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TRACKING THE BUZZ FOR LADY LAMB THE BEEKEEPER 28


CREATE YOUR OWN SCREEN TEST

EVENTS 6.6 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: THE UNCLUDED (KIMYA DAWSON & AESOP ROCK) Tickets $15/$12 Members FREE parking in The Warhol lot Media sponsor: 91.3FM WYEP

6.14 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOURS The Warhol will close at 5pm due to a private event.

7.13 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: BELLE & SEBASTIAN WITH SPECIAL GUESTS YO LA TENGO Stage AE Co-presented with PromoWest North Shore & Opus One Productions Tickets: $35

In a gallery reminiscent of Warhol’s Silver Factory studio, visitors are invited to create their own screen test utilizing a computer touch screen, a moveable

7.19 – 7pm

backdrop, a specially modified vintage camera, and twin

OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUERS Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

studio lights. Upon completion, the visitor’s screen test is transformed digitally from real time to slow motion and pushed to the Internet, where it will be available on a custom webpage. The screen test can be shared on

8.16 – 8pm

various social media channels.

SOUND SERIES: PSYCHIC TV / PTV3 New Hazlett Theater Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

THE SCREEN TEST INTERACTIVE IS OPEN DURING MUSEUM HOURS ON THE 6TH FLOOR. VISIT SCREENTEST.WARHOL.ORG FOR DETAILS. The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013


Over 21 • 9pm - Midnight

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Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers AMYJO BROWN, LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns TRACEY HICKEY, JEFF IHAZA, JOHN LAVANGA

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 20

{COVER ILLUSTRATION BY LIZZEE SOLOMON}

{ART}

[PULLOUT] 2013 SUMMER GUIDE. Plenty to do, see and eat this summer. Details in City Paper’s preview of summer activities.

“What we’re seeing is the anti-choice side feeling very empowered.” — Planned Parenthood CEO Kim Evert on proposed laws that would limit abortion access

[VIEWS]

16

“The key to full-spectrum sustainability is to get people talking across boundaries.” — Environmentalist David Orr on the idea of communitywide sustainability initiatives

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

sandwich covers every taste 26 “This sensation you could ever have.” — Eric Tolchin on Lucy Nguyen’s Strip District bahn mi

{ADMINISTRATION}

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“It was a very enlightened place to be.” — Lady Lamb the Beekeeper’s Aly Spaltro on working at Bart & Greg’s DVD Explosion while working on her craft

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

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33

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STEEL CITY MEDIA

“The lavish party scenes are like a casting call for RuPaul’s Drag Race — all shrieking, sparkly feathers and candy-colored bathing suits.” — Al Hoff, reviewing The Great Gatsby

[ARTS] lyrical color photographs portray 91 “His an underrepresented side of life in often-stereotyped rural Appalachia.” — Robert Raczka on Aaron Blum’s images of his upper-middle-class West Virginia hometown

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 20 EVENTS LISTINGS 94 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 101 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 102 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 103 N E W S

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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INCOMING

“THE INCREASED BURDENS … HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO DRIVE WOMEN OUT OF STATE OR UNDERGROUND.”

RE: Wheatley spokesman on Luke’s $10K gift: “We were just as surprised as anybody” (May 10, online only) “It always comes down to the money. Campaign Finance Reform Now!!! PS ... Let’s stop electing lawyers.” — Web comment from “Doug McLean”

RE: Brave New World of campaign finance taking shape (May 10, online only) “Let’s not stop at the municipal or state levels. We can demand campaign finance accountability at the level of the contest for president.” — Web comment from “Robert Heckman”

IMPOSSIBLE CHOICE

Despite onerous restrictions already in place, women’s health options are coming under fire again

RE: Protesters deliver budget wishes to Gov. Corbett (May 9, online only) “So that’s what I saw in the dumpster behind his office.” — Web comment from “Real Deal”

“I wonder if the @NHL knows that other teams exist outside of Pittsburgh.” — May 13 tweet from “Alex Westgate” (@alexgate2000)

“Call me a loser, but I’m pretty excited for the Pittsburgh mayoral race.” — May 13 tweet from “Kevin Horne” (@KevinHornePSU)

{BY LAUREN DALEY}

I

T’S NOT LIKE getting an abortion in Pennsylvania was easy before. Just ask Janet, who more than a decade ago found out she was pregnant, at age 17. State law requires parental consent if a minor wants an abortion, unless a judge bypasses the requirement. But Janet, who grew up around Erie, couldn’t tell her parents. And so she and her boyfriend cobbled together $450 from paychecks from Walmart and washing dishes, and had friends drive her to a clinic in nearby Buffalo, N.Y. When she spoke to a counselor about the decision to abort, “Basically I told the woman, ‘I’m 17, I’ve got all these plans. I’m going to college. This can’t happen,’” says Janet, who spoke on condition of using an alias. “I just felt like it was something I had to do.” Today, Janet and her boyfriend are married, living the life she hoped for — and pregnant with a child she says they can now support and are more prepared to raise. But at her high school, where sex education consisted of little more than being told about puberty, many of her classmates weren’t so lucky. “Even ninth-graders were having babies,” Janet recalls. “That’s scary stuff.” Some didn’t finish high school, let alone make it to college.

“It was just a matter of who had the money to do what,” Janet says. And women’s-rights advocates fear that, after years of an already difficult status quo, Republicans are seeking to put women like Janet in even more dire straits. PENNSYLVANIA’S Abortion Control Act was

passed in 1989. In 1992, a U.S. Supreme

Court decision upheld most of its provisions, and it became effective in 1994. Once that ruling was handed down, observers note, things quieted down on Pennsylvania’s legislative front. “For years any abortion-related issues were really confined to fighting about family-planning appropriations,” says Sue Frietsche, a senior staff attorney with the Women’s Law Project who is CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013


Dayton Enciso, pc Darcy Monteverde Dayton, Jennifer L. Enciso and Amy E. Peckk

Real Estate Law Residential and Commercial Title Insurance, Closings and Assessment Appeals

Business Planning Corporations, LLCs, and Partnerships

Estate Planning & Administration Wills, Trusts, Powers of Attorney, LGBT and Domestic Partnerships

Litigation Civil and Criminal including Landlord/Tenant Disputes and DUI

Family Law Pre and Postnuptual Agreements, Divorce, Custody and Support

4517 LIBERTY AVENUE

412-918-1845

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The Robert M. Mill Lecture Series

Pittsburgh Labor & Management Past & Future: A Labor-Management Discussion presents a panel discussion

Cybersecurity—Implications for Workforce & Technology Development How will a national cybersecurity model benefit the Pittsburgh region in workforce development & technology applications that affect all education, government, law enforcement & industry sectors?

O F F

EYEWEAR IN MAY

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 t2:00 p.m.

UPMC Eye Center Optical Shops

Reception to follow Moderated by:

The Honorable David J. Hickton, JD

LOCATIONS

United States District Attorney,Western District of Pennsylvania

Uptown–UPMC Mercy 412-232-8520

Featured speaker: Ernest McDuffie, PhD, Lead, National Initiative for Cybersecurity

Oakland–Forbes Ave. 412-647-PITT (7488)

Education (NICE), National Institute of Standards and Technology

Panelists: Michael R. Dunleavy, Business Manager/Financial Secretary,

Oakland–UPMC Presbyterian 412-647-2145

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local 5

McKeesport–Lincoln Way 412-673-2525

Jinx P. Walton, Chief Information Officer, University of Pittsburgh

Wexford–Children’s Pine Center (Pediatric services only) 724-940-6160

CCAC–Allegheny Campus Foerster Student Service Center Auditorium (SSC) 808 Ridge Avenue t Pittsburgh, PA 15212

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This event is free of charge. Reservations are required by Thursday, May 23, 23, 2013. 20 013 3. RSVP to 412.237.4476 or LaborManagement@ccac.edu

Offer applies to prescription and non-prescription glasses and sunglasses and may not be combined with vision insurance or other discounts. Some brands not included in sale.

Information, directions & parking locations: www.ccac.edu/MillLectureSeries

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IMPOSSIBLE CHOICE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

PofE T the

WEEK

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BEST OF PITTSBURGH VOTING BEGINS 06.05.13 www.pghcitypaper.com

also counsel for Allegheny Reproductive Health Center. “For many, many years the dominant strategy we saw was a stealthy incremental strategy — deny as hard as you can that what you’re doing is taking health care away from women. …. That strategy has clearly been supplanted by an openly radical strategy.” Over the past two years, the General Assembly debated a number of abortionrelated bills, including one requiring a mandatory, invasive ultrasound. Another bill, meanwhile, reclassified abortion facilities as ambulatory surgical facilities. The latter bill passed, which has forced clinics to undergo costly renovations to comply with new standards. Kim Evert, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania, says that complying with those rules cost $325,000 for the agency’s Downtown clinic. It’s not clear yet how much that will increase the cost for patients. “We’re looking at that right now because our costs have gone up significantly,” Evert says. “This is budget time, [we’re] trying to figure that out.” Meanwhile, new legislation being drafted in Harrisburg might ensure that many women will continue bearing the higher costs entirely on their own. Two measures, Senate Bill 3 and House Bill 818, are being crafted to preclude new state-run health-insurance exchanges from covering abortion. The exchanges, which are due to be created by 2014 under President Barack Obama’s health-care reform, are intended to offer insurance to Pennsylvanians who can’t get insurance through an employer. Republicans say they are trying to preserve the status quo. “Obamacare prompted this,” says Joe Pittman, chief of staff for SB3’s sponsor, Indiana County Republican Don White. “If Obamacare were not law and the exchanges were not coming into place, we wouldn’t be having this conversation.” Pittman says SB3 is intended to enforce existing bans that bar tax dollars from being used to pay for abortion except in cases of rape, incest and danger to the life of the mother. “We’re not setting any new standards here,” says Pittman. Consumers can purchase a policy outside of the exchange if they wish, he adds.

That’s unrealistic, say critics. Planned Parenthood officials say that 80 percent of private insurance companies offer abortion coverage, making the measure a departure from the status quo. “There is no one who offers and no one who will buy a separate policy for abortion,” says state Sen. Daylin Leach, a Philadelphia-area Democrat. “You don’t buy kidney-stone insurance. No one predicts what they are going to have.” Democrats are countering the legislation. House Bill 818, a measure identical to White’s bill, passed in the House on April 23. It is now before the Senate, where state Sen. Jay Costa (D-Forest Hills) says Senate Democrats will introduce two amendments. One change will allow abortion to be covered when a pregnancy poses a threat to the mother’s health — not just to her life, as the bill is currently written. Democrats also want to allow individuals to purchase a policy covering abortion on the insurance exchange provided that the policyholder covers any related administrative fees. Such a change, Costa says, would be “consistent with the intent of no taxpayer dollars going toward abortion,” Costa says. Pitman says White opposes the changes. Such amendments, he says, are unworkable. “Despite best efforts to describe this as private insurance, it is not.” And if lawmakers want to amend the bill, he says, they should amend the entire Abortion Control Act to make sure the rules remain uniform. In any case, says Evert, the legislation suggests that “clearly there’s been a change in the political climate. What we’re seeing is the anti-choice side feeling very empowered.”

“NO ONE WHO WILL BUY A SEPARATE POLICY FOR ABORTION. ... YOU DON’T BUY KIDNEYSTONE INSURANCE.”

IN FACT, White’s bill isn’t the only one

worrying advocates and pro-choice legislators. Republican state Rep. Matt Baker — who spearheaded the legislation requiring costly clinic renovations last year — has introduced a package of bills dubbed “the rights of conscience bills.” The bills would, among other things, allow insurance plans offered either by the state or private employers to drop coverage for contraception, sterilization procedures or abortifacient drugs or devices if it’s against their conscience. The package also includes legislation that would require any insurer offering CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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IMPOSSIBLE CHOICE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice,

don’t drink & drive. LANDMARKS HOUSING RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221 REPAIRING PANEL DOORS

UPCOMING 7 4 4 R E B E C C A A V E N U E WORKSHOP:

SATURD AY, M AY 1 8

10:00 - 11:30AM

Thinking about replacing a great solid panel door because its damaged? Join us this Saturday to learn what to do with your door. Regis Will, member of Western Pennsylvania Woodworkers Association and historic preservation enthusiast, will discuss and demonstrate how to repair panel doors on your own. This workshop is FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: marylu@phlf.org or 412-471-5808 ext. 527.

744 REBECCA AVENUE

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412-471-5808

Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania 933 Liberty Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222

a plan to provide duplicate policies with one not offering coverage of contraceptive methods, sterilization procedures or abortifacient drugs or devices. Citing scheduling conflicts, a spokeswoman for Baker said the representative would not be able to answer City Paper’s questions via email. But in a March 4 co-sponsorship memorandum, Baker wrote to his colleagues that he was introducing the measures because he believes “that the rights of conscience are being impeded by a Government who requires that employers, employees and governmental entities support, through use of tax dollars and insurance premiums, devices and procedures which violate their religious beliefs and conscience.” Republicans say that while Obama’s health-care overhaul is motivating much of the new legislation, another factor is the case of Dr. Kermit Gosnell, who has been on trial for running an abortion clinic that authorities called a “house of horrors” in Philadelphia, performing late-term abortions in deplorable conditions. (As this issue was going to press, the Gosnell verdict was being read by jurors and the doctor had been convicted of several counts, including three counts of first-degree murder for the death of three live infants, and involuntary manslaughter of a patient.) “I don’t think there was ever really a lull in pushing protecting life. … But it got

added emphasis after the Gosnell case,” says Stephen Miskin, spokesman for the Pennsylvania House Republican Caucus. That case, says Miskin, “opened the eyes of many people. Was Gosnell the exception … or was what happened in Philadelphia commonplace in other places?” But opponents of the bill say such restrictions will result in more cases of women having to go to unscrupulous providers like Gosnell. “An increase in cost of abortion care, coupled with the decrease of licensed providers in Pennsylvania, has the potential to create a market for illegal and dangerous clinics to operate under the radar and put women’s lives in danger,” says Rebecca Cavanaugh, spokeswoman for Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania. Cavanaugh says clinics work with clients to ensure they receive services via a sliding scale and foundation support, “but the increased burdens placed on women have the potential to drive women out of state at best … and underground at worst.” But with Republicans controlling both the legislature and the governor’s mansion, choice advocates acknowledge that they are on the defensive. “The idea that women can’t make decisions for themselves without the input of men is how the world is supposed to work according to these people,” Leach says. “Now they have a governor willing to go along with it.” L D A L E Y @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Affordable birth control available at Planned Parenthood health centers nationwide. Make an appointment today.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013

IDIOTBOX


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REDEVELOPING HISTORY Will arena development revitalize the Hill or simply extend Downtown? {BY AMYJO BROWN} WHEN TRAVIS Williams of the Pittsburgh

Ward e 14thtic Club h t y b ed ra Endorsdent Democ n Indepe

Ending gun violence is the Civil Rights issue of our generation. A Pittsburgh where you can walk in any neighborhood free of fear and violence is the Pittsburgh we must build. Make the Commitment.... We must develop a comprehensive strategic plan, in partnership with the police department and community organizations, which addresses the complex underlying causes of gun violence.

Taking Action.... Appoint a “Gun Violence Prevention Coordinator”” to organize and direct a well-structured plan. Implement intelligence-based policing strategies and strategically deploy police officers in heavy crime areas. Diversify our police force by hiring more minority and women officers. Provide funding for proven educational, training and mentoring programs for our youth and young adults. Improve the lines of communication between our police force and community residents by adopting programs like “Coffee with Cops.”

Providing the Leadership.... As an attorney for 27 years and as a former community organizer, I will use my mediation, negotiation and organizational skills to build a consensus to make this a reality.

This is the leadership that I will bring to City Council.

www.samhensgreco.com VOTE May 21st Committee to Elect Sam-Hens-Greco, Paul Klein & Holly Maurer-Klein, Co-Chairs, Karen A. Denberg, Treasurer

Penguins stood before a roomful of Hill District residents April 10 to discuss the team’s plans for the Lower Hill District for the first time, he said out loud what nearly all in the room knew to be true. “It would be easy for me to stand up here and say, ‘Trust us,’” the team’s chief operating officer told the crowd of about 120. “I certainly understand how far that would go.” The Pittsburgh Penguins, who have been granted the exclusive rights to develop the city-owned site of the former Civic Arena, are working on a master plan for the 28 acres of prime real estate between Bedford Avenue and Centre Avenue, just east of Downtown. While the team was not yet in the picture in the 1950s, when city planners embarked on a redevelopment plan that included construction of the arena and the demolition of a large section of the Hill District, the Penguins now hold the responsibility for ensuring the next redevelopment of the Lower Hill doesn’t make the same mistakes. For the Penguins’ part, team representatives say they are mindful of the past. “We’re taking that history and thinking about what are the key things,” says Craig Dunham, president of Dunham reGroup, a consulting firm hired by the Penguins. Those include a partial return to the street grid that once helped define the vibrant African-American neighborhood, extending Wylie Avenue again from Crawford Place to Washington Place and adding two new cross streets connecting Bedford and Centre avenues. The proposed street grid also connects the Hill District to Downtown again, adding a pedestrian walkway and park on a bridge over I-579. The park would be one of three green spaces envisioned within the site, which will be a mix of residential and commercial. The urban-redevelopment project of the ’50s was “a project intended to take away a community,” Williams says. “This is, in our mind, a move back to creating communities where people want to live, work and play.” The Penguins’ plans are to be formally submitted to Pittsburgh City Council and the city’s Planning Commission in the com-

ing weeks. In the meantime, in presentations to Hill District residents, team representatives are seeking the community’s endorsement of their ideas for ensuring the Hill’s cultural legacy is protected. But mistrust does indeed underlie the discussions, particularly when talk turns to how much direct benefit Hill District residents will see from the project. Robert Bowden, a community organizer with the Hill District Consensus Group, says part of the problem is the framing of the issue. “The residents of the Hill District want the development to reflect an extension of the Hill going [into] Downtown. The developers, obviously, want this framing to be Downtown extended outward,” he says. Solutions vary: Some community leaders — such as City Councilor Dan Lavelle — are putting an emphasis on ensuring Hill residents get jobs from the development work expected to occur over the next 10 years, as well as opportunities to locate businesses in the new development. “The Lower Hill development has the opportunity to do for Pittsburgh what the redevelopment of the airport did for Atlanta — create generational wealth opportunities,” Lavelle says. Others are pressing for something more immediate and more tangible: The Hill District Consensus Group is leading a grassroots campaign urging the city to require the Penguins to dedicate $1 per car in parking revenue to a Hill District communityimprovement fund to be used for services such as youth programs and job training. The Penguins do not favor that idea, Williams says, adding it would be only a short-term fix at best. He says the Penguins will not have the parking rights once development begins. But, he says, he hopes to build trust, little by little, as the process moves forward. “A lot of the ideas and expectations are great ideas, and we want to fulfill as much of that as we can,” he says. “But we also have to balance that against bringing development to the table. If you put so many demands into the pot and a developer can’t fulfill those or it becomes unreasonable, the development won’t be here and nobody benefits. “It stays a parking lot.”

“THE DEVELOPERS, OBVIOUSLY, WANT THIS FRAMING TO BE DOWNTOWN EXTENDED OUTWARD.”

A B ROW N @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013


PENN HILLS GAME EXCHANGE 431 Rodi Rd • Penn Hills • 412-371-0386

Buy/sell/trade from our selection of hundreds of classic video games! NINTENDO! SEGA! XBOX! PLAYSTATION! AND MUCH MORE! Imports & other hard-to-find titles!

Play over 75 classic arcade games on our giant projection screens! Try some pinball in our game room! Just $5/hour!

www.pennhillsgames.com MON-FRI: 5:30P - 10P • SAT AND SUN: NOON - 10P

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consol energy center friday, september 20 TICKETS ON SALE FRIDAY, MAY 17 AT 10AM • Ticketmaster.com • Charge by phone 800.745.3000 : A BEAVER PRODUCTION :

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013


Join Port Authority, BikePGH and several thousand Pittsburghers in celebrating National Bike to Work Day on Friday, May 17th this year. Find the hydration station nearest you at carfreefridays.org to grab a SWAG Bag as you get ready to roll into your weekend! It's a great day to show your support for safer streets and improved bike amenities in the city of Pittsburgh. The Venture Outdoors Festival, sponsored by DICK’s Sporting Goods returns to Point State Park on Saturday, May 18, 2013. As one of the region’s largest outdoor, family-friendly community events, the Festival showcases the best outdoor recreational opportunities our region has to offer all in one place and all for free. Festival activities run from 11:00 AM to 6:00 PM and include biking, kayaking, rock wall climbing, fishing, kite flying, children’s activities and more. All of Port Authority’s buses are now equipped with bike racks. Whether it’s your everyday commute or a weekend ride we’re ready to help you get your bike on. Bikes can now be used on Port Authority's Light Rail System (T) seven days a week. Bikes may also be taken on the Monongahela Incline at any time with no restrictions.

It doesn't have to be Friday to go car free.

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There are no bike racks on the T or incline. Bikes must be stowed in the designated wheelchair spaces on the T and incline. Persons in wheelchairs have priority over bicycles.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013


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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

Caribou Baby, a Brooklyn, N.Y., “ecofriendly maternity, baby and lifestyle store,” has recently been hosting gatherings at which parents exchange tips on “elimination communication” — the weaning of infants without benefit of diapers (as reported in April by The New York Times). Parents watch for cues, such as a certain “cry or grimace” that supposedly signals that the tot urgently needs to be hoisted onto a potty. (Eventually, they say, the potty serves to cue the baby.) Dealing with diapers is so unpleasant, they say, that cleaning an occasional mess becomes tolerable. The little darlings’ public appearances sometimes call for diapers, but can also be dealt with by taking the baby behind the nearest tree. One parent even admitted, “I have absolutely been at parties and witnessed people putting their baby over the sink.”

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The principal and head teacher at a Godalming, England, special-needs school were reported by employees in March for allowing a student with self-harm issues to cut herself, under staff supervision. Teachers were to hand the girl a sterilized blade, wait outside a bathroom while she acted out, checking up on her at two-minute intervals, and then dress the girl’s wounds once she had finished. The school reportedly abandoned the policy six days after implementing it.

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Last year, according to Chicago’s WBBMTV, Palmen Motors in Kenosha, Wis., sold a brand-new GMC Terrain SUV to an elderly couple, 90 and 89, in which the husband was legally blind and in hospice care, on morphine, and the wife had dementia and could barely walk. According to the couple’s daughter, it was her brother, David McMurray, who wanted the SUV but could not qualify financially and so drove his mother from Illinois to Kenosha to sign the documents while a Palmen employee traveled to Illinois to get the father’s signature (three weeks before he passed away, it turns out). An attorney for Palmen Motors told the TV station that the company regretted its role and would buy the vehicle back.

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The city council of Oita, Japan, refused to seat a recently elected member because he refused to remove the mask he always wears in public. Professional wrestler “Skull Reaper A-ji” said his fans would not accept him as authentic if he strayed from his character. Some masked U.S. wrestlers, and especially the popular Mexican “lucha libre” wrestlers, share the sentiment. (At press time, the issue was apparently still unresolved in Oita.)

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At a Jan. 8 public meeting, Cooper City, Fla., Commissioner Lisa Mallozzi, annoyed with local activist (and former commissioner) Gladys Wilson, told her (according to video and audio of the meeting), “[B]low me.” Wilson, 81, said later she did not understand what the phrase meant; Mallozzi said later that she meant only that she needed to blow her nose.

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Passive possession of child pornography is not a victimless crime, authorities say, because by definition a child had been abused

in the creation of the image, but that reasoning was no relief for New Zealander Ronald Clark, who was sentenced to three months in jail in Auckland in April for watching pornographic cartoon videos of short-statured elves and pixies. A child-protection activist acknowledged that no child was harmed in the creation of the Japanese anime artwork, but insisted that it was still injurious because “[I]t’s all part of that spectrum.” Clark said he wondered if he might also be convicted for viewing sexual stick-figure drawings.

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John Leopold, the former county executive of Anne Arundel County, Md., serving 30 days in jail for illegally forcing his government security detail and another employee to perform personal errands, apparently wasted no time in March displaying a similar attitude toward his jailers. He quickly demanded that the jailers serve him a breakfast of Cheerios, skim milk, bananas and orange juice instead of the scheduled fare.

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California street gangs stage fights whose locations can be accurately predicted using the same algorithm that anthropologists use to predict where lions and hyenas will fight in the wild to protect their own territories. A UCLA researcher, using the standard “Lotka-Volterra” equation on 13 equal-sized criminal gangs in the Boyle Heights neighborhood in east Los Angeles, produced a table of probabilities showing how far from each gang’s border any fights were likely to occur. In the period 1999 to 2002, the formula correctly showed that about 58 percent of shootings occurred within 0.2 miles of the border, 83 percent within 0.4 miles, and 97 percent within 1 mile.

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Carl Bellenir, 48, was arrested in San Luis Obispo, Calif., in February after he had successfully cashed in, at a Santa Barbara Bank & Trust, several rolls of pennies that had been stuffed into rolls labeled for dimes. Bellenir apparently did not realize that the rolls would be examined later in the day and so returned the very next morning to the same bank and tried it again. Police were called, and Bellenir fled, but he was captured down the street at a Bank of America trying the same trick.

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Dateline Saudi Arabia: A newspaper in the capital city of Riyadh reported in April that three men from the United Arab Emirates were booted out of a religious festival by Saudi morality police because they were thought to be “too handsome” and would make Saudi women improperly attracted to them.

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Kent Hendrix heroically rushed to the aid of a female neighbor being assaulted by an acquaintance on their residential street in Millcreek, Utah, in April and scared the man off (though he soon turned himself in). Hendrix is a bishop in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints and, more to the point, a black belt in karate, and even more to the point, was aiming his favorite samurai sword at the attacker. Said Hendrix, “His eyes just got huge … that he was staring down 29 inches of razor.”

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS@ E A RT HL I N K . N E T OR WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013


Clinical Trials: It’s your choice.

Are You Constipated? Clinical Trials Research Services is conducting a research study of an investigational medication for constipation. If you are at least 18 years of age and have had symptoms of constipation for at least 6 months, this research study may be an option for you. Qualified participants will receive study-related and study medication at no cost. Financial compensation up to $50 per visit may be provided for time and travel.

U P C O M I N G E N T E R TA I N M E N T

For more information call 412-363-1900

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DE

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SLOW-BRAISED BONELESS SHORT RIB WAS MELTINGLY TENDER AND DEEPLY SAVORY

HILLTOP EATS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} It’s easy to overlook Patrix Café. It’s tucked inside the Hill House Association’s Kaufmann Center, and there’s not even a sidewalk sign outside. But folks are finding this offshoot of caterer Patrick Polk’s Patrix Gourmet Foods. Nine months after opening, the café has just added breakfast to its eclectic menu. Polk, who grew up on the North Side, started catering four years ago. He’d been (and still is) a musician, touring as a keyboardist and vocalist with his inspirational/gospel group. But his mom and her friends loved the caramel apples he whipped up for her birthday once, and the dessert business that resulted segued into catering for the likes of the Urban League. Another client, Hill House, wanted a lunch option for employees in its renovated Kaufmann Center. Now Patrix Cafe draws customers from as far away as Monroeville for everything from a tomato-and-goat-cheese tart to burgers and comfort-food Wednesdays. (Think fried catfish and four-cheese mac.) At $6.95, the tasty grilled chicken salad — mixed greens, blue cheese, walnuts and red onions — is about the priciest thing on the menu. Most sandwiches and wraps, and even hot dishes like agave chipotle-crusted salmon, are under $6. Don’t forget the popular greentea ginger punch — or desserts like Polk’s signature banana pudding. “We sell out of that almost every day,” he says. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri. 1825 Centre Ave., Hill District. 412-467-6497

the

FEED

Now that berry season is upon us, experiment with some cool fruity summer drinks that tap p our regional bounty. Try adding a mash of strawberries, raspberries or blueberries (with or without sugar added) to a glass of seltzer. This is also a grand way to use up those mushy, m overripe berries.

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A CUT ABOVE {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

T

HE FANTASTICALLY named Moon is a township in transition between its past as a bustling service depot for Pittsburgh International Airport and its future as the collegiate, if frankly suburban, hometown of Robert Morris University. In this shifting landscape, hotels formerly occupied by USAir travelers now serve as dorms for RMU undergrads, and a restaurant called Savory Hill is a conceptual, if not physical, landmark. Outwardly, Savory Hill presents little to distinguish it from the other businesses on Brodhead Road, a secondary commercial thoroughfare which winds its way westward from the concentration of chain stores nearest the airport-university corridor. It’s easy to drive right past it, but to do so would be a shame: Savory Hill’s fortifying menu of locally sourced, creatively prepared fine dining stands out in a local restaurant scene mostly represented by empty calories. Savory Hill bills itself “an eclectic bistro,” and decorative touches like reclaimed wood-plank bathroom doors and candleholders fashioned from trimmed wine

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013

Southern fried chicken

bottles (labels left on) suggest, ironically, a particular brand of urban sophistication which relies on a rustic country aesthetic. Rather than allow this to bend our brains into pretzels, we focused on owner-chef Thomas Langan’s ambitious menu, whose restrained selection dabbles both in trendy offerings such as short rib and in intriguing updates of timeless classics like Southern

SAVORY HILL

988 Brodhead Road, Moon. 724-457-7109 HOURS: Tue.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. PRICES: Soups, salads and starters $3-12; entrees $19-23 LIQUOR: Full bar; on-staff sommelier

CP APPROVED fried chicken. Savory Hill’s suburban clientele may inform the more familiar options, but at no point does the menu condescend or get bogged down in the expected. Our meal began with a creative chef’s Holy Grail: an original yet accessible appetizer. Rock Solids Bites were morsels of

dip (yes, dip) crusted and quick-fried for an effect reminiscent of jalapeño poppers without the pepper. See what we mean by intriguing? Regular options include spinach dip crusted with crushed pita chips and French-onion dip coated with potato chips, and as with every category on the menu, there is always a daily special. While the popper analogy may be off-putting, these bites transformed traditional pub grub into something much more sublime, with satisfying crunch, a burst of savory flavor and no regrets. The starter list as a whole bounced between rarified — scallop Napoleon, with asiago-lemon bread crumbs and star-anise gastrique — and regular-Joe, such as buffalo-chicken nachos, albeit classed up with a bleu cheese-celery relish. Both ends of the spectrum appealed, but, seduced by the promise of local, seasonal produce, we selected salads. Baby romaine was a version of a Caesar, tiny leaves with oven-roasted tomato and a tasty garlic-herb crouton. The dressing was much like a traditional Caesar, too, though a refreshed version really could


have sung, as did the honey-champagne vinaigrette on Angelique’s chef’s garden salad. Its carefully balanced sweet and acidic notes were the perfect foil for this lovely salad of tender baby lettuces, “toy box” tomatoes (which must be so named because they look like colorful baubles) and local goat cheese, making it one of the most memorable salads she has ever had. South of the Border surf-and-turf in lesser hands could turn into steak and shrimp with some salsa, but Langan is better than that. Chipotle-marinated sirloin was no surprise, but it was a nice cut — thin enough that the chili flavor held up, thick enough to cook well. Even better were beautifully seared scallops, still translucent in the center, lightly flavored with tequila and lime. The bed of honey-chipotle jasmine rice was as thick as a risotto, but its sweetness highlighted the dish’s main shortcoming: not enough spice. Each element was well balanced, but none packed any heat, so that the plate as a whole tilted just a touch bland.

Deconstructed crème brûlée

Slow-braised boneless short rib was meltingly tender and deeply savory, as short rib should be, and accompanied by a lusciously sticky risotto studded with charred asparagus. The vegetable’s caramelized top notes struck just the right balance with its bitter undertones. But the best part may have been the fresh local carrots. The size of a child’s finger, they came in three colors — orange, yellow and deep purple-red — and were cooked to the peak of tender-firm sweetness. A trio of homemade cheesecakes provided an echo of the “bites” concept at the close of our meal. Topped with vanilla, chocolate and strawberry sauces, the cake itself was rich and creamy, and the crumbly graham-cracker crust showed that sometimes, tradition knows best. It’s still a local secret, but the view from Savory Hill is superb. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

SHOTS HEARD ’ROUND THE WORLD British-born liquor expert wants us to show “independence” Pittsburgh newcomer Rob McCaughey is a wine and spirits evangelist. The affable Brit spent the last 20 years as a global ambassador of hospitality and beverage management, working in Europe, Asia and, for the last five years, as an importer and distributor in Abu Dhabi. McCaughey moved to Pittsburgh a few months ago to accompany his wife, a Ph.D. candidate at Pitt. He says he knew he wanted to work in the city’s beverage industry, but “I wasn’t quite sure what I was going to do.” When he walked into Dreadnought Wines, a Strip District libations vendor whose owners (Deb Mortillaro and Mike Gonze) put a heavy emphasis on education, he knew he’d found the right fit. After a couple of conversations, he was hired as the store’s education director. “Giving people the independence to make smart choices is a big part of what I do,” he says. McCaughey admits that Pennsylvania’s tricky liquor laws took a bit of getting used to. “I didn’t understand how the three-tier system or the PLCB worked,” he says. Happily, “people [in the service industry] were really friendly and keen to share ideas. You don’t find the snobbery you’d get in other cities.” McCaughey’s classes at Dreadnought will be geared to both restaurant-industry professionals and general enthusiasts. He’ll lead certification-focused classes of the Wine and Spirits Education Trust, but also teach fun evenings like a blind tasting of single-malt world whiskeys, scheduled for May 20. “No one in the city is doing such a focused, educational program,” he says. “We really want to become a one-stop shop for training.” Customers expecting an old-fashioned booze-up — something that has been known to happen at other tastings around town — should rethink their expectations. “It’s not just for people to come here to drink,” McCaughey says. “This is more about understanding the actual products, flavors and regions. Tasting is there to reinforce and help people understand those building blocks.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

2013 Penn Ave., Strip District. 800-565-2816 or www.dreadnoughtwines.com

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us

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ALI BABA. 404 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-2829. Service is quick at this Middle Eastern restaurant, designed to feed students and nearby museumstaff lunchers. It can get loud and close during busy times, but the atmosphere is always convivial. A wide-raging menu ensures that carnivores and herbivores alike leave satisfied. JE BRADDOCK’S AMERICAN BRASSERIE. 107 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-992-2005. Aiming for the theater crowd and the casual diner, the menu at this clubby venue ranges from hot sandwiches to steak and seafood dinners. Some of the creative offerings include a local twist: The mussels and frites “Strip District style” combines shellfish with kielbasa and beer, and the Pittsburgh Reuben sandwich incorporates a pierogie. KE CAFÉ RAYMOND. 2103 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-4670. A perfect place to catch lunch or a snack during Strip District shopping forays, this little café offers an array of artisan breads, French pastries, fine cheeses and refined delicatessen fare. The few tables up front — augmented by sidewalk seating in season — have the feel of a bright, cozy, Parisian café. J

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TOAST!

KITCHEN & WINE BAR

5102 BAUM BLVD. SHADYSIDE 26TH & SMALLMAN STREETS, IN THE STRIP • 412-261-6511 WWW.MEATBALLS.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013

www.toastpgh.com 412-224-2579

and offers free bacon at the bar on Tuesdays? JE

DELUCA’S. 2015 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-566-2195. DeLuca’s doesn’t have the White House cachet of Pamela’s, but the portions are large and the quarters are close. On weekends, it’s one of Pittsburgh’s great gathering places. Try the “Super Bowl” omelet. J

LEGENDS OF THE NORTH SHORE. 500 E. North Ave., North Side. 412-321-8000. Despite its name, Legends is no sports bar: It’s a family-friendly restaurant with a local flavor. The menu is almostexclusively Italian: Offerings include classics such as gnocchi Bolognese and penne in vodka sauce, and more distinctive specialties such as filet saltimbocca. KF

DINETTE. 5996 Penn Circle South, East Liberty. 412-362-0202. This refined California-inspired pizzeria and wine bar offers a small menu mostly featuring gourmet thin-crust pizzas. The focus here is on fresh, local and sustainable. Inventive pizzas include toppings such as wilted greens, littleneck clams, goat cheese and Brussels sprouts. Guests at the wine-bar counter get a front-row seat for the pizza-making. KE

MALLORCA. 2228 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-1818. The ambience here is full of Old World charm, with just a touch of hipness bolstered by attentive service. The fare is Spanish cuisine, and there’s no mistaking the restaurant’s signature dish: paella, featuring a bright red lobster tail. In warm weather, enjoy the outdoor . www per patio along lively a p ty pghci m Carson Street. KE .co

FULL LIST ONLINE

“Toast can serve as an upscale bar for after-work drinks or late-evening conversation. It’s casual and inexpensive enough to go to “just because,” but also serious enough to be a special occasion destination” - China Millman, Pgh Post-Gazette

New How Lee {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} dishes may sound mysterious, but they’re delicious. KE

Dinette {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} CHINA STAR. 100 McIntyre Square, 7900 McKnight Road, North Hills. 412-364-9933. Though a standard ChineseAmerican menu available, the real action is on the humbly Xeroxed Sichuan menu that’s all in Chinese. Fortunately, there is a translated version available, and the names read like a gourmand’s exotic fantasy: duck with devil’s tongue yam, rabbits in flaming pan. These authentic

EGGS N’AT. 8556 University Blvd., Moon Township. 412-262-2920. This stylish and cheery diner offers a variety of pancakes, as well as sandwiches and combo platters of breakfast foods. The “Mama Evans” pancakes are filled with blueberries and bacon, a combination that is smoky, sweet and savory all at once. Also on offer: muffuleta, a New Orleans-style multi-layered and pressed sandwich. J

HARRIS GRILL. 5747 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-362-5273. A neighborhood bar and grill (with two outdoor patios) where fun is as important as the fresh food and the cold beer. What else to make of a place that serves “Britney Spears” (chicken tenders on a stick), Cheeses of Nazareth and The Wrongest Dessert Ever,

THE MINTT. 3033 Banksville Road, Banksville. 412-306-1831. This casual eatery successfully taps the multicultural cuisines of India’s eastern coast, with dishes such as gongura chicken and mutton biryani. Other regions are also represented with dosas, curries and tandoori specialties. For an appetizer, try Chicken 555, dressed with peanuts, curry leaves and a traditional pickle. KF NEW HOW LEE. 5888 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1888. It’s an oddly signed storefront restaurant but this is Sichuan cuisine that rises above its peers with food that’s well cooked, expertly seasoned and fearlessly spicy. The less-typical entrees include cumin mutton, dan dan CONTINUES ON PG. 26


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May 26 5-11pm

The evening before Memorial Day, Day Kaya® consumes 20th Street for our annual block party. Join us as we welcome summer with:

Streets e h t n i Dancing

* Tropical Drink Carafes * Out * P door Grilling * ig Roast

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26 M AY

2000 Smallman Street | Strip District | 412.261.6565 | bigburrito.com

on the

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SATIN HEARTS | JUNE 7 | 7-10PM CAIT CUNEO | JUNE 21 | 7-10PM RESTAURANT HOURS: Tuesday-Thursday & Sunday Lunch 11-3, Dinner 5-9 Friday & Saturday Lunch 11-3, Dinner 5-10

www.TablesOnTheGreen.com • 724-226-0955 1299 Lane Ave. Natrona Heights PA 15065 N E W S

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

So thern South rn Hospititalit Hosp lity. Who said you can’t find

Real Soul Food in Pittsburgh?

Come See Uncle Troy!

HEY BROWN BAGGER, EAT YOUR LUNCH AT STEELHEAD!

Soul Food at Monroeville Mall

Pittsburgh Marriott City Center 112 Washington Place, Downtown 412-471-4000 for Reservations www.thesteelhead.com

Scan to View Steelhead Menus

the

Wooden Nickel R e s t a u r a n t

&

L o u n g e

Located in the Food Court

412.858.5155 Little

BANGKOK IN THE STRIP

Authentic Thai Cuisine

Enjoy! 2 Outdoor Patios Live Music Every Fri & Sat Night!

DAILY DRINK

SPECIALS

MARTINI MONDAYS DRAFTS TUESDAYS WINE WEDNESDAYS THIRSTY THURSDAYS

LATE NIGHT BITES

½ Off Lounge Menu from 9-10pm 4006 Berger Lane - Monroeville 412-372-9750 TheWoodenNickelRestaurant.com 26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013

All Lunches $

7 - $9 freshest

THE LOCAL PRODUCE FROM THE STRIP Mon 11:30-3:00 Tue-Thu 11:30-9:00 Fri-Sun 11:00-9:00

Dine in / Take Out BYOB

1906 Penn Avenue Strip District 412-586-4107 GOUTDOOR DINING F LITTLEBANGKOK INTHESTRIP.COM

noodles, tea-smoked duck and Chendu fried dry hot chicken. JF NOLA ON THE SQUARE. 24 Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-9100. Offering a boldly refined take on straight-up, traditional New Orleans food, NOLA’s menu is an invitation to kick back, relax and savor the flavors: cheesy griddle grits with a chunky tomato sauce and green beans; Creole tartiflette with camembert, mustard sauce and bacon; oyster stew; and catfish strips paired with spicy papaya. KE OISHII BENTO. 119 Oakland Ave., Oakland. 412-687-3335. Bamboo walls and a low counter with colorful cloth cubes for seating denote a place for moderately priced Japanese food, including sushi. Oishii also adds a few Korean dishes for variety and spice; those seeking a little heat might consider bulgogi, the Korean BBQ. JF

offMenu {BY AMYJO BROWN}

WE LOVE LUCY WHEN 71-YEAR-OLD Lucy Nguyen set up her grill and the table full of pickled ingredients in the Strip District two weeks ago, the texting and Tweeting and Facebooking began: “Look who I found!” Jeff Guerrero was one of those who spread the word, texting 20 friends on Nguyen’s first day: “Lucy is back from Vietnam.” And she has brought her signature banh mi sandwiches: French-bread hoagies filled with marinated and grilled pork or chicken, piled with pickled carrots, cauliflower, red onions, hot peppers, herbs and hot sauce. “She sold out of hoagies before I got here,” Guerrero says. “I kinda shot myself in the foot.”

SOBA/UMI. 5847-9 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-362-5656/412-3626198. Here, the local Big Burrito group offers two different menus in the same building. Soba offers pan-Asian fusion (from Korean barbeque to Thai corn chowder and Vietnamese hot-and-sour shrimp) in a minimalist yet elegant restaurant/lounge. Umi’s Japanese menu, meanwhile, focuses on sushi and teriyaki; it’s a perennial finalist in City Paper’s “Best of Pittsburgh” issue. LE STATION STREET. 6290 Broad St., East Liberty. 412-365-2121. A neighborhood hot-dog joint with exotically dressed dogs, including: chili cheese (with curds), Hawaii (pineapple and bacon), kimchi, sweetbreads and “devil” (egg salad, Tabasco and potato chips). Also offers tacos. JF STEELHEAD BRASSERIE AND WINE BAR. Marriott City Center, 112 Washington Ave., Downtown. 412-394-3474. In this upscale hotel restaurant, the straightforward menu promises that the aquatic name holds more than brand value. While entrées include seafood and other meat in almost equal proportion, the soups and starters are dominated by the former, with old favorites like jumbo shrimp cocktail matched with more contemporary offerings. LE THAI GOURMET. 4505 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-681-4373. Located in a narrow former lunchroom, Thai Gourmet is the casual, no-nonsense and no-frills member of Pittsburgh’s Thai restaurant club. The prices are on the low end, but the food quality is high and the portions are huge. The decor mixes Asian themes with diner kitsch in a delightful way. JF

{PHOTO BY AMYJO BROWN}

Street-food vendor Lucy Nguyen sells banh mi.

Nguyen is an established, and beloved, Strip District tenant who began selling the sandwiches outside of My Ngoc, the restaurant she ran for about 16 years. Though she has since closed the restaurant because it was “too much work,” she still maintains her cart, now located in the parking lot of Bar Marco, from spring to late fall. She spends winters in her native Vietnam. Nguyen’s story is one many of her customers know: She moved to Pittsburgh more than 40 years ago, following her husband, a serviceman whom she met in Hue, Vietnam. They had three daughters. Nguyen worked in hotel housekeeping before opening her restaurant. Guerrero says the food isn’t the only reason he gets excited about seeing Lucy: “A lot of it is Lucy herself. … [T]he food is good, but I’m also taken care of here.” Nguyen has been known, for example, to refuse payment when a loyal customer is down on his luck. She is mothering in other ways, too — quick to introduce others to new flavors and foreign foods. “This sandwich covers every taste sensation you could ever have,” says Eric Tolchin, another regular who brought a handful of work colleagues by Nguyen’s cart last week after he discovered she was back. “Today is the greatest day of my life,” he exclaimed as he approached. Turning to his co-workers, whom he hoped to turn into new disciples, he said: “This is the greatest sandwich you’ll ever have. That’s all you need to know.” A B ROW N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


35¢

PATIO Now Open!

--------- TUESDAY ---------

Monday thru Thursday!

Try our $6.00

HALF OFF

all BOTTLES of WINE

WING NIGHTS 5-9pm

LUNCH COMBO From “the Big Book of Combinations” Lunch is served Monday - Friday 11am to 4pm

--------------------

The Patio is Open! 900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

Available for private events & outside catering. 2302 E. Carson Street • South Side • 412-381-0517

w www.TheLibrary-Pgh.com

LET’S DO LUNCH

BenjaminsPgh.com

2126 EAS EAST AST T CA CARS CARSON RSON ST ST. 412-481-0480

Daily Lunch Service Begins Promptly at 11:31 AM

Gri&ing Chi ing Drinks Specials & Half Off Appetizers

Pet FFriendly Patio Call for Catering 412-683-1448 4428 LIBERTY AVE BLOOMFIELD delsrest.com

N E W S

Don’t be late.

Shiloh GrilL

123 Shiloh Street, Mt. Washington

412.431.4000 +

TA S T E

theShilohGrill.com

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LOCAL

“I AM INTRIGUED BY SPECIFIC METAPHOR AND VERY PHYSICAL WORDING.”

BEAT

{BY RORY D. WEBB}

HE’S THE DJ

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

KEEPING UP

DJ Pete Butta

If being well-travelled lends a sense of diversity, it should come as no surprise the sense of variety that Pete Butta embraces as a DJ. The New Jersey-born 25-year-old was raised in Illinois before living his teen-age years in State College. His interest in music began in fourth grade, when he purchased Dr. Dre’s “Forgot About Dre” single on vinyl. It was a small piece to a greater puzzle that Butta is still building today. “Every record or little piece of equipment was an accomplishment,” he explains. “Like, ‘Yo, look what I got, look what my next step in becoming a DJ is.’” In 10th grade, Butta got his first set of turntables and began practicing in his parents’ basement. At an Ol’ Dirty Bastard concert, Butta met current WAMO-FM DJ Mike Jax, who, at the time, was a Penn State student with his own radio show. “[Now] I knew someone that was a DJ and on the radio week in and week out,” says Butta, who began sitting in on Jax’s show. “Before I could learn how to drive, I was on college radio.” Butta laughs as he recalls his first time DJing live, spontaneously at an event at Damon’s Bar & Grill. “They hit capacity early,” he says, “so people had to go outside to try and get their friends in and there was an empty set of turntables in a room with, like, 30 people dancing. So I was like, ‘I guess this is the first time I have to play in front of people.’” In 2011, Butta moved to Pittsburgh and continued to expand his résumé — which also included an internship with Sirius XM in New York City. Since moving to Pittsburgh, he’s toured with Braddockborn hip-hop group The Come Up, contributed to various parties and earned corporate sponsorships. As one-fifth of the Fuk Dat Party team, Butta has helped to organize a monthly event that travels to different neighborhoods and venues throughout Pittsburgh, bringing a variety of creative styles and sounds to each location. Butta also is a resident DJ at S Bar every Saturday night. “Just being able to be versatile is what’s really been dope as a DJ for me,” he says. “From cruise ships, to gay bars, to playing skate competitions.”

F

RESH OFF a spate of European tour dates and about to embark on a U.S. tour, Aly Spaltro, better known as the mastermind of Lady Lamb the Beekeeper, is remarkably calm. She is back in Brooklyn, where she resides and where she recorded her debut album, Ripely Pine. “It was kind of a culture shock to get back to New York, but I love being home and I’m happy to be back,” Spaltro says. Given the amount of preparation and fine-tuning that went into the album, Spaltro’s calm is warranted. The songs on Ripely Pine were written over the course of about three years while Spaltro was living in Brunswick, Maine, and then recorded over 10 months after relocating to her current BK digs. Now she is eager to share the material. The careful attention paid in creating Ripely Pine can be felt immediately upon hitting “play,” and the music stays remarkably fresh over repeated listenings. It is hard to believe that the songs here are the result of Spaltro’s first outing as a songwriter — harder still when one considers that they were conceived when she was 19. On Ripely Pine, she emerges as a voice fully formed.

More on Pete Butta: www.petebutta.com

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHERVIN LAINEZ}

{BY IAN THOMAS}

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013

Video-store apiarist: Aly Spaltro

The album’s 12 tracks do not traffic in vagueness. They are specific, often to the exclusion of accessibility. But in that specificity lies their value. Vivid imagery abounds on Ripely Pine, while frequent allusions to small animals and to human anatomy speak to a fascination with the natural world. “I am intrigued by specific metaphor and very physical wording,” Spaltro says. “The idea that you could describe something so specifically that [maybe] it could become a little horrific — I’m intrigued by that.”

LADY LAMB THE BEEKEEPER

WITH XENIA RUBINOS, MIDGE CRICKETT 8 p.m. Fri., May 17. Garfield Artworks, 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield. $8. All ages. 412-361-2262 or www.garfieldartworks.com

As such, the songs not only lend themselves to scrutiny, but bear it well, and Spaltro is in no rush to demystify the content. Vocally, she can whisper honey-sweet nothings or yelp vinegar yowls with uniform ease, performing every task she attempts

with competence and confidence. Spaltro’s confidence in her abilities speaks to the circumstances under which the songs were written. The album took shape while she was working at Bart & Greg’s DVD Explosion, an environment that Spaltro found supportive and nurturing. “It was the independent video store, and everyone in the town rented from that store,” she recalls. “It was a [very] enlightened place to be. I stored my gear behind a wall [so] that no one would know it was there and I would work [after] the late shift and into the morning.” Spaltro is working in a music business that keeps its classifications neat and tidy, but she balks at the “girl-with-the-guitar” designation. “Being a girl in the industry is tricky,” she says. “I’ve worked hard over the years to make people understand that I’m not just a singer-songwriter. I’d never use that label for myself.” On Ripely Pine, she aims to showcase her versatility. She is happy to skirt expectations and genre-specific norms when it means giving her songs the chance to reach their “full potential.” “Because the structures of my songs are unformulaic,” CONTINUES ON PG. 30


KEEPING UP, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

she says, “I wanted them to be full and epic, and cover the ground from minimal to lush, even in one song.” In keeping with her desire to let the content of her songs dictate their form, she accepted the help of producer Nadim Issa, with whom she’d collaborated previously. While recording at Let ’Em In Music, Issa’s Brooklyn studio, the two reworked the existing songs to achieve the scope and sweep that Spaltro desired. This reimagination included adding strings and horns to the songs, which were initially written as solo pieces. Most importantly, though, their time in the studio gave rise to structural experimentation of movements and divergences within songs that define Ripely Pine. Most of the album’s dozen songs meander on tangents after false finishes and other detours. Nine of the tracks exceed the fourminute mark. The method works to great effect; resolutions segue into epilogues, subverting the songs expected meaning. On “Bird Balloons,” one of the album’s highlights, Spaltro waxes nostalgic about a turbulent relationship whose nature defied definition, before arriving at a détente: “And the stars they were so still / And both our hearts, they were revealed / and you were my friend.” Not content with such a tidy resolution, she jumpstarts the song with a whoop, kicking a hole out of the back end and reasserting her role in the experience: “I’m a ghost and you all know it,” she snarls, “I’m singing songs and I ain’t stoppin’.” Given the introspective nature of the songs on Ripely Pine, the boldness of these production and arrangement choices cannot be overstated. What could as easily have been quiet, delicate affairs are instead brassy barn-burners. “Older songs were revived in the recording process, because they went from being solo songs to [me] arranging them from the ground up,” Spaltro says. “In that way I [had to] reconnect with them. I still feel very much connected to them, even if the content is a little older.” While Lady Lamb’s sound bears some marks of the Americana movement of recent years — think Heartless Bastards, Iron and Wine, or Neko Case — it is ultimately distinctive, owing largely to the uniqueness of the arrangement and structure of the songs. In spite of being written piecemeal, Ripely Pine is a remarkably cohesive album, with recurring motifs, sonic and lyrical, that speak to Spaltro’s passion for her subject matter. What’s most interesting is that her lyrical approach is antithetical to her approach to production. The message of her lyrics is consistently one of self-reliance, yet the epic arrangements she achieves could only be accomplished through collaboration. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013

NEW RELEASES

B. WHITE THE ANOMALY (THE 58S)

McKeesport rapper B. White here presents his first solo full-length, released by his group The 58s. In 18 tracks (plus two bonus tracks), he lays down often brutal truths about life in the Mon Valley. White mixes social commentary and the personal, often in close quarters. On one track simply called “Me,” he laments the hardships of street life and the futility of hip-hop culture’s worship of material things, then wraps up the chorus with: “Welcome to hell / Welcome to me.” It reveals a jarring sense of self-consciousness, sometimes even self-loathing, that mixes with a more general and expected hip-hop bravado. It’s worth taking notice when the deep-voiced rapper takes time on a beautifully produced track (“Funeral”) to drop a rhyme like, “But this is real as it can get / And I feel like a piece of shit.” Recommended. BY ANDY MULKERIN

THE 58S PRESENT B. WHITE AND GUESTS PERFORMING THE ANOMALY. 7 p.m. Fri. May 25. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $10-15. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com CRYSTAL SETH DISTRICT XXIII (SELF-RELEASED)

Rapper Crystal Seth has a knack for engaging his audience during live performances, and he’s taken long strides toward translating this energy to his recorded music on District XXIII. The overall zoned-out vibe is fitting for highway cruises on a summer day, and the more upbeat songs like “Flying Is Living” and “Onesy and Slippers,” which features Action Bronson, are highlights. Locals Beedie and Chevy Woods also make appearances as the Fox Chapel High School grad and Penn State student shares his college and life experiences with listeners. BY RORY D. WEBB


UPCOMING SHOWS Sat May 18

BOTTOM SHELF BLUES BAND 10 PM • $10 • 21+ Wed May 22

POETRY.COM COMEDY & POETRY SHOW 9:30 PM • $10/$15 • 21+ Thur May 23

STEVE HOFSTETTER 9 PM & 11 PM • $20 • 21+ Sun May 26

NEID’S HOTEL BAND 7:30 PM • $10 • 21+ Wed June 5

THE CRAWDADDIES 8:30 PM • $7 • 21+ Thurs June 6

WE WERE PROMISED JET PACKS 8 PM • $13/$15 • Lmt. All Age Tues June 11

BEN KENNY OF INCUBUS 8 PM • $13/$15 • 21+

PITTSBURGH STATION SQUARE

+1-412-481-7625 • HARDROCK.COM /HARDROCKPGH

@HRCPITTSBURGH

©2013 Hard Rock International (USA), Inc. All rights reserved. SeeTheShow™

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HUGE SPRING SALE SAVINGS IN EVERY DEPARTMENT! Lingerie & much more

LESSONS FROM THE BEYOND {BY ANDY MULKERIN} IAN SVENONIUS has never been one to

Pittsburgh

LWEDNESDAY, ADIES NIGHT MAY 22, 7-9 PM Refreshments f will be served

SPEAKER

Dana Kirkpatrick, MS, NCC, LPC Relationship Expert and Certified Sex Therapist

FREE GIFT WITH PURCHASE 7775 McKnight Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15237 I www.adamevepittsburgh.com I 412-548-3384

think of a rock band as just a rock band. The frontman of Nation of Ulysses, The Make-Up and Weird War always has something else going on — usually something involving leftist politics and an aesthetic uniformity that feels a little bit dangerous, a little bit cool. So it’s little surprise that his new book, Supernatural Strategies for Making a Rock ’n’ Roll Group, isn’t exactly a simple how-to for budding musicians. Like Svenonius’ previous literary offering, The Psychic Soviet, the new book mixes cultural criticism, history, anthropology and a bit of left-field methodology to make the reader think about rock music in terms not often discussed in music writing. The conceit of parts of the book involves the idea that the author held a séance with a number of dead rock luminaries to learn their “secrets,” because living rockers won’t share for fear of losing their industry advantage. The bits spoken by musicians like Buddy Holly and Mary Wells, though, form one continuous narrative about the history of the rock band — which, Svenonius argues, followed in the form of the youth street gang, and therefore has more in common with that social group than with any previous musical organization. It’s a trip simultaneously mindbending and silly; it’s one thing to read and digest a sentence like: “Only barbaric countries (e.g., the United States of America,

IAN SVENONIUS READING

8 p.m. Fri., May 17. Pittsburgh Filmmakers, 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-681-5449 or pfm.pittsburgharts.org

Israel) regularly employ their armies as instruments of death.” It’s wholly another to imagine that sentence spelled out in spaghetti by a dead Motown singer. Of course, it’s exactly that mixing of ideology and impish humor that’s informed

{PHOTO COURTESY OF EVA MOOLCHAN}

The dead-rock-star whisperer: Ian Svenonius

Svenonius’ music all this time. Just as he did in The Psychic Soviet, where Svenonius argued that Hitler was driven by his love of operatic narrative and death, he makes provocative points here, often expressed aphoristically: “The death cult in rock ’n’ roll is one of its most important aspects and is born of the medium’s potent sexual power.” (That one’s attributed to Brian Jones.) After the séance, Svenonius goes through all of the usual signposts of rock-band life, not unlike what you’d find in a more traditional guidebook — but his take is always a bit more complex. The “van” section, for example, doesn’t discuss what’s “best” to buy, but defines the different modes of transports as cultural signifiers for rock bands. In a section on finding bandmates, he painstakingly describes the characteristics of each Zodiac sign as a sort of occult key for finding a rock group. Svenonius — who speaks at Pittsburgh Filmmakers this Friday as part of his Supernatural Strategies book tour — continues to prove himself an unconventional and important thinker when it comes to cultural studies and pop music. While some parts of the book can tend toward the silly, it’s anchored by the serious scholarship that makes Svenonius one of our more respected writers on music. A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013


CP SUMME S SU SUMMER UM RG GUIDE UIDE 201 2013 013 01 13

1


2

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

3


FOR TICKETS, CALL 412.392.4900 OR VISIT PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG GROUPS OF 10+ CALL 412.392.4819

TITLE SPONSOR

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS

ELGAR, GRIEG & RAVEL WITH VALENTINA LISITSA

MANFRED HONECK CONDUCTS ROSSINI’S WILLIAM TELL OVERTURE

A GRAND FINALE WITH YUJA WANG

May 17-19

May 31-June 2

June 7-9

PNC POPS

KENNY G June 13-16

ALL OF THESE PERFORMANCES FEATURE THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA AT HEINZ HALL

PRESENTING SPONSOR

Presentation licensed by Disney Concert Library © Disney / Pixar

Jerry Garcia Symphonic Celebration featuring Warren Haynes

June 18

4

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Pixar in Concert presented by First Niagra

June 21 & 22

The Music of Led Zeppelin July 18

Idina Menzel July 21


Now

that the sun is shining again, get out there and enjoy yourself. We’ve compiled a list of activities and events to keep you active and entertained this summer. And because you’ll need to be fortified, we’ve also included various places to sample the season’s bounty.

Contents Music 08 Films 20 Arts+Exhibits 26 Stage 34

Fairs, Festivals+ Special Events 40 Outdoors 42 Kids 44

ILLUSTRATIONS BY LIZZEE SOLOMON

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

5


Weddings, Nightclubs, Proms, Corporate Events...

/ , 9 (  7 + ( $7 ( 5

We’ll do our part to make it perfect. We are pleased to present live theater in Ohio’s Amish Country! Enjoy a performance of one of our hit musicals on your next visit—come early to have dinner and shop. Adapted from the best-selling novel by

B E V E R LY

LEWIS

The

Adapted from the best-selling novel by

Confession OFFIC OF THE P IAL DJ ITTS CELEBRAT BURGH ION!

Playing June 4 – August 17

WANDA E. BRUNSTETTER Playing August 22 – December 21

Tickets Available Now! For schedules and ticket information, visit amishcountrymusicals.com or call 855-344-7547

Playing at Carlisle Inn Sugarcreek

PROUD PARTNER

Located at 1357 Old Rt. 39 in Sugarcreek, Ohio Approximately 2 hours west of Pittsburgh

www.pittsburghdjcompany.com

‡ Duquesne University offers more than

CATCH UP, GET AHEAD, OR JUST TAKE A CLASS FOR FUN...

WWW.DUQ.EDU/SUMMER 6

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

SUNNY DAYS... BRIGHTER FUTURE... SUMMER@DU

500 courses during the summer ‡ Choose from anatomy and physiology, biology, chemistry, calculus, modern languages and more 13 ‡ sessions, from 3 to 12 weeks, starting in May, June and July

Also this summer… ‡ music workshops ‡SDUDOHJDOFHUWLÀFDWHSURJUDP ‡ reading classes and athletic camps for kids ‡ courses for educators ‡ professional development workshops ... and much more!


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CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

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Chaka Khan at Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival, June 7-9

Summer MUSIC ◆

MAY 16

Smiling Moose Faun Fables, The Turpentiners. Thunderbird Café

Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Escape the Fate, The Color Morale, Glamour of the Kill. Mr. Small’s Theatre

Belie My Burial, She’s in Pain.

MAY 17

MAY 18

31st Street Pub

Club Café (late show)

First Niagara Pavilion

Patron Saint, Bare Minimum, Braynstream Records. Smiling Moose ose New York Funk Exchange.

(early show)

When the Planets, Tohu Bara. Tim McGraw, Rascal Flatts, Brad Paisley, Luke Bryan, Blake Shelton, Keith Urban, Jason Aldean, Miranda Lambert. Lady Lamb the Beekeeper, Xenia

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Garfield Artworks

Norman Nardini. Moondog’s Mutts, Ray Lanich Band.

Middle Class Rut, Chux Beta, Coastal Remedy. Altar Bar El Ten Eleven, Michna. Club Café Tim McGraw, Brantley Gilbert, Love and Theft. First Niagara Pavilion n Wreck Loose, Welch and Penn, Derek Krystek. Garfield Artworks Bottom Shelf Blues Band. Hard Rock ock Café Bill Toms. Moondog’s Ghost B.C., Ides of Gemini.

A Guy Named Guy. 222 Ormsby Whiskey Daredevils, 4 Dollar Mistake, The Lobot-o-mites. 31st Street Pub Marshall Tucker Band, Slant 6, Westward Hollow. Altar Bar Lisa Ferraro, Erika Luckett. Club Café

8

Rubinos, Midge Crickett.

Slingshot Dakota, Waypoint, Free Throw, Crash City. 222 Ormsby Cartel, State Champs, The Composure, Paper States, The Color Code. Altar Bar Chuck Prophet and the Mission Express. Club Café Simon & Garfunkel Retrospective.

Thiings to do! Things to eat!

Mr. Small’s Theatre

Thunderbird Café


MAY 19

Andrew W.K., Sneaky Mike. Altar Bar Grant Lee Phillips. Club Café Styx, REO Speedwagon, Ted Nugent. First Niagara Pavilion Heartless, Vitamin X, Dead in the Dirt, Illegals, Hounds of Hate. The Mr. Roboto Project Juicy J. Stage AE ◆

MAY 20

Red, We As Human, Southbound Fearing, Chaos Killed. Altar Bar Josh Ritter, Bill Deasy. Byham Theater ◆

MAY 21

Daylight, Xerxes, Pity Sex, Foreign Tongues, Run, Forever. 222 Ormsby Pete Wentz (DJ set), Keebs, DJ Bamboo. Altar Bar

Futurebirds, Coronado. Brillobox Tim Ruff, Joy Ike, Zach Rock. Club Café Cheap Girls, Diamond Youth, I Am a Sea Creature. Smiling Moose Fall Out Boy. Stage AE ◆

MAY 22

Crown the Empire, Capture the Crown, Palisades, Heartist, Famous Last Words, Forever in Fear. Altar Bar

Laura Stevenson, Field Mouse, Homeless Gospel Choir. Club Café Fierce Bad Rabbit. Hard Rock Café Matt Pryor, James Dewees, Into It. Over It., Blue of Colors. Smiling Moose ◆

MAY 23

Porno Tongue, The Murder Junkies. 31st Street Pub

Tigers Jaw, Pianos Become the Teeth, Sainthood Reps, Allison Weiss. Altar Bar Anne Feeney. Club Café Moira Scar, Animal Lover, Satyr/Elfheim.

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The Mr. Roboto Project

Scott Ainslie. The Roots Cellar Cabinet. Thunderbird Café ◆

MAY 24

Prawn, Have Mercy!, I Kill Giants, Old Grey. 222 Ormsby Solarburn, Pipewrench, Embers to Ashes. 31st Street Pub Le Shook, OGWS. Altar Bar The Mr. Chris Combo, Motometer.

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Club Café

JEFF the Brotherhood, Hunters. Brillobox Foreigner, Silent Partner. Carnegie Library Music Hall

John Brown’s Body, Moon Hooch.

Rex Theater CONTINUES ON PG. 10

MUSIC VENUES 31st Street Pub. 3101 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-391-8334

222 Ormsby. 222 Ormsby St., Mount Oliver. 222Ormsby.tumblr.com 6119. 6119 Penn Ave., East Liberty. www.facebook.com/6119Penn Altar Bar. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-206-9719 Andy Warhol Museum. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. 412-237-8300 Belvedere’s. 4016 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555 Benedum Center. 803 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-456-6666 Brillobox. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 421-621-4900 Byham Theater. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-456-6666

Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead. 510 E. 10th St., Munhall. 412-368-5225

Club Café. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. 412-431-4950

Club Zoo. 1630 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-201-1100

Consol Energy Center. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. 412-642-1800 First Niagara Pavilion. 665 Rt. 18, Burgettstown. 724-947-7400

The Frick Art & Historical Center. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze.

412-371-0600

Garfield Artworks. 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-361-2262

Hard Rock Café. 230 W. Station Square Drive, South Side. 412-481-7625 Hartwood Acres. 200 Hartwood Acres, Indiana Township. 412-351-2528 Heinz Field. 100 Art Rooney Ave., North Side. 412-322-9662 Heinz Hall. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-392-4900

Highland Park. Highland Park. 412-255-8975 Howlers. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-0320 Jergel’s Rhythm Grille. 103 Slade Lane, Warrendale. 724-799-8333 Meadows Racetrack and Casino. 210 Racetrack Road, Washington. 724-503-1200 Mellon Square. Smithfield Street at Sixth Avenue, Downtown. Moondog’s. 378 Freeport Road, Blawnox. 412-828-2040 Mr. Roboto Project. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject.org Mr. Small’s Theatre. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. 412-821-4447 Palace Theater. 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg. 724-836-8000 Peoples Natural Gas Park. 90 Johns St., Johnstown. 888-222-1889 Rex Theater. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-6811 Riverview Park. Perry North. 412-255-2539 The Roots Cellar. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave. Shadyside. 412-361-1915 Schenley Plaza. Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-255-8975 The Shop. 4314 Main St., Bloomfield. 412-951-0622 Smiling Moose. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-4668 South Park. South Park. 412-835-4810 Stage AE. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. 412-229-5483 St. Clair Park. 135 N. Maple Ave., Greensburg. 724-838-4323 Three Rivers Arts Festival. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-471-6070 Thunderbird Café. 4033 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177

JULY

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CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

9


SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 09

Passengers, Distances, Blood Red, Osho.

The Mr. Roboto Project Reason and EOS, Pav Medicinal, Billy Pilgrim, Creative Chemistry, Tracksploitation. Smiling Moose ◆

MAY 25

Mr. Small’s Theatre

The Highballers, Bessemer.

31st Street Pub

Club Café (late)

The Bloody Beetroots. Mr. Small’s Theatre The Beauregards, The Neffs, City Steps, Roller Girl. The Smiling Moose

MAY 26

Enta, Strangers Now, Placeholder, Ink and Swet. 222 Ormsby Weekend Nachos, Like Rats, Pray for Teeth, Purge. The Mr. Roboto Project Dead Confederate, Roadkill Ghost Choir. Thunderbird Café ◆

MAY 27

The Mr. Roboto Project ◆

MAY 28

Project Pitchfork, Ayrias. 31st Street Pub OOOOO, Son of David, Cutups. 6119 The Dandy Warhols, The Shivas. Mr. Small’s Theatre

Voices and Vessels, Us, Ghosts, The Apprehended. The Mr. Roboto Project Marina and the Diamonds, Charli XCX. Stage AE

Altar Bar

MAY 29

Oklahoma Car Crash, Grass Is Green, Unraveler. 222 Ormsby Adelaide in Autumn, Steve Hawk, Shawn Mehaffey. Hard Rock Café Attack Attack!, The Plot in You, Get Scared, Dangerkids, Closer to Closure. Mr. Small’s Theatre

Jon Wayne & The Pain. Thunderbird Café ◆

MAY 30

The Living Deads. 31st Street Pub Guster, Jukebox the Ghost. Carnegie Library Music Hall Peter Case, The Damaged Pies. Club Café

Concert Picnic Tips Summer is the season to wrest free of the tyranny of bar concerts and enjoy a picnic dinner at a concert in the park. But … what to pack? Here are a few ideas to help make your lawn snacks memorable.

+ +

First things first: Prodigious numbers of blankets are advised. The more layers you can put between your food and hungry ants, the better.

Pack light, and pack stuff that won’t need any further prep work or utensils once you get to the show. Tea sandwiches are great. A caprese salad — stacked tomato slices, mozzarella and basil, with perhaps with a drizzle of balsamic reduction — is the definition of summer finger food. Cut your bread and cheese beforehand, so you don’t miss the opening act while trying to saw sourdough with a plastic knife.

+

Most amphitheater areas are, by their nature, not on level ground. Consider bringing cups with lids on them to hold your drinks; you might look like a toddler with a sippy cup, but you won’t be going back to the pitcher every two minutes for refills because your cup fell over again.

+

JUNE 06

The Hush Sound, Hockey, River City Extension, Genevieve, Lucas Carpenter.

Melvins, May 27

Melvins. Mr. Small’s Theatre Citycop, Harvey Pekar, Worn Colors.

JUNE 05

The Bronx. 6119 Ariel Pink, Purple Pilgrims. Altar Bar Metric. Mr. Small’s Theatre {PHOTO COURTESY OF JESSI ROSE}

The 58’s present B. White performing The Anomaly. Altar Bar Kinetic. Club Café (early) Paul Benson, Ayesha Scott, Mod Social, Hounds of Jezebel feat. John Curry.

JUNE 04

The Dirty River Boys, Nameless in August. Club Café Frank Turner & the Sleeping Souls, The Architects, Beans on Toast.

Speaking of drinks … alcohol iss prohibited at most park concerts, and we certainly wouldn’t advise skirting the law. Butt if you choose to, maybe pick a discreet beverage, verage, like wine in a Tetra-Pak container. Bandit andit wines get the job done, and basically y look like big juice boxes. Just behave yourself, self, and don’t let the kids get into it.

Brian Davis, East Coast Turnaround, The James Everett Band. Hard Rock Café Anti-Flag, The Swellers, Hostage Calm, World’s Scariest Police Chases. Mr. Small’s Theatre Lighthouses, Homies, Sprrws. The Mr. Roboto Project ◆

MAY 31

Paul Kelly, Dan Kelly. Club Café (early) School of Athens, Atlas, Lowly, The Tree Ghost. Club Café (late) Dave Matthews Band. First Niagara Pavilion

Commander Cody. Moondog’s Anti-Flag, Lemuria, Code Orange Kids, Worship This. Mr. Small’s Theatre

The Uncluded (Aesop Rock and Kimya Dawson). Andy Warhol Museum Verity’s Lie, Act of Pardon. Club Café We Were Promised Jetpacks, The Beauregards. Hard Rock Café The Outlaws. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille The Flatliners, The Holy Mess, August Ruins. Smiling Moose Passion Pit, Cults. Stage AE The Mantras. Thunderbird Café

JUNE 07

Grand Piano, Barons, World’s Scariest Police Chases. 222 Ormsby Hands, Delicious Pastries, Neighbours. 6119 California Guitar Trio. Club Café (early) Charlie Mars. Club Café (late) Pittsburgh Opera Resident Artists. Frick Lotus. Mr. Small’s Theatre Filligar, The 4onthefloor, June 4 Josie McQueen.

National Frozen Yogurt Day

Smiling Moose We Three, Vito Disalvo, Giorgia Fumanti. South Park Flag. Stage AE

Lauren Mann and the Fairly Odd Folk.

The Smiling Moose Pittsburgh CLO. South Park Wild Belle. Thunderbird Café ◆

JUNE 01

Derketa, Liquified Guts, Vermithrax. 31st Street Pub

Johnny Miller and the Back Slidin’ Fools, Frank Vieira. Altar Bar Ben Valasek and the Growlers, Mark Dignam. Club Café (early) Demos Papadimas and His Band, The Womack Family Band. Club Café (late) Brad Paisley, Chris Young, Lee Brice. First Niagara Pavilion

Weird Paul Rock Band, Grand Piano, Hard Money. Howlers “Weird Al” Yankovic. Meadows Racetrack and Casino

Bloc Party, Bear Mountain. Mr. Small’s Theatre Jazzam. Thunderbird Café ◆

JUNE 02

Pitbull, Ke$ha. First Niagara Pavilion The Starting Line, Punchline, Paper States. Mr. Small’s Theatre ◆

JUNE 03

Texas in July, Tuesdays Too Late, Arcane Have, Let the River Swell. Altar Bar Motive. Smiling Moose Kendrick Lamar, Schoolboy Q, AB-Soul, Jay Rock. Stage AE

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros. Three Rivers Arts Festival ◆

JUNE 07-09

Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival feat. Chaka Khan, Sean Jones, Allison Miller, Rudresh Mahanthappa, Cecil Brooks III, more. Cultural District, Downtown ◆

JUNE 08

Hot Mass Afterhours. 1139 Penn Ave., Downtown

Merchandise, Milk Music, Destruction Unit. 6119 Humanaut’s Out of Order feat. More or Less Record Label Night. Belvedere’s Doug Khorey and His Band of Broken Hearts. Club Café (early) Gene the Werewolf. Club Café (late) Sean Carney, Jimmy Adler. Moondog’s Charles Wallace Band. Riverview Park Nevada Color, Patrick Joseph, Coastal Remedy, Revolution Radio. Smiling Moose Cold War Kids. Stage AE Ralph Stanley. Three Rivers Arts Festival ◆

JUNE 09

Close Talker, Family Cat, Brett Shumaker. 222 Ormsby NoMaD, Junior Guthrie. Club Café Bob Mould. Hartwood Acres The Lampshades, City Steps, Morningbells. Howlers CONTINUES ON PG. 12

10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


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CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

11


SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

GALLERY CRAWL in the Cultural District Friday, July 12

A PRODUCTION OF

Orgone, Ruby Velle & The Soulphonics. Rex Theater

Silversun Pickups, Foals, Surfer Blood, Blondfire. Stage AE Cello Fury, Joy Ike, Scott Blasey. Three Rivers Arts Festival ◆

JUNE 10

Death Grips, Ratking. Altar Bar Alt-J, Guards. Mr. Small’s Theatre Local Natives. Stage AE Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Three Rivers Arts Festival ◆

JUNE 11

JUNE 15

Genghis Khan, Skell, Deflowered. 31st Street Pub

Face to Face, Swingin’ Utters, Teenage Bottlerocket, Blacklist Royals, The Goddamn Gallows, Joshua Black Wilkins. Altar Bar Toby Keith, Kip Moore. First

Niagara Pavilion

Adam Lambert. Pride in the Street, Penn Avenue, Downtown

Mark Lucas. Riverview Park Peter Frampton, Robert Cray. Stage AE

Drowning Pool, Eye Empire, Even the Dead Love a Parade, Exalia, Long Time Divided, Descendsion.

The Airborne Toxic Event. Three Rivers Arts Festival

Fletcher’s Grove. Thunderbird Café

Altar Bar

The Mountain Goats, The Baptist Generals. Carnegie Library Music Hall Josh Krajcik. Club Café

New Kids on the Block, Boyz II Men, 98 Degrees. Consol Energy Center

Ben Kenney (of Incubus), The Wise, These Three Words.

Hartwood Acres Japandroids. Mr. Small’s Theatre

Hard Rock Café

The National, Dirty Projectors. Stage AE Grupo Fantasma. Three Rivers Arts Festival ◆

JUNE 12

Joy Ike, May 21, June 09 and July 28

Dangermuffin. Club Café Leon Russell. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Spitalfield, Shane Henderson & The Future Perfect, Jon Walker. Smiling Moose

Of Monsters and Men, Half Moon Run. Stage AE Glen Hansard. Three Rivers Arts Festival ◆

JUNE 13

Mount Moriah, Jesse Sykes. Club Café Lucius. Three Rivers Arts Festival Ultraviolet Hippopotamus. Thunderbird Café ◆

JUNE 14

T. Mills, Choo Jacksoon oon, Ze Martinezz, The New Era. Altar Bar ar Scott Reynolds, Luca a Brazi, The Sparrows. Club Café (early)

Kevin Finn, Samantha McDonough, The Turpentiners. Club Café (late) Baroness, Coliseum. Mr. Small’s Theatre

Smiling Moose

JUNE 17

The Boxer Rebellion, Fossil Collective. Mr. Small’s Theatre ◆

JUNE 18

Class Picture, Arrows in Her. 222 Ormsby Low, Mike Doughty. Altar Bar The Guggenheim Grotto. Club Café Dawes, Shovels & Rope. Mr. Small’s Theatre Aoife O’Donovan. Rex Theater Owen, Slingshot Dakota, Brightside. Smiling Moose Brandi Carlile. Stage AE ◆

JUNE 19

Cute Is W What We Aim Forr, The D Dangerous Summer. Altar Bar The Teno Tenors. Byham Theatre Ben Shan Shannon, Barnaby Bright. C Club Café JC Brooks & The Uptown Sound. Sm Smiling Moose Full of H Hell, Seven Sisters of Sleep, Pray for Teeth, Purge, Meth Quarry. The Mr. Roboto Project Rob Everclear, Live, Filter, Evercl Sponge. Stage AE Spong Spritual Rez. Spritu Thunderbird Café Thunde

Natural Gas Park

Swans, Michael Tamburo mburo. Rex Theater

Tommy Castro and the Painkillers.

Sonny & The Sunsets, Little Wings, Jonathan Warner, Wayne Beck.

The Blind Boys of Alabama. Three Rivers Arts Festival

10,000 Maniacs. People’s ple’s

South Park

JUNE 16

Night Beds, Jenny O. Brillobox Charles Rocha, Gypsy (of Gypsy and His Band of Ghosts), John Robinson, Chris Hannigan Trio. Club Café The Vogues.

JUNE 20

Rosco Bandana. St. Clair Park Red Baraat. Three Rivers vers Arts Festival Big Mean Sound Machine achine.

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, The Heartbrea Smithereens. Consol Smitheree

Thunderbird Café

Center Energy Cen CONTINUES ON PG. 14

12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


music + art Ten days of free

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros

Hugh Hayden

Glen Hansard s Ralph Stanley

Vanessa German Yvette Mattern &

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

The Blind Boys of Alabama Red Baraat s Grupo Fantasma

Chang-Jin Lee Lightwave International Susan Goethel Campbell

The Airborne Toxic Event s Lucius

Artist Market 300+ artistisans

Cello Fury with Scott Blasey & Joy Ike

Juried Visual Art Exhibition

June 7-16, 2013 | 3riversartsfest.org CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

13


SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

Second Empire. Mellon Square Jonathan Richman. Mr. Small’s Theatre ◆

JUNE 20-23

Lyndsey Smith and Soul Distribution. Mellon Square

Molly Hatchet, Eric Lindell & the Sunliners with Anson Funderburgh, Joe Grushecky & the Houserockers, John Howie & the Rosewood Bluff, Jimmy Adler, Norman Nardini, more. Thunder in the Valley, Johnstown ◆

JUNE 21

Dikembe, Signals Midwest. 222 Ormsby Cold Cave, The Garment District. 6119 Nektar, Martin Turner’s Wishbone ASH, The Blue Devils. Altar Bar Billy Price Band.

Laughing Eye Weeping Eye, Great Blue Heron, Hunted Creatures. The Shop ◆

JUNE 28

The Long Knives, Atlas, Scattergun, Chux Beta. 31st Street Pub Cosmin TRG. 6119 WYEP Summer Music Festival feat. Anders Osborne, Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit, Jesse Dee, Neighbours. Schenley Plaza

PigPen Theatre Co., The End of America, Southside American. Smiling Moose

Monty Alexander.

South Park Amphitheater

Club Café

Walter Trout.

David Bach Consort.

Moondog’s Son Volt. Mr. Small’s Theatre

St. Clair Park ◆

Morning Teleportation, The Brushfire, J L T. Smiling Moose Marrakesh Express. St. Clair Park

The Wailers. South Park

Greg Allman, July 02

Randall Baumann. Thunderbird Café ◆

JUNE 22

David Wilcox. Club Café (early) The Wheals. Club Café (late) The Chain, The Sidewinder Band. Hard Rock Café

Kenny Chesney. Heinz Field Why?, Sarah Jaffe. Mr. Small’s Theatre Colter Harper. Riverview Park

Mr. Small’s Theatre Alice Cooper,

Marilyn Manson. Stage AE ◆

JUNE 24

Taproot, Patron Saint, Definitive Strike, Salvasin. Hard Rock Café Brightside, Dad Punchers, Gatherer, Whooves, Killing Thing. The Mr. Roboto Project ◆

JUNE 25

Lipstick Homicide, The New Lows, Brett Shumaker. 222 Ormsby Two Gallants, Broncho. Brillobox Bushwalla, Jesse Ruben. Club Café Yeasayer. Mr. Small’s Theatre Say Anything, Eisley, HRVRD, I The Mighty. Stage AE ◆

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

First Niagara Pavilion The O’Jays, Gladys Knight. Meadows Racetrack and Casino Roger Humphries. Riverview Park Disobey. Smiling Moose ◆

JUNE 30

Jimmy Eat World. Club Zoo David Byrne & St. Vincent. Palace Theatre

June 10

The Front Bottoms, A Great Big Pile of Leaves, The Artless. Smiling Moose

National Ice Tea Day

JULY 01

Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers, Edie Brickell. Heinz Hall ◆

JULY 02

Greg Allman, Joe Grushecky. Byham Theater

Bruno Mars. Consol Energy Center ◆

JULY 03

Nude Beach. Club Café Smiling Moose 10th Anniversary Party. Smiling Moose ◆

JULY 04

The Copyrights, Maxx Gregg. 222 Ormsby ◆

JULY 05

Robert Michaels. Frick Brother Josephus & The Love Revolution. St. Clair Park

JUNE 27

Deutschtown Music Festival. Many local

Os Mutantes, Capsula. Club Café

14

Club Café

Matchbox Twenty, The Goo Goo Dolls.

JUNE 26

Eleanor Friedberger, Teen. Brillobox Dirty Dozen Brass Band. Rex Theater Social Distortion. Stage AE ◆

Altar Bar

Brooke Annibale, Sam Brenner.

JUNE 23

ZZ Ward. Altar Bar Chicago. Heinz Hall Rogue Wave, Caveman.

JUNE 29

Bunny Five Coat, The Redlines, Channel Scorpion News. 31st Street Pub Afterthefall, Fist Fight in the Parking Lot, Skell, Zilch, Zion Cross.

JULY 06

bands, various North Side venues. North Side


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JULY 07

The Maine, A Rocket to the Moon, This Century, Brighten. Altar Bar Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Hartwood Acres A Silent Film. St. Clair Park ◆

JULY 08

One Direction. Consol Energy Center Fitz & The Tantrums, Saints of Valory, Ivy Levan. Mr. Small’s Theatre ◆

The Whiskey Rebellion, Until We Have Faces. 31st Street Pub El-P, Killer Mike, Kool A.D., Despot.

Altar Bar

JULY 10 JULY 11

The Black Lillies. Club Café Joe Robinson, The James Williamann Situation, Nickymo & The Mamalukes. Hard Rock Café

Ben Shannon. Mellon Square O.A.R. Stage AE

JULY 12

Shear Shazar, Jacob Klein. Club Café

Heal t

Downtown

Bethesda. Club Café (late) Cody Simpson, Ryan Beatty.

Smiling Moose

JULY 13

JULY 09

Phone Calls From Home, Rain Audio. ◆

Hot Mass Afterhours. 1139 Penn Ave.,

Humanaut’s Out of Order feat. Will Azada. Belvedere’s Mary Fahl (of October Project).

Vienna Teng. Club Café ◆

First Niagara Pavilion

David Cassidy. South Park Mac Miller, Chance the Rapper, Vince Staples, The Internet. Stage AE Sweetback Sisters. St. Clair Park Ekoostik Hookah. Thunderbird Café

ets

South Park

Rob Zombie, Mastodon, Five Finger Death Punch, Amon Amarth.

ucts for He od al r P

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Jill Sobule, Julia Sweeney. Club Café Taylor Swift. Heinz Field Eric Johnson. Riverview Park Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

hy

The Uncluded, June 06

Club Café (early)

Carnegie Library Music Hall Jeff Grubbs. Riverview Park Belle and Sebastian, Yo La Tengo. Stage AE ◆

JULY 14

Big Time Rush, Victoria Justice. First Niagara Pavilion

Great Big Sea. Hartwood Acres Park Amphitheater ◆

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Toro y Moi, Toxie. Mr. Small’s Theatre

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CONTINUES ON PG. 16

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

15


SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 15

STEVEN BY STEVE MADDEN

JULY 16

Spanky Wilson. Riverview Park

Boz Scaggs. Carnegie Library Music Hall Lil Wayne, T.I., Future. First Niagara Pavilion Matt Schofield, The Derek Woodz Band. Hard Rock Café Pity Sex, The World Is a Beautiful Place and I Am No Longer Afraid to Die, Dads, Brightside, Adventures.

JULY 21

Heart, Jason Bonham. First Niagara Pavilion Pittsburgh Blues Festival. Hartwood Acres Park Amphitheater ◆

Energy Center ◆

The Mr. Roboto Project

222 Ormsby

Mr. Small’s Theatre

Bob Schneider, Wheeler Brothers.

JULY 17

Vans Warped Tour.

Club Café

The Draft. Smiling

First Niagara Pavilion ◆

Moose

JULY 18

Smash Mouth, Sugar Ray, Gin Blossoms.

Samantha Crain. Club Café

Jimmy Buffett. First

Stage AE

Niagara Pavilion Mark Ferarri. Mellon Square fun., Tegan and Sara. Stage AE

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JULY 25

Random Play. Mellon Square

Shade, The Red Western, Claire With the Turban. Mr.

JULY 19

Lynyrd Skynyrd, Bad Company. First Niagara Pavilion Pittsburgh Blues Festival.Hartwood Acres The Stickers. South Park Jesse Dee. St. Clair Park ◆

JULY 24

Masked Intruder, WSPC, Elway, Sam Russo.

Baauer & RL Grime, Shlohmo, Ryan Hemsworth. ◆

JULY 23

The Eagles. Consol

JULY 20

Zac Brown Band. First Niagara Pavilion Mother Cool. Hard Rock Café Pittsburgh Blues Festival. Hartwood Acres Park Amphitheater

Small’s Theatre ◆

JULY 26

Sixpence None the Richer. South Park Guggenheim Grotto. St. Clair Park Adam’s Ale. Thunderbird Café ◆

JULY 27

Tim Barry, Cory Branan, Des Ark. 31st Street Pub

Thao & The Get Down Stay Down. Mr. Small’s Theatre CONTINUES ON PG. 18

Farmers Markets Besides fruits and veggies, shoppers can also pick up baked goods, cheeses, meat and assorted victuals such as jams and salsas. Five of the city-run farmers’ markets are already open, and two more unfurl their canopies in June. All markets are 3:30-7 p.m., except the City-County Building. Beyond the city, there are dozens of other markets and farm stands, so enjoy the bounty.

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MONDAY: East Liberty, Penn Circle West TUESDAY: South Side, 18th and Sidney streets WEDNESDAY: Carrick (opens June 19), Carrick Shopping Center, Brownsville Road and Parkfield Street

THURSDAY: Bloomfield, St. Maria Goretti oretti School parking lot, Cedarville Street and Friendship Avenue venue Beechview (opens June 27), St. Catherine ine of Siena parking lot, Broadway Avenue e and Belasco Street

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CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

17


SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 16

Chelsea Baratz. Riverview Park Funktapuss. Thunderbird Café ◆

Joe Negri. Highland Park ◆

JULY 28

Joy Ike, Johnny Miller. Hartwood Acres Park

AUG. 15

Hugo Down. Mellon Square ◆

Amphitheater ◆

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Andy Warhol Museum Jason Aldean, Jake Owen, Thomas Rhett. First Niagara Pavilion James Hunter. South Park Amphitheater Lake Street Dive. St. Clair Park

Father John Misty, Night Moves. Mr. Small’s Theatre ◆

AUG. 01

Mia Z. Mellon Square ◆

AUG. 02

Justin Hayward (of The Moody Blues).

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Marty Ashby Quartet. Riverview Park ◆

AUG. 02-04

Glen Hansard, June 12

Mellon Square

AUG. 23

Amphitheater

Adam Ant & The Good, The Mad, & The Lovely Posse. Stage AE

AUG. 03

AUG. 24

Wiz Khalifa, A$AP Rocky.

Salsamba. Riverview Park

First Niagara Pavilion Ronnie Dunn. Meadows Racetrack and Casino Kevin Howard. Riverview Park

AUG. 25

John Mayer, Phillip Phillips. First Niagara Pavilion

AUG. 04

Rickie Lee Jones. Hartwood Acres Michele Bensen. Highland Park

Yes. Carnegie Library Music Hall The Yellowjackets. Hartwood Acres

Park Amphitheater Kenia. Highland Park ◆

AUG. 06

Maroon 5, Kelly Clarkson, Rozzi Crane. First Niagara Pavilion ◆

AUG. 07

The Black Crowes, Tedeschi Trucks Band, The London Souls. Stage AE ◆ ◆

June 14

National Strawberry Shortcake Day

AUG. 09 AUG. 10

AUG. 30

Fungus, The Elliots. Altar Bar

Rusted Root, Joel Plaskett. Hartwood Acres JD Eicher, Caleb Lovely, Danielle Barbe. South Park Yarn. St. Clair Park ◆

AUG. 08

Los Amigos Invisibles. South Park The Black Lillies. St. Clair Park Mike Dillon Band. Thunderbird Café ◆

AUG. 29

Highway 4. Mellon Square

The East Enders. Mellon Square

AUG. 31

Kenny Blake. Riverview Park ◆

SEPT. 04

Zappa Plays Zappa. Carnegie Library Music Hall

The Dreaming, Definitive Strike, Winter’s Descent. Hard Rock Café ◆

SEPT. 06

Rock All Night Tour Lawrenceville.

Rascal Flatts, The Band Perry.

Many local bands. Various venues, Butler Street, Lawrenceville Hot Mass Afterhours. 1139 Penn Ave., Downtown Humanaut’s Out of Order feat. Mike Servito and Jason Cuban. Belvedere’s Elevations. Riverview Park

First Niagara Pavilion Axiom Brass. Frick Darius Rucker. Stage AE

AUG. 11

Galactic. Hartwood Acres PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

AUG. 22

The Williams Band.

Duquesne Tamburitzans. South Park

Peoples Natural Gas Park

18

AUG. 18

Tony Lucca, Honor by August. Club Café Flexure. Highland Park

Flood City Music Festival feat. Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, Robert Randolph & the Family Band, Greensky Bluegrass, Rubblebucket, Bonerama, more. ◆

AUG. 17

Kansas.

Carnegie Library Music Hall Blake Shelton, Easton Corbin, Jana Kramer. First Niagara Pavilion Matrimony. Frick The Weeks, William Forrest. Smiling Moose Snarky Puppy. St. Clair Park ◆

AUG. 16

Psychic TV/PTV3.

SEPT. 07

Kid Rock, ZZ Top, Uncle Kracker. First Niagara Pavilion ◆

SEPT. 08

Muse. Consol Energy Center


Rolling in on June 15!

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF CITIPARKS}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

NOW THROUGH OCTOBER

NUMBERS RULE this season at the megaplex: Quite a few releases have a 2 or 3 — even a 6! — appended to their titles. Add in unnumbered sequels, plus remakes and spins-offs, and it’s a recycleheavy summer! The action is non-stop this summer. In assorted crime-fighting, we have terrorists attacking the White House (second time this year!) and facing off against one badass cop (Channing Tatum); White House Down opens June 28. In The Lone Ranger (July 3), Armie Hammer plays the masked avenger, with Johnny Depp mugging it up as his sidekick, Tonto. On July 19, the retired spies are back on the job, in Red 2, looking for a loose nuke; on the same day look for R.I.P.D., an action-comedy about undead cops, the Rest in Peace Department. More mismatched buddy cops: Melissa McCarthy and Sandra Bullock star in The Heat (June 28), and Mark Wahlberg and Denzel Washington pair up to o fight crime in 2 Guns (Aug. 2). Superheroes never get a vacation because the villains ains never stop messing g stuff up: Man of Steel, a.k.a. Superman, a.k.a. Clark Kent, flies again on June 14; Marvel’s hairy dude with the killer fingernails gets his spotlight in The Wolverine (July 26); ); and the teen superheroes eroes are back in Kick-Ass 2 (Aug. 16).

Cinema in the Park

{BY AL HOFF}

On the crime side: The car-boosting gang is reunited for one last job (we hope) in Fast and Furious 6 (May 24), and Now You See Me, a caper pitting the FBI against illusionists against corrupt CEOs, opens May 31. The real-life tale of celebrities who

R.I.P.D.

get robbed by teens, The Bling Ring, starring Emma Watson, opens June 28; and corporate espionage is the focus of Paranoia (Aug. 16). Battling weirder stuff: It’s Brad Bat vs. a whole planet of zomPitt v bies in World War Z (June 21). Then, Then giant undersea robots! Pacific Ring opens July 12. And it’s another chapter for the it demi-god in Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters (Aug. 7) For action from the past, see the he-men of Greece battle Persians in 300: Rise of an Empire (Aug. 2). 30 And in the future: Will and Jaden Smith struggle with the


post-apocalypse in After Earth (May 31), and it’s haves vs. have-nots in the year 2154 in Elysium (Aug. 9). If you’re looking for frights: Lena Hedley stars in The Purge (June 7), a horror thriller about when murder becomes legal. Or, visit a haunted farm in The Conjuring (July 19). The comic pain just keeps on throbbing: The Hangover Part III opens May 23. In The Internship (June 7), a comedy that might just be a Google ad, Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson get hired at the searchengine HQ. In the meta-comedy This Is the End, all your faves from R-rated comedies (Seth Rogen, James Franco and Jonah Hill, Monsters University among others) play themselves during an apocalypse; it opens June 12. Not sure who painting to electric signs and food design) asked for another chapter of this not-fun- in conjunction with the Three Rivers Arts Festival. Also booked for Filmmakers: ny Adam-Sandler-and-friends romp, but Noah Baumbach’s comedy FranGrown Ups 2 hits screens July 12. ces Ha (June 7) and the crime For kids, it’s all animated drama A New York Heartbeat this season: New on May 24 June 18 (July 5). is Epic, an adaptation of The The warmer weather Leaf Men book, and Turbo means area drive-ins are (July 17), about a snail. But open, and Pittsburghers it’s mostly another round can also walk to several of favorites: From Pixar, it’s city parks for outdoor films: Monsters University (June The Cinema in the Park se21); more adorable minions, ries returns on June 8, with reminions, minions in Despicacent and classic family faves includble Me 2 (July 3); and the return of the cheery blue creatures The Smurfs 2 ing Jack the Giant Slayer and Jumanji. The annual Moonlit Matinee series of classic (July 31). In early June, Pittsburgh Filmmakers films from the 1970s and ’80s — from The will host a series of eight free art-related Goonies to The Warriors — at the Oaks documentaries (subjects range from cave Theater in Oakmont begins May 24.

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Summer ARTS

SUMMER AT SOERGEL ORCHARDS EXPERIENCE A FAMILY TRADITION

CURRENT

3rd Street Gallery. Waterworks (Pittsburgh Watercolor Society membership show), through May 25. 707 Penn Gallery. Adult Arcade (immersive multimedia installation by Marc Burgess), through May 17. 709 Penn Gallery. Cast of Characters (international group show for character-driven work), through May 17. 943 Liberty Avenue. Path: Installation by Elin Hansdottir (maze-like installation), ongoing. American Jewish Museum. A Stitch in ive Textiless (group Jewish Time: Provocative om the U.S. and exhibition of artists from abroad), through July 28.

The Andy Warhol Museum. I Just Wantt to

Corn Roasts, pony-ride birthday parties, farm petting zoo, Beer Tastings, Amish-made donuts and more great food and events all summer long!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Watch (Warhol’s film, TV and video work), ongoing. Artists Image Resource ource. ART: Printmaking (National Society of urgh Arts and Letters Pittsburgh gh May 20. chapter show), through

Associated Artists of Butler County.

ugh Spring Art Show, through June 21. Assemble Artspace e. See for Yourself (projects and robots botics, by the Community Robotics, ology Education and Technology Empowerment Lab), through May 31.

The Way and The Wayfarers (paintings by Joshua Hogan) at Box Heart Gallery, June 25-July 20

August Wilson Center. SOLO Exhibits (fiber art, printmaking, painting and sculpture by Leslie Ansley, Jo-Anne Bates and Tina Brewer), through June 29. be Galleries. Vivian Fliegel — The Latest Works, through June 22. Boulevard Gallery. Travels Behind the Lens (photographer Mary Beth Kratsas and mixed-media artist Aldrich Jenkins), through May 25. Box Heart Gallery. Urban Blues (paintings by Richard Pian), through May 25. Brew House Space 101. Botanizing the Asphaltt (work by Edith Abeyta), through June 17 17. Carnegie Mus Museum of Art. 20/20: Celebrating Two Decades of the Heinz Architectur Architectural Center, through May 19. Associated Artists of Pittsbu Pittsburgh 102nd Annual Exhib Exhibition, through June 23. “Japan is the … Collecting Prints Key …”: I and Ivories, 1900-1920, throug July 21. Teenie through Ph Harris Photographs: Focus r o on Hair, ongoing. Plus permanent exhibits. Carnegie Museum of Natural History His . BugWorks

(photography, specimens and thro live bugs), through July 28. Ligh Works by Paul Garden of Light: y (natu Crevoshay (nature-inspired jewelry), throug through Aug. 11.


ARTS + EXHIBITS VENUES 3rd Street Gallery. Carnegie, 412-276-5233.

707 Penn Gallery. Downtown, 412-325-7017.

Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation. Oakland, 412-268-2434. International Images. Sewickley, 412-741-3036.

412-281-8723.

American Jewish Museum.

Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Bloomfield, 412-924-0634. Mattress Factory. North Side,

Squirrel Hill, 412-521-8010.

412-231-3169.

709 Penn Gallery. Downtown,

North Side, 412-237-8300.

Artists Image Resource. North Side,

Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village. Avella, Pa., 587-3412. Miller Gallery. Carnegie Mellon campus,

412-321-8664.

Oakland, 412-268-3618.

www.assemblepgh.org.

Garfield, 412-362-0274.

Butler, 724-283-6922.

Shadyside, 412-441-5200.

The Andy Warhol Museum.

Assemble Artspace. Garfield, Associated Artists of Butler County. August Wilson Center for African American Culture. Downtown,

ModernFormations Gallery. Morgan Contemporary Glass. North Hills Art Center. Ross Township,

412-364-3622.

412-258-2700.

Photo Antiquities. North Side,

412-687-2606.

Phipps Conservatory. Oakland,

412-721-0943.

Pittsburgh Center for the Arts.

Be Galleries. Lawrenceville, Boulevard Gallery. Verona, Box Heart Gallery. Bloomfield,

412-687-8858.

Brew House Space 101. South Side, 412-381-7767.

Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History. Oakland,

412-231-7881.

412-622-6914.

Shadyside, 412-361-0873.

Pittsburgh Glass Center. Friendship,

412-365-2145.

Point Park University. Downtown,

www.pointpark.edu.

412-622-3131.

Sen. John Heinz Pittsburgh Regional History Center. Strip District,

North Side, 412-237-3400.

Shady Side Academy. Fox Chapel,

Carnegie Science Center. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh.

412-454-6000.

www.shadysideacademy.org.

North Side, 412-322-5058.

Silver Eye Center for Photography.

Squirrel Hill, 412-421-8888. Fe Gallery. Lawrenceville, 412-860-6028. Filmmakers Galleries. North Oakland, 412-681-5449. Fort Pitt Museum. Downtown, 412-281-9284. Frick Art & Historical Center. Point Breeze, 412-371-0600. Future Tenant. Downtown, 412-325-7037. Galerie Werner. Shadyside, 412-716-1390. Gallerie Chiz. Shadyside, 412-441-6005. The Gallery 4. Shadyside, 412-363-5050. Gallery on 43rd Street. Lawrenceville, 412-683-6488. Garfield Artworks. Garfield, 412-361-2262. Gay & Lesbian Community Center. Downtown, 412-422-0114. Greensburg Art Center. Greensburg, 724-837-6791. Hoyt Institute of Fine Arts. New Castle, 724-652-2882.

Society for Contemporary Craft.

Christine Frechard Gallery.

Carnegie Science Center. Highmark Sports Works, Omnimax Theater, Buhl Digital Planetarium, roboworld and other permanent and ongoing exhibits, shows and activities. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. Newly reopened Waterplay exhibit, plus Attic, Backyard, Garden, Fred Rogers & Us and other ongoing exhibits and programs. Christine Frechard Gallery. Connie Cantor (paintings), Jean Gaudaire-Thor (paintings) and Heather Tabacchi (photographs), through June 3.

South Side, 412-431-1810.

Strip District, 412-261-7003.

Society for Contemporary Craft Satellite Gallery. Downtown, 412-261-7003.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Johnstown. 814-269-7234. Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Ligonier Valley. 724-238-6015. Space Gallery. Downtown, 412-325-7723.

Sweetwater Center for the Arts. Sewickley, 412-741-4405.

Three Rivers Arts Festival. Downtown, 412-281-8723. Toonseum. Downtown, 412-232-0199. UnSmoke Systems Artspace. Braddock, www.unsmokeartspace.com.

Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Greensburg,

724-837-1500. WildCard. Lawrenceville, 412-224-2651. Wood Street Galleries. Downtown, 412-471-5605.

Fe Gallery. Alabaster Blast (contemporary fiber-arts group show), through Sat., May 18.

Filmmakers Galleries. E Block (Mark

Perrott’s photos of Western Penitentiary), through June 15. Fort Pitt Museum. Exhibits on colonial history in the region, ongoing. Plus: Summer Saturdays at the Fort (living-history demonstrations on colonial life), June 8, July 4, July 14 and Aug. 10. Frick Art Museum. A Kind of Alchemy: CONTINUES ON PG. 28

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

27


SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

Silver Eye Center for Photography.

Medieval Persian Ceramics (touring exhibit), through June 16. Future Tenant. Live, Waste, Live (window exhibit by Marie Barcic), through May 30. Galerie Werner. RETROFRESH (contemporary realist and abstract paintings by artists including James Kennedy and Claire Hardy), through Sept. 15. Gallerie Chiz. Jeffrey Moyer and Holly Van Dine, through June 1. The Gallery 4. Toys in the Attic (recent works by Alessandra Sulpy), through May 25. The Gallery on 43rd. April in Paris (new photographs by Scott Davidson), through Sat., May 18. Garfield Artworks. Faith in Rituals (themed group show), through May 25. Greensburg Art Center. All Things Bright and Beautiful, through June 21. Hoyt Institute of Fine Arts. Artwear 2013: Melissa Lobaugh, through May 31. 40th Hoyt Regional Juried Exhibition, through June 1.

Continuum: Doug DuBois and Aaron Blum, through June 1. Society for Contemporary Craft. Fiberart International (group show), through Aug. 18.

Society for Contemporary Craft Satellite Gallery. Kevin Turner: New Work (ceramic sculpture), through June 2.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Johnstown. Respect in Retrospect: The Photography of Amelia Patsy (Western Pennsylvania industrial history), through July 6.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Ligonier Valley. Highlights from the

Permanent Collection: Celebration of the Wolf Family Donations (including works by Hart Benton, Calder, Cassatt and Warhol), through Aug. 4. Sweetwater Center for the Arts. Lost & Found: Sustainable High Fashion, through May 31.

Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Aaronel deRoy Gruber: Art(ist) in Motion

Art by Genesis Breyer P-Orridge

Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation. What We Collect: Recent

(sculpture by the late iconic Pittsburgh artist), through June 2. Pop-Up Exhibitions: Amy DiPlacido and Scott Turri, through June 2. WildCard. PGH365: AIGA Pittsburgh’s Annual Design Competition and Exhibition, through June 3. Wood Street Galleries. Memento Mori (kinetic-sculpture-based installations by Gregory Barsamian), through June 16.

Art Acquisitions, 2007-2012 (botanical illustrations from the 19th century to the present), through June 30. International Images. First Annual Student Show (university students), through June 31. Mattress Factory. Screenings (installation of spontaneous film sketches inspired by the museum’s Gestures series), through May 23. Feminist and … (group show), through May 26.

Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village. Exhibits on local prehistoric

societies including a famed archaeological site, plus a 16th-century Indian village and colonial-era village. 15th Annual Atlatl Competition (prehistoric spear-throwing), June 15; Independence Day Celebration, July 4; and Insider Tour of Meadowcroft Rockshelter, July 6, Sept. 14, Oct. 12 and Nov. 9. Miller Gallery. I’m Feeling Lucky (Carnegie Mellon 2013 senior student art exhibition), through May 18.

MAY

707 Penn Gallery. Talus (photographs Genesis Breyer P-Orridge: S/HE IS HERE at The Andy Warhol Museum, June 15-Sept. 15

ModernFormations. “In-Visible”: When Personal Is Political (works by Dafna Rehavia-Hanauer), through May 31.

Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery. teapots! (seventh invitational, featuring 60-plus artists), through June 11.

Outdoor Hideaways Dining out can feel like a mini-vacation, especially if you find yourself enjoying the warm weather at one of these restaurants’ hidden al fresco spots.

Church Brew Works, Lawrenceville: Enjoy a Pious Monk Dunkel in the brewery’s two-level Hop Garden whilst staring aring up at the heavens.

Nicky’s Thai Kitchen, North Side: This cozy row-house restaurant’s outdoor seating is more than just a patio — it’s an exotic garden, filled with plants native to Thailand. nd.

Café du Jour, South Side: The flora and d fauna of the secluded courtyard makes for a peaceful, romantic escape from busy East Carson Street. Tin Front Café, Homestead: The sculpture-filled back patio is the perfect oasis to recharge yourself with vegetarian specialties. Il Pizzaiolo, Mount Lebanon: Enjoy your pizza and vino in a verdant interior courtyard, beneath the shade of an oak tree. ree.

North Hills Art Center. Regional Show (multi-media juried art), through June 14. Panza Gallery. Significant & Sublime: The Critical Role of Art Teachers in Public Education (group show featuring area teachers), through June 1. Phipps Conservatory. Botanicals gardens. Temporary and seasonal exhibits include: Butterfly Forest, through Sept. 2; Summer Flower Show (with glass art), through Oct. 6; and Tropical Forest India, ongoing. Photo Antiquities. The history of photography in images and equipment, plus preservation and educational exhibits, ongoing. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Fiberart International

July

by Lindsay Merrill and Paul Rouphail), May 31-June 30. 709 Penn Gallery. Al Bright: Abstract Jazz Works (paintings), May 31-June 30. August Wilson Center. Call and Response (oil paintings by local artist Marlana Vassar), Fri., May 17-Aug. 31. Box Heart Gallery. Marshes, Mountains, and Fields: Small Landscapes, Big Views (paintings by Crista Pisano), May 28-June 22 (June 1 reception). Carnegie Museum of Art. One and the Same (Susan Philipsz’s sound installation), May 18-July 14. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. Adventures with Clifford the Big Red Dog opens Fri., May 18.

Silver Eye Center for Photography. 8 x 8 Photo

Party (party and sale), Fri., May 17. Space Gallery. On the Glass Surf (multimedia exhibit by Thad Kellstadt), May 17-June 30. Toonseum. Reuben Awards Exhibit (seven decades of the country’s top cartooning honor, in conjunction with the National Cartoonists Society Conference), opens May 23. Unsmoke Systems Artspace. PGH Photo Fair (featuring internationally-known dealers, museum-quality prints and photo-based art), May 18 and 19.

National Hot Dog Month

2013, through Aug. 18. 30:2 (Associated Artists of Pittsburgh exhibit), through Aug. 18. Solo shows by Maggie Mills, Kay Healy and Allison Kaufman, from Philadelphia’s Center for Emerging Visual Artists, through Aug. 18. Pittsburgh Glass Center. Consciousness (flame-worked glass by Eunsuh Choi), through June 16. Point Park University. Silk Road (images from 1972 from Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal and India), at the Lawrence Hall Gallery, through Aug. 9.

JUNE

Sen. John Heinz Pittsburgh Regional History Center. Art of the Steelers, through

June 2. From Slavery to Freedom, ongoing. SmartSteps, ongoing. Plus permanent exhibitions and Sports Museum. Shady Side Academy. Art Beat (group show by 19 emerging or established local artists), through May 24.

P-Orridge: S/HE IS HERE (showcase of work by the famed avant-garde artist and musician), June 15-Sept. 15. Caldwell Linker: All Through the Night (local artist’s photos of Pittsburgh’s LGBQT community), June 15-Sept. 15. Nick Bubash: The Patron Saint of White Guys That

The Andy Warhol Museum. Genesis Breyer

CONTINUES ON PG. 30

28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

29


SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

Nick Bubash: The Patron Saint of White Guys That Went Tribal and Other Works at The Andy Warhol Museum, June 15-Sept. 15

Find your Summer Style at Goodwill! Stop by any of our 30 retail locations. New merchandise arrives daily! Find the store nearest you at www.goodwillswpa.org. Shop on Thursday, May 23rd and receive 25% off of donated apparel and Good-to-Go Computers!

Good clothes. Good prices. Good cause. 30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Went Tribal and Other Works (local artist and tattooist’s first solo museum exhibition, centering on found-object sculptures), June 15-Sept. 15. Artists Image Resource. Ten or Twenty in Twenty Thirteen (annual fundraising party), June 1. Associated Artists of Butler County. Photo show, June 29-July 27. borelli-edwards Galleries. Atticus Adams – Summertime, June 29-July 27. Boulevard Gallery. Work by Richard P. Rauso (watercolor) and Leslie Sorg (batiks & oils), June 1-28. Box Heart Gallery. The Way and the Wayfarers (paintings by Joshua Hogan), June 25-July 20 (June 29 reception).

Carnegie Museum of Natural History. Roads of Arabia (cultural history of the Arabian Peninsula), June 22-Nov. 3. Tlingit Totem Pole carving and installation by Tommy Joseph, June 1-21. Carnegie Science Center. Butterfly Weekend (with Phipps Conservatory), June 1 and 2. Bikes: Science on Two Wheels opens June 15. USS Requin Behind-the-Scenes Tech Tours, June 23, July 7 and 21, Aug. 4 and 25, and Sept. 8. Christine Frechard Gallery. Melanie Werner Collection, June 4-July 11. Gallerie Chiz. Chris Visgitis and Todd Sanders, June 7-29. Filmmakers Galleries. Ink and Silver (group show by advanced photography students), June 28-Sept. 13. FirstFriday ArtWalk. Gallery crawl on Ellsworth Avenue, Shadyside, June 7. The Gallery 4. Terrifyingly Elegant Cake Sculptures by Scott Hove, June 1-29.

Gay & Lesbian Community Center. Super! (exhibit exploring the homoerotic subtext of superhero culture), opens June 2. Hoyt Institute of Fine Arts. A Landscape for All Seasons (group show), June 4-July 26. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Copper Foil Portraits from the 1940s-1970s by Irma Freeman, June 7-July 5. Mattress Factory. Annual Urban Garden Party, June 21. Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery. glassweekend ’13 (group show),

June 21-Sept. 28.

ModernFormations. David Grim, June 7-28. Photo Antiquities. The Civil War (rare and historic glass-plate negatives), June 1-July 31.

Sen. John Heinz Pittsburgh History Center. Pennsylvania’s Civil War, June 22-Jan. 4. Sweetwater Center for the Arts. Pittsburgh Tattoo Works III, June 7-July 18.

Three Rivers Arts Festival. With artists’ market, outdoor installations and juried visual-art show, June 7-16. Unblurred. Gallery crawl on Penn Avenue, Bloomfield, Friendship and Garfield, June 7.

Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Pop-Up Exhibitions: Mark Barill and

Dorion Barill, June 5-30. WildCard. Craft Hard: Art Inspired by Action Movies (group show of visual art, needlepoint and quilts), opens June 6. ◆

JULY

709 Penn Gallery. Chris McGinnis: The Productive Machine (oil paintings and video installation), July 12-Sept. 1. Artists Image Resource. Garage Sale (affordable work by working artists clearing out their studios), July 6.


Associated Artists of Butler County. Cranberry Invitational Show, opens July 10. Cranberry Community Days (featuring art fair), July 11-13 August Wilson Center. The Art of Elizabeth Catlett from the Collection of Samella Lewis (more than 30 works by the late AfricanAmerican sculptor), July 12-Sept. 13.

Memorial Medical Center patients), July 12-Aug. 24). Unblurred. Gallery crawl on Penn Avenue, Bloomfield, Friendship and Garfield, July 5. â&#x2014;&#x2020;

Miniatures, Aug. 10 to Sept. 7.

Art by Jacci Delaney

Boulevard Gallery. Pat

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Boulevard Gallery. Mary Ellen McShea (oil, watercolor and acrylic) and Melissa Cooper (fiber), Aug. 3-30.

Nigro (watercolor) and Ilona Ralston (hand-painted glass), July 6-27.

Box Heart Gallery. Mythical

Tales, Flight Paths, and Figures of the Sky (mixed-media works on paper by John Humphries), July 23-Aug. 17 (July 27 reception).

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Box Heart Gallery. Julia

(paintings by Sonja Sweterlitsch), Aug. 20-Sept. 14 (Aug. 24 reception).

Christine Frechard Gallery.

FirstFriday ArtWalk.

Marc Brun, July 12-Aug. 23.

Gallery crawl on Ellsworth Avenue, Shadyside, Aug. 2. Gallerie Chiz. Scott Hunter, Aug. 2-31.

FirstFriday ArtWalk.

Gallery crawl on Ellsworth Avenue, Shadyside, July 5.

Frick Art Museum. Clayton

FREE ADMISSION

AUGUST

Be Galleries. Caitlyn Burroughs â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Lifeforms at Pittsburgh Glass Center, July 5-Nov. 17

Days Revisited: A Project by Vik Muniz (restaging of 1999 interpretative photography project), July 13-Oct. 27. Gallerie Chiz. Photography â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Invited Group Show, July 5-27. The Gallery 4. Kawaii, the Japanese Sense of Cuteness, by Hiromi Ikeda, July 6-27. Mattress Factory. Chiharu Shiota (Japanese artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s installation and the first exhibit in the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new building), opens July 12. ModernFormations. Benedict Oddi, July 5-Aug. 16. Pittsburgh Cultural Trust. Downtown gallery crawl, July 12. Pittsburgh Glass Center. Lifeforms (group show inspired by vintage biological models), July 5-Nov. 17.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Johnstown. The Art of Healing Exhibition: Reflections 2013 (work by Conemaugh

The Gallery 4. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Elaborately

staged oil paintings and props,â&#x20AC;? by Leslie Minnis, Aug. 3-24. Hoyt Institute of Fine Arts. Claire Hardy: Pittsburgh Steel Mill Project, Aug. 6-Sept. 27. Work by Dee Briggs (sculpture), Aug. 6-Sept. 27. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Automata: A Kinetic Art Show (group exhibition), Aug. 2-Sept. 5. Photo Antiquities. Hand-Tinted Vintage Photographs (on tin, paper and glass), Aug. 1-Sept. 30.

É°É&#x2030;ČľÉ&#x201E;É&#x2018;Č?É&#x153;ČŁČ?4É&#x201E;Č˝É&#x201E;Č˝Č?ǸȣČ?ȾǸHȨɨČ?É&#x2018; 3HQQV\OYDQLD¡V5LYHURIWKH<HDU

Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Ligonier Valley. Frudakis: Two

Generations of Sculpture, Aug. 16-Nov. 10.

Unblurred. Gallery crawl on Penn Avenue, Bloomfield, Friendship and Garfield, Aug. 2.

Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Pop-Up Exhibitions: Brian McCall,

Ryan Taylor and Joe Wos, Aug. 7-Sept. 1 (at Westmoreland @rt 30).

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The Beers of Summer Looking to impress friends or family at the summer picnic, or just want to live the good life around the campfire? Local beer experts recommend keeping the heat in mind when you choose your craft beers. Aim for light, crisp beers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; wits, pale ales, saisons, hefeweizens. Locally, East Endâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wit and Monkey Boy are good selections, as are Bellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oberon, Troegâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sunshine Pils, Ayinger Brau-Weiss and Allagash White.

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CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

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Shop til you drop. Eat at great restaurants. Stay at award-winning inns. New for 2013 — WATERFIRE SHARON Saturday, August 3 ~ Saturday, September 14 ~ Saturday, October 12 Lighting occurs at dusk and continues until Midnight A day-long event of music, food and unique arts programming culminating with the lighting of over fifty sparkling bonfires on the Shenango River, accompanied by enchanting music and diverse performers from around the globe. *dates subject to change – visit WaterFireSharonPA.org for specific event information.

SharonPa.com ~ 800-637-2370 32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


WISHING FOR A FEW DAYS AWAY... to play those perfect rounds of golf... experience an amazing outdoor adventure... or enjoy a shopping getaway... and afterwards relax at your choice of Mercer County’s diverse accommodations?

Tee off at “One of America’s Top Golf Destinations.” (Golf Digest Magazine) Enjoy shopping at a top rated outlet mall, three of the world’s largest stores and numerous specialty shops... tax free on most clothes and shoes! Experience an adventure on land, water or air! Relax at luxurious mansions, B&B’s, full or limited service hotels and campgrounds.

Mercer County PA is located at the crossroads of I-80 and I-79 in western Pennsylvania. To start planning your Escape to Mercer County, visit us on the web at www.VisitMercerCountyPA.com or call 800-637-2370 to request your free Escape Package. CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF CASSIE K. RUSNAK}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CURRENT

Abigail/1702. Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa’s drama follows the girl who cried “Witch!” in The Crucible into adulthood, through May 26 (City Theatre). Clybourne Park. Bruce Norris’ scathing, Pulitzer- and Tony-winning comedy about race as expressed through home-selling (and -buying) in one Chicago house, in 1959 and 2009, through May 19 (Pittsburgh Public Theater). Dani Girl. A young girl copes with a life-threatening disease through the power of imagination in this new musical by er Dimond, Michael Kooman and Christopher through May 19 (Stage 62).

Five Women Wearing the Same Dress. Alan Ball, who went on to American te this Beauty and Six Feet Under, wrote smaids 1993 comedy set amongst bridesmaids h backstage at a wedding, through tre). May 19 (McKeesport Little Theatre). Little Shop of Horrors. The classic doo-wop musical about a man-eating houseplant, by Howard Ashman and Alan Menken, through May 19 (Little Lake Theatre). Next to Normal. Brian Yorkey and Tom Kitt’s hit 2009 Broadway musical about a troubled American family, which won a Pulitzer Prize and multiple Tonys, through May 19 (Stage 62).

Pittsburgh International Children’s Festival.

Performers from around the

The Pillow Project presents The Green Swan, June 28-30

world are featured at this annual festival based in Oakland and presented by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, through May 19. www.trustarts.org Tarzan. Adapted from the animated Disney movie, with songs by Phil Collins, through May 19 (Pittsburgh Musical Theater). Walk Two Moons. Drama adapted from the Newberry Medal-winning children’s book by Sharon Creech, through May 19 (Prime Stage Theater). Without Ruth. Daughters must make end-of-life decisions about their mother in this brand-new play by Off the Wall’s Virginia Wa Wall Gruenert, through May 18 W Productions). (Off the Wall ◆

MAY M

Moonlight & Valentino. Mo Thre Three women visit a fourth whose husband has unexpectedly died iin this comedy by Ellen Simo Simon, May 16-June 1 (South P Par Park Theatre). First Voice Festival. F A showcase for local and v visiting African-American a artists, performers and w writers, featuring August C Wilson Center fellows Nathan James, Bridgette Perdue, Marlana Vassar, Wild and Nikki Young, Josh Wilder May 17-25 (A (August Wilson Center). In the Raw. The reading series for new plays concludes with The Gospel Singer, by Pittsburghbased playwright C C.S. Wyatt, a drama about a singer torn betw between two cultures, May 19 and 20 (Bricolag (Bricolage Productions).


THEATER COMPANIES + VENUES Amish Monkeys. Point Breeze, www.amishmonkeys.com. Apple Hill Playhouse. Delmont, 724-468-5050. Arcade Comedy Theater. Downtown. 412-339-0608. August Wilson Center. Downtown, 412-258-2700. Benedum Center. Downtown, 412-456-6666. Bricolage Productions. Downtown, 412-394-3353. Byham Theater. Downtown, 412-456-6666. Cabaret at Theater Square. Downtown, 412-456-6666.

Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead. Munhall, 412-368-5225. Carrnivale Theatrics. North Side,

www.facebook.com/CarrnivaleTheatrics. City Theatre. South Side, 412-431-2489. CLO Cabaret. Downtown, 412-281-3973. The Company of Pittsburgh. Carnegie, 412-807-9528. Gemini Children’s Theater. Point Breeze, 412-243-5201. Heinz Hall. Downtown, 412-392-4900.

Johnny Appleseed Children’s Theater. Delmont, 724-468-5050. Little Lake Theatre. Canonsburg,

724-745-6300.

Looking Glass Theatre. Canonsburg,

412-561-4402.

McKeesport Little Theater.

McKeesport, 412-673-1100. New Hazlett Theater. North Side, 412-320-4610.

Miracle on South Division Street. Over the Tavern playwright Tom Dudzick offers another comedic slice of working-class life in Buffalo, May 23-June 8 (Little Lake). Side By Side By Sondheim. A popular revue of songs by Stephen Sondheim, drawn from Company, Follies, West Side Story and more, May 23-Aug. 18 (CLO Cabaret). The Kreutzer Sonata. Pittsburgh premiere of Nancy Harris’ adaptation of the Tolstoy novella about a man whose belief that his wife had an affair might have been mistaken, May 30June 22 (Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre). Man of La Mancha. The frequently revived Broadway hit musical, featuring “The Impossible Dream,” imagines an imprisoned Miguel de Cervantes acting out his Quixote, May 30-June 8 (The Company of Pittsburgh). 42nd Street. “We’re in the Money,” “Lullaby of Broadway” — it’s old-time show-biz fun with this 1980 musical (set in 1933), May 31-June 9 (Pittsburgh CLO). ◆

JUNE

Radio Golf. The 1990s-set installment in August Wilson’s famed Pittsburgh Cycle has a backdrop of neighborhood redevelopment in a changing Hill District, June 1-29 (Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co.). Other Desert Cities. Palm Springs shortly after the 2003 invasion of Iraq is the setting for Jon Robin Baitz’s acclaimed new comic drama about a well-connected but dysfunctional

No Name Players. Oakland, www.nonameplayers.org. Off the Wall Productions. Carnegie, 724-873-3576. Opera Theater of Pittsburgh. Fox Chapel, 412-621-1499. Pittsburgh CLO. Downtown, 412-325-1582. Pittsburgh Musical Theater. Downtown, 412-539-0900. Pittsburgh Improv. The Waterfront, West Homestead, 412-462-5233.

Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre Co. Oakland, 412-561-6000. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theater Co.

Downtown, www.pghplaywrights.com. Pittsburgh Public Theater. Downtown, 412-316-1600. Playhouse Jr. Oakland, 412-621-4445. Prime Stage Theater. North Side, 724-773-0700. Quantum Theatre. Various locations, 412-697-2929. South Park Theatre. South Park, 412-831-8552. Stage 62. Carnegie, 412-429-6262. Steel City Improv Theater. Shadyside, www.steelcityimprov.com The Summer Company. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-243-5201. The Theatre Factory. Trafford, 412-374-9200. Throughline Theatre Company. Lawrenceville, www.throughlinetheatre.org. Undercroft Opera. Oakland, 412-422-7919. Unseam’d Shakespeare. Oakland, 412-621-0244.

family, June 6-30 (Pittsburgh Public). Same Time Next Year. Bernard Slade’s 1975 comedy about two lovers who have an annual assignation for a quarter-century, June 6-22 (South Park). State of the Union. Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse’s 1945 play about a presidential candidate having an extramarital affair, June 6-15 (The Summer Company). Why Do Fools Fall in Love? Roger Bean’s musical revue featuring ’60s pop from “I Will Follow Him” to the title tune, June 6-22 (Apple Hill Playhouse). The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail. Robert Edwin Lee and Jerome Lawrence’s play about Henry David Thoreau’s refusal to pay a tax that might fund the Mexican-American War, June 7-15 (Throughline Theatre Co.). Sylvia. A.R. Gurney’s comedy about a married man having a mid-life crisis and the stray dog who advises him, June 13-29 (Little Lake). The Tempest. Not exactly Shakespeare’s version; rather, William Davenant and John Dryden’s 1667 version based on Willy’s take, June 13-29 (Unseam’d Shakespeare). Five One-Acts by F.J. Hartland. Gemini Children’s Theater fundraiser showcases five works by the local playwright, June 20-29 (Gemini). Carmen. Bizet’s famous opera, with full orchestra, presented in English, June 20-23 (Undercroft Opera). Phantom. Not the Andrew Lloyd Weber thing,

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Immunization strengthens what the body does naturally!

CONTINUES ON PG. 36

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

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SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

but rather Maury Yeston and Arthur Kopit’s own 1991 musical adaptation of the creepy romance, June 21-30 (Pittsburgh CLO). Midnight Radio. The latest themed installment of the live comedy series in the style of a classic radio broadcast, complete with sound effects, spoof commercials, fake breaking news and more, June 22-30 (Bricolage Productions).

You Haven’t Changed A Bit and Other Lies. This 2001 “musical about growing up at 60” takes a comic look at three longtime married couples, June 27-July 13 (South Park). ◆

JULY

Motherhood Out Loud. David Cale,

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Beth Henley and Theresa Rebeck are among the 14 writers who collaborated on this recent anthology-style play about, well, motherhood, July 3-20 (Little Lake). Caught in the Net. Ray Cooney farce about a bigamist London cabbie trying to keep his two families apart, July 4-20 (Apple Hill). Mnemonic. British theater company Complicite devised this 1999 play, with multimedia, about how “place and memory collide while stories that are older than the millennium connect us to each other and those who came before,” July 5-28 (Quantum Theatre). The Tales of Hoffman Retold. A new version of this opera about a man’s complicated love life, part of Opera Theater of Pittsburgh’s SummerFest, July 6, 13 and 21 (Opera Theater). A Little Night Music. Sondheim’s modern-classic musical (featuring “Send in the Clowns”) about romance and infidelity in the countryside, July 7, 12, and 20 (Opera Theater). The Little Mermaid. Adaptation of the animated Disney musical, with songs by Alan Menken, Howard Ashman and Glenn Slater, July 9-21 (Pittsburgh CLO).

KIDS THEATER CURRENT

Honk Jr. A musical based on the Hans Christian Andersen classic about an ugly duckling, through May 26 (Playhouse Jr.) Huck Finn. Mark Twain’s story of the runaway kid and his companion, Jim, on a raft on the Mississippi, adapted by Eric Coble, through May 26 (Playhouse Jr.).

MAY

Afternoon of the Elves. Janet Taylor Lisle’s award-winning book about an impoverished, unpopular kid whose backyard contains a magical secret, adapted by Y York, May 25-June 9 (Playhouse Jr.).

JUNE

Li’l Red. A musical adaptation of “Little Red Riding Hood,” by Richard Kinter, June 20-28 (Johnny Appleseed Children’s Theater). Rumplestiltskin. That irascible gnome is still spinning straw into gold, June 17-26 (South Park Children’s Theatre). Go, Dog. Go! Dogs go wild in this musical, adapted by Allison Gregory and Steven Dietz from the P.D. Eastman story, June 26-July 13 (Looking Glass).

36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Nathan James at the August Wilson Center’s First Voice Festival, May 17-25

Lady Windermere’s Fan. Oscar Wilde’s comedy about a society woman who plots to avenge her husband’s suspected infidelity, July 11-27 (PICT). Shining Brow. Daron Hagen’s 1993 opera about Frank Lloyd Wright and his affair with Mamah Cheney, July 11 and 19 (Opera Theater). Sisters of Swing. The story of mid-century hit-makers The Andrews Sisters, featuring songs like “Bei Mir Bist Du Schön” and “The Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy,” July 12-28 (The Theatre Factory). Joe Turner’s Come and Gone. The August Wilson Center begins a decade-long project to stage student productions of all of its namesake’s Century Cycle plays, July 12-14. (August Wilson Center).

JULY

A Winnie-the-Pooh Birthday Tail. Musical adaptation of the Pooh story by James W. Rodgers, July 4-12 (Johnny Appleseed).

The Ugly Duckling & Other Tails. Adaptations of fairy tales, July 1-10 (South Park). Fe Fi Fo Fum. Those magic beans will get you every time, even in this musical adaptation by Vera Morris and Bill Francoeur, July 18-Aug. 26 (Johnny Appleseed). Tweet! A Musical. July 15-24 (South Park).

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Adaptation of the famous Roald Dahl story about kids who win a tour of a mysterious candy factory, July 17-Aug. 3 (Looking Glass).

AUGUST

The Monster Under the Bed. A kid gets the day off from school when his mom accidentally takes the monster under the bed to school in Kevin Dyer’s play, Aug. 7-24 (Looking Glass). Alice in Wonderland. William Glennon’s adaptation of the Lewis Carroll classic, Aug. 1-9 (Johnny Appleseed). 12 Dancing Princesses. July 29-Aug. 7 (South Park).


Viva Los Bastarditos. Pittsburgh premiere of Jake Oliverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rock musical about rockers leading the people against would-be dictators, which won the audience award at the 2010 fringeNYC festival, July 12-27 (No Name Players). The Secret Gardener. Mozartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comedy La finta giardiniera, July 14 and 20 (Opera Theater). Pittsburgh Pride Theater Festival. The return of this independent showcase for LGBTQ-themed one-acts, featuring work by playwrights Jeff Cordell, Kathryn Miller Haines, Wali Jamal and Carol Mullen, July 18-27 (at Pittsburgh Playwrights). Avenue Q. The Broadway-hit R-rated musical spoofing Sesame Street follows a recent college graduate and his NYC neighbors, including naked singing puppets, with songs by Robert Lopez (The Book of Mormon) and Jeff Marks, July 18-28 (Stage 62). The Love List. Norm Fosterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contemporary comedy about a middle-aged guy who seems to get just the woman heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wishing for, July 18-Aug. 3 (South Park). A Slight Case of Murder. Damon Runyon and Howard Lindsayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1930s comedy details the travails of an ex-bootlegger and his family adjusting to respectable life, July 18-27 (Summer Company). Oedipus Rex. Sophoclesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; classic about a king trying to save his ravaged country, July 19-27 (Throughline). Italian-American Reconciliation. A guy tries to win back his ex-wife in this comedy from John Patrick Shanley (Moonstruck), July 25-Aug. 10 (Little Lake). Midnight Radio. The latest themed installment of the live comedy series in the style of a classic radio broadcast, complete with sound effects, spoof commercials, fake breaking news and more, July 27-Aug. 4 (Bricolage). The Buddy Holly Story. The short life and many hits of the groundbreaking rocker are fodder for Alan Janesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; musical, July 30-Aug. 4 (Pittsburgh CLO). â&#x2014;&#x2020;

AUGUST

Eat on the Street This summer, Pittsburgh has twice as many food trucks on the road as last summer. Here are the offerings and how to track them:

FRANKTUARY New York-style hot dogs. Includes vegetarian options. @franktuary

OH MY GRILL Grilled cheese sandwiches @OhMyGrill

PGH TACO TRUCK CK Tacos. Includes des vegan and glutenfree options. s. @PghTacoTruck uck

Clinical Trials Research Services, LLC is currently conducting clinical trials in the following areas:

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May 17 - 19

Southern Hospitality. Comedy about the

Yan Pascal Tortelier, conductor Valentina Lisitsa, piano

four Futrelle sisters trying to save their small Texas town by luring a salsa manufacturer, Aug. 1-11 (Apple Hill).

National Fried Chicken Day

SEPTEMBER

Golijov: Sidereus (Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra co-commission)

Grieg: Piano Concerto Ravel: Rapsodie Espagnole Elgar: In the South, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alassioâ&#x20AC;? Valentina Lisitsa

their step-grandson, Aug. 22-Sept. 1 (Apple Hill). Happily Ever Laughter. Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s famed Oedipus and the Foul Mess in Second City brings its improv and sketch Thebes. Playwright Sean Graney, of Chicago comedy to the Pittsburgh Public Theater for theater troupe The Hypocrites, offers this three shows only, Aug. 23 and 24 (Public). world-premiere â&#x20AC;&#x153;rock-inspired contemporary In the Heights. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the first local production takeâ&#x20AC;? on classic Greek tragedy, Aug. 2-17 of Lin-Manuel Mirandaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hit Broadway (No Name). musical about a New York Don Juan Comes Back neighborhood, sung and from the War. A new danced to Latino music and July 6 translation of Odon Von hip hop, Aug. 23-Sept. 1 Horvathâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1936 play (Carrnivale Theatrics). imagining the legendary Midnight Radio. The latest lothario as a repentant themed installment of the ex-soldier in the wake of live comedy series in the style World War I, Aug. 8-31 (PICT). of a classic radio broadcast, Tuesdays With Morrie. A complete with sound effects, journalistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relationship with spoof commercials, fake his terminally ill former college breaking news and more, professor is the subject of this Aug. 24-Sept. 1 (Bricolage). two-character drama, adapted from The Art of Murder. A painter plots to Mitch Albomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book by Albom and Jeffrey kill his art dealer in Joe DiPietroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comedy, Hatcher, Aug. 8-24 (South Park). Aug. 29-Sept. 14 (South Park). Crimes of the Heart. Beth Henleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pulitzer-winning comedy about three sisters â&#x2014;&#x2020; and their outrageous lives, Aug. 15-31 The Lion King. Hit musical adaptation (Little Lake). of the animated Disney film, Sept. 3-29 Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Tennessee Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (Benedum Center). classic, Aug. 22-31 (Summer Company). Is He Dead? New adaptation of a recently On Golden Pond. Ernest Thompsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chestnut about an elderly couple, their summer home and unearthed Mark Twain farce about a struggling

COMING UP... MUSIC DIRECTOR MANFRED HONECK CONDUCTS

WILLIAM TELL TO THE OVERTURE THEME LONE RANGER May 31 - June 2

412.392.4900 \ PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG GROUPS OF 10+ CALL 412.392.4819

CONTINUES ON PG. 38

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

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SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

young Parisian painter who fakes his own death, then poses as his own twin sister, Sept. 5-21 (Little Lake). Defending the Caveman. Rob Becker’s popular one-man show about understanding relationships from the guy’s perspective, Sept. 5-Oct. 13 (CLO Cabaret).

www.facebook.com/cruzebar).

DANCE Bodiography Center for Movement. Bodiography students perform alongside the troupe in classical and contemporary works, June 8 (Byham Theater). Carnegie Performing Arts Center. The center’s Spring Showcase, featuring student dancers, June 1 and 2 (Carnegie Music Hall, Carnegie). 412-279-8887 CorningWorks. Beth Corning’s new onewoman show remains, June 5-9 (New Hazlett). Continuum Dance Theater. Third Tuesdays You Drink … We Dance (informal performance in lounge setting), Tue., May 21 (Bar Marco, Strip District). www.continuumdancetheater. blogspot.com Duquesne University Tamburitzans. The noted Eastern European folk-dance troupe performs Aug. 23 (South Park Amphitheater). 412-350-5929 Kelly-Strayhorn Theater. Balafon West African Dance Conference, May 17 and 18. Annual Full Bloom Summer Dance Party, June 1. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School. Student and pre-professional divisions perform new and classic works in the annual Pre-Professional Showcase, Fri., May 17-Sun., May 19 (George Rowland White Performance Studio, Downtown). 412-281-0360

The Second City at Pittsburgh Public Theater, Aug. 23 and 24

The Pillow Project. Premiere of Pearlann Porter’s ( ), May 17-19. Premiere of Porter’s The Green Swan, June 28-30. Second Saturdays performance series: June 8 (with guest Phat Man Dee), July 13 (with jazz group Blue Redshift) and Aug. 10 (with jazz group Ronnie Burrage and Burrage Band) at The Space Upstairs in Point Breeze. www.pillowproject.org Texture Contemporary Ballet. Second annual birthday party, July 6 (Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield). Perpetual Motion

Pick Your Own Produce Somewhere between growing your own food and plucking it from some supermarket shelf, there’s pick-your-own. It’s a good way to remind the kids (and yourself) that dinner ultimately comes right from the dirt. Following are some of the area farms that let you do your own harvesting — mostly for berries, apples and pumpkins.

Morris Farm. Organic growers offer pick-your-own summer vegetables and melons July through September. 110 Slebodnik Road, Irwin. www.morrisorganic.com Reilly’s Garden Center at Summer Seat Farm. Pick ck strawberries, red and black raspberries and blueberries starting ng in June (and pumpkins in fall). Roosevelt Road, Ohio Township. p. www.reillyssummerseatfarm.com Cherry Valley Organics. Organic farm lets you pick flowers and berries. Cherry Valley Road, Burgettstown. 724-777-0790 or www.cherryvalleyorganics.com Triple B Farms. Strawberries, apples, raspberries, peaches and pumpkins for the picking, June through October. Off Route 51 at the Elizabeth exit. 724-258-3557 or www.triplebfarms.com Soergel Orchards. Pick your own strawberries and blueberries, plus sunflowers, zinnias and, in fall, pumpkins. 2573 Brandt School Road, Wexford. 724-935-1743 or www.soergels.com www.soe Simmons Farm. Strawberries, peaches, apples, pumpkins Sim and cut flowers can be picked seasonally. 170 Simmons a Road, McMurray. 724-941-1490 or www.simmonsfarm.com

Trax Farms. Pick your own strawberries and blueberries May through August. Union Township, Washington County. 412-835-3246 or www.traxfarms.com

38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

(new choreography), July 18-21 (New Hazlett). www.textureballet.org

COMEDY Amish Monkeys. Improv comedy, June 8 and July 13.

Arcade Comedy Theater. Mark &

Pittsburgh Comedy Showcase. Hosted by Mike Wysocki, every Friday (Corner Café, South Side, 412-488-2995). Pittsburgh Improv. Jo Koy, Thu., May 16Sat., May 18. Clint Coley, Sun., May 19. John Henton, May 23-26. Comic Wars, May 29. Gary Owen, May 30-June 2. An Evening with Craig Shoemaker, June 7-9. Sebastien Maniscalco, June 13-15. Mo’Nique, June 21-22. Tommy Davidson, June 27-30. Aries Spears, July 25-28. Iliza Shlesinger, Aug. 2-4. Doug Benson, Aug. 3. Slapsticks Productions. Funny Fundraisers: Monessen Italian Club ISMA, Fri., May 17 (Monessen; 724-684-3710). Ligonier Theatre, Sat., May 18 (Ligonier). Butler Football Boosters, May 31 (Butler; 724-287-9934). Deer Lakes Boys Soccer Boosters, June 1 (Cheswick, 724-265-1248). Saint Ursula Catholic School, June 8 (Allison Park, 412-920-5653). Steel City Improv Theater. Panic & Hotel Nowhere every Monday. 808 & Well Known Strangers every Monday. Ruckus, The Cage Match and The Jam Session, Thursdays through Aug. 1. The Lupones: Made Up Musicals, The Death Show and The Writers’ Room & Cream Stain, Fridays through July. Various improv groups, Fridays through July.

LITERARY/ SPOKEN WORD Carnegie Library Sunday Poetry & Reading Series. Susan Urbanek Linville,

Jonathan’s Fireside Chat, Fri., May 17 and Sun., May 19; G. Emil Reutter and Diane July 6. Sally Brooks with Uke & Tuba, Sat., Sahms Guarnieri, June 16; Rosaly DeMaios May 18. Kris Levkulich with Jesse Landis Eigsti, Roffman, July 21; and Rina Ferrarelli, Aug. 18 May 24. This Improvised Life, May 25. Ruckus (Carnegie Library, Oakland, 412-622-3151). Improv!, May 25. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Cave Canem. Cave Canem poets Toi — Live Read, May 31. Dodge Intrepid Radio Derricotte, Cornelius Eady and more, June 20 Show, June 1. Race to the Coffin Comedy Show, (City of Asylum/Pittsburgh, North Side, June 6. Arcade Forenics League, June 8. Electric ebaisleycoap@gmail.com). Slidez: PowerPoint Exiled Voices of Karaoke, June 8. Pride China and Tibet. City {PHOTO COURTESY OF AMANDA TEMPLE} Weekend at Arcade, of Asylum/Pittsburgh June 13-16. Dinner hosts a day-long series with the Nolens Improv of free talks, readings Show, June 21 and and performances by July 27. Blue Light writers and musicians Special Comedy show, in exile from China June 21 and July 26. and Tibet, including The Cellar Dwellers author Liao Yiwu, Improv, June 22. Gilda’s human-rights activist Birthday Party!: An Chen Guangcheng and All-Female Comedy special guest, dissident Event for Gilda’s poet Huang Xiang. Club of Western PA, June 8 (North Side, June 28. Reset List 412-323-0278). Improv Rock Concert, Hemingway’s June 29. Danny Summer Poetry Palumbo & Friends Series. Squirrel Hill Comedy Show, July 5. Poetry Workshop: Live Read, July 20. Anthony Ciotoli, Ann Heinz Hall. Curran, Ziggy Edwards, Daniel Tosh, June 12 Randy Minnich, Author Edward McClelland at (two shows). Pam O’Brien, Rosaly Penguin Bookshop, June 10 Cabaret at Theater DeMaios Roffman, Square. Pittsburgh Miguel Ruiz and Arlene Improv Jam, every Thursday. Weiner, Tue., May 21; Jan Beatty, Celeste Gainey, Carnegie Library Music Hall of Elise D’Haene and Liane Ellison Norman, Homestead. Tracy Morgan, June 7. May 28; Joan E. Bauer, Roberta Hatcher, Gene Club Café. An Evening of Comedy with Hirsch, Joseph Karasek and Jill Khoury, June 4; Krish Mohan feat. Dan Jenniches, John Ralich, Jay Carson, Sheila Carter-Jones, Barbara hosted by Zach Funk May 24 (South Side, Edelman and Richard St. John, June 11; Leslie 412-431-4950). Anne McIlroy, Sean Thomas Dougherty and Cruze Bar. Erin Foley, June 7. Adam Sank, Sherrie Flick, June 18; James Deahl, Norma West July 12. Bridget McManus, Aug. 2 (Strip District, Linder, Sheila Kelly and Michael Wurster,


June 25; Toi Derricotte, Judith Robinson and Philip Terman, July 2; Paola Corso, Rina Ferrarelli and Sheryl St.Germain, July 9; 5 AM Party & Tribute: Ed Ochester, Judith Vollmer and Friends, July 16; David Ades, Renee Alberts, Kristofer Collins and Nancy Krygowski, July 23; Nikki Allen, Marilyn Bates, Jimmy Cvetic, John Grochalski, Jason Irwin, Amanda Reynolds, Kayla Sargeson, Scott Silsbe and Bob Ziller, July 30 (Hemingway’s Café, Oakland, Jbauer103w@aol.com). Moth Mainstage. They keep booking larger venues for this annual showcase for winners of Pittsburgh’s monthly storytelling series, a franchise of the popular New York original, Aug. 22 (Byham). Mystery Lovers Bookshop. Dennis Palumbo, Sat., May 18. Publication party for Tempest Reborn, by local author Nicole Peeler, May 28. Chill & Thrill Fest (June 14-19), including: Publication party for In Fact Books, June 14; Slasher Chic Thriller Book Swap, June 16; Linda Castillo (Her Last Breath), June 18; and Taylor Stevens (The Doll), June 19. Summer Solstice Soiree with local author Kathleen Shoop and friends, June 21. Coffee & Crime with author Jon McGoran (Drift), July 20 (Oakmont, 412-828-4877). The New Yinzer Presents. Jasmine Dream Wagner, Alicia Salvadeo and T.C. Jones, Thu., May 16 (ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield, tnypresents.blogspot.com). Penguin Bookshop. Edward McClelland (Nothin’ But Blue Skies), June 10 (Sewickley, 412-741-3838). Saturday Night Stories. Fiction readings by Elise D’Haene, Amanda Young and Christina Deka., Sat., May 18 (Biddle’s Escape, Wilkinsburg, 412-999-9009).

Dreams do come true! Erin Foley at Cruze Bar, June 7

Steel City Slam. Pittsburgh’s premier poetry slam, with featured poets and cash prizes. Thu., May 16, June 20, July 18 and Aug. 15. (720 Music Café, Lawrenceville, www.pghpoetry.org). WordPlay. New quarterly show blending true stories accompanied live by a DJ, hosted by series originator Alan Olifson. First installment includes tellers David Harris-Gershon, Nora Matthews, Alan Olifson, Amanda Hamilton Roos, Todd Shaffer, May 31 (Bricolage). Writers LIVE. Nathaniel Philbrick (Bunker Hill: A City, a Siege, a Revolution), Thu., May 16 (Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Oakland, 412-622-8866).

Over the last year, we have graduated from a pop-up project to a mainstay in Downtown Pgh! Thanks to Mayor Ravenstahl, PDP, donors, dreamers, and all who have supported us! Come check out the new dreamers and cool off this summer with our new Dreamshakes!

539 Liberty Ave. Pgh, Pa 15222 www.DreamCreamIceCream.com

OPTIONS NOW RESEARCH STUDY FOR MEN AND WOMEN Magee Womens Research Institute is looking for HIV-negative men and women (who are not pregnant or breast-feeding) between the ages of 18 and 45 to participate in a research study.

This study will assess the safety and acceptability of an investigational medication given as an injection. In the future, it is hoped that this medication will be developed to help prevent HIV infection.

For more information and to see if you qualify for this study, please call 412-463-9053 or 412-852-0390. You may be compensated up to $2,550 (females) or $1,775 (males) for your time.

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

39


Summer FAIRS

Screaming Orphans at Pittsburgh Irish Festival

FESTIVALS + SPECIAL EVENTS ◆

ONGOING

throughout the city through fall. 412-422-6405 or www.citiparks.net for complete list

Visual art exhibitions, public art installations, music and dance performances, and arts and crafts market. 412-471-3191 or www.3riversartsfest.org

MAY 15-19

Pittsburgh International Children’s Festival. Schenley Plaza, Oakland.

JUNE 08

www.pghkids.org

Harmony Herb and Garden Fair. Harmony

MAY 17-19

Museum, Harmony. www.harmonymuseum.org

Ambridge Nationality Days. Ambridge. www.ambridgechamberofcommerce.com 40th Annual National Road Festival. Various spots along Route 40. 724-437-9877 or www.nationalroadpa.org ◆

MAY 18

Venture Outdoors Festival. Point State Park, Downtown. www.ventureoutdoors.org ◆

MAY 18-19

Sheep and Fiber Festival. Greene County Fairgrounds, Waynesburg. 724-627-8119 or www.sheepandfiber.com ◆

MAY 25

Pyrofest. Fireworks festival, Hartwood Acres. www.pyrofest.com ◆

MAY 27

Memorial Day Celebration ebration. Soldiers & Sailors Hall, Oakland. 412-621-4253 ◆

JUNE 02

Animal Friends Mutt utt Strut. South Park. Games, ames, activities and pooches.. 412-847-7000 or www.thinkingoutside thecage.org ◆

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

JUNE 07-16

Three Rivers Arts Festival. Downtown.

40

Pittsburgh Neighborhood Festivals. Held

JUNE 07

JUNE 15

Atlatl Competition. Meadowcroft, Avella. Try your hand at the ancient sport. 724-587-3412 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org ◆

JUNE 16

Pride Awareness March and PrideFest. Downtown. www.pittsburghpride.org ◆

JUNE 23

Classic Car Show. Pennsylvania Trolley Museum, Washington. 877-728-7655 or www.pa-trolley.org ◆

JUNE 28-JULY 06

Big Butler Fair. Butler County Fairgrounds. Head for the biggest fair ’round these parts. 724 865 2400 or www.bigbu www.bigbutlerfair.com 724-865-2400 ◆

JUNE 29

Walnut Street Jam. Shady Shadyside. Live bands perform. 412-6 412-682-1298 or www.thinksha www.thinkshadyside.com ◆

JULY 02-04 0

Three Riv Rivers Regatta. North Side and Downtown. race fireworks, Boat races, fis food, fishing. www. threeriv threeriversregatta.net ◆

JULY 04

Point State Park Fountain Reopening ng.

Indepen Independence Day Cel Celebration.

Downtown. www. g heinzhistorycenter.org

Meadow Meadowcroft, Avella. fo and Games, food


demonstrations of 19th-century rural celebrations. 724-587-3412 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org ◆

JULY 04-07

JULY 12-21

Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix. Various

JULY 15

Vintage Grand Prix Car Show. Walnut Street, Shadyside. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com ◆

Washington County Agricultural Fair

JULY 25-AUG. 03

Fairgrounds, Dunbar. 724-628-3360 or www.fayettefair.com ◆

JULY 27

JULY 29

AUG. 02-04

Black Family Reunion. Schenley Park Oval. 412-422-6426 ◆

Walnut Street Jam. Shadyside. Live bands perform. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com ◆

Park, Kittanning. Arts and crafts, food, music and other entertainment. www. armstrongfestival.com ◆

AUG. 02-04

Festival of Water. Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium, Highland Park. 412-365-2532 or www.pittsburghzoo.com ◆

AUG. 03-04

139th Annual Rain Day. Waynesburg,

Regatta at Lake Arthur. South Shore,

Greene County. 724-627-8111 or www.raindayfestival.com

Moraine State Park. www.lakearthurregatta.org

AUG. 01-04

Fort Armstrong Folk Festival. Riverfront

AUG. 24-SEPT. 29

Greater Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival. West Newton. Open Saturdays, Sundays and Labor Day. 724-872-1670 or www.pittsburghrenfest.com

AUG. 17

AUG. 25

Antique Trucks and Trolleys.

National Vanilla Ice Cream Day

AUG. 12-17

Lawrence County Fairgrounds, New Castle. 724-654-7745 or www.lawrencecountyfair.com ◆

Pennsylvania Trolley Museum, Washington. 877-728-7655 or www.pa-trolley.org

July 23

Lawrence County Fair.

JULY 21-27

Fayette County Fair. Fayette County

National, regional and local artists. 412-6821298 or www.thinkshadyside.com ◆

bands perform. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

Bedford County Fair. Bedford County Fairgrounds, Bedford. 814-623-9011 or www.bedford-fair.com

AUG. 24-25

Walnut Street Jam. Shadyside. Live

{PHOTO BY AL HOFF}

AUG. 10-17

www.washingtonfair.org

JULY 13

Lawrenceville. www.doodahdays.com

AUG. 10

Washington County Agricultural Fair. Washington. 724-225-7718 or

locations. Vintage car races and shows. www.pittsburghvintagegrandprix.com

Doo Dah Days: Stephen Foster Music and Heritage Festival. Allegheny Cemetery,

The Arts Festival on Walnut. Shadyside.

Annual Antique Gun Show. Harmony Museum, Harmony. www.harmonymuseum.org

724-834-7474 or www.artsandheritage.com

Park, Downtown. Music, art, dance. www.umojacompany.org

www.butlerfarmshow.com

Westmoreland Arts and Heritage Festival. Twin Lakes Park, Greensburg. ◆

AUG. 05-10

Butler Farm Show. Butler.

AUG. 16-24

www.indianacountyfair.com ◆

Rochester, Beaver County. 724752-5973 or www.bigknobgrangefair.org

Greensburg. 724-423-5005 or www.westmorelandfair.com

AUG. 17-24

Somerset County Fair. Meyersdale. 814634-5619 or www.somersetcountyfairpa.com ◆

AUG. 20-24

Hookstown Fair. Hookstown, Beaver County. 724-573-4512 or www.hookstownfair.com ◆

AUG. 24-25

AUG. 27-31

Big Knob Grange Fair.

Westmoreland County Fair.

AUG. 25-31

Indiana County Fair. Indiana.

African Arts in the Park. Point State

AUG. 30-SEPT. 02

Pennsylvania Arts and Crafts Colonial Festival. Westmoreland County Fairgrounds, Greensburg. 724-863-4577 or www.familyfestivals.com ◆

SEPT. 06-08

Pittsburgh Irish Festival. Riverplex at Sandcastle, West Homestead. www.pghirishfest.org

AUG. 04-10

Greene County Fair. Waynesburg. 724-6274752 or www.greenecountyfair.org

Food Trips There are plenty of places to stuff your face within city limits, but there are also some worth the drive: About an hour north in Slippery Rock is North Country Brewing Company (141 S. Main St.), a sprawling, funky microbrewery with an outdoor patio. The brewery aims to operate sustainably. For instance, the spent grains from the beer-making are used to feed the cattle that provide the outstanding farm-to-table Black Angus burgers. In Beaver County, a bit of nostalgia awaits at Jerry’s Curb Service (1521 Riverside Drive, Bridgewater). This is a ’50s-style drive-in restaurant, complete with car hops and vintage cars parked in the e lot on weekends. Try the hot sausage. Want to feel like you’re in Tuscany without using yourr passport? Take a short trip to Narcisi Winery (4578 Gibsonia Road, Gibsonia) to sample one of the reds, whites, blush or rosé wines, made from grapes harvested from m local vineyards. Bring a picnic and enjoy a bottle on the grounds ounds while listening to live entertainment, or enjoy a bite from rom its La Vite Ristorante.

Clem’s Café (1985 Rt. 22 East, Blairsville) offers that quintessential American road food: barbecued ribs, chicken and pork. k. It’s a little joint that boasts big flavors, courtesy of the hardwood d fire.

DO SOME

GOOD CLEAN FUN HELP KEEP THEM

H AV E S O M E

Join Paddle Without Pollution on Saturday, June 8th, for the Third Annual Three Rivers Cleanup, paddling toward The Point for food and fun afterwards. After all, it’s okay to get a little dirty!

www.paddlewithoutpollution.com CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

41


Walk NOW for Autism. Heinz Field. 412-367-4571 ◆

JUNE 02

Greenfield Glide. 5K run and walk over a cross-country course. Schenley Park Overlook. 412-255-2493 or www.greenfieldglide.com ◆

JUNE 02-14

Senior Games. If you’re 60 or older, compete in archery, bocce, bowling, darts, 5K run and other events. Various locations. 412-422-6405 ◆

JUNE 07

Wave Pool, South Park. 412-351-0512

Park Golf Course. 412-835-3545

JULY 05-26

Grant Street and Mellon Square Walking Tour. Each Friday at noon. Meet at the entrance of the Omni William Penn hotel on Sixth and Grant streets, Downtown. Free. 412-471-5808, x527 or www.phlf.org for reservations ◆

JUNE 07-28

JULY 09-21

Paul G. Sullivan Championship.

Tennis tournament open to players 16 and older. Frick Park Red Clay Courts. 412-244-4188

noon. Meet at Smithfield Street and Fourth Avenue, Downtown. Free. 412-471-5808, x527 or www.phlf.org for reservations

JUNE 15-23

JULY 10

Juniors Golf Championship.

Bob O’Connor Summer Tennis Classic. Tennis

JUNE 20

Men’s Golf Championship. South Park Golf Course. 412-835-3545 ◆

JULY 09

Women’s Golf Championship. South Park Golf Course. 412-835-3545

Fourth Avenue and PPG Place Walking Tour. Each Friday at

AUG. 13

tournament open to boys and girls 16 and younger. Frick Park. 412-244-4188

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CITIPARKS}

tournament open to all ages and abilities Schenley Park Tennis Center and Stanton Avenue courts. 412-244-4188

JULY 20

Women’s Golf Championship. North

Park. 412-255-2493 or www.riverview5k.com

South Hills Kids Triathlon. Ages 7-12.

Riverview 5K Run and Walk. Riverview

JUNE 24-30

Frick Park Red Clay Junior Open. Tennis

City pools

North Park Golf Course. 412-835-3545

JULY 13

Pittsburgh Pirates Fun Run/Walk for Epilepsy. 5K course. PNC Park. www.efwp.org ◆

JULY 24

AUG. 16

Juniors Golf Tournament. South Park

Two-Player Scramble. North Park Golf

Golf Course. 412-835-3545

Course. 412-835-3545

JULY 27-28

Pittsburgh Triathlon and Adventure Race. Compete in an international- or sprint-distance triathlon, or the “Adventure” tri featuring a 2-mile paddle, 20K bike ride and 5K run. www.piranha-sports.com ◆

AUG. 02-30

AUG. 24

Run Around the Square 5K Run/Walk. Henrietta

National Cotton Candy Day

Market Square Area Walking Tour. Each Friday

SEPT. 05

Seniors Golf Championship. South Park Golf Course. 412-835-3545

SEPT. 06-27

Bridges and River Shores Walking Tour. Each Friday at noon. Meet in front of Renaissance Hotel, Downtown. Free. 412-471-5808, x527 or www.phlf.org for reservations

AUG. 09-25

Bikefest. A celebration of life on two wheels

SEPT. 21

Dollar Bank Junior Great Race.

in Pittsburgh. Various events and locations. www.bike-pgh.org ◆

at noon. Meet at PNC’s Triangle Park across from the Fairmont Hotel Downtown. Free. 412-471-5808 ext. 527 or www.phlf.org for reservations ◆

and Milton streets, Regent Square 412-246-9506 or www.runaroundthesquare.com

July 31

One-mile fun run for kids under 12. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-255-2493 or www.RunGreatRace.com

AUG. 10

North Park Kids Triathlon. Ages 7-15.

SEPT. 29

Pool, North Park. 412-351-0512

one-mile “Mini-Breeze” fun run. Brookline Memorial Recreational Center. 412-571-3222

The annual 10K foot race grows every year, so register early. There’s also a 5K run/ fitness walk. 412-255-2493 or www.RunGreatRace.com

Brookline Breeze 5K Run and Fitness Walk. Plus non-competitive

Richard S. Caliguiri Great Race.

JULY 18

Men’s Golf Championship. North Park

JUNE 22

Annual Rachel Carson Trail Challenge. A 34-mile endurance hike from North Park to Harrison Hills County Park. Two shorter events — the 16-mile Homestead Challenge and a 7-mile Friends and Family Challenge — also take place that day. www.rachelcarsontrails.org

Golf Course. 412-835-3545 ◆

JULY 18-SEPT. 19

GR I T’S

Summer Natural History Tours/Walks. Boyce Park, Deer Lakes Park, Harrison Hills Park, Hartwood Acres, and White Oak Park. 724-733-4618

Al Fresco Lunch Downtown If you don’t want to walk all the way to the e Point for your picnic, try these other brown-bag-friendly spots: The table and chairs set up on the patios outside tside August Wilson Center, at Liberty Avenue ue and William Penn Place The re-vamped Market Square, now with h tables and chairs

Mellon Green, a.k.a. the former Occupy encampment. The grass has had more than a year to recover and is waiting for lazy lunchers. ers.

umm

er

n!

Fantastic fishing, all year round Beautiful sandy beaches Spectacular birding Intriguing museums & historic sites Thousands of campsites Affordable accommodations

tin d es

2013 events to check out! Oswego’s Harborfest, 7/25-28 Speedway Classic Weekend, 8/29-9/1 Dragon Boat Festival, 9/7 For events & visitor information: 1-800-248-4FUN (4386)

WWW.VISITOSWEGOCOUNTY.COM Scan QR code with your smart phone to access our complete calendar of events!

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

®NYSDED

Agnes R. Katz Plaza, at Seventh St. and Penn Ave., if you’re lucky enough to claim an eyeball to sit in

Make Oswego County your s

atio

EAT ADVENTURE!

43


Camp Deer Creek . . . since 1933

Pittsburgh’s Oldest & “Funnest” Family Owned & Operated Children’s Day Camp

June 17-August 9, 2013 • Ages 4-15 • Transportation provided in many Pittsburgh areas 412-767-5351 • www.campdeercreekonline.com

Summer KIDS ◆

ONGOING

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. Branches of the library citywide offer kids’ and teens’ programs — from storytime and crafting to children’s yoga — throughout the summer. www.carnegielibrary.org

Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh.

STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL

June 14-15, 10AM-4PM FREE ADMISSION

,

Adventures with Clifford the Big Red Dog, opening May 18, is summer’s special exhibit. There are also plenty of interactive programs, including a garden, a “makeshop” and Waterplay, a newly renovated water-based exhibit. North Side. 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

S

TR

Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium. The zoo offers plenty of kids’ programs, including the hands-on Kids Kingdom area. Highland Park. 412-665-3640 or www.pittsburghzoo.org

Tyke Hikes. Venture Outdoors presents relaxed, inexpensive nature hikes in city and county parks, for parents with children up to 8 years old. Various locations, usually weekday mornings. www.ventureoutdoors.org ◆

SUMMER DAY CAMPS

Carnegie Museums. Both the Car

rec centers all over town offer sports ning and outdoor programs; beginning June 17, Summer Food Service nch program provides breakfast, lunch ge and snacks to children up to age 18. Most centers are open 1-9 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays. 412-422-6542 or www.citiparks.net

Museum of Art and Museum of Mus Natural History hold camps for a Natu variety of ages. This year’s offerings var include camps themed around inc the 2013 Carnegie International and Architecture 101, a camp for high schoolers. Powdermill Nature Reserve, an offsite research facility in Rese Rector, Pa., offers camps as well. Oakland. 412-622-3288 or www.carnegiemnh.org/camps/

18 outdoor swimming pools from June 14 through Labor Day; swim lessons and swim team events are available at each. Beechview, East Hills, Shadyside and Troy Hill are the site of spray parks, where you can get soaked without opening a fire hydrant. 412323-7928 or www.citiparks.net

FARM

programs that help them learn in a handson manner. Focus age is tween-and-up. www.hivepgh.sproutfund.org

Citiparks Recreation Centers ers. Ten

Citiparks Swimming Pools s and Spray Parks. The city offers fers

AX

Citiparks Roving Art Cart

Š

Hive Days of Summer. Sproutoutfunded project connecting kidss with

Carnegie Science Center. The Science Center offers a series of camps throughout the summer, for ages 4 to teen. Topics range from “Creepy Crawly Bugs” r to “Livin’ It! A CanTEEN Camp.” North Side. 412-237-1637 or N www.carnegiesciencecenter.org www Girls Ro Rock! Pittsburgh. Camp for girls ages 8-16 to learn to be in a rock band. No instrument or musical ban experience necessary. Girls will form exp CONTINUES ON PG. 46

44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


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S TA R T S

Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater and Giant Eagle present

TO DAY!

9 1 5 1 y Ma PITTSBURGH NAL I NTE R N ATI O

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Theater A DIVISION OF

University of Pittsburgh Theaters and Schenley Plaza

PRESENTING SPONSOR

PGHKIDS.ORG • 412-456-6666 CP SUMMER GUIDE 2013

45


SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 44

ZOOFORTALL,

bands and perform at the end of the week. Shadyside. www.girlsrockpittsburgh.org

Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Topics include fashion, photography, puppetry and yoga — teachers include art-scene fixtures like Tom Sarver, Christine Bethea, Jennifer Hedges and Michael Lubbert. Age range 4-14. Bloomfield. www.irmafreeman.org

Monologues and Movement. Kids from grades 5-9 learn to write and present monologues at a camp presented by Prime Stage Theater and Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. June 17-21. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, Strip District. www.primestage.com National Aviary. Camps for ages 4-18, with themes like “Feathers and Fun” and “Intro to Falconry.” North Side. 412-3237235 or www.aviary.org/summer-camps

Phipps Conservatory. Camps throughout the summer for kids ages 2 and 3 (with an adult) through 12. Topics range from “A Bug’s World” to “Plant Your Plate.” Oakland. 412441-4442 x3925 or phipps.conservatory.org Animal Adventures Zoo Camp at Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium

Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Summer art camps range from “Introduction to Fashion” to “Medieval Times,” plus high school immersion camps that teach arts like animation, web design and ceramics. Shadyside. 412-361-0455 orwww.pittsburgharts.org

Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium. Animal Adventures Zoo Camp caters to kids ages 2-13, with halfday and all-day programs including “Wild Families” and “Zoo TV.” Highland Park. 412-665-3640 or www.pittsburghzoo.org

the globe, as well as hands-on educational programs. Oakland. www.pghkids.org ◆

Allegheny County Marbles Tournament. The culmination

National Watermelon Day

include “A Peek at the Past,” for kids ages 4-6, and “Passport to Imagination,” for kids entering grades 2-5. Art is central to these camps. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

MAY 15-19

is the 27th; each year, the event features performances by theater groups from around

ZOO FOR SMALL,

JUNE 18-AUG. 16

Citiparks Roving Art Cart.

Celebrating 40 years, the Roving Art Cart provides free art-creation projects for kids at different city parks each Tuesday through Friday. 412-665-3665 or www.citiparks.net ◆

Pittsburgh International Children’s Festival. This year’s iteration of the festival

pittsburghzoo.org

of the county’s annual spring marbles program, which produces a disproportionate number of national marbles champs. County Courthouse Courtyard, Downtown. 412-260-7278 or www.alleghenycounty.us

Aug. 03

The Frick Pittsburgh. Camps

MAY 30-JUNE 01

JUNE 24-30

Frick Park Red Clay Junior Open. Tennis tournament for players 16 and younger, on the clay courts at Frick Park. Regent Square. 412-244-4188 or www.citiparks.net

It’s All Greek When it comes to summer food festivals, it’s hard to beat the Greeks. Here’s a couple to get you started on indulging your taste for souvlaki, moussaka and baklava: THROUGH MAY 18 St. Nicholas. 419 S. Dithridge St., Oakland. and. 412 412-683-3866 683 3866 JUNE 12-15

Holy Cross. 123 Gilkeson Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-833-3355 JUNE 28-30

One Wild O W d Place Pll P | Pi Pitt Pittsburgh, b h PA PA 15206 115 520 0

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Holy Dormition. 12 Washington Ave., Oakmont. 412-828-4144


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SEWICKLEY 412-741-8310


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CRITICS’ PICKS

MC KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER EATER PRESENTS...

FIVE WOMEN WEARING THE SAME DRESS A COMEDY BY ALAN BALL. DIRECTED BY LORA OXENREITER

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JASON THRASHER}

1614 COURSIN ST. ST.

NOW – MAY 19, 2013

McKEESPORT

Friday & Saturday performances at 8:00pm. Sunday matinees at 2:00pm. TICKETS ARE $15 $15.00, 00 $7 $7.00 00 FOR STUDENTS GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

DISCOUNT

For up to 4 people. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Expires October 31, 2013

ds

Neiighhbborrhhoo t iic N Histor TOUR #1 H Neighborhoods ge rita TOUR #2 He

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JUNE SALE

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CARTON PRICES STARTING AT $20.00 Seneca • Opal 120s • King Mountain • Buffalo • Gator • Native Pride • Pride • Senate • Rt. 20 • Signal • Smokin’ Joe • Market • Niagara • Native Surgeon General’s Warning: Quitting Smoking Now Greatly Reduces Serious Risks To Your Health

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Futurebirds

STATION SQUARE NTOWN HOTELS AND PICKUPS FROM 6 DOW 42-2349 L RESERVATIONS CAL 1-800-3

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013

[PARTY ROCK] + SUN., MAY 19

[INDIE ROCK] + TUE., MAY 21

Since the release of I Get Wet more than a decade ago, Andrew W.K. has developed a close following for his strange, irreverent approach to music, and his party-on philosophy. Songs like “Party Hard” and “I’m a Vagabond” define his sound, which at times feels reminiscent of the kind of shameless, good-time-seeking attitude of ’80s hair-metal bands. In many ways, W.K.’s music is like hair-metal’s edgier, more genuine offspring. The energy that pours through the tracks is raw, the choruses shouted and glossless. Best of all, the whole thing translates into a memorable and passionate live performance, which will undoubtedly be showcased at Altar Bar. John Lavanga 8 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. All ages. $20-$22. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

Futurebirds, the Athens, Ga., band that just released its second full-length on Fat Possum, has alt-country tendencies, sure. But just as notable are the band’s shoegazey notes; at

Laura Stevenson and the Cans

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVE GARWACKE}

20%

h” urg e “OLLB SONeeLENth ZNER TR EY TOURS

[FOLK ROCK] OCK] + MON., MAY 20 Josh Ritterr iss a songwriter’s songwriter — heck, Josh Ritterr is a writer’s songwriter. The Americana-flavored mericana-flavored singer and d guitarist has been at it since his early y 20s, when times, it sounds like Galaxie 500, if Galaxie 500 he was at Oberlin College in had come from the South instead of Harvard. Ohio, and his latest, The Beast The reverb is heavy, and reminiscent of other in Its Tracks, indie buzz bands of late, like Real Estate. ks, s was written in the wake of his divorce from And, more importantly, the songwriting im musician Dawn Landes. is top-notch. The band plays Brillobox The sometimes-novelist tonight with times-novelist wit Coronado. AM 9 p.m. made headlines dlines across 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10-12. the state recently 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net ecently 412-621-49 when he wrote a scathing Facebook [INDIE FO FOLK] + WED., MAY 22 acebook post protesting Singer-songwriter Laura Stevenson first Singer-songw esting Messiah College’s gained notoriety for her involvement notor ollege’s anti-homosexuality in the musical collective Bomb the Music osexuality stance after Industry!, but her h solo work presents the er a show at the Mechanicsburg talented musician musici in a very different light. chanicsburg school; you Her new album, album Wheel, is a tantalizingly u won’t have Andrew W.K. to sign a pledge to stay poppy collection collectio of tracks featuring jinstraight when gling guitars and hen you go an great arrangements of to the Byham string and brass elements to add layers of ham Theater tonight to see Ritter complexity to a cheery album. Her music and Bill Deasy. borders on folky easy. Andy folk at times, making her a great fit for Club Mulkerin 8 p.m. 101 Cl Café, where she plays tonight with her Sixth St., Downtown. h group, Laura Stevenson and the Cans. $28.25-33.25. 2 . All ages. 25 Canss. JL 8 p.m. 56-58 S. 412-456-6666 666 6 or 66 12th St., Sou South uth th Side. $10 412-431-4950 www.trustarts.org or www.clubcafelive.com tartts.o org www w.cl clubca l {PHOTO COURTESY OF CHERIE ROBERTS}

PRESENT THIS AD FOR A

(412) 673-1100 For Reservations www.mckeesportlittletheater.com


OPUS ONE PRESENTS

LISA FERRARO AND ERIKA LUCKETT (EARLY) WHEN THE PLANETS (LATE) TIM RUFF (ALBUM RELEASE SHOW) LAURA STEVENSON ANNE FEENEY MR. CHRIS COMBO & MOTOMETER (EARLY) AN EVENING OF COMEDY WITH KRISH MOHAN KINETIC (EARLY) THE TRUTH FT. PAUL BENSON & AYESHA SCOTT (LATE) 05/30 PETER CASE 05/31 PAUL KELLY 05/17 05/17 05/21 05/22 05/23 05/24 05/24 05/25 05/25

05/21 FUTUREBIRDS 05/24 JEFF THE BROTHERHOOD

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} WED, MAY 15 • 9PM FUNK/ROCK FROM NEW ORLEANS

JOHNNY SKETCH AND THE DIRTY NOTES THUR, MAY 16 • 8PM CLASSIC COUNTRY

SLIM FORSYTHE BIG BAND

MAY 16 Derek Woodz Band

MAY 23 City Buses

FRI, MAY 17 • 9PM ROCK

FAUN FABELS AND TURPENTINERS SAT, MAY 18 • 9PM FUNK

NEW YORK FUNK EXCHANGE MON, MAY 19 • 9:30PM

OPEN STAGE WITH CRAIG KING TUES, MAY 20 • 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH

THE THOTH TRIO OPEN FOR LUNCH Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

ROCK/POP THU 16

1810 TAVERN. The Redlines. Bridgewater. 724-355-3494. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Chuck Prophet & the Mission Express. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Driftwood, The Armadillos. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Simon & Garfunkel Retrospective. Tribute concert. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LAVA LOUNGE. Derek Woodz Band, Supper Break String Band. South Side. 412-431-5282. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Escape The Fate,The Color Morale, Glamour Of The Kill. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Bessemers, Slim Forsythes Rockin Gospel Hour. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 17

SAT, MAY 18 vs TAMPA BAY STORM AT

$2 84

AMERICAN LAGER 16oz Draft DURING POWER GAMES

4251 Northern Pike MONROEVILLE

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013

31ST STREET PUB. The Whiskey Daredevils, $4 Mistake, The Lobotomites. Strip District. 412-391-8334. 565 LIVE. The Satin Hearts. Bellevue. 412-761-9500. CLUB CAFE. When The Planets, Tohu Bara (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. FRANKIE’S. Fungus. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Lady Lamb The Beekeeper, Xenia Rubinos, Midge Crickett. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. The Nomadx, Tommy Kupiac. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. The Dave Iglar Band. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HEY ANDY’S. Daniels & McClain. Monongahela. 724-258-4755. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Triggers, The Red Western, Good Sport. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. The Long Knives, The Fissures, Antimony. South Side. 412-770-4983. KENDREW’S. The GRID. Aliquippa. 724-375-5959. MOONDOG’S. Norman Nardini, Jake Banta. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PENN HEBRON GARDEN CLUB. Charlie Hustle & the Grifters. Penn Hills. 412-657-0635. ROY’S BY THE TRACKS. The Bill Ali Band. Finleyville. 724-348-7118. SMILING MOOSE. Mutts Ray Lanich Band, The Mutts. South Side. 412-431-4668.

STAGE AE. For My Valentine, Young Guns, Halestorm, Stars In Stereo. North Side. STRAND THEATER. The Music of Irving Berlin. Feat. Rita McKenzie. Zelienople. 724-742-0400. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Faun Fables, The Turpentiners. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 18

562 MERCHANT ST. The Dave Iglar Band. Part of Ambridge Nationality Days. Ambridge. ANCIENT ORDER OF HIBERNIANS. Brad Wagner & the Barflys. Pitcairn. 412-829-2399. BRIDGEVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY. Hewlett Anderson. Bridgeville. 412-221-3737. CATTIVO. Solar Burn. Metal Night w/ band, DJ, costume contest, vendors, more. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CH-CHANGES. The Fabulous Miss Wendy, Hear Kitty Kitty, The Theadora Kelly Project, Mahi Gato. New Castle. 724-923-4800. CLUB CAFE. El Ten Eleven, Michna. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. RPG’s. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Goddamn

Zombie, Curse Born, Willbozarth, Jerry Fels & the Jerry Fels. Aliquippa. 724-375-5080. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Wreck Loose, Welch & Penn, Derek Krystek. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Wink & The Single. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARVEY WILNER’S. JellyRoll. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Paddy The Wanderer, The Jump Cuts, Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JOHNNY’S. Southside Jerry & Friends. Wilmerding. 412-824-6642. LATITUDE 40. The Standard Band. North Fayette. 412-593-5555. MOONDOG’S. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Ghost B.C., Ides Of Gemini. Millvale. 866-468-3401. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. The Satin Hearts. Downtown. 412-471-9100. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. The Mike Scheer Band. Shaler. 412-487-6259. SHADY SIDE ACADEMY. Carolina Liar. Benefits the Homeless Children’s Education Fund. Fox Chapel. 412-968-3160. SMILING MOOSE. Patron Saint, Bare Minimum, Braynstream

LOCAL TWEETS Recent dispatches from the music Twittersphere @MacMiller (Mac Miller)

I do not side with any one religion. All of you have your reasons and your positives that come from what you believe.

@MacMiller (Mac Miller)

I just hope none of u are ignorant enough to think you are more sure of the “truth” then the next man.

Records. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Angry Johnny Stangry & the CRS Band. New Alexandria. 724-433-1322. STRAND THEATER. The Music of Irving Berlin. Feat. Rita McKenzie. Zelienople. 724-742-0400. THREE STREETS GRILLE. Gone South. Finleyville. 724-348-8030. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. New York Funk Exchange. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. THE WAC CLUB. Daniels & McClain. Clairton.

SUN 19

ALTAR BAR. Andrew W.K. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Grant Lee Phillips. South Side. 412-431-4950. FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. REO Speedwagon, Styx, Ted Nugent. Burgettstown. 724-947-7400. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Weird Paul Rock Band 99 Cent Variety Show. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

MON 20

ALTAR BAR. Red. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

TUE 21

ALTAR BAR. Pete Wentz. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. Futurebirds, Coronado. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Tim Ruff, Joy Ike, Zach Rock. Tim Ruff album release show. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The People’s Temple, Lost Realms, The Dumplings. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. PETER B’S. Har-di-Har. Sarver. 724-353-2677. SMILING MOOSE. Cheap Girls, Diamond Youth, I Am A Sea Creature. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Fall Out Boy. North Side.

WED 22

ALTAR BAR. Crown The Empire. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Laura Stevenson, Field Mouse, Homeless Gospel Choir. South Side. 412-431-4950. ROCK BOTTOM. Good Brother Earl. Waterfront. 412-462-2739. SMILING MOOSE. Matt Pryor, James Dewees, Into It. Over It. South Side. 412-431-4668.

DJS @MacMiller (Mac Miller)

now look at my album cover. Still think I’m just naked for attention?

THU 16

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273.


FRI 17

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Anthony Suzan. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Dance/ top 40 hits. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3730. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 18

720 RECORDS. Classic Material. Feat. Large Professor & DJ Selecta. Lawrenceville. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. Gypsy, Bhangra, Arabic Hip-Hop, Bollywood, more w/ Pandemic Pete, Preslav, Joey J. & Tina Milo. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. MEXICO CITY. DJ Juan Diego VII. Salsa & Latin music. Downtown. 412-980-7653. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Tracksploitation. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Dance/ top 40 hits. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3730. REMEDY. Push It! DJ Huck Finn, DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

SUN 19

RIVERS CASINO. DJs Bill Bara & Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 21

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. DJ Zan Naz, DJ Outtareach. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

WED 22

AVA BAR & LOUNGE. DJ Outtareach. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. HAMBONE’S. DJ Mangler. 50s–70s Old time Rock N’ Roll. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Magic. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 18

CJ’S. House of Soul. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

SUN 19

STAGE AE. A$AP Ferg. North Side.

BLUES

LA CASA NARCISI. Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. LITTLE E’S. Jeff Bush Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe Negri w/ Jeff Lashway. Downtown. 412-281-7100. PARK HOUSE. Jeremy Franz Project. North Side. 412-224-2273.

BONNIE & CLYDE’S. Roger EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Don Barbour Jazz Quartet. Wexford. Hollowood’s Cobra Kings. South 724-934-2110. Side. 412-431-4090. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse SPEAKEASY. The Blues Orphans. Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. North Side. 412-904-3335. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip Gresh Gris Gris. Downtown. District. 412-642-2377. 412-471-9100. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Jill SPEAKEASY. Ken Karsh West & Blues Attack. Quartet, Sweaty Betty Shaler. 412-487-6259. Blues Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. JT’S. Elan Trotman. . w w CIP’S. The Stingrays. w Monroeville. paper Dormont. 412-668-2335. pghcitym .co 412-292-1753. FRANK’S PUB & GRILL. LITTLE E’S. The Eddie Billy Price. Bethel Park. 412Brookshire Quartet. 833-4606. Downtown. 412-392-2217. HARD ROCK CAFE. Pittsburgh SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Night of Blues. Hosted by the Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala. Bottom Shelf Blues Band. Station Greensburg. 724-850-7245. Square. 412-481-7625.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

SAT 18

INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. THE R BAR. The Accelerators. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RICH’S PARKSIDE DEN. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. McKeesport. 412-896-1966. WIGHTMAN SCHOOL. Jimmy Adler Band. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-5708.

SUN 19

SUN 19

ROYAL PLACE. Jerry Lucarelli, Vince Taglieri, Sunny Sunseri. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ the Thoth Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUNNY JIM’S TAVERN. The Blue Bombers, Patrick Scanga. Kilbuck. 412-761-6700.

JAZZ

$15 large pizza & pitcher domestic beer FREE POOL all night

PRODUCTIONS

Wind Up wednesdays

ROBIN HOOD OOD

$2 Miller Lite Drafts til 12am FREE POOL all night ½ off Select Appetizers 9-11pm

MAY 17, 18, 24, 25

SAT 18

FRI 17

Pizza & Beer Night tuesdays

STAGE & STEEL

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Eric Johnson & the Fabulous A Team. North Side. 412-904-3335. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

Thirsty thursdays

$7 Yuengling Pitchers til 12am Karaoke 9:30-1:30am

DINNER THEATER

Happy Hour 6-8pm

FRIDAY MAY 17th FRIDAY MAY 24th Show 7:30pm

Tickets on Sale NOW

TI CK ETS:

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$25 General $20 Student/Senior $10 Kids 12 & Under

05.19 Latrice Royale Anti-Bullying Benefit 06.14 Jujubee Loud & Proud Show

Reservation only! STAGEANDSTEEL.COM 412-480-4758

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TUE 21

THU 16

ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. Two Wheel Pass. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Charles Wallace Quartet. Downtown. 412-471-9100. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jam Session w/ Poogie Bell & Erik Lawrence. North Side. 412-904-3335.

FRI 17

ACOUSTIC

AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Bridgette Perdue. Downtown. 412-589-9144. CAFE NOTTE. Brian Edwards Excursion. Emsworth. 412-761-2233. CLUB CAFE. Lisa Ferraro & Erika Luckett (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Neon Swing Xperience. North Side. 412-904-3335.

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WED 22

720 RECORDS. James Johnson, Paul Thompson, Cliff Barnes. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. SEWICKLEY HOTEL. Daval/ Stater Guitar Duo. Sewickley. 412-427-9979.

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BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jess Sides. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. SEVICHE. Jason Kendall, Jim Graff. Downtown. 412-697-3120.

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86

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013

(412) 322-WAGE www.carlsonlynch.com

FRI 17

BEER NUTZ PLAZA. Tim & John. Fox Chapel. 412-963-6882. BONNIE & CLYDE’S. Lenny & Jeff. Wexford. 724-934-2110. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin The Troubadour. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. PENN BREWERY. Claire Stucznyski. North Side. 412-237-9400. SEWICKLEY HOTEL. Rick Revetta. Sewickley. 412-741-9457.

EARLY WARNINGS Local release shows

SAT 18

MARS BREW HOUSE. Carl Schubert. Mars. 724-625-2555. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. PENN BREWERY. John Galt Theory. North Side. 412-237-9400.

Allies

{SUN., MAY 19}

Heartless Certain Death 7-inch release

SUN 19

HAMBONE’S. Calliope Old Time Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. PITTSBURGH PUBLIC MARKET. Alex Korshin & Keith Watson, Broke, Stranded & Ugly. Strip District. 412-281-4505.

With Vitamin X, Dead in the Dirt, Hounds of Hate, Radium Girls

Mr. Roboto Project, 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield {SAT., JUNE 01}

Ben Valasek and the Growlers Time Waits for No One CD release

MON 20

HAMBONE’S. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. NORTH COUNTRY BREWING. Bluegrass Night. Slippery Rock. 724-794-2337.

WED 22

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD SAT 18

MULLANEY’S HARP & FIDDLE. Red Hand Paddy. Strip District. 412-266-5778.

WED 22

FERRANTE’S LAKEVIEW. Cahal Dunne’s Grand To Be Irish. Presented by Latshaw Productions. Greensburg. 724-834-4590.

COUNTRY THU 16

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

FRI 17

THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Shannon Labrie. Harmony. 570-294-6450.

SAT 18

FRIENDS BAR. Northern Road. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027. MONESSEN VOL. FIRE DEPT. #1 SOCIAL HALL. Dallas Marks. Monessen. NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe & his New Payday Loners. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

CLASSICAL FRI 17

PITTSBURGH PHILHARMONIC. Romeo & Juliet. Succop Theater,

Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side

{FRI., JUNE 14}

Allies/German Shepherd split 7-inch release

Howlers, 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield

Butler Community College, Butler. 724-284-8505. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Feat. Yan Pascal Tortelier, conductor & Valentina Lisitsa, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 18

GO FOR BAROQUE. Persiani, Giacomelli, Vivaldi. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100. PAUL COHAN. Cafe Notte, Emsworth. 412-761-2233. PITTSBURGH CIVIC ORCHESTRA. Upper St. Clair High School, Upper St. Clair. 412-279-4030. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Feat. Yan Pascal Tortelier, conductor & Valentina Lisitsa, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Around the World with Disney. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

SUN 19

Scott. 412-668-0903. KEAN THEATRE. Chuck Blasko & The Vogues. Gibsonia. 724-444-5326.

FRI 17

BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Vox Lumina. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. PALACE THEATRE. River City Brass. Beach Blanket Brass. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

SAT 18

CHARTIERS VALLEY INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL AUDITORIUM. Harmony Singers of Pittsburgh. Born to be Somebody. Scott. 724-941-5343. CLUB COLONY. Groove Doctors. Scott. 412-668-0903. LEMONT. Judi Figel. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. River City Brass Band. Beach Blanket Brass Concert. Midland. 724-643-9004.

FULL LIST ONLINE

ORCHESTRA OF THE ALLEGHENIES. www. per CHARTIERS VALLEY McKeesport Area pa pghcitym INTERMEDIATE High School, McKeesport. .co SCHOOL AUDITORIUM. 412-664-2854. Harmony Singers of PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY Pittsburgh. Born to be ORCHESTRA. Feat. Yan Pascal Somebody. Scott. 724-941-5343. Tortelier, conductor & Valentina Lisitsa, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. RICHARD KONZEN. Aeolian pipe Jazz Standards & Showtunes organ concert. Hartwood Acres, singalong. Lawrenceville. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. 412-681-4318.

SUN 19

MON 20

OTHER MUSIC THU 16

CLUB COLONY. Mark Vennere.

WED 22

CLUB COLONY. Mark Vennere. Scott. 412-668-0903.


What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

May 15 - 21 WEDNESDAY 15

866-468-3401 or ticketweb. com/opusone. 8p.m.

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH THEATERS AND SCHENLEY PLAZA Oakland. For more info visit pghkids.org or call 412-456-6666. Through May 19.

Simon & Garfunkel Retrospective

Childrens Festival

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

Slant 6 & Westward Hollow. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

ELGAR, GRIEG & RAVEL FRIDAY, MAY 17 HEINZ HALL

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guests Tom Breiding. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Johnny Sketch & The Dirty Notes THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8:30p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-263-2877. All ages 412-821-4447. With special guests Ides of Gemini. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m. show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8:30p.m.

JERGELS RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. Tickets: jergels.com. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests State Champs, The Composure, Paper States & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

MONDAY 20 Red

52nd Annual Greek Food Festival ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX CATHEDRAL Oakland. 412-682-3866. Free event. For more info visit stnickspgh.org. 11a.m.

FRIDAY 17

Elgar, Grieg & Ravel

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests We As Human, Southbound Fearing & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

SUNDAY 19

Josh Ritter and the Juicy J - Stay Trippy Tour River City Band

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through May 19.

Bullet For My Valentine: The HardDrive Tour

THURSDAY 16

gettstown. Tickets: livenation. com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

Andrew W.K.

Ghost B.C.

Cartel

Danny Schmidt & Carrie Elkin

newbalancepittsburgh.com

STAGE AE North Side. With Escape the Fate special guest Halestorm, MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. Young Guns & Stars In Stereo. 412-821-4447. With special All ages show. Tickets: guests The Color Morale & ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Doors open at 6p.m. more. All ages show. Tickets:

SATURDAY 18

consolenergycenter.com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

Pittsburgh Power vs. Tampa Bay Storm

Middle Class Rut

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets:

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests

STAGE AE North Side. With special guest A$AP Ferg. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Doors open at 7p.m.

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

The Midwest Rock N’ Roll Express: REO Speedwagon, Ted Nugent and Styx

Abigail 1702

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Bur-

TUESDAY 21 CITY THEATRE South Side. 412-431-CITY. Tickets: citytheatrecompany.org. Through May 26.

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A NEW DAY {BY AL HOFF}

THE 3-D IS UNNECESSARY UNLESS YOU LIKE DRESS SHIRTS TOSSED IN YOUR FACE

Japanese anime is associated with films that are fantastical, cyberpunkish or require the creative license that animation can provide. But the latest feature from the renowned Ghibli studio co-founded by Hayao Miyazaki, From Up on Poppy Hill, is quite simply a slice of ordinary life. It’s 1963 and Japan is prepping for the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. But in the harbor town of Yokohama, teen-age Umi is running a boarding house, going to school and falling in love. She’s taken with Shun, a bright boy from her school, who helps to lead a campaign to save the ramshackle student-activities clubhouse from the wrecking ball.

In the pink: Jay Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio)

DREAM BOY {BY AL HOFF}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ©2011 CHIZURU TAKAHASHITETSURO SAYAMA-GNDHDDT}

Umi embarks on another busy day.

CP APPROVED

The film’s small story is set against a larger cultural one, as Japan transitions from the sorrows and hardships of the last generation’s wars to being a modern world power. Nearly every scene contains visual cues that show Japan’s mish-mash of old and new, while the story illustrates this new generation, caught between the nostalgic pull of the past and the responsibility of leading this new Japan. The late Hayao Miyazaki wrote the script (adapted from a manga), and the film is directed by his son, Goro Miyazaki. While the hand-drawn Poppy Hill doesn’t have the sublime nature of studio’s best work, like Spirited Away, it’s charming and filled with exquisite visual details, such as the bubbles of fat in the cooking pot or the ever-changing light over the harbor. Dubbed in English. Starts Fri., May 17. Harris AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Registration is now open for Pittsburgh’s

48 Hour Film Project.

The event happens July 12-14, when you and some pals get 48 hours to write, cast, produce, shoot and edit a short film; genre, mandatory prop and line, and other requirements will be assigned then. Completed films will be screened in late July. You must register by June 17 to get the early-bird discount. More information at www.48hourfilm.com.

88

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013

O

N ONE LEVEL, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is about puncturing grand myths and the manipulation of smaller truths. In that spirit, I’ll confess to not having read the Jazz Age novel since the Carter administration, and will spare you the howthis-movie-ruins-the-book screed. Instead, allow me to lay out some concerns about how Baz Luhrman’s infatuation with re-inventing classics and dispensing glitter undermines his film adaptation. This Gatsby isn’t the delirious train wreck some of us feared (or hoped) it would be, but it’s not a success, either. And if these complaints seem petty, well, everything about this film seems to encourage a viewer to process it superficially. A Bit of Everything: Luhrman seems determined to shoehorn the novel into a variety of user-friendly genre slots: noirish mystery, melodrama, music video and even rom-com (the first hour got a lot of laughs). And somehow, a short book got turned into a very long movie. Framing Devices Galore: The story, set in 1922, is narrated by Gatsby’s pal, Nick Carraway (Tobey Maguire), who, in 1929, is in a sanitarium. He relates the story to his doctor and writes it up as therapy; his spoken words (both handwritten and typed) also appear on screen. And, we begin and end the story going through monogrammed “JG” gates.

Playing the Part: Gatsby is intentionally theatrical, but that archness makes some scenes resemble an expensively produced high school play. Too often, exuberant behavior is cartoonish, while elsewhere the characters’ disaffected ennui is flat and dull. The lavish party scenes are like a casting call for RuPaul’s Drag Race — all shrieking, sparkly feathers and candy-colored bathing suits. Speaking of which: Is Daisy (Carey Mulligan) wearing a cheap wig? Oh Dear, Old Sport: Leonardo DiCaprio seems a reasonable facsimile for Gatsby, the boy from nowhere who re-invents himself partly through costumes and affected speech. But no matter how dreamily DiCaprio is photographed (loved the pink suit, darling!), he remains a mannequin, offering us little emotional entry into Gatsby’s tragedy.

THE GREAT GATSBY

DIRECTED BY: Baz Luhrman STARRING: Leonardo DiCaprio, Tobey Maguire, Carey Mulligan, Joel Edgerton In 3-D, in select theaters

Script by Cliffs Notes: Every theme is spelled out and repeated, as if this story of the disillusion of the American Dream is too hard for any of us in 2013 to understand. And that green light Gatsby can’t stop staring at? You’ll see and hear a lot about it. Beat On Ceaselessly: “You can’t repeat the past,” we’re told. And I’d add: You can’t make it 3-D, either. Luhrman’s decision to do so is totally unnecessary, unless you like dizzying plummets, and glittery things and dress shirts tossed in your face. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW

THE HANGOVER PART III. The wolf pack winds up getting in trouble in Las Vegas again. Todd Phillips directs this raucous comedy starring Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms, Zach Galifianakis and Ken Jeong. Starts Thu., May 23. KISS OF THE DAMNED. Zombies have received so much press lately, we’ve forgotten about the other undead we used to love — vampires. Kiss of the Damned Fans of the sexy, Eurotrash strain of vamps — perpetual life is so languid, dahlink — should through Sun., May 19, at various venues. See www. be pleased with this latest entry, a melodrama silkscreenfestival.org for complete schedule. from Xan Cassavetes (daughter of the late filmmaker John). STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS. Uh oh — somebody Flame-haired Djuna (Joséphine de La blew up the Enterprise! Kirk, Spock and the gang now Baume) is bunking down in a Connecticut estate. must uncover and defeat the evil forces responsible. She meets a handsome screenwriter named J.J. Abrams directs this sci-fi actioner. Starts Wed., May Paolo (Milo Ventimiglia) at the video store (!), 15, in select IMAX theaters; everywhere else on Thu., and the pair become instantly enraptured, so May 16. much so that she confesses she’s a vampire. He doesn’t care, so she half-bites him and they become forever lovers. Their idyllic nights are shattered when BLAZIN G SADDLES. OK, so cowboys and beans Djuna’s bad-girl sister, Mimi (Roxane Mesquida), don’t mix, but Mel Brooks’ riotous send-up of turns up. (After causing some bloody trouble Westerns, riddled with gleefully offensive jokes, overseas, Mimi’s on her holds together just fine. This way to vampire rehab. 1974 laugh-fest stars Gene It’s just a throwaway Wilder, Cleavon Little and line, but there’s an the incomparable Madeline Intervention spinoff Kahn. 2 and 7 p.m. Wed., I’d like to see.) Mimi’s May 15. Cinemark Robinson bad behavior ripples and Pittsburgh Mills throughout the Greater New York-area THE ’BURBS. Tom Hanks, vampire community, Bruce Dern and Carrie Fisher where, it seems, the star in Joe Dante’s 1989 good manners of the comedy about a pair of genteel blood-sucking suburban pals who wonder set are very fragilely whether another neighbor maintained. might be a cannibal. It’s all rather 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 15. stylishly filmed, with AMC Loews. $5 Ki-Duk Kim’s new feature, Pieta, screens at the Silk Screen festival. just enough sex and dripping blood to THE FRUIT HUN TERS. make this unsuitable viewing for the Twilighters. This new documentary from Yung Chang (Up the It’s a bit soapish, but then again, the questions of Yangtze) looks at man’s long and fruitful (sorry) commitment, betrayal, love and amorality that relationship with nature’s sweet bounty. The film are pondered here are fair game in any genre. features actor and community activist Bill Pullman, 7 and 9:15 p.m. Fri., May 17; 10 p.m. Sat., May as well as macro photography of various exotic fruits. 18; and 7 p.m. Sun., May 19. Hollywood (Al Hoff) Fruit Hunters will be preceded by a short film about mushrooms, and how they might hold the answers SILK SCREEN ASIAN AMERICAN FILM to current environmental problems. In English, and FESTIVAL. The festival featuring recent films various languages, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Thu., May 16, from Asia, the Middle East and the U.S. continues and 11 a.m. Sat., May 18. SouthSide Works

REPERTORY

To view the official festival line-up and schedule, and to purchase festival tickets, please visit silkscreenfestival.org

CONTINUES ON PG. 90

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 89

MARKO FRIDAY N IGHT. Catch a sneak preview of this locally cast and produced comedy, written and directed by Ben Dietels. Former rock star Marko is now reduced to working at a supermarket, but when his old pal comes to town, he gets his mojo back through a crazy night out. 7 p.m. Fri., May 18. Hollywood. Free THE THIEVES. Choi Dong-hoon’s heist film was a gigantic hit in South Korea, and who doesn’t like a twisty crime caper with a huge cast of pretty people, exotic locales and kicky stuntwork? Two criminal FROM THE LEGENDARY STUDIO GHIBLI CREATORS OF SPIRITED AWAY AND THE SECRET WORLD OF ARRIETTY

BREATHTAKING!” “VISUAL VISUAL S MAG MAGIC! MAGIC GIC C!!” “STUNNING! -

-Peter Debruge, VARIETY

AS BEAUTIFUL A HAND DRAWN ANIMATED FEATURE AS YOU ARE LIKELY TO SEE!” -Kenneth Turan, LOS ANGELES TIMES

++++

ONE OF THE SHIMMERING HIGHLIGHTS OF THE YEAR!”

-Michael Phillips, CHICAGO TRIBUNE

A MUST-SEE!”

-Peter Rainer, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR

WRITTEN BY HAYAO MIYAZAKI DIRECTED BY GORO MIYAZAKI

STARTS FRI 5/17

HARRIS THEATRE

© 2011 2011, 01 1 2012 20 12 CHIZURU C H IZ IZURU ZURU URU U TAKAHASHI TA A TAKA - TETSURO RO O SAYAMA SAYA AYA MA - GNDHDDT GNDHD NDHD DD DTT

-AO Scott, THE NEW YORK TIMES

809 LIBERTY AVENUE 0)443"52'(s  

gangs join forces to rob a reputedly impenetrable casino in Macau, but the execution is imperiled by personal dramas (there’s love and hate among the crew), secret agendas, people pretending to be somebody else, and plot twists galore. This Ocean’s Eleven-style feature is nothing but good fun for us, though. Screens as part of Silk Screen. In Korean, with subtitles. 8:15 p.m. Fri., May 17. Regent Square (AH)

(Shelley Duvall) and son Danny (Danny Lloyd), are in grave peril of losing their minds — and lives. Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 adaptation of Stephen King’s novel drops some of King’s supernatural elements in favor of omnipresent dread and a meditation about the collapsing family unit, but it’s still a freaky, hair-raising ride. The film continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of classic comedies; your call if this film is funny or scary. 8 p.m. Sun., May 19. Regent Square (AH)

THEY LIVE. A working-class dude named Nada (Roddy Piper) discovers the truth behind people’s infuriating complacency: They’re being continually brainwashed into submission to serve the needs of an elite class of aliens. John Carpenter’s campy 1988 sci-fi thriller (with fisticuffs!) has since gained status as a trenchant observation on class, consumerism and why we so eagerly do as we’re told by corporate entities. 10 p.m. Fri., May 17, and 10 p.m. Sat., May 18. Oaks (AH) VALLEY OF SAIN TS. Musa Syeed’s gentle dramedy takes place at Dal Lake, in Kashmir, where a young man named Gulzar operates a water taxi and dreams of leaving the troubled region. But an encounter with a visiting researcher, stranded at the lake during a week of curfew, causes Gulzar to re-assess his place in the world. The film is a rare chance to see this scenic area, home to colorful boats and lotus flowers, but also imperiled by careless development and pollution. Screens as part of Silk Screen. In Kashmiri, with subtitles. Noon, Sat., May 11, and 3 p.m. Sun., May 19. Carnegie MIBSTERS. “Not everybody says, ‘Oh, I’m gonna go practice marbles,’ but now I say that a lot.” That’s the attitude you need if you’re hoping to win the National Marble Tournament. Jeff Eddings’ hour-long doc follows three boys from Pittsburgh as they seek mibster glory at the annual championship, held in Wildwood, N.J. 2 p.m. Sat., May 18. Heinz History Center, 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. Free

M. Fritz Lang’s gorgeously shot 1931 film details a Berlin working-class community’s search for a child-killer, in which the horror of the crime causes police and criminals to work together. Peter Lorre is indelible as the predator, his portrayal both horrifying and pitiable. Screens in a new digitally restored version. In German, with subtitles. Mon., May 20, through Thu., May 23. Regent Square (AH)

CP

{PHOTO COURTESY OF COMMUNITY PHARMACY}

Shift Change: Putting Democracy to Work

with museum admission. 412-454-6000 or www. heinzhistorycenter.org KEY OF LIFE. In this Japanese comedy (with a dash of romance and crime thriller added), a struggling actor assumes the identity of a sophisticated hitman after the latter suffers a bout of amnesia. Kenji Uchida’s film has fun tweaking identity, and what it means to play roles in everyday life. The rather lazy actor has trouble selling himself as a gangster, while the meticulous and organized hitman finds success as a cheesy actor. Screens as part of Silk Screen. In Japanese, with subtitles. 2 p.m. Fri., May 17. Melwood (AH) THE SHIN IN G. It seemed like a great opportunity for writer Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson) and his family: a caretaking gig at an isolated mountain hotel. But the place is wicked haunted, and soon the little family, including wife

CP

CHARGE. This recent doc from Mark Neale (Faster and Fastest) captures the build-up to and execution of the world’s first zero-emissions motorcycle grand prix in June 2009. To be preceded by a short film, “Solar Roadways,” about making cars solar-powered. 7 p.m. Thu., May 23, and 11 a.m. Sat., May 25. SouthSide Works SHIFT CHANGE: PUTTING DEMOCRACY TO WORK. This new documentary from Melissa Young and Mark Dworkin looks at the growth of worker-owned cooperatives, in the U.S. and around the world. The film screens as part of the Battle of Homestead Foundation’s monthly film series, featuring works related to labor and economic issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 23. Pump House, Homestead. Free. 412-831-3871 AN DY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

Happy hour has never been so interesting! This Thursday, May 16 Free; Cash bar 5:30–9 p.m. Happy Hour 6–7 p.m. Gallery Conversation The Associated Artists of Pittsburgh 102nd Annual Exhibition Come see this latest installment of the Associated Artists exhibition, a Pittsburgh tradition featuring work by members of AAP, one of the oldest and largest visual arts organizations in the country. Hear award winners Atticus Adams, Seth Clark, and Kara Skylling discuss their art and the creative energy that is making Pittsburgh a destination for practicing artists. Culture Club is sponsored by Thursday night, May 16, free admission (4–8 p.m.) is courtesy of the museums' directors and the Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD).

tues–sat: 10–5 | thurs: 10–8 | sun: noon–5 guided tours daily | members visit free cmoa.org | 412.622.3131 one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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[DANCE]

DUBOIS AND BLUM DRAMATIZE THEIR SUBJECTS WITHOUT IDEALIZING THEM

FRESH LEGS {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PITTSBURGH BALLET THEATRE SCHOOL PRE-PROFESSIONAL SHOWCASE. 7 p.m. Fri., May 17; 1 and 7 p.m. Sat., May 18; and 1 p.m. Sun., May 19. $20. 412-281-0360 or www.pbt.org N E W S

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COMPARE

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CONTRAST {PHOTO COURTESY OF DUANE RIEDER}

{BY ROBERT RACZKA}

A dancer as the white swan from Swan Lake

While Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre is one of the nation’s top ballet companies, its school also has a reputation for turning out top talent. The school draws dancers from around the world to hone their skills in preparation for a professional career. A highlight of that training is the annual Pre-Professional Showcase, May 17-19 at Point Park University’s George Rowland White Performance Studio. For area dance fans, the showcase is an early look at some of the high school and graduate-student dancers, ages 14 to 22, who will soon populate companies including PBT. One such dancer is Willoughby, Ohio, native Diana Yohe, who will join PBT as an apprentice next season. Yohe, 18, trained at Cleveland City Dance and Joffrey Ballet’s trainee program before entering PBT’s graduate program. She’ll dance lead roles in two of the showcase’s six works. At the matinee on Sat., May 18, she’ll perform the role of the white swan Odette in Act II divertissements from Marius Petipa’s classic ballet Swan Lake. It’s staged by PBT artistic director Terrence Orr, who Yohe says calls the role as a “thinking game.” Adds Yohe, “You have to picture each step you do in your head. They can go perfectly or come out terribly wrong. Your job is to still make them look beautiful.” Yohe will also be featured in Michael Smuin’s 1978 ballet “Quattro a Verdi” (7 p.m., May 18, and 1 p.m. May 19). Staged by PBT School’s newest faculty member, Andre Reyes, and set to opera music by Giuseppe Verdi, the ballet is a virtuoso pas de quatre that pays homage to Petipa’s classic pas de deux formula, only with four dancers instead of two. “It’s super-energetic and the hardest thing I have danced so far,” says Yohe. Also on the program will be: David Lichine’s one-act ballet “Graduation Ball”; August Wilson Center Dance Ensemble member James Washington’s celebratory work “Beauty, the Lack Of,” set to music by Olafur Arnalds; the classic Italian “Tarantella” dance; and “Prossimo,” a new ballet by Reyes for 12 male dancers that he calls “a showcase for the boys to do what they live to do.” Of the showcase, Orr says, “It’s very much a full-fledged production and quite challenging for the dancers.”

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ONTINUUM: Doug DuBois and Aaron

Blum is the first in a projected series of contemporary photography exhibits exploring mentorship and influence — generally between teacher and student. Blum received an MFA in photography in 2010 from Syracuse University, where he studied with DuBois, and each is represented by selections from a recent longterm project focusing on a social group in a defined location. DuBois and Blum dramatize their subjects without idealizing them, creating nuanced images that reflect an intimate knowledge acquired through extensive personal interaction and, in Blum’s case, shared history and identity. Doug DuBois, a 50-ish prof, has been prestigiously exhibited, published, collected, fellowshipped and honored as an educator. His project “My Last Day at Seventeen” (2009-12) is a sensitive depiction of coming-of-age in a housing estate in southwestern Ireland, where the project grew out of an artist’s residency that included working with at-risk youth. DuBois’ photographs feature people — mostly teen-agers — alone or in groups, and in their expressions we can read uncertainties and anxieties that are not unusual among those on the threshold of adulthood. But those emotions are heightened by Ireland’s economic problems and the lack of opportunity that beclouds the subjects’ future. Each of DuBois’ portraits has an emotional poignancy, along with an unsettled

From Doug DuBois’ “My Last Day at Seventeen” series

quality created by facial expression, pose, details (patches of graffiti, broken windows, an antisocial tattoo) and subtle tensions of angle and composition. Many also include

CONTINUUM: DOUG DUBOIS AND AARON BLUM continues through June 1. Silver Eye Center for Photography, 1015 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereye.org

a considered slice of locale, including seacoast, park and street views around the brightly colored housing. The houses and surroundings generally look relatively clean and decently maintained, and the young

people look fairly healthy, though many appear anxious or sullen, coupled with flashes of bravado among the young men. This is not a picture of desperate poverty, but a world in which young people of limited means are challenged by an uncertain future, short on optimism and hope. Aaron Blum’s “Born and Raised” (201013) depicts an environment closer to home: his hometown of New Martinsville, W.Va. Thirty-year-old Blum, formerly director of education at Silver Eye, currently works as an adjunct photography instructor in the Pittsburgh area. His lyrical color photographs portray his “upper middle class family and friends,” showing an underrepresented side of life in often-stereotyped rural Appalachia. As with DuBois, Blum includes evocative portraits of people posed CONTINUES ON PG. 92

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University of Pittsburgh Campus, July 15-26 (M-F) 9am – Noon, Cathedral of Learning (Grades 4-8) (M-F) 10am – 1pm, Cathedral of Learning (Grades 9-12)

Pine-Richland, July 15-25 (Monday - Wednesday) 9am – Noon (Grades 4-8) (Thursdays) 9am – 3pm (Grades 4-8)

Mt. Lebanon, June 17-27 (Monday - Wednesday) 9am – Noon (Grades 4-8) (Thursdays) 9am – 3pm (Grades 4-8) For more information, please visit:

www.wpwp.pitt.edu/youth/ywi/ or call 412-624-6557

in a variety of surroundings. But Blum casts a wider net, using interior still lifes and views of large-scale industry and unpeopled landscapes. In each case, Blum manages the image effectively, condensing aspects of the world into a slice of time and space, yielding a stand-alone photograph that is laden with information and suggestive of insight, yet open-ended. While a photograph might feature a nuclear power plant or an up-to-date factory of the sort that doesn’t need many workers, we’re not guided to any conclusions. Outdoors there is some decrepitude to be seen and some revitalization as well, while nature is ubiquitous and barely held at bay. Indoors, bourgeois comfort is the dominant motif. The overall impression is of people existing in a changing world that, in this case, hasn’t left them behind.

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CLASS OF ’76 {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

DuBois describes his project as “somewhat fictional, somewhat documentary,” even acknowledging digital alterations, while Blum describes his series as “based on the false impressions of others, [and his own] idealizations and personal experiences.” I think what DuBois and Blum mean to convey in their artist’s statements is that these projects are not limited by the strictures of photojournalism or its close kin social documentary. In gallery talks at the exhibit’s opening, DuBois and Blum emphasized that these scenes are often stage-managed in collaboration with the subjects. This is not the realm of staged art photography, however, but rather modestly tweaked photographic realism. Much of the power of both series resides in their detailed description of appearances, and their plausible insight into social groups and attitudes. Because this is the first installment of this series, it’s not surprising that the nature of influence between mentor and student being explored and celebrated is rather direct: There are similarities of tone, approach and appearance, while still recognizing the diverging paths. But I hope that as Continuum unfolds, influence will be defined broadly, with room for unexpected insights within less apparent connections.

David V. Matthews’ Meltdown in the Cereal Aisle is his first collection of short stories. It’s self-published, but don’t be put off: Meltdown is a nice piece of work, entertaining and slick in its way, but also rather sophisticated. Its 141 pages contain eight interconnected stories set in Western Pennsylvania over the past 35 years. Matthews plays with chronology and skillfully employs popculture signifiers like bad rock bands and forgotten sitcoms to explore his characters’ secret hearts. Yet Meltdown is neither ponderous or treacly. Matthews’ style is crisp, even deceptively offhanded. His firstperson narrators and other characters are all quippy and bantering, as glib as the ensemble in a Kevin Smith screenplay. And the tone is often almost blithely satirical. Yet there’s plenty going on beneath the surface. At its best, the book blends the thematic concerns of literary fiction with the snappy pace of genre work. In “Putting the Bi into Bicentennial,” a teen-age girl has invited the narrator, her male classmate, back to her house, and warns him about her parents’ hyper-patriotic décor: “[I]t looks like Uncle Sam took a crap in here.” The episode ends awkwardly — but intriguingly, it’s not even quite the focus of the story, whose narrator is looking back over the three decades since his last days as a class-of-’76 high school senior in suburban Center Township. The amusingly, if unsettlingly, self-serving narrator reappears briefly in “The Sovereign Egg,” told from the perspective of the girl, now grown up and a hipster theater director. The title story, meanwhile, lampoons academia, corporate life and pop culture. But it’s also a moving, and at times incisive, portrait of the relationship between two sisters, one with a newborn child, navigating modern anxieties. In “Sheer Musical Joy for the Ages” (love these titles), Matthews somehow earns your sympathy for a cad obsessed with bedding a stunning virgin. (Extra credit here for the appearance of recurring character Blake Summers, a former hair-metal god turned singing megachurch pastor.) And “Peach Monstrosity Sans Necktie” somehow works 9/11 and punk rock into a madly time-hopping story that juxtaposes a fiction reading with the real events that inspired it. Matthews, 48, is a long-time fixture at local readings and art openings. He’s known both for posting personal-ad fliers for himself around town, and for being diagnosed, at age 41, with Asperger’s syndrome. Meltdown documents the societal milieu of his times with a sensibility all his own.

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

From Aaron Blum’s “Born and Raised” series

Sat.

[BOOK REVIEW]


[PLAY REVIEWS]

CANCER KIDS {BY ROBERT ISENBERG} BE ADVISED: As I left Dani Girl at last Friday’s performance, a woman rushed past me. She scampered down the corridor, sobbing uncontrollably. She waved off concerned friends, shrieking, “I can’t! I can’t!” Dani Girl is that emotional. Not always either sad or funny, but an unsettling mixture of both. Because the show is a musical about children with cancer, the climax is an absolute shocker — whatever you expect at the beginning of Dani Girl, the opposite happens. And faced with song titles like “God Is Dead” and “Comaland,” you should prepare to soak your face in tears. That said, Stage 62’s premiere staging of Dani Girl is brave, intelligent and astonishing. It doesn’t feel like a volunteer production in the basement of a public library, but rather an avant-garde workshop at a Brooklyn fringe festival. Christopher Dimond’s semi-autobiographical script is about a young girl, Dani, who endures leukemia for the second time. Her single mother clutches rosary beads and skirts total meltdown. Dani’s best friend is Raph, her (literal) guardian angel, a goofy cherub with a penchant for tough love.

DANI GIRL continues through Sun., May 19. Andrew Carnegie Free Library, 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie. $15-18. 412-429-6262 or www.stage62.org

Dani is smart and upbeat, but she struggles to comprehend her suffering. When a new kid, Marty, shows up, they pretend to travel through galaxies, into the body, and to heaven. Their quest is peppered with pop-culture references, from Star Wars to hip-hop videos, exactly as a child would rehash them. They even sing a cheery tune about their suicide pact. Dani Girl is like the Dora the Explorer of terminal oncology. The show, directed by Dustin Wickett, takes you completely by surprise, and when your mouth isn’t gaping with alarm, you’re laughing hysterically or bawling your eyes out. The show was first conceived at CarnegieMellon, but it seems written specifically for these actors. As Dani and Marty, Natalie Hatcher and Stephen Santa are as perfect a pair as I’ve ever seen in community theater; they sing Michael Kooman’s challenging songs (lyrics by Dimond) with ease and aplomb. Becki Toth is predictably strong as Dani’s mother, and Rob James plays Raph — and Darth Vader, and God — with astound-

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ABBY KRAFTOWITZ}

Zachary Spicer and Diane Davis in City Theatre’s Abigail/1702

ing dexterity. The experience is disarmingly as one of the most loathsome, evil, powercrazed villains of the American Theater; unique. Brace yourself, and be amazed. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M watching her hideous manipulations in The Crucible is a breathtaking experience. But here, she turns up as a misunderstood waif with a horrible childhood. If Aguirre-Sacasa wants to rehabilitate her, he should go back {BY TED HOOVER} to the actual Abby, who was an 11-yearWHEN WE LEFT Abigail Williams, near the old girl and not the lascivious, treacherous end of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, she 17-year-old murderer Miller made up. There’s something else: Miller turned had just vanished after bringing Salem to its knees with accusations of witchcraft. the Salem witch trials into a scalding cry In his new play, Abigail/1702 (now at against political fascism. Aguirre-Sacasa City Theatre), Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa at- looks at the same event and comes up with tempts to answer the question: “Where’d a simpering melodrama about lonely people falling in love. And, too, the otherworldshe go next?” The first choice a playwright must ly lengths he needs to go for the happy endmake is which Abby to follow: Miller’s ing Americans crave irked me as well. Thanks to an amazing set of designers dramatic creation or the real Abigail upon whom she was based. Aguirre-Sacasa’ — Tony Ferrieri, Pei-Chi Su, Andrew David picks Miller’s version … and that’s where Ostrowski and Eric Shimelonis — director Tracy Bridgen puts on one hell of a show. the trouble starts. There’s a lot of down time in the script, but Bridgen and company supABIGAIL/1702 ply endless diversion. continues through May 26. City Theatre, Diane Davis plays Abi1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-55. gail, and I only wish her 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org incredible commitment and power had been used In this play, Abigail has moved into the in a better play. John Feltch woods outside of Boston and becomes a impresses with a surprise medicine woman. Into her cabin stumbles character at the climax, and Deirdre MadiJohn Brown, a man with his own past and gan’s intense underplaying offers plenty a galloping case of the pox. She eventually of reward. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M cures him and, heterosexuals being as they are, the two fall in love. Aguirre-Sacasa’s intent might be to beatify Abigail; certainly we are meant to forgive her her trespasses and, indeed, come to {BY ALAN W. PETRUCELLI} admire her. IT MAY NOT be easy being green, but It don’t work. Miller (inventing freely) wrote Abigail Pittsburgh Musical Theater’s produc-

MILD COLONIALS

tion of Disney’s Tarzan is doing an awfully good job. The Byham’s stage has been turned into a remote Congo jungle, complete with torrential rainstorms, flying cockroaches, cavorting fireflies and killer leopards. Tarzan the Ape Man’s English is nearly nonexistent. Yet he is able to break into Phil Collins songs with the ease of Lindsay Lohan slipping into court. But oh! What fun this is! The story of a baby boy, left behind after a leopard kills his parents, has been pure escapist fodder ever since Edgar Rice Burroughs penned the first of his 24 Tarzan novels back in 1912. Daddy Ape Kerchak hates the “thing” and favors infanticide. But his wife, Mama Ape Kala, sees the baby as a replacement for the child they lost to the leopard. We watch Tarzan go from boy to man, swinging on ropes, playing with his best pal, Terk, and wondering why he is so different from the others. (One reason: He refuses to roll around in ape poop, as his primate pals are wont to do.) But it’s when the grown Tarzan swings onto the stage in the form of a loin-clothed, dreadlocked muscle-stud that the real fun begins.

TARZAN continues through Sun., May 19. Pittburgh Musical Theater at the Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $12.25-44.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghmusicals.com

He falls for a visiting English explorer named Jane; he falls in love with her and her him. This is the best PMT production I have seen, and kudos must be given to the cast and crew, especially scenic designer Todd Nonn, makeup designer Christopher Patrick and director Colleen Petrucci, who makes the two-hour-plus evening swing by faster than Tarzan at his quickest. Real-life hubby and wife David and Kathlene Toole play Tarzan and Jane, and their chemistry boasts just the right amount of mischievous glee and wonder. Alysha Watson steals the spotlight. She brings Kala’s soul and heart to life with staggering presence. She is brilliant. And I don’t use that word often. If she’s not a household name, I’ll eat my first edition of Tarzan. Him: Tarzan You: Go.

TARZAN IS THE BEST PMT PRODUCTION I HAVE SEEN.

GONE APE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

05.1605.23.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., MAY 16

Art by Thad Kellstadt

{ART} To mark Association of Art Museum Directors’ Art Museum Day, admission to The Carnegie Museum of Art is free from 4-8 p.m. today. And on Saturday — which is officially Art Museum Day nationwide — The Andy Warhol Museum, The Frick Art & Historical Center and the Westmoreland Museum of American Art are free all day. (OK, the Frick proper usually doesn’t charge anyway, but tours of restored Frick family home Clayton are free.) Guests are also invited to share their experiences through the AAMD’s social-media platforms. Jeff Ihaza www.aamd.org

{ART} It’s the playoffs, and the stakes are high. The National Society of Arts & Letters’ three-day National Visual Art Competition for printmakers features first-place winners from all 18 NSAL chapters, including Pennsylvania’s. The national winner nets a $15,000 prize. And this year’s host is The Andy Warhol Museum. Competition will be fierce; maybe the Warhol will screen the action outdoors, in its Art Fan Zone? Bill O’Driscoll 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Competition continues through Sun., May 18; exhibit continues through June 2. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

MAY 17 On the Glass Surf

believes were innocent. “They were found guilty, and they were killed,” Sister Helen has said. “And I was with them. And boy, that sets a fire in your heart, because I’ve actually been with the people as they were being killed by the state and they looked at my face. And there’s no way you walk away from something

{TALK} Sister Helen Prejean is best known for Dead Man Walking, her 1994 book about her experiences with death-row inmates that became an acclaimed film. She remains an outspoken advocate for abolishing the death penalty. Tonight, she speaks at Rodef Shalom, hosted by Pennsylvanians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty. Her latest book is The Death of Innocents, detailing the flawed trials that led to the executions of two men she

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MAY 17 Valentina Lisitsa

like that and say, ‘I’m neutral on that.’” BO 7 p.m. Thu., May 16. Morewood and Fifth avenues, Oakland. Free. 412-606-5543 or www.pa-abolitionists.org

+ FRI., MAY 17 {LANDMARK} There is scant competition for the title of Pittsburgh’s most famous timepiece. And this weekend, the Kaufmann’s Clock marks its 100th year as something for people to meet under. The clock’s namesake department store is history, but Macy’s Downtown Pittsburgh hosts two days of festivities, including street-fair activities with carnival games, cooking demos and gift-card giveaways. It starts this morning with an appearance by Mr. McFeely of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. Highlights Saturday include the afternoon street fair and an appearance by the Harlem Globetrotters. BO 9:45 a.m.-noon. Also noon-4 p.m. Sat., May 18. 400 Fifth Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-232-2000

{DANCE} Balafon West African Dance Ensemble, an artist collective centered around West African culture, offers the


sp otlight

Bridgette Perdue calls being a fellow with August Wilson Center for African American Culture “a dream come true.” Annually, the fellowship supports African-American artists who then showcase new work at the Center’s First Voice Festival. Perdue, a R&B vocalist and composer, dreamt of singing and dancing to her own music, and of staging a performance with a baby grand piano. On Fri., May 17, her show Wake Up and Dream, opens the festival, complete with a full band and backup dancers. Also opening that night is Wilson fellow Marlana Adele Vassar’s exhibit of new paintings inspired by performances in the Cultural District. Although a previously scheduled show by playwright, performer and recent Carnegie Mellon drama-school graduate Joshua Wilder has been removed from the program, next week, filmmaker Nikki Young presents a staged reading and theatrical trailer premiere for her new drama, Things Not Seen. And the festival closes May 25, with writer and performer Nathan James’ latest version of his acclaimed evening-length one-man show Growing Pains, which explores culture and media from the perspective of a young black man. Bill O’Driscoll Fri., May 17-May 25 (all performances at 8 p.m.). 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Admission to performances is $10. 412-258-2700 or www.augustwilsoncenter.org

{ART} Multi-genre artist and former Pittsburgher Thad Kellstadt is back with a new exhibit at SPACE. On the Glass Surf uses

through June 30. 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-325-7723 or www. spacepittsburgh.org

{MUSIC} Ukrainian-born pianist and YouTube celebrity Valentina Lisitsa performs Edvard Grieg’s Piano Concerto with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra at Heinz Hall tonight. Lisitsa’s more than 30 million YouTube views make her one of the Internet’s mostwatched classical musicians. She has performed around the world, including at Carnegie Hall. Music Web International says, “Valentina Lisitsa combines an imperious sweep with aristocratic poise and sensitivity.”JI 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., May 18, and 2:30 p.m. Sun., May 19.

MAY 16 National attiion onal al Visual Visu isu Art Competition

{ART}

Art by Katie Ford

that gets in the way.” The show, which continues artistic director Pearlann Porter’s experiments in The Space Upstairs, features live musical accompaniment by Dave Pellow. There are three performances this weekend. BO 9 p.m. nightly through Sun., May 19. 214 N. Lexington St., Point Breeze. $10-15. www.pillowproject.org

+ SAT., MAY 18 Kaufmann’s f ’ Clock C

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600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $20-93. 412-392-4900 or www. pittsburghsymphony.org

{DANCE} No words are in the title of The Pillow Project’s latest fulllength production. No surprise, then, that the themes of ( ) reflect such paradoxes as “physicality without connection” and the “the open space

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& Crime breakfast at Mystery Lovers’ Bookshop. BO 10 a.m. 514 Oakmont Ave., Oakmont. Free. Reservations required at 412-828-4877.

champions of the childhood game. Highlights include a tournament of past national champions from the 1940s through 2012, skills demonstrations and marble-themed games for kids. The day is capped with the premiere of Jeff Eddings’ hour-long documentary Mibsters: A Marble Story. The film follows three boys from Pittsburgh to the National Marble Tournament.

{GAMES} Today is Marble Mania Day at the Sen. John Heinz Pittsburgh History Center, with a roster of events celebrating Pittsburgh’s historic pre-eminence at growing

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Last time we caught up with Dennis Palumbo, the garrulous Penn Hills native-turnedscreenwriter-turned-Hollywood-psychotherapist was visiting with his first detective novel, 2010’s Mirror Image. Now he’s up to his third in a series of Pittsburgh-set crime novels featuring psychologist Daniel Rinaldi. In Night Terrors, Rinaldi is retained by the FBI to treat a retired profiler of serial killers suffering from night terrors, an extreme sleep disorder associated with children that Palumbo says is becoming more common in adults in real life, too. The book launch is today’s Coffee

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The second annual PGH Photo Fair has a new and bigger location. The two-day showcase for fine-art photography at Braddock’s Unsmoke Systems Artspace features a dozen internationally known art-dealers, including newcomers Stephen Bulger Gallery, of Canada, London’s Next Level Projects, and Berlin’s Only Photography. On offer are rare books, limited editions, one-of-a-kind prints and more. PGH Photo Fair founder Evan Mirapaul promises a range of work from 19th-century vintage prints to contemporary work. BO Noon-6 p.m. Also 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun., May 19. 1137 Braddock Ave., Braddock. Free. www.pghphotofair.com

+ SUN., MAY 19 {OUTDOORS}

{WORDS}

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video, installation and sound to weave “icons from personal history and memory” into “a haunted paradise on the border of fracture and utopia.” Kellstadt, whose work has been exhibited internationally and in galleries around the U.S., is based in Iowa City, Iowa. A reception, with DJ, is tonight. BO 5:3011 p.m. Exhibit continues

JI 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Mibsters screening at 2 p.m. 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. Free with regular admission ($6-15, free for kids 5 and under). 412-454-6000 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

MAY 18 PGH Photo Fair

{IMAGE COURTESY OF GITTERMAN GALLERY}

Second Annual Black River African Dance Conference, at Kelly-Strayhorn Theater. The two-day conference features workshops on technique in the music and dance of Guinea, Senegal and Mali. Today’s children’s matinee showcases local African drum and dance talent. On Sat., May 18, Balafon and South Carolina-based Wona Womalan West African Dance Ensemble perform Kiridi-An African Cinderella Story. JI Showcase: 10 a.m. ($2.50) Kiridi: 8 p.m. Sat., May 18 ($15-25). 5931 Penn Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

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Want to explore the city on your own terms while getting a workout? Check out City Spree, a race without a course, which kicks off City of Play’s (formerly Obscure Games) fourth season of madcap events around the city. Runners and walkers will create their own route, traveling between checkpoints to discover connections between neighborhoods. It’s billed as a 5k-ish or 10k-ish race, depending on how many locations and checkpoints participants reach. The race begins and ends at Bakery Square, in Larimer. Lauren Daley 7 a.m. $25. info@cityofplay.org or www.cityspreerace.com

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412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER ABIGAIL/1702. The story of The Crucible’s Abigail Williams, 10 years later. Tue-Sun. Thru May 26. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. CLYBOURNE PARK. A look at the house & neighborhood from A Raisin in the Sun in 1959 & 2009. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Tue-Sun. Thru May 19. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. THE CRUCIBLE. Fri, Sat. Thru May 18. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. DANI GIRL. Story of a young girl who turns a battle w/leukemia into a fantastical adventure. Presented by Stage 62. Thu-Sun. Thru May 19. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-429-6262. DEATH WINS THE PRIZE. Murder mystery dinner theater. Presented by Pohl Productions. Fri, Sat and Sun., May 19. Thru May 18. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. FIVE WOMEN WEARING THE SAME DRESS. Five bridesmaids

come to realize, that they, despite their differences, have more in common w/ each other than they do w/ the bride. Fri-Sun. Thru May 19. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. THE FOX ON THE FAIRWAY. A comedy by Ken Ludwig. Thru May 18. Butler Little Theatre, Butler. 724-287-6781. GOOD BLACK DON’T CRACK. Play by Rob Penny. Presented by Kuntu Repertory Theatre. Thu-Sat. Thru May 18. Carnegie Library, Homewood. 412-559-7114. THE GOSPEL SINGER. Play by C.S. Wyatt set in 1987 about a drag jazz performer who dreams of being a gospel singer. Part of the In the Raw Festival. May 19-20, 7 p.m. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999. HEDDATRON. A depressed & pregnant housewife finds herself kidnapped by robots & taken to South America where she is forced to perform the title role in a mechanical version of Hedda Gabler. May 16-18. Smithfield United Church of Christ,

International XXX Centerfold:

BRETT ROSSI TUESDAY-SATURDAY Live May AMATEU Wed, MaRyNITE 14-18 15

NEXT WEEK: Sensational Superstar Pole Dancer:

Farrah Frost MAY 21-25 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Mon-Sat: Noon-2am • Sun: 3pm-2am

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Downtown. 412-251-7904. LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS. A musical about a man-eating houseplant, a nerdy floral shop clerk, & a sweetheart in love with her bad boy dentist. Thu-Sat. Thru May 18. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. MOONLIGHT & VALENTINO. A light-hearted comedy that captures the warmth & spirit of 4 women seeking answers to life’s biggest questions. Thu-Sun. Thru June 1. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. ROBIN HOOD. The classic tale w/ a twist. Presented by Stage & Steel. Fri, Sat. Thru May 25. SS Peter & Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church Hall, Carnegie. 412-480-4758. TILL DEATH DO US PART. Murder mystery dinner theater. May 18-19. Castle Shannon Borough Building, Castle Shannon. 412-254-4633. WALK TWO MOONS. Play based on the book by Sharon Creech. Presented by Prime Stage Theatre. Fri-Sun. Thru May 19. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-622-3114. WITHOUT RUTH. Based on the life

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CNOT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

You and a guest are invited to a special advance screening of

of Ruth Haston, a longtime resident of the Hill Distict, & inspired by the diaries of her daughter, Linda. Thu-Sat. Thru May 18. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576.

COMEDY THU 16

VICKI LAWRENCE & MAMA. 2 & 8 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

THU 16 - SAT 18

JO KOY. May 16-18 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 17

DAVID KAYE, MATT BERGMAN. Funny Fundraiser. 6 p.m. Monessen Italian Club, Monessen. 724-684-3710. FIRESIDE CHAT W/ MARK & JONATHAN. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MIDSEASON REPLACEMENT: AN IMPROVISED SITCOM. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru May 31 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. PITTSBURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE W/ MIKE WYSOCKI. Fri, 9 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995.

FRI 17 - SAT 18

DARREN CARTER. May 17-18 Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 18

DAVID KAYE, BUBBA BRADLEY, DAVID MICHAEL. Funny Fundraiser. 6:30 p.m. Ligonier Theater, Ligonier. 724-238-6514 x 2. THE LUPONES: MADE UP MUSICALS. Sat, 8 p.m. Thru July 27 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 323-401-0465. SALLY BROOKS W/ UKE & TUBA. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown.

MON 20

TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 21

OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 22

135 9th Street 412-281-7703 www.blushexotic.com DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH 96

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013

JOKEE OAKEE. Comedy open stage hosted by Tonnochi:B. Wed Younger’s, North Side. 412-452-3267. CONTINUES ON PG. 97


“conSTRICTed II” by Dafna Rehavia, from IN VIsible: When Personal is Political at modernformations

VISUAL

ART

NEW THIS WEEK

419 BEAVER ST. Maddie On Things. Select photographs from the book Maddie On Things, by Theron Humphrey. Open May 17, 6-8 p.m. & May 18 10am-5pm. Sewickley. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Urban Gurlz Go Downtown. Installation art by Marylloyd Claytor Dance Company. Downtown. 412-882-5509. RENZIEHAUSEN PARK. Spring Art Show. Amateur, experienced, professional & student works. Opens May 17, 5-9 p.m. Jacob Woll Pavilion. McKeesport. 412-469-2710. SPACE. Thad Kellstadt: On the Glass Surf. Video, installation & sound create a haunted paradise on the border of fracture & utopia. Opening May 17. Downtown. 412-325-7723. TRINITY GALLERY. Adrienne Borkowski: A Solo Exhibition. Opening reception: May 18, 6-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2458. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. PGH Photo Fair. Feat. 12 internationally known dealers exhibiting museum-quality prints & photo-based art. Opens May 18. Braddock. 646-436-4698.

ONGOING

28 WEST SECOND GALLERY & STUDIO SPACE. The Female Construction. Annual

Women Exhibition feat. Suzanne Andrews, Ruthanne Bauerle, Meghan Edge, Lora Finelli, Harriete Meriwether, Roberta Myers, Rebecca Perry-Soike, Sam Thorpe & Michelle Urbanek. Greensburg. 724-205-9033. 3RD STREET GALLERY. Waterworks 2013. Pittsburgh Water Color Society. Carnegie. 412-276-5233. 707 PENN GALLERY. Adult Arcade. New works by Marc Burgess. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. In Cast of Characters. Curators Vicky Clark & Cindy Lisica bring together 6 diverse artists to question the nature of our everyday existence & our relationship to larger-than-life heroes & gods. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. SOLO Exhibits. Work by Leslie Ansley, Jo-Anne Bates & Tina Brewer. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BARCO LAW BUILDING. The Art of Japanese Noh Drama Tsukioka Kogyo, 1869-1927. Japanese woodblock prints from the collection on Richard

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

& Mae Smethurst. Oakland. 412-648-1490. BE GALLERIES. The Latest Works. Work by Vivian Fliegel. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Painters of le Poire. Feat. work from artists at le Poire Studio & Gallery. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Original Belgian Botanical Illustrations. Bruxelles 1828 Hand Colored Lithography, presented by J. & K. Willison. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Good Things Come In Threes. Work by Michael Flaherty, Jennifer RobbinsMullin, & George Yancura. Harmony. 724-452-0539. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Travels Behind the Lens. Work by Mary Beth Kratsas, Aldrich Jenkins, & Ted Scanga. Verona. 412-828-1031. THE BREW HOUSE. Botanizing the Asphalt. Site-specific work by Edith Abeyta. South Side. 412-381-7767. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. The 102nd show from the oldest continuously exhibiting visual arts organization in the country. Japan is the Key: Collecting Prints & Ivories, 1900–1920. Collections from the early years of the Carnegie Institute. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Rebirth. Work by Connie Cantor, Jean-Gaudaire Thor, & Heather Tabacchi. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. EASTSIDE GALLERY. New Door. Work by Joan Downing, Bernie Pintar, Phiris Kathryn, Sickles, more. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. FE GALLERY. Alabaster Blast. Fiber art exhibit feat. over a dozen internationally renowned artists. Lawrenceville. 412-389-5800. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. E Block. Photography by Mark Perrott. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. A Kind of Alchemy: Medieval Persian Ceramics. A look at the diversity of ceramics made in ancient Persia, now present-day Iraq, Iran, & Afghanistan. Feat. 10thcentury splashware, buffware, slip-painted ware, lusterware & 14th-century fritware, more. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. CONTINUES ON PG. 98

EXHIBITS AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR

EVENT: Art opening

Botanizing the Asphalt

AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. for Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. , Feat. imagery, film & oral history by Edith Abeyta, narratives to explore communities, at The Brew House, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. South Side BOST BUILDING. Collectors. CRITIC: , Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of 22, an artist from Southwestern PA. Homestead. Swissvale 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. WHEN: 20/20: Celebrating Two Decades of the Heinz Architectural Center. Feat. timeline highlighting important exhibitions & events, This is definitely one of the better exhibits I’ve seen here a display of 20 objects from the in a while; I think Pittsburgh is a real beacon for the collection selected by current or past curatorial staff, more. whole art-in-public spaces movement. With an exhibit Oakland. 412-622-3131. like this, there was definitely an immersive, urban feel to CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF the pieces. The locally designed posters were especially NATURAL HISTORY. BugWorks. engaging, just thinking how every poster for every Feat. beautiful photography of random show out there is designed by an artist who insects, amazing specimens, & live bugs! Garden of Light: Works by deserves a serious amount of credit for that sort of work. Paula Crevoshay. Feat. nearly Abeyta’s work was simply genius. The 3-D installations 70 fine art jewelry pieces. that looked like something out of a viral video with a Ongoing: Earth Revealed, million views — just stunning. Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. BY JEFF IHAZA CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin illustrations from the early 19th rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature submarine, and more. North Side. century through the present. exotic plants and floral displays 412-237-3400. Oakland. 412-268-2434. from around the world. Oakland. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other 412-622-6914. with costumed guides featuring Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Cameras this restored stagecoach stop. Hill. 724-329-8501. & the Famous Photos They Took. Ligonier. 724-238-4983. MARIDON MUSEUM. Beautiful Including a copy of Daguerre’s first CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. Birds. Display of art from the camera, James Bond’s mini Minox University of Pittsburgh Jazz museum’s study storage facility. spy unit, the Big Bertha that caught Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards Collection includes jade and ivory Bill Mazeroski rounding third base from the International Hall of statues from China and Japan, as in 1960 Winning Series, more. Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. North Side. 412-231-7881. DEPRECIATION LANDS 724-282-0123. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG MUSEUM. Small living MCGINLEY HOUSE & AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 history museum MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. animals, including many celebrating the Historic homes open endangered species. Highland settlement and history for tours, lectures and Park. 412-665-3639. of the Depreciation more. Monroeville. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL . Lands. Allison Park. w w w 412-373-7794. HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits paper 412-486-0563. pghcitym NATIONAL AVIARY. on the Homestead Mill. Steel .co FALLINGWATER. Tour Home to more than industry and community artifacts the famed Frank Lloyd 600 birds from over 200 from 1881-1986. Homestead. Wright house. Ohiopyle. species. With classes, lectures, 412-464-4020. 724-329-8501. demos and more. North Side. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY FORT PITT MUSEUM. 412-323-7235. CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Reconstructed fort houses NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in museum of Pittsburgh history rooms helping to tell the story the anti-slavery movement. circa French & Indian War and of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. Ongoing: Western PA Sports American Revolution. Downtown. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. Museum, Clash of Empires, and 412-281-9285. 412-624-6000. exhibits on local history, more. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. Strip District. 412-454-6000. CENTER. Ongoing: tours of This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion SOLDIERS & SAILORS Clayton, the Frick estate, with site features log house, blacksmith MEMORIAL HALL. Military classes, car & carriage museum. shop & gardens. South Park. museum dedicated to honoring Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. 412-835-1554. military service members since HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & the Civil War through artifacts this Tudor mansion and stable BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly & personal mementos. Oakland. complex, and enjoy hikes Forest. Watch butterflies emerge 412-621-4253. and outdoor activities in the from their chrysalises to flutter ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. surrounding park. Allison Park. among tropical blooms. Summer Features 5,000 relics of Catholic 412-767-9200. Flower Show. Glass art surrounded saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR by colorful blooms. Feat. work by WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Daviea Davis, Jason Forck, Steven Learn about distilling and What We Collect: Recent Art Acquisitions, 2007–2012. Botanical Sadvary, Lisa Platt, more. 14 indoor coke-making in this pre-Civil

Tom Jomas

Fri., May 10

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War industrial village. Scottdale. 724-887-7910. WILDCARD. Highlights From PGH365: AIGA Pittsburgh’s Annual Design Competition & Exhibition. Feat. designs by Brett Yasko, Nick Caruso, Eve Faulkes, strawberryluna, MAYA, more. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

DANCE FRI 17

DANCES OF INDIA & THE MIDDLE EAST. Feat. Anjali Soi, Sahra & Amethyst. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274.

FRI 17 - SUN 19

PRE-PROFESSIONAL SHOWCASE. International roster of students age 14-22, & a new all-male work by PBT faculty members. May 17-19 Point Park University, Downtown. 412-391-4100.

SAT 18

VISUAL ART

FUTURE TENANT. Live, Waste, Live. Window exhibit by Marie Barcic feat. printed & stenciled full body portraits of Pittsburghers grown from compost. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. RetroFRESH. Contemporary paintings by James Kennedy, Claire Hardy, Donald Deskey, Alexander Minewski, Louise Evans-Scott, Vladimir Naiditch, & Henri de Waroquier. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Material Matters: An Adventure! Work by Priscilla Hollingsworth & Jeffrey Moyer. Shadyside. 412-441-6605. THE GALLERY 4. Toys in the Attic. Work by Alessandra Sulpy. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. April in Paris. Photography by Scott Davidson. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Faith in Rituals. Work by Dave D’Incau Jr., Lindsey Hayakawa, & Stephen

BLACK RIVER AFRICAN DANCE CONFERENCE: KIRIDI W/ SPECIAL GUESTS. “Kiridi-An African Cinderella Story” feat. Wona Womalan West African Dance Ensemble of Charlestown, SC. 7 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

Marco, Strip District. 412-471-1900.

TUE 21

FUNDRAISERS

YOU DRINK .. WE DANCE. Continuum Dance Theater presents excerpts of a work-in-progress. Bar

CONTINUED FROM PG. 97

THU 16

NHCO MINI-MASTERS GOLF

Haynes. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. INTERNATIONAL IMAGES. 1st Annual Student Show. Work by Bethany Summers, Carter Warren, Chloe Newman, Nicole Catalfamo, Rigel Richards, more. Sewickley. 412-741-3036. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MAKE YOUR MARK ARTSPACE & COFFEEHOUSE. Steel City Medley. Photographs by Jay Ressler. Point Breeze. 412-365-2117. MATTRESS FACTORY. Feminist and.. New work by Julia Cahill, Betsy Damon, Parastou Forouhar, Loraine Leeson, Ayanah Moor, & Carrie Mae Weems. Ongoing

FUN-RAISER. Mini golf, buffet dinner, silent auction, prizes. Benefits North Hills Community Outreach. 5 p.m. RMU Island Sports Center, Neville Island. 412-307-0069.

Public Talk and Blessing with

His Holiness 33rd Menri Trizin Spiritual head of the Tibetan Bön Tradition

Ordinary Mind and the True Nature of Mind Saturday, May 25, 3-5 pm First United Methodist Church of Pittsburgh 5401 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232 Tickets $25 or $30 at door

Order online at www.olmoling.org or call (412) 904-1112 The talk will be followed by a Benefit Dinner Proceeds benefit the children, monks and nuns at Menri Monastery 98

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013

Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Rare Gems. Work by Thommy Conroy. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. In- Visible’ : When Personal Is Political. Artworks of Dafna Rehavia-Hanauer. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! Work by Nancy Adams, Marilyn Andrews, Ronit Dagan, Eric Boos, Barbara Poole, Frank FLynn, Lavon Williams, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Regional Multi-Media Art Show. Juried art show feat. amateur & professional artists. Ross. 412-364-3622. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Faces & Places: Photographs of Old Economy. Never before seen photography from the late 19th & early 20th centuries. Ambridge. 724-266-4500.

FRI 17

8 X 8 PHOTO PARTY. Hors d’oeuvres, vintage-themed photo booths, 8x8 square photo exhibition, more. 7 p.m. Silver Eye Center for Photography, South Side. 412-431-1810. AFTER HOURS AT THE LIBRARY. Live music by the Freedom Band, art from Tugboat Printshop, desserts from Marty’s Market, more. 6-8 p.m. Carnegie Library, Lawrenceville. 412-682-3668. COCKTAILS & CUISINE. Benefits Crisis Center North. 6 p.m. The Woodlands, Wexford. 412-364-6728.

SAT 18

GWEN’S GIRLS - A SURE BET. A night of food, drink, & games benefiting Gwen’s Girls. 6 p.m. American Eagle Outfitters Headquarters, South Side. 412-904-4239 x 44. HIGHMARK WALK FOR A HEALTHY COMMUNITY. 5K walk, 1-mile fun walk benefiting 68 health & human service organizations. 7:45 a.m. Stage AE, North Side. LET THEM EAT CAKE! Cake decorating & tasting contest. Benefits the Midwife Center. 7:30-10 p.m. Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. 412-321-6880 x 208. MAKERDATE. Skills auction, live music, more. Benefits Assemble. 7 p.m. 6119 Penn Ave, East Liberty. MARS BAND ON THE RUN 5K RUN/WALK. Benefits Mars Area High School Band. 9 a.m. Mars Area Senior High School, Mars. 412-402-9123. NAMI CYCLES. Bike distances ranging from 5-73 miles. Benefits NAMI Southwestern Pennsylvania. 9:30 a.m. Cedar

PANZA GALLERY. Significant & Sublime: The Critical Role of Art Teachers in Public Education. Feat. work of 23 Pittsburgh-area public school teachers. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PICTURESQUE PHOTOGRAPHY & GIFTS. Photography by Brenda Knoll. Lawrenceville. 412-688-0240. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Fiberart International 2013. Juried exhibition of contemporary fiber art. Presented by the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh. 30:2. Group exhibition presented by Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Coming Home. Fabric installation by Kay Healy. Friday Nights at Guitar Center. Work by Allison Kaufman. Rites of Passage. Oil paintings by Maggie Mills. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Consciousness. Flameworked glass by Eunsuh Choi. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SCHOOLHOUSE ART CENTER. Cinco de Mayo Art Show. Work

by South Arts artists. Bethel Park. 412-831-8156. SHADY SIDE ACADEMY. Art Beat. Group show feat. Atticus Adams, Kim Beck, Seth Clark, Sarika Goulatia, Ryder Henry, Lori Hepner, Thaddeus Mosley, more. Fox Chapel. 412-968-3000. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Continuum. Work by Doug DuBois & Aaron Blum. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin Turner: New Work. Sculpture. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 15. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop. Open studio. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. An Art(ist) in Motion. Work by Aaronel deRoy Gruber. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Memento Mori. Sculpture by Gregory Barsamian. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

Creek Park, Rostraver. 412-366-3788.

LITERARY

SUN 19

THU 16

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. THE FAIRYTALE FESTIVAL. Games, prizes, princess pavillion, crafts, music, more. Benefits The Gemini Children’s Theater. 2-5 p.m. Riverview Park, North Side. 412-243-6464. REDLINE FASHION SHOW. Presented by Willie Gee’s. Benefits The Pittsburgh Aids Task Force. 5:30 p.m. The Priory, North Side. 412-915-2561. WALK WITH ME PITTSBURGH. 1-mile walk & all-day admission to Kennywood. Benefits the Easter Seals of Western PA. 8:30 a.m. Kennywood Park, West Mifflin. 412-281-7244 x 229.

MON 20

CITY THEATRE GALA & AUCTION. Cocktails, music, dancing, more. Heinz Field East Club Lounge. 5:30-10 p.m. Heinz Field, North Side.

TUE 21

DINE FOR ANIMAL FRIENDS. Dinner benefits spay/neuter programming. Call to register. 7 p.m. Mad Mex, Robinson. 412-847-7094.

WED 22

POWER PROMISES: A NIGHT OF HOPE. Dinner, music, & a brief program by emcee Brenda Waters. Benefits POWER. 5:30 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-243-7535 x 223.

AMERICAN HISTORY BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP. April 1865, The Month that saved America by Jay Winik. Every other Thu, 9:15 a.m. Thru May 16 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Third and First Thu of every month The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. JASMINE DREAM WAGNER, ALICIA SALVADEO, T.C. JONES. The New Yinzer Reading Series. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274. NATHANIEL PHILBRICK. Pittsburgh Arts & Lecture’s Writers LIVE series. 6 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland. SISTER HELEN PREJEAN. Lecture w/ author of Dead Man Walking. 7 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-606-5543. STEEL CITY SLAM. Poetry slam. 7-10 p.m. 720 Records, Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592.

FRI 17

JULIE CECCHINI, ANDREW EDWARDS. Writers in the Wall Series. 7:30 p.m. Aspinwall


Municipal Building, Aspinwall. 412-781-0213.

KIDSTUFF

FRI 17 - SUN 19

THU 16

26TH ANNUAL PENNWRITERS CONFERENCE. 50+ workshops & panels for writers at all levels/all genres. Keynote speakers: Donald Maass & Bobbi Carducci. May 17-19 Pittsburgh Airport Marriott, Coraopolis. 412-788-8800.

SPRING COMICS CLUB. Learn about the visual & narrative elements of comic strips & graphic novels. Thu, 4-6 p.m. Thru May 23 Assemble, Garfield. 773-425-1531.

SAT 18

THE 27TH ANNUAL PITTSBURGH INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL. Feat. performers from Australia, Russia, Ireland, the United Kingdom and United States, plus hands-on activities. www.PGHKIDS.org Thru May 19 Schenley Plaza, Oakland. 412-682-7275.

NANCY KRYGOWSKI ,LORI WILSON, YONA HARVEY. Poetry reading, part of the Versify Reading Series. 7:30 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729. SUSTAINING WONDER: REBOOTING YOUR WRITE MIND. Writing workshop. Sat, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru May 25 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-244-8458.

MON 20

JEWISH FOLKTALES W/ ALAN IRVINE. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. OUT OF THE GUTTER: GRAPHIC NOVEL DISCUSSION GROUP. Third Mon of every month, 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PALS BOOK CLUB. Seniors only. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

THU 16 - SUN 19

If the wicked call from the other side, she doesn’t hear. Blinds shut. Devices blink & twitter. Before it’s too late, her mother snaps a picture — anticipates The mother will mark the photo tomorrow. Sign. Seal. We’re all well! — one of the last acceptable print messages. Meanwhile, Soup

— FROM “I WORKED HARD SO MY GIRLS DIDN’T HAVE TO SERVE NOBODY ELSE LIKE I DID EXCEPT GOD,” BY YONA HARVEY

Yona Harvey, along with poets Nancy Krygowski and Lori Wilson, appears Saturday as part of Versify,

a monthly reading series at East End Book Exchange.

ART OUT THERE: BOOK BRICKS. Learn how to turn old bricks into your favorite books for bookends or outdoor decor. 2-3 p.m. Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-6920. SATURDAY CRAFTERNOON: CAT CRAFTS & SCRATCH DAY W/ THOM DELAIR & CREATELAB. 1-4 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

SAT 18 - SUN 19

SAT 18

ADVENTURES W/ CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG. 9-foot tall Clifford w/ tail slide, build a sandcastle on T-Bone’s beach, play instruments in the Musical Marina, more. May 18-Sept. 1 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SUN 19

MISS EBONY TEENAGE & MISS PRINCESS PAGEANT. 5 p.m. Pittsburgh Obama 6-12, East Liberty. 412-727-1092. PLAY W/ CLAY AT THE HANDBUILDING TABLE. Ages 3+. Sun, 12-3 p.m. Thru May 26 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

7:30 p.m. Sat., May 18. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-224-2847 or www.eastendbookexchange.com

MON 20

BROWN BAG LUNCH BUNCH. A lunchtime story for kids ages 3-6. Mon, 12:30 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. GET YOUR GAME ON TEENS! Play videogames, board games, cards & more with other teens. Third Mon of every month, 3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141.

TUE 21

CHESS CLUB. For students in K-7th grade. Every other Tue. Thru May 21 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PLAY W/ CLAY ON THE POTTER’S WHEEL. Ages 3+. Tue, 12-3 p.m. Thru May 28 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

OUTSIDE FRI 17

BIKE TO WORK DAY. Join thousands of other Pittsburghers in biking to work. Visit bikepgh.org for a map of hydration stations.

SAT 18

BIRDWATCHING HIKE. 8 a.m. Succop Conservancy, Butler. 724-586-2591. LAUREL HIGHLANDS HIKING TRAIL QUEST. Sat. Thru May 25 412-255-0564. REGIONAL TRAIL CORPORATION 5K RACE WALK/2 MILE FUN WALK. Youghiogheny River Trail in West Newton. 724-872-5586.

SUN 19

local art scene & the artists that are making Pittsburgh their home. 5:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. AN EVENING OF ASTRONOMY & STARGAZING FOR FAMILIES. w/ former NASA consultant, Kevin Manning. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MEDITATION & WHOLE LIFE TRANSFORMATION. Supreme Meditation & the Science of Transformation w/ Acharya Kedar. Free public program. Winchester Thurston, Upper School, Shadyside. 724-420-5826. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

BLUEBIRDS. Learn about bluebird natural history & how you can attract them to your yard. 2-3:30 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park, Hookstown. 724-899-3611. THE CITY SPREE. A city-wide 5K without a course. http://www. cityspreerace.com/ 7 a.m. Bakery Square, Unknown.

TUE 21

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 22

WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 16

BUSINESS/POLITICAL NETWORKING MIXER. A showcase of local businesses & political organizations. 5:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-723-2414. CELEBRATING WOMEN! HAVING A GLOBAL IMPACT. Awards ceremony honoring women who are helping this region or are introducing this region to global influences. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700. CULTURE CLUB: THE ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF PITTSBURGH 102ND ANNUAL EXHIBITION. Discussion about the

USED BOOK & MEDIA SALE. May 17-18 Peters Township Middle School, McMurray. 724-554-3062. SILK SCREEN FILM FESTIVAL. Visit www.silkscreenfestival.org for full schedule. Thru May 19

She samples with a lean near bowing.

SAT 18

FRI 17 - SAT 18

FRI 17 - SUN 19

for dinner, again? What else? It’s winter. Herbal constellations swivel in froth. Stir.

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FULL LIST ONLINE

CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Discussing Allen Grossman’s The Ether Dome 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-621-6880.

Candy-colored bulbs frame a girl for a holiday.

THU 16 - WED 22

TUE 21

WED 22

[LITERARY]

angst & oddly angled aches, strawberry letters. Whatevers.

BIG & RED. Create 2D & installation art. In conjunction w/ the Adventures w/ Clifford the Big Red Dog exhibit. Sat, Sun, 10 a.m.ANTONY CIOTOLI, ANN 4:30 p.m. Thru May 26 Children’s CURRAN, ZIGGY EDWARDS, Museum of Pittsburgh, North RANDY MINNICH, PAM Side. 412-322-5058. O’BRIEN, MIGUEL RUIZ, HONK! JR. A modern ARLENE WEINER. version of Hans Reading w/ the Squirrel Christian Andersen’s Hill Poetry Workshop. The Ugly Duckling. 8 p.m. Hemingway’s Cafe, www. per Presented by pa Oakland. 412-621-4100. pghcitym Playhouse Jr. Sat, Sun. .co JAPANESE Thru May 26 Pittsburgh CONVERSATION CLUB. Playhouse, Oakland. First and Third Tue of every 412-392-8000. month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, HUCK FINN. Contemporary Oakland. 412-622-3151. adaptation of Mark Twain’s novel. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice Sat, Sun. Thru May 26 Pittsburgh conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. STEEL CITY POETRY SLAM. Third Tue of every month, 9 p.m. Shadow Lounge, East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

Bruno Works, Downtown. 412-434-7080. FISH FRYDAY DRAG SHOW. 10:30 p.m. Friends Bar, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027. PENN-LIBERTY CULTURAL DISTRICT WALKING TOUR. Fri, 12-1 p.m. Thru May 31 Katz Plaza, Downtown. 412-471-5808.

THU 16 - SUN 19

SILK SCREEN FILM FESTIVAL. Visit www.silkscreenfestival.org for full schedule. Thru May 19

FRI 17

COMMUNITY CREATIVE SCHOOL: LEARNING TO PITCH YOURSELF. w/ Adam Paulisick, Data Driven Creative. 12-1 p.m.

SAT 18

22ND ANNUAL HISTORIC SOUTH SIDE HOME TOUR. Self-guided walking tour of homes in the Historic South Side Neighborhood. Begins at UPMC Mercy South Side, 2000 Mary St. 10 a.m. ADULT PROM: RELIVE THE MAGIC. 80s-90s music, photo booth, vote King & Queen, more. 8 p.m. The Center of Harmony, Harmony. 724-400-6044. AFTERNOON TEA DANCE. English Country dancing & tea. 1:30-4:30 p.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-535-2078. ART LAB: THE BLACKLIGHT PROJECT. Create unique sculptural objects & check out their glow-factor in a custombuilt black-light booth. 1-4 p.m. Mattress Factory, North Side. 412-231-3169. THE COOPERATIVE MOVEMENT TODAY: MONDRAGON IN SPAIN TO PITTSBURGH & THE UNITED STATES. Discussion w/ Carl Davidson & Rob Witherell. Sponsored by the Battle of Homestead Foundation. 1:30 p.m. Homestead Pump House, Munhall. 412-831-3871. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Korean grammar & basic conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. NATURALLY SOERGEL’S ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION. Allergen- & gluten-free cooking demos, discounts, more. 11 a.m. Soergel Orchards, Wexford. 724-935-1743. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE GARDEN MART. Plant & garden vendors. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Old Economy Village, Ambridge. 724-266-4500 x 114. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At CONTINUES ON PG. 100

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the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SPERMS TO WORMS. 12 teams of artists re-create experiences from birth to death in 12 hours. 3577 Bigelow Blvd., Oakland. 12 p.m. SPRING GARDEN MARKET & HOME SHOW. 80+ vendors. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Alameda Park, Butler. 724- 284-5383. VECHERINKA BALKAN DANCE PARTY. Live music, dance lessons, more. Third Sat of every month, 7:30 p.m. Thru June 15 BulgarianMacedonian National Education and Cultural Center, West Homestead. 412-461-6188.

SAT 18 - SUN 19

PORTERSVILLE STEAM SHOW SPRING GAS-UP. Antique cars, flea market, train rides, demos, vintage village, more. May 18-19 Portersville Steam Show Grounds, Portersville. 724-452-8656.

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AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. BELLYDANCE CLASS W/ JEMEENA. Sun, 10 a.m. Thru June 30 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-337-1846.

MEDITATION & WHOLE LIFE Historical Society, Greensburg. Dreamcoat. May 19-20. Come TRANSFORMATION. Supreme prepared to sing, from memory, 724-532-1935. Meditation & the Science of 32 measures of a classic musical WORKABLE CAREER FAIR. Transformation w/ Acharya Kedar. theater piece. Bring sheet music 9 a.m.-12 p.m. South Hills Free public program. Doors open in the correct key, marked w/ any Interfaith Ministries, Bethel Park. at 12:15 p.m., seating ends at edits.Geyer Performing Arts Center, 412-586-3732. 12:30 p.m. 12:15 p.m. Unity Scottdale. 724-887-0887. Center of Pittsburgh, Bloomfield. THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN 724-420-5826. CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Spring COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE. PFLAG GREENSBURG. Support, audition dates for their Nov. Seeking new players, no education & advocacy for the concert. May 20 - 21. Call experience necessary. Wednesdays, LGBTQ community, family & MaryColleen Seip or visit www. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-7878. friends. Third Sun of every month, themendelssohn.org for more LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of information. Westminster conversational English. Wed, Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. Presbyterian Church, Upper 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. THE PITTSBURGH RECORD St. Clair. 412-835-6630. 412-622-3151. & CD CONVENTION XXXVI. Record vendors, memorabilia, more. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. DoubleTree [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] Hotel - Green Tree, Green Tree. 412-331-5021. PITTSBURGH REPTILE SHOW & SALE. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Futules’ Harmar House, Cheswick. 724-516-0441. During the National Multiple Sclerosis Society’s MuckFest RIVERS OF STEEL SUNDAY MS, runners swing over and slosh through five miles of HERITAGE MARKET. Farm & artist muddy pits, craters and trenches — all for a good cause. market. First Sun of every month Volunteers are needed to help with hydration stops, and Third Sun of every month. check-in, the post-finish-line festivities and more. Visit Thru Sept. 15 Homestead Pump www.nationalmssociety.org for information. House, Munhall. 412-464-4020. TAKE A SHOT AT CHANGING THE WORLD FILM FESTIVAL. THE RAGE OF THE STAGE Films about changing the world LUNCH & LEARN W/ ILLAH PLAYERS. Auditions for a sexy, made by middle & highschool NOURBAKHSH. Discuss the future steampunk play adaptation students. 1 p.m. Senator John of technology education for kids. of Oscar Wilde’s horror novel, Heinz History Center, Strip District. http://remakelearning.org/ The Picture of Dorian Gray. 412-454-6000. 12-1:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. Call or visit www.facebook.com/ A TOUR OF JEWISH MAKE YOUR OWN COMPOST rageofthestage for info. SQUIRREL HILL. Open house TEA BREWER. 7-9 p.m. Phipps South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. tours of several synagogues & Garden Center, Shadyside. 724-292-8427. landmarks. 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m. 412-441-4442 x 3925. THE SUMMER COMPANY. Jewish Community Center, PFLAG WASHINGTON. Support, Auditions for 2013 season. Squirrel Hill. 412-624-2280. education & advocacy for the May 30. Men/women age 17+, WHAT DO YOU WANT TO LGBTQ community, family & 2-min. contemporary monologue. KNOW?: THE PARANORMAL friends. Fourth Wed of every Non-equity, walk-ins welcome. & BEYOND. w/ Frank month First Presbyterian Peter Mills Theater ( Duquesne, DeAngeles. Pittsburgh Church, Downtown. Rockwell Hall ), Uptown. Theosophical Society. 412-471-3436. 412–243-6464. 1:30-3 p.m. Chatham THE PITTSBURGH University, Shadyside. SHOW OFFS. A www. per a p 412-462-4200. meeting of jugglers pghcitym .co BLAST FURNACE. Seeking & spinners. All levels submissions for Volume 3, Issue 2. welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Theme is “travel.” Submit poetry MORNING SPANISH Union Project, Highland Park. about physical travel/world travels, LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. 412-363-4550. travels of the mind, travels outside Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon PGC SUMMER LECTURE SERIES. of the box, etc. Submit no more Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Discussion of contemporary than 3 of your best. http://www. 412-531-1912. glass art feat. Dave Walters, DH blastfurnacepress.com SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. McNabb, Richard Parrish. 6-8 p.m. BRICOLAGE THEATER. Seeking Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. stories that are true, funny, & follows. No partner needed. 412-365-2145. between 1,500 to 2,000 words Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace WILLPOWER UNWRAPPED: for WordPlay, a new storytelling Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. THE SCIENCE BEHIND THE event. Email submissions to alan@ 412-683-5670. CRAVINGS. Workshop by Nickie olifson.com. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE Corey of Healthy Habit Change. THE PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, Call to reserve a spot. 6:30 p.m. SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 67th South Side. 412-431-5282. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. Annual International Aqueous 412-242-3598. Open exhibition. http://www. WORKABLE CAREER pittsburghwatercolorsociety.com FPA SALUTING SERVICE. Evening FAIR. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Millvale 412-731-0636. to honor veterans w/ special guest, Community Center, Millvale. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM Rocky Bleier. 7 p.m. Soldiers & 412-586-3732. OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking Sailors Memorial Hall, Oakland. individual artists & artist groups for 412-512-0589. month-long exhibitions in a new PAINT THE TOWN PINK. CCAC SOUTH CAMPUS transitional gallery measuring. Networking event presented THEATRE. Auditions for Fiddler on Artists will be responsible for all by Pretty Living PR. 6 p.m. the Roof. May 19. Email jhall2@ aspects of their exhibition. Send Savoy Restaurant, Strip District. ccac.edu for more information. images & a brief introduction to the 412-628-8451. CCAC South Campus, West Mifflin. work to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org WHAT WE WORE. Showing 412-469-1100. w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org military uniforms, wedding THE GEYER PERFORMING ARTS & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. dresses, children’s fashions, more. CENTER. Auditions for Joseph 7-8:30 p.m. Westmoreland County Greensburg. 724-837-1500. & the Amazing Technicolor

WED 22

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TUE 21

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{BY DAN SAVAGE}

I have a mentally disabled cousin who has lived for more than 40 years in the same nursing home in a small, conservative town. He is now in his late 60s. He has always enjoyed dressing up as a woman, but given that he’s in a Christian nursing home, he must keep it fairly secret. He doesn’t want to move from his home of so many years. He periodically calls to tell me about a dress he’s purchased or his monthly therapy sessions where he’s permitted to dress up, and I’m uncomfortable with the sexual vibe of the conversations. I would like him to have a sexual outlet, but one that doesn’t involve me. Any ideas? SHE KNOWS IT’S REALLY TOUGH

Nope. And staging some sort of intervention now — well, the effort seems about four decades late. Even if you could find a new living situation for your cousin, SKIRT, your cousin doesn’t want to move. He’d probably be happier if he didn’t have to keep his dresses secret, but things could be much, much worse. I’m in a monogamous heterosexual relationship. We don’t use protection except birth control. Is there any reason other than sexually-transmitted-infection issues — not an issue for us — that we shouldn’t share a butt plug? SEX TOYS ARE PRICEY

Nope.

GLASS

nience store or a truck stop and steal some porn mags. My brothers and I learned important life lessons shoplifting porn when we were your son’s age: to be watchful, to seize opportunities and to run like hell. I am one of those straight girls who like to make out with other girls when I am drunk. It’s fun to get the attention of men by kissing girls! Why do so many lesbians and bi women disparage this behavior? I am just an adult having sexy fun with other consenting adults!

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I can’t believe there are still queers out there hatin’ on drunk straight girls (DSGs) who make out with other DSGs. Same-sex marriage remains illegal in 38 states, the HIV-infection rate among young gay and bi men is up, and trans people who just want to use the toilet are being attacked in schools and state legislatures. (Google “rape” and “public restroom,” and tons of stories come up — but they’re all about straight men attacking women. Want to make public restrooms safer? Ban straight men from using them.) The queer community has 99 problems, but DSGs making out with DSGs ain’t one.

MY BROTHERS AND I LEARNED IMPORTANT LIFE LESSONS SHOPLIFTING PORN WHEN WE WERE YOUR SON’S AGE.

We’re a straight couple, and my boyfriend and I love playing with his butt. I love being able to ride him when he has a butt plug in, but it always falls out during sex. Do we need a different toy? PLUG LEAVES US GUESSING

What you need is a bigger butt plug. The circumference of the widest part of the butt plug (the part that goes in his ass) needs to be four or five times greater than the circumference of the narrow part of the butt plug (the part his sphincters grip). If the widest part of your butt plug isn’t much wider than the narrow part, that butt plug will fly out of your boyfriend’s ass. Bigger butt plugs look intimidating, but the extra effort required to get a bigger butt plug in a straight boy’s ass … well, it pays off in the end. My son is 13. After I caught him with porn on his smartphone, I replaced it with a dumb phone and limited his access to the Internet. We have talked about desensitization and the oppression of women that occurs with porn. Yet the hormones rage on. He has asked me to buy him a Playboy. I want him to come to me to talk about sex, but a mom buying her son porn doesn’t seem OK. If I don’t buy him a magazine, he will seek porn on the non-parent-regulated Internet. If I do purchase porn for him, doesn’t that just encourage him to walk the path of porn? BAFFLED BY TEENAGED BOYS

If your son wants old-fashioned, pre-Internet porn, he can acquire it in the old-fashioned, preInternet manner: He can get his ass to a conve-

I’m a female and have been seeing a great guy. We’ve been having awesome vanilla sex, but I dig light spanking. I have told him this, and he talks some hot dirty talk about what he’s GOIN G to do to me, but there’s no follow-through. This discomfort is linked to some abuse he witnessed — his stepdad hurt his mother. I’m happy for him to ease into it slowly, but it’s been at least a month since I last brought it up, and I’ll go crazy if I don’t get some kinky sex soon. MISSING MY KINKS

Here’s what to tell your boyfriend: “Vaginal intercourse without consent is rape, but vaginal intercourse with consent is sex. You can wrap your head around that, right? So wrap your head around this: Spanking someone without consent is assault, but spanking someone with consent is sexy. And you’re going to spank me right now, with my consent, and it’s going to be hot.” No sex question. I just want you to tell me what is up with two guys at my gym. The skinnier dude does all the grunt work — sets up the weights, wipes down the equipment — while the bigger dude stands there. The skinnier one can’t be the bigger dude’s personal trainer. Yesterday when the bigger dude noticed his shoe was untied, he pointed to his shoe, and the skinnier dude knelt and tied his fucking shoe for him. What the hell? MOST EVERYONE AT THE GYM IS FREAKED

What you’ve described sounds like a semipublic Dom/sub muscle-worship scene. But I could be wrong. If you have to know for sure, ask the bigger dude. If these dudes are doing some Dom/sub scene, and the point is to humiliate the scrawnier dude, the bigger dude will be only too delighted to tell you about it.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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DOMINATION

ADULT VIDEO

1. Genre vaguely alluded to by No Doubt 4. *Part of Georgia named for a relative of baseball legend Ty 6. Take, as a cigarette 9. Ball callers 13. Early 2010’s street protest movement, briefly 14. Waiting to score, hopefully 16. Hype 17. *Place to get clean 18. Leaves in a mug, say 19. The Tritons of the NCAA 20. Greek colony associated with philosophy 22. Product detail, briefly 23. Wooden boats 24. Gambles that don’t involve the house 26. 27. “Parks and ___” (Amy Poehler show, casually) 28. Triple Crown stat 29. NYSE figure 31. “Retaliation” movie franchise 34. 36. Second-best of the Hank Williamses 37. Legislation that protects people with impairments: Abbr. 38. Ritzy European vacation area 40. Mauna ___ (“long volcano”) 41. Cordial texted word 42. To whom you might be instructed to tell a secret

43. Battery parts? 45. Relates, colloquially 46. Deep dish pizza chain 47. “The Money ___” (Hanks/Long classic) 48. *Furry arctic creatures 50. Illusion 55. Lumbering sorts 56. Rapper’s asset 57. Magazine with an Independent Press Award 58. Very tall Obama cabinet member Duncan 59. Reacts to a bad joke, perhaps 61. Half-pint 62. “___ little spice to your life ...” 63. Coquettes 64. Jeremy’s character on “Entourage” 65. Bloc established officially in Moscow in 1922 66. Strong furniture wood 67. 68. Word before horse or lion

DOWN

1. Results of chafing 2. Talib who recorded with Mos Def 3. Tapped on, as a cigarette 4. Bed that might fold 5. “Let me just finish this thing ...” 6. Preoccupations for Wayne and Garth 7. Midget carracing org. 8. Ryan who made out with Billy Crystal 9. Maneuver after

checking for cops, often 10. Virgin Mary and Shirley Temple, for two 11. “Punk Prayer Mother of God, Chase Putin Away!” band 12. Private problem, briefly 15. Clinton’s rel. 21. Plane opening 23. Baked with a cheese and breadcrumb crust 25. Big name in free bar snacks 26. No longer thinking about, as an ex 28. Fit to ___ 30. See 54-Down 31. Skips in the record? 32. Just talk 33. Hammy cheerleading gesture 34. Kitchen initialism popularized by Rachel Ray

35. Trent Reznor’s band, on T-shirts 39. Skye married to Ben Lee 44. “Julius Caesar” phrase 47. Nebraska native 49. “There is some concern ... “ 50. Cheap-arse wine 51. The finding of a Virgin Mary-shaped gummy candy, e.g. 52. Google Maps, essentially 53. Part of many kits 54. With 30-Down, journalistic selectivity, and what this puzzle’s starred entries contain 56. Cold, in Colombia 58. Nonpro sports org. 59. Source of “frankenfood,” briefly 60. Old draft agcy.

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

05.15-05.22

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You have arrived at the edge of reality. Or rather, to be precise, you have arrived at the edge of what you think of as reality. Here’s where things could get very interesting. Just on the other side of that edge you’re brushing up against, there is much, much more reality — a vast territory you have barely imagined, let alone believed in or explored. Are you feeling brave? If you’re willing to find out about stuff you didn’t even realize you would love to experience, I suggest you slip across the border and wander around on the other side.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

A character in Neil Gaiman’s graphic novel A Game of You delivers this speech: “Everybody has a secret world inside of them. … No matter how dull and boring they are on the outside, inside them they’ve all got unimaginable, magnificent, wonderful, stupid worlds. Not just one world. Hundreds of them.” As a Gemini, you are not, of course, dull and boring on the outside. That may have something to do with why your secret inner worlds are often even frothier and sparklier than most people’s. But lately, I’m afraid, some of those secret inner worlds of yours have gotten a bit shabby and dank. It’s time for a deep cleansing. To be thorough, don’t just wash your own brain. Wash your wild heart and funky soul, too.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

The 14th-century poet Dante was a major influence on 20th-century novelist James Joyce. “I love Dante,” wrote the author of the epic novel Ulysses. “He is my spiritual food.” And yet Joyce felt he had to absorb Dante in small doses. “Dante tires one quickly,” he said. “It is as if one were to look at the sun.” Is there any influence like that in your own life, Libra? Judging from the astrological omens, I’m guessing it’s a fine time for you to get as much sustained exposure to that glorious source as you can bear.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

“You begin saving the world by saving one person at a time,” said writer Charles Bukowski. “All else is grandiose romanticism or politics.” I invite you to make that thought one of your guiding principles in the coming week, Cancerian. Translate your high ideals into actions that make a practical impact on particular human beings and animals. Instead of merely talking about what good things you want to do, actually do them. As much as possible, be sure that every detail of your daily life reflects your vision of ultimate truth and beauty.

Greek poet Sappho was renowned in antiquity. The nine books she wrote were so esteemed that the historian Strabo wrote, “in this whole span of recorded time we know of no woman to challenge her as a poet even in the slightest degree.” And yet little of Sappho’s work survives. As of 2004 there were just 264 fragments and three complete poems. But then a fourth complete poem emerged. Its text was written on papyrus that had been wrapped in the casing of an Egyptian mummy. The mummy had been stored for years in a backroom at Cologne University in Germany before someone discovered its hidden treasure. Your assignment, Scorpio, is to seek an equivalent recovery. Search for a part of the past that’s still beautiful and useful, even if that quest leads you to unlikely and obscure places.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

If you were a fledgling savior, now would be a propitious moment to begin your messianic mission. If you were a musician hoping to leap to the next level of career success, this would be prime time to plan an extensive tour. If you were the inventor of the Next Big Thing, I’d suggest that you get your marketing campaign in gear. And if none of those descriptions fits your personal situation, regard them as apt metaphors for your use. How can you spread the word about what’s most important to you?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

As frontman of the band Queen, Virgo singer Freddie Mercury made use of his four-octave range with flamboyant showmanship and breathtaking technique. Many critics regard him as one of the greatest vocalists in the history of pop music. Freddie joked that he was perfect except for one glaring flaw: his overbite. Because he had four extra teeth in his upper mouth, his top jaw protruded. But he chose not to alter his appearance with surgery because he suspected it might change his singing voice in unpredictable ways. Is there a comparable situation in your own life, Virgo? A so-called imperfection that seems to be entwined with a beautiful asset? I urge you to be like Freddie. Accept the paradox — embrace it and celebrate it — and move on.

I absolutely forbid you to be a slave of happiness, a victim of pleasure or a prisoner of love. Wait. Sorry. I take that back. What gives me the right to forbid you from doing anything? It’s your life. You’re the boss. So let me reframe my previous advice. Dear Aquarius, I beg you not to be a slave of happiness, a victim of pleasure or a prisoner of love. None of the good things in life will give you what you need if you make yourself crazy or sick while pursuing them. That’s the cautionary news. The encouraging news is that in the next five weeks, I think you will have a knack for cultivating a graceful relationship with happiness, pleasure and love.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

Don’t be like the ducks that are floating on Phoenix Lake a short distance from where I’m sitting. They’re feeding entirely on the surface, happy to skim a few insects from the top of the placid waters they’re drifting on. No, Pisces, be more like the frogs that are diving to probe for morsels down below. This is a phase of your

astrological cycle when the quest for more variety can deepen your perspective and provide better nourishment.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

In the alternate universe created by Marvel comic books, there is a mutant superhero called Squirrel Girl. She has the magic power to summon hordes of cute, furry squirrels. Under her guidance, they swarm all over the bad guy she’s battling and disable him with their thousands of tiny chomps and thrashing tails. She and her rodent allies have defeated such archvillains as Dr. Doom, Deadpool, Baron Mordo and Ego the Living Planet. Let’s make her your role model for the coming weeks, Aries. The cumulative force of many small things will be the key to your victories. As in Squirrel Girl’s case, your adversaries’ overconfidence may also be a factor. Do you allow your imagination to indulge in fantasies that are wasteful, damaging or dumb? I dare you to stop it. Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

When I turn my psychic attention in your direction, I smell smoldering smoke. Here’s how I interpret that: Your internal fire is burning with less than maximum efficiency. Do you agree, Sagittarius? If so, do you know why that might be? Did you not provide enough kindling? Is the wood too green? Is the ground wet? I urge you to find out what the problem is. You can’t afford to have sputtering flames and sooty light and spotty warmth. You need a steady blaze that radiates brilliant light and strong heat.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Very few of us are completely uninhibited about expressing who we really are. Most everyone is shy about revealing at least one facet of his or her identity. Why? Maybe because we’re afraid that people will judge us harshly for being different from what they think we should be. Or maybe our secret side is at odds with our selfimage, and we hesitate to acknowledge it even to ourselves. What is this part of you, Capricorn? In what sense are you still in the closet about a truth or quality or event that’s central to your character? I urge you to have a conversation with yourself about it. You aren’t necessarily ready to tell the whole world about it, but now might be the right time to start considering the possibility that you can give it more room to play.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 104 + SERVICES 104 + STUDIES 105 + WELLNESS 108 + LIVE 110

WORK HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Paid In Advance! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.thehomemailer. com (AAN CAN)

Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

Advertise Here Today! $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay. com (AAN CAN)

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

GREAT

Follow us on

ONE DAY!

Adopting your newborn would be life’s greatest joy. Will give a child life of security, endless love. Great family, education, wonderful home. Expenses paid. Please call Ria at 1-888-851-4935

Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes

Adoring Couple, Lawyer & Doctor/Teacher yearn to be doting Dad & At-Home Mom Expenses Paid Ben & Amy

1-800-816-8424 Adoption: A Suburban life, Secure future, love & Laughter for your Newborn.

Helper wanted for small trucking company in Monroeville Area. Some cleaning and paperwork. 1 day/ wk. 412-969-2626

Expenses Paid Call Maria at 866-429-0222

@PGHCityPaper

Drivers

PAY FOR

ADOPTION

ANNOUNCEMENTS

A DO P T

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

SERVICES

WANTED Pittsburgh City Paper needs friendly drivers to work (early morning hours) to distribute the paper in the Pittsburgh area. Interested candidates must have a clean DMV history and current proof of insurance. Regular lifting of up to 50 lbs is required. Heavy, bulk retail delivery to CP sites weekly.

Must have a full-size truck/van. CONTACT >> 412.316.3342 x173 Jim for an application

SURROGATE MOTHERS WANTED Established Program Conducted By A Local Law Firm Seeks Compassionate, Loving Women To Carry Couple’s Biological Babies, Generous Compensation Paid To Those Women Who Qualify. M. Lawrence Shields III Attorney At Law 412-221-0640 X 101

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses! Discover the “Success and Moneymaking Secrets” THEY don’t want you to know about. To get your FREE “Success and Money Making Secrets” CD, please call 1-800-790-5752 (AAN CAN)

CLASSES AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-4923059 (AAN CAN) Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper! ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com(AAN CAN)

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

Your ad could be here

HAULING

D & S HAULING Reliable Low Rates Call NOW

412-877-0730

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

412.316.3342

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 104

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013


STUDIES

Healthy Controls Needed for Research Study (UPMC Oakland)

CLINICAL STUDIES Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

ASTHMA? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

412-650-6155

CLINICAL STUDIES Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

This study of cognition and schizophrenia is looking for healthy controls of European descent over the age of 30. Participation involves 1-2 appointments lasting a total of between 5-9 hours and the completion of diagnostic interviewing and cognitive testing, donation of a blood sample, and taking part in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI).

Our board-certified physicians have been conducting clinical trials to advance primary care practice and the health of patients since 2003. We are currently enrolling for clinical trials in the following areas: • Asthma • COPD • Migraine • Diabetes • Cardiovascular • High cholesterol • IBS with diarrhea

VAGINAL DRYNESS?

Participants will be reimbursed $175 upon completion of study procedures. Men and women ages 40 and above with no history of psychotic illnesses and no current problems with substance abuse may be eligible.

For more information, please call 412 246 6356 or 1 800 994 8182

412-650-6155

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

Schizophrenia Research Study Participants Needed

See what our clients are saying

IBS? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

412-650-6155

CONSTIPATION? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

ENDOMETRIOSIS?

MENSTRUAL CRAMPS?

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

I’ve In the past two years, the h bot h wit ed isfi been very sat se pon res the and ads design of our to e hav I w kno I en they evoke. Wh in ts jec sub ch ear res advertise for ly ate edi imm I up, gro the 24-35 age er. Pap City the think of using

Do you or someone in your family have schizophrenia? This UPMC research study examines the effects of schizophrenia on cognition. We are seeking families affected by schizophrenia to take part. Participation involves 1-2 visits; during these visits, you will complete diagnostic interviewing and cognitive testing, provide a blood sample, and complete a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI). Participants will be reimbursed $175 for completing all study procedures.

For more information, please call

— Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

412-246-6356 or 1-800-994-8182

need some extra cash? You can earn from $400- $900 by participating in one of our research studies! Novum Pharmaceutical Research Services is one of the world’s leading research companies in the testing of generic mediations. You may be eligible to participate if you are:

• • • • •

At least 18 years of age Currently not taking prescription or illegal drugs Willing to have multiple blood samples taken In general good health Willing to schedule a physical - (no cost to you)

For more information, please call our Recruiting Department at

1-800-586-0365

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Do you like to work on the issues you care about? Would you like to prepare for your future? Want to get paid to make a difference?

$1,400/Month Health Care and Child Care $5,550 Education Award and Federal Student Loan Deferment Hands on Leadership Development, Coaching, and Nonprofit Career Based Training Information Sessions will be held from March – May brandenb@publicallies.org

www.panerabread.jobs

For more information, visit www.publicallies.org or Contact Branden Ballard at 412-258-3022 or brandenb@publicallies.org

Application Deadline May 24th

www.paguard.com

www.saltworks.org

applicants@ doubletreepgh.com www.farmersnb.com

Reserve your space now for the next Career Corner Recruitment Section in June!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013


Saltworks Theater Company OPEN INTERVIEWS TUESDAY, MAY 21 10:30 AM – 1:30 PM Hiring all restaurant positions Experience preferred • High volume restaurant • Great compensation • Health benefits for F/T employees • Located in heart of downtown • One block from Consol Energy Center • Career advancement

Resumes accepted at applicants@doubletreepgh.com

www.bigelowgrille.com Downtown Pittsburgh One Bigelow Square Pittsburgh, PA 15219

is located in Pittsburgh and tours social issue shows to schools throughout PA, WV, OH, NY, NJ. This is a nine month parttime contract, Sept-May. Paid per show, per diem, hotel accommodations, hourly rehearsal rate. Shows educate students K-12 on various issues including drugs and alcohol, bullying, violence, relationships, self-esteem, etc.

Check us out at www.saltworks.org Must have Bachelor’s degree in theater or related field or equivalent acting experience. E-mail headshot and resume to nalrutz@saltworks.org. If interested, I will call you to schedule an audition.

MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR The Farmers National Bank, a strong independent community bank headquartered out of Emlenton, PA, has an outstanding opportunity available for a Mortgage Originator in our new Cranberry Township, Butler County, PA location. Qualifying applicants must have the experience and ability to establish, develop and maintain business partners within our community. The Originator must cultivate quality business relationships and a referral network of realtors, closing attorneys, appraisers and builders to promote the residential lending program within the Bank. The Originator must be able to meet aggressive production, profitability, growth and service goals while ensuring the portfolio maintains strong credit quality.

Minorities are encouraged to apply.

NOW HIRING Full-Time and Part-Time Associate Positions

The ideal candidate must possess a previous Mortgage Originator background with a minimum of three years experience in mortgage origination including experience with secondary market, conventional, construction and equity lending. A Bachelors Degree in Business or Finance and strong verbal and written communication skills. A thorough knowledge of the Cranberry Township market, excellent business development skills, a strong commitment to provide quality customer service, and a desire to become actively involved in local community and civic events are essential. We offer an excellent compensation and benefits package. For prompt consideration, qualified candidates should send or fax their resumes with salary requirements to:

Applications available at the following locations

The Farmers National Bank of Emlenton Attn: Human Resources Dept. 612 Main Street P. O. Drawer D Emlenton, PA 16373 Fax (724) 867-0797 Email: careers@farmersnb.com

Greensburg - Westmoreland Mall Shadyside - Centre Ave Cranberry - Next to Joanne’s Allison Park - Home Depot Plaza Fox Chapel - Waterworks Plaza Settlers Ridge - Ridge Rd Parkway Exit Murrysville - Walnut Plaza Blvd of the Allies - Across from Magee Hospital Penn Center - Across from Sheetz

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Flexible hours, Daylight and Evening Scheduling

Apply at your local Panera Cafe or at panerabread.jobs N E W S

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WEIGHTLOSS TREATMENT Bariatric Weightloss, LLC No Long Term Contract No Start Up Fee

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings. Now accepting Highmark and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Flexible Hours Including Mornings

Health Services

COUNSELING

MIND & BODY

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 ;;;;;;;;;;;;

JADE Wellness Center

355 Fifth Ave Suite 1120 Pgh, PA 15222 412-680-2064

WELLNESS

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

412-400-7159 ;;;;;;;;;;;;

Zhangs Wellness Center

MIND & BODY

412-401-4110 $40/hr

massage

DOWNTOWN 322 Fourth Ave.

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

(1st Floor)

SUBOXONE

• NOW Treating Pregnant Women

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

We treat:

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Addictions

Phoenix Spa New Young Professional Free Table Shower w/60 min. Open 10-10 Daily

Superior Chinese Massage Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

China Massage

(Lawrenceville)

724-519-7896

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 (in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

412-621-3300

Your ad could be here

$50/HR Free Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

Aming’s Massage Therapy 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

4309 Butler Street

• Group and Individualized Therapy

~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

selfesteemworkshops.com

STAR

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Xie LiHong’s

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

• VIVITROL -

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

WELLNESS CENTER

Chinese Bodyworks

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

MIND & BODY

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

SELF-ESTEEM WORKSHOPS

Therapy

MIND & BODY

412.316.3342

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others 108

WE have been there. WE know your pain. Don’t Wait Any Longer!

Now Hiring for LPC/LCSW MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.15/05.22.2013

Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116


GRAND OPENING!

TIGER SPA

Judy’s Oriental Massage

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

FULL BODY MASSAGE

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

$40/hr Now with Vichy Shower 4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Accepting All Major Cards

get your

yoga on! We offer classes 7 days a week!

Alignment-focused Hatha yoga in Point Breeze! We have Prenatal, Baby & Me, Yoga for Athletes, Flow classes & more.

Call for class schedule or visit www.clayyoga.com 4519 Liberty Ave, Bloomfied 412-335-1332

Drop in anytime OR sign up for a session!

www.innerhearthyoga.com N E W S

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Buying or selling a home? Choose a pro who lives and works in the city. Call today for a consultation: Rick Schweikert Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 5887 Forbes Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15217

412-352-3417

Rick Schweikert rick.schweikert@pittsburghmoves.com

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LIVE MOVING SERVICES ABC SELF STORAGE5x10 $45, 10x10 $65, 10x15 $95. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069 Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

HOUSE FOR SALE

ROOMMATES

REAL ESTATE SERVICES NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses! Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

HOUSE FOR SALE

New Price $ 360,000 - Mexican War Street Totally Renovated3-story, brick, 3 BR, 2 BA home. Original details, mantels, with 5 fireplaces. Beautiful woodwork & copper downspouts. Extra lot included. Call George E Lucas to see. 412-771-8400

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

HOUSE FOR SALE

Auction of House & contents Saturday June 22 Open House Saturday June 8 Cheaper than Rent $ 47,900 - Stowe Twp. Well Maintained - 2 BR, Frame Cape Cod set on a large level, fenced-in lot. Features a gas furnace with central air. Ready to move in. Call George E Lucas Today. 412-771-8400

Beautiful, well-maintained Colonial-style 3-bedroom, 2-garage home, 1,600+ square feet. Near Greentree Road and McMonagle, Scott Township. Contents include furniture & antiques Info and photos at http://arlacherryoak.wordpress.com Contact David Kearns, LIC # AU2464L, 724-239-2050



May 15, 2013 - Summer Guide