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POLITICAL CURRENCY: MAYORAL CANDIDATES ON CITY FINANCES 06


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013


OUT OF THE BOX TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUERS

EVENTS 5.3 – 5pm YOUTH INVASION 2013 Teens take over The Warhol! Tickets $3 students/$5 adults Co-presented with HIVE Pittsburgh

5.11 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: COLIN STETSON WITH SPECIAL GUEST SARAH NEUFELD (OF ARCADE FIRE) Tickets $15/$12 Members FREE parking in The Warhol lot Media sponsor: 91.3FM WYEP

5.14 – 10am-5pm ART MUSEUM DAY 2013, FEATURING FREE ADMISSION As part of Art Museum Day 2013 FREE admission

Join Time Capsules Cataloguers Erin Byrne, Marie Elia and Elaina 6.6 – 8pm

Vitale as they take the first look inside one of Warhol’s unopened

SOUND SERIES: THE UNCLUDED (KIMYA DAWSON & AESOP ROCK) Tickets $15/$12 Members FREE parking in The Warhol lot Media sponsor: 91.3FM WYEP

boxes! Warhol was an avid collector of art, Fiestaware, photographs, newspapers, dental molds and especially the minutiae of his daily life. In 1974, he began filling the first of his 600 Time Capsules with source material, correspondence and

6.14 – 10am-5pm

clothing. The Time Capsules reflect more than Warhol’s personal

SPECIAL HOURS The Warhol will close at 5pm due to a private event.

life—they act as an insightful snapshot of the time and contain a wealth of information for researchers.

5.10 – 7pm The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

FREE WITH MUSEUM ADMISSION N E W S

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013


Over 21 • 9pm - Midnight

ROCK & BOWL! {EDITORIAL}

05.01/05.08.2013

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers AMYJO BROWN, LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns TRACEY HICKEY, JEFF IHAZA, JOHN LAVANGA

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 18 {COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{ART}

[NEWS]

06

“I didn’t create the financial mess we face, but I mopped it up.� — Mayoral candidate and Pittsburgh City Councilor Bill Peduto on the city’s financial situation

[TASTE]

22

“You don’t want to go home smelling like you haven’t been, so eat some ramps.� — Announcer at the MasonDixon Ramp Festival

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Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

“Why can’t The Shining be about the Nazis and the moon landing?� — Al Hoff, reviewing Room 237, a doc about Kubrick’s film

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

“The artist’s idea finally arrived after contemplating an old porn-shop sign with flashing bulbs, which carried the rubric ‘Adult Arcade.’� — David Berger on Marc Burgess’ new installation

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

[LAST PAGE]

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WWW.ARSENALBOWL.COM

{ADMINISTRATION}

[ARTS]

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AL bowl.com ARSEN i n revitalize revitalizedd Lawrenceville

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

[SCREEN]

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412-683-5992 44TH AND BUTLER ST.

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers MICHAEL ARTMAN, SHEILA LETSON, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[MUSIC]

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FRE E WI- FI

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, CHRIS JURAN, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, JEANNE MUMFORD, EMILY POZZUTO, MICHAEL RANALLO Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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“Our 4-year-olds are playing with iPods. That’s because of Tesla.� — Filmmaker Michael Anton on the legacy of Nikola Tesla

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INCOMING

THE CITY’S FINANCIAL PICTURE HAS IMPROVED, BUT THE NEW MAYOR WILL HAVE PLENTY OF WORK TO DO

RE: Helping Out: Trevor Project offers hope to teens struggling for LGBT acceptance (April 24) “The Trevor Project is an amazing resource. Persad Center is also doing outreach into rural communities, but I think that PFLAG tends to be the trailblazers and thank God for them!” —Web comment from “Pghlesbian”

RE: Employees file complaint with National Labor Relations Board against Rivers Casino (online only, April 18) “People should know that those dues are really reasonable. It’s a fantastic fee for job insurance. Can’t beat having a union behind you. If you don’t have a job you can’t get health insurance. Today’s world requires job insurance too. Go Union.” — Web comment from “Susan Cook”

RE: Urban Renewal: How Pittsburgh could save the world ... or at least itself “Despite improvements over the past few decades, our region’s air quality still ranks among the worst in the nation — and we aren’t improving as quickly as many other cities. ... If we truly want to be the ‘most livable city,’ we must contend with our air-pollution problem.” —Facebook comment from “Breathe Project”

MONEY MATTERS

RE: The Place Beyond the Pines: An uneven drama that starts strong, but fails to coalesce in a satisfying manner (April 10) “I [am] done with your paper. The Place Beyond the Pines is an American masterpiece.” — Web comment from “Mike Krashoff”

From Act 47 to UPMC, mayoral candidates sound off on city’s financial state {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

“Asked @MayorLuke who he’s been meeting with while he’s been MIA from the media. ‘Um, NOT YOU ... despite your repeated attempts.’ #burn!”

— April 25 tweet from Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reporter Moriah Balingit (@MoriahBee)

still operates under two state fiscal-oversight boards: the Act 47 board and the Intergovernmental Cooperation Authority. While there appears to be no immediate end in sight to the ICA, Ravenstahl’s petition to exit Act 47 is pending before the state officials — a move some officials say is premature. In addition, the new mayor will be left to deal with a lawsuit filed by Ravenstahl challenging the tax-exempt status of UPMC (which has counter-sued the city). With that in mind, we’ve compiled information from interviews and candidate debates to see how the Democrats stand on the city’s financial plight — and where they hope to find new revenues.

BEFORE HE STOPPED running for re-election in March, Mayor Luke Ravenstahl spent a lot of time touting the city’s current financial picture — and his role in fixing it. And in some ways, the city’s financial picture has improved since he took office in 2006. The city’s debt has been cut from more than $800 million to about $580 million. The city’s pension is 60 percent funded — up from 34 percent in 2009 — and Peduto says the city’s financial recovery the city’s coffers have a surplus. But the next mayor may have other has come a long way, but a complete turnproblems to contend with. Pittsburgh around is still distant. An early supporter

Bill Peduto

of using Act 47 to improve the city’s finances, Peduto served as council’s finance chairman while the city devised its second five-year financial-recovery plan, which was enacted in 2009. He says he worked to “make sure the city stayed away from bankruptcy” by taking “the hits necessary,” even cutting his own salary. “In my time on council,” says Peduto, “I didn’t create the financial mess we face, but I mopped it up.” Peduto says exiting Act 47 now would be a mistake. He favors finishing up the current five-year plan by 2014, and then entering into a final five-year plan. The city could opt out early if certain benchmarks — like selling off excess property and establishing a “professional management system for paving” — are achieved. By 2018, Peduto says the city’s debtCONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013


MONEY MATTERS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

2013

LEASE FOR

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$ 2013

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service payments will decrease by about $40 million, and to continue to chip away at that debt, he says it’s important to “refrain from borrowing heavy sums of money.” Similarly, Peduto says the city can resolve its pension headache if it follows up on another initiative he helped launch: taking revenues from increased parkingmeter rates and dedicating them to the fund. (Peduto has been in a running argument with the city’s Parking Authority, which he says is withholding money from the fare hikes.) Finally, Peduto says he will work toward a statewide change to pension plans that will allow for new employees to enroll in a modified 401(k)-style plan, while keeping the city’s current pension plan for those already enrolled. When it comes to challenging the taxexempt status of the city’s nonprofits, Peduto supports Ravenstahl’s lawsuit against UPMC, but says Ravenstahl erred by declaring UPMC would be the only target. Peduto says health-insurer Highmark is in the same class as UPMC, and challenging one should entail challenging both. “If you say there’s unfairness in [tax payments] and then just pick one, it’s an unfair measurement,” Peduto says. “Saying we’re going to go through an entire approach and look at everyone … would have been the best approach.”

CANDIDATES PROPOSE DIFFERENT WAYS TO END STATE OVERSIGHT OF THE CITY’S BUDGET.

A.J. Richardson

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2003, he joined with Republicans in supporting a bill to preclude the city from charging a tax on commuters — something it might otherwise have been able to do under Act 47. The legislation drew fire from fellow area Democrat state Sen. Jay Costa and Democrats in the House, but Wagner remained firm. The city, he said, lacked “good fiscal management,” and until that changed, “I, for one, am not going to require the people that I represent to pay new taxes to the city of Pittsburgh or to any other community in Pennsylvania.” Some critics contend that Wagner was settling scores with then-Mayor Tom Murphy — who had beat Wagner in a tough 1993 mayoral election — or trying to win favor from suburban voters before his statewide auditor-general campaign. But Wagner denies that, saying Murphy’s “record was not one of fiscal responsibility and … I didn’t feel comfortable further taxing the people and giving those dollars to an administration going into Act 47.” Today, Wagner says the city has reduced its debt burden under financial oversight. But like Peduto, he says there is more work to be done: “I haven’t seen the efficiencies in city government necessary for [ending Act 47 oversight] to occur.” That would be a goal of his first term, he adds. Wagner and Peduto also agree that the city can generate revenue by selling off at least some of the 30,000 properties held by the Urban Redevelopment Authority. As for the city’s challenge of UPMC’s tax-exempt status, Wagner sounds broadly sympathetic to the lawsuit. “Yes, the mayor … had every right to challenge UPMC on their nonprofit status,” he told an April 3 gathering at the University of Pittsburgh. But there’s a caveat: Wagner hasn’t decided whether he’ll continue that challenge. As he told the Pitt audience moments later, if elected mayor, “I will look at the mayor’s challenge of UPMC and continue it if they’re not meeting the guidelines set up by ... the laws of Pennsylvania.” In an interview with City Paper, Wagner said that after being elected, he’d conduct his own review and decided whether to drop the lawsuit, continue it or even expand it. “Maybe there should be more entities involved in this,” Wagner says. “There are some other pretty big nonprofits here.”

Self-described community activist A.J. Richardson says the city needs to take a “more proactive approach to finances” by increased public transparency in how the city’s money is being allocated in the community. Richardson says the city should also invest in small businesses as a way to generate new revenues. But he says before an individual receives a grant for small business, he or she must complete a financial-literacy course that he would also like to see taught in public high schools. Finally, Richardson says he agrees with Ravenstahl’s attempt to remove UPMC’s tax-exempt status and says the healthcare giant is “acting more like a corporation than a nonprofit” and “is more concerned with its own quantity of life, rather than people’s quality of life.”

Jack Wagner Wagner has often been a tough critic of the city’s finances. As a state senator in

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013


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MONEY MATTERS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

Jake Wheatley

Glass in the Gardens. SUMMER FLOWER SHOW THROUGH OCTOBER 6 Come discover a sparkling, imaginative world where lush foliage and colorful blooms mingle with the dazzling creations of local glass artists. A perfect combination of artistry, whimsy and beauty, it’s all part of Summer Flower Show: Glass in the Gardens at Phipps. For details, visit phipps.conservatory.org.

Under fiscal oversight, Wheatley says the city “has done a decent job” working to resolve its financial mess. But, he says, there are substantial challenges moving forward — especially in finding a solution to pensions. Wheatley says the right solution is one that “won’t add an additional tax burden to local businesses and taxpayers and doesn’t include selling off the city’s resources.” His own proposal? Getting the city to realize big savings if it examines its energy utilization and enters into “energy-performance contracts.” For example, Wheatley told the audiences at an April 11 forum, “if we were spending $100 million on energy consumption as a city, we can get guaranteed $33 million back that we can invest in more energyefficient” programs and infrastructure. Those savings, he continued, could be dedicated to the city’s long-term pension obligation. “These aren’t new concepts,” Wheatley added. “They’re being used and are successful in other cities.” The U.S. Army has used such performance contracts to realize energy savings, as have cities including Boulder, Colo.

Wheatley says the city’s pension problems may also be a key to solving the ongoing fight with UPMC. Instead of challenging nonprofits, he says, they should be brought to the table “for a conversation.” “I don’t want to threaten our largest employers for them to do right,” Wheatley says. “We have a history in this city of sitting down and talking with these groups. If we explained the situation and got them to commit somewhere around $15 million a year that would be attached strictly to the pension obligation, I think that’s something we could sell.” Wheatley can’t say if he would come in and halt the lawsuit against UPMC if elected, but adds that “if you’re going to challenge [UPMC’s] status, it should be expanded to all large nonprofits to make sure everyone is held to the same standard.” Wheatley says the city is positioning itself to come out of Act 47 oversight. But without financial oversight, he says, it will be all the more important for a mayor to keep costs down — namely by being a tough negotiator with city unions. And Wheatley, who has received no endorsements from labor groups, says he’s the guy for the job: “I am not beholden to anyone.”

SOME CANDIDATES SAY RAVENSTAHL’S SUIT AGAINST UPMC SHOULD HAVE CAST A WIDER NET.

C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

{BY MATT BORS}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

IDIOTBOX


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HEADING FOR THE HILLS

Mayoral race shaping District 4 contest {BY CHRIS POTTER}

PofE T the

WEEK

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Call Animal Friends today!

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12

JUST HOW QUIET has the Pittsburgh City Council race in District 4 been? Until an April 29 forum in Brookline, the two Democrats in the race had not been in the same room for a political event. And even then, there were few fireworks. Incumbent Natalia Rudiak told the crowd at St. Mark Evangelical Lutheran Church that during her first term, “The tide has turned, and we are building a better south Pittsburgh.” And while her challenger, former post-office worker John Lee, claimed to be “a better fit for what these communities are all about,” he offered little direct criticism. (Though Lee, 52, did set some teeth on edge by referring to 33-yearold Rudiak as a “very bright girl.”) Underneath the surface, though, are tensions about the future direction of District 4, which includes Brookline, Beechview, Carrick, Bon Air and Overbrook. In a recent campaign mailing, Lee decries Rudiak as a councilor who “forgot who elected her” and “takes her marching orders from Bill Peduto,” the East End city councilor and mayoral candidate. What’s more, the letter predicted, it was “highly probable” that Peduto would lose the mayor’s race to Jack Wagner, whose family is a fixture of South Hills politics. “It’s not productive to have our councilperson on the wrong side of City Hall,” the letter warned. “I had to say what I feel,” says Lee of the letter. Rudiak says that message will backfire: “Politics is about addition, not division,” she says.

Rudiak won her 2009 council bid with just over one-third of the vote, after two rivals split the support of party footsoldiers and Wagner loyalists. A Carrick High School graduate with a master’s degree in public policy from Carnegie Mellon University, Rudiak ran as a reformer opposing “old-school political gamesmanship.” She was championed by Peduto-style reformers, who’d previously had little electoral success outside the East End. Rudiak, though, emphasizes her role as a district advocate. “I ran for office because I thought the South Hills were being neglected,” she says. “And over the past four years, I’ve spoken with every real-estate developer and foundation head I can.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

Among her accomplishments, she cites the $7 million reconstruction of Brookline Boulevard, begun this spring after more than a decade of delay. Rudiak also touts new or renovated community and senior centers, and plans for a “Dairy District” retail business development around Carrick’s Colteryahn dairy. While Rudiak allows that “No elected deserves all the credit” for those developments, “our office had a role in every one of them.” On council, Rudiak typically sides with Peduto, and in oppoJohn sition to Mayor Luke Lee Ravenstahl: After 2010’s “Snowmageddon” winter storm, when she was “just a brighteyed newcomer” to council, she subpoenaed Ravenstahl’s public-safety director to answer questions about snow-removal. And she acknowledges that city politics can be fractious. “I’ve been taken aback by some of the rhetoric that comes from both sides,” she says. Still, she says, those battles haven’t hampered her ability to help the district. “I think [Lee] is saying that the mayor is so mad at me that he’s holding projects back in south Pittsburgh,” she says. “But Natalia that’s absurd. There has Rudiak been an unprecedented level of investment in this community.” Lee remains unimpressed by those accomplishments. “She didn’t do that,” he says of the district’s developments. “She was the councilperson when some of that came up.” Planning for the Brookline Boulevard project, he notes, began years ago — and ought to be handled better today. The project is a “debacle” he says, with many businesses accessible only by a dizzying catwalk of plywood walkways over swaths of torn-up asphalt. But primarily, Lee’s campaign touts his own neighborhood roots — the Brookline native was a near-legendary basketball coach at area Catholic high schools — while suggesting that Rudiak is too, well … Shadyside-y. “She got the master’s degree from CMU; I got my degree from the streets of

Brookline,” he says. Shortly after launching his bid, he told City Paper that while Rudiak held an early fundraiser at Downtown bar Olive or Twist, “I’d rather stop at the Moonlight Café.” (When Rudiak opened her campaign headquarters shortly afterward, she pointedly invited her supporters to the Moonlight.) Noting Rudiak’s appeal to younger voters, Lee says “I like the idea that young people are getting involved” in the district. “But you have a lot of older people here too,” and their concerns have more to do with filling potholes than with filling up at new restaurants. Lee says that because he’s more focused on such street-level issues — and less caught up in council factions — he’d be better able to facilitate projects like Brookline Boulevard. A random City Paper check of area merchants found that business has been hurt to varying extents, though most seemed pleased with the project’s pace. Rudiak allows that the Brookline project involves disruptions, but says such growing pains come with progress. “Patience is a virtue,” she told attendees of the April 29 forum. “Things will be difficult before they get easy.” It remains to be seen how bumpy Rudiak’s own road will be. Lee is the endorsed Democrat; Rudiak, who finished a distant third in the party’s 2009 endorsement vote, didn’t compete for it this time. Lee also has the backing of the Fraternal Order of Police and the firefighters union — two useful allies in a district that many public-safety employees call home. Rudiak has endorsements, too, including the city paramedics union and the SEIU, as well as pro-LGBT groups and Planned Parenthood. But unlike in 2009, there’s no third candidate to split her opposition. And Wagner’s mayoral run may well increase turnout from Wagner backers who opposed her in 2009. Still, the mayoral race is very much in flux. A recent poll by Keystone Analytics shows Wagner and Peduto in a statistical tie. “It’s presumptuous” for Lee to assume Wagner will win, Rudiak says. “We have an election coming up.” C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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Saturday, May 4 from 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside Campus Join us for morning workshops, breakout sessions, lunch, and exhibits from local chefs, community groups, businesses, and more. For more information and to register, visit www.chatham.edu/foodneighborhood Hosted by Chatham University’s Master of Arts in Food Studies program and School of Sustainability and the Environment.

Meditation A Must for Body, Mind and Spiritual Well-Being Would you like more serenity, vitality and mental clarity in your life? Research shows that mediation can diminish many ills, alleviate stress, increase harmony in relationships and increase spiritual fulfullment. Come explore the benefits of meditaiton and practical methods of getting startws. Learn about Transmission Meditation, a simple yet powerful group service meditation.

Dorothy Jones, Ph.D., psychologist and author of Joy Awaits lectures on metaphysical belief systems and methods of awakening the Higher Self

FRI, MAY 10, 2013 - 6:30PM AT UNION PROJECT 801 N Negley Ave, Pittsburgh

TUE, JUNE 11, 2013 - 7:00PM AT SITE NITE First United Methodist Church, 5401 Centre Ave, Pittsburgh $5 SUGGESTED DONATION - NO ONE WILL BE TURNED AWAY!

More info: 1-800-860-8035 or transmissionmeditation@verizon.net Chatham University • Woodland Road • Pittsburgh, PA 15232

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

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public transit

Going to the Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon? Skip the marathon traffic. Take the bus, T or bike. Port Authority and BikePGH encourage you to ride before you drive. There will be extra and frequent T and bus service on race day and plenty of bike parking locations Downtown. And join BikePGH and the Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon for The Bike Spectator Ride. Follow the runners on a designated parallel bike route along the Marathon route. A guide will be distributed at the GNC Live Well Pittsburgh Health and Fitness Expo May 3-4 and can be downloaded online at pittsburghmarathon.com. So plan to ride your bicycle or take the bus or T, or all of the above, to the GNC Live Well Pittsburgh Health and Fitness Expo and on Race Day May 5th. Look for the “Taking Public Transit” brochure or get schedule & bus detour info at PortAuthority.org/marathon. Bike parking will be available at the following events: GNC Live Well Pittsburgh Health and Fitness Expo FRIDAY, MAY 3 11:00 AM - 8:00 PM SATURDAY, MAY 4 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM David L. Lawrence Convention Center *The Expo will open at 10:00 AM, one-hour early, for VIP participants only. Green Light Wireless Finish Line Festival SUNDAY, MAY 5 7:00 AM - 2:00 PM Point State Park And don’t forget all of Port Authority’s buses are now equipped with bike racks. Whether it’s your everyday commute or a weekend ride we’re ready to help you get your bike on. Bikes may now be taken on Port Authority’s Light Rail System [T] and the Monongahela Incline seven days a week without time restrictions.

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Affluent East End has three strong progressive council candidates to choose from {BY CHRIS POTTER} PITTSBURGH’S AFFLUENT East End has the kind of problems many neighborhoods would kill for. Case in point: trying to choose a city councilor to represent District 8, which encompasses Shadyside along with portions of Squirrel Hill and Point Breeze. Longtime councilor Bill Peduto isn’t running for re-election, to focus on his mayoral bid. Three Democrats — activist Jeanne Clark, Peduto aide Dan Gilman and attorney Sam Hens-Greco — are seeking to replace him. (The winner will likely face Republican Mordecai Treblow in November.) Choosing between them may not be easy. Planned Parenthood, for one, made no endorsement because all three candidates are strong on reproductive rights. And the candidates have largely abided by a pledge to run positive campaigns. Still, they have different styles, and Gilman and Clark especially hold different positions on key issues. Gilman, for example, strongly backs a citywide ban on natural-gas drilling. While gas companies have shown little Dan interest in drilling here, Gilman Gilman says, “There are still many questions” about its environmental impact. Clark, who previously worked for the environmental group PennFuture, disagrees. “If you don’t like natural gas,” she warns, “you end up using coal.” The ban, she says, only makes it harder to attract drilling firms to Pittsburgh office space. Hens-Greco takes a middle course: With the state Supreme Court set to issue a decision on whether local zoning rules apply to drillers, “I think it belongs on the city’s books for now.” The candidates have similar differences on Mayor Luke Ravenstahl’s lawsuit challenging UPMC’s tax-exempt status. Gilman favors the suit, while Clark says the city will be outgunned: “When you deal with a bully, you have to anticipate how that bully will behave.” Hens-Greco has recommended a “collaborative tax project” approach, in which nonprofits would pay some portion of their tax burden, while the city “sells” the remaining tax credit to other taxpayers. But all three candidates have one thing in common: the challenge of getting their race noticed. As Hens-Greco puts it, “The question you most often get [from voters] is ‘What do you think of the mayor’s race?’”

