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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013


EVENTS 4.12 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: DEERHOOF, WITH SPECIAL GUEST PEOPLE GET READY Tickets $18/$15 Members & students Media sponsor: 91.3FM WYEP

4.13 – 2pm AUTHOR TALK AND BOOK SIGNING, THANK YOU ANDY WARHOL BY CATHERINE JOHNSON Tickets FREE

4.27 – 8pm

Nora Chipaumire: MIRIAM Friday, April 19 & Saturday, April 20, 2013 / Kelly Strayhorn Theater / 8pm / Co-presented with the Kelly Strayhorn Theater The Warhol is pleased to partner with the Kelly Strayhorn Theater to welcome back dancer/choreographer, Nora Chipaumire. As a much anticipated follow-up to lions will roar…, a collaboration with fellow Zimbabwean and legendary musician, Thomas Mapfumo, (co-presented with the August Wilson Center in 2011) Chipaumire returns with Miriam, her first character-driven work, with influences such as Joseph Conrad’s writings, the life of South African singer and activist Miriam Makeba; and the Christian iconography of Mary. Accompanied by a dynamic score from Afro-Cuban composer Omar Sosa, Chipaumire and fellow performer, Okwui Okpokwasili, command the stage—both crime scene and sacred space—with a striking performance dealing with the objectification and power of the black female body and the alienating experience of living in exile. The tour of Nora Chipaumire is made possible by a grant from Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation with support from the National Endowment for the Arts. The presentation of Nora Chipaumire was made possible by the New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Dance Project, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and additional funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Photo by Antoine Tempe.

OFF THE WALL 2013: SANDRA BERNHARD: I LOVE BEING ME, DON’T YOU? Byham Theater Co-presented with Pittsburgh Cultural Trust Tickets: $35 – 40

5.11 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: COLIN STETSON WITH SPECIAL GUEST SARAH NEUFELD (OF ARCADE FIRE) Media sponsor: 91.3FM WYEP Tickets $15/$12 Members FREE parking in The Warhol lot

5.14 – 10am-5pm ART MUSEUM DAY 2013, FEATURING FREE ADMISSION FREE admission

full subscription (7 performances) $123/$98 Members & students

seating is limited for most performances, so advance purchase is strongly suggested

single tickets

performances may contain adult subject matter and strong language

$25/$20 Members & students

Funding for the Off the Wall series was provided by the Quentin and Evelyn T. Cunningham Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation. The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

For tickets call 412.237.8300 or visit warhol.org.

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X marks the intersection of everything you need. X marks the intersection of two of Port Authority’s most useful bus routes, connecting riders to all the essentials. Great grocery stores. Art house theaters and multiplexes. Boutiques, bars and big names in retail. There’s the 64 Lawrenceville-Waterfront, with Bloomfield, Shadyside and Squirrel Hill in between. Or try the 75 Ellsworth. Start at SouthSide Works, hit up Oakland and the Shadyside shops. Then end at Bakery Square, where there’s alway something new opening up. And both routes connect to each other, the busway and other ways to get Downtown or around town.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013


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is a sad day for many of us — 55 “This we worked with him.� — U.S. Attorney David J. Hickton on the charges leveled against former Pittsburgh Police Chief Nate Harper

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Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers AMYJO BROWN, LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns TRACEY HICKEY, JEFF IHAZA, JOHN LAVANGA

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{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.





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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“WE DON’T EXPECT OUR POLICE TO SHOOT UNARMED SUSPECTS.”

