molson Canadian & Molson Ice

www.MELLINGERSBEER www. MELLINGERSBEER.com .com

412.682.4396

like us on Facebook!

@MellingerBeer

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

23


OPUS ONE PRESENTS

Punk state of mind: Thunder Vest (from left: Donovan Greenaway, Phil Irvin, Steve Chiang, Kevin Eaton, Steve Terzolino)

SIMPLY THE VEST {BY J.E. ROSENFELD}

06/23 ROGUE WAVE 06/25 YEASAYER 06/26 ALESANA 06/06 A FUNDRAISER FOR SOUTHWINDS, INC.

FT. VERITY'S LIE & ACT OF PARDON

06/08 DOUG KHOREY AND HIS BAND

OF BROKEN HEARTS (EARLY)

06/08 GENE THE WEREWOLF (LATE) 06/09 NORTH OF MASON-DIXON (NOMaD) 06/13 06/15 06/18 06/19

ACOUSTIC EP CD RELEASE PARTY MOUNT MORIAH TEAMMATE GUGGENHEIM GROTTO BEN SHANNON & BARNABY BRIGHT

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

PUNK ROCK IS alive and well, living in Pittsburgh … and named after a vest designed to keep animals calm. Since July 2012, Thunder Vest has been playing, writing and drinking together; now, the band’s self-titled debut is set to bring its message to the masses. Recorded with Eric Wrecker of The Cheats at the Red Room, the 11-track CD is bursting with energetic, catchy punk songs. Stand-out tracks include “Cigarette Girl,” “Rad Girls” and “It’s All About Me”; according to vocalist Scott Terzolino, the band writes songs “about girls, drinking and karate, and about girls drinking while doing karate.” Thunder Vest is five seasoned musicians, brought together by their friendship and love of all things punk rock. Terzolino (lead vocals), Phil Irvin (bass, vocals), Steve Chiang (lead guitar, vocals) and Donovan Greenaway (rhythm guitar, vocals) have all been in various successful bands over the years, as has the youngest member, drummer Kevin Eaton. Trash Magnet, Atomic Drops, Torn Apart Hearts, The Slabowskis and The Traditionals are just a few names that grace their musical résumés. Like the members of most bands, they hate to choose a defining label, but Terzolino explains that Thunder Vest is on “the punk side of rock ’n’ roll.” Greenaway breaks in: “Punk rock is a state of mind.” Thunder Vest’s album and live shows prove that it is definitely the state of this band’s mind. At a Thunder Vest show, the loud, pulsating sound of the band takes over the room. Eaton and his drum kit are obscured by the rest of the band members standing before him in an ever-changing, moving line of instruments. Each member is clad in a vest of some sort, adorned, in the clas-

sic punk style, with pins of their favorite bands. Terzolino sings, bellows and gyrates all over the stage as each lyric belted out is met with back-up vocals from the front line. The crowd pushes forward, screaming and singing along. The band looks forward to writing music, hanging out with friends and getting any kind of reaction from the crowd. “We do it for the social aspect,” Chiang says. Besides, what else is there to do on Wednesday — practice night — but create great music and drink with your best friends?

THUNDER VEST CD RELEASE WITH PLAYOFF BEARD, LATECOMER 10 p.m. Sat., June 8. 31st Street Pub, 3101 Penn Ave., Strip District. $5. 412-391-8334 or www.31stpub.com

Thunder Vest has deep roots in the city’s music scene, and the members collectively believe Pittsburgh is thriving and bursting with talented bands of every genre. “All the bands I like are dudes like us,” Terzolino says — then they all talk at once, giving shout-outs to members of The Cheats, Octane Saints, Dirty Charms and others. Clearly they are true lovers of the local music scene. Most bands have a plan to get signed and become famous, but Thunder Vest doesn’t subscribe to that agenda. All band members have careers — architects, insurance adjusters, etc. — and they have no delusions about breaking out of the city. Though they don’t feel that the odds are stacked against them, Irvin sums it up: “Want a record deal? Get the fuck out of Pittsburgh.” It’s evident that this ensemble of friends is living their version of the American Dream: family, friends and punk rock. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


ON THE RECORD

with Kevin Garrett of Noble Hunter {BY NICOLE CHYNOWETH}

Noble Hunter’s Kevin Garrett

A few years ago, Pittsburgh native Kevin Garrett, 22, left town to study music technology at New York University. Now a recent graduate, Garrett returns to the area as vocalist and guitarist for indie folk-rock band Noble Hunter. YOU GREW UP IN POINT BREEZE. HOW HAS THAT PART OF YOUR LIFE INFLUENCED YOU MUSICALLY? I always get nostalgic about Point Breeze because I just love the neighborhood and everyone there. One of the songs off of our record is called “Lexington,” and it’s about the street I lived on. Every once in a while in the songwriting, I’ll think back to Point Breeze and try to incorporate it. ANY SIGNIFICANT MEMORIES FROM YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD? I lived across the street from Malcolm McCormick, who has since turned into Mac Miller, and he’s obviously done very well for himself. We were friends in Point Breeze, and I remember hanging out with him. WHAT WAS THE TRANSITION LIKE FROM PITTSBURGH TO NEW YORK CITY? Polarizing. I had no idea where I was and what was going on, and if I needed to go somewhere I asked 10 different people before I figured it out. WHAT EXCITES YOU ABOUT RETURNING TO PITTSBURGH? I always like bringing people back to Pittsburgh just in general because I love the city so much. It will be fun to bring what I’m working on in New York back to Pittsburgh and show my [progress] to people from home. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NOBLE HUNTER with NIC LAWLESS, TONY RESCH. 9 p.m. Fri., June 7. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $7. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

25


{PHOTO COURTESY OF LAURE VINCENT-BOULEAU}

CRITICS’ PICKS

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros [AMERICANA] + FRI., JUNE 07

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros slightly predated the current explosion of foot-stompin’, “HEY!”-yellin’ folk acts with 17 people apiece; the band’s catchy-as-hell single “Home” came out in 2009, though it didn’t hit the big time in the U.S. until 2011, when it was suddenly in every TV commercial ever. It’s probably safe to say that that song paved the way for a lot of the Lumineers and Phillip Phillips success we’ve seen lately, not to mention Of Monsters and Men, the Icelandic group that has at least two songs that sound exactly like “Home.” See the originals tonight, kicking off the Three Rivers Arts Festival’s concert series, which runs through next weekend. Andy Mulkerin 7:30 p.m. Point State Park, Downtown. Free. All ages. www.3riversartsfest.org

[SINGER-SONGWRITER] + FRI., JUNE 07

the singer-songwriter label that becomes a pitfall for many punk rockers after their glory days.) He’ll be playing in Pittsburgh for the first time in nearly a decade at Hartwood Acres tonight. John Lavanga 7:30 p.m. Middle Road, Indiana Township. Free. All ages. 412-767-9200

Patrick Joseph

It’s been five years since Patrick Joseph left town for Los Angeles to pursue his music there; since then, he’s put out a full-length and gotten [HIP HOP] + MON., JUNE 10 Originally hailing from Sacramento, Death a number of cable-TV and movie placements. Grips is a hip-hop group whose frenetic, thunThe accolades continue to pile up for the dering style can’t be easily classified. Their moody singer-songwriter, who brings to music hits hard, with a blend of mind the quiet side of ’90s Britpop. powerful, rapid-fire synth, dark Tonight, he returns to his electronic backing music, hometown with his band, heavy percussion and playing at Hard Rock Café. rapper MC Ride’s deep Mikey Yurick and Paul voice delivering verses Luc open. AM 9:30 with an edge that is p.m. 230 W. Station Death borderline combatSquare Drive, Station Grips ive. Most imporSquare. $7. 412tantly, the group 481-7625 or www. carries a feeling of hardrock.com irreverence, as if the members know [INDIE ROCK] + all of hip hop’s rules SUN., JUNE 09 and break them anySince the cataclysmic way. This attitude has demise of storied punk certainly been seen in its band Hüsker Dü, guitarist business relationships, too: Bob Mould has transformed After a dispute with label Epic, from the hard-drinking punk the band self-released its second god he was into someone just as album, No Love Deep Web, complete interesting, but slightly unexpected. He’s with an obscene image on the album cover. come out of the closet, been a part of another Rollins would be proud. Death Grips play band (Sugar), worked as a script writer for Altar Bar tonight with Ratking. JL 8 p.m. professional wrestling, and put out a number 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $18-$20. All ages. of solo albums. (Few reflect the aimless rage of 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com the Hüsker Dü days, but he manages to avoid

26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 06 ALTAR BAR. The Hush Sound, Hockey. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Verity’s Lie, Act Of Pardon. A Fundraiser for Southwinds Inc. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. We Were Promised Jetpacks. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Guests of Guests, Locks & Dams, Dapper Dillies. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THE IRONWORKS. Erimha. Oakland. LAVA LOUNGE. Grandchildren, Coronado, The Fleeting Ends. South Side. 412-431-5282. ROCK ROOM. Nigel & Mikey’s Big Bad Birthday Jam-a-Rama Extravaganza. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. SMILING MOOSE. The Flatliners, The Holy Mess, August Ruins The YJJ’s, Suite Mary, Lukaih,

the Deathriders. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Passion Pit, Cults. North Side. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Mantras. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Care, Crisp Lake, Nick Malburg. Lawrenceville. 412-683-4190. LINDEN GROVE. Switch. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Lotus, James Gyre. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PARK HOUSE. Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo. North Side. 412-224-2273. 31ST STREET PUB. POINT STATE PARK. Dead River, Lycosa, Edward Sharpe & Perish. Strip District. the Magnetic Zeros. 412-391-8334. www. per pa Three Rivers Arts ATRIA’S RESTAURANT pghcitym o .c Festival. Downtown. & TAVERN. 412-471-0235. Terrance Vaughn. ST. CLAIR PARK. A Richland. 724-444-7333. Silent Film. SummerSounds BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Concert Series. Greensburg. DaPhunk Band. Fox Chapel. 724-838-4324. 412-727-8000. STAGE AE. Flag, Killer Of Sheep, CIOPPINO SEAFOOD Code Orange Kids, Hounds Of CHOPHOUSE BAR. Gene Hate. North Side. Stovall Trio. Strip District. TERRACE GARDENS. 412-281-6593. Daniels & McClain. Clairton. CLUB CAFE. California 412-233-2626. Guitar Trio (Early) Charlie THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Noble Mars (Late). South Side. Hunter, Nic Lawless, Tony Resch. 412-431-4950. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. W. NEW CASTLE ST. Punk Rock Karaoke. Benefit for PLAZA. Perfect Storm. Butler. Girls Rock Pgh. Bloomfield. 724-256-5769. 412-682-0320. WOOLEY BULLY’S. The KOPEC’S. Jakes Simmons & the Dave Iglar Band. New Brighton. Little Ghosts, Unraveler, Lawn 724-494-1578.

FRI 07

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 08

MP 3 MONDAY

31ST STREET PUB. Thunder Vest, The Latecomer, Playoff Beard. Thunder Vest CD Release. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BLVD PUB & KITCHEN. Terrance Vaughn Power Trio. Canonsburg. 724-746-2250. BROTHERS GRIMM. KardaZ. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. CIP’S. The Good Guys. Dormont. 412-668-2335. CLUB CAFE. Gene The Werewolf, Bastard Bearded Irishmen, Chrome Moses (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Gone South. Robinson. 412-489-5631. FRANKIE’S. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027. HARVEY WILNER’S. The Teardrops. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Trollkicker, Prime 8, Nick Mayhem, GK. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JOEY D’S. The Dave Iglar Band. Harmarville. 412-828-0999. LITTLE E’S. Velvet Heat Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Lotus. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THE R BAR. The John Stangry Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

NIGHTLY STANDARD

Each week, we bring you a new track from a local band. This week’s offering comes from Nightly Standard; stream and download the band’s song “Not Meant to Be” for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

CONTINUES ON PG. 30

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

27


Opens Friday! Join us for the historic opening of the 54th annual Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival this Friday, June 7 with Riverlights at the Point Presented in partnership with Riverlife and the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

June 7—16, 2013 3riversartsfest.org

Dollar Bank Stage

(EADLINE-USIC

5:00 pm 6:15 pm 7:30 pm Sunset

Fountain dedication ceremony Donora—Pittsburgh-based pop fusion Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros Pittsburgh: Spectral Ascending and lights in the park and on the water

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros *UNEsPM

June 7

! MEMBERTROUPERENOWNEDFORITSUNIVERSALLY APPEALINGSOUND INCLUDINGTHEHITSONGh(OME vTHE BANDKICKSOFFOURTIME HONOREDCELEBRATIONOFTHEARTS

*UNEs2ALPH3TANLEY

*UNEs#ELLO&URYft. Joy Ike & Scott Blasey

*UNEs0ITTSBURGH3YMPHONY/RCHESTRA

*UNEs'RUPO&ANTASMA

*UNEs'LEN(ANSARD

*UNEs,UCIUS

*UNEs2ED"ARAAT

*UNEs4HE!IRBORNE4OXIC%VENT

*UNEs4HE"LIND"OYSOF!LABAMA

s n a i c i s u m 240 hours of jazz

72

28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

FANRD OEPEEN

TO THE PUBLIC


music +art 10 days of free

Visual Art

Point State Park Gateway Center Cultural District

Creativity in Motion

12-8pm Artist Market

12-6pm

Giant Eagle Creativity Zone

 lNEARTISTSANDCRAFTSPEOPLE

(ANDS ONARTSPROJECTSFORALLAGES

'ATEWAY#ENTERAND0OINT3TATE0ARK

0OINT3TATE0ARK

Public Art

Miniature Marina

4EMPORARYINSTALLATIONSTHROUGHOUTTHE &ESTIVALFOOTPRINT

BY,AUREL&OUNDATION #HILDRENSMODELSAILBOATACTIVITY 'ATEWAY#ENTER

Juried Visual Art Exhibition

DreamCycle Tent

3HOWCASING0ITTSBURGHSVIBRANTCREATIVE COMMUNITY

)NSPIREDBYTHEARTOFCYCLING 0OINT3TATE0ARK

4RUST!RTS%DUCATION#ENTER ,IBERTY!VENUE

Gallery Exhibitions

Artists In Action Stage

)NDOORGALLERIESTHROUGHOUTTHE #ULTURAL$ISTRICT

0ROFESSIONALARTISTDEMONSTRATIONS

Art on Film

Gateway to the Arts Tent

0ITTSBURGH&ILMMAKERSSERIESATTHE (ARRIS4HEATER

4RANSFORMINGCHILDRENSLIVES THROUGHTHEARTS

,IBERTY!VENUEs4IMESVARY

0OINT3TATE0ARK

0OINT3TATE0ARK

Corporate Sponsors

Media Partners

Foundation & Government Support

#OLCOM&OUNDATIONs,AUREL&OUNDATIONs4HE0ITTSBURGH&OUNDATIONs"ENEDUM&OUNDATIONs4HE"ESSIE&!NATHAN#HARITABLE4RUSTOFTHE0ITTSBURGH&OUNDATION 4HE&INE&OUNDATIONs4HE'RABLE&OUNDATIONs0ENNSYLVANIA#OUNCILONTHE!RTSs!MERICAN%AGLE/UTlTTERS&OUNDATIONs)MAGINE0ITTSBURGHCOMs6IBRANT0ITTSBURGH (ENRY,(ILLMAN&OUNDATIONs&AIR/AKS&OUNDATION

Don’t miss

Chaka Khan Rudresh Mahanthappa Eddie Pamieri Salsa Orchestra Marcus Miller and so many more... N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

29


CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

ROCK ROOM. Iron City Hooligans, Koffin Varnish, Coon Doggin Outlaws. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. SMILING MOOSE. Nevada Color, Patrick Joseph, Coastal Remedy, Revolution Radio Harmless Rhythm, Messenger, 20 Shades. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPEAL’S TAVERN. John & the Broken Stone. New Alexandria. 724-433-1322. STAGE AE. Cold War Kids. North Side. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Jackyls of Botswana, Mount Mckinlyeys, Scott Fry Experience. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 09

Holy Spirit, Crappy Funeral. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. Mason’s Case, Sun Hound, The Brushfire. South Side. 412-381-3497. POINT STATE PARK. Glen Hansard. Three Rivers Arts Festival. Dollar Bank Stage. Downtown. 412-471-0235. SMILING MOOSE. Spitalfield, Shane Henderson & the Future Perfect, Jon Walker. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Of Monsters And Men, Half Moon Run. North Side.

DJS THU 06

GARFIELD ARTWORKS. PAWS, Generally Fantastic Maturity, Fun BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ Home, The Marbits. Garfield. DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. 412-361-2262. Lawrenceville. HOWLERS COYOTE 412-687-2555. CAFE. City Steps, CLUB TABOO. Lampshades, DJ Matt & Gangsta Morningbell. Shak. Homewood. www. per a Bloomfield. p 412-969-0260. pghcitym .co 412-682-0320. THE HANDLE BAR & POINT STATE PARK. Cello GRILLE. DJ John. Twist Fury, Joy Ike, Scott Blasey. & Shout Entertainment. Three Rivers Arts Festival. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. Dollar Bank Stage. Downtown. PARK HOUSE. JX4 Jeff Justus. 412-471-0235. North Side. 412-224-2273. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Lungs Face Feet, Taluna, Pandemic. Shadyside. 412-363-5845. AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Summer STAGE AE. Silversun Pickups, Fling Fridays. East Liberty. Surfer Blood, Blondfire. North Side. 412-363-8277. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff ALTAR BAR. Death Grips. Strip Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. District. 412-263-2877. Downtown. 412-456-6666. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Free BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. Global & Time, Old Time Machine, Sephus international music. Bloomfield. Lee. Garfield. 412-361-2262. 412-621-4900. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Alt-J, CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Guards. Millvale. 866-468-3401. Reggae Fridays. East Liberty. THE SHOP. Dischordia, 412-362-1250. Slaves BC, Dope Lake Bloomfield. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Good 412-452-2054. Vibes Coalition. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, 31ST STREET PUB. Karma to Burn, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. Cultivator, Dope Lake. Strip District. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Dance/ 412-391-8334. top 40 hits. Mt. Washington. ALTAR BAR. Drowning Pool. 412-431-3730. Strip District. 412-263-2877. REGINA ELENA CLUB. DJ CLUB CAFE. Josh Krajcik, Jim Platt. Ron Hopkinson. Sharpsburg. South Side. 412-431-4950. 412-781-0229. CONSOL ENERGY CENTER. New ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Kids on the Block, 98 Degrees, Boyz South Side. 412-431-2825. II Men. Uptown. 412-642-1800. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ GARFIELD ARTWORKS. The Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. Delphines, The Dumplings, Nox Boys. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HARD ROCK CAFE. Ben Kenney. BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul & Station Square. 412-481-7625. Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild MONK’S. Matt Murchison Mutiny. R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Lawrenceville. 917-903-3759. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. STAGE AE. The National, Dirty CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Projectors. North Side. Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. CLUB CAFE. Dangermuffin, The DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. Seams. South Side. 412-431-4950. 412-431-8800. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Drgn THE NEW AMSTERDAM. King, Dylan Reynolds, Matt KoeDJ Billy Pilgrim. Lawrenceville. nig. Garfield. 412-361-2262. 412-904-2915. HARD ROCK CAFE. Ramble On: REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Dance/ A Tribute To Led Zeppelin. Station top 40 hits. Mt. Washington. Square. 412-481-7625. 412-431-3730. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Opportunist, Microwaves, Come South Side. 412-431-2825.

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 07

MON 10

TUE 11

SAT 08

WED 12

30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

SUN 09 RIVERS CASINO. DJs Bill Bara & Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 11 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Open Turntable Night. East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

WED 12 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. When Life Gives You Lemons.DANCE. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. HAMBONE’S. DJ Mangler. 50s-70s Old Time Rock N Roll. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. DJ John. Twist & Shout Entertainment. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. LAVA LOUNGE. Emo Night 11. South Side. 412-431-5282. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B THU 06 ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. The Uncluded (Kimya Dawson & Aesop Rock), Hamell on Trial. North Side. 412-237-8300. FRANKIE’S. SB00, Deejay Deez S.Boo. Squirrel Hill. 412-670-7330.

BLUES THU 06 ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. The Breadline Preachers. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. John Gresh’s Gris-Gris. North Side. 412-322-1850.

FRI 07 EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Don Hollowood’s Cobra Kings. South Side. 412-431-4090. JUNE BUG’S. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Sutersville. 724-872-4757. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Gresh’s Gris-Gris. Downtown. 412-471-9100. PENN BREWERY. The Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-237-9400. THE R BAR. The Carpenter Ants. Dormont. 412-942-0882. WOLCOTT PARK. Mal Scoppa & the Tall Tales. Sewickley.

SAT 08 INDEPENDENT CITIZENS SLOVAK CLUB. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Connellsville. 724-628-9881. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. The Rhythm Aces. South Side.


EARLY WARNINGS {PHOTO COURTESY OF DEVIN LUDWIG}

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. The Jazz Conspiracy Big Band. Warrendale. 412-256-8234. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

MON 10 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Interval Jazz Mondays. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. ROYAL PLACE. Jerry Lucarelli, Vince Taglieri, Sunny Sunseri. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000.

TUE 11 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series: The music of James Bond Films. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Scout Niblett

WED 12

Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side

720 RECORDS. James Johnson, Paul Thompson, Cliff Barnes. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

{THU., SEPT. 19}

ACOUSTIC

{SUN., AUG. 25}

We the Kings Scout Niblett

THU 06

The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side

{TUE., SEPT. 30}

Starfucker

Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District

MOONDOG’S. Sean Carney w/ Jimmy Adler. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

TUE 11 U.S. STEEL TOWER. Mahajibee Blues. Downtown.

WED 12 THE BULLPEN. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Avella. 724-356-3000.

JAZZ THU 06 CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. HYEHOLDE. Ron Wilson, Paul Thompson. Moon. 412-264-3116. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

FRI 07 CULTURAL DISTRICT. Pittsburgh International JazzLive Festival Jazz Crawl. 150 local & regional musicians. Downtown. 412-456-6666. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Stranger Convention. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LITTLE E’S. Feddie Pugh & Friends. Downtown. 412-392-2217. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

SAT 08 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse

N E W S

Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. Hubb’s Groove The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CULTURAL DISTRICT. Orrin Evans. Penn Ave Stage II. Sarah Elizabeth Charles. 9th St. Stage. Rudresh Mahanthappa. Penn Ave Stage II. Gerald Clayton. Penn Ave Stage I. Cecil Brooks, III. 9th St. Stage. Pat Martino. Penn Ave Stage II. Eddie Palmieri. Penn Ave Stage I. Downtown. 412-456-6666. FRESCO’S RUSTIC EUROPEAN CUISINE & WINE BAR. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Wexford. 724-935-7550. RIVERVIEW PARK. Charles Wallace Quartet. North Side. 412-255-2493. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

SUN 09 CULTURAL DISTRICT. Allison Miller & Boom Tic Boom. 9th St. Stage. Sean Jones Quartet. Penn Ave Stage II. Gregory Porter. Penn Ave Stage II. Marcus Miller. Penn Ave. Stage. Roger Humphries. 9th St. Stage. Ralph Peterson. Penn Ave Stage II. Chaka Khan. Penn Ave Stage I. Downtown. 412-456-6666. EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. J&D CELLARS. Stranger Convention. North Strabane. 724-579-9897.

+

TA S T E

+

BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank of Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. PALACE THEATRE. Detention. T.G.I.S Concert Series. Greensburg. 724-836-1123.

Dixon(NOMaD), Junior Guthrie. NOMaD Acoustic EP CD release. South Side. 412-431-4950.

MON 10

WED 12 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, HOMEWOOD. The Flow Band. Homewood. 412-441-2039.

HAMBONE’S. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. NORTH COUNTRY BREWING. Bluegrass Night. Slippery Rock. 724-794-2337.

COUNTRY

WED 12

MONONGAHELA AQUATORIUM. The Hillbilly Way, Justin Fabus Band. Monongahela. 724-258-5905. ST. MAURICE PARISH. Dallas Marks. Forest Hills. 412-271-0809.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Weds. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

THU 06 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

SAT 08

SUN 09

WORLD

LEGION KEENER PARK. Nancy Deckant. Latrobe.

TUE 11

CLASSICAL

POINT STATE PARK. Grupo Fantasma. Three Rivers Arts Festival. Dollar Bank Stage. Downtown. 412-471-0235.

REGGAE FRI 07 CHURCH BREW WORKS. The Flow Band. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8200.

SAT 08 STONE VILLA WINE CELLARS. The Flow Band. Acme. 724-423-5640.

ORCHESTRA. Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1 & Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5 feat. Manfred Honeck, conductor & Yuja Wang, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. ZACHARY GOOD. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-951-9367.

SUN 09 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1 & Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5 feat. Manfred Honeck, conductor & Yuja Wang, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

MON 10 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Three Rivers Arts Festival. Dollar Bank Stage. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-471-0235.

OTHER MUSIC

FRI 07 PITTSBURGH OPERA RESIDENT ARTISTS. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1 & Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5 feat. Manfred Honeck, conductor & Yuja Wang, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

FRI 07 - SAT 08 PITTSBURGH OPERA. Renaissance City Choirs. Strip District. 412-345-1722.

MON 10

HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 12 THE CHADWICK. Latshaw Pops Orchestra: Viva Las Vegas. Wexford. 724-853-4050.

SAT 08 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY

FRI 07 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Dixie Doc & the Pittsburgh Dixieland All-Stars. North Side. 412-508-8951. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. Doc & Tina. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. MULLANEY’S HARP & FIDDLE. Tim & John. Strip District. 412-642-6622. WOLCOTT PARK. Mal Scoppa & the Tall Tales. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

SAT 08 BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Laura Trubnick. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. ELWOOD’S PUB. Acoustical Bruce. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. Parabelle. South Side. 724-822-5521. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. PITTSBURGH PUBLIC MARKET. Donna O. Strip District. 412-281-4505. POINT STATE PARK. Ralph Stanley. Three Rivers Arts Festival. Dollar Bank Stage. Downtown. 412-471-0235.

SUN 09 CLUB CAFE. North of Mason-

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

31


What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

June 5 - 11 WEDNESDAY 5 52 Ariel Pink

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Purple Pilgrims. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Metric MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 6 63 Art in the Park

PENN AVENUE PARKLET Strip District. Free event. 6p.m. Through August 29.

The Hush Sound/Hockey ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests River City Extension, Genevieve & Lucas Carpenter. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:15p.m.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

SOUND SERIES: The Uncluded - Kimya Dawson & Aesop Rock

263-2877. With special guests Ratking. All Ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Shore. 412-237-8300. Tickets warhol.org. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 11

Ben Kenney of Incubus

Passion Pit

STAGE AE North Side. With special guest Cults. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

The Mantras

THUNDERBIRD CAFÉ Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

FRIDAY 74 7

HARD ROCK CAFÉ Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests The Wise and These Three Words. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

METRIC WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5 MR. SMALLS THEATRE

info visit pittsburghjazzlive.com. event. Through June 16. Through June 9.

Tracy Morgan - Excuse My French

A Grand Finale with Yuja Wang

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through June 9.

Pittsburgh Jazz Live International Festival

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS CULTURAL DISTRICT. For more

The Mountain Goats

SATURDAY 8 85

Paddle Without Pollution

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL For more info & to register visit Munhall. 412-368-5225. Tickets: paddlewithoutpollution.com. carnegieconcerts.com. 8p.m.

Gene The Werewolf CLUB CAFÉ South Side 4122013 Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival 431-4950. With special guests DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH. For more info & festival schedule visit 3riversartsfest.org. Free

Bastard Bearded Irishmen & Chrome Moses. Over 21 show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or

ticketweb.com/opusone. 10p.m.

SUNDAY 9 96

Whiskey and Woofs 2401 SMALLMAN STREET Strip District. Proceeds benefit Animal Rescue League. For more info visit Animalrescue.org. 1p.m.

MONDAY 10 Death Grips

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. With special guests The Bapist Generals. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 7:30p.m.

Drowning Pool ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Eye Empire, Even the Dead Love a Parade, Exalia & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

KISUMU 3 KATIKA

A brand that stood for comfort and fitness

KIBURI

Relaunched for Spring 2013! MBT SANDALS FOR MEN AND WOMEN IN OUR STORES NOW!

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

KISUMU 3

32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

The Sport 3 will arrive mid June!

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes


TRICKED {BY AL HOFF}

GRETA GERWIG IS A WRY AND ENGAGING COMIC ACTOR BORDERING ON THE ADORKABLE

Louis Leterrier’s comedy thriller about a renegade group of illusionists, Now You See Me, relies heavily on one of magic’s biggest tricks: Create enough flash-and-crash diversion, and audiences won’t immediately notice it’s the same tired routine. And apparently without guile, the film’s script — a weak pastiche of one-liners and plot holes — explains this gimmick, even as it’s counting the cash you gave up to learn it.

AN

UNFINISHED

Who’s zooming who? Mark Ruffalo and Morgan Freeman discuss a trick.

The utterly preposterous story finds an FBI agent (Mark Ruffalo) and an French Interpol investigator (Melanie Laurent) trying to bust a magic act called the Four Horsemen (Jesse Eisenberg, Isla Fisher, Dave Franco and scene-stealer Woody Harrelson). During their act, The Horsemen rob banks and give away the money. Also on the trail: a for-profit debunker (Morgan Freeman). Leterrier shows us the “shocking” stage act (seemingly shot on the abandoned set of The Weakest Link), then pulls back the curtain to show how it’s done. (Honestly, a lot of the “how” seems to be “because we said so” rather than being based in any reality.) This approach should double our fun, but Leterrier has no gift for creating compelling entertainment — and remember, it’s how you perform the trick, not the trick itself, that matters. The pace is dreadful, the exposition and dialogue clunky, and no amount of cheesy light shows and villain switcheroos can make this bedazzled mess into awe-inspiring magic. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Dust off your giant suit! Jonathan Demme’s 1984 film

STOP MAKING SENSE, featuring Talking Heads in performance, kicks off the Hollywood Theater’s summer celebration of concert films. 9:15 p.m. Fri., June 7; 7 p.m. Sat., June 8; and 7 p.m. Sun., June 9. Hollywood N E W S

+

WOMAN

{BY HARRY KLOMAN}

Greta Gerwig seeks a groove.

I

N FILMS LIKE The Squid and the Whale and Margot at the Wedding, writer/ director Noah Baumbach tells challenging stories about the lives of highly educated, highly creative, highly strung New Yorkers. The comparison to Woody Allen is obvious, although Baumbach is more disquieting and depressing. And now, his new reference point is the emerging Lena Dunham (Girls), who’s much looser and funnier. That’s what makes Baumbach’s leisurely and lighter-hearted new film, Frances Ha, a bit of a disappointment. I enjoyed almost every moment of it, and I believed its often plaintive emotions. But his script is a little too clever, his blackand-white photography more affect than effect. Indie art films can often become polished cliché, and nothing in Frances Ha startled me: I expected more than just a clever rendition of familiar people in familiar situations.

We see what Baumbach is up to in the first scene, and by the end, he’s reinforced it over and over. Frances — portrayed by Greta Gerwig, who co-wrote the script — is 27 going on sophomoric, and she needs to buck up. She’s an aspiring (would-be?) dancer at a small city company — until she isn’t any more.

FRANCES HA DIRECTED BY: Noah Baumbach STARRING: Greta Gerwig Starts Fri., June 7. Regent Square

She likes to play-fight in the park with her best pal, Sophie, from whom she becomes estranged when Sophie becomes engaged. She stumbles from living situation to living situation, then takes a weekend trip to Paris (more “huh?” than “ha”), and then, maybe, turns a corner. “I should sleep in my own bed, be-

cause I bought it,” Frances tells Sophie as they cuddle in the opening scene. In other words, she’s a big girl now with a big-girl bed. Much of the rest of her dialogue hammers home this theme. She even says: “I’m so embarrassed, I’m not a real person yet.” And later, she says, “I like things that look like mistakes,” as if Baumbach is either hedging his own bet or glorifying his own work. Still, if you’re a pretentious pseudointellectual, like me, you’ll probably enjoy Frances Ha (short for her full last name, because she’s incomplete — get it?), although the movie does feel like three episodes of an HBO series, sans nudity and sex. The people are pretty, the dialogue is quick, the movie has many lovely set pieces, and Gerwig is a wry and engaging comic actor bordering on the adorkable. “Take your time,” an older woman tells Frances, and she replies, weightily, “I will. I can’t help it.” Well, yeah, you can. You just don’t. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

33


REPERTORY

FILM CAPSULES CP

STUCK IN LOVE. Greg Kinnear and Jennifer Connelly star in this new romantic comedy about a family of writers. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 6. Hollywood

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

LONDON: THE MODERN BABYLON. This new documentary essay from Julien Temple (Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten) looks at the changes to the British capital, from the turn of the 20th century through the 2012 Summer Olympics. To be preceded by a short film by Nelson George, “All Hail the Beat,” which profiles the Roland TR-808 drum machine. 7 p.m. Thu., June 6, and 11 a.m. Sat., June 8. SouthSide Works

NEW THE INTERNSHIP. A pair of laid-off salesmen (Vince Vaughn, Owen Wilson) get internships at Google, and find themselves competing with tech-savvy youngsters. Shawn Levy directs this comedy. Starts Fri., June 7. LOVE IS ALL YOU NEED. The story revolves around the middle-aged Ida (Trine Dyrholm), who has just been declared cancer-free and declines reconstructive surgery, certain her husband won’t care. Then she catches him with the girl from accounting. Philip (Pierce Brosnan), a British businessman in Denmark, recently lost his wife and has “chosen to be by myself” rather than to seek love again. They meet when Ida backs her car into Philip’s, just as both are on their way to catch a flight to Italy, where (believe it or not!) Ida’s daughter is marrying Philip’s son. Director Susanne Bier works so hard at being charming, romantic and bittersweet that from scene to scene you wonder what she’ll think of next. Certainly nothing that hasn’t been thought of before. The mini-dramedies that follow, some of them touching enough to satisfy, take place in idyllic settings, and Bier handles her actors with a casual touch that keeps it warm. But it’s all so contrived and well intended that you like it a little more just because you feel a little sorry for it. Unless, of course, you take comfort in cliché, in which case Love Is All You Need is all you need. In English, and Danish, with subtitles. Starts Fri., June 7. Manor (Harry Kloman)

‘‘A MIRACLE

OF A MOVIE.’’

‘‘★★★★’’ ‘‘★★★★’’ ‘‘★★★★’’ ‘‘★★★★’’

THE MOUNTAIN. Join CP contributor Robert Isenberg as he presents his latest film, a 48-minute documentary about a recent adventure, his trek up Mount Whitney, the tallest in the lower 48 states. It’s a snow-capped peak that looms over Death Valley, so expect highs and lows. 8 p.m. Thu., June 6. Melwood. $10

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ISIS AQUARIAN}

The Source Family THE PURGE. A family hides a targeted fugitive during “the purge,” a 24-hour period in which murder is legal. Ethan Hawke and Lena Hedley star; James DeMonaco directs this thriller. Starts Fri., June 7.

CP

THE SOURCE FAMILY. Maybe you already know about the 1970s Los Angeles-based free-love-and-vegetables cult known as the Source Family? Among its distinctions, the group fronted a rock band, YaHoWa 13, which recorded several psych-rock LPs treasured by vinyl collectors (and since digitally re-released). Maria Demopoulos and Jodi Wille’s documentary recounts the rise and fall of the Source Family, which grew out of a successful vegetarian restaurant on the Sunset Strip. The leader was the charismatic Father Yod, who established a commune in the Hollywood Hills for the exploration of utopian living, mysticism and “sex magick.” In the early 1970s, the group prospered, even drawing celebrities, but ultimately fell to the twin perils of most cults: internal struggles with egos and external struggles with legal authorities. In the film, former Family members recount their involvement, supplemented by archival footage. Fortunately for the filmmakers, the supremely confident Yod had early on appointed a Family

historian, who took photographs, and made audio and film recordings, many of which are incorporated here. (The Family was so committed to documentation that footage includes both a birth and a deadly accident.) This is a must-see for those interested in cults and the various peculiar communal living experiments of the late 1960s and early ’70s. Perhaps the real surprise is how positive many of former members remain (the men more so than the women, who had less control over their fates in the group), and what variety of lives they pursued after the Source Family disbanded. 7 p.m. Fri., June 7; 9:15 p.m. Sat., June 8; and 4:30 p.m. Sun., June 9. Hollywood (Al Hoff) THIS IS THE END. A group of celebrities are trapped at James Franco’s Los Angeles house during an apocalyptic event. Franco, Seth Rogen, Jay Baruchel, Jonah Hill, Craig Robinson and Danny McBride, among others, play versions of themselves. Rogen and Evan Goldberg write and direct this comedy. Starts Wed., June 12. WHAT MAISIE KNEW. Scott McGehee’s film is a modern-day adaptation of the Henry James novel about a girl caught in a custody battle. Steve Coogan and Julianne Moore star. Starts Fri., June 7. Manor

ELECTRIC SIGNS. Alice Arnold’s 2012 documentary looks at the increased use of illuminated digital signs in our public spaces. Is it Blade Runner yet? Screens as part of the Three Rivers Arts Festival. 7 p.m. Fri., June 7, and 7:45 p.m. Sat., June 8. Harris. Free FAR OUT ISN’T ENOUGH: THE TOMI UNGERER STORY. Brad Bernstein’s new documentary traces the tumultuous career of illustrator Tomi Ungerer, who did children’s books in the 1950s, protest posters in the ’60s and, later, erotica. Screens as part of the Three Rivers Arts Festival. 8:15 p.m. Fri., June 7, and 7:30 p.m. Mon., June 10. Harris. Free ROCKY. The endless sequels have made Sylvester Stallone’s Philadelphia-based pugilist something of a joke. But the 1976 film, directed by John Avildsen, was a small-scale, bittersweet drama that was nominated for 10 Academy Awards, and won three, including Best Picture. Stallone, Talia Shire, Burgess Meredith and Burt Young star. 10 p.m. Fri., June 7, and 10 p.m. Sat., June 8. Oaks MAXO VANKA’S MASTERPIECE: THE MURALS AT ST. NICHOLAS CHURCH. This documentary from local filmmaker Ken Love tells the story of Croatian immigrant Maxo Vanka and the murals he painted at the St. Nicholas Church, in Millvale, in the 1930s. The works combine religious imagery with searing indictments of war and capitalism. Screens as part of the Three Rivers Arts Festival. 4 p.m. Sat., June 8; 5:15 p.m. Sun., June 9; and 6 p.m. Sat., June 15. Harris. Free

Dayton Enciso, pc Darcy Monteverde Dayton, Jennifer L. Enciso and Amy E. Peckk

Real Estate Law

Residential and Commercial Title Insurance, Closings and Assessment Appeals

Small Business Planning

our outstanding selection of

Estate Planning & Administration

ART BOOKS, all month long!

Wills, Trusts, Powers of Attorney, LGBT and Domestic Partnerships

Litigation Civil and Criminal including Landlord/Tenant Disputes and DUI

Family Law Pre and Postnuptial Agreements,

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT

STARTS FRIDAY, JUNE 7TH REGENT SQUARE THEATRE

1035 SOUTH BRADDOCK AVE (412) 682-4111 PITTSBURGH

34

Divorce, Custody and Support

4517 LIBERTY AVENUE

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

SALE! ART IN JUNE 20% OFF

Corporations, LLCs, and Partnerships

412-918-1845

DEKLEGAL.COM

929 Liberty Ave in Downtown Pgh’s Cultural District

412-471-1899

Open Sun 11:30-6pm and Mon-Fri 11:30-7pm Thurs open til 9pm


LANDMARKS HOUSING RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221 TOOL CARE AND REPAIR

UPCOMING 7 4 4 R E B E C C A A V E N U E WORKSHOP:

S AT URD AY , J UN E 8

10 : 00 - 11:30AM

Regis Will, member of Western Pennsylvania Woodworkers Association and historic preservation enthusiast, will discuss and demonstrate proper tool care and This workshop is FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are methods for repair. appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: marylu@phlf.org or 412-471-5808 ext. 527.

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

744 REBECCA AVENUE

412-471-5808

The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend Love Is All You Need FOOD DESIGN. A lot of work goes into making our food look, smell, taste, feel and even sound good. Learn more in Martin Hablesreiter and Sonja Stummerer’s 2011 doc. Screens as part of the Three Rivers Arts Festival. In German, with subtitles. 5:15 p.m. Sat., June 8, and 4 p.m. Sun., June 9. Harris. Free ONE DAY IN THE LIFE OF ANDREI ARSENEVICH. One renowned filmmaker — Chris Marker — pays tribute to another, the late Andrei Arsenevich Tarkovsky (Stalker, Solaris), using film clips, journal entries and musings. Screens as part of the Three Rivers Arts Festival. In various languages, with subtitles. 6:30 p.m. Sat., June 8, and 7 p.m. Fri., June 14. Harris. Free CINEMA IN THE PARK. American Graffiti, Sat., June 8 (Riverview). The Pirates! Band of Misfits, Sat., June 8 (Grandview) and Sun., June 9 (Schenley). Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted, Tue., June 11 (West End/ Elliott Overlook) and Thu., June 13 (Brookline). The Amazing Spider-Man, Wed., June 12 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-422-6426 or www.citiparks. net. Free

ANNIE HALL. In his Academy Award-winning 1977 romantic comedy, Woody Allen drops much of his earlier broad comedic approach to sagely poke about in modern relationships. Allen’s alter ego, Alvy Singer, falls for Annie (Diane Keaton), the kooky neurotic WASP. Their relationship is marked by sexual dysfunction, lots of analysis and screenings of The Sorrow and the Pity, but throughout, Allen scatters plenty of one-liners and creates some of his best set pieces. The film continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of films featuring legendary screen couples. 8 p.m. Sun., June 9. Regent Square (AH) FILM KITCHEN. The finalists for this year’s Film Kitchen short-film contest (theme: ketchup) screen tonight. Prizes will be awarded, including an audience-choice award. Come show your support for local filmmakers and America’s second-favorite condiment. 8 p.m. (7 p.m. reception with food and beer) Tue., June 11. Harris. $8

N E W S

+

make the right choice,

don’t drink & drive.

ANIMAL HOUSE. Toga! Toga! Toga! Party like it’s 1962, as the brothers of Delta House unleash alcoholfueled academic mayhem. John Landis directs this 1978 National Lampoon comedy starring John Belushi as everybody’s favorite college cut-up, Bluto. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 12. AMC Loews. $5

Experience the upscale difference of

JAY AND SILENT BOB’S SUPER GROOVY CARTOON MOVIE. Filmmaker Kevin Smith and his partner in comedy, Jason Mewes, stop by to present their new venture, an animated comedy directed by Steve Stark. In the film, Mewes and Smith’s alter-egos, Jay and Silent Bob, become the weed-smoking suburban superheroes, Bluntman and Chronic, fighting their arch-nemesis, the League of Shitters. If you want to learn why pot and poop jokes never get old, be sure to stick around for the Q&A after the screening. 7 p.m. Sun., June 9. Oaks. $30 (tickets at www.seesmod.com/ groovymovie)

CP

out in Pittsburgh but

BERT STERN: THE ORIGINAL MAD MAN. Shannah Laumeister’s recent bio-doc recounts the life and career of the influential and prolific photographer. In the 1950s and ’60s, Stern’s bold, artistic photographs, such as his work for Smirnoff vodka, made him a star in the ad world, before he branched out into fashion and the artistic pursuit of beautiful women. Screens as part of the Three Rivers Arts Festival. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 12. Harris. Free

Pittsburgh PPittsbur iitts ttttsbbur burgh urg urg rgh Lingerie & much more

Before your Big Day,

The Internship

for the night of your big day and for every day after, come to your Adam and Eve Store.

MORE THAN HONEY. Marcus Imhoof’s new documentary looks at bee colonies in California, China, Switzerland and Australia, in particular, the “colony collapse disorder,” that is killing bees worldwide. In various languages, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 13. Hollywood

GET GE G ET A

AI WEI WEI: NEVER SORRY. Chinese artist and political activist Ai Wei Wei is lauded in the West while frequently harassed in his homeland. Alison Klayman’s recent doc looks at the artist courts controversy, using his 2008 Sichuan earthquake-related exhibit as a primary example. Screens as part of the Three Rivers Arts Festival. In English, and Mandarin, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 13, and 4 p.m. Sat., June 15. Harris. Free ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

FREE GIFT EVERYDAY: 20% DISCOUNT with Military ID

JJoin Jo oin o our ur rrewards ewar ew ards ds program! pro rogr gram!

Text SEXY to T

TUESDAY: Ladies Day 20% OFF

81018

WEDNESDAY: Student / Faculty 20% OFF with ID

7775 McKnight Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15237 I www.adamevepittsburgh.com I 412-548-3384

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

35


[WORDS]

EACH OF BARSAMIAN’S SCULPTURES IS A MECHANICAL MARVEL

VOICES HEARD

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

EXILED VOICES OF CHINA AND TIBET 1-9 p.m. Monterey Street between Jacksonia and Sampsonia, North Side. Free. Reservations required at ehutton@ cityofasylumpittsburgh.org

36

SPIN CYCLES [ART REVIEW]

{BY ROBERT RACZKA}

A

NIMATION LIES at the heart of

Human-rights lawyer Chen Guangcheng {PHOTO COURTESY OF U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE}

Exiled Voices of China and Tibet is sure to be Pittsburgh’s biggest-ever gathering of prominent expatriate Chinese dissidents. It might be the biggest anywhere. On June 8, the day-long City of Asylum Pittsburgh event will host writers and musicians who have suffered censorship and imprisonment at the hands of the Chinese government. Perhaps the best-known guest is Chen Guangcheng, the human-rights activist and lawyer who, though blind, escaped house arrest in China last year with the help of the U.S. State Department. He now lives in New York City. Other guests include: Liao Yiwu, a dissident poet (living in Germany) and author of the 2008 book The Corpse Walker; Taiwan-born, Germany-based Tienchi Martin Liao, president of the Independent Chinese PEN Center, a writers’ group with many members inside China; New York Times Beijing correspondent Andrew Jacobs (who covered Chen’s detention and escape); and World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh president Steven E. Sokol. Highlights include Tienchi, Liao and Chen conducting “An Illegal Conversation: What we would like to talk about together in China — but can’t.” Interpreters will translate for participants who don’t speak English. The closing concert features: Melong, a Tibetan rock band (now based in Minnesota) with a political edge; Huang Xiang, the dissident poet who was the first exiled writer COAP sheltered, known for his fiery performances; and Pittsburgh-based political rapper Jasiri X. COAP co-founder and president Henry Reese says the event, like 2012’s Iranthemed forum, highlights the importance of freedom of expression. In keeping with COAP’s mission, this is no academic seminar: It’s free, open to the public and held under a tent on Monterey Street, near the houses where its exiled writers stay. Tienchi, speaking by Skype from Hong Kong, emphasized that in China, “There is still no freedom of expression. … If [writers] really want to speak the truth, they are always facing lots of harassment and threats.” She lauded Chen: “He is a courageous and really brave person who fights for human rights for his compatriots.” Reese adds that the reach of the Chinese government is long. He says some Pittsburghers associated with global businesses declined to attend this event. “If you do business in China, you just don’t want to be associated with it,” he says. “To me, that’s why we need to do it.”

Gregory Barsamian’s sculptural enterprise. With their three-dimensional constructions viewed as sequences keyed to a flashing strobe — think Claymation in the flesh — Barsamian’s frenetic, kinetic sculptures cycle through brief narratives of a dozen or more steps. The illusions are compelling and the quality of fabrication is impeccable, while the minitales they tell range from the delightful to the quasi-political to the kinda gross. Born in 1953, Brooklyn-based Barsamian is not young, but if his playful work is any indication, he’s young at heart. He’s also no stranger to Pittsburgh. His current exhibit at Wood Street Galleries, Gregory Barsamian: Memento Mori, was preceded by a solo exhibit there in 2003 and an appearance in a 2002 group exhibit there; a gallery staffer told me he’s the most requested artist at Wood Street. Barsamian has a well-defined artistic practice. For about 25 years, he’s been producing elaborate sculptures utilizing the technique of the zoetrope, a 19th-century device (and precursor of cinema) in which one views a sequence of images to create the illusion of motion. The audience’s initial engagement with Barsamian’s work is typically, “How did he do that?” Yet, as with any good magic trick, even once you figure it out or have it explained to you (and from what I overheard in the gallery, few people do figure it out), it doesn’t diminish the effect. As niches go, Barsamian’s is broad enough to accommodate a lifetime of creative exploration. Each of Barsamian’s sculptures is a mechanical marvel, a sleight-of-hand and -eye that plays out in and around an

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

The illusion of movement: Gregory Barsamian’s “Blue Shirt”

armature — typically, a steel form resembling a metal rack or cage with the motor in view. Appended to it is a series of representational, somewhat comical forms, such as a bird or a human hand, which

GREGORY BARSAMIAN: MEMENTO MORI continues through June 16. Wood Street Galleries, 601 Wood St., Downtown. 412-471-5605 or www.woodstreetgalleries.org

rotate on an axis such that the flashing strobe illuminates them in sequence. Barsamian crafts those recognizable

forms in carefully stepped modifications, much the way that animated cartoons are created. The viewing experience is peculiar, as the flicker of the strobe and the rapidity of the transformation render it elusive, such that one sometimes strains to see just what is happening. The illusion of movement might be Barsamian’s stock-in-trade, but his real strength lies in wedding that illusion to a transformation. In Memento Mori, for instance, “Runner” (2008) is clever and amusing, with a tiny figure racing along the tip of a spinning circular saw blade. But “Untitled” (2000) holds one’s interest longer, as an artist or writer seated at a desk crumples a paper, possibly an art review gone


The more recent pieces tend to be more complicated, with narratives that are often ambiguous without being vague. “Five Stages of Grief” (2008) is an open sphere of curving steel that partially obscures the view of a progression so rapid that it’s hard to identify all of the stages. Pieces of paper spiral up and around, transforming from a single sheet into a paper airplane and then into a crumpled ball, which is burnt up and re-emerges as a sheet of paper. Even as I strained to unpuzzle what I was witnessing, I wasn’t frustrated by it, although with several pieces located in each of the gallery spaces, the lights, motion and, sometimes, noise can make you feel like you’re inside a pinball machine. The most compelling sculptures are the most surreal. In “Drum 52” (2013), we peer into a 55-gallon steel drum in which a hand drops a coin into liquid, where it splashes before bouncing back up as a ball that becomes a coin. In “Blue Shirt” (2013), a rotating group of shirts drops a paper bag from which falls an apple, which turns into a heart that morphs into a bird that flies back up into the shirts. At its best, as here, Barsamian’s work is as irrational and elusive as a Magritte painting, toying with expectations and delighting in the unconscious. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

N E W S

+

STAGE BRIEFS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

+

August Wilson was still alive when, in 2003, Pittsburgh Playwrights launched its ambitious quest to become the first theater company to stage all the plays in the towering playwright’s famed Pittsburgh Cycle in the order they premiered on Broadway, one each year. That first show was Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, directed by Eileen J. Morris. Wilson himself — a mentor to Playwrights founder and artistic director Mark Clayton Southers — attended. Now Morris is directing Radio Golf for Playwrights, completing the Cycle depicting the 20th-century AfricanAmerican experience, decade by decade. Southers, who directed half of Playwrights’ Century stagings, stars as Harmon Wilks, the Hill District real-estate developer who in the 1990s aspires to be Pittsburgh’s first black mayor. Wilson, a Hill native, died in 2005, months after Radio Golf hit Broadway. Other plays in the Cycle include Pulitzerwinners Fences and The Piano Lesson. (Pittsburgh Public Theater has staged all the Cycle plays, too, but neither annually nor in Broadway-premiere order.) Given Wilson’s devotion to both his craft and the everyday characters in his plays, it’s apt that a resilient, independent troupe like Playwrights should be the first to hit for the cycle in this fashion. Alongside Southers, the production stars a stellar local cast including Chrystal Bates, Kevin Brown, Wali Jamal and Art Terry.

Now - June 9‡&ORVLQJ6XQGD\

)HDWXULQJ -RH\)DWRQ H

Photo courtesy of Casa Mañana Theatre

Gregory Barsamian’s “Untitled” (detail)

[STAGE]

Cast of Pittsburgh CLO’s 42nd Street | Photo: Matt Polk

off-track, and tosses it toward the viewer, where it writhes around and is burnt up. In the earlier works here, the audience-pleasing illusion of movement is offset by themes and subjects that seem willfully provocative. In “Corprophagia” (1991), a man tears pages from a book and eats them, while center stage, a sheet of newspaper deposits a turd which then evaporates. “Shuttlecock,” also from 1991, features the nose of a fighter jet that morphs into a penis — an overly familiar Freudian trope, though not a farfetched one.

June 21 - 30

412-456-6666

pittsburghCLO.org Groups 412-325-1582

At the Benedum Center

RADIO GOLF Sat., June 8-June 29. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20-30 (opening night: $35). 412-212-8031 or www.pghplaywrights.com

+

A half-century after Shakespeare died, playwrights John Dryden and William D’Avenant wrote a new, Restoration-era version of The Tempest. Perhaps surprisingly, The Tempest, or The Enchanted Isle — which added female characters because women could now take the stage — remained the world’s go-to Tempest well into the 1800s. Another theatrical survivor, Unseam’d Shakespeare Co., marks its 20th anniversary with a production. A decade ago, after founder and artistic director Laura Smiley began teaching theater at Slippery Rock University, the troupe scaled back its production schedule to just a show or two a season. But it’s continued producing memorable work. With Andy Kirtland filling the new role of associate artistic director, says Smiley, Unseam’d hopes to step up its game. With this Tempest, directed by Michael Hood, expect a Pythonesque sensibility, with outrageous costumes and lots of winks to the audience. “It’s a very fun play,” says Kirtland. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE TEMPEST, OR THE ENCHANTED ISLE Wed., June 12-June 29. Studio Theater, Cathedral of Learning, Forbes Avenue at Bigelow, Oakland. $15-25. www.unseamd.com

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

JUNE 13-16 | HEINZ HALL FOR TICKETS, CALL 412.392.4900 OR VISIT PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG GROUPS OF 10+ CALL 412.392.4819 TITLE SPONSOR

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

37


Spring Cleaning

[PLAY REVIEWS]

BRUTAL MUSIC {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

Johnnie Bryant, CEO

HOW TIMELY Leo Tolstoy can be, in the

We are looking for new clients to satisfy

Specializing in: • Residential • Commercial Cleaning • Carpet Cleaning • Construction and Fire Hazard Cleaning • Upholstery Cleaning • Real Estate Cleaning NEW CUSTOMER SPECIAL

by Eileen Moushey

%

20 OFF OF THE REGULAR PRICES

• Referral Discounts Available “WE AIM TO PLEASE BY ANY MEANSâ€? Call to schedule your appointment today!

412-538-7850 • JBsCleaningCompany.com

at Gaetano’s Restaurant 1617 7 BANKSVILLE ROAD ROA RO R

June 15 & 29 Order d tickets tti k t online: online li www.eatdrinkmurder www. eatdrinkmurder.org .org

Clinical Trials Research Services, LLC is currently conducting clinical trials in the following areas:

IBS with Diarrhea Endometriosis Constipation Vaginal Dryness/Hot Flashes Gout Osteoporosis

Chronic Diarrhea High Cholesterol High Blood Pressure Diabetes Over Eating and Obese Menstrual Cramps

Principal Investigators – Dr. S. Berg, Dr. G. Rosenberg, Dr. L. Dobkin Do you have a medical condition that is not listed? Give us a call. Our studies change regularly and we may have a study that’s right for you. Please call 412-363-1900 for more information.

GET TRAINING. GET NOTICED.

GET CREATIVE. GET STARTED.

MAKE TELEVISION.. MAKE MOVIES. MAKE A DIFFERENCE. CE. CE

SHIRLEY DOUGLAS INVENTOR / ENTREPRENEUR / COMMUNITY TV PRODUCER

Shirley uses her show to highlight what’s happening in the Pittsburgh Community. What will you do with your show? Take our FREE on-line orientation now at www.PCTV21.org PITTSBURGH COMMUNITY TELEVISION

412-322-7570 38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

WATCH:

The Shirley Jones Douglas PJ Talk Show TUESDAYS AT 9PM COMCAST 21, VERIZON 47

hands of Irish playwright Nancy Harris and Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre. The Kreutzer Sonata, which started life in 1889 as a scandalous novella, has tempted many artists in various media, from still painting to multimedia extravaganzas. But Harris’ 2009 one-act monologue provides a truly meaty adaptation — if I may mix metaphors — by cutting Sonata to the bone. The original Sonata, of course, is by Beethoven. Tolstoy considered it too powerfully emotional and sensuous for casual listening, especially in mixed company. In his original story, he uses the music to arouse a ďŹ erce and fatal passion between a bored society matron (and amateur pianist) and a professional (if equally bored) violinist. In Harris’ play, the would-be paramours and all of Tolstoy’s other minor characters are sucked away from the live action. The entire play meanders through the mind, memory and imagination of the unwilling member of this love triangle, the husband, Pozdynyshev. It’s a tour de force performance by Martin Giles, directed by PICT’s interim producing artistic director, Alan Stanford, and enhanced by the talents of the design/tech team.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHELLE BELAN}

Martin Giles in PICT’s The Kreutzer Sonata

sound composer; Gianni Downs, scenic designer and production manager; JohnMichael Breen, assistant director; Aaron Billinger, technical director; et al. Sonata plays to Giles’ mercurial strengths, switching moods and tones in a blink. But it’s still a challenge for the audience as well as actor. Heavy serious ideas — worth chewing on — leavened with the occasional levity. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

THE KREUTZER SONATA continues through June 22. Henry Heymann Theatre, Stephen Foster Memorial, Forbes Avenue at Bigelow, Oakland. $25-48. 412-561-6000 or picttheatre.org

GOOD KNIGHT {BY ROBERT ISENBERG}

IT WAS PICASSO himself who painted the most iconic image of Don Quixote — a black-and-white sketch of a skinny old Pozdynyshev is one of Tolstoy’s typi- man on a horse, little Sancho at his side, cally complacent bourgeois whose life falls and windmills all around. Like Picasso, the brand-new Company apart. Giles does not merely fall, or disintegrate, but rips off agonizing hunks of esh of Pittsburgh has chosen the most famous in working through his anger, pride, suspi- story in Spanish literature and taken owncion, stupefaction and envy into a jealous ership. Man of La Mancha is a Broadway classic, a subversive ’60s rage before he ultimately spin on Quixote, and direcplummets into limitless tor Ted Watts Jr. takes the (but unspoken) remorse. interpretation one step farPianist Alaine Fink, as ther. The resulting producthe nameless wife, and tion is stripped-down, brave violinist Juan Jaramillo, and ultimately fantastic, in seen and heard only in every sense of the word. recordings, complete the For starters, actor Dar“castâ€? as they haunt Pozrel R. Whitney is not the dynyshev. Jim French’s beanpole knight errant, but lighting helps Giles look a burly and bearded cabaltruly possessed, while prolero, like the understudy for jections designed by Jessi Sedon-Essan provide the virtual “props.â€? a Dos Equis commercial. He is a fair singer Props of another variety are also due to and actor, but Whitney’s real asset is his Elizabeth Atkinson, music director and Hemingwayesque charisma; he really looks

DARREL R. WHITNEY REALLY LOOKS AND SOUNDS LIKE HE WOULD TRY TO WRESTLE A WINDMILL.


and sounds like he would try to wrestle a windmill. As Sancho, his goofy sidekick, Bret Sloan is less diminutive and meek than gregarious and fun-loving. Whitney and Sloan share a delightful rapport, and one wonders, halfway through the show, why everyone doesn’t go adventuring. Conceived by Dale Wasserman, Joe Darion and Mitch Leigh, the original La Mancha was an existential experiment, where Miguel Cervantes lands in prison and must explain himself to thieves and murderers. As the failed poet tells the story of his mad Spanish knight, the inmates improvise supporting roles, until the dungeon becomes an entire fictional world. Cervantes plays Quixote, sings some of the most romantic songs in musical history, and then the Inquisition hauls him into court. In the rebellious spirit of the Vietnam era, La Mancha questioned authority, sanity, reality and justice.

MAN OF LA MANCHA continues through Sat., June 8. The Company of Pittsburgh at Off the Wall Theater, 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $20. www.companyofpgh.org

Watts distills the staging into its essential elements. The uncredited costume design is earthy and periodaccurate; the actors really look like culprits impersonating peasants. In place of an orchestra pit, Michael Borowski and Nathan Zoob play the entire score on guitars. A few singers are astonishing, such as Zanna Fredland as Aldonza, local tavern wench and Quixote’s female obsession. But the cast’s mixed abilities add up to far more than the sum of their parts. Small companies take note: This La Mancha surpasses its impossible dream. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

ON THE MONEY {BY TED HOOVER}

I CAUGHT Star Trek: Into Darkness the night

before I saw the Pittsburgh CLO’s production of 42nd Street and couldn’t help comparing the two. Star Trek was OK, but I left thinking it was all green screen with stunt people in wire and harnesses, and rigged blasts and CGI explosions … and, really, nothing had anything to do with actual people being creative. (Geeks writing computer code doesn’t count.) Meanwhile, at the start of 42nd Street — the house lights dim and the overture gives way to the sound of a rickety piano. Suddenly we hear an explosion of tap dancing, and the front curtain ascends 4 feet, reveal-

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MATT POLK}

Ephie Aardema in Pittsburgh CLO’s 42nd Street

ing two dozen pairs of legs tapping in unison. The curtain will eventually rise all the way on a group of hopefuls auditioning for a Broadway musical. But that initial swift reveal of sight, sound and, well, real people really creating a dazzling coup d’theatre … there’s suddenly enough humanity to blast you against the back wall. And that’s hardly the only occasion. When, in 1980, director/choreographer Gower Champion made a musical out of the fabled 1933 Warner Bros. movie (“You’re going out there a kid, but you’ve got to come back a star!”), he turned every single Harry Warren & Al Dubin song into a showstopper. Michael Stewart and Mark Bramble wrote a rock-solid script telling the story of young Peggy Sawyer’s big break working for director Julian Marsh. Sure, it’s not Anna Karenina. But then Star Trek’s no Pride and Prejudice.

JERRY GARCIA

SYMPHONIC CELEBRATION FEATURING

WARREN HAYNES WITH THE

ND

42

STREET

continues through Sun., June 9. Benedum Center, 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10-65.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pgharts.org

Charles Repole directs this CLO production, with Michael Lichtefeld recreating much of the Champion choreography. It’s a tremendously entertaining production, maybe a little flat in the book scenes, but each number lifts you out of your seat. Luba Mason is utter perfection as the diva Dorothy Brock, singing and clowning with remarkable precision. Patrick Ryan Sullivan’s underplaying of Marsh is a defensible choice which pays off strongly in the second act. And they don’t come any more adorable than Ephie Aardema, whose talent makes us believe that Peggy will, indeed, come back a star. But, ultimately, huge credit to everyone for singing and dancing up a storm … and doing their own stunts.

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

TUES, JUNE 18 | 7:30PM HEINZ HALL FOR TICKETS, CALL 412.392.4900 OR VISIT PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG GROUPS OF 10+ CALL 412.392.4819

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

39


FOR THE WEEK OF

06.0606.12.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., JUNE 06

music will set the mood for the hardcore crafts of four local (or formerly local) artists: Andrew O. Ellis, Tara Goe, Elliot McNally and Mario Zucca. OL 6 p.m. Exhibit continues through July 22. 4209 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Free. 412-224-2651 or www.WildcardPGH.com

{EXHIBITS}

947 Penn Avenue

Tom Wendt Trio

Friday June 7th 5:30-9PM

Cecil Brooks III

Friday June 7th 10-2AM

Roger Humphries

Saturday June 8th 10-2AM

Eric Suseoff

Sunday June 9th 11-2PM www.thesonomagrille.com 930 Penn Avenue

George Jones Trio

This summer, eight Pittsburgh venues join more than 2,000 museums nationwide in the Blue Star Museums Initiative. From Memorial Day to Labor Day, participating museums offer free admission to activeduty military personnel and up to five of their family members. Locally, military members will have free access to The Andy Warhol Museum; the August Wilson Center for African American Culture; the Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History; the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh; the Frick Art & Historical Center; the Senator John Heinz History Center; and the Mattress Factory. Olivia Lammel Program continues through Sept. 2. museums@ bluestarfam.org or www. arts.gov/bluestarmuseums

{ART} If you think the DIY movement still largely belongs to grannies and hippies, perhaps Wildcard’s latest exhibit will revamp crafting’s wimpy reputation. Tonight, the testosterone-soaked action-

Friday June 7th 5:30-9PM www.seviche.com 24 Market Square

Billy the Kid & the Regulators John Gresh

Friday June 7th 9-12AM

Billy Price

Saturday June 8th 8-11PM www.nolaonthesquare.com 25 Market Square

George Heid Trio

Friday June 7th 5:30-9PM www.perlepgh.com

40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

{ART}

JUNE 12 Daniel i l Tosh h

film realm collides with string, fabric and other domestic materials at the opening of Craft Hard. This show reduces Bruce Willis’s heaving, hairy pecs to needlepoint and Schwarzenegger’s stoic stare to a quilt panel. Action-movie

Summer’s in full swing for Unblurred. Tonight’s installment of the monthly Penn Avenue gallery crawl features more than a dozen venues for music and art, including several new exhibits. At ModernFormations Gallery, Somebody, Anybody …. Everybody highlights drawings and prints by David Grim and photography and sculpture by Mark Panza. Painter Brian Gonnella imagines the apocalypse, U.S.-style, in American Eschatology, at Image Box. Most Wanted Fine Art has Signs of Summer, with paintings by Hiromi Katayama and Michael Galone. And the Roboto Project offers not only art about pizza (a group show), but actual pizza. Bill O’Driscoll 6-11 p.m. 38005400 Penn Ave., Bloomfield, Friendship and Garfield. Free. www.friendship-pgh.org

{COMEDY}

Friday June 7th 5:30-9PM

Market Square has new Valet PARKING

+ FRI., JUNE 07

JUNE 07 Erin Foley

Tonight, emerging standup comedian Erin Foley continues her Lower the Bar tour at Cruze Bar. Though Foley has recently done a few guest-star gigs on screen, her comedy is mostly practiced on stage. Her humor has stirred up laughs from Conan to Comedy Central, from the Gotham Comedy Club to the Laugh Factory. In recent routines, Foley pokes fun at the hipsterchemist baristas at snobby coffee shops and extends her condolences to readers of “the saddest book in bookstores,” a vegan cookbook for one. OL 8 p.m. (18 and over). 1600 Smallman St., Strip District. $19-30. 415-326-6339 or www.showclix.com


Art by Chang-Jin Lee

Free!Event

There seems to be more visual art than usual at this year’s Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. Yes, this Pittsburgh Cultural Trust production still includes an arts ’n’ crafts market and nightly musical headliners from Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros to Ralph Stanley and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. And they’re reopening Point State Park Fountain, with a big June 7 to-do called Riverlights at the Point. But this year, the art displays go beyond the usual Juried Visual Art Exhibition, Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ Art on Film festival, and even the new Flight School Showcase exhibit. Outdoors, look for Richard Gluckman and Robert Wilson’s “Sign of Light,” a large-scale LED work visible from the North Side. Make your own “sign of goodness” yard sign at artist Vanessa German’s Art House, in the Giant Eagle Creativity Zone. Scan the rivers for The Drift, a floating performance-art stage, or duck beneath the park’s portal bridge and transcend it all with artist Chang-Jin Lee’s “Floating Echo,” a transparent, inflatable, floating Buddha statue (pictured). And in the participatory 100 Portraits of Pittsburgh Air, locals who receive a free air filter each are asked to place it somewhere they think the air is dirty. The results will be displayed as socially conscious art … at next year’s festival. Bill O’Driscoll Fri., June 7-Sun., June 16. Point State Park and various locations, Downtown. Free. 412-456-6666 or www.3RiversArtsFest.org

{MARKETPLACE}

{COMEDY}

On 30 Rock, he is known as Tracy Jordan; in The Longest Yard, he plays Ms. Tucker; and on Saturday Night Live, he has been Uncle Jemima, Astronaut tronaut Jones, and Reggie Owens of Wong and Owens: s: Ex-Porn Stars. Tonight, Tracy cy Morgan stops by Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead for a one-night show for all ages. The show continues his international Excuse My French tour. OL 8 p.m. 510 E. 10th Ave, Munhall. $35.5040. 412-3685225 or www. LibraryMusicHall.com om

pora and around the U.S. Presented by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Showcase Noir will work in harmony with the Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival, which will provide tthe tunes from neighboring stage. Artists a neighborin include jewelry-maker Alicia jewe Piller, mixed-media artist mix Justice Whitaker and others othe working in media from textiles me to ceramics. OL Noon-7 p.m. Also noon-7 p.m. Sun., June 9. Eighth Street and Penn Avenue. Free. 412-456-6666 or www. trustarts.org

Local and national artists converge in the Cultural District to present and sell

Art by Tara Goe

{DANCE} {D

JUNE 06

Craft Cr raft afft Hard Hard d

NE 08 + SAT., JUNE {OUTDOORS}

Today’s Riverview Park Heritage Day has all the trimmings, including birds from the National Aviary; critters from the Animal Rescue League and the Humane Society; a Carnegie Science Center booth; pony rides at frontierthemed “Fort Heritage”; tours of Allegheny Observatory; the Citiparks Roving Art Cart; and even free refreshments. But its centerpiece is a special tribute to the late Moses Carper. Carper, who died in December, was the longtime community activist and “cowboy of Riverview Park” who oversaw the park’s equestrian program. Citiparks honors him with a 1:30 p.m. ceremony at the park’s Visitor Center. BO Noon4 p.m. Off Perrysville Road, Perry North. Free. 412-2552493 or www.citiparks.net

N E W S

their work in the 10th annual Showcase Noir. This marketplace features pieces created by emerging and established artists from the African dias-

Dan Dancer and choreographer Moriah Ella ograp Yes Brain Dance Mason’s Y debuts this weekTheaterr deb end with two performances of Of Snails and Lips, at Friendship’s Spinning Plate Artist Lofts. Mason is rolling out this new work in a series of summer performances in different venues around {PHOTO COURTESY OF AMANDA TEMPLE}

JUNE 10 Edward McClelland

town, collaborating with different writers and artists along the way. The show’s theme, according to press materials, is “vulnerability and opening up to the world,” so look out: We hear both snails and lips are pretty sensitive. BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sun., June 9. 5720 Friendship Ave., Friendship. $10 (June 9 show includes $25 dinner option). www.facebook.com/ YesBrainDanceTheater

of this friendly competition for short original films, held at the Harris Theater. Finalists screen tonight at the grand finale, part of the Three Rivers Arts Festival. Filmmakers vie for cash prizes awarded by a panel of judges, as well as an audience-choice award.

+ MON., JUNE 10

JUNE 07

Tracy racy accy Morgan Morg Morg Mo rgan an

{WORDS}

In 1967, the year Edward McClelland was born, the nation’s unemployment rate was 3.8 percent. And few places were better set than his hometown of Lansing, Mich., with its roaring General Motors complex. Today, like so many Midwest towns, Lansing’s a sink of unemployed people, boarded-up buildings and a toxic industrial legacy. Journalist and author McClelland’s new book, Nothin’ But Blue Skies (Bloomsbury Press), vividly explores the past, present and future of Rust Bowl towns and their residents, from Decatur, Ill., to Detroit, Buffalo and his current hometown of Chicago. (Sadly, or maybe happily, Pittsburgh doesn’t figure in.) Tonight he makes a free appearance at Sewickley’s Penguin Bookshop. BO 6 p.m. 420 Beaver St., Sewickley. Free. 412-741-3838

The evening includes complimentary refreshments. Film Kitchen is sponsored by Pittsburgh Filmmakers. BO 8 p.m. 809 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $8. 412-681-9500

+ TUE., JUNE 11 {SCREEN}

+ WED., JUNE 12

The long-running Film Kitchen screening series, for local and independent artists, uses its annual contest to fete a condiment. “Ketchup” is the theme

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

two shows at Heinz Hall, part of a national tour of more than 25 cities. Tosh, who anchors the hit Comedy Central show Tosh.0, is trading his signature green screen for red-velvet theater curtains on this summer’s The June Gloom Tour. He

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

{COMEDY}

Tonight, Daniel Tosh does

+

E V E N T S

+

performs with special guest Jerrod Carmichael, who was recently featured on two different “10 Comics to Watch” lists, and who had a supporting role on the new Fox comedy series The Goodwin Games. OL 7 and 9:30 p.m. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $49.50-75. 412-392-4900 or pittsburgh symphony.org

C L A S S I F I E D S

41


Weddings, Nightclubs, Proms, Corporate Events... We’ll do our part to make it perfect.

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER 42ND STREET. Fired from her first

OFFIC OF THE P IAL DJ ITTS CELEBRAT BURGH ION!

PROUD PARTNER

www.pittsburghdjcompany.com itt b hdj

Broadway show, Peggy Sawyer thought she’d never see her name in lights. Fate had other plans. Tue-Sun. Thru June 9. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. BROADWAY FLASHBACK. Cabaret dinner theater. Presented by Pohl Productions. Sat, Sun., June 9 and Fri., June 14. Thru June 15. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. CHICKENS. The story of a family through the eyes of their 4 chickens. Presented by Hatch. June 7-9. Fe Gallery, Lawrenceville. 412-254-4038. JULIUS CAESAR. Presented by Food for Groundlings Theatre Company. June 6-8 and June 14-15. CCAC South Campus, West Mifflin. 412-469-6219. THE KREUTZER SONATA. A tale of love, loss & betrayal, inspired by Beethoven’s sonata for piano & violin. Thru June 22. Henry Heymann Theatre, Oakland. MAN OF LA MANCHA. Tony Award-winning play by Dale

RADIO GOLF. August Wilson’s Wasserman. Presented by the play about Harmond Wilks, Company of Pittsburgh. Thru an Ivy-League educated real June 8. Off the Wall Theater, estate developer who aspires Carnegie. 724-873-3576. to redevelop the Hill District & MIRACLE ON SOUTH DIVISION become the first Black mayor STREET. Comedy by Tom of Pittsburgh. Wed-Sun. Thru Dudzick. Thu-Sun. Thru June 8. June 29. Pittsburgh Playwrights Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. Theatre, Downtown. 724-745-6300. SAME TIME, NEXT YEAR. THE NERD. An odd Doris & George, each character wears out married to other his welcome when he people, rendezvous visits a fellow veteran once a year. Thu-Sun. he saved in Vietnam. www. per pa Thru June 22. South Presented by Saint pghcitym o .c Park Theatre, Bethel Vincent Summer Theatre. Park. 412-831-8552. Tue-Sat. Thru June 15. St. THE SECRET OF THE PEARL. Vincent College, Latrobe. Theatrical expose on perfecting 724-537-8900. lovemaking between female NUNSET BOULEVARD. Fri, Sat. lovers. A poetry- based show w/ Thru June 8. Comtra Theatre, music, exotic dance & comedy. Cranberry. 724-591-8727. Adults only. Tue., June 11, 8 p.m. OTHER DESERT CITIES. The Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. Palm Springs life of a movie star/ 724-873-3576. politician & his wife is upset by SHINING BROW. An opera about the arrival of unruly relatives. Frank Lloyd Wright. Presented Presented by Pittsburgh Public by Opera Theater of Pittsburgh. Theater. Tue-Sun. Thru June 30. June 7-8. Fallingwater, Ohiopyle. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-326-9687. 412-316-1600.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SIDE BY SIDE BY SONDHEIM: A MUSICAL CELEBRATION. Collection of songs from Company, Follies, A Little Night Music, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, more. Wed-Sun. Thru Aug. 18. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. STATE OF THE UNION. A 1946 political satire surrounding the selection of a Republican presidential candidate. Presented by The Summer Company. Thu-Sat. Thru June 15. Peter Mills Theater (Duquesne, Rockwell Hall ), Uptown. 412–243-6464. THE TAMING OF THE SHREW. Outdoor stage at South Park Theatre. Bring blanket or lawn chair & picnic. Sat, Sun. Thru June 9. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. THE TAMING OF THE SHREW. Shakespeare in the Park, presented by Poor Yorick’s Players. Sat, Sun. Thru June 9. Tall Trees Amphitheater, Monroeville. 412-537-1705.

COMEDY THU 06

ALL IN THURSDAYS

1.50

$

BLUE MOON ALL DRAFTSS DA Y! UNTIL MIDNITE

1811 EAST CARSON SOUTHSIDE

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru June 27 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. JOHN DICK WINTERS, ALEX STYPULA, JESSE IRVIN, TIM ROSS, SHANNON NORMAN. Race to the Coffin Comedy Tour. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown.

FRI 07 DOC DIXON, DAVID MICHAEL, TOM MUSIAL. Comedy For a Cause benefiting Ellen Louttit. 5:30 p.m. Rostraver Cenral Fire Hall, Belle Vernon. 724-984-3165. PITTSBURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE W/ MIKE WYSOCKI. Fri, 9 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. PLAYER ONE IMPROV W/ ERIC DONALDSON. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. THAT’S WHAT JEANNE SAID! LIVE. 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. TRACY MORGAN. 7 p.m. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall, Munhall. 412-368-5225.

FRI 07 - SUN 09

CRAIG SHOEMAKER. June 7-9 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 08 AMISH MONKEYS. Improvisational comedy troupe. Bring-a-Prop Night! Bring a prop that has an interesting shape, is CONTINUES ON PG. 44

42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013


VISUAL THUR, JUNE 6 • 9PM FUNK/ROCK/JAM

THE MANTRAS

Summer is almost here... ...and take Straub Cans with you!

FRI, JUNE 7 • 9PM ROCK

NOBLE HUNTER WITH NIC LAWLESS PLUS TONY RESCH SAT, JUNE 8 • 9PM ROCK

Check the display at your local beer distributor or visit: www.straubbeer.com to find out how to win a Venture Outdoors membership for two.

JACKYLS OF BOTSWANA (FORMERLY FORBIDDEN 5) WITH MOUNT

MCKINLEYS AND SCOTT FRY EXPERIENCE

ART

MON, JUNE 10 • 9:30PM

OPEN STAGE WITH CRAIG KING

Work by Sage Perrott, from ZA – An Art Show All About PIZZA at the Mr. Roboto Project

NEW THIS WEEK 3634 PENN AVE. Water Works. Recent work by Laura Phillips & Laurie Trok. Opening reception: June 7, 7-10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 917-903-3759. 937 LIBERTY AVE. Confluence. New works presented by the Society of Sculptors. Opening reception: June 7, 6-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-901-7760. CAVO. Kaleidoscope. Local artist showcase feat. Makinde, Jake Corrick, Marsha Lee Moore, Alyssa Clifford, Jamie Apgar, Ross Kennedy, more. Opens June 6, 8 p.m. Presented by RAW:natural born artists. Steubenville. 412-610-1384. EASTSIDE GALLERY. MCG Invitational Scholarship Winners. Work by Lauren Brown, Adam Linn, & Aaron Kandel. Opening reception: June 7, 5:30-8:30 p.m. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. GALLERIE CHIZ. Passion. Work by Chris Visgitis & Todd Sanders. Opening reception: June 7, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Copper Foil Portraits 1940s-1970s. Work by Irma Freeman. Opening reception: June 7, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-924-0634. MENDELSON GALLERY. Expressive Forms. Work by Anire Mosley & Jonathan Shapiro. Opening reception: June 7, 6-9 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Somebody, Anybody… Everybody. New work by David Grim & Mark Panza. Opening reception: June 7, 7-10 p.m. Part of Unblurred. Garfield. 412-362-0274. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT.

ZA. Group show feat. pizzathemed art. Opening reception: June 7, 7-9 p.m. Part of Unblurred. Bloomfield. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7. REMEDY. Voodoo Velvet. Paintings. Opens June 7, 10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. SHAW GALLERIES. Gettysburg Landscapes. Paintings by Diane Grguras. Opening reception: June 7, 5-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Tattoo Works III. A juried exhibition of new & innovative artwork from local tattoo artists. Opening reception: June 8, 8-10:30 p.m. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TRUNDLE MANOR. Serendipity. Work by Donnie Toomer. Opening reception: June 6, noon. Meet the artist begins at 7 p.m. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Rustbelt Romanticism. An exhibit of paintings, drawings, & film by Mark & Dorion Barill. Opening reception June 7, 6-8 p.m. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WILDCARD. Craft Hard: Art Inspired by Action Movies. Work by Andrew O. Ellis, Tara Goe, Elliot McNally, & Mario Zucca. Opening reception: June 6, 6-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Talus. Paintings by Lindsay Merrill and Paul Rouphail. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. Abstract Jazz Works. Abstract oil paintings created during live

Must be 21 years old to enter. No Purchase Necessary.

performances with Jesse Dandy, Art Blakey, Winton Marsalis, Jimmy Owens, & others. Live painting w/ musician Roger Humphries, June 9, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. SOLO Exhibits. Work by Leslie Ansley, Jo-Anne Bates & Tina Brewer. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BE GALLERIES. The Latest Works. Work by Vivian Fliegel. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Richard P. Rauso, Leslie Sorg, Christina Roselle, Laura Tabakman. Watercolors, batiks & oils, designer handbags & jewelry design. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Marshes, Mountains, & Fields. Paintings by Crista Pisano. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. Botanizing the Asphalt. Site-specific work by Edith Abeyta. South Side. 412-381-7767. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. The 102nd show from the oldest continuously exhibiting visual arts organization in the country. One & the Same. Sound installation by Susan Philipsz. Japan is the Key: Collecting

TUES, JUNE 11 • 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES FT. THE MUSIC OF

JAMES BOND FILMS OPEN FOR LUNCH Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

TRIVIA

JUNE 6 GRANDCHILDREN

with Big Tom

JUNE 13 LOU LOMBARDI’S STRANGE LOVE

$2.50 LEINENKUGEL BREWS $5 EVIL DRINKS

JUNE 20

WEDNESDAY 10ppm

MALLORY BURLESQUE

ACOUSTIC MUSIC

$2 PBR Drafts

with Mike D. $2.50 YUENGLING

Everyday 9-11

$5 PBR Drafts & Fireball Shot

$3 AMERICAN HONEY

10 0p pm m

KARAOKE

$2.50 COORS LIG LIGH HT T $3 EVIL SHOTS

All Day ‘till Midnight

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET

CONTINUES ON PG. 44

412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

43


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 42

bigger than an apple, but is not valuable or easily damaged. 8 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464. ARCADE FORENSICS LEAGUE. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. DAVID KAYE, TOM MUSIAL, DAVID MICHAEL. Funny Fundraiser. 6 p.m. St. Ursula School, Allison Park. 412-486-5511. THE DEATH SHOW: AN IMPROVISED FUNERAL. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-805-2130. ELECTRIC SLIDEZ: POWERPOINT KARAOKE. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. THE LUPONES: MADE UP MUSICALS. Sat, 8 p.m. Thru July 27 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 323-401-0465.

UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP

MON 10

TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 11 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 12

Pizza & Beer Night tuesdays $15 large pizza & pitcher domestic beer FREE POOL all night

Wind Up wednesdays

$2 Miller Lite Drafts til 12am FREE POOL all night ½ off Select Appetizers 9-11pm

Thirsty thursdays

$7 Yuengling Pitchers til 12am Karaoke 9:30-1:30am

Happy Hour

6-8pm

Tues-Fri

Watch the games at Cattivo

06.07 (lower level) Obscure

kink fetish night

06.08 (main level) Great Lakes Beer Tasting appetizers, beer samples & giveaways 6-8pm

06.08

(lower level) Hanging goth industrial night

Garden

146 44th Street Lawrenceville PA 15201 412.687.2157 www.cattivo.biz Open Tues-Sat 4-2am Check our website & Facebook page for more events 44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

DANIEL TOSH. 7 & 9:30 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. A Stitch in Jewish Time: Provocative Textiles. Group exhibition feat. contemporary artists from the United States & abroad. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. The Playground Project. Survey exploring the history of post-war playground design & highlighting important examples of playgrounds from the 20th century. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Tlingit Totem Pole. Carving & installation by Tommy Joseph. BugWorks. Feat. beautiful photography of insects, amazing specimens, & live bugs! Garden of Light: Works by Paula Crevoshay. Feat. nearly 70 fine art jewelry pieces. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

Prints & Ivories, 1900–1920. Collections from the early years of the Carnegie Institute. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Melanie Werner Collection. Feat. 18th-Early 19th Century Fine European Antique Art as well as modern art pieces. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. E Block. Photography by Mark Perrott. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. A Kind of Alchemy: Medieval Persian Ceramics. A look at the diversity of ceramics made in ancient Persia, now present-day Iraq, Iran, & Afghanistan. Feat. 10th-century splashware, buffware, slip-painted ware, lusterware & 14th-century fritware, more. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. RetroFRESH. Contemporary paintings by James Kennedy, Claire Hardy, Donald Deskey, Alexander Minewski, Louise Evans-Scott, Vladimir Naiditch, & Henri de Waroquier. Oakland. 412-716-1390. THE GALLERY 4. Sweet Mortality. Recent works by Scott Hove. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG GARDEN AND CIVIC CENTER. Norwin Art League Annual

submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL HISTORY. Explore the complex interplay between culture, nature and biotechnology. Garfield. 412-223-7698. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. I N V E N T O R

Membership Show. Greensburg. 724-836-1123. HOMESTEAD PUMP HOUSE. The Landscape of Steel. Photographs by Kevin Scanlon. Munhall. 412-464-4020. JAMES GALLERY. James Gallery Group Exhibition. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MAKE YOUR MARK ARTSPACE & COFFEEHOUSE. Steel City Medley. Photographs by Jay Ressler. Point Breeze. 412-365-2117. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! Work by Nancy Adams, Marilyn Andrews, Ronit Dagan, Eric Boos, Barbara Poole, Frank FLynn, Lavon Williams, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Regional Multi-Media Art Show. Juried art show feat. amateur & professional artists. Ross. 412-364-3622. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The Civil War. A collection of rare and historic images printed from original glass plate negatives that survived the harrowing travels of Civil War Photographers. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed

Y: The Orgone Archive, Pittsburgh 13 (2002-2013). Feat. a decade’s worth of promotion & propaganda in the form of posters, stickers & bits of paper created by The Orgone Archive. Downtown. 412-325-7037. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. HILL HOUSE KAUFMANN CENTER. A Walk in My Shoes. Interactive exhibition feat. two rooms, a bisexual teen’s bedroom & a war veteran’s living room, created by & decorated w/ works of local artists & authors. Presented by Kaufmann Center. Hill District. 412-290-9652. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295.

in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Fiberart International 2013. Juried exhibition of contemporary fiber art. Presented by the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh. 30:2. Group exhibition presented by Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Coming Home. Fabric installation by Kay Healy. Friday Nights at Guitar Center. Work by Allison Kaufman. Rites of Passage. Oil paintings by Maggie Mills. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Consciousness. Flameworked glass by Eunsuh Choi. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Continuum. Work by Doug DuBois & Aaron Blum. South Side. 412-431-1810. SPACE. Thad Kellstadt: On the Glass Surf. Video, installation & sound create a haunted paradise on the border of fracture & utopia. Downtown. 412-325-7723. TRINITY GALLERY. Adrienne Borkowski: A Solo Exhibition. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2458. U.S. POST OFFICE & COURTHOUSE. Whitehall Arts Courthouse Exhibit. Paintings by Whitehall Arts members. Downtown. 412-561-4000. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Memento Mori. Sculpture by Gregory Barsamian. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

MARIDON MUSEUM. Beautiful Birds. Display of art from the museum’s study storage facility. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Glass art surrounded by colorful blooms. Feat. work by


Daviea Davis, Jason Forck, Steven Sadvary, Lisa Platt, more. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905.

FESTIVALS THU 06

ART IN THE PARK. Food, music, vendors, more. Thu, 6-8:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 29 Penn Avenue Parklet, Wilkinsburg. 412-727-7855.

SAT 08

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Midseason Replacement & DND show at Steel City Improv Theater, in Shadyside

FRI 07

IRWIN ETHINIC FESTIVAL & SPRING CRAFT SHOW. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Irwin. 724-864-3100.

WINING AGAINST CANCER. Music, fashion show, food & drink, raffles, more. Benefits the clinical trial of a r e vaccine therapy for a pap pghcitym terminal brain cancer. .co www.eventbee.com/v/ winingagainstcancer 6 p.m. Cavo, Steubenville.

FULL LIST E ONwLwIN w.

SUN 09 SUMMER READING EXTRAVAGANZA. Live music, children’s activities, food trucks, more. 12-5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3114.

MON 10 - WED 12 SAXONBURG VFC CARNIVAL. Water battles, raffle, pageants, fireman’s parade, more. June 10-15 Main St., Saxonburg, Saxonburg. 724-321-1761.

DANCE THU 06 - SUN 09

REMAINS. One-woman show. Choreography & performance by Beth Corning. Thru June 9 New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-320-4610.

N E W S

SAT 08 2ND ANNUAL VERONA 5K RACE/WALK. http://www. veronaborough.com/ 9 a.m. Verona Community Park, Verona. BIKE MS: ESCAPE TO THE LAKE. 150 mile bike ride to Conneaut, Ohio. Benefits the National MS Society - Western PA Chapter. 7 a.m. Seneca Valley Senior High School, Harmony. 412-261-6347. COMEDY TO CURE CANCER. Feat. Aaron Kleiber & Lee Terbosic. Benefits the RSG1 Foundation. The Boiler Room, Banksville. 724-272-8797.

+

TA S T E

+

FRI 07 - SUN 09

cook from Oakland

TUE 11

WHEN: Fri.,

FLAMES OF LOVE FUNDRAISER SCREENING. Benefits the Payatas Project. 7:30 p.m. Hollywood Theater, Dormont. 412-889-6538.

POLITICS

WED 12

May 31

B Y O L IV IA L AMME L

64TH ANNUAL SPRING FUNDRAISER. Silent auction, access to Fiberart International 2013, live jazz, more. Benefits Global Solutions Pittsburgh. 6-9 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-471-7852.

TUE 11

MON 10 - WED 12

MON 10

LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. MT. LEBANON WRITER’S GROUP. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

It was different improv depending on the troupe performing. Every troupe had a different style, so there was never any feeling of repetition — it was always new and different sorts of comedy, which I really appreciated. The first troupe, DND, had a more classic improv, like a prompt was given and they created a whole scenario off of it. I like them because there were just two people and it was pretty funny to see them playing all the characters and switching between characters. Midseason Replacement [was] really funny. It was a sitcom complete with laugh tracks. Their whole sketch on menstruation was really appropriate for improv and almost reminiscent of the television show Strangers With Candy. This is my first time going to an improv show; it’s definitely much better than watching it on TV. It seemed scripted, but you know it’s entirely improv and that was impressive to me. Very talented.

THU 06

ANNUAL USED BOOK SALE. June 10-14 Shoppes at Northway, Ross. 412-366-1300.

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. FATHER’S DAY CD CARD MAKING. Audio card workshop w/ the Saturday Light Brigade. Thru June 16, 1-4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

ART & INSPIRATION W/ WILLIAM ROCK PRESENTS AN EVENING W/ HUANG XIANG. Poetry reading & live music. 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

STATE-OF-THE-HEART GOLF TOURNAMENT. Benefits the Verland Foundation. 1 p.m. Green Oaks Country Club, Verona. 412-741-2375.

CRITIC: Matthew Getzow, 20, a

FUNDRAISERS

Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, Highland Park. 412-434-7044. TAKE STEPS PITTSBURGH. Walk event benefiting Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America. 4:30 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-823-8272.

NOSTALGIC STEP BACK IN TIME. 1960s-themed dinner party & kick-off of the Westmoreland Croquet Tournament. 5:308:30 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg. 724-836-7497. PITTSBURGH PRIDE DRAG BOWL. Fundraiser to support Pittsburgh to host the IGBO Mid-Year Conference in 2015. 7 p.m. Noble Manor Lanes, Green Tree. 412-922-4622.

SUN 09 4TH ANNUAL PANERA BREAD PUP WALK. 1-mile riverfront walk w/ special guests Charlie & Tasha Batch. Benefits the Western PA Humane Society. Begins at the Waterfront, Homestead. 10 a.m. 412-321-4625 x 248. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. CAROL RABER MEMORIAL GOLF CHALLENGE. Benefits the Steel City Dragons. 12 p.m. River Forest Country Club, Freeport. 724-295-2298. ELLIOTT ACRES GOLF OUTING. Benefits disabled horseback riders. 9 a.m. Aubrey’s Dubbs Dred Golf Course, Butler. 724-287-4832. LIVER LIFE WALK. Benefits the American Liver Foundation. 9 a.m.

M U S I C

+

CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116.

THU 06 STOP GUN VIOLENCE! Forum w/ local, state & federal leaders. 7-9 p.m. Bower Hill Community Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-343-0953.

KIDSTUFF THU 06 - WED 12

LITERARY

ADVENTURES W/ CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG. 9-foot tall Clifford w/ tail slide, build a sandcastle on T-Bone’s beach, play instruments in the Musical Marina, more. Thru Sept. 1 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 06 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Third and First Thu of every month The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323.

THE KID WHO RAN FOR PRESIDENT. A 12-year-old & his campaign manager organize a political campaign that will change the world. Presented by The Theatre Factory KidWorks. Sat, Sun and Fri., June 7. Thru June 9 The Theatre Factory, Trafford. 412-374-9200.

SAT 08 KENTUCKY AVENUE SCHOOL CARNIVAL & OPEN HOUSE. Bounce house, games, prizes, crafts, more. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 412-228-7127.

SAT 08 - SUN 09 AFTERNOON OF THE ELVES. Play based on the book by Janet Taylor Lisle. Presented by Playhouse Jr. Sat, Sun. Thru June 9 Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. BODY PRINTS. Create silkscreen, block, or linoleum prints of your CONTINUES ON PG. 46

SAT 08 BOOK SIGNING W/ DAN ROONEY & CAROL PETERSON. Allegheny City: A History of Pittsburgh’s North Side. 1 p.m. Barnes & Noble - Waterworks, Aspinwall. 412-781-2321. BOOK SIGNING W/ RICHARD “PETE” PETERSON. Author of Pops: The Willie Stargell Story. 12 p.m. Barnes & Noble Waterfront. 412-462-5743. EXILED VOICES OF CHINA & TIBET. Readings & performances by Liao Yiwu, Huang Xiang, Jasiri X, more. 1 p.m. City of Asylum, North Side. 412-323-0278. PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

E COUPLE’S NNITE 5 WED, JU

FRIDAY, JUNE 7 Shows All Day & Night, Starting at Noon

MON 10 (ARMCHAIR) ROAD TRIP & DINER DINNER. Dinner & book signing w/ historian & author Brian Butko. 6:30 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-828-4877.

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

NEXT WEEK: Champion Pole Dancer & Contortionist

XXXMAS IN JUNE MATINEE PARTY:

Lacey Rain LIVE JUNE 11-15

135 9th Street 412-281-7703 www.blushexotic.com

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH +

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

45


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

[URBAN FARM TOUR] hands & feet. June 8-9, 10 a.m.4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SUN 09 PLAY W/ CLAY AT THE HANDBUILDING TABLE. Ages 3+. Sun, 12-2 p.m. Thru June 30 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

more. 5 p.m. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-258-6636.

WED 12

SAT 08 NATURE ILLUSTRATION WORKSHOP. w/ Mark A. Klingler, Scientific Illustrator. Presented by the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Powdermill Nature Reserve, Rector. 724-593-4070. VICTORY LODGE GOLF OUTING. 8 a.m. Aubrey’s Dubbs Dred Golf Course, Butler. 724-287-4832.

WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 06

AFRICAN AMERICAN LEADERSHIP ASSOCIATION ANNUAL SUMMIT. 8:30 a.m.3:30 p.m. Wyndham Garden Hotel, Oakland. 412-540-5063. PLAY W/ CLAY ON THE BUGS IN YOUR BACKYARD. POTTER’S WHEEL. Ages 3+. Learn about plant pests, Tue, 12-3 p.m. Thru June 25 pollinators, & other INTRO TO GEOCACHING. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, insects. Thu, 7-9 p.m. Presented by Venture North Side. 412-322-5058. Thru June 27 Outdoors. 1-3:30 p.m. ZENTANGLE FOR TEENS. Art Phipps Garden Alameda Park, Butler. workshop w/ Lynne Martinelli. Center, Shadyside. . w w 412-255-0564. w Open to all middle & high 412-441-4442 x 3925. aper p ty ci h g KAYAKING THE p school students. 1:30 p.m. Mount INTERNATIONAL .com CREEK. Kayak the Lebanon Public Library, Mt. WOMEN’S Slippery Rock Creek. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ASSOCIATION OF Ages 12+. 1-4:30 p.m. Jennings PITTSBURGH. Social, Environmental Center, Slippery cultural club of American/ Rock. 724-794-6011. international women. Thu First RAIN HARVESTING. Learn Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. about the environmental & T’AI CHI IN MELLON PARK. pittsburgh@gmail.com. fi nancial benefi ts of water Thu, 5:45-6:45 p.m. Thru June 27 NATIONAL SIBLING conservation, & make a rain barrel Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. LEADERSHIP NETWORK or a rain chain. Presented by the 412-441-4442 x 3925. CONFERENCE. Connect w/ Audubon Center for Native Plants. other siblings of people w/ 2-4 p.m. Succop Conservancy, disabilities & those who care about Butler. 724-586-2591. siblings. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Wyndham RIVERLIGHTS AT THE POINT. Grand Pittsburgh, Downtown. Grand re-opening of the 312-993-1002. Point State Park fountain & SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, POSITIVELY LIFE CHANGING kick-off of the Dollar Bank Three 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, SUMMER SERIES WORKSHOP. Rivers Arts Festival. Feat. live Oakland. 412-477-4677. Thu. Thru June 27 Coach Monique, music, light installations, Ross. 412-400-2085. Thu. Thru June 27 Coach Monique, Ross. 412-400-2805. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. TRAVEL SERIES: TAIWAN. Speaker: Zelda Wilbert. 6:30 p.m. Call Livelinks. Maridon Museum, Butler. The hottest place to meet 724-282-0123. WEST COAST SWING. Swing the coolest people. dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

TUE 11

SUN 09

FULL LIST ONLINE

OUTSIDE THU 06

FRI 07

TUE 11

make a real connection

THU 06 - FRI 07 FREE YOGA, MEDITATION & ENLIGHTENING TALKS. w/ Swami Mukundananda. Thru June 7 Sri Venkateswara Temple, Penn Hills. 412-407-4782.

FRI 07

Try it Free!

412.566.1861 Ahora en Español 18+

46

www.livelinks.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

DOWNTOWN’S BEST WALKING TOUR. Meet at Grant St. entrance. Fri, 10-11:30 a.m. Thru June 28 Omni William Penn, Downtown. 412-471-5808. MARKET SQUARE AREA FREE FRIDAY WALKING TOUR. Begins at 5th Ave. & Market St., Downtown. Fri, 12-1 p.m. Thru June 28 412-471-5808. MERIDIAN STATION CAR CRUISE. 4-8 p.m. Meridian Station, Butler. 724-482-4436. OBSCURE: A NIGHT OF GOTH, KINK & PERFORMANCE ART. DJs, photo booth, vendors, more. First Fri of every month, 9 p.m.

The Third Annual Chicks-in-the-Hood

Pittsburgh Urban Chicken Coop Tour

is like a garden tour, but with chickens instead of flowers. Founder Jody Noble-Choder discussed the event, which features 14 self-guided stops across the city, and benefits Just Harvest. WHAT INSPIRED THE TOUR? I noticed they were having them in other cities, and I [thought] it would be a great idea to have a tour like that in Pittsburgh. It’s a fun day to get out, learn about sustainability projects, about how easy it is to have chickens. HAS RAISING CHICKENS TAUGHT YOU ANYTHING UNEXPECTED? I’ve learned that I don’t want to come back as a chicken in my next life, because everything is trying to eat you. That’s the biggest challenge: trying to keep everything from eating them. But they’re so much fun. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sun., June 9. $10. Tickets available at various locations the day of the tour. Visit pittsburghpropoultrypeople.blogspot.com or email noblechoder@aol.com for information.

Thru June 7 Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-339-0825. RAINBOW RISING COFFEE HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and friends. Music, games, movies, entertainment and more. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Smithton. First Fri of every month 724-872-5056.

FRI 07 - SAT 08 OLD ALLEGHENY TOUR & TASTING. Visit lavish homes & gardens in the Allegheny West Historic District. www. alleghenywest.org June 7-8

SAT 08

ANIMAL RESCUE DAY. Visit w/ representatives from a variety of dog/cat rescues, small animal groups, & pet bird centers. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. THE CALIFORNIA MARKETS. Open-air market. California Ave. at Brighton Heights Blvd., Brighton Heights. Second Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Thru Sept. 14 215-828-9060. DOWNTOWN HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at City County Building, Downtown. Sat.

Thru Aug. 31 412-302-5223. GIRLIE SHOW – SHOWCASE OF FEMALE TALENT. Feat. Jenny Morgan & Johanna Lowe. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. H.E.A.L. EXPO. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. YMCA Homewood/Brushton, Homewood. 412-482-0301. HERB & GARDEN FAIR. Vendors, workshops, trade plants, more. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Harmony Museum Barn Annex, Harmony. 724-452-7341. INCLINE HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at the bottom of the Monongahela Incline. Sat. Thru Oct. 26 412-302-5223. MANUP PITTSBURGH - DADS’ CONFERENCE. Speakers: Steelers Coach Mike Tomlin, Ed Glover of Urban Impact & Mark Merrill of All Pro Dad. 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Orchard Hill Church, Wexford. 412-321-3811 x 104. OUR TRIP TO “MARS”. Nora Swisher & Dan Wilcox from CMU will speak about their trips to the Mars Desert Research Station to study what it would be like to be Martian colonists. 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing

follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SOUTHSIDE COMMUNITY RUMMAGE SALE. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Hot Metal Bridge Faith Community, South Side. 412-481-4010. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WALK WITH ME. Hand-holding project w/ artist Paige Tighe. 12-4 p.m. The Brew House, South Side. 412-381-7767.

SAT 08 - SUN 09 LEE THREATENS PITTSBURGH: A CIVIL WAR EVENT. Feat. living history encampments by Union Soldiers, Civil War-era music, speakers, more. June 8-9 Old Economy Village, Ambridge. 724-266-4500. SHOWCASE NOIR. AfricanAmerican artist & designer exhibition. 8th st. & Penn Ave., Downtown. June 8-9 412-456-6666.

SUN 09 3RD ANNUAL PITTSBURGH URBAN CHICKEN COOP TOUR. Ticket information at http:// pittsburghpropoultrypeople. blogspot.com/p/2013chicken cooptour.html 9 a.m.-3 p.m. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES SALE. 7:30 a.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-532-1935. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CANONSBURG SUNDAY CAR CRUISE. Sun, 1-5 p.m. Thru Sept. 22 The Handle Bar & Grille, Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. CIRCLE OF FAITH. Participants from churches, synagogoues & other faith communities will welcome LGBTQIA members. Everyone is welcome. Highland Park Reservoir, Highland Park. 2-3 p.m. 412-450-0114. UP: HOW POSITIVE OUTLOOK CAN TRANSFORM OUR HEALTH & AGING. Discussion & book signing w/ Hilary Tindle, M.D., M.P.H. 2 p.m. Barnes & Noble Waterfront. 412-462-5743. WHAT DO THE ANCIENT ONES TELL US ABOUT NOW & THE COSMIC FUTURE. w/ Rainbow Eagle. Pittsburgh Theosophical Society. 1:30-3 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-462-4200.

SUN 09 - WED 12 SPIRITUAL & EMOTIONAL GROWTH THROUGH LIFE: INSIGHTS FROM THE MINISTRY


OF FRED ROGERS. Summer leadership conference. June 9-12 Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, East Liberty. 412-924-1346.

MON 10 BEHIND THE MAGIC OF URBAN ALCHEMY: STORIES OF URBAN RESTORATION IN ACTION. Discussion w/ Dr. Mindy Fullilove. 6 p.m. Hill House, Hill District. 412-391-4144. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry, North Park. THE DEN. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. OLD ALLEGHENY COUNTY JAIL MUSEUM SELF GUIDED TOUR. Mon, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Thru June 24 Court of Common Pleas, Family Division, Downtown. 412-471-5808. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SUMMER OPEN HOUSE. www.chatham.edu/cwe/events/ openhouse/ 5-7 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1253.

TUE 11 THE FORMATION OF TEMPLE SINAI. Speaker: Jackie Braslawsce. Presented by Squirrel Hill Historical Society. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707. THE HISTORY & IMPACT OF FINANCIAL POWER: THE VAMPIRIC RISE, FALL & RISE AGAIN OF FINANCIAL CAPITALISM. Interactive program comparing the Great Depression to the Great Financial Crisis of 2008. 7 p.m. and Sat., June 29, 1:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MEDITATION: A MUST FOR BODY, MIND & SPIRITUAL WELL-BEING. 7 p.m. First United Methodist Church Pittsburgh, Shadyside. 412-221-5314. PERENNIAL GARDEN MAINTENANCE. 6:30-9 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

WED 12 COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE. Seeking new players, no experience necessary. Wednesdays, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-7878. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Farmers’ market. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 30 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

N E W S

THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. USE ALL THE CRAYONS! THE COLORFUL GUIDE TO SIMPLE HUMAN HAPPINESS. Discussion w/ author Chris Rodell. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

AUDITIONS

BRICOLAGE. Auditions w/ Midnight Radio Jr. & Midnight Radio Classic. June 5-6. Prepare a song, any impressions you can do, & a short monologue. Email Tami@webbricolage.org for info. Downtown. 412-471-0999. THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. Auditions for the Annual Summer Broadway Revue. June 9. Ages 1320, prepare a song & cold reading from script. www.heritageplayers. org/ 412-254-4633. MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. Auditions for How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying. June 16-17. Men/women age 16-65, 16 bars of music, cold reading, be prepared to dance. www.mckeesportlittletheater.com/ McKeesport. 412-673-1100.

gmail.com Thru June 9. Bridgewater. 724-775-6844. THE RAGE OF THE STAGE PLAYERS. Auditions for a sexy, steampunk play adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s horror novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray. Call or visit www.facebook.com/ rageofthestage for info. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 724-292-8427. THE REP. Auditions for All My Sons & Soldier’s Heart. June 11. kmartin@pointpark.edu. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8141.

SUBMISSIONS

ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF BUTLER COUNTY. Seeking submissions for outdoor sculpture contest. Artists must submit at least 2 quality photographs or digital images for each piece entered that accurately represents 2 views of the sculpture. Deadline: June 15. More info at www.aabcartcenter. com/current-calls-for-artists2/ 724-283-6922. BLAST FURNACE. Seeking submissions for Volume 3, Issue 2. Theme is “travel.” Submit poetry about physical travel/world travels, travels of the mind, travels outside of the box, etc. Submit no more than 3 of your best. www.blastfurnacepress.com/ THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

JOB FAIR JUNE 10,11,12

10:00 AM TO 3:00 PM

THE PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM

The Pennsylvania Trolley Museum, in Washington, Pa., was founded in the 1950s to commemorate the streetcars that were being replaced by automobiles and buses. Qualified volunteers are always needed for a variety of jobs, and the museum will host a Volunteer Meet and Greet for interested folks, at 9:30 a.m. Sat., June 8. Call 724-228-9256 or visit pa-trolley.org for information.

PITTSBURGH BATTLEGROUNDS. Auditions for the Pittsburgh Battlegrounds rap battle. June 7. www.facebook.com/ events/539278332782624/ Frankie’s, Squirrel Hill. 724-290-8076. THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Auditions for Princess Ida. June 3 & 11. Prepare a Gilbert & Sullivan (preferred), standard musical theater, or classical song. No a capella selections. www.pittsburghsavoyards.org/ Our Lady of Victory Maronite Catholic Church, Carnegie. 412-734-8476. POOR YORICK’S PLAYERS. Auditions for Shakespeare in the Park production of Henry V. June 15-16. Men/women, 2-min. Shakespearean monologue. Call for appointment. www. pooryoricksplayers.org Tall Trees Amphitheater, Monroeville. 412-277-2226. R-ACT THEATRE PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for Maroon for Murder. June 9. Men/women age 20+, script readings. RACTProd@

+

TA S T E

+

performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 67th Annual International Aqueous Open exhibition. www.pittsburghwater colorsociety.com/ 412-731-0636. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking individual artists & artist groups for month-long exhibitions in a new transitional gallery measuring. Artists will be responsible for all aspects of their exhibition. Send images & a brief intro to the work to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

HIRING MANAGERS, BARTENDERS, WAIT STAFF AND FLOOR STAFF ALSO SEEKING PROFESSIONAL ENTERTAINERS

412-904-3191 1620 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. 5 blocks from Casino - Off of Beaver Ave. “The Penthouse Club” and the 3-key logo are registered trademarks of General Media Communications, Inc., and are used under license.

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

47


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

KEEP CALM AND

DON’T BITCH UNLESS YOU VOTE BEST OF PITTSBURGH VOTE NOW www.pghcitypaper.com

I love my husband of 20 years, but our sexual differences are putting a strain on our marriage. Ten years ago, he asked me to talk dirty to him about having sex with other men. It has progressed to him wanting to be a cuckold. I only want to be with him, but he presses the issue by verbalizing cuckold situations during sex. This makes me close my eyes and shut down. By the time he is done, I have no desire to orgasm because I no longer feel attractive. The only way he can get off is to talk about, think about, or hear me talk about having sex with other men. It makes me feel worthless as a sex partner — which is crazy, because I am attractive and open to a great deal of things. I long for him to touch me, kiss me and look at me the way he used to. He is a good father and a good provider, and I love him. But this is crushing my self-esteem. E X T RE M E LY F RUS T RAT E D F E M AL E E X P E RI E NCI NG DE S PAI R

Your husband was probably reading cuckolding blogs for years before he worked up the nerve to raise the subject, EFFED, and here’s what he’s gleaned: Husband brings it up, wife shoots it down, husband whines, wife agrees to explore it as fantasy only and then one day — after months or years of dirty talk — wife announces she wants to give it a try. She winds up loving it, and husband lives happily ever after in cuckolded bliss. Reading so many cuckolding success stories — many likely fictitious — has left your husband convinced that if he keeps at it, one day you will want to try it. (Some wives do try it and like it. I got a letter from a woman who’s angry that her husband — after years of dirty talk and a half-dozen cuckolding experiences — decided it isn’t for him after all. She doesn’t want to go back to sleeping with just him. Dr. Cuckenstein created a monster.) Tell your husband in no uncertain terms that you don’t want to hear about cuckolding anymore. He is free to think about whatever he wants to during sex — we all are — but he has to keep his cuckolding fantasies to himself. No more closing your eyes and waiting for him to finish. (And what kind of asshole can finish under those circumstances?) If he brings up other men, go to the kitchen and have some ice cream. Your husband needs to find a new erotic script that works for you both. The incentive for him: Since you are open to many things, a fantasy scenario that turns you on is likely to become reality pretty quickly. Finally, cuckolds don’t see their wives as unattractive. Cuckolds see their wives as so desirable — and so insatiable — that they’re incapable of giving their wives all of the sexual attention they deserve. I can see why you’re upset: You want sex to be about the two of you, and your inconsiderate husband is always running his mouth about people who aren’t in the room. But your husband’s fantasies don’t mean he finds you unattractive — they mean the exact opposite.

I am a 28-year-old married straight male. I have a lot of confusion regarding my sexual orientation and gender identity, and I am in therapy. My question is about my current self-pleasuring routine. I get high and watch “sissy self-hypnosis” videos. These videos consist of text, pictures and subliminal suggestions aimed at hypnotizing straight males into some kind of “mind control” sex slavery. Some are about cuckolding and femdom; some are about being brainwashed into sucking cock. It is all done in a really amateurish and (hopefully) ineffective way. Am I destroying my brain here? M A N W O N D E R I N G A B O U T H YP N O S I S

I haven’t encountered any glassy-eyed straight guys offering to suck cock, so I’m thinking these videos are ineffective. They sound like a harmless way for an otherwise healthy, stable straight guy to fantasize about ceding his power to people the culture taught him to regard as inferior, i.e., women and fags. That said, it doesn’t sound like you’re an otherwise healthy, stable straight guy. You’re confused about your sexual orientation and gender identity, and you’re working with a shrink. So you might wanna avoid these videos for the time being.

“IF HE BRINGS UP OTHER MEN, GO TO THE KITCHEN AND HAVE SOME ICE CREAM.”

My husband had an affair for eight months. He also blew through our savings and racked up considerable credit-card debt. The college fund for our two children is gone. He spent all of the money on dinners, gifts and vacations for his girlfriend. I am so angry, I can’t imagine staying. My husband ended the affair and wants desperately to save our marriage. As much as it pains me to subject my kids to divorce, I don’t know if I can commit to him again. Is the best option to DTMFA? HEARTBROKEN

Sexual infidelity is one thing — a relatively common thing — but we’re not talking about one thing here. We’re talking about a whole series of betrayals. Your husband betrayed you sexually and financially. He stole from his own children. We all experience temptation. But I cannot wrap my head around how someone could spend his own children’s college fund — and his family’s savings — on gifts, trips and meals for his piece-of-shit on the side. (Not all “other women” are pieces of shit, but anyone who would allow her married lover to spend that kind of money on her in eight months is a flaming piece of shit.) DTMFA. It’s advice, not binding arbitration. You can make up your own mind. And while I couldn’t see staying if I were in your shoes, I could see myself meeting with a marriage counselor a few times before pulling the plug — for the sake of the kids. This week on the Savage Lovecast, Dan reveals how to get straight women to dive into casual sex, and Lindy West talks about men who think your vagina is disgusting: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013


Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

06.05-06.12

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): How free do you want to be, Gemini? A tiny bit free, hemmed in by comfortable complications that require you to rely on white lies? Or would you rather be moderately free in ways that aren’t too demanding — politely, sensibly free? Maybe you feel brave and strong enough to flirt with a breathtaking version of liberation — a pure, naked freedom that brings you close to the edge of wild abandon and asks you to exercise more responsibility than you’re used to. I’m not telling you which kind you should opt for, but I am suggesting that it’s best if you do make a conscious choice.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In August 1961, the Communist government of East Germany built the Berlin Wall. It was a thick concrete barrier designed to prevent the oppressed citizens of East Berlin from escaping to freedom in West Berlin. The barrier was eventually policed by armed guards. Traffic between the two Berlins became virtually impossible for the next 28 years. Then a miracle occurred: East German authorities relinquished their stranglehold. They tentatively allowed East Berliners to travel to West Berlin. Soon the Mauerspechte, or “wall woodpeckers,” showed up. Armed with hammers and chisels, these people began chipping away at the Wall. Two years later, most of it had been demolished. I hereby assign you to be a wall woodpecker in your own sphere, Cancer. The time is right to demolish a barricade. It may take a while, but you’re ready to start.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The following slogan captures the spirit I bring to composing my horoscopes: “I live in the future so

that you don’t have to.” But right now this slogan doesn’t apply to you. From what I can tell, you are currently visiting the future as much as I do. Here’s what I wonder, though: Are you time-traveling simply to run away from the dilemmas that face you in the present? Or are you taking advantage of your jaunts to acquire revelations that will help you solve those dilemmas once you return?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You know that there are different kinds of stress, right? Some varieties wear you out and demoralize you, while other kinds of stress excite and motivate you. Some lead you away from your long-term goals, and others propel you closer. The coming weeks would be an excellent time for you to fine-tune your ability to distinguish between them. I suspect that the more you cultivate and seek out the good kind, the less susceptible you’ll be to the bad kind.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Studies show that people spend 87 percent of

their time inside buildings and 6 percent in enclosed vehicles. In other words, they are roaming around outside enjoying the wind and sky and weather for only 7 percent of their lives. I think you’re going to have to do better than that in the coming week, Libra. To ensure your mental hygiene stays robust, you should try to expose yourself to the natural elements at least 9 percent of the time. If you manage to hike that rate up to 10 percent or higher, you stand a good chance of achieving a spiritual epiphany that will fuel you for months.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Resurrection is the Scorpionic specialty. Better than any other sign of the zodiac, you can summon the power to be reborn. It is your birthright to reanimate dreams and feelings and experiences that have expired, and make them live again in new forms. Your sacred totem is the mythical phoenix, which burns itself in a fire of its own creation and then regenerates from the ashes. Now here’s the big news headline, Scorpio: I have rarely seen you in possession of more skill to perform these rites than you have right now.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

KEEP CALM AND

DON’T BITCH UNLESS YOU VOTE BEST OF PITTSBURGH VOTE NOW www.pghcitypaper.com

Octavio Paz spoke to a lover in his poem “Counterparts”: “In my body you search the mountain for the sun buried in its forest. In your body I search for the boat adrift in the middle of the night.” What have you searched for in the bodies of your lovers, Sagittarius? What mysteries and riddles have you explored while immersed in their depths? How has making love helped you to better understand the meaning of life? I invite you to ruminate on these uncanny joys. Remember the breakthroughs that have come your way thanks to sex. Exult in the spiritual education you have received through your dealings with lust and sensuality. And then go out and stir up some fresh epiphanies.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Do you know what minced oaths are? They’re rarely used anymore. If you went back a hundred years, though, you’d hear them regularly. They were sanitized swear words, basically; peculiar exclamations that would allow people the emotional release of profanities without causing a ruckus among those who were listening. “Bejabbers!” was one. So were “thunderation!” and “dad-blast!” and “consarn!” Here’s one of my favorite minced oaths: “By St. Boogar and the saints at the backside door of purgatory!” I bring this up, Capricorn, because I suspect it’ll be a minced oath kind of week for you. What I mean is: You’ll have every right to get riled up, and you should express your feelings, but not in ways that create problems for you.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): There’s only one correct way to spell the English word “beauty.” But that wasn’t true centuries ago. Before the advent of the printing press, orthographic anarchy prevailed for many words. Some of beauty’s variations included bewte, beaute, beaultye, beuaute, bealte, buute, bewtee and beaultye. I bring this up, Aquarius, because I think it would be fun and healthy for you to take a respite from having to slavishly obey standardized rules. I’m talking about not just those that apply to spelling, but others, too. See what you can get away with.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the last chapter of Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel The Brothers Karamazov, the lead character says the following: “There is nothing nobler, stronger, healthier and more helpful in life than a good remembrance, particularly a remembrance from childhood. A beautiful, holy memory preserved from childhood can be the single most important thing in our development.” I bring this up, Pisces, so as to get you in the right frame of mind for this week’s featured activity: remembrance. One of the greatest gifts you can give yourself is to reminisce about the old days and the old ways. To do so will enhance your physical health and purify your emotional hygiene.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The longest natural arch in the world is the Fairy Bridge in Guangxi Province, China. Made of limestone, this 400-foot-wide span crosses over the Buliu River. No one outside of China knew about it until 2009, when an American explorer spied it on Google Earth. Let’s make the Fairy Bridge your metaphor of the month, Aries. Judging by the astrological omens, I suspect there’s a good chance you will soon find something like a natural, previously hidden bridge. In other words, be alert for a link between things you didn’t know were connected.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I hope that in recent weeks you’ve made yourself a master of sticky and intricate details. I trust you’ve been working harder and smarter than you have in a long time. Have you, Taurus? Have you been grunting and sweating a lot, exerting yourself in behalf of good causes? Please tell me you have. And please say you’re willing to continue for a while longer. The way I see it, your demanding tasks aren’t quite finished. In fact, the full reward for your efforts may not become available unless you keep pushing beyond the point that you consider to be your fair share. I dare you to do something that you will remember with pride and passion until the end of your days. Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013


FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 51 + SERVICES 51 + STUDIES 52 + WELLNESS 54 + LIVE 55

WORK HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay. com (AAN CAN)

Looking for Eyebrow Threaders that are willing to travel for our company. Applicants must be licensed cosmetologists or estheticians with a passion for eyebrows for many of our busy mall locations! Candidate should maintain quality service by establishing and enforcing company standards. Candidate must keep a strong client base and ensure customer satisfaction. You must talk to clients with a friendly tone. Greet customers when they enter the salon, making eye contact and showing genuine interest in their beauty care needs! You will also be responsible for hiring and supervising staff. As a traveler you must ensure the salon is well-maintained and that all employees follow company’s Standard Code of Conduct. $10.00 per hour based on sales, plus tips, commission included on a per product basis. Traveler’s covered accommodations will include flight, hotel stay, car rental or reimbursement for taxi. If interested, call the Hiring Department at 847-4161933.

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE! Paid In Advance! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-station. com (AAN CAN) Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN) Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

SERVICES

HELP WANTED Small, well established family owned/ operated dealership located in the heart of a wonderful little town is in need of one enthusiastic person to handle ALL aspects of our sales department to include all internet/ phone leads as well as all walk in traffic. You MUST have extensive experience in auto sales, as well as extensive product knowledge in regards to imported and unique/special interest and Classic cars. Computer and e-mail knowledge a must. Immediate, Full time position available in an extremely pleasant environment. All replies held in strict confidence. International Motorcars of Pittsburgh LTD. 724.325.0000 Amanda Gable. www.imotorcars. com/ The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY! Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

GENERAL SERVICES

CLASSES

We are a professional concrete company concrete done right at the right price. We can replace or just repair - don’t trust your driveway to any handyman, you need a concrete company!! Licensed and bonded - GREAT REFERENCES CALL TODAY!!! 412-223-2512

AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-4923059 (AAN CAN)

Choose Mutual Builders Corporation for the most professional roof repair, roof replacement, and new roof installation in Pittsburgh, Whitehall, Bethel Park, Monroeville, and McKeepsport, Pennsylvania. Call today for a free estimate at (412) 3539904 in Pittsburgh, PA. Mutual Builders Corporation PO Box 5174 Pittsburgh, PA 15206 (412) 353-9904 Floor Care Service Our services include • Floor Stripping and Waxing • Floor Scrubbing and Recoating •Cement Floors Clean and apply Sealer • Floor Cleaning Floor Buffing We can bring back you floors to the beauty that they once was , just give a call today for your free estimate 412.452.0267 Vinyl Composite Tile (VCT)

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com(AAN CAN) EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2013. www.AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN)

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069 Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ADOPTION

HAULING

Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

Adopt

D & S HAULING Reliable Low Rates

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342 CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Caring, Financially Secure Home, Music, Laughter, Gourmet Meals Await 1st Baby. Expenses Paid - Tina

1-800-933-1975

Call NOW

412-877-0730

INSTRUCTORS

NOTHING TO DO IN PITTSBURGH? BORED? NOT ANYMORE! LEARN TO CHICAGO STEP PITTSBURGH STEEL CITY STEPPERS Join the style that’s Sweeping the NATION!!! CHICAGO-STYLE STEPPIN’ DANCE LESSONS Wednesdays 7 -8:30 PM Wilkins School Community Center CONTACT: steelcitysteppers@hotmail.com “ friend” us on Facebook and Meetup.com

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

51


STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Find your next place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

CONSTIPATION? OSTEOPOROSIS? CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

See what our clients are saying In the past two years, I’ve both the been very satisfied with response design of our ads and the I have to they evoke. When I know jects in advertise for research sub ediately the 24-35 age group, I imm er. think of using the City Pap

— Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

People with Current Cold Sore or Canker Sore needed for a Research study (UPMC Oakland) This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions. Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart. Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100. Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

PGHCityPaper

5900 Penn Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15206 52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

For more information, please call 412-246-6367

Learn more at www.GoNovum.com


DOUBLY FUN

Ink Well {BY BEN TAUSIG}

ACROSS

48. Curse associated with Joe Pesci 1. Durable textured 51. Scale wall material 52. Deep feeling 7. Word said 53. Consumes quickly while wearing a 56. Johnny ___ sexy cat costume 59. Particularly pisslike 11. Thing on cheap drinks? a cat’s paw 62. Put down a dog? 14. Persist 63. Tree with nuts 15. Currency used in pesto recently in crisis 16. Band with a trippy 64. Puncture with jukebox/spaceship logo silly-looking cleats, as a lawn 17. TV show about a Trojan War hero’s early 65. Was in first place 66. Charon’s river years as a mobster? 67. Getting 20. Strip on buzzed, say? a mountain? 21. Bond in “License to Kill” 22. Pacific island 1. Places to getaway seek wellness 23. Mostly female 2. “Nip/___” punk band of the 3. American 1970s, with “the” naturalization 25. Note above C test subject 26. Director who had 4. Team that lost to have “Life of Pi” to MIA in the 2013 explained to him over NBA playoffs and over before he 5. Like some agreed to adapt it? spring days 31. Bathtub drink 6. Like 32. Dr. Eric Foreman infomercials, often portrayer, on “House” 7. Remainder 36. Clinton-era 8. Commercial space station prefix with -Tune 37. Louisiana sub 9. Wee warbler 39. Lightning ___ bottle 10. Sashimi topper 40. “Spaced 11. Spin one’s wheels? Cowboy” yodeler 12. Hello, to Ku’uipo 43. Wear the right 13. One may be clothes and such turned in a lot 45. Clique of cows 18. Lioness profiled in who totally knew the book “Born Free” about this patch 19. Like some of grass before apartment listings anyone else? 24. Jean-___ Godard

DOWN

N E W S

+

25. “Yeah, obviously” 26. Electrical impedance units 27. Prepare, as pasta 28. “Check,” in poker 29. Insect-resistant plant, e.g., briefly 30. Sexual partner 33. It may scoop up baba ghanoush 34. Nabokov novel about a Russian literature teacher 35. Sex on the beach component? 37. Proseccoopening sound 38. Strap-___ (sex shop items) 41. Emulate Steve Vai 42. Pharmacist’s abbr. 43. Flying disc on the beach 44. Tech company headquartered in

TA S T E

Armonk, New York 46. Nude cousin? 47. Danny who wrote the “Simpsons” theme 48. Like some Bach works 49. Authored 50. Looked at libidinously 53. Huff 54. “Down by the River” supergroup, initially 55. “I’ll take ‘Before & After’ for $200, ___” 57. One-named Deco designer 58. Talked above one’s pay grade 60. “Come on Pilgrim” and “Interpol,” for two 61. Prior to, poetically

get your

yoga on! There is light at the end of the tunnel. We offer classes 7 days a week! Call for class schedule or visit www.clayyoga.com

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

4519 Liberty Ave, Bloomfied 412-335-1332

Find your next job in the City Paper’s “WORK” section. +

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

53


WEIGHTLOSS TREATMENT Bariatric Weightloss, LLC No Long Term Contract No Start Up Fee

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Flexible Hours Including Mornings

Health Services

COUNSELING

MIND & BODY

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 ;;;;;;;;;;;;

JADE Wellness Center

355 Fifth Ave Suite 1120 Pgh, PA 15222 412-680-2064

WELLNESS

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE

Xie LiHong’s

412-400-7159

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

selfesteemworkshops.com

Aming’s Massage Therapy

;;;;;;;;;;;;

Zhangs Wellness Center

MIND & BODY

412-401-4110 $40/hr

massage Therapy

DOWNTOWN 322 Fourth Ave.

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

(1st Floor)

412-319-7530

Phoenix Spa

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

New Young Professional Free Table Shower w/60 min. Open 10-10 Daily 4309 Butler Street

STAR

SUBOXONE

• NOW Treating Pregnant Women

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

We treat:

NO WAIT LIST

Addictions

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

WELLNESS CENTER

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

Superior Chinese Massage

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

Chinese Bodyworks

• Group and Individualized Therapy

~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

MIND & BODY

Advertise Here Today!

SELF-ESTEEM WORKSHOPS

• VIVITROL -

a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

MIND & BODY

Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

China Massage

(Lawrenceville)

724-519-7896

(across from Eat n’ Park)

4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

412-595-8077

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

412-621-3300

Your ad could be here

$50/HR Free Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

Therapeutic Massage

412.316.3342

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others 54

WE have been there. WE know your pain. Don’t Wait Any Longer!

Now Hiring for LPC/LCSW MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.05/06.12.2013

Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116


LIVE

GRAND OPENING!

TIGER SPA

Judy’s Oriental Massage

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

FULL BODY MASSAGE

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

$40/hr Now with Vichy Shower 4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Accepting All Major Cards

SOUTH FOR RENT

ROOMMATES

MOVING SERVICES

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

ABC SELF STORAGE5x10 $45, 10x10 $65, 10x15 $95. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

Immediate sublease available through November. 1br/ 1ba in the Flats @ SouthSide Works. $1,460/month, PARKING INCLUDED, credit check necessary. Contact: info@littlearth.com or (412) 471-0909

BUY and SELL

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

“LIVE” section

your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the

of the City Paper

G

Asian OPENRIANNGD ! Massage 4376 Murray Ave. Pgh, PA 15217

Real Estate & Public Auction Saturday June 22, 9am Open House Saturday June 8 338 Cherrydell Dr., Scott Twp. Pgh 15220 Includes house sale (at noon), plus antique, collectible & household items, ALL must sell!

412-421-0800 www.metrospapgh.net

Info and photos at www.auctionzip.com, http://arlacherryoak.wordpress.com Contact David Kearns, LIC # AU2464L 724-239-2050

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others. N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

55


THURSDAYS IN JUNE Earn Entries 6:00am, June 1 through 8:50pm, June 27. 5 winners each drawing will have a chance to win up to $10,000 Cash!

Drawings at 4pm, 5pm, 6pm, 7pm & 8pm.

$50K BIG PAY GRAND FINALE | JUNE 27 Grand Prize Drawing 8PM 2nd Chance Drawing 9PM Activate your entries 2:00pm through 7:50pm each drawing day.

Visit Rush Rewards Players Club and RIVERSCASINO.COM for complete details. 25 base points = 1 entry Must be present and have valid ID to win. Activate your entries 2:00pm through 7:50pm each drawing day. Entries remain active until the last drawing time. Visit Rush Rewards Players Club for full details. On June 27, 2013 activate your entries 2:00pm through 8:50pm.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

June 5, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 23

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you