Jeanne Clark “For more than 40 years, I’ve been working in Pittsburgh and other places for women’s rights, gay rights and environmental protection,” Clark tells audiences. That legacy has earned Clark, 63, endorsements from such national figures as Feminist Majority head Eleanor Smeal and Kate Michelman, forJeanne mer head of the National Clark Abortion Rights Action League. (More locally, Clark’s backers include the Allegheny County Labor Council and Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald, a longtime ally.) She’s been a highly visible critic of Mayor Luke Ravenstahl, as when his police bureau promoted officers previously accused of domestic violence. In one widely-reported incident, Ravenstahl accosted her on a “cookie cruise” fundraiser in honor of the late mayor Bob O’Connor. Clark says schooling issues are a large concern: While city officials don’t control the school district, she says the city-run school buildings house “wraparound services” for kids after the school day is through. But women’s issues — like the dwindling number of female police officers on the force — are a central concern in her campaign. “There are virtually no women on boards, commissions and authorities,” Clark says. “And if you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu.”

Dan Gilman

Sam

HensThough Gilman, 30, Greco is the youngest candidate in the race, he’s stressing experience and continuity. Hired by Peduto after graduating from Carnegie Mellon University, Gilman boasts of having “years of experience, working block by block.” And he pledges that, because of his familiarity with district issues, he’ll be able to “hit the ground running” as a councilor. Gilman also touts a theme of innovation, proposing government efforts to find low-cost office space for incuba-

tors. Like his boss, he stresses the importance of adopting new technology in government. “City building inspectors don’t have email!” is a common Gilman lament. Gilman has racked up a bevy of endorsements, including SEIU, the local paramedics union and AFSCME, which represents public employees. Gilman also snagged the Democratic Party endorsement, surprising many: Clark and Hens Greco have headed the party’s 7th and 14th ward committees respectively. But would Gilman have a hard time interacting with the mayor’s office, if Peduto loses to Jack Wagner or Jake Wheatley? “I don’t worry about that one bit,” Gilman says. “I’ve worked well with others, and there are people supporting my campaign who back Jack Wagner and Jake Wheatley.”

Sam Hens-Greco Hens-Greco, 56, might seem like a dark horse. He hasn’t been in government like Gilman, and his political activity draws less public attention than Clark’s. But observers say he’s been door-knocking assiduously, and his activism hasn’t gone unnoticed. A lawyer, Hens-Greco has offered services to newly arrived immigrants, victims of antiLGBT discrimination, and other causes. He’s fond of quoting a backer who told him, “I’m going to support you because you live your values.” Hens-Greco has proposed several initiatives during the campaign, from providing tax incentives for rain barrels to allowing members of the public — rather than just city officials — to park in spots near the City-County Building. But for him, he says, the campaign “has really been about gun violence. Everybody is concerned, and I think it’s an issue that can transform the city” — perhaps by spawning the creation of a “gunviolence” czar. Hens-Greco is short on specific proposals, and gun violence might seem a remote issue in District 8 neighborhoods, among the city’s safest. But “when you have people firing guns Downtown at 4 p.m.,” HensGreco says, “it doesn’t matter what district you’re from.” C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013


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S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS @ E ART HL I N K . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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A University of Kansas professor and two co-authors, in research in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Finance, found that children age 10 and under substantially outperformed their parents in earnings from stock trading in the few days before and after rumors swirled on possible corporate mergers. A likely explanation, they said, is that the parents or guardians were buying and selling for their children’s accounts using illegal insider information that they were cautious about using in their personal accounts, which would more easily arouse suspicion. While the parents’ accounts had nice returns, the kids’ accounts (including those held by the very recently born) were almost 50 percent more profitable. (The study, reported by NPR in April, covered 15 years of trades in Finland, chosen because that country collects age data that the U.S. and other countries do not.)

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Delicate Marketing Required: (1) A fluoride-free chocolate toothpaste “proven” to strengthen teeth and regenerate enamel is now on sale in limited markets in the U.S. Theodent (active ingredient: “rennou”) is also available in mint flavor, said its New Orleansbased inventor, Dr. Tetsuo Nakamoto. (2) One of the 12 Canadian foods chosen to accompany the country’s International Space Station astronaut in December is the limited-issue dry cereal especially noted for its fiber, organic buckwheat and various nontraditional ingredients. “Holy Crap” cereal is available throughout Canada and in 19 other countries.

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“Even to Icelanders accustomed to harsh weather and isolation,”

reported The New York Times in March, the city of Grimsstadir “is a particularly desolate spot.” Nonetheless, Chinese billionaire land developer Huang Nubo has announced he intends to build a luxury hotel and golf course in the area for his countrymen seeking “clean air and solitude.” Since snowfalls often run from September until May, locals are skeptical of Huang’s motives, but he continues to press for a long-term lease covering about 100 square miles for a project estimated to eventually cost about $100 million.

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Since gastrointestinal noroviruses are so infectious and can be fatal in countries with marginal hygiene, scientists at the U.K. government’s Health and Safety Lab in Derbyshire needed to study the “reach and dispersion” of human “vomitus,” especially its aerosolizing. Working with nauseous patients would be impractical, and thus, researcher Catherine Makison created “Vomiting Larry,” a puke-hurling robot with a range of almost 10 feet. (According to a University of Cambridge researcher, one can be infected by fewer than 20 norovirus particles, each droplet of puke can contain 2 million particles, and the virus remains active on hard surfaces for 12 hours.)

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Research published in February by Britain’s Royal Society science association found that male guppies in mating mode prefer to congregate with plainer, less colorful males, probably for an obvious reason: to look better by comparison. Said Italian researcher Clelia Gasparini, “You want to impress [a female potential mate].” Would you “look more attractive in comparison with [the dowdy, awkward comic star] Mr. Bean or George Clooney?”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

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Even though human hearts open warmly to helpless animals, kindness is not universal. As Clemson University animal-conservation student Nathan Weaver found with a quick experiment late last year, some drivers will deliberately swerve into a turtle trying to cross a busy road — seven drivers, he found, in the space of one hour (though most drivers easily avoided the realistic rubber model).

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Wealthy Russians have recently found a way around the country’s horrid traffic jams: fake ambulances, outfitted with plush interiors for relaxation while specially trained drivers use unauthorized lights and sirens to maneuver through cluttered streets. London’s Daily Telegraph reported in March that “ambulance” companies charge the equivalent of about $200 an hour for these taxis.

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After a trial on fraud charges, the Iranian judiciary sentenced four bankers and their collaborators to death in February and several others to public floggings for obtaining loans by forgery in order to purchase government properties. The total amount involved reportedly was the equivalent of about $2.6 billion — tiny compared to losses suffered since 2008 by investors and customers of large American banks’ illegality, money-laundering and corner-cutting, for which no one has yet been jailed even for a single day.

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Corey Moore, a Washington, D.C., “street legend,” according to The Washington Post, for beating one arrest after another on murder and firearms charges, was finally convicted in February and faced at least 15 years in

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prison. The case was broken by a foot policeman in the suburb of Takoma Park, Md., who saw Moore toss an open bottle of beer into some shrubbery. After a sidewalk chase, a search yielded cocaine, which enabled a search of Moore’s apartment that supplied crucial evidence the police had been lacking for years.

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Romanian lawyer Madalin Ciculescu, 34, said in April that the next stop for his lawsuit is the European Court of Human Rights after two Romanian courts turned down his claims against Orthodox bishops who failed to exorcize the demons that were causing his flatulence. He sued the archdiocese because at least two exorcisms (one in his office, one at home) proved useless, thus harming his business as well as rendering his home life unpleasant. An archdiocese spokesman said the exorcisms were done properly, by the book.

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Took It Too Far: (1) The school board in Windham, Mass., voted in March to ban popular, ubiquitous dodgeball from the district’s curriculum because the game treats players as “human targets.” Dodgeball (even though played these days with a foam ball) also suffers from “eliminating” players as the game progresses, which an education professional warned renders them less active than the good players. (2) The Castle View School in Britain’s Essex County issued a specific ban in March against serving popular “triangleshaped” pancakes after one was thrown at a pupil. (Not affected, reported London’s The Independent, were “rectangle-shaped” pancakes, even though those, of course, have four firm corners instead of three.)


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THE CRABCAKE SAUCES WERE AMONG THE HIGHLIGHTS OF THE MEAL

RAMPING UP {BY AL HOFF} Ramps, a.k.a. wild onion, wild garlic or ramson, are the new darling of the culinary world. These smallish, springtime leeks are native to our region and, not surprisingly, were foraged and incorporated into down-home dishes around here long before any chef in Brooklyn made them into a garni. Some local CSAs offer ramps, and you can splurge for them at Whole Foods ($15/pound). But to really get your ramp on, it’s worth the drive to the annual Mason-Dixon Ramp Festival, in Mount Morris, Greene County. Held in a ridge-top park, the festival offers musical entertainment, country crafts and ramps galore. Sample ramps that have been pickled, beer-batter-fried or dipped in chocolate. Fill your belly with ramp and potato soup, a ramp burger or the Mason-Dixon Dog, topped with chili, coleslaw, kraut and raw ramps (“a whole meal for a buck, with a hot dog right in the middle of it”). And yes, there is ramp hard-tack candy and ramp wine. Take home jars of ramp jelly, some ramp fudge, recipe cards from the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank (including one for a pineapple-ramp salsa) and a T-shirt that reads “Ramps: God’s Gift to the Appalachians.” Some folks don’t care for eating ramps because their pungent garlickyonion-ness can stick to you. Not a problem here: “You don’t want to go home smelling like you haven’t been,” the MC called out, “so eat some ramps.” The ramp festival is held every April. See www.masondixonpark.net for next year’s details. A H OFF@ PGHC ITY PA PE R.CO M

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At the third annual

FOOD IN OUR NEIGHBORHOOD, learn how what you eat and where it comes from is a community issue. Workshops include starting a food business and sourcing alternative options for acquiring food, such as co-ops, buying clubs and community gardens. There will also be chefs and community organizations on hand, plus activities for all ages, including how to build a “seed bomb.” 10 a.m.5 p.m. Sat., May 4. Chatham University campus, Shadyside. Free. www.chatham.edu

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A STOP IN TIME {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

S

OME SAY the phrase “you can’t get

there from here” was invented in Pittsburgh. Whether or not that’s true, our region’s road system will make your GPS beg for mercy, and complaining about it is a venerable pastime among natives and newcomers alike. Sure, getting lost is no fun, but there can be serendipity while traveling our region’s countless meandering highways and byways. It was just such lucky happenstance that led us to a family-owned Italian and seafood restaurant in East McKeesport with the improbable name of R-Time at Rene’s. The restaurant we had set out for, within a rollercoaster’s drop of Kennywood, turned out to be closed. Still hungry, we charted a course for Monroeville, which led us through Duquesne and McKeesport to East McKeesport. There we discovered a little commercial district complete with an oldfashioned hardware store, a barber with customers still hanging out at dusk and RTime at Rene’s. Well, we thought, why not? Rene’s current identity dates back to 1987, but the layout, with a bar entrance

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

Fish sandwich with fries

off the sidewalk and dining room entrance off a small parking lot, suggests a longer history — perhaps of the kind of place that millworkers might have patronized for a drink at the bar after work, and returned to for family meals on weekends. The place was pretty quiet at 8 p.m. on a Thursday, although a steady trickle of customers came in for the kitchen’s weekly

R-TIME AT RENE’S

1030 Fifth Ave., East McKeesport. 412-829-8113 HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups and salads $4-10; entrees $6-17 LIQUOR: Full bar

all-you-can-eat shrimp special. We passed on that, but sampled seafood in the forms of crabcakes, lobster mac-and-cheese and Rene’s “famous” fried fish sandwich. Cannelloni and pasta covered the Italian side of things. The presence of lobster mac-and-cheese hinted at some contemporary updating

of Rene’s mostly old-school menu, and our crabcake order confirmed this hunch by coming with chipotle-lime cream and piquillo pepper purée. These sauces, accompanying a starter portion of three wee crabcakes, were among the highlights of the meal. Each one had its own dynamic flavor — the chipotle-lime tart and zingy, the pepper sweet and earthy — which, in turn, played off the other’s zestier quality. The crab itself was too salty, although we liked the cakes’ proportions: tall enough that each side took some sear even as the interior remained moist and just cooked through. Another starter, fried zucchini, also featured a properly cooked interior, allowing the thin planks to retain their bright, vegetal appeal. Parmesan-peppercorn was a good choice of dipping sauce. But the breadcrumby coating was distractingly tough. Jason had no complaints about the wedding soup, with its broth bursting with chicken flavor and its tiny, tender meatballs; his only quibble was that it could have stood some more greens. The lobster in the mac-and-cheese, however,


had almost no presence. We detected no lumps or claws in our sizable serving, just shreds, and these had an off-putting fishy flavor that the gooey cheese mix was too mild to counter. Rene’s “award-winning” cod sandwich was better than that, and its breading was, happily, lighter than that on the zucchini. But it was not as light and crisp as we’ve had on the best fish sandwiches around here. Pittsburghers know their fish sandwiches, and would probably classify this one as “good enough.” What separates cannelloni from other stuffed pastas, like shells or manicotti, is the thinness of its wrapper: Whether relying on crepe-like crespelles or paper-thin sheets of pasta, cannelloni has a delicacy that other, more robust stuffed noodles do not. That’s why it didn’t work that Rene’s used lasagna noodles — the old-fashioned, thick ones with ruffled edges. The result was a dish that, though different in form from lasagna, was indistinguishable in taste and texture. Judged as lasagna rolls, it was satisfactory, and well complemented by a flavorful meatball. But Jason’s hopes for good, tender cannelloni had been dashed.

Bruschetta

Angelique was well satisfied with her pasta dish, though. She designed it herself off the “Create Your Own Pasta!” menu, and it consisted of penne in a credible vodka sauce with good, spicy Italian sausage and just-wilted spinach. Other options, including linguini or whole wheat linguini, “signature” tomato sauce, garlic and oil, and alfredo a la Rene’s, looked equally palatable. R-Time at Rene’s is off the beaten path — ours, anyway — but provided a comfortable, friendly and ultimately satisfying meal on a night when the journey turned out to be the destination. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

TIME CURES ALL THINGS

After long wait, Cure adds liquor service It took seven months — time spent partially remodeling the dining room, building a climate-controlled wine room and overcoming liquor-license hassles — but Justin Severino’s Cure finally has a full-service bar. No wonder he hopes customers spend some time enjoying the Lawrenceville establishment’s new liquor offerings. “We want to encourage our customers to linger longer. I want people to come here to have an experience,” he says. Michael Kreha and Colin Anderson, both formerly of Bar Marco, will run the wine and cocktail programs, respectively. “Bringing the two of them into what we’re doing is going to be really fantastic,” Severino says. Kreha, who recently passed the level 1 sommelier exam, is fascinated by the connection between food and wine. “I want to do some stuff that was a little more classic than I did at Bar Marco,” he says. “I’m going to open with more whites and rosés. It really fits his food.” Look for Anderson’s cocktails to have a culinary focus, too. The forward-thinking bartender plans to take advantage of some of the toys found in Cure’s kitchen. “He’s already made bitters using the Cryovac and the thermal circulator,” says Severino. Anderson’s goal is to “take what we have in the kitchen and infuse it into the cocktails.” Preserved citrus like Meyer lemon and bergamot will appear in several drinks; more adventurous imbibers can enjoy cocktails featuring rum infused with Severino’s blackstrap-molasses-cured ham. Beer lovers, meanwhile, can expect a rotating selection of eight brews on tap, plus a curated selection of bottles. Severino also plans to have the largest selection of amaro in Pittsburgh (including a number of bottles he will bring back from a late-summer trip to Italy). But Severino says nobody should consider putting Cure on their agenda for a Butler Street pub-crawl. “We’re not encouraging late-night bar activities. The focus remains on food,” he says. It’s just that now, the food “is supported by good cocktails, amaros, beer and wine.”

“I WANT PEOPLE TO COME HERE TO HAVE AN EXPERIENCE.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

5336 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-252-2595 or curepittsburgh.com

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

Little

BANGKOK IN THE STRIP

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AMEL’S. 435 McNeilly Road, Baldwin. 412-563-3466. This South Hills institution serves up a broad selection of Mediterranean favorites, from kabobs and pilafs to lemony salads, as well as staples of the American and Italian comfort cuisine. Amel’s atmosphere is lively with seating in the restaurant’s amusing and lavishly decorated warrens. KE

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1906 Penn Avenue Strip District 412-586-4107 LITTLEBANGKOK INTHESTRIP.COM

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China Palace Shadyside Featuring cuisine in the style of

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Pet Friendly Patio. 4428 LIBERTY AVE BLOOMFIELD 412-683-1448 delsrest.com

Robbie’s Super-stuff Superlicious BBQ {PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL} ELEVEN. 1150 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-201-5656. This multi-leveled venue (with balcony) perched on the edge of The Strip is noted for its innovative, contemporary American cuisine. Dishes are prepared with fresh, local ingredients and served in a classy modern space, to be complemented with an amazing wine selection. LE JUNIPER GRILL. 4000 Washington Road, McMurray. 724-260-7999. This sister restaurant to Atria’s chain cultivates an ambience of artfully casual insouciance. The preparations — many with Mexican or Asian influences — are appealingly straightforward, neither plain nor fussy: Pork loin with bourbon glaze; spicy flatbread loaded with shrimp, roasted red and poblano peppers, pineapple and cheese; and skirt steak drizzled in a creamy chipotle sauce. LE

dressings, the menu here is copious (and that’s not including the daily specials). The Mount Washington location, with its spectacular view of the city, is a popular venue for special occasions, out-of-towners and anyone who loves fish. KE PASTITSIO. 3716 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7656. This tiny storefront café boasts a Greek deli, complete with a steam table and a display cooler with salads. Its namesake bakednoodle casserole is a winner, but much of the menu changes daily according to what’s fresh. J PIACQUADIO’S. 300 Mount Lebanon Blvd., Mount Lebanon. 412-745-3663. There’s still pleasure to be had in oldfashioned breaded chicken and veal, served up at this classic Italian-American restaurant. Indulge in old-school comfort foods, such as manicotti (made with crepes) and beans and greens (with sausage), as well as chicken and pastas specials. KE

FULL LIST ONLINE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

CURE. 5336 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-252-2595. Charcuterie specialties are just part of the locally inspired menu at this rustic-chic Lawrenceville restaurant. A short menu offers seasonal specialties (wild onions in spring), often combined with pork, but vegetables get a spotlight in dishes such as risotto with local mushrooms. LF

STARTING THIS WEEKEND!

MAKE RESERVATIONS SOON! 4126831448

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE www.chinapalaceshadyside.net

BURGATORY. 932 Freeport Road, The Waterworks, Aspinwall. 412781-1456. Nestled in an off-thepath corner of The Waterworks strip mall, Burgatory is in the running for best burgers in town. It starts with its own blend of ground sirloin, chuck, brisket and short rib, and buttery buns — then piles on the toppings. (There are prefab combinations and checklists for custom orders.) Add shakes, fries — or perhaps an extra-ordinary salad. JE

Gri ing on Liberty

DISHES!

11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

E2 {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} E2. 5904 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1200. The popular, cozy brunch spot has expanded, adding a dinner menu that refracts traditional, Old World recipes through the prism of the contemporary American kitchen (fresh, local, seasonal). It’s as elemental as cannellini beans with red-pepper flakes, or as elaborate as seared scallops with butternut-squash mash, fried leeks and Portobello, and truffled pumpkin seeds. KF

KAHILA’S TASTE. 305 N. Craig St., Oakland. www. per 412-377-7951. In POINT BRUGGE pa pghcitym North Oakland, this CAFÉ. 401 Hastings .co Caribbean eatery St., Point Breeze. offers a taste of tropical 412-441-3334. This cozy sunshine, with a menu neighborhood bistro reflects featuring oxtail stew, curried a concerted effort to translate goat, scovitch fish, jerk chicken the European neighborhood and roti with a choice of filling. café — warm, welcoming, The tiny space is geared toward unpretentious yet delicious — takeout, but there are a few to Pittsburgh. Despite bits of tables alongside the coolers full Asian fusion, the selections are of tropical-fruit soft drinks and classic Low Country fare such as walls festooned with island maps Belgian beef stewed with beer, and Bob Marley posters. JF and Italian influences in risotto, sausage and polenta. KE MONTEREY BAY FISH GROTTO. 1411 Grandview Ave., Mount ROBBIE’S SUPER-STUFF SUPERWashington (412-481-4414) LICIOUS BBQ. 1000 Ardmore and 146 Mall Circle Drive, Blvd., Forest Hills. 412-823-4003. Monroeville (412-374-8530). This Forest Hills venue offers Because fish lends itself to straight-up Southern barbecue endless preparations and of chicken, beef and pork, with CONTINUES ON PG. 26


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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

all the sides you’d expect, such a greens (cooked in pork broth), mac-and-cheese and corn-filled corn bread. Get the sauce on the side to savor the smokiness of the meat. KF SONOMA GRILLE. 947 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-697-1336. The menu here groups food and selected wines (mostly Californian, of course) under such oenophilic summaries as “jammy” and “muscular,” encouraging an entirely new approach to food selection. The restaurant’s offerings include tapas, hearty meat dishes with an array of international seasonings, and a mix-n-match, create-your-own section for mixed grill. KE

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Real Soul Food in Pittsburgh?

HEY BROWN BAGGER, EAT YOUR LUNCH AT STEELHEAD! Pittsburgh Marriott City Center 112 Washington Place, Downtown 412-471-4000 for Reservations www.thesteelhead.com

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Come See Uncle Troy! Soul Food at Monroeville Mall Located in the Food Court Scan to View Steelhead Menus

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

412.858.5155

SPOON. 134 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-6001. A swanky restaurant offering American cuisine focusing on locally procured, sustainable ingredients and seasonal offerings. What stands out is the sensitivity with which each dish was conceived — from flavor, texture and the creation of fresh combinations. Thus, ancho chilies and pork are paired with new yet just-right blendings such as cilantro, lime and feta. LE STAGIONI. 2104 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-4738. This cozy storefront restaurant offers a marriage of traditional ingredients and modern, sophisticated sensibilities. From inventive salads utilizing seasonal ingredients and house-made pastas to flavorful meat entrees and vegetarian plates, the fare exhibits a masterful combination of flavors and textures. KF VIVO KITCHEN. 432 Beaver St., Sewickley. 412-259-8945. The fare is contemporary American with a vaguely European accent, featuring elegantly simple preparations of elemental, straightforward ingredients, such as roasted mushrooms with gorgonzola or scallops with blood-orange sauce. Flavorings such as lemon, garlic and fennel reflect the kitchen’s Mediterranean heritage. LE YAMA. 538 Third St., Beaver. 724-774-5998. This Japanese restaurant offers familiar favorites such as tempura, sushi and teriyaki, but takes an artistic approach to authentic cuisine. Thus fried gyoza dumplings are garnished with a small tumbleweed of finely grated carrot, and an octopus salad is graced with cucumber matchsticks. KF THE ZENITH. 86 S. 26th St., South Side. 412-481-4833. Funky antique décor you can buy and a massive, convivial Sunday brunch make this a vegan/vegetarian hotspot. For the tea snob, the multi-page list is not to be missed. FJ

offMenu {BY AMYJO BROWN}

HERBAL SKILLS

Group provides chance to learn/teach about herbs THE WOMEN working in the sunken, walled herb garden behind the Phipps Garden Center reserve a wealth of expertise in herbs — those grown for food, medicine, fragrance or for the natural dyeing of materials. All are members of the Western Pennsylvania unit of the Herb Society of America; many have belonged for decades. The local unit was established in 1958 and includes about 40 members. “They all work so hard and they’re so knowledgeable,” says Rin Babson, one of the junior members. “Almost every member, practically, has the ability to get up and give a lecture [at the monthly meetings]. They’re so spectacular — you just sit there and say, ‘This is the best thing I’ve heard all month.’”

{PHOTO BY AMYJO BROWN}

Western PA Unit of the Herb Society of America.

Indeed, Jean Reiland, a retired medical-research technician who is in charge of the dye bed, speaks easily about each of the plants — describing how parsley can be used to dye fabrics green and onions to dye them yellow or orange. “Vegetable dyes never come out quite the same in any two dye batches,” she says. “It’s always interesting to see what you’re going to get.” She speaks, too, of the culinary bed, which features the usual herb suspects — with one exception: Sprinkled in are a few ramps, a wild onion foraged and treasured by local chefs. They are known to be difficult to cultivate. Reiland laughs gently at the suggestion, almost winking. “Not once you get them started,” she says. The unit is made up mostly of retirees — but that seems to be more a product of the time of day they gather (meetings and garden work are usually scheduled at 10 a.m. Mondays and Wednesdays) than mission. Anyone of any age is welcome, they say. Ruth Rouleau, a former children’s librarian who joined in 1975, says she’s learned more from her peers than she ever could have imagined. “We can all buy all the books that are out there, but doing what we’re doing today and talking to one another and learning — it’s just the best way to learn about herbs,” she explains. A B ROW N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


AN EVENING WITH

ANTHONY BOURDAIN

ERIC RIPERT

THIS MONDAY!

BUCCO’S

GAME SPECIAL

ALL DAY! EVERY DAY!

$2.50 I.C. Light Pounders $9.99 Medium One Topping Pizzas

Two Slices & a Drink

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412-481-0480 2126 EAST CARSON ST. www.GoodvsEvilTour.com

*-/:--3.7:)?--3 St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Cathedral

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;]VLIa5Ia\W ;I\]ZLIa5Ia SERVING HOURS Sunday: Noon to 8p Monday to Thursday: 11a to 9p Friday & Saturday: 11a to 10p (music till midnight) Œ?WVLMZN]T/ZMMS.WWL Œ4][KQW][/ZMMS8I[\ZQM[ Œ4Q^MTa/ZMMS,IVKQVO

EAT-IN OR TAKE-OUT Visit www.stnickspgh.org for a fax or email order form. Fax orders (lunch only) to 412.683.4960. *St. Nicholas Cathedral is located on the corner of S. Dithridge St. and Forbes Ave., across from The Carnegie Museum.

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LOCAL

BEAT

“SO MUCH OF IT IS AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL. EVERY STORY I TELL IS 100 PERCENT TRUE.”

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

SUBURBAN SONATAS When Corinne Kraft rekindled her love of the violin, the Edgewood Symphony Orchestra gave her a place to play with others. Now the president of the organization — and part of the second-violin section — she says the same is true of many of the orchestra’s 70 volunteer musicians. While some are professional musicians, there are also business owners, doctors, teachers, engineers and students, “people from all walks of life,” Kraft says. “I think if you had to do the average profile, it would be we’ve all played since we were children and still want to do it. And that’s what the Edgewood Symphony allows us to do: to play with people who share the love of music with us.” This year, the ESO celebrated its 25th season, which comes to a close Sunday with performances of Shostakovich’s Festive Overture, Grieg’s Piano Concerto — performed by music director and concert pianist Walter Morales — and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 4. The group’s roots actually extend back longer than 25 years — to the 1940s, when violinist Eugene Reichenfeld founded the Wilkinsburg Civic Symphony. In 1987, in search of a new home, the WCS was taken in by nearby Edgewood. Morales became music director in 2005 and, Kraft says, “He’s really brought our orchestra to new heights, to where we don’t feel like we’re amateurs anymore.” Unlike many community orchestras, which select symphonic movements, the ESO often plays full symphonies. “I think that’s very special for a community orchestra,” Kraft says. “That’s what our members like to do. We like to challenge ourselves.” Not surprisingly, such organizations are not common in small suburbs: With a population of a little over 3,000, Kraft says Edgewood is one of the smallest communities in the country to have its own symphony orchestra — if not the smallest. “We pride ourselves on not just being a community orchestra,” she says. “We try to reach out into the community, particularly in educating young people on the beauty of live classical and symphonic music. “We want classical music and the orchestra music to live on.”

“WE’VE ALL PLAYED SINCE WE WERE CHILDREN AND STILL WANT TO DO IT.”

MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

EDGEWOOD SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA SEASON FINALE CONCERT. 3 p.m. Sun., May 5. Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10-15. www.edgewoodsymphony.org

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BEYOND

BULLYING

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY JOHN LAVANGA}

T

HE JOSH & GAB Show has a memo-

rable song called “Nine O’Clock Behind the Jack Rabbit”: It’s the story of a frightened kid at Kennywood Park who’s nervously counting down the hours until he has to put on a brave face and meet a bully for an old-fashioned middle-school brawl. He’s terrified, and admits it: “I’m not one for fighting, and I don’t have a plan. Because I bruise really easily and I have tiny hands.” The song, like most of The Josh & Gab Show, is a story pulled straight from the lives of the group’s two members, comedian Gab Bonesso and songwriter Josh Verbanets. This particular one came from the childhood of a friend of Verbanets. “‘Nine o’clock behind the Jack Rabbit’

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

Meet you in the schoolyard: Josh Verbanets and Gab Bonesso

was this famous phrase in my school,” he explains, “because it basically meant, ‘I’m gonna beat you up.’” The song is anchored by a steady bass line and breaks out into a fiercely rockin’ chorus in which Bonesso chimes in with

the duo’s anti-bullying show — which utilizes music, comedy and interaction with children — provides a personal connection to children who are dealing with the issue of bullying. JOSH VERBANETS is best known around

MORE ON THE JOSH AND GAB SHOW: www.joshandgab.com

growling vocals. In the end, though, it turns out that the bully is just as scared as the boy. The story continues: “We rode some rides together and didn’t want to leave.” It’s a very Pittsburgh example of how

Pittsburgh for his frenetic performances as the frontman in energetic indie-rock trio Meeting of Important People. The band’s poppy tracks and sometimes-silly lyrics have become a staple of the local scene over the past half-decade. Bonesso, for her part, is perhaps best known for her over-the-top, standup stage presence, and edgy stand-up that includes more adult-oriented subject matter, like criticism of the Catholic Church. That


might make doing a children’s show seem odd, but the fit has been perfect. The selfdescribed “manic energy” she brings to the stage plays well to younger crowds. “I’m very cartoony when I’m telling the story,” she says. “And I always make sure it ends with a punchline, because I am a comedian at the end of the day.” Verbanets echoes the sentiment: “I’ve never seen a performer relate to an audience like Gab Bonesso.” Much has been said in recent years about the pervasiveness of bullying via social media. In 2012, Consumer Reports estimated that 800,000 minors were subject to a form of bullying on Facebook alone. Children who are bullied have fewer and fewer places to hide from the criticism of their peers. According to Elizabeth Forward Middle School Principal Michael Routh, who’s worked with Josh and Gab, bullying has become a “24-hour-a-day, seven-day-aweek thing.” On the flip side, there’s also been an outpouring of public support for those being bullied. From Lady Gaga’s public statements on her troubles with bullies growing up, to the outpouring of support for LGBT youth through Dan Savage’s It Gets Better Project, bullying has become an issue that is being confronted outright by public figures. Though bullying may be more widespread now, it’s an issue that the public no longer shies away from. VERBANETS AND Bonesso began performing together from time to time a couple of years ago, Verbanets says, hopping in and taking part in each other’s shows. “She would have a comedy show and she would ask me to come down and play a few acoustic songs to help warm the crowd up, or we would be doing a show and we would ask her to come, jump on stage, introduce the bands, and say something ridiculous into the microphone.” While sharing the stage was fun, the two didn’t really put together collaborative sketches until January 2012. After seeing a video of Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Zooey Deschanel performing a song about New Year’s Eve, the two decided to satirize the two actors by dressing up like them and putting together a song in honor of … Presidents Day. “Josh wrote this schmaltzy song about the assassination of Abraham Lincoln,” Bonesso recalls. “I wrote it in probably 15 minutes,” Verbanets says, “based on all the knowledge I could remember about Abe Lincoln, which was of course acutely factually wrong.” The video didn’t exactly go viral, but it was a big hit among friends. One, a teacher in the Montour School District, suggested that the two would be great at CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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OPUS ONE PRESENTS

ON THE RECORD

with Kelley Deal of The

Breeders {BY MARGARET WELSH}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRIS GLASS}

The Breeders’ Kelley Deal

The Breeders are celebrating the 20th anniversary of their platinum record Last Splash with the LSXX World Tour, on which they play the entire album, start to finish. Guitarist Kelley Deal spoke with City Paper while running pre-tour errands. DID YOU KNOW YOU WERE MAKING SOMETHING SPECIAL WITH LAST SPLASH? I think if you’re sitting there going, “Oh my God, I’m making greatness,” you’re a douche. But we certainly didn’t sit around thinking, “What I’m making is sucking.” I think we were totally into it. As we play it from start to finish, how each song goes into the next, it’s just a fabulous piece of music. You hear some country, some pop, a little bit of kraut rock, and it does it effortlessly. HAS THE LANDSCAPE CHANGED AT ALL FOR WOMEN IN BANDS SINCE YOU STARTED? Back then, there were so many chicks in bands it was ridiculous. It was awesome. You didn’t think it was special, that was just how it was. Now, I’m not saying that there’s not, but it doesn’t seem as prevalent. Does it?

05/02 ANDY GRAMMER 05/28 THE DANDY WARHOLS

PERFORMING 'THIRTEEN TALES FROM URBAN BOHEMIA'

THE BREEDERS ARE IMPORTANT TO A LOT OF FEMALE MUSICIANS, BUT THE BAND SEEMED LESS ABOUT “WOMEN WHO ROCK” THAN ABOUT PEOPLE WHO HAPPENED TO BE WOMEN, ROCKING. The idea [of] a female who happens to be in a band, but who is not rocking the feminist identity somehow — if you have to explain why that’s really kind of a stupid [distinction] — then you’re just the other side of a coin. If you’re not ignoring females in rock, you’re “celebrating” females in rock — that’s the same fucking coin. It’s time to just take it off the table.

05/29 ATTACK ATTACK! (FINAL TOUR) 05/02 JOE PUG (2 SHOWS) 05/03 STEELESQUE (EARLY) 05/03 ROUND BLACK GHOSTS, CORONADO 05/04 05/04 05/09 05/10 05/12 05/14 05/15

MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE BREEDERS with THE CONNECTIONS. 7 p.m. Fri., May 3. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. Sold out at press time. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

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& NAMELESS IN AUGUST THE WEATHERED ROAD (EARLY) RAY LANICH (LATE) HE'S MY BROTHER SHE'S MY SISTER TRIXIE WHITLEY (SOLO) (EARLY) JAMES McCARTNEY 91.3FM WYEP PRESENTS DAVID WAX MUSEUM DANNY SCHMIDT & CARRIE ELKIN

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD

S C R E E N

FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

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BEYOND BULLYING, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

BIKE Every NIGHT Monday $1.50

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Yuengling Lager, Light Lager and Black & Tan (outside only)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

writing songs with a message for kids. Soon enough, the school district had commissioned them to write a 45-minute anti-bullying performance for Ingram and Burkett elementary schools. The duo immediately poured themselves into their work, incorporating research, songwriting and interactive comedy into the act. “We sat around her mother’s dining-room table, scribbling on poster board and writing bits in notebooks,” Verbanets says. “I wrote about six new songs in a week-and-a-half. Gab wrote all sorts of incredible comedy and interactive exercises.” Though neither saw the act as a career catapult, they had an inkling that it might catch on. Then, quickly, they found themselves making The Josh & Gab Show a full-time commitment. “We did one show and next thing I knew, we were getting booked and people were calling and asking us if we could come [to their schools],” Bonesso says. The Josh & Gab Show has caught on with local schools, with numerous performances every month across Allegheny County and beyond. The program’s popularity hinges on the show’s highly personal nature. “So much of it is autobiographical,” Bonesso notes. “Every story I tell is 100 percent true.” For Verbanets, it was his artistic streak, along with good friends, that helped him get through his days of being bullied as a youth. “I was lucky to have a great group off creative friends around me,” me, he says. “So So any ny time I felt frightened as a kid, I always lways had someone to be in a movie I was making or help work on a song with me.” The Josh & Gab Show has teamed up with the Children’s hildren’s Museum of Pittsburgh ittsburgh for a series of performances erformances

throughout the summer. And on May 11, the duo celebrates the release of a collection of their original songs, I Am Not a Bully, through Music is Family, a New Jersey-based label that focuses on positive children’s music. The album, produced by Jake Hanner of Donora, is a mix of personal stories about bullying and catchy tracks that utilize Josh’s skills as a poppy indie rocker to avoid the mundaneness that sometimes plagues children’s tunes. Elizabeth Forward’s Routh, who brought the duo in to perform last August, agrees. He adds that Verbanets and Bonnesso’s positivity, rare among antibullying programs, is also crucial to connecting with the kids. “The assemblies that we used to drag in here, they kind of had this dark overtone to them,” he says. “Josh and Gab, they approach it differently. They share their own personal experiences, and I think that touched the kids in a way, and made sense to them.” “Gab and I, we aren’t very far removed from youth,” says Verbanets. “We’re both full-time performers and artists, so we kind of live slightly strange lives where we haven’t really had to grow up.” The result is a performance that emphasizes moving past the gloom-and-doom rhetoric that often surrounds bullying, and looking to creative outlets as a way of coping, whether it be music, comedy or anything else. Bonesso says that her goal is to “show these kids that no matter what horrible horribl thing has happened to us, we were able abl to turn it into this really cool fun thing thin that everyone can enjoy, and that they’r they’re capable of doing it too, even if they’r they’re not artists.” I N FO@PGH IN F O@ P G HC C I T Y PA P E R.C R. C O OM


CRITICS’ PICKS

Jessica Hernandez and the Deltas [NOISE ROCK] + FRI., MAY 03

Implodes is a Chicago band, but with Pittsburgh roots. Three of the four members of the droney soundscape outfit did considerable time in bands here. (Ken Camden was in Arco Flute Foundation, Matt Jencik in Hurl, and Justin Rathell in Alpha Control Group C.) On the heels of a new release, Recurring Dream, on Kranky, Implodes comes to its sort-of-hometown to play the Smiling Moose tonight. Andy Mulkerin 9 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $8. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

[HIP HOP] + SAT., MAY 04 Since his time as a member of Wu-Tang Clan, Ghostface Killah has been changing the face of hip hop with his swift, often cryptic, and utterly relentless flow. He’s capable of moving back and forth between tough talk and such meandering gems as: “Why is the sky blue? Why is water wet? / Why did Judas rat to Romans while Jesus slept?” The unique combination makes him one of the most universally respected men in hip hop. He rocks Mr. Small’s Theater tonight with a bevy of rappers, including Chyron, Mo’$crilla and The Wave. John Lavanga 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $22. All ages. 412-821-4477 or www.mrsmalls.com

[TRIBUTE] + SUN., MAY 05

Pittsburgh’s Karl Hendricks Trio shared a lot with the Seattle-by-way-of-Chicago indie-rock trio Silkworm: Both became popular in the indie-guitar-rock heyday of the ’90s, and KHT more recently signed with Comedy Minus One, the label whose roster also includes the post-Silkworm group Bottomless Pit. So it’s fitting that the Trio’s first local show in months is part of a Silkworm tribute tonight

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at Brillobox. While KHT headlines, the other band on the bill is Heather Loves Silkworm — a Chicago-based Silkworm tribute (who knew?). Before the music, they’ll screen Couldn’t You Wait? The Story of Silkworm, a documentary about the band and the tragic death of drummer Michael Dahlquist. AM 7:30 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $6. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

[INDIE ROCK] + MON., MAY 06 Listening to Brooklyn-based psych-rock band Chappo can feel like stepping into a time machine. Whether it’s the jingling tambourines or the falsetto backing vocals that fill the tracks of its EPs, or the general vibe that the band gives off, there’s quite a throwback feel. There’s a lot that sets it apart as well: None of the songs feels like an homage to any particular bygone era, and there’s a great deal of variety in what the band can do. The key Implodes seems to be frontman Alex Chappo’s ability to wield his voice with utter versatility, striking whatever tone he requires. The group plays at 6119 tonight. JL 8:30 p.m. 6119 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $10. 18 and over. www.druskyentertainment.com

[SOUL] + TUE., MAY 07

It was only a few months ago that Jessica Hernandez and the Deltas played Pittsburgh, but it’s a welcome surprise to see the band back so soon; its live performance is hard to beat. Led by the singer and sometimes-keyboardist Hernandez — small in stature and huge on energy — the band jams out retro soul music in a very right-now manner. Plus, there’s a baritone sax; who can resist? AM 7:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $7. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

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ROCK/POP THU 02 ALTAR BAR. Loudness Loudness, Lady Beast, Nomad Queen. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Joe Pug, Justin Endler (early) Chet Vincent (late). South Side. 412-431-4950. THE DEAD HORSE CANTINA & MUSIC HALL. Brandon Gibbs, Eric Brittingham, Jeff LaBar, Lucky Me. McKees Rocks. 412-973-3295. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Scatter Gather, The Lampshades, Zipper Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Friendly Faux , Mt. McKinleys, Atlas. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. Steve Moakler, Elenowen. Station Square. 412-481-7625. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Andy Grammer, Parachute, Andrew Ripp. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

FRI 03

   

  

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you. wyep.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

31ST STREET PUB. Thundervest, Dead Batteries, Scattergun. Strip District. 412-391-8334. 99 BOTTLES. Daniels & McClain. Carnegie. ALTAR BAR. Bryen From Mr.Greengenes. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. The Droogs. North Side. 412-237-8300. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Amoeba Knievel, FOOD, The New Real Fall Cover Band. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. CH-CHANGES. Rumpke Mountain Boys. New Castle. 724-923-4800. CLUB CAFE. Steelesque, Adam Levine (Early) Round Black Ghosts, Coronado, Nameless In August (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Spires That In The Sunset Rise, Mike Tamburo, Puzzle Pieces. Garfield. 412-361-2262. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Sputzy Sparacino. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HARD ROCK CAFE. The Cheaters. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Porno Tongue, SFX, Split the D, Satyr/Elfheim. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. Mother’s Little Helpers, The Faves. South Side. 412-770-4983.

LINDEN GROVE. Switch. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MOONDOG’S. Norman Nardini. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Breeders, The Connections. Millvale. 866-468-3401. OBEY HOUSE. Gone South. Crafton. 412-922-3883. ROSTRAVER ICE GARDEN. Asking Alexandria, Chimaira, Motionless in White, Whitechapel. Belle Vernon. 724-379-7100. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. The Holidays, Southside Jerry. Washington. 724-503-1200. SMILING MOOSE. Implodes, Abysme, Onodrim. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Good Night States, Emily Rodgers, Big Snow Big Thaw. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 04 ALTAR BAR. The Grascals. Strip District. 412-263-2877. AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Girl in

Yellow Hat. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BULLDOGS SPORTS BAR AND GRILL. Wicked. Latrobe. 724-537-4444. CLUB CAFE. The Weathered Road, The Hellfire Club, Boon (Early. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Daniels & McClain. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. The Long Knives, The Fissures, Bob Kocher. Aliquippa. 724-375-5080. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Mark Rose, Rival Summers. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Stephen Chopek. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. Red Elvises. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Modern Nature, The Hangdog Hearts. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. The Idle Drifters. South Side. 412-381-3497. LATITUDE 40. No Bad JuJu. North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

MP 3 MONDAY THE IDLE DRIFTERS

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a

“Daisy,”

local band. This week’s offering, comes from The Idle Drifters’ first EP, to be released at a show Sat., May 4, at Inn Termission Lounge, 1908 E. Carson St., South Side. Stream or download the song on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


MCGROGAN’S TAPROOM. Fungus. Canonsburg. 724-745-9119. THE MEADOWS - HARMAR. DaPhunk Band. Harmarville. 412-828-0610. OAKMONT TAVERN. Lucky Me. Oakmont. 412-828-4155. PALACE THEATRE. Lights Out – A Tribute to Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Rush Tribute. Ross. 412-364-8166. ROOSTERS ROADHOUSE. The Bill Ali Band. Bridgeville. ROYAL PLACE. The Wurms. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000. SALATINO’S RIVERHOUSE CAFE. The Dave Iglar Band. Charleroi. 724-565-5700. SMILING MOOSE. Echoes Never Lie, Tragedy in Black, EchoJade, Embers to Ashes. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Cause theCAUSE. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 05 6119 PENN AVE. JMSN, Badboxes. East Liberty. BEACH HOUSE RESTAURANT. The Dave Iglar Band. Finleyville. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Sunday Night One Hit Wonder Spaktacular w/ Elliott Sussman. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Shades of June. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. SMILING MOOSE. Thunderhawk, Mensrea, SolarBurn. South Side. 412-431-4668.

MON 06 31ST STREET PUB. Joe Buck Yourself, Viva Le Vox, Rachel Brooke, Sean Y Zander. Strip District. 412-391-8334. 6119 PENN AVE. CHAPPO. East Liberty.

TUE 07 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Mrs. Skanotto, Lady & The Monsters. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Senses Fail, Such Gold, Real Friends, Major League. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. Grand Piano, The Yellers, Bryan Kinney, Jessica Hernandez & The Deltas. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 08 31ST STREET PUB. Dope Stars Inc., My Parasite, Anges Wired for Sound. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CLUB CAFE. The David Mayfield Parade, Dan Getkin & the Masters of American Music. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Oberhofer, Celestial Shore, White Like Fire. Garfield. 412-361-2262. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Alex Clare, The Knocks. Millvale. 866-468-3401. ROCK BOTTOM. Good Brother Earl. Waterfront. 412-462-2739. SMILING MOOSE. The Down

& Outs, The Anti-Psychotics, The Lobot-o-mites, No Movement. South Side. 412-431-4668.

THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Gina Mungo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

DJS THU 02 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 03

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 04 KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. Ray, Goodman & Brown. East Liberty. 412-431-0773. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Ghostface Killah, Adrian Younges’ Vencie Dawn, Chyron, Kipp-E & Klyental, Styxx, Tutto Fresco, DJ FlipWave, Young Bravo, more. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. Cumbia, Gypsy, Balkan, Bhangra, Baile Funk, Tropical Bass, more. Mayday de Mayo edition. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. THE BLIND PIG Bombo Claat Friday’s SALOON. The Blues Reggae. East Liberty. Bombers w/ Pat Scanga. 412-362-1250. New Kensington. www. per THE NEW 724-337-7008. pa pghcitym AMSTERDAM. EXCUSES BAR & .co Good Vibes Coalition. GRILL. Don Hollowood’s Lawrenceville. Cobra Kings. South Side. 412-904-2915. 412-431-4090. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, JUMPER’S JUNCTION. Muddy DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. Kreek Blues Band. Washington. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 724 206 0080. South Side. 412-431-2825. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Gresh Gris Gris. Downtown. Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. 412-471-9100. PENN BREWERY. The Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-237-9400. AVA BAR & LOUNGE. African Night. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. BREWSTONE. Muddy Kreek Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Blues Band. Wilkins Twp. Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. 412-825-6510. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. FRANK’S PUB & GRILL. CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals Sweaty Betty. Bethel Park. & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. 412-833-4606. 412-687-2157. THE HOP HOUSE. Shot O’ Soul. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. 412-431-8800. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. MEXICO CITY. DJ Juan Diego VII. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. Salsa & Latin music. Downtown. MOONDOG’S. Ron Yarosz & the 412-980-7653. Vehicle. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. THE R BAR. The Blues Junkies. Tom Cox, Jwan Allen, Preslav. Dormont. 412-942-0882. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPEAL’S TAVERN. The Hawks ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Blues Band. New Alexandria. South Side. 412-431-2825. 724-433-1322. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

BLUES

FRI 03

FULL LIST E N O LIN

SAT 04

SAT 04

JAZZ

SUN 05 RIVERS CASINO. DJs Bill Bara & Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 07 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. DJ Zan Naz, DJ Outtareach. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

WED 08 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. DJ Outtareach. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611.

THU 02

ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Ron Wilson, Dave Pellow. Downtown. 412-325-6769. BONNIE & CLYDE’S. The Etta Cox Duo. Wexford. 724-934-2110. DANTE’S RESTAURANT & LOUNGE. Jerry & Louis Lucarelli, Sunny Sunseri, Vince Tagliari, Peg Wilson. Brentwood. 412-884-4600. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. The Ken Karsh Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Stranger Convention. Garfield. 412-328-4737. TEDDY’S. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180.

WED, MAY 1 • 8PM ROCK/SOUL (NO COVER)

DOUG KHOREY AND HIC BAND OF BROKEN HEARTS THUR, MAY 2 • 9PM ROCK/FUNK/JAZZ

CMB FRI, MAY 3 • 9PM INDIE ROCK

MAY 2 Mystic Cowboyz, Ariel

GOOD NIGHT STATES PLUS EMILY RODGERS AND BIG SNOW BIG THAW SAT, MAY 4 • 9PM JAM BAND

THE CAUSE MON, MAY 6 • 9:30PM

SAT 04

OPEN STAGE

ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY. California University of PA Jazz Festival. California. 724-938-4000. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jimmy Ponder Trio. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. The Andrea Pearl Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Dianne Reeves. North Side. 412-322-1773. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

WITH CRAIG KING TUES, MAY 7 • 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES FEATURING DAVID

MAY 9 Noah Sugarman of 500 Miles to Memphis, The Semi-Super Villians

THROCKMORTON OPEN FOR LUNCH

Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

SUN 05 ELWOOD’S PUB. Jeff Pogas, Larry Belli. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. John Hall Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Stranger Convention. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. DIMARCO’S BISTRO. The Bobby Reed Organ Trio. Uniontown. 724-438-1611. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

MON 06

FRI 03

WED 08

565 LIVE. Jerry Lucarelli, Vince Taglieri, Sunny Sunseri, Peg Wilson. Bellevue. 412-720-8098.

720 RECORDS. James Johnson, Paul Thompson, Cliff Barnes. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592.

PARK BRUGES. Slide Worldwide. Highland Park. 412-661-3334. ROYAL PLACE. Jerry Lucarelli, Vince Taglieri, Sunny Sunseri. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000.

SAT, MAY 4 vs ORLANDO PREDATORS

TUE 07

AT

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. James Street Jazz Jam. North Side. 412-904-3335. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series feat. David Throckmorton. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

“BIG JOHN” $4 27oz American Lager Draft DURING POWER GAMES IN MAY

(Penn Ave. in The Strip District)

CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 33

LOCAL TWEETS

SEWICKLEY HOTEL. Daval/Stater Guitar Duo. Sewickley. 412-427-9979.

Recent dispatches from the music Twittersphere

ACOUSTIC THU 02 BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank of Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000.

@joyike (Joy Ike)

if you’re talking too much, you’re listening too little.

@DrawUsLines (Draw Us Lines)

FRI 03 BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. John Raymond. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. CAFE AU VINEYARD. Cafe’ Au Vineyard. Bridgeville. 412-921-4174. ELWOOD’S PUB. Doc & Tina. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. MULLANEY’S HARP & FIDDLE. Tim & John. Strip District. 412-642-6622.

SAT 04

@MacMiller (Mac Miller)

ALTAR BAR. Shelf Life String Band, The Grascals. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Chuck Owston. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. CLUB CAFE. Ray Lanich, The Semi-Supervillains, Jeremy Caywood (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. MARS BREW HOUSE. Brad Yoder. Mars. 724-625-2555. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

birds

SUN 05 WALNUT STREET. The Grifters. Walnut & Ivy St., Shadyside. Pittsburgh Marathon’s Music by the Mile. Shadyside. 412-586-7785.

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. Cheswick. 734-265-1181.

FRI 03

w paper pghcitym .co

WED 08 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-596-2743.

WORLD FRI 03 MULLEN’S ON CARSON. Red Hand Paddy. South Side. 412-266-5778.

SUN 05

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

THU 02

FULL LIST E N O LwIN w.

NORTH COUNTRY BREWING. Bluegrass Night. Slippery Rock. 724-794-2337.

34

COUNTRY

CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Lyle Lovett. Munhall. 412-368-5225.

MON 06

madmex.com

The spirit of the 70s rock is alive in Pittsburgh

KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. Philippine Madrigal Singers. East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

SAT 04 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Shiners. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

SUN 05 PALACE THEATRE. Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

CLASSICAL FRI 03 CRISTA MILLER, ORGANIST. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-4951.

SUN 05 EAST END CHORAL FESTIVAL. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 11. EDGEWOOD SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-473-8880. FOUR CHOIRS FESTIVAL. Choirs of Calvary Episcopal, East Liberty Presbyterian, Saint Andrew Episcopal, & Shadyside Presbyterian Churches. East Liberty Presbyterian

Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800.

TUE 07 CLASSICAL REVOLUTION PITTSBURGH. Brazilian Choro Music. Bar Marco, Strip District. 412-471-1900.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 03 CLUB COLONY. Mark Vennere. Scott. FRIDAY FAITH CAFE. John Wyrick Band. Washington. 724-222-1563.

SAT 04 FOX CHAPEL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Pittsburgh Concert Chorale. Fox Chapel. 412-635-7654. LEMONT. John Sarkis. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

SUN 05 INGOMAR UNITED METHODIST CHURCH. Pittsburgh Concert Chorale. Franklin Park. 412-635-7654. PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF SEWICKLEY. The Chancel & Youth Choirs. Sewickley. 412-741-4550.

MON 06 HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 08 CLUB COLONY. Mark Vennere. Scott.


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IN PITTSBURGH

May 1 - 7

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WEDNESDAY 1 14 FRIDAY 36 3 Poor Old Shine

Youth Invasion 2013

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412431-4950. Tickets: ticketweb. com/opusone. 8p.m.

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. Tickets: $3 students/$5 adults. For more info visit warhol.org. 5p.m.

THURSDAY 2 25 Steve Moakler / Elenowen

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guest Park Avery. Limited All ages. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

Disco Days & Boogie Nights

Nitty Gritty Dirt Band

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Parachute, and Andrew Ripp. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 7p.m.

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 8p.m.

La Cenerentola (Cinderella) BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghopera.org. 8p.m.

HARD ROCK CAFÉ Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests The Rivers Own & more. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Andy Grammer

SUNDAY 5 58

Lyle Lovett

The Cheaters

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through May 5.

Dawn & more. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

MONDAY 6 68

BUCKCHERRY

Anthony Bourdain and Eric Ripert: Good vs. Evil

SATURDAY, MAY 4 STAGE AE

SATURDAY 4 47

412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Nonpoint. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Pittsburgh Power vs. Orlando Predators

Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests Junction PA. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10:30p.m.

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: consolenergycenter.com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

Twelve Reasons To Die Tour featuring Ghostface Killah

Buckcherry

Metromix on Q BAJA BAR & GRILL Fox Chapel. 412-727-8000. All ages. Free event. 8p.m.

Mark Morris Dance Group

Red Elvises

BYHAM THEATER Downtown.

HARD ROCK CAFÉ Station

MR.SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Adrian Younges, Venice

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m.

TUESDAY 70 Senses Fail

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Such Gold, Real Friends & more. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 7p.m.

Spring Event

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SHINE ON {BY AL HOFF}

WHERE THE FILM SHOULD ZIP, SCENES ARE BAGGY, AND CLOGGED WITH REPETITIVE DIALOGUE

Think Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 film The Shining is (A) a horror film, (B) an adaptation of a Stephen King novel, (C) boring or (D) all of the above? Well, according to the five Shining-ologists of Rodney Ascher’s Room 237, you’d be wrong on all counts and just not thinking hard enough. In Ascher’s essay, four men and one woman posit their theories of what Kubrick was really saying. The arguments are buttressed with clips from The Shining, as well as other Kubrick films and an assortment of stock footage.

PUMP IT UP

Beyond the book: Room 237 director Rodney Ascher

No expert ever appears on film, and without identification, it’s often hard to tell who is talking. But the theories are often so loopy, poorly explained or contradictory that combining them in a streamof-conscious jumble makes some crazy sense. Why can’t The Shining be about the Nazis and the moon landing? Or, “an extremely disturbing story … of haunted phantoms and demons who are sexually attracted to humans and are feeding on them.” Or American Indians. The number 7. The number 42. Calumet baking powder. Subliminal Seduction. It’s entertaining in an oddball way, like sitting next to an amusing kook at the bar. Any film is open to a variety of interpretations, and thus, these are neither right nor wrong. On one level, it’s just fascinating that The Shining inspires so much thought. And join the fun: After all, says one expert, “There must be a lot of stuff in [the film] that nobody has seen yet.” Starts Fri., May 3. Harris AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

GONE WITH THE WIND You know the story: Those damn Yankees burn the South; Ashley can’t man up; Scarlet pouts all over Tara; and Rhett Butler doesn’t g give a damn. But sure as some Southern uthern belles will never go o hungry again, Victor ictor Fleming’s epic 1939 historical melodrama odrama holds up to repeated eated viewings. wings. 2 p.m. Sat., May 4, and 5 p.m. Sun., un., May 5. Oaks aks

{BY AL HOFF}

I

N THE OPENING monologue of Michael Bay’s Pain & Gain, Daniel Lugo (Mark Wahlberg) lays out his philosophy about making it. It’s vaguely related to his job — he’s a muscle-head who works as a personal trainer at a Miami gym, and he believes in doing the reps. America, after all, started out as “13 scrawny colonies,” before getting pumped up into a dominant nation. But Lugo decides his straightaway to the American Dream is simply to jack somebody else’s. He’s got an obnoxious gym client (Tony Shalhoub) who won’t stop braying about his wealth, and Lugo figures: Why not just kidnap him, get him to sign over his assorted goodies, and bam! Dream achieved! Lugo ropes in two buddies, a gym rat (Anthony Mackie) and an ex-con-turnedto-Jesus (Dwayne Johnson). Unfortunately, neither man is any smarter than the dim Lugo, and though the mark is successfully kidnapped, the plan begins to fall apart, undone by careless details.

Miami vice: Anthony Mackie, Mark Wahlberg and Dwayne Johnson

Since we know how the film ends — it’s based on a true story from the mid-1990s that you may recall, plus Bay opens with Lugo being apprehended by the cops — its pleasures rely on how the tale is told. This is a mixed bag: The three leads are entertaining enough actors (with the edge going to Johnson, particularly once his character goes off the rails), but man, does this film

PAIN & GAIN DIRECTED BY: Michael Bay STARRING: Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson, Anthony Mackie, Tony Shalhoub

feel bloated. It’s well over two hours in length, and even though Bay has turned down his trademark bombast and action, he seems to have filled that hole with plenty of foot-dragging. (There’s some literal foot-dragging as well, but most of the body parts on display are fake boobs and he-man chests.)

Where the film should zip, scenes are baggy, and clogged with repetitive dialogue. (If an interrogation takes place in a warehouse full of sex toys, we don’t need characters to state and re-state the obvious comic properties of gigantic dildos.) Voiceovers also repeat the obvious. Pain & Gain should be a dark comedy, but Bay plays it like a romp (though not quite as kicky as the trailer would have you believe). It’s self-aware of the absurd source material — a title even appears on screen during a bizarre scene saying “this is still a true story” — yet fails to convert that knowledge into anything edgy or insightful. There’s some unintended irony here. Bay wants to say something critical (I think) about the hollowness of shortcutting one’s way to the trappings of success (big house, fancy boat). But he relies on one of our laziest cultural signifiers — the thoughtless comic-action movie, blinged out with rap and slo-mo on the surface, but still empty inside. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

destroyed by an evil dude known as The Mandarin (Ben Kingsley). Payback ensues. Shane Black directs this latest in the Marvel franchise; Robert Downey Jr. stars. In 3-D in select theaters. Starts Fri., May 3.

REPERTORY

NEW DISCONNECT. Henry Alex Rubin’s ensemble drama tells four somewhat interlocking stories of lives disrupted and consumed by new technology. In one tale, a teen-age boy is part of an online sex-chat group that a TV reporter is profiling. Two other teen-age boys are “catfishing” a schoolmate, leading the nerdy loner to believe there’s a girl interested in him. Across town, an already troubled husband and wife discover they’re victims of online identity theft. Needless to say, everybody’s story grows more tragic and frantic — until the batteries run out, and people remember that it’s often easier to communicate face to face. There are some good performances and enough intrigue to keep viewers engaged in easy-topredict narratives. But ultimately, this Crashlike exploration of social networking doesn’t have much to impart that we don’t already know: Good-old-fashioned human contact matters; assume nothing on the Internet is real; and stop texting at the dinner table. The other truism about humans is they will act foolishly, despite warnings, and that gives

THE GREAT OUTDOORS. Dan Aykroyd and John Candy star in Howard Deutch’s 1988 comedy about a vacation ruined by rowdy relatives. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 1. AMC Loews. $5 KOKOKO. A museum ethnographer “adopts” a working-class woman, moving her into her St. Petersburg apartment and trying to “better” her. Their friendship, which is destined to crash upon the immovable rocks of class, is the subject of this recent chick-flick dramedy from Avdotia Smirnova. Screens as part of the Russian Film Symposium. In Russian, with English subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 1. Melwood VIVAN LAS ANTIPODAS. Travel to Earth’s antipodes — places located diametrically opposite each other on the globe — in Victor Kossakovsky’s new documentary. 7 p.m. Thu., May 2, and 11 a.m. Sat., May 4. SouthSide Works RITA’S LAST FAIRY TALE. In this fantastical melodrama examining social and institutional decay, Death works as a nurse at a shabby hospital. Renata Litvinova directs and stars as the lavishly and

The Entrepreneur recent drama. The family factory in gritty Turin is failing, and he’s increasingly estranged from his wife. As Nicola scrambles to meet payroll, he also begins a pursuit of a young Romanian immigrant, who he suspects might be having an affair with his wife. Questions of pride, fidelity and the price of success in this new era of global economic instability are explored. These concerns are familiar, but the resolution is a bit soap opera-ish. This film concludes a festival of recent Italian films, presented by the University of Pittsburgh. In Italian, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Fri., May 3. Alumni Hall, University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. Free. www.italianfilmfests. org/pittsburgh (AH) GROMOZEKA. In Vladimir Kott’s melodrama, we find three middle-age men, once teen-age pals, struggling economically and emotionally: One is a doctor who can’t reconcile his love affair; another is a laid-off cop whose grown son is headed toward a life of crime; and the third is a widowed cab driver whose college-age daughter has strayed into an unsavory career. Screens as part of the Russian Film Symposium. In Russian, with English subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Fri., May 3. Melwood

Disconnect Disconnect a depressing vibe rooted in reality. Starts Fri., May 3. AMC Loews and Cinemark Robinson (Al Hoff)

exquisitely costumed Grim Reaper. Screens as part of the Russian Film Symposium. In Russian, with English subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 2. Melwood

IRON MAN 3. Inventor and evil-fighter Tony Stark (a.k.a. Iron Man) finds his world

THE ENTREPRENEUR. Things are falling apart for Nicola (Pierfrancesco Favino) in Giuliano Montaldo’s

SHORT STORIES. In this literary-minded anthology from Mikhail Segal’s, four satirical tales about Russian life are told: a couple meets with a very detail-oriented wedding planner; a roundelay of corruption begins with a single car-related payoff; the librarian of a Pushkin library is brought in to help find a missing child; and a middle-age man finds little to talk about with a beautiful, but vacuous young woman. Screens as part of the Russian Film Symposium. In Russian, with English subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Sat., May 4. Melwood

DEAD AND BREAKFAST. In this 2004 horror spoof from Matthew Leutwyler, an RV full of twentysomethings is forced to bunk down in a remote Texas town at a creepy old bed-andbreakfast. (If a shambling David Carradine is your proprietor, you should keep moving.) The burg is overrun with villainous dead folks and the living must hole up and take head shots. It’s tongue-inbutchered-cheek all right, and fans of the genre will cheer for the familiar buckets of blood and the various comic set pieces involving body parts (man with chainsaw stuck in face, severed head that won’t shut up). Dead’s one novelty is a series of alt-country tunes from Zach Selwyn that echo the on-screen mayhem — and in one scene, gets the undead up and line-dancing. Yee-haw and yuck. 11:30 a.m. Sun., May 5. Hollywood, Dormont. $15 (includes 10:30 a.m. breakfast; tickets at www. showclix.com); $7 film only (AH) THE PARTY. Peter Sellers stars in Blake Edwards’ 1969 comedy, about a lowly film extra who is mistakenly invited to a star-studded affair. The film opens a month-long, Sunday-night series of comedy classics. 8 p.m. Sun., May 5. Regent Square ALIEN. Giger’s monster and set designs are still the most impressive aspect of Ridley Scott’s 1979 outerspace horror show. With only the barest of ’70s-style CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

THIS FILM IS NOT APPROVED OR ENDORSED BY, NOR IS IT IN ANY WAY ASSOCIATED WITH, THE KUBRICK FAMILY, WARNER BROS., OR THE SHINING FILMMAKERS, NOR DO THE VIEWS AND OPINIONS EXPRESSED IN IT REFLECT THE VIEWS OF STANLEY KUBRICK OR THE SHINING FILMMAKERS.

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT STARTS FRIDAY, MAY 3RD

HARRIS THEATRE

809 LIBERTY AVENUE (412) 682-4111 PITTSBURGH

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

conspiracy subplots, the film is as lean and mean as its titular critter (though not nearly as slimy): Spaceship has monster on board; kill monster before it kills you. Scott engineers a series of differently calibrated scares, culminating in a cunningly contrived final confrontation with hero-by-default Sigourney Weaver. Still, the thin characterizations and thinner story wouldn’t amount to much without the dazzling design work. That’s especially true of Giger’s biological-mechanical creature, a walking nightmare if there ever was one on film. 2 and 7 p.m. Wed., May 8. Cinemark Robinson and Pittsburgh Mills. (Bill O’Driscoll)

RUSSIAN FILM SYMPOSIUM {BY AL HOFF} The Russian Film Symposium, now in its 15th year, continues through Sat., May 4. The theme for this year’s symposium, co-presented by the University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Filmmakers, is “Re-Imagining Class: Recent Russian Cinema.” Symposium organizer Vladimir Padunov, an associate professor of Slavic language and literature at Pitt, says that the focus is on the emerging middle class and how it is misrepresented in contemporary cinema.

Gromozeka

The World Before Her

CP

BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S. While largely beloved as an über-chic portrait of slack, Blake Edwards’ 1961 film is, at its heart, still Truman Capote’s simple tale of the rootless nature of America’s then-impending future. It stands the test of time not just as a retro-kitsch masterpiece, but as a thoroughly current comment on America’s collision-course, bipolar culture, desperate to be at all the parties and to simultaneously dwell contently in that most elusive of American concepts: home. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 8. AMC Loews. $5 (Justin Hopper) ROBINSON INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM COMPETITION. Independent filmmakers from around the world were invited by JFilm: The Pittsburgh Jewish Film Forum to submit a short film that contained “an essence of Jewishness” in theme, history or culture. Tonight, the five finalist films, from more than two dozen entries, will be screened, and cash prizes awarded. To be followed by a reception. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 8. SouthSide Works. $10/$5 students. www.JFilmPgh.org THE WORLD BEFORE HER. Nisha Pahuja’s new documentary tracks two teen-age Indian girls in training — one pursuing the Miss India crown and the other learning to be a warrior at a Hindu nationalist military-style camp. In English, and Hindi, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Thu., May 9, and 11 a.m. Sat., May 11. SouthSide Works ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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“There was basically a dictatorship of the proletariat [during] Soviet times,” he says, followed by “a rule by the oligarchs through the ’90s and early ’00s. … It was then with the advent of capitalism, banks and so on, that you’ve got the beginning of a new kind of class that hasn’t been in Russia since before 1917 — a middle class.” It’s a group, he explains, “that is growing in economic power, and in numbers, and yet at the same time, they can’t quite figure out what to do with this group of people — that’s the re-imagining part.” Don’t look to current Russian cinema for accurate representations, Padunov cautions. “Most filmmakers, scriptwriters, directors of photography and actors in Russia belong to this middle class. And yet they’re making films that consistently represent this middle class as living in a style that only the very wealthy could afford. What is that about, and and why is that happening?” Film scholars and critics will be on hand to introduce the films and lead discussions. A selection of films screen during the day on the Pitt campus (Wed., May 1, through Fri., May 3, in David Lawrence Room 106; free), with four films picked for evening screenings at the Melwood Screening Room, in Oakland. These include the tale of a provincial woman taken in by a St. Petersburg ethnographer, Kokoko (7:30 p.m. Wed., May 1); a lavishly costumed fantasy about Death, Rita’s Last Fairy Tale (7:30 p.m. Thu., May 2); the gritty, male mid-life melodrama Gromozeka (7:30 p.m. Fri., May 3); and the anthology of modern life Short Stories (7:30 p.m. Sat., May 4). AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

All films in Russian, with subtitles. Melwood films are $8 (discounts for students and seniors). For more information, visit www.rusfilm.pitt.edu.


[DANCE]

THE INSTALLATION IS MEANT TO BE “MY OWN RED-LIGHT DISTRICT WITHOUT ANY FILTH.”

MUSIC MAN {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@ PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MARK MORRIS DANCE GROUP 8 p.m. Sat., May 4, Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $19-48. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org N E W S

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[ART REVIEW]

Mark Morris Dance Group in “Petrichor” {PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIAN SNYDER}

I first met celebrated choreographer Mark Morris in 2002, on a tour of his state-ofthe-art Brooklyn, N.Y. Dance Center with a dozen fellow dance critics. As we were being led into the main studio where Morris was rehearsing his Mark Morris Dance Group, he stopped us and sternly directed us to take our shoes off and quietly seat ourselves along one wall of the studio. It was my introduction into the temperamental genius’ controlling nature, just one aspect of a complicated personality. In public, Morris can be funny and charming as well as irritable and opinionated. Morris, 57, generally bars outsiders from his creative process and has been known to withdraw permission to perform his works from companies he feels no longer do them justice. He’s managed to wield his intense personality to become one of the most influential and important choreographers in dance history. His more than 130 works — for his company, the world’s leading ballet companies and for the opera — are known for their accessibility, cleverness and musicality. Morris, who while growing up studied both music and dance, is unique among choreographers in that he prefers to choreograph from a musical score and insists upon the use of live music in his works. It’s a practice his company — which includes both dancers and musicians — has adhered to in the studio and on tour since 1996. “Music is my interest and the reason that I choreograph,” says Morris, speaking by phone from his New York apartment. “My musicians are as much a part of my company as the dancers are. It’s a unity.” Morris and company return to the Byham Theater on May 4 to close out the Pittsburgh Dance Council’s season with three of his works, including 2010’s “The Muir,” set to Beethoven arrangements of a collection of Irish and Scottish folk songs. Says Morris: “There is a narrative text, so the words you are hearing reflect what the dancers are doing.” Also on the program are “Petrichor” (2010), a work for eight women set to music by Heitor Villa-Lobos, and the aptly titled “Festival Dance” (2011), a Bohemian folk dance with music by Johann Nepomuk Hummel. “It’s a good show,” says Morris. “And live music is always worth it.”

PEEP SHOW {BY DAVID BERGER}

Dissolving the physical: An image from Adult Arcade, an installation by Marc Burgess

I

N THE CURRENT exhibit at 707 Penn

Gallery, Adult Arcade, viewers must overcome their disorientation and reflect upon how their presence is part of, but also separate from, the artist’s conception of a space. According to Marc Burgess, the individual “create[s] a personalized atmosphere depending on where [he] chooses to walk throughout the space.” The storefront-sized space is a darkened room closed off by black drapes, enlivened by sensor-tripped red lights, textured wall paintings, ambient music and minimalistic sculpture. Burgess, the energetic force behind Adult Arcade, is a graduate of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, a jack of all trades, and a foreman at Wood Street Galleries. In an email interview with CP, Burgess said that he spent a year thinking about manipulating the various elements in the exhibit, intrigued by forces of scale and perspective that he found in the work

of Dali and Escher. His idea finally arrived after contemplating an old porn-shop sign with flashing bulbs, which carried the rubric “Adult Arcade.” The installation evokes complex and multiple associations, thoughts and moods, but also gives us a glimpse of the inner world of the artist. He grew up in

ADULT ARCADE continues through May 17. 707 Penn Gallery, 707 Penn Ave., Downtown. www.trustarts.org

the ’80s, during the ascent of robotics and “lasers all over the place — in sci-fi movies, dance clubs, factories, even your local supermarket,” he writes. The installation is meant to be “my own red-light district without any filth.” As the artist Sol LeWitt said, “Most ideas that are successful are ludicrously

simple.” So it is with this installation. However, it takes some time to orient yourself to the surroundings. Light sensors on the floor and ceiling are activated by movement, but the lights stay on for only two or three seconds. It is also difficult to ascertain when or where one’s movement will be detected. The sensors activate pairs of red spotlights that are aimed at groups of textured paintings on the wall. These 3-by-3-foot white-and-black paintings are arranged in groups of two to five canvases. The surfaces, made up of joint compound, are worked up by forks or other implements to create reliefs and patterns sometimes resembling railroad ties or topographical maps. Ribbons of black arranged by one-point perspective meander and loop through paintings that have great plains of oceanic whiteness. In some cases, the black marks remind one of rivulets of water or lakes and valleys seen from a great distance above. CONTINUES ON PG. 40

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PEEP SHOW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

PRESENTS...

FIVE WOMEN WEARING THE SAME DRESS A Comedy by Alan Ball. Directed by Lora Oxenreiter

MAY 3-19, 2013 Friday & Saturday performances at 8:00pm. Sunday matinees at 2:00pm. TICKETS ARE $15.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • MCKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS

www.mckeesportlittletheater.com

At the center of the room is located a nearly symmetrical white sculpture made up of wooden rectangular boxes of different sizes. An enigmatic monolith, capped by a long wooden strut, it rises to the ceiling. A laser is mounted on the ceiling, and Burgess concerns himself with the way the pencil-point-sharp red beam wraps around the edges of this sculpture. Some elements in the sculpture’s façade overhang, and it is interesting to see how the laser skips the resulting intervals in the vertical surface, implying continuity in the face of discontinuity. While the visual message put forth by the artist is slow to be realized, the background soundscape is more immediate. Burgess used a Boss loop station to create the 10 or so tracks, each made from one to 30 layers of sound that he composed himself playing both guitar and bass. It operates as a steady electrical drone, sometimes with a call-and-response pattern, but always with an intense driving rhythm. It is hard not to meditate through this music on the loneliness of our planet as we produce sound that slowly makes its way into the cosmos. Contrasting with the more mundane elements of the installation is a ceilingmounted revolving laser. Activated by movement, it creates a moving red latticework on one of the empty walls. The motor produces a whirring sound as its components struggle to turn. The noise is unintentional, says the artist, the result of a last-minute equipment substitution. Still, there is an element of robotic foreignness here, inadvertently making a statement about our conflicted relationship with machines. On a second visit to the exhibit, I discovered some wooden beams hanging from a corner of the room, possibly created in order to dialogue with the monolith. It almost seems a kind of spatial music mirroring the orbs that float in our solar system. One is reminded of painter Frank Kupka’s “The First Step.” The beams lack any logic, but perhaps there is only the need to be intuitive here. In the end, Adult Arcade makes me think about the parts of the physical universe that are largely invisible. Maybe less is more, or perhaps there are laws in the universe, reflected in the exhibit, that extend beyond our cognition.

THE LASER BEAMS LACK ANY LOGIC, BUT PERHAPS THERE IS ONLY THE NEED TO BE INTUITIVE HERE.

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[ART REVIEW]

WIKIPHOTO {BY ROBERT RACZKA}

Audiences peruse OH SNAP! {PHOTO COURTESY OF JIM LOOMIS}

M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER

As with a wiki website, the principle for a show now at the Carnegie Museum of Art is user-generated content. In OH SNAP!, the public is invited to submit photographs for display in response to any of the 13 photographs installed in the museum’s Forum Gallery. And a nicely varied selection it is, from prodigy Jacques Henri Lartigue’s quirky image from early-20th-century France to Malian photographer Malick Sidibé’s 1968 album-page of portraits; amateur Robert Off’s Fox Chapel family snapshot; a technical/scientific record; and art approaches from street photography to staged scenes. This exhibit, which grew out of a sixmuseum consortium, is designed to reach new audiences by positioning viewers in a more active relationship to art from museum collections. To participate — the official description of the exhibit as “collaborative” overstates it — you respond to one of the photographs on display (also available on the museum’s website, as are the submissions). Aspects to consider include subject, composition, mood and “whatever else you want!” (Exclamation points abound.) Then you upload a photograph of yours that you believe has an affinity. The unidentified photos are hung near the photograph that inspired them, in a continually evolving display. Submissions are streaming in and generally look pretty good, allowing for their small size and lack of frames. Because participants aren’t asked to specify the relationship between their photos and the inspirations, it’s up to the audience to seek the connection. That turns out to be a satisfying topic to puzzle over. There’s often an immediacy to the associations, as Charlee Brodsky’s “Last Smokestack at the Homestead Works” (c. 1995) spawned mostly images of strong verticals and industrial structures. Others, such as Philip Perkis’ “Brooklyn, New York” (1984), set off a range of responses including figures, blurred movement, scenes along the road and two ice-cream cones raised as if for a toast. There’s a danger that the democracy of the exhibit will undermine the idea of significance, especially for those millenials and Gen Xers inclined to think that quality is purely subjective. Still, OH SNAP! is a fresh attempt at a portal exhibit meant to lure in new viewers. And that’s true even though bridging experiences might be needed to cultivate an interest among those audiences in the established museum functions of connoisseurship and cultural studies. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

OH SNAP! continues through May 12. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org


talk (and bitch and moan and laugh until your cheeks hurt) radio*

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^㛛½ãÊóÄFILM FACTORY&®Äƒ½›ò›Äã May 11

11:00 AM

CMU, Purnell Center for the Arts

On May 11, Pittsburgh’s emerging filmmaking talent is showcased by the world class CMU Drama School students as they perform a live table read of the three short scripts of the finalists in the 2013 FILM FACTORY competition and watch and be inspired as our Hollywood hopefuls compete to win up to $30,000 to make their short film and meet face to face with our panel of industry professionals.

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chandra thomas (left) and Lynne Wintersteller in Pittsburgh Public Theater’s Clybourne Park

Z_WdW heii

[PLAY REVIEWS]

RACE CARD {BY TED HOOVER} IT’S NO SURPRISE that Bruce Norris, author

of 2010’s Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy Clybourne Park began his career as an actor. The play, now at the Pittsburgh Public Theater, is chockablock with the juicy roles actors love and the explosive scenes they crave to play. Based on — or rather, suggested by — Lorraine Hansberry’s landmark Raisin in the Sun, the show opens in 1959. All-white members of the titular neighborhood gather to beg friends not to sell their house to a black family (the charac-

Greatest Hits Tour On Sale Friday at 9am

CLYBOURNE PARK continues through May 19. Pittsburgh Public Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $29-55. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org.

August 20 8pm Heinz Hall Box Office (412) 392-4900

HeinzHall.org

ters from Raisin). Act II is the same house in 2009. The neighborhood has been all black for years, but now a white couple is trying to buy (and gentrify) the house from descendants of the Raisin family Norris uses this set-up merely as a springboard for an unending supply of jokes. Clybourne Park is one of the funniest shows I’ve seen in a while, though it’s a very particular sort of humor. Fans of Arrested Development and BBC’s The Office will recognize its humiliation comedy. Norris places on-the-edge characters in over-the-top situations and has everyone say exactly what they shouldn’t.

Clybourne doesn’t examine “the race question” so much as exploit it — the morality of which might have bothered me if I hadn’t been laughing so hard. Like some actor-written plays do, Clybourne falters on the bigger picture. Act I is all familial secrets dragged into the daylight, while Act II has no plot and little dramatic movement. The play goes pear-shaped when Norris widens his focus and suddenly all minorities are attacked; it’s more theatrically convenient than reality-based. The cast features seven actors playing a different person in each act, and it’s a great opportunity to see this company display very impressive acting chops. This is very much an ensemble show, and Brad Bellamy, Lynne Wintersteller, chandra thomas, Jared McGuire, Bjorn DuPaty, Tim McGeever and Megan Hill turn in impressive work, especially when juxtaposing their Act I and Act II duties. Michael Schweikardt’s designed a terrific set and Pamela Berlin’s direction couldn’t be bettered. She keeps the comedy front and center while perhaps giving the work more depth than it actually possesses. I was in the mood for fun, entertaining theater. Clybourne Park delivers. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

OMG, R+J! {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} KILLER ABS, KILLER SHOES — and of course

all that killing in the plot — enliven CarnCONTINUES ON PG. 44

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013


Tickets Available at:

www.Balafon.org (412) 204-7068

Fri. May 17 & Sat. May 18 Dance & Drum Workshops I African Market PITTSBURGH OBAMA (Formerly Peabody) Show Pass $60: Any 5 workshops plus concert ticket! All Workshops $5 Students I $10 regular

Performances KELLY STRAYHORN THEATER Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MatinĂŠe Performance I May 17, 10am I pay-what-you-can Concert Performance I May 18, 8pm I $15 advance I $25 door

Black River Conference is sponsored by The Pittsburgh Foundation and The Heinz Endowment and City Paper. The presentation of Black River Conference Concert Performance is made possible by support from the Kelly Strayhorn Theater.

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Pittsburgh Dance Council Presents

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PLAY REVIEWS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 42

COMING UP AT HEINZ HALL

egie Mellon University School of Drama’s production of Romeo & Juliet. Director Don Wadsworth goes “extreme” to yank Shakespeare’s juvenile romance into the 21st century, whether the play can handle it or not. Sure, the text is still 16th century, but now sometimes texted or rapped. The changing digitalized backdrops are glaringly hip. (Hiply glaring?) Romeo seems strangled in his headphone wires. And everybody’s whipping out smartphones at the slightest photo op. Gee, you have to wonder why Friar Laurence sent important info by donkey-mail instead of Twitter. Updating Billyboy is always a problem. The gadgets mainly add distractions and chuckles. OTOH, the production’s assault on the senses does intensify the drama, and Wadsworth emphasizes the story’s physicality to maximize the high energy of the characters. (Kudos also to fight director Randy Kovitz and choreographer Jesse Carrey-Beaver.) One thing is certain:

MA NOAH continues through May 12. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co., 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-25. www.pghplaywrights.com

BENEDETTI & TCHAIKOVSKY May 10 & 12 Kazem Abdullah, conductor Nicola Benedetti, violin Brahms: Tragic Overture Hindemith: Mathis der Maler, Symphony Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto

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The men of Verona are incredibly buff: more six-packs than Mellinger’s. There is much notable scenery-chewing. Brian Morabito dominates the first act: roaring, whispering and writhing to portray a super-charged and, if not sociopathic, at least obnoxious Mercutio. Adam Hagenbuch also dials it up for a capricious if charming Romeo. Amid the puddles of testosterone, Grace Rao creates an assertive and sweet Juliet. As her Mom, Ginna LeVine is a wonderful bitch and the only well-dressed one in the bunch. Bright and bombastic, this R&J underlines just how hot-blooded, hotheaded (and just basically hot) hardheaded people get themselves into a lot of trouble. And sometimes the spectacle is a lot of fun. Does it add any great new insights into Romeo & Juliet? Is Romeo & Juliet even deep enough to offer new insights? Just enjoy the ride. And spare me the whining in the program notes that — surprise! — young people realize they live in a dangerous world, and that not even school is a safe haven. Gee. All I could think was May 4, 1970. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

AFTER THE FLOOD {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} MAMA IS CERTAINLY NOT on the couch

in Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co.’s production of Ma Noah, an awardwinning 2004 serious comedy by company founder and artistic director Mark Clayton Southers. My “mama on the couch” reference is to George C. Wolfe’s wickedly funny The Colored Museum (1985), satirizing the post-Raisin in the Sun memes of African-American theater and art. Southers takes that sensibility into the 21st century with more realism, depth and layered humor. Set in 2004 in the Philadelphia projects, Ma Noah begin as a seemingly standard drama of a woman raising her children to adulthood almost singlehandedly. (First husband dead, second in jail, leaving two sets of half-siblings with complicated relationships.) Their world is buffeted with waves of anger, frustration and confusion, but especially by the tentacles of the drug trade that promises dreams and delivers destruction. But the title character devises ingenious strategies to protect her young-adult children from the flood of temptations and dangers that threaten to destroy her family. Ma Noah also provides the opportunity for a bravura performance by Chrystal Bates, from passionate speeches to stage business that I dare not reveal, except to say that Bates gleefully pulls it off. This production also marks the first time that Bates has performed with real-life daughter Cheryl Bates-White. As seemingly the most sensible of the four children, BatesWhite channels her mother spot-on in a scene leading a family prayer. Completing the family (and cast) are a wonderfully physical DeVaugn Robinson as the wound-too-tight younger brother;

ROMEO & JULIET continues through Sat., May 4. Philip Chosky Theater, Carnegie Mellon University campus, Oakland. $25-29. 412-268-2407 or www.drama.cmu.edu

the sylph-like Heaven Bobo as his full sister; and mercurial Trevor Butler as the eldest son, a more complicated — and compromised — update of Lorraine Hansberry’s Walter Younger. Director Tracey D. Turner artfully interprets Southers with Joseph Martinez contributing fight choreography; Cheryl El-Walker, costumes and makeup; Diane Melchitzky, set; Thurston Reyes, lights; and Mark Whitehead, sound. There’s a lot of pain in Ma Noah, stanched but not stopped by the occasional triumphs and joy. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013


It’s 1702, a decade after The Crucible’s infamous seductress danced with the devil in Salem.

THE THRILLING NEXT CHAPTER OF A THEATRICAL LEGEND

MAY 4-26, 2013

BY ROBERTO AGUIRRE-SACASA

DIRECTED BY TRACY BRIGDEN

From one of the writers of Marvel Comics, Glee, and Big Love

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

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FOR THE WEEK OF

05.0205.09.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ FRI., MAY 03

+ SAT., MAY 04

{FUNDRAISER}

{ART}

Access to reproductive health care. Resources for re-entering society after incarceration. Equal pay. Gender equality. These are just some of the things that The Women’s Law Project fights for. Join the group tonight for its Rights to Realities benefit, featuring a silent auction plus entertainment from the Alec Chapman Trio and pianist Amy Lindsey, and an original spoken-word performance by Vanessa German. Meanwhile, the group’s Rights to Realities challenge matches donations of $100 or more, dollar for dollar. Lauren Daley 6 p.m. The Fairmont, 510 Market St., Downtown. $60. Register at 412-281-2892 or www. womenslawproject.org.

Alessandra Sulpy’s oil paintings are somewhere between amusing and creepy, depicting an alternate universe where dolls and mannequins roam and the language of gesture translates from awkward yearbook poses and vintage cheesecake. Souvenirs and “cheap doodads” also figure in, according to the locally based artist, 27. Her show of recent works, titled Toys in the Attic, opens at The Gallery 4 with tonight’s reception. BO 7-11 p.m. Exhibit continues through May 25. 206 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. Free. 412-363-5050 or www.thegallery4.us

MAY 04

{STAGE}

Abigail/1702

{ART} One of the more select group shows for local artists this season graces a less familiar venue. The Fox Chapel campus of Shady Side Academy hosts Art Beat, featuring the work of 19 local artists. The roster of contributors begins with sculptor and locally-based eminence Thaddeus Mosley, but also includes such established names as Atticus Adams, Stephanie Armbruster, Kim Beck and Barbara Weissberger, and emerging talents like Seth Clark, Lori Hepner and Ryan Woodring. The show, in the school’s Hillman Center and Benedum Visual Arts Center, opens with tonight’s reception. Bill O’Driscoll 7-9 p.m. Exhibit continues through May 24. 423 Fox Chapel Road, Fox Chapel. www.shadysideacademy.org

and a sound installation by the group Western Pennsylvania. Assemble showcases robot technologies, and Toro’s Tavern has standup comedy. And bid farewell to local fixture ARTica Gallery and Antiques, which is closing at month’s end and liquidating in the meantime. BO Most events 710 p.m. 4100-5400 Penn Ave., Bloomfield/Garfield/Friendship. Free. www.friendship-pgh.org

Abigail Williams was the bad girl of The Crucible — the one who cried “Witch!” Now playwright Roberto AguirreSacasa — also known for writing for TV’s Glee and Big Love — imagines Williams 10 years later in colonial America, living under a new name and getting a visit … from the Devil. City Theatre’s seasonending production of AguirreSacasa’s new play Abigail/1702 stars Diane Davis and Zachary Spicer, and is directed by City’s Tracy Brigden. Preview performances begin tonight;

{ART} It’s even busier than usual at this month’s Unblurred gallery crawl. Along Penn Avenue, check out new shows at venues including Image Box, Artisan, ModernFormations, Garfield Artworks and Most Wanted Fine Art; the latter two feature live music. Roboto hosts printmaker, photographer and writer Max Wheeler

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

MAY 04

Morose & Macabre’s Atrocity Exhibition


sp otlight Anthony Bourdain’s award-winning book Kitchen Confidential illuminated the unknown world behind restaurant-kitchen doors. The 2002 book, which also shed light on the chef’s personal trials, helped bring the behind-the-scenes food world into the mainstream and inspired a new generation of foodies. Bourdain, chef-at-large at New York’s famed Brasserie Les Halles, also hosts Travel Channel’s Emmy Award-winning No Reservations and The Layover, and is known for his quirky and seemingly unfiltered humor. His recent television endeavors include The Taste, a cooking competition, and a food-based docu-series for CNN. For the speaking tour Good vs. Evil, Bourdain is joined by his long-time friend Eric Ripert, the chef and co-owner of New York’s famed Le Bernardin. The guest judge and “fan favorite” on Bravo’s Top Chef has also written four cookbooks and other volumes including Avec Eric, On the Line, A Return to Cooking and the Le Bernardin Cookbook. On May 6, at the Benedum Center, the pair will share stories and discuss the place of food in our collective lives. Copies of their books will be available. Bourdain’s own latest, a culinary-themed graphic novel titled Get Jiro!, reached No. 1 on the New York Times bestseller list. Jeff Ihaza 7:30 p.m. Mon., May 6. 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $45-145. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.culturaldistrict.org

Is Life / Ma la viata e fatta cosi is apparently the only autobiography published in the U.S. written in Italian by a firstgeneration Italian-American woman. Tonight, the Center hosts a presentation by Ruberto’s granddaughter, scholar Laura E. Ruberto, who translated the work for its bilingual edition. BO 6 p.m. 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. Museum admission ($6-15) plus $5. 412-454-6000 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

the official opening night is May 10. BO 5:30 p.m. Continues through May 26. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-55. 412-431-2489 or www. citytheatrecompany.org

{CABARET}

Morose & Macabre’s Atrocity Exhibition is an annual festival for the costumed and the creepy, the frightful and the fanciful. Think goth, steampunk, vaudeville and beyond. The fifth-anniversary show, Commedia Dell’Morte: Carnivale, features sideshow, cabaret and outlandish burlesque from a national array of performers, plus exhibiting artists on theme. At the Rex Theater, MC Cherri Baum will introduce everyone from local faves Phat Man Dee and Andrew The Impaled to visitors like Penny De La Poison and New Orleans’ Vinsantos. Not forgetting “the world’s longest striptease,” by Lita D’Vargas. BO 10 p.m. (doors at 9 p.m.). 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $10-13. www. moroseandmacabre.com

MAY 05 Philippine Madrigal Singers

{WORDS} perform a Cinco de Mayo concert at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater. The group, composed of students, faculty and alumni from the University of the Philippines, was the first choir in the world to be named the “World’s Best Choral Ensemble” by the Asia Pacific Brands Foundation, among other

awards. Tonight’s performance of Philippine, Asian and international songs, sponsored by the Philippine-American Performing Arts of Greater Pittsburgh, is directed by Mark Anthony Carpio. The program includes traditional Filipino dances by 30 youth performers from the PAPAGP. Jeff Ihaza 4:30 p.m.

Art by Stephanie Armbruster

+ SUN., MAY 05 {SPORT}

It’s Pittsburgh Marathon day. Look for closed-off streets, some 30,000 competitors running either 13.1 or 26.2 miles — and more street-level safety anxiety than usual, matched with more security. (Spectators this year shouldn’t bring backpacks, for instance.) The first wheelchair racers start at 6:50 a.m. You can just watch, or you can help out: Volunteers are still needed all along the course, throughout the day. BO www.pittsburghmarathon.com

5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $10-100. 724-591-8525 or www.philippinefolkdance.org

+ MON., MAY 06

MAY 03

Art Beat

The internationally acclaimed Philippine Madrigal Singers

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M U S I C

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+ TUE., MAY 07 {MUSIC} Choro is a classic popular urban music of Brazil, dating from the 19th century; its fast tempo and tradition of virtuosity make it that country’s equivalent of New Orleans-style jazz. Pittsburgh’s lone practitioners are Choro No Vinho, whose six members (on guitar, violin, brass and hand drum) perform tonight at Bar Marco. The show’s presented by Classical Revolution Pittsburgh, whose mission is making live chamber

{WORDS} One of Western Pennsylvania’s oldest book festivals returns for its 18th year. The onenight Festival of Mystery, presented by the awardwinning Mystery Lovers Bookshop, offers the opportunity to meet and talk with 49 local and national mystery authors, all in one place. Guests at Oakmont’s Greek Orthodox Church tonight include British author Frances Brody, best known for her Kate Shackleton mysteries. JI 5 p.m. 12 Washington St., Oakmont. $8-9. 1-888-800-6078 or www.mysterylovers.com

MAY 04

Toys iin the h Attic A Artwork by Alessandra Sulpy

{WORDS}

{MUSIC}

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Author, zine hero and bicycling enthusiast Pete Jordan — once known by his nom de zine “Dishwasher Pete” — formerly lived in Pittsburgh. He left in 2001 because there weren’t enough fellow bicyclists. That was before this town’s biking

bikes and the bicycle’s role in fighting Nazis. On the U.S. leg of his book tour, Jordan reads tonight, at the Brew House. BO 7:30 p.m. 2100 Mary St., South Side. Free. 412-381-7767

A bit of international people’s history with a Pittsburgh flavor visits Heinz History Center tonight. Just after World War II, at age 43, Leonilde Frieri Ruberto and her family left her small Italian village for the U.S. — and Bloomfield. In 1980, Ruberto wrote her life story, and Such

S C R E E N

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boom, but Jordan found somewhere inarguably better: Amsterdam. His new book, In the City of Bikes, explores the strange and wonderful history (and ubiquity) of human-powered two-wheelers there, including public-use

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music more accessible. But choro’s samba and bossa nova rhythms might just expand your idea of “chamber music.” BO 8 p.m. 2216 Penn Ave., Strip District. $10 (includes refreshments). www. classicalrevolutionpgh.org

C L A S S I F I E D S

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coworkers concoct a plan to get even w/ their sexist boss. Fri-Sun. Thru May 12. New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-657-3969. ABIGAIL/1702. The story of The Crucible’s Abigail Williams, 10 years later. Tue-Sun. Thru May 26. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. CLYBOURNE PARK. A look at the house & neighborhood from A Raisin in the Sun in 1959 & 2009. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Tue-Sun. Thru May 19. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. THE CRUCIBLE. Fri, Sat. Thru May 18. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. DEATH WINS THE PRIZE. Murder mystery dinner theater. Presented by Pohl Productions. Fri, Sat and Sun., May 19. Thru May 18. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. FIVE WOMEN WEARING THE SAME DRESS. Five bridesmaids come to realize, that they, despite their differences, have more in common w/ each other than they

do w/ the bride. Fri-Sun. Thru May 19. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. FOR THE TREE TO DROP. Reading of a play by Lissa Brennan about a plantation mourning the loss of its owner’s son, & a slave working to bury her brother, who has been hung as punishment for rebelling. Based on Sophocles’ Antigone. Part of the In The Raw Festival. May 5-6, 7 p.m. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999. THE FOX ON THE FAIRWAY. Comedy by Ken Ludwig. Presented by Stage Right. Thu-Sat. Thru May 11. Boyd Community Center, O’Hara. 412-228-0566. JACQUES BREL IS ALIVE & WELL & LIVING IN PARIS. Thu-Sat and Sun. Thru May 12. The Theatre Factory, Trafford. 412-374-9200. LA CENERENTOLA (CINDERELLA). Presented by Pittsburgh Opera. Tue, Fri and Sun., May 5. Thru May 3. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. LITTLE GEM. Three generations of middle-class Irish women tell the story of one extraordinary year.

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Tue-Sun. Thru May 5. City Theatre, Oakland. 412-624-7529. THE PAPER BAG BANDIT RIDES South Side. 412-431-2489. AGAIN OR BEHIND THE CHEAP LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS. A musical about a man-eating house- MASK. Waverly Opera House Production. May 3-4. Waverly plant, a nerdy floral shop clerk, & Presbyterian Church, Regent a sweetheart in love with her bad Square. 412-242-0643. boy dentist. Thu-Sat. Thru May 18. SUITE SURRENDER. A Farce by Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. Michael Mckeever. Thu-Sun. Thru 724-745-6300. May 11. South Park Theatre, MA NOAH. Rebecca Pratt, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. a single mother of four, WALK TWO MOONS struggles to keep her READING. Play based family intact in the face on the book by Sharon of drugs, pregnancy & Creech. Presented by unemployment. She www. per pa Prime Stage Theatre. must draw upon all her pghcitym .co Sun., May 5, 1 p.m. reserves of hope & courCarnegie Library, Oakland. age in her fight to save her 412-622-3114. children’s souls. Thu-Sun. Thru WITHOUT RUTH. Based on the life May 12. Pittsburgh Playwrights of Ruth Haston, a longtime resiTheatre, Downtown. dent of the Hill Distict, & inspired THE ODD COUPLE. Sat, Sun. Thru by the diaries of her daughter, May 5. The Legacy Theatre, Allison Linda. Thu-Sat. Thru May 18. Park. 877-987-8080. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. OUR CLASS. The Pittsburgh 724-873-3576. premiere of a play about YOU SAY TOMATO, I SAY SHUT Polish neighbors during the UP! A 21st century love story Holocaust. Presented by Pittsburgh where “Happily Ever After” meets Irish & Classical Theatre. Thru “It’s Complicated” Wed-Sun. Thru May 4. Stephen Foster Memorial, May 5. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

FULL LIST ONLINE

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

SaVE THE DATE!

THEATER 9 TO 5: THE MUSICAL. 3 female

COMEDY THU 02 - SAT 04 JOSH BLUE. May 2-4 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 03 COMEDY SHOWCASE. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. FELON O’ REILLY, IAN HARVIE. We Are Not Saints: Recovery Comedy Tour. 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MIDSEASON REPLACEMENT: AN IMPROVISED SITCOM. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru May 31 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. PITTSBURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE W/ MIKE WYSOCKI. Fri, 9 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995.

SAT 04 CHRIS & TAMI: SECOND HONEYMOON TOUR IMPROV SHOW. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. DAVID LAWRENCE. Magic & comedy show. 1 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412–243-6464.

MON 06 TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 07

www.pittsburghdjcompany.com itt b hdj

OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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“Vessel with Three Blue Objects” by Priscilla Hollingsworth, from Material Matters: An Adventure! at Gallerie Chiz SHAW GALLERIES. All Things Bright & Beautiful. Wildlife paintings by Don Woods. Closing reception: May 4, 5-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-281-4884.

ONGOING

VISUAL

ART

NEW THIS WEEK 28 WEST SECOND GALLERY & STUDIO SPACE. The Female Construction. Annual Women Exhibition feat. Suzanne Andrews, Ruthanne Bauerle, Meghan Edge, Lora Finelli, Harriete Meriwether, Roberta Myers, Rebecca PerrySoike, Sam Thorpe & Michelle Urbanek. Opening reception May 4, 7-10 p.m. Greensburg. 724-205-9033. 3RD STREET GALLERY. Waterworks. Pittsburgh Watercolor Society annual member show. Opening reception: May 4, 5-8 p.m. 412-276-5233. Carnegie. 412-276-5233. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Travels Behind the Lens. Work by Mary Beth Kratsas, Aldrich Jenkins, & Ted Scanga. Artist reception: May 4, 6-9 p.m. Verona. 412-828-1031. CAVO. Expressions. Local artist showcase feat. Phillip Seth, Glenn Isenberg, Rebecca Weaver, Brett Guerra, James, Guentner, Angie Candell, more. Opens May 2, 8 p.m. Presented by RAW:natural born artists. Steubenville. 412-977-7506. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Rebirth. Work by Connie Cantor, Jean-Gaudaire Thor, & Heather Tabacchi. Opening reception: May 3, 5-8 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. EAST END BOOK EXCHANGE. Book/Art. Work by Sarah Leavens. Opens May 3, 7-9 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. GALLERIE CHIZ. Material Matters: An Adventure! Work

by Priscilla Hollingsworth & Jeffrey Moyer. Opening reception: May 3, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-6605. THE GALLERY 4. Toys in the Attic. Work by Alessandra Sulpy. Opening reception: May 4, 7-11 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Faith in Rituals. Work by Dave D’Incau Jr., Lindsey Hayakawa, & Stephen Haynes. Opening May 3, 6 p.m. Garfield. 412-361-2262. MENDELSON GALLERY. Rare Gems. Work by Thommy Conroy. Opening reception: May 3, 5:309 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. I’m Feeling Lucky. CMU 2013 Senior Art Exhibition. Opening reception May 3, 6-8 p.m. Conversation w/ artists & faculty, May 14, 6:30-9 p.m. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. In- Visible’ : When Personal Is Political. Artworks of Dafna Rehavia-Hanauer. Opening reception May 4, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-362-0274. SCHOOLHOUSE ART CENTER. Cinco de Mayo Art Show. Work by South Arts artists. Opening reception & dinner: May 4, 6-9 p.m. Bethel Park. 412-831-8156. SHADY SIDE ACADEMY. Art Beat. Group show feat. Atticus Adams, Kim Beck, Seth Clark, Sarika Goulatia, Ryder Henry, Lori Hepner, Thaddeus Mosley, more. Opening reception: May 3, 7-9 p.m. Fox Chapel. 412-968-3000.

707 PENN GALLERY. Adult Arcade. New works by Marc Burgess. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. In Cast of Characters. Curators Vicky Clark & Cindy Lisica bring together 6 diverse artists to question the nature of our everyday existence & our relationship to larger-than-life heroes & gods. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Longterm exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. SOLO Exhibits. Work by Leslie Ansley, Jo-Anne Bates & Tina Brewer. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BARCO LAW BUILDING. The Art of Japanese Noh Drama Tsukioka Kogyo, 1869-1927. Japanese woodblock prints from the collection on Richard & Mae Smethurst. Oakland. 412-648-1490. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Painters of le Poire. Feat. work from artists at le Poire Studio & Gallery. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. THE BREW HOUSE. 42.8864° N, 78.8786° W. Feat. work by 10 artists from the Buffalo (NY) Arts Studio. Part of the Distillery 7 Exchange Program. South Side. 412-381-7767. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. The 102nd show from the oldest continuously exhibiting visual arts organization in the country. Japan is the Key: Collecting Prints & Ivories, 1900–1920. Collections from the early years of the Carnegie Institute. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Laura Jean McLaughlin, Jane Ogren. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. EASTSIDE GALLERY. New Door. Work by Joan Downing, Bernie Pintar, Phiris Kathryn, Sickles, more. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. CONTINUES ON PG. 51

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EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 08 JOKEE OAKEE. Comedy open stage hosted by Tonnochi:B. Wed Younger’s, North Side. 412-452-3267. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR

16th Annual Art All Night

EVENT:

40th and Willow streets, Lawrenceville

CRITIC: Abby Michalak, 20, a student from Oakland

AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. WHEN: Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. This was a one-of-a-kind event. I walked in and it just felt BOST BUILDING. Collectors. like a giant amusement park full of art. I really enjoyed Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestthe fact that so [many] of the pieces on display had ern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. the contact information of the artists as well as pricing CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 20/20: Celebrating Two Decades to purchase the art. I think that’s a really good way to of the Heinz Architectural Center. promote local art in the city. The one piece I was most Feat. timeline highlighting struck by was a really beautiful screen-print with Marilyn important exhibitions & events, a display of 20 objects from the colMonroe quotes on it. I was impressed by the piece by lection selected by current or past itself, but when I read the card attached to it, I found out curatorial staff, more. Oakland. the artist was just 13 years old. At that age I couldn’t have 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF imagined doing anything like that. NATURAL HISTORY. EmpowerBY J E F F I H A Z A ing Women: Artisan Cooperatives that Transform Communities. Folk art objects illustrating the power of women working together to MARIDON MUSEUM. Hina FIRST PRESBYTERIAN provide for their families, educate Matsuri Doll Exhibit. 724-282-0123. CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany their children, promote equality, stained-glass windows. Downtown. Beautiful Birds. Display of art from & give back to their communithe museum’s study storage facility. 412-471-3436. ties. BugWorks. Feat. beautiful 724-282-0123. Collection includes FORT PITT MUSEUM. photography of insects, amazing Reconstructed fort houses museum jade and ivory statues from China specimens, & live bugs! Garden of and Japan, as well as Meissen of Pittsburgh history circa French & Light: Works by Paula Crevoshay. porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. Indian War and American RevoluFeat. nearly 70 fine art jewelry MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY tion. Downtown. 412-281-9285. pieces. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open FRICK ART & HISTORICAL Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. for tours, lectures and more. MonCENTER. Ongoing: tours of Oakland. 412-622-3131. roeville. 412-373-7794. Clayton, the Frick estate, with CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. MOUNT LEBANON PUBLIC classes, car & carriage museum. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome LIBRARY. Civil War 150: Exploring Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. (planetarium), Miniature the War & Its Meaning through the HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Railroad and Village, USS Requin Words of Those Who Lived It. Feat. Tudor mansion and stable comsubmarine, and more. North Side. letters, personal accounts, & images plex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor 412-237-3400. from the Civil War. Presented by activities in the surrounding park. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL the Gilder Lehrman Institute of Allison Park. 412-767-9200. HISTORY. Explore the American History in partnership HUNT INSTITUTE FOR complex interplay between w/ The Library of America. Mt. BOTANICAL culture, nature and Lebanon. 412-531-1912. DOCUMENTATION. biotechnology. Open NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to What We Collect: Fridays 5-8, Saturdays more than 600 birds from over Recent Art Acquisitions, 12-4 & Sundays 12-4. . w w w 200 species. With classes, lectures, 2007–2012. Botanical paper Garfield. 412-223-7698. pghcitym o .c demos and more. North Side. illustrations from COMPASS INN. Demos 412-323-7235. the early 19th century and tours with costumed NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 through the present. guides featuring this restored rooms helping to tell the story Oakland. 412-268-2434. stagecoach stop. Ligonier. of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other 724-238-4983. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. 412-624-6000. Hill. 724-329-8501. University of Pittsburgh Jazz OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Silk Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion from the International Hall of Road. Photo exhibition of images Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. site features log house, blacksmith taken along the Silk Road in DEPRECIATION LANDS shop & gardens. South Park. Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal & MUSEUM. Small living history 412-835-1554. India in 1972 by Albin & Virginia museum celebrating the PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & Curtze. Downtown. 412-391-4100. settlement and history of the BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. Forest. Watch butterflies emerge GUILD. MCG Invitational Arts 412-486-0563. from their chrysalises to flutter Exhibition. Juried exhibition for among tropical blooms. Summer FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed students in Pittsburgh Public Frank Lloyd Wright house. Flower Show. Glass art surrounded Schools. Awards reception: May 9, Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. by colorful blooms. Feat. work by 6-9 p.m. North Side. 412-322-1773.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

Daviea Davis, Jason Forck, Steven Sadvary, Lisa Platt, more. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 18811986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. 1968: The Year that Rocked America. Nearly a dozen interactive video presentations & more than 100 evocative artifacts that explore how the year 1968 helped shape our modern world. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Lost & Found: Sustainable High Fashion. Contemporary fashions created w/ repurposed & upcycled elements. Opening reception: May 4, 7-9 p.m. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. Scottdale. 724-887-7910. WILDCARD. Highlights From PGH365: AIGA Pittsburgh’s Annual Design Competition & Exhibition. Feat. designs by Brett Yasko, Nick Caruso, Eve Faulkes, strawberryluna, MAYA, more. Opens May 2. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

SPECIAL SAT 04 COMMEDIA DEL’MUERTE: CARNIVALE. Morose & Macabre’s Atrocity Exhibition. Feat. NeoVictorian horror inspired art, oddities & performances. 9 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-381-6811.

FESTIVALS WED 08 BRADDOCK COMMUNITY DAY. Exhibitions, clinics, food, music, more. 5-9 p.m.


VISUAL ART

DANCE SAT 04 MARK MORRIS DANCE GROUP. Presented by the Pittsburgh Dance Council. 8 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666. WORKS IN PROGRESS. Bellydance performance feat. Lisa Zahiya, Janim, & the Pittsburgh Samba Group. 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-759-0522.

FUNDRAISERS THU 02 59TH ANNUAL HUMAN RIGHTS DINNER. Keynote Speaker: Swin Cash. Benefits the NAACP, Pittsburgh Unit. 6:30 p.m. Wyndham Grand Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-471-1024.

FRI 03 RIGHTS TO REALITIES. Wine reception, silent & live auctions, more. Benefits the Women’s Law Project. 6 p.m. Fairmont Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-281-2892.

SAT 04 BARK FOR LIFE OF SOUTH HILLS. Noncompetitive walk for dogs & their owners. Benefits the American Cancer Society. 10 a.m. Allegheny County South Park Fairgrounds, South Park. 724-222-6911. LAUGHTER IS THE BEST MEDICINE: AN EVENING W/ ROB ROGERS. Benefits the Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic Center. 6 p.m. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-661-4224. SUNSCREEN OPEN GOLF OUTING. Benefits Miles Against Melanoma. 12 p.m. Lake Arthur Golf Club, Butler. 412-901-2078.

SUN 05 8TH ANNUAL FRIENDSHIP LUNCHEON. Kentucky Derby theme, Master of Ceremonies: Jennifer Antkowiak. Benefits VNA Hospice. 11 a.m. Butler Country Club, Butler. 724-431-3213. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. DICK’S SPORTING GOODS PITTSBURGH MARATHON. Liberty Ave. between Sixth St. & Seventh St., Downtown. RUK & ROLL BOWL. Benefits the Rukmini Foundation. 12-4 p.m. AMF Mt. Lebanon Lanes, Mt. Lebanon. 412-854-0600. WINE & CHOCOLATE TASTING. Benefits Renaissance & Baroque & The Pittsburgh Camerata. 4 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-2048.

POLITICS THU 02 GREEN PARTY MEETING. First Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Citizen Power, Squirrel Hill. 412-231-1581.

FE GALLERY. Alabaster Blast. Fiber art exhibit feat. over a dozen internationally renowned artists. Lawrenceville. 412-389-5800. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. E Block. Photography by Mark Perrott. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. A Kind of Alchemy: Medieval Persian Ceramics. A look at the diversity of ceramics made in ancient Persia, now present-day Iraq, Iran, & Afghanistan. Feat. 10th-century splashware, buffware, slippainted ware, lusterware & 14th-century fritware, more. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Displacement. Installations by Phil Hessler & Natalia González Requena. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. The Classic Collection: European & American Classical & Academic Styles. Early 19th & 20th century paintings. RetroFRESH. Contemporary paintings by James Kennedy, Claire Hardy, Donald Deskey, Alexander Minewski, Louise Evans-Scott, Vladimir Naiditch, & Henri de Waroquier. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIA MALL. New Oil Paintings. Work by Joe Winkler. Mt. Lebanon. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. April in Paris. Photography by Scott Davidson. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. INTERNATIONAL IMAGES. 1st Annual Student Show. Work by Bethany Summers, Carter Warren, Chloe Newman, Nicole Catalfamo, Rigel Richards, more. Sewickley. 412-741-3036. JAMES GALLERY. unwrapped. Shibori-dyed quilts by Jan Myers-Newbury. West End. 412-922-9800.

WED 08 MAYORAL CANDIDATES FORUM ON DESIGN, PLANNING, & PUBLIC POLICY. 6 p.m. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-281-0995.

LITERARY THU 02 AMERICAN HISTORY BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP. April 1865,The Month that saved America by Jay Winik. Every other Thu, 9:15 a.m. Thru May 16 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council.

Pizza & Beer Night tuesdays

CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MAKE YOUR MARK ARTSPACE & COFFEEHOUSE. Steel City Medley. Photographs by Jay Ressler. Point Breeze. 412-365-2117. MATTRESS FACTORY. Feminist and.. New work by Julia Cahill, Betsy Damon, Parastou Forouhar, Loraine Leeson, Ayanah Moor, & Carrie Mae Weems. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! Work by Nancy Adams, Marilyn Andrews, Ronit Dagan, Eric Boos, Barbara Poole, Frank FLynn, Lavon Williams, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Faces & Places: Photographs of Old Economy. Never before seen photography from the late 19th & early 20th centuries. Ambridge. 724-266-4500. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Cameras & the Famous Photos They Took. Including a copy of Daguerre’s first camera, James Bond’s mini Minox spy unit, the Big Bertha that caught Bill Mazeroski rounding third base in 1960 Winning Series, more. North Side. 412-231-7881. PICTURESQUE PHOTOGRAPHY & GIFTS. Photography by Brenda Knoll. Lawrenceville. 412-688-0240. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Fiberart International 2013. Juried exhibition of contemporary fiber art. Presented by the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh. 30:2. Group exhibition presented by Associated Artists

Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Third and First Thu of every month The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SCOTT SILSBE, DAVE NEWMAN. Reading & book signing. 6:30 p.m. Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009.

FRI 03 BOOK SIGNING W/ DAN ROONEY & CAROL PETERSON. Allegheny City: A History of Pittsburgh’s North Side. 6 p.m. Gallery

$15 large pizza & pitcher domestic beer FREE POOL all night

of Pittsburgh. Coming Home. Fabric installation by Kay Healy. Friday Nights at Guitar Center. Work by Allison Kaufman. Rites of Passage. Oil paintings by Maggie Mills. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Consciousness. Flameworked glass by Eunsuh Choi. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. Point Park Project 1: Kaleidoscope. Work by Di-Ay Battad, Katie Mackowick, Chris McGinnis, & Daniel Luchman. Downtown. 412-391-4100. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Continuum. Work by Doug DuBois & Aaron Blum. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin Turner: New Work. Sculpture. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 15. SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART. Red, White & Blue in Black and White: The American Scene in Prints, Drawings & Photographs. 35-some works on paper from the museum’s collection, from photographs to lithographs. Ligonier. 724-238-6015. TRINITY GALLERY. Evolution. New work by Matt Gatto. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2458. UNDERCROFT GALLERY, FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Watercolors by Phiris. A solo exhibit of watercolor paintings by Phiris Kathryn Sickels. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. THE UNION HALL. Light/ Dark: Shades of Self & Surface. Paintings by Rachael Ryan. Strip District. 412-471-1900. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. An Art(ist) in Motion. Work by Aaronel deRoy Gruber. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Memento Mori. Sculpture by Gregory Barsamian. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

Wind Up wednesdays

$2 Miller Lite Drafts til 12am FREE POOL all night ½ off Select Appetizers 9-11pm

Thirsty thursdays

$7 Yuengling Pitchers til 12am Karaoke 9:30-1:30am

Happy Hour 6-8pm

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José Tony’s AND

ALL DAY - SUNDAY, MAY 5TH

(CINCO DE MAYO)

COORS LIGHT Bottles and Drafts

on 43rd Street, Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. CHILDREN’S LITERATURE CONFERENCE. Feat. presentations by Brian Pinkney & Siobhan Vivian. 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg. 724-836-7159. COFFEE, TEA & TEENS. Discussion group for parents of teens. Registration requested. First Fri of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. North Hills Youth Ministry Counseling Center, West View. 412-366-1300 x 25. RENEE DEMICHIEI FARROW. Reading & book signing of Empower! Women’s Stories of Breakthroughs, Discovery & Triumph. 6-8 p.m. Urban Cottage, Lawrenceville. 412-683-1950.

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FIESTA FRIDAY, SATURDAY AND SUN DAY

Saturday, May 4th, starting at 10pm.

LIVE MUSIC featuring THE WHEALS $4.25 Margaritas $1 Tacos $2.75 Select Mexican Beer VISIT OUT FACEBOOK PAGE @ JOSE AND TONY’S

1573 McFARLAND ROAD • MT. LEBANON, PA • 412.561.2025

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SAT 04

BOBblehead n. A person who moves their head up and down to the music of BOB FM

SAT 04

CALL ME WILLIAM, THE LIFE & LOVES OF WILLA CATHER. Performance presented by Prudence Holmes. 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. HEATHER ABRAHAM. Book signing w/ author of The Bookie’s Daughter: A Memoir of Growing Up in a Crazy, Crime-Ridden Family. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. John Howard Graphics, Jeannette. 724-787-9070.

Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. CHARLIE & KIWI’S EVOLUTIONARY ADVENTURE. Join Charlie as he travels back to the Age of Dinosaurs to discover how evolution works. Feat. story theater & discovery area. Presented by Commonwealth Connections Academy. Tue-Sun. Thru May 12 Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. MOVE WITH ART. Pull levers to move a 10-foot wooden man, create images on a giant Kaleidoscope, feed rubber balls to a life-size wooden cow & much more. Thru May 12 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 06

FRI 03 - SUN 05

THU 02

SUSTAINING WONDER: REBOOTING YOUR WRITE MIND. Writing workshop. Sat, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru May 25 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-244-8458.

SUN 05

DISNEY’S THE LITTLE MERMAID. OPEN POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by The Petite Players. Presented by the Pittsburgh May 3-5 Grand Theatre, Elizabeth. Poetry Exchange. First Mon of 412-384-0504. every month, 7-10 p.m. Brentwood THE SECRET GARDEN. Based Library, Brentwood. 412-882-5694. on the children’s book by Frances READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. Hodgson Burnett. Fri-Sun. Thru plays from August Wilson & new May 5 Lincoln Park Performing works by up & coming Arts Center, Midland. playwrights. First Mon of 724-643-9004. every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American CLAYTON KIDS: Culture, Downtown. www. per MEGA-MUSIC BOX. 412-258-2700. a p ty ci h pg Listen to an orchestrion SUCH IS LIFE: MA LA .com & create your own VITA E’ FATTA COSI: A musical instrument. 11 a.m. MEMOIR. Laura E. Ruberto, Frick Art & Historical Center, discusses post WWII Italian Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. immigration in Pittsburgh as detailed in her grandmother’s memoir. Senator John Heinz History CINCO DE MAYO. Mexican stories, Center, Strip District. 412-454-6000. THIRD ON THIRD. Seated readings songs & snacks. Ages 3+. 1:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. of screenplays written by local Lebanon. 412-531-1912. screenwriters. Every third Mon, LEGOS FOR TEENS. For middle 7 p.m. Thru June 17 3rd Street & high school age only. 2 p.m. Gallery, Carnegie. 412-276-5233. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PLAY W/ CLAY AT THE JAPANESE CONVERSATION HANDBUILDING TABLE. Ages CLUB. First and Third Tue of every 3+. Sun, 12-3 p.m. Thru May 12 month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-622-3151. North Side. 412-322-5058. KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, BROWN BAG LUNCH BUNCH. A Sewickley. 412-741-3838. lunchtime story for kids ages 3-6. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice Mon, 12:30 p.m. Penguin Bookconversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. shop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 04

SUN 05

TUE 07

MON 06

WED 08 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116.

KIDSTUFF THU 02

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

SPRING COMICS CLUB. Learn about the visual & narrative elements of comic strips & graphic novels. Thu, 4-6 p.m. Thru May 23 Assemble, Garfield. 773-425-1531.

THU 02 - WED 08 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing

TUE 07

CHESS CLUB. For students in K-7th grade. Every other Tue. Thru May 21 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PLAY W/ CLAY ON THE POTTER’S WHEEL. Ages 3+. Tue, 12-3 p.m. Thru May 14 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TUESDAYS WITH TESS. Tue, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

OUTSIDE THU 02 BIRD SANCTUARY LEARN & LISTEN. Presented by Venture Outdoors. 6-8 p.m. The Birdwatchers Store, Slippery Rock. 412-255-0564.

BIRDWATCHING HIKE. 8-10 a.m. Succop Conservancy, Butler. 724-586-2591. LAUREL HIGHLANDS HIKING TRAIL QUEST. Sat. Thru May 25 412-255-0564.

TUE 07 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 08 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF CHOCOLATE, BLUES & BUSINESS NETWORKING FESTIVAL. Business expo, open networking, door prizes, blues music, chocolate treats, more. Old cell phones will also be collected for the Women’s Shelter of Pittsburgh. 1-7 p.m. Epiphany Catholic Church, Uptown. 469-387-8151. CITY DHARMA. Soto Zen Meditation. jisen@deepspringzen. org Thu, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. MARRIAGE PREPARATION WORKSHOP. Thu. Thru June 6 Faith Community Church, Penn Hills. 412-242-0210. GLOBALPITTSBURGH FIRST THURSDAYS. International community networking event. 5:30-8 p.m. AVA Bar & Lounge, East Liberty. 412-392-4513. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. PORKY OLDIES DANCE. First Thu of every month and Last Tue of every month Brentwood VFW Post 1810, Brentwood. 412-881-9934. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. TURKEY: LIKE A TASTE OF HONEY ON YOUR TONGUE. w/ Dr. John Nichols. 6:30 p.m. Maridon Museum, Butler. 724-282-0123. URBAN GURLZ TRUNK SHOW. Capricorn II clothing line & choreography excerpts by the Marylloyd Claytor Dance Company. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. YWCA, Downtown. 412-391-5100. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

FRI 03 AGENOMICS: A CONFERENCE TO RESOLVE ECONOMIC CHALLENGES OF GROWING OLD. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Pittsburgh Marriot City Center, Downtown. 412-580-3256. GREAT PLANT AUCTION. Hors d’oeuvres, live & silent auctions, more. 6 p.m. Phipps Garden Center,


[VISUAL ART] Artwork by strawberryluna

Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. HOME SAFE HOME: TOOLS & TIPS FOR SENIORS. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. OBSCURE: A NIGHT OF GOTH, KINK & PERFORMANCE ART. DJs, photo booth, vendors, more. First Fri of every month, 9 p.m. Thru June 7 Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-339-0825. RAINBOW RISING COFFEE HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and friends. Music, games, movies, entertainment and more. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Smithton. First Fri of every month 724-872-5056. YOUTH INVASION 2013: STATUS UPDATE. Teens take over the Warhol! DJs, fashion show, art activities, more. 5-10 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300.

SAT 04 BUTLER PET EXPO. Vendors, seminars, games, more. Benefits the Butler County Humane Society. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Butler Farm Show Grounds, Butler. 724-283-1500. CINCO DE MAYO THE FOURTH BE W/ YOU. Pinatas, DJ, tacos, screening of Star Wars: Episode IV. 5 p.m. The Parkway Theater, McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668. DR. SKETCHY’S HEROINES & VILLAINS FREE COMIC BOOK DAY AFTER-PARTY. Life drawing w/ a twist. 7-9 p.m. The ToonSeum, Downtown. 412-232-0199. FREE COMIC BOOK DAY. Free comics, special guests, discounts, more. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Phantom of the Attic, Oakland. 412-621-1210. GLASS FLOWER WORKSHOP. Call for time slot. and May 11-12 Vessel Studio Glass, South Side. 412-779-2471. HISTORIC HANNA’S TOWN OPENING DAY. Tours, historical demonstrations, a full tea, more. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x 210. KNIT THE BRIDGE. Learn about knitting & help make panels for the Knit the Bridge project. 1-4 p.m. Mattress Factory, North Side. 412-231-3169. KOREAN FOOD BAZAAR. 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Korean Central Church of Pittsburgh, Shadyside. 412-687-7775. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Korean grammar & basic conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. “LEARN A FORM” IMPROV WORKSHOP W/ THE NEW MOVEMENT. 4 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MAY SATURDAY CEILI. w/ Pittsburgh Ceili Club. 7 p.m. Morningside VFW, Morningside. 412-254-3130. MORTGAGES FOR MOTHERS. Home-buying workshop feat.

If you missed PGH365 — AIGA Pittsburgh’s annual design competition and exhibition — you can still get a taste this month at Wildcard. The contest, which took place in March, celebrated graphic design in the form of posters, logos, ad campaigns and other work. The Wildcard show highlights pieces by local designers like strawberryluna (their winning poster is pictured above), Brett Yasko, Eve Faulkes and more. Through June 3. 4209 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Call 412-224-2651 or visit www.wildcard.com. speaker Lynne Hayes-Freeland. 9 a.m. Sheraton Station Square Hotel, Station Square. 412-261-2000. OUTRAGEOUS BINGO. Feat. drag performances, more. Benefits Gay & Lesbian Community Center of Pittsburgh & Shepherd Wellness Community. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566. PILLOWS WORKSHOP. Learn step-by-step how to make a fun & creative pillow. 2-4 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SILENT MOVIE EVENT. Screening of The Kid Brother w/ musical accompaniment by Clark Wilson. Presented by The Pittsburgh Area Theatre Organ Society.

2 p.m. Keystone Oaks High School, Dormont. 724-446-9744. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target - East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SPORTS CARD SHOW. Special autograph guest: Bob Friend. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Allegheny Elks Lodge #339, North Side. 412-721-8109. SPRING CRAFT FAIR. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. East Union Presbyterian Church, Cheswick. 412-767-5750. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

SUN 05 $10 RABIES CLINIC. Presented by Animal Care & Welfare, Inc. 12-3 p.m. PA Fitness West, Imperial. 724-573-4665. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727.

AUDUBON CENTER FOR NATIVE PLANTS SPRING SALE. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100. BELLYDANCE CLASS W/ JEMEENA. Sun, 10 a.m. Thru June 30 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-337-1846. CONTRA DANCE. Beginners welcome. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 410-701-0048. ITALIANO-ESPRESSO. Italian conversation club. Presented by Mondo Italiano. Sun, 11 a.m. Thru June 30 Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-478-3682. KUNDALINI ASCENSION. w/ Andrew Nesky. Pittsburgh Theosophical Society. 1:30-3 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-462-4200. REUSED BLUE JEANS TOTE WORKSHOP. 2-4 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. RIVERS OF STEEL SUNDAY HERITAGE MARKET. Farm & artist market. First Sun of every month and Third Sun of every month. Thru Sept. 15 Homestead Pump House, Munhall. 412-464-4020. VERONA’S CREATIVE MARKETPLACE. Arts & crafts vendors, live music, more. First Sun of every month, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thru Sept. 1 Verona Borough Building, Verona. 412-828-8080.

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MON 06 ANTHONY BOURDAIN & ERIC RIPERT: GOOD VS. EVIL. 7:30 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. FOLK CUSTOMS OF EASTERN SLOVAKIA. Discussion w/ John Righetti. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PRESERVING THE HARVEST. Learn to preserve food by freezing, canning & drying. 7-9 p.m. Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

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TUE 07 SLOVAK LESSONS. For beginning students. Sponsored by the Western PA Slovak Cultural Association. Tue. Thru June 4 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-2990.

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BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP. For Widows/Widowers over 50. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, Ross. 412-366-1300. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon

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Upper St. Clair. 412-835-6630. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. & between 1,500 to 2,000 words MARYLLOYD CLAYTOR 412-531-1912. for WordPlay, a new storytelling HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN DANCE COMPANY. Rolling event. Email submissions to GROW? w/ Julie Butcher Pezzino auditions for Modern Dance alan@olifson.com. & Carla Castagnero. Helping & Modeling Spring Intensive. FUTURE TENANT: IMPROBABLE Women Helps the World Lecture April 22, 24, 29, May 6, 8, 13, & 15. MOVIES. Submit a 1-sheet poster Series, benefiting Bethlehem mclaytorcapricornii@verizon.net & 400-600 word plot for a movie Haven. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. YWCA, Downtown. 412-882-5509. w/ an unlimited budget that will Fairmont Pittsburgh, Downtown. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. never be made. Entries due by May 412-391-1348 x 228. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 5, 11:59 p.m. More info at http:// JOB FAIR. Over 70 employers w/ 18+ for murder mystery shows futuretenant.org/events/improbaimmediate openings. 4-6 p.m. performed in the Pittsburgh area. ble-movies-call-for-entries Eastminster Presbyterian Church, 412-833-5056. GALLERY FLYNN. Seeking work East Liberty. THE MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF by film & visual artists to display in LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice PITTSBURGH. Additional audition new gallery. McKees Rocks. conversational English. Wed, dates for the 2013/2014 season. 412-969-2990. 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. Singers will be heard April 27th INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. 412-622-3151. at Heinz Hall, & May 15th after Submit your film, 10 minutes or THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. 5pm at Third Presbyterian Church, less. Screenings held on the second A meeting of jugglers & spinners. Shadyside. Contact MaryColleen Thursday of every month. DV8 All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Seip or visit www.themendelssohn. Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. Union Project, Highland Park. org 724-263-5259. 724-219-0804. 412-363-4550. PITTSBURGH CLO ACADEMY OF NEW SLANG LITERARY TRADING FAIRLY W/ TEN MUSICAL THEATER. Auditions MAGAZINE FOR WOMEN AND THOUSAND VILLAGES. for In the Heights. May 6-7 & 9. GIRLS IN PITTSBURGH. Literary Learn about the guidelines Prepare 2 contrasting magazine supported by The of fair trade & how you 16-bar cuts (pop-rock/ Women and Girls Foundation. can make an impact on contemporary musical Taking submissions of creative the fair trade market. theater). Downtown. writing, visual art, photographs, 6:30 p.m. East End Food 412-327-3217. and essays from women and girls w. w w Co-op, Point Breeze. er PITTSBURGH PRIDE of all ages. www.new-slang.org hcitypap g p 412-242-7726. THEATER FESTIVAL. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. .com URBAN BALLROOM Auditions for a showcase Seeking vendors for the Garden DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, of locally written & produced Mart to sell plants, products, more. 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, plays with a LGBT theme. May Call for details. 724-266-4500 x 114. Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. 4 & 6. To schedule an audition, THE PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR WEST COAST SWING please send a message through SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 67th WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance the PPTF-13 Facebook Page, email Annual International Aqueous lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, pptf@gmail.com, or call. Pittsburgh Open exhibition. http://www. South Side. 916-287-1373. Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. pittsburghwatercolorsociety.com/ 412-370-0904. 412-731-0636. THE SUMMER COMPANY. THE POET BAND COMPANY. ATL-NYC PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for 2013 season. May Seeking various types of poetry. Auditions for new TV show, I Want 30. Men/women age 17+, 2-min. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail.com To Be Discovered. Log onto contemporary monologue. NonSILVER EYE CENTER FOR www.iwant2bdiscoveredonline. equity, walk-ins welcome. Peter PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking entries com & post video of group or Mills Theater ( Duquesne, Rockwell for 8 x 8 PHOTO PARTY showcase. individual talent. 3 minutes max. Hall ), Uptown. 412–243-6464. One digital submission per THE DOCHERTY AGENCY. Open THE TALENT GROUP. Open person. Digital, film, or cell phone auditions for adult models & casting for models and actors cameras allowed. http://silvereye. actors. First Tue of every month. 1st Monday of every month. org/8x8registrationform.pdf Downtown. 412-765-1400. 11:45 a.m., 5:45 p.m. 412-471-8011. 412-431-1810. THE GEYER PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Auditions for Joseph & the Amazing Technicolor Dream[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] coat. May 19-20. Come prepared to sing, from memory, 32 measures of a classic musical theater piece. Bring sheet music in the correct Grow Pittsburgh, along with the Greater Pittsburgh key, marked w/ any edits. Geyer Community Food Bank, will be giving out vegetable Performing Arts Center, Scottdale. seeds and seedlings at Produce to People distribution 724-887-0887. points throughout June. Volunteers are needed to help THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. Audisort and pack seeds on May 10 and 14 at the Grow tions for Nunsense. May 5-6. Actors Pittsburgh offices, 6587 Hamilton Ave., Larimer. Those age 17-49. www.heritageplayers. with gardening experience are also invited to help org/ Schoolhouse Art Center, Bethel Park. 412-254-4633. with distribution. Email dwalmsley@gpcfb.org or visit INDEPENDANT FILM www.pittsburghfoodbank.org for information. PRODUCTION. Auditions for “Drummer for the Mob.” May 7. Seeking male actors age 26-65, THE THEATRE FACTORY. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM female actors age 30-45, 1 female Auditions for Sisters of Swing: The OF AMERICAN ART. age 25-30 who can pass for 17. Story of the Andrews Sisters. May 4 Seeking individual artists & Readings from the script. Bring & 6. Women/men age 20s-30s. headshot & resume. Call for artist groups for month-long appointment. Residence Inn PittsMan must portray/sing Bing Crosby, exhibitions in a new transitional burgh, North Side. 732-922-0483. Danny Kaye, others. 32 bars of gallery measuring. Artists will THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN music & cold readings from the be responsible for all aspects of CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Spring script. Call for appointment. their exhibition. Send images & a audition dates for their Nov. conTrafford. 724-454-7193. brief introduction to the work to: cert. May 20 - 21. Call MaryColleen bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ a Seip or visit www.themendelscc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org sohn.org for more information. BRICOLAGE THEATER. & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Westminster Presbyterian Church, Seeking stories that are true, funny, Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013


Savage Love

advertise your business in pittsburgh city paper

{BY DAN SAVAGE}

I am a 23-year-old straight male. My exgirlfriend and I started dating when we were both 17, and continued dating until I broke up with her after our freshman year in college because things felt too serious. We continued to have sex, but I blocked out all my feelings for her, while she was open about still wanting to be with me. She started dating someone else sophomore year. I realized then that I still wanted to be with her, and I broke down emotionally and made both our lives difficult. I was a very unattractive person then. I also found out other details by snooping. I know that during the time we dated, she faked orgasms with me. This made me feel inadequate. Since then, we have forgiven each other and tried to rekindle our romantic relationship. Unfortunately, while for me there is a sexual attraction, she says she is no longer attracted to me. I’m sensitive, fashionable and artistic, and she tells me she’s more attracted to the “all-American-man” type. She is currently dating someone long-distance. But we still talk about “us,” we still cuddle, and she’ll say things like, “When I think of growing old, I imagine doing so with you.” I try to be a friend, but hearing emotional crap about her relationship makes me want to scream, “No guy will ever clear your bar, because I set the bar!” Is there any chance that we will be together again? HER IDEAL MATE

decided that a “monogamish” arrangement appealed to us. He recently got orders for a year-long deployment, and one thing we need to do before he leaves, I think, is have another conversation about nonmonogamy. I think we should adopt a “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy. I doubt I could tolerate the stress of this upcoming year if I were expected to abstain from sex for the duration. But it’s unlikely that either of us would want to hear about the other’s casual hookups when we’re separated by nine time zones. Yet I can’t bring myself to speak up, because I’m already so jealous of the people he might fuck while I’m on the opposite side of the world and unable to fuck him myself. Suddenly, the thought is nearly intolerable. What would you do? WORRIED I FEAR ESTRANGEMENT

If my husband were about to deploy to a war zone, I would probably do what you’re doing, WIFE: I would worry about the people who might want to fuck my husband — because that would provoke less anxiety than worrying about the people who might want to harm my husband. Talk to your husband and put that “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy on the table. Considering that you’ll most likely have more opportunities than he will over the next 12 months, a DADT policy may be precisely what your husband wants. And share your feelings of jealousy with him. Those feelings are not only natural, they’re a good sign. It would be more worrisome if you didn’t care whom he fucked. And your husband might share your chief concern: It’s one thing to think about your partner fucking someone else when you’re around (and you’re able to remind your partner why he’s with you), and it’s quite another thing to think about your partner fucking someone else when you’re not around. Feelings of jealousy and insecurity can make a person feel like she’s not cut out for a monogamish relationship. But working through those feelings — with your partner, not your sex-advice columnist — proves you are cut out for one. Good luck. I hope your husband comes home safe and sound.

WHEN TWO PEOPLE AREN’T GOOD TO EACH OTHER, THEY SHOULD GET THE FUCK AWAY FROM EACH OTHER.

There are six other continents on this planet in addition to the one your ex-girlfriend currently resides on. And my advice for you is to pick one and move there. Get. The. Fuck. Away. From. Her. Not because your ex is evil, but because this relationship is over. She’s not only seeing someone else, she’s made it clear that you’re not her type. And I gotta say … This relationship will never be what it was, because neither of you will ever be what you were. You’re never going to be 17 and in love for the first time again. The bar you’re talking about? Hormones set it, you didn’t. Also: It sounds like you behaved terribly after you dumped your ex. When you wrote, “I made both our lives difficult,” I read, “I stalked my ex.” (Snooping after a breakup? That’s a stalker move.) And having “emotionless sex” with someone who has “blocked out all [his] feelings” for you — being treated like a Fleshlight by someone you still have feelings for — is rarely pleasant. So perhaps she’s treating you this way — keeping you on call for cuddles, dumping “emotional crap” about her current boyfriend — in a subconscious effort to get revenge. But whatever her deal is, the bottom line is this: When two people aren’t good to each other, when they’re not good for each other, they should get the fuck away from each other.

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If you have two friends, one male and one female, who are both married (not to each other) and looking for an affair, is it OK to put them in touch? May I bring them together in the same way I would two single people — throw a party with lots of alcohol? The man is in a sexless marriage and wants to get laid. The woman is getting divorced and needs to get laid. Note: The man and I have sex every few months. It’s awesome sex. I would like to offer this to my female friend, but I’m not sure how he would feel about being passed around. What should I do? IS THIS HOW ASHLEY MADISON GOT STARTED?

My husband and I are both in our mid-20s. He’s in the military, and not long ago, we

You should go to the liquor store.

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SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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DOMINATION

HAVE YOU BEEN A BAD BOY? COME SEE MISTRESS AMANDA

Stripped, Bound, Gagged now the fun begins... call for an appt.

412-461-5258 ACROSS 1. Peter, eldest of the Monkees 5. Nonchalant 9. Tosses some chips in the pot, say? 14. Cookie that’s one year older than crosswords 15. Instrument on Mariah Carey’s “Hero” 16. “Pal Joey” author John 17. How some prefer to go out 19. Made speechless 20. Draft 21. Autograph signer’s tool 23. At ___ (unsure what to say) 24. Response to a site gag? 25. Be full of chit? 26. Shinto, e.g., briefly 27. Lamb Chop’s partner 31. “No, seriously” 33. Disney On Ice leaps 34. Song that begins “Hey, where did we go, days when the rains came” 38. Baller’s building 39. One who finds god through reason 40. Array in a honeymoon suite 43. It’s cut and dried 46. Many of his relics

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

CHANGE IS GONNA COME

are housed in the Egyptian Museum 47. Ironic 48. Alternative to a snake 50. “Ready to roll?” 53. British battleship 55. Doors tune? 56. Change, e.g., and a hint to this puzzle’s theme 58. On track to win 59. BO part 60. Roman four, if there’s no V handy 61. Sirs’ partners 62. Sanctioned car seizure, casually 63. Pocket billiards ball count, sometimes

DOWN 1. Vehicle that removes wrecks 2. Maryland’s state bird 3. Update, as machinery 4. Department store chain headquartered in Wisconsin 5. Desert near Beijing 6. Angle iron 7. Pax TV, now 8. Plead to get 9. Use a lane 10. “Cat on ___ Tin Roof” 11. Stooges album with “Search and Destroy” 12. Philosopher’s subject

13. Blue state 18. Eveready products 22. Goldsworthy of “Degrassi” 24. Billie, to fans 27. ___ Dimas, California (Bill and Ted’s city) 28. Hasten, old-style 29. Straggles 30. Place to get off 31. ___ Skye (Donovan’s daughter) 32. Transpose 34. Scene 35. Place to go, when you’re on your way somewhere 36. Unagi, e.g. 37. Obloquy, informally 38. What a forger

might pull off 41. “TMI, bro ...” 42. Quake 43. State where Don Ho was born (or was he? let’s see the REAL birth certificate, Don!) 44. OTC pain reliever 45. Super goofy English terrier 48. Letters next to Clinton’s name, until 2008 49. Singing spring sign 51. Garden cover 52. Honorary legal degs. 53. Post-L letters 54. Space leader? 57. Breathless dedication

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

05.01-05.08

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Imagine you’re in a large room full of costumes. It’s like a masquerade store at Halloween plus a storage area where a theater troupe keeps the apparel its actors use to stage a wide variety of historical plays. You have free reign here. You can try on different masks and wigs and disguises and get-ups. You can envision yourself living in different eras as various characters. If you like, you can even go out into the world wearing your alternate identities. Try this exercise, Taurus. It’ll stimulate good ideas about some new self-images you might want to play with in real life.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Ray LaMontagne sings these lyrics in his tune “Empty”: “I looked my demons in the eyes. Laid bare my chest and said, ‘Do your best to destroy me. I’ve been to hell and back so many times, I must admit you kind of bore me.’” I wouldn’t be opposed to you delivering a message like that to your own demons, Gemini — with one caveat: Leave out the “Do your best to destroy me” part. Simply peer into the glazed gaze of those shabby demons and say, “You bore me and I’m done with you. Bye-bye.” And then walk away from them for good.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I know a devotee of Tibetan Buddhism who got an unexpected message from her teacher. He told her she has made such exemplary progress in her quest for enlightenment that she has earned the ultimate reward. When she dies many years from now, the teacher said, she will enter nirvana! She will have no further karmic obligation to reincarnate into a new body in the future, and will be forever excused from the struggle of living in the material world. Although her teacher meant this to be good news, she was heartbroken. She wants to keep reincarnating. Her joyous passion is to help relieve the suffering of her fellow humans. Can you guess what sign she is? Yes: a Cancerian. Like her, many of you are flirting with an odd and challenging choice between selfishness and selflessness.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A lawyer named John Keogh filed an application with the Australian Patent Office. It was for a “circular transportation facilitation device.” His claim was approved. He thus became the owner of the world’s first and only patent for the wheel. So far, he has not tried to collect royalties from anyone who’s using wheels. I nominate him to be your role model, Leo. May he inspire you to stamp your personal mark on a universal archetype or put your unique spin on something everyone knows and loves.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): This may be the best week in a long time to practice the art of crazy wisdom. And what is crazy wisdom? Here’s how novelist Tom Robbins described it to Shambhala Sun: It’s “a philosophical worldview that recommends swimming against the tide, cheerfully seizing the short end of the stick, embracing insecurity, honoring paradox, courting the unexpected, celebrating the unfamiliar, shunning orthodoxy, volunteering for tasks nobody else wants or dares to do, and breaking taboos in order to destroy their power. It’s the wisdom of those who turn the tables on despair by lampooning it, and who neither seek authority nor submit to it.” And why should you do any of that weird stuff? Robbins: “To enlarge the soul, light up the brain and liberate the spirit.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

“Why should we honor those that die upon the field of battle?” asked Irish poet William Butler Yeats. “A man may show as reckless a courage in entering into the abyss of himself.” A woman may show similar bravery, of course. In my astrological opinion, that’s the noble adventure beckoning to you, Libra: a dive into the depths of your inner workings. I hope that’s the direction you go; I hope you don’t take your stouthearted struggle out into the world around you. All the best action will be happening in that fertile hub known as your “soul.”

In the wild, a tiger’s diet consists entirely of meat. The big cat loves to feast on deer and wild boar, and eats a variety of other animals, too. The hunt is always solitary, never done in collaborative groups. That’s why the creature’s success rate is so low. A tiger snags the prey it’s seeking only about 5 percent of the time. It sometimes has to wait two weeks between meals. Nevertheless, a tiger rarely starves. When it gets what it’s after, it can devour 75 pounds of food in one sitting. According to my astrological analysis, Aquarius, you’re like a tiger these days. You haven’t had a lot of lucky strikes lately, but I suspect you will soon hit the jackpot.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Historical records suggest that ancient Greek philosopher Democritus went blind late in his life. There are different stories about why. According to one account, he intentionally did it to himself by gazing too long into the sun. That was his perverse way of solving a vexing problem: It freed him from the torment of having to look upon gorgeous women who were no longer interested in or available to him because of his advanced age. I hope you won’t do anything like that, Scorpio. In fact, I suggest you take the opposite approach: Keep your attention focused on things that stir your deep attraction, even if you think you can’t have them for your own. Valuable lessons and unexpected rewards will emerge from such efforts.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The French word flâneur is a meme that refers to a person who strolls around the city at a leisurely pace, exploring whatever captivates her imagination. To the casual observer, the flâneur may seem to be a lazy time-waster with nothing important to do. But she is in fact motivated by

one of the noblest emotions — pure curiosity — and is engaged in a quest to attract novel experiences, arouse fresh insights and seek new meaning. Sound fun? Well, congratulations, Pisces, because you have been selected as the Flaming Flâneur of the Zodiac for the next two weeks. Get out there and meander!

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Are you afraid that you lack a crucial skill or aptitude? Do you have a goal that you’re worried might be impossible to achieve because of this inadequacy? If so, now is a good time to make plans to fill in the gap. If you formulate such an intention, you will attract a benevolent push from the cosmos. Why spend another minute fretting about the consequences of your ignorance when you have more power than usual to correct that ignorance? What’s the single most important question you have to find an answer for in the next five years? Deliver your best guess to me at Freewill astrology.com.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Search your memory, Sagittarius, and recall a time when you pushed yourself to your limits as you labored over a task you cared about very much. At that time, you worked with extreme focus and intensity. You were rarely bored and never resentful about the enormous effort you had to expend. You loved throwing yourself into this test of willpower, which stretched your resourcefulness and compelled you to grow new capacities. What was that epic breakthrough in your past? Once you know, move on to your next exercise: Imagine a new assignment that fits this description, and make plans to bring it into your life in the near future.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Nairobi is Kenya’s capital and home to more than 3 million urbanites. A few minutes’ drive from the city center, there’s a 45-square-mile national park teeming with wildlife. Against a backdrop of skyscrapers, rhinos and giraffes graze. Lions and cheetahs pounce. Wildebeests roam and hyenas skulk. I suggest you borrow the spirit of that arrangement and invoke it in your own life. In other words, be highly civilized and smartly sophisticated part of the time; be wild and free the rest of the time. And be ready to go back and forth between the two modes with grace and ease.

Empower Yourself. South Hills Power Yoga teaches Inspired Power Yoga that ignites the body and mind through the cultivation of breath and presence. Classes incorporate a wide variety of inspirational themes & occasional music that fuel the powerful current created by the asana flow. Offering both heated and non-heated classes. Accessible for all levels.

Located in Dormont 3045 West Liberty Ave.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

And opening this winter in Waterdam Centre - Peters Township

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 58 + STUDIES 58 + WELLNESS 60 + SERVICES 62 + LIVE 62

WORK HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

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Your ad could be here

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HELP WANTED NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

Saltworks Theater Company is located in Pittsburgh and tours social issue shows to schools throughout PA, WV, OH, NY, NJ. This is a nine month parttime contract, Sept-May. Paid per show, per diem, hotel accommodations, hourly rehearsal rate. Shows educate students K-12 on various issues including drugs and alcohol, bullying, violence, relationships, self-esteem, etc.

Check us out at www.saltworks.org Must have Bachelor’s degree in theater or related field or equivalent acting experience. E-mail headshot and resume to nalrutz@saltworks.org. If interested, I will call you to schedule an audition. Minorities are encouraged to apply.

412.316.3342

Spokesmodel National Promotional agency is seeking Spokesmodels to conduct promotions for a leading tobacco product within nightlife and retail establishments in Pittsburgh and surrounding areas. This part time position is ideal for attractive, outgoing young men and women who are looking for an interesting, challenging position within the nightlife and retail scene that will allow them to make good money and have fun. Position Requirements: • 20 – 25 hours of daytime and/ or evening availability over 3 – 7 days per week. • Clean neat appearance and outgoing personality excellent verbal and people skills • Prior Face-to-Face Promotional Experience preferred • MUST be at least 21 years old Responses can be sent to HR@MSPromotions.com and must include resume, references and comp card/recent photo.

Do you like to work on the issues you care about? Would you like to prepare for your future? Want to get paid to make a difference?

$1,400/Month Health Care and Child Care $5,550 Education Award and Federal Student Loan Deferment Hands on Leadership Development, Coaching, and Nonprofit Career Based Training

STUDIES Call Today to Advertise Your Business in Pittsburgh City Paper!

412-316-3342

CLINICAL STUDIES

ASTHMA? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

412-650-6155

IBS? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

412-650-6155

ENDOMETRIOSIS? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

VAGINAL DRYNESS? CALL TODAY!

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CONSTIPATION?

Information Sessions will be held from March – May

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For more information, visit www.publicallies.org or Contact Branden Ballard at 412-258-3022 or brandenb@publicallies.org

MENSTRUAL CRAMPS?

Application Deadline May 24th

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013


Schizophrenia Research Study Participants Needed

Healthy Controls Needed for Research Study

Clinical Research Study

(UPMC Oakland)

Do you or someone in your family have schizophrenia? This UPMC research study examines the effects of schizophrenia on cognition. We are seeking families affected by schizophrenia to take part. Participation involves 1-2 visits; during these visits, you will complete diagnostic interviewing and cognitive testing, provide a blood sample, and complete a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI).

This study of cognition and schizophrenia is looking for healthy controls of European descent over the age of 30. Participation involves 1-2 appointments lasting a total of between 5-9 hours and the completion of diagnostic interviewing and cognitive testing, donation of a blood sample, and taking part in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI).

Type 2 Diabetes

A 26-week research study is evaluating the safety and efficacy of a new investigational insulin in people with type 2 diabetes.

Participants will be reimbursed $175 upon completion of study procedures. Men and women ages 40 and above with no history of psychotic illnesses and no current problems with substance abuse may be eligible.

Participants will be reimbursed $175 for completing all study procedures.

For more information, please call

Qualified participants will receive all study-related care and study medication at no cost and may be compensated for time and travel.

For more information, please call 412 246 6356 or 1 800 994 8182

412-246-6356 or 1-800-994-8182

You may qualify if you: ✓ Are 18 years or older ✓ Have a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes for at least 6 months ✓ Have undergone continuous treatment with basal insulin regimen (insulin detemir; insulin glargine; insulin NPH), for at least 3 months ✓ Have an HbA1c level between 7.0% and 10.0% ✓ Have body mass index (BMI) of 40.0 kg/m2 or less

See what our clients are saying The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

I’ve In the past two years, the h bot h been very satisfied wit se pon res design of our ads and the to e hav I w they evoke. When I kno in ts jec sub advertise for research ly ate edi imm the 24-35 age group, I er. think of using the City Pap

Please Contact: 412-650-6155

— Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

need some extra cash? You can earn from $400- $900 by participating in one of our research studies! Novum Pharmaceutical Research Services is one of the world’s leading research companies in the testing of generic mediations. You may be eligible to participate if you are:

• • • • •

At least 18 years of age Currently not taking prescription or illegal drugs Willing to have multiple blood samples taken In general good health Willing to schedule a physical - (no cost to you)

For more information, please call our Recruiting Department at

1-800-586-0365

5900 Penn Avenue N E W S

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Weightloss Treatment Medical Bariatric Weightloss, LLC NO Start Up Fees NO Long Term Contract 355 Fifth Ave. Suite 1120 Pgh, PA 15222 412.680.2064

Addiction & Recovery Health Services

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings. Now accepting Highmark and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

WELLNESS COUNSELING

MIND & BODY

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 ;;;;;;;;;;;;

JADE Wellness Center

SUBOXONE We treat: Opiate Addiction

LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

massage

• SUBOXONE a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 STAR Superior Chinese Massage

• NOW Treating Pregnant Women

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

China Massage $50/HR Free Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

724-519-7896

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

Chinese Bodyworks Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104 3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont Zhangs Wellness Center

412-401-4110 $40/hr DOWNTOWN 322 Fourth Ave. Phoenix Spa New Young Professional

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Free Table Shower w/60 min.

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

Open 10-10 Daily

412-595-8077

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

4309 Butler Street (Lawrenceville)

412-621-3300

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

Health and Wellness Directory

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

WE have been there. WE know your pain. Don’t Wait Any Longer!

www.ThereToHelp.org

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Therapy

MIND & BODY

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

(1st Floor)

• Group and Individualized Therapy

412.434.6700

- UPMC for You - United Health - And Many Others

MIND & BODY

• VIVITROL -

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS We Accept:

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~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug Addictions

Includes Med Management & Therapy

SELF-ESTEEM WORKSHOPS

MIND & BODY

Now Hiring for LPC/LCSW MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116


GRAND OPENING!

TIGER SPA

Judy’s Oriental Massage

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

FULL BODY MASSAGE

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

$40/hr Now with Vichy Shower 4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Accepting All Major Cards

get your

yoga on! Alignment-focused Hatha yoga in Point Breeze! We have Prenatal, Baby & Me, Yoga for Athletes, Flow classes & more.

Stop by during the marathon! (Um...unless you’re running it. In which case, stop by after.) We’ll be outside cheering on the runners starting at 8am. Check out the space, meet the teachers, and buy a pass at a discounted rate! 4519 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield 412-335-1332

Drop in anytime OR sign up for a session!

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PUBLIC NOTICE CITIZEN POLICE REVIEW BOARD City of Pittsburgh Pursuant to the Pittsburgh City Code, Title Six, Article VI, §662.04(e)(i), effective 8/3/2010, you are hereby notified of the following:

SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS

MOVING SERVICES

ROOMMATES

Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes

Work exchange, Retreat Center in CA. Seeking good men, 23-45. strong, with spiritual interest. Hands-on work, metal shop, foundry. Includes room, board, living allowance $150 month. www.volunteer. odiyan.org Email volunteer@odiyan.org

ABC SELF STORAGE5x10 $45, 10x10 $65, 10x15 $95. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

TERM EXPIRATIONS

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Seat #2, City Council Appointment: Ms. Karen McLellan Law Enforcement Professional Appointed: 01/29/13 Expiration: 10/31/13

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

Seat #3, City Council Appointment: Mr. Howard Joe Brown Appointed: 12/11/12 Expiration: 10/31/13 Seat # 4, City Council Appointment: Mr. Paul S. Homick, Esq. Appointed: 11/13/12 Expiration: 10/31/13 Seat #5, Mayoral Appointment: Ms. Leshonda R. Roberts Appointed: 08/02/10 Expiration: 10/31/13 VACANCY Due to resignation; effective 4/21/13 Seat #7, Mayoral Appointment: Mr. Ralph E. Norman Law Enforcement Professional Appointed: 10/26/10 Expiration: 10/31/15

Any City resident interested in serving a four-year term on the INDEPENDENT CITIZEN POLICE REVIEW BOARD should inform their City Council representative for City Council Seats and the Mayor for Mayoral seats. For additional information please call the CPRB. 412-765-8023 Dr. Emma Lucas-Darby, Chair Elizabeth C. Pittinger, Executive Director

Discover the “Success and Moneymaking Secrets” THEY don’t want you to know about. To get your FREE “Success and Money Making Secrets” CD, please call 1-800-790-5752 (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION UNPLANNED PREGNANCY? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Open or closed adoption. YOU choose the family. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. Call 24/7. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN) Adopting your newborn would be life’s greatest joy. Will give a child life of security, endless love. Great family, education, wonderful home. Expenses paid. Please call Ria at 1-888-851-4935

Adopting your newborn would be life’s greatest joy. Will give a child life of security, endless love. Great family, education, wonderful home. Expenses paid. Please call Ria at

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.01/05.08.2013

LIVE

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Advertise Here Today!

HOUSE FOR SALE

HOUSE FOR SALE REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069 Advertise Here Today!

CLASSES AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-4923059 (AAN CAN) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com(AAN CAN) EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2013. www.AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN)

HAULING

D & S HAULING Reliable Low Rates Call NOW

412-877-0730

New Price $ 360,000 - Mexican War Street Totally Renovated3-story, brick, 3 BR, 2 BA home. Original details, mantels, with 5 fireplaces. Beautiful woodwork & copper downspouts. Extra lot included. Call George E Lucas to see. 412-771-8400

Cheaper than Rent $ 47,900 - Stowe Twp. Well Maintained - 2 BR, Frame Cape Cod set on a large level, fenced-in lot. Features a gas furnace with central air. Ready to move in. Call George E Lucas Today. 412-771-8400

BREATHTAKING HISTORICAL HOME Located in Shadyside. This 3 story, 5 BR, 3.5 Ba. 9 room home features large formal dining room, open foyer, new kitchen, mother-in-law suite and 2 car integral garage. Priced at $600K MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE!!!

Call George E Lucas 412-771-8400 #1 Choice Real Estate

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CELEBRITY BUZZ

Local filmmaker seeks to restore famed inventor’s reputation {BY CHRIS POTTER} than a household name. Stefan Lorant’s coffee-table history, Pittsburgh: The Story of an American City, relegates him to just a couple sentences. Many local histories don’t mention him at all. But as Tesla once predicted, “[T]he future, for which I really worked, is mine.” “Our 4-year-olds are playing with iPods,” says Anton. “That’s because of Tesla.” And they still may see the famous Tesla-coil science-class demonstration. Tesla is championed on Facebook pages with titles like “Occupy Energy — the World’s Call to Release Nikola Tesla’s Scientific Research.” (“We … demand Nikola Tesla’s research into harnassing [sic] electricity from the ionosphere.”) There’s even an annual Wisconsin gathering called “Teslacon” attended by steampunks — members of a cultural niche that, like some of Tesla’s inventions, seems to have come from an alternate universe that branched off in 1887. “He’s very much a cult icon,” Anton says. And a natural subject for a film: “You can have a million ideas, but all it takes for a film is one great story.” Anton and Tesla may even be kindred spirits: dreamers who have struggled to capitalize on — or to find the necessary capital for — their dreams. A decade ago, Anton named his production company Silvermask Productions, because back then, “When I’d go in for an audition or a meeting, I always felt like they saw me as second-tier.”

A promotional photo from The Mad Scientist

THEY SAY LIGHTNING doesn’t strike the same place twice. But when it comes to Nikola Tesla — mystic, inventor and pioneer of alternating-current electricity — there are bound to be exceptions. Among them is Michael Anton, a native of Jeannette who’s returning to filmmaking to tell Tesla’s story. When Anton left filmmaking at age of 23 — “It was the Robert Downey Jr. story, without the drugs,” he says of his departure — he’d already made a handful of lowbudget films. The best-known was 2006’s Potheads: The Movie, which attracted a surprisingly high-profile cast for a film shot on a five-figure budget. (The cast included the guy who’d played Darth Maul in the Star Wars prequel, and one-half of the electronic dance-music duo LMFAO.) But when asked about the film, Anton winces like he’s been zapped with 120 volts. “I was young. One of my mistakes was the execution of Potheads,” he says. More recently, the now-30-year-old has been doing marketing for hospice-care facilities outside Pittsburgh. But then Ti Bureau, his film producer and romantic partner, asked him, “Have you ever heard the Nikola Tesla story?” As Anton discovered, that story is a classic tale of immigrant success, unsung genius and occasional pigeoncoddling. And it forms the basis of The Mad Scientist, the biopic Anton has written and hopes to begin shooting in Pittsburgh late this summer. A Serbian, Tesla came to America in 1884 with four pennies in his pocket and the dream of working for his hero, Thomas Edison. But while Edison recognized Tesla’s genius, he was threatened by it too: Tesla was pursuing an alternating-current system of generating and distributing electricity, which Edison saw as a rival to his own direct-current system. While he hired Tesla, the two soon had a falling out: For a time Tesla found work digging ditches, but was later hired by Pittsburgh’s own George Westinghouse. Together, they established a working AC system that became the national standard, despite Edison’s bitter opposition. But Tesla’s real mystique stems from his eccentricities — he liked to care for injured pigeons found on city streets — and the inventions the world wasn’t ready for. Tesla had early intimations about such futuristic technologies as radar, robotics, drone warfare — even the Internet. He envisioned a “world wireless” system with which, “[a]n inexpensive instrument, not bigger than a watch, will enable its bearer to hear anywhere, on sea or land, music or song, the speech of a political leader … or the sermon of an eloquent clergyman.” Since his 1943 death, Tesla has been overshadowed by the American capitalists who exploited his genius — even in Pittsburgh, where Westinghouse was more

But the Tesla project, Anton says, is generating audible buzz. He’s cast Serbian actor Branko Tomovic in the feature role, and he says investors are showing interest in the film, which could mean a budget in the seven-digit range. With such prospects, he can mount a production with its own “Tesla-coil specialists.” And, hopefully, put Tesla’s name back where it belongs: in lights. CPOTTER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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May 1, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 18

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