INCOMING Drag story one-sided, distraction from real issues I was surprised by the article “Dragged Down” [March 13], and how biased I felt it was without looking at all knowledge that was out there. Your viewpoint on this particular piece seems to be one-sided and filled with inaccuracies and other unfounded information. You are supposed to check your sources, so I would hope you would do so in the future. What needs to be looked at is how we represent all the population to be fair. I would hope that you would take into consideration Pennsylvania HB 177, the Hate Crimes Bill, because that’s addressing the aspect of hate itself. I’m not just speaking about hate toward gay people, although certainly the bill will deal with that. We must not tolerate hate in our communities. I would believe that the newspaper would support that effort, and would support discouraging hate in our community. I think that since the newspaper itself is a vehicle of free speech, it would support other avenues of free speech like Pittsburgh Community Television, which will be up for funding this June. I would hope you would retract the article that is so factless and instead offer real insight. I would think as a responsible paper you would contact the mayoral candidates and you would ask them what their feelings are on the Hate Crimes Bill so we have a clear idea of where each candidate stands on this issue. How do they feel about gay rights? How do they feel about the city having the financial responsibility to balance its budget? How do they feel about making sure the diversity of this city is reflected in decisions on where funding goes? We need to understand who these candidates truly are and where they truly stand. We don’t need more politics of smoke and mirrors. What we need is truth. What we need is understanding. — John A. DeBartola President, Keystone Alliance/ Gaylife Newsletter

Bottle-nose dolphin bisque and panda-kabobs served with condor foie gras. Also “red wine,” your choice of A, AB, B or O. — March 22 tweet from “Fake Jeffrey Romoff” (@JeffRomoffUPMC) after a legal filing claims that the real UPMC head has a private chef, among other perks

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These nine still photos were taken from the police-cruiser dashboard camera the night officers stopped 19-year-old Leon Ford. The routine traffic stop resulted in Ford being shot four times in the chest by city officers.

POLICEDRAMA A

T FIRST, there was nothing unusual about the traffic stop that began at about 9:30 p.m. on the night of Nov. 11. Two Pittsburgh Police officers, trailing a 2006 silver Infiniti G35x they later reported was “driving too fast,” saw the driver fail to come to a complete stop at a Highland Park intersection. As a dashboard camera recorded, they flashed their lights, prompting the driver to use his right-turn signal and pull over almost immediately, near the corner of Stanton Avenue and Farragut Street. The driver, 19-year-old Leon Ford Jr., was alone. He handed over his license, ve-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013

hicle registration and proof of insurance. There are a lot of mysteries about what happened next:

Video captured the night police shot and paralyzed an unarmed motorist leads to more questions, not answers {BY AMYJO BROWN} Why did the officers doubt Ford’s identity when Ford’s paperwork was in order, stretching the stop out to nearly twice the amount of time of an average

traffic stop in Pittsburgh? Why did none of the three city officers involved in the stop have a working microphone on his uniform, which would have allowed their conversations with Ford to be recorded? Why did one of the officers jump inside the car — despite a strongly worded policy to the contrary? And what would cause Ford to suddenly put the car in gear, driving away with the officer inside? What will be certain is this: Ford, unarmed, will prove to be exactly who he says he is. The officer who jumped into the car will suffer a dislocated thumb and CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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POLICE DRAMA, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

A special evening with

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Which is how he pulled up the name of Lamont Ford Jr. Lamont Ford had been sentenced in February 2012 on a charge of possession with intent to deliver. But it’s unclear why the ofďŹ cers would have been interested in him: Court records show that he’d completed his six-month probation by the time of Leon Ford’s stop, and had no warrants outstanding. It is also unclear how a third ofďŹ cer, David Derbish — who was called to the scene by Miller to help identify the driver, according to an in-car audio recording — would be familiar with Lamont Ford. Court records do not show Derbish as having been involved in Lamont Ford’s previous arrest. And none of the ofďŹ cers responded to messages left through Zone 5 Commander Timothy O’Connor. O’Connor referred questions about the incident to acting police chief Regina McDonald, who declined to discuss the incident, citing an internal investigation. The dashboard camera shows Kosko standing next to the InďŹ niti, talking with Ford, while Miller and Derbish can be heard discussing Ford’s identity inside the car: “Dude, dude — remember Lamont Ford?â€? Miller can be heard asking on the tape’s audio. “Yeah,â€? says Derbish. “Is that him?â€? “Yeah, it’s the same dude,â€? Derbish says — though after another exchange he asks, “How did he get a new license plate?â€? Records do show similarities between the men. Both have “Juniorâ€? in their name, and according to police and court records, both are black men, about 5-foot-7, with brown eyes and black hair. Leon Ford weighed about 165 pounds at the time of the incident; a police report stemming from a July 2011 arrest described Lamont Ford as weighing about 140 pounds. But Leon and Lamont also have different middle names, and different birthdays: Lamont Ford is about four months older. Leon Ford also has distinctive tattoos, including one on his neck that spells out the name of his sister, who was killed in a trafďŹ c accident in 2006. On tape, Derbish and Miller can be heard noting the differing birthdays. Still, Derbish concludes, “Yeah, look right there and right there — it’s got to be him.â€? “Got to be him,â€? Miller agrees. Moments

“IT WENT FROM A ROUTINE TRAFFIC STOP TO A HARASSING SITUATION.�

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numerous scratches when it crashes, according to the police report and his later testimony in court. Ford, hit in the chest by four of the ďŹ ve bullets ďŹ red from the ofďŹ cer’s gun, will be paralyzed, according to his family. He’ll later be charged with a felony count of aggravated assault, as well as three misdemeanor counts of recklessly endangering all three ofďŹ cers. At a March 7 preliminary hearing, Ford’s attorney argued that his client “simply reacted to overzealous police ofďŹ cersâ€? — an excuse the District Attorney’s ofďŹ ce and other law-enforcement professionals reject. “Even if it’s an unlawful arrest, he cannot refuse to comply,â€? says Sheldon Williams, a retired 16-year Pittsburgh Police veteran who reviewed the video of the incident. “We can’t have people trying to determine right or wrong in the moment.â€? But Williams, who trained ofďŹ cers in the department on use-of-force tactics among other areas, also has some questions about how police acted that night, noting that Ford followed the ofďŹ cers’ instructions for the majority of the stop. “I surely wrestle with what did he see that made him not want to cooperate? What was the threat he saw?â€?

FOR MUCH of the stop, the dashboard camera shows little sign that anyone feels threatened. While the ofďŹ cers who initiated the stop, Michael Kosko and Andrew Miller, repeatedly shine their ashlights throughout the car, both can be seen at times standing together next to the driver’s-side door. That’s contrary to the bureau’s policy, which requires that when two ofďŹ cers are on scene, one provides cover for the other from the opposite side of the vehicle throughout the stop. While talking to Ford, they often shift their feet and look away from both the vehicle and Ford. Kosko is often seen holding paperwork in the hand he’d use to draw his weapon. But ofďŹ cers immediately harbored doubts about Ford. The problem wasn’t his record: Other than a ďŹ rst-time DUI in early September, court records show no history of run-ins with the police. But according to the police report, Kosko ran Ford’s name through the bureau’s computer system as “L. Fordâ€? instead of “Leon Ford,â€? because “sometimes people use different names.â€?

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013


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POLICE DRAMA, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

later, they exit the vehicle. The next few minutes of the video unfold silently, outside the range of the dashboard-camera microphone. The dashboard camera records only the movements of the officers — none of Ford’s movements. While Miller joins Kosko on the driver’s side, Derbish provides cover on the passenger side, shining his flashlight into the car. All three officers now have their hands free, and positioned near their weapons. Derbish, peering through the car window, motions for Miller to come to his side. Testifying later at the preliminary hearing, Derbish says he “observed a large unnatural bulge” in the pocket of Ford’s sweatpants and believed it was a firearm. He testified that Miller agreed. “Miller ... asked the driver to step out,” Derbish testified. “The driver replied no. Miller asked again. He did not. Miller opened the car door and asked a third time. He did not.” Miller then “went

hands on the driver and attempted to remove him.” In the video, Miller’s attempt to pull Ford from the vehicle appears to meet resistance, and Miller pulls harder. At the same time, Derbish reaches for the passenger-side door. He tugs, then looks up at the other officers. Kosko turns toward the open driver’s door and reaches down — possibly to unlock the passengerside door. Derbish tugs on the passenger-side door again, opens it and jumps inside. Derbish testified later that initially, he opened the passenger door because he “feared the driver was reaching for a gun.” But then he saw Ford reach for the gear shift. Fearing the other officers were in danger, he struggled with Ford over the gear shift while Miller tried to remove Ford from the car. “A car is 1,000 pounds; it doesn’t have

to move far to cause injury,” Derbish said. The video shows the Infiniti rock slightly back and forth after Derbish jumps in. The brake lights flicker briefly and then the car lurches forward, causing Kosko and Miller to jump out of the way and both car doors to close. Six seconds elapse between the moment Derbish enters the Infiniti and the sound of the first gunshot. Derbish testified that he was knocked around by the motion of the car and felt Ford pushing on his chest. He said he yelled repeatedly for Ford to stop. “I felt my life was in danger. The vehicle wasn’t stopping,” he testified. “I was in danger of falling out the back door. I withdrew my weapon and fired.” The vehicle veered off the road and crashed. Police later called out dogs to search for the weapon police thought they saw. None was found.

“WHY THEY CHOOSE TO GO HANDS-ON AT THAT POINT IS UNKNOWN TO ME.”

LEON FORD did not testify at his prelimi-

nary hearing; his attorney, Fred Rabner, has instructed the family not to speak about the incident, and did not return calls for comment. Leon Ford Sr. declined an interview on his son’s behalf, and declined to share his son’s version of events. But he says Leon Jr. “is in real bad shape

physically and mentally” — and that the family feels powerless to challenge the officers’ conduct. “Everything is justified,” he says. “Everything they say is, ‘We thought we saw a gun.’” But questions are being asked about police actions that night. For starters, by the time Ford threw the car into “drive,” he’d been pulled over for roughly 16 minutes. The bureau’s policy on vehicle stops encourages police to be “quick, effective and efficient.” And while it doesn’t specify how long a stop should take, the bureau’s annual report shows that in 2012, the average stop was just 10 minutes, 29 seconds. In court, Rabner blamed the officers for ignoring Ford’s license, and the evidence that he and Lamont Ford were different people: Police “wouldn’t accept the fact that he was who he said he was,” Rabner argued. “It went from a routine traffic stop to a harassing situation,” says Brandi Fisher, president of the Alliance for Police Accountability — and a relation to Ford through her sister’s marriage to his brother. Pittsburgh Citizens Police Review Board Executive Director Elizabeth Pittinger, who reviewed the video, says the stop “was fine up until the point where [police] didn’t believe he was who he said he was.” “Why wouldn’t they believe the man CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, UPMC is ranked among the nation’s top 10 hospitals by U.S. News & World Report.

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Must be willing to submit to a pre employment drug test and background check. Must be 18 or older to apply. Must be able to acquire state licensing. Rivers Casino is an equal opportunity employer.

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POLICE DRAMA, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

PofE T the

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who gave them ID?” she asks. “That could affect anybody.” Williams, the former detective, isn’t troubled by the length of the stop: “I think they were really trying to overcome their suspicions,” he says. But he does question some of their other actions. “I think there was a plan to get into the car,” Williams says, citing the tug on the what appears to be a locked passenger-side door and its unlocking by Kosko. “Why they choose to go hands-on at that point is unknown to me.” Bureau policy asserts that “[t]he officer should never reach into the suspect’s vehicle while the engine is running” (emphasis included). Williams says some situations can justify breaking a policy: “It’s not unreasonable for officers to try and take control of the weapon” — particularly when they are within close range. Still, he says, “it is risky for the officers. It’s not something I would condone as my first step for gaining control.” Another concern is the lack of audio from outside the police vehicle. According to bureau policy, at least one officer should have been wearing a microphone that would have recorded any conversation with Ford. But that audio is missing. Officials with the Bureau and the District Attorney’s Office declined to answer questions related to the microphones. It is not known, for example, whether the

officers had previously reported problems with their microphones: A response to a City Paper records request was still pending as of press time. Pittinger says recording is done “for the sake of documenting … the police actions and ensuring unambiguous accountability.” Not having such tape in this case, she adds, “defeated the system of accountability.” All three officers continue to actively patrol while an internal investigation is ongoing, according to O’Connor. Fisher says she is “not comfortable at all” with the officers being back on the street. “Any time a police officer is under investigation, especially for use of deadly force, he should not be working continuously.” A 2010 city ordinance allows for officers to be put on paid administrative leave during an investigation of an officer’s use of force. But such leave is “at the direction of the Chief of Police and the Public Safety Director,” and in any case “shall not be considered a suspension or disciplinary action taken against the officer.” “In the court of public opinion, it probably would be more palatable if they put them on administrative leave until all the questions are answered,” Williams says. “We don’t expect our police to shoot unarmed suspects.” Ford’s arraignment is scheduled for April 24. A B ROW N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Mike Do you like handsome, mature men? If so, Animal Friends has a perfect match for you: Mike! His green eyes and curious yet laid-back personality make him a great companion!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013

{BY MATT BORS}

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[POTTER’S FIELD]

COMMUNITY BLUES

UPMC finally feels our pain {BY CHRIS POTTER}

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CYCLING EXPO Benefits the Pittsburgh Cycling Community

Sunday April 7th 2013 10am-5pm Circuit Center in the South Side 5 Hot Metal Street Pittsburgh, PA 15203 U Fashion Show U Vendors U Local Bike Shops

U Speakers U Workshops U Silent Auctions

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WHEN MAYOR Luke Ravenstahl announced a lawsuit challenging UPMC’s tax-exempt status, it was yet another media shitstorm for the hospital giant. When you’re claiming to be a charity, it’s hard to imagine worse PR than a lawsuit accusing your CEO of hiring a private chef, chauffeur and jet. These days, even the new pope supposedly cooks for himself and takes the bus. But Ravenstahl’s press conference wasn’t a complete disaster. The media completely ignored UPMC’s most damning critic: Brookline resident Kendra Bowser. While the politicians talked about CEO pay and the cost of UPMC’s tax exemptions, Bowser was more succinct: “I’m no longer permitted to see the doctors who have been able to give me the ability to live my life,â€? she told reporters. Bowser, 33, says she suffers from crippling migraines, which UPMC doctors have controlled. But she has a new headache now: She carries a Highmark-issued Community Blue policy, which UPMC doesn’t recognize. In fact, for UPMC, Community Blue may as well be the Scarlet Letter: It won’t even allow Bowser to pay out of her own pocket — something she says she’s willing to do, even though she ďŹ gures a single ofďŹ ce visit could cost $300. “This is someone who was taking care of me for 10 years,â€? she says. “It’s a continuity-of-care thing.â€? Like many Community Blue subscribers, Bowser works for UPMC’s biggest rival: the West Penn Allegheny Health System, which Highmark is merging with. So you could dismiss her as a competitor’s employee, trying to make UPMC look bad. (Bowser also acknowledged a debt dispute with UPMC a decade before.) Except when it comes to looking bad, UPMC hardly needs help. The fate of Community Blue subscribers was laid out earlier this month by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s Bill Toland. And on its own website, UPMC atly acknowledges that Community Blue subscribers aren’t welcome. Predictably, it claims that it’s doing patients a favor by casting them out: “UPMC does not believe it is legally, ethically or medically appropriate to ‌ impose more onerous economic terms on those individuals,â€? the site asserts.

But as Toland noted, while UPMC can legally deny treatment to patients like Bowser, “Cash is usually an accepted form of payment — [except] when it comes to Community Blue customers.â€? If it’s wrong to charge cash or out-of-network rates, are Community Blue patients — those insured by UPMC’s sworn enemy — the only ones UPMC is treating morally? I doubt it. The obvious conclusion here is that UPMC is simply trying to tarnish Community Blue — part of its loudly proclaimed belief in healthcare competition. But consumer choice is supposed to play a role in competitive markets too. A few years ago, for example, UPMC tried to convince people to drop Highmark completely on a website called ‌ keepyourdoc.com. That’s exactly what Bowser says she was trying to do. And if she wants to pay extra for that privilege, she says, “That should be my decisionâ€? — not UPMC’s. And when politicians like Ravenstahl fault UPMC for earning proďŹ ts, UPMC says it has to make money to maintain its own ďŹ nancial health. But patients like Bowser could help it do so — by paying cash for services, without the discounts medical providers give insurers. Yet apparently, UPMC is neither charitable enough to let those patients see their doctors, nor mercenary enough to charge them a premium for doing so — strange behavior for a nonproďŹ t that insists it has to make money. Ravenstahl’s court challenge will likely drag on for years, and before it’s over, Harrisburg may already have rewritten the law governing nonproďŹ ts. (That would require a change to the constitution and a public referendum, which couldn’t happen before 2015. But do you doubt UPMC could drag the lawsuit out? Or buy enough election-season advertising to make Karl Rove look like a guttershield salesman?) In the meantime, though, there’s something UPMC needs to understand: This is why people hate you. Because too often when they expect you to act like a charity, you claim you need to run like a business ‌ but when they want to tax you like a business, you insist you’re actually a charity. And even if you win this case, your headaches aren’t going away either.

UPMC CLAIMS IT’S DOING COMMUNITY BLUE PATIENTS A FAVOR BY CASTING THEM OUT.

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013


& Hope

Experience the Love, Sacrifice

Easter at North Way.

Are You Planning to Quit Smoking?

OAKLAND 120 McKee Place, Pittsburgh

EAST END 5941 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh

Good Friday Services Noon, 6 & 8pm, Friday, March 29

Good Friday Service 7pm, Friday, March 29 Easter Services 9 & 11am, Sunday, March 31

Easter Services 9 & 11am & 12:30pm, Sunday, March 31

The RAND Corporation in Pittsburgh is conducting a research study with healthy adult smokers (ages 18-65) who are motivated to quit smoking. Individuals will participate in a practice quit smoking attempt and then receive free behavioral treatment to help them quit smoking. Participation requires attending several in-person sessions at the RAND offices over a one month period. Participants can receive up to $275.00 for their time and effort in completing the study procedures. Support for travel, transportation, and parking is also provided.

northway.org/CityEaster 724-935-6800

If you are interested, please call: 412-683-2300, ext. 4965

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decision making through research and analysis.

One Church. Multiple Locations. All Generations. 8&9'03%t0",-"/%t4&8*$,-&:7"--&:t&"45&/% Pittsburgh Dance Council Presents

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Box Office at Theater Square » 412.456.6666 » TrustArts.org /dance » Groups 10+ 412.471.6930 N E W S

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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One of the many decisions greeting Pope Francis, as Salon.com pointed out, is whether to officially recognize a Patron Saint of Handgunners — as urged by a U.S. organization of activists for more than 20 years. According to legend, St. Gabriel Possenti rescued an Italian village from a small band of pillagers (and perhaps rapists) in the 19th century by shooting at a lizard in the road, killing it with one shot, which supposedly so terrified the bandits that they fled. No humans were harmed, activists now point out, signifying the handgun was obviously a force for good. The head of the St. Gabriel Possenti Society has noted that, however far-fetched the “lizard incident” may be, it was rarely questioned until U.S. anti-gun activists gained strength in the 1980s.

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Though Americans may feel safe that the Food and Drug Administration approves a drug only for certain specific uses, the U.S. Court of Appeals in New York ruled in December that drug-company salespeople have a First Amendment right to claim that drugs approved for only one use can be marketed for nonapproved uses as well. Doctors and bioethicists seemed outraged, according to the Los Angeles Times, generally agreeing with a University of Minnesota professor who called the decision “a complete disgrace. What this basically does is destroy drug regulation in the United States.”

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Denials of disability allowances in the town of Basildon, England, near London, are handled at the Acorn House courthouse, on the fourth

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS @ E ART HL I NK . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

floor, where afflicted people who believe they were wrongly rejected for benefits must present their appeals. However, in November, zealous government safety wardens, concerned about fire-escape dangers, closed off the fourth floor to wheelchair-using people. Asked one woman, turned away in early February, “Why are they holding disability tribunals in a building disabled people aren’t allowed in?” (In February, full access resumed.)

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Among the helpful civic classes the city government in Oakland, Calif., set up earlier this year for its residents was one on how to pick locks (supposedly to assist people who had accidentally locked themselves out of their homes), and lock-picking kits were even offered for sale after class. Some residents were aghast, as the city had seen burglaries increase by 40 percent in 2012. Asked one complainer, “What’s next? The fundamentals of armed robbery?” (In February, Mayor Jean Quan apologized and canceled the class.)

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We Must Kill This Legislation Because Too Many People Are for It: In February, the North Carolina House of Representatives Rules Committee took the unusual step of preemptively burying a bill to legalize prescription marijuana (which 18 states so far have embraced). WRAL-TV (Raleigh-Durham) reported Rep. Paul Stam’s explanation: Committee members were hearing from so many patients and other constituents (via phone calls and emails) about the importance of medical marijuana to them that the representatives were feeling “harassed.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013

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Two teachers and three student teachers at a Windsor, Ontario, elementary school somehow thought it would be a neat prank on their eighth-graders to make them think their class trip would be to Florida’s Disney World, and they created a video and PowerPoint presentation previewing the excursion. The kids’ exhilaration lasted only a few days, when they were informed that plans had changed and that they would instead be visiting a local bowling alley. Furthermore, the teachers captured the students’ shock on video, presumably to repeatedly re-enjoy their prank. (When the principal found out, she apologized, disciplined the teachers and arranged a class trip to Niagara Falls.)

police report, he would settle for her being his girlfriend again — or a one-night stand.

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Solutions to Non-Problems: (1) Illinois state Rep. Luis Arroyo introduced a bill in March that would ban the state’s restaurants from serving lion meat. (2) Georgia state Rep. Jay Neal introduced legislation in February to ban the implantation of a human embryo into a nonhuman. Rep. Neal told the Associated Press that this has been a hot issue in “other states.”

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Dustin Coyle, 34, was charged with domestic abuse in Oklahoma City in January, but it was hardly his fault, he told police. His ex-girlfriend accused him (after she broke up with him) of swiping her cat and then roughing it up, punching her, elbowing her and sexually assaulting her. Coyle later lamented to police that she and he were supposed to get married, but for some reason she changed her mind. “If she would just marry me, that would solve everything,” but, according to the

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Gary Ericcson, 46, was distraught in January at being charged with animal cruelty in shooting to death his beloved pet snake. He told the Charlotte Observer that he is not guilty, as the dear thing had already passed away and that he shot it only “to get the gas out” so that other animals would not dig it up after he buried it. He said he was so despondent (fearing that a conviction will prevent him from being allowed to have even dogs and cats) that in frustration he had shot up and destroyed a large cabinet that housed his Dale Earnhardt collectibles. Teri James, 29, filed a lawsuit recently in San Diego against San Diego Christian College because it fired her for being pregnant and unmarried — a violation of specific employee rules. She said the firing was obviously illegal gender discrimination because her job was quickly offered to the next-mostqualified candidate: James’ fiancé, who was openly cohabiting with James all along and is the baby’s father.

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In a Philadelphia courtroom in February, alleged assault victim John Huttick was on the witness stand tearfully describing how miserable his life has become since he lost his left eye in a barroom fight with the defendant. Right then, however, his prosthetic eye fell out. The judge, certain that it was an accident, quickly declared a mistrial (especially since two jurors, seated a few feet away, appeared sickened).

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THE TURKEY MEAT WAS SUFFUSED WITH SUBTLE SMOKINESS, AND EXTREMELY MOIST

THE PIZZA ORDER {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} When I first visited the Pizza House, in Ambridge, nearly 15 years ago, I was intimidated. “Do you know how to order in there?” asked my wife, who had grown up eating the crispy, square slices. “Because there’s a system.” The “system,” while not an overly complicated one, can flummox even a veteran and well-traveled pizza consumer. The first challenge is finding the shop. While the sign over the door says “Pizza House,” no one calls it by that name. Over the years, the shop, which opened in 1950, has become known as “Police Station Pizza,” because of its approximation to the Ambridge Police Station. Soon after entering, an employee will acknowledge you with one of two greetings. He will ask, “How many?” or if you look like a regular, he will simply nod with a look that says … “How many?” The rookie will undoubtedly tell the clerk how many and what he wants on them. This classic blunder will generate snickers from other customers. When ordering at Police Station, you give the number first, then are asked separately for toppings. To order correctly is a badge of honor. On a recent visit, the guy ahead of me was asked how many and ordered 12 with sausage before getting a raised hand from the clerk. Oops. The clerk then turned to me and gave a nod. “Six,” I replied confidently. “Six.” CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

1007 Merchant St., Ambridge. 724-266-3904

FriedFish

Report ST. RAPHAEL CATHOLIC CHURCH 1154 Chislett St., Morningside 412-661-3100 Fridays in Lent, 4:30-7:30 p.m.

Crispy, tasty batter-fried fish is the highlight, along with quick, organized service. The seating was nearly all filled up when we visited, a testament to this fry’s dinner-time popularity.

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TEXAN PROUD {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

L

OCATED IN WHAT appears to be an old

drive-in burger stand near the former .airport entrance in Moon, Selma’s Texas Barbecue represents a bit of a culture clash. The setting and the decor — heavy on family pictures and Texas kitsch — suggest humble, down-home goodness. But the ingredients and preparation seem tailored to appeal to today’s discerning foodies, with everything from lemonade to tartar sauce and baked beans made in-house. Most enticing of all, each meat is treated with its own custom rub and dry-smoked for hours, then served unsauced so that diners can choose from the six different styles on offer. The latter has become a bit of a trend (and a welcome one), but Selma’s takes almost a sommelier’s approach, explaining the ingredients and character of the sauces and suggesting meat pairings for each. One downside of Selma’s approach is that, with all of the meat and many of the sides slow-cooked in advance, they can run out. Indeed, there are signs proclaiming “First Come, First Served,” and we regretted

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Fried catfish and hushpuppies

being too late to try chicken with Alabama white sauce, an improbably delicious, mayonnaise-based concoction that we’ve made at home but never seen at any restaurant. But with ribs, pork, brisket, turkey and catfish still on offer, there was little chance we would go hungry.

SELMA’S TEXAS BARBECUE 9155 University Blvd., Moon. 412-329-7003 HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sun. noon-6 p.m. PRICES: $6-23 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED First, a general judgment: While everything we tried was moist and extraordinarily tender, smoke flavor was understated in most of the meats. Whether this was by design or miscalculation, the result was that, unlike the best barbecue we’ve eaten in Texas, sauce was more or less necessary to amp up the flavors of the naked meats. This in-

cluded, alas, the brisket, which, when done perfectly, should need no accompaniment at all. On the other hand, the turkey breast was probably the best we’ve ever had, prepared by any method. The thick-sliced, mild white meat was suffused with subtle smokiness, and the flesh was extremely moist without a hint of mushiness. We thought that all but one of the sauces were good examples of their types, from peppery Texas Cowboy to sweet, but not cloying, Kansas City. Both versions of Memphis — hot and original — provided a good middle ground of balanced sweet-spicytart notes. Carolina Pig-Pickin’, consisting mostly of chili-pepper flakes in vinegar, should have been the perfect medium for pulled pork, but it was watery and bland. Jason’s theory was that it needed to be applied to meat right off the grill, when it’s primed to absorb liquid as the juices move through the muscle. Regardless, we quickly moved on to others, determining that, for our tart-leaning tastes, Carolina mustard was the best. Selma’s version was well balanced, with plenty of yellow-mustard


kick, enhanced by vinegar and onions and tempered by a little sweetness from honey, sugar or both. One thing we never knew before we visited Texas was just how ubiquitous smoked sausage is. Thanks to a large German population (chicken-fried steak is really just an American version of wienerschnitzel), sausages became an inevitable partner to brisket on the grill, with results far different from hot-grilled fresh sausage or from smoked sausage finished over coals. Smoked sausage meat becomes dense yet juicy, and the smoke, surrounding the link from all sides, enhances the spices provided by the sausage-maker. Selma’s describes its sausages as hot Italian, but they either have an extraordinary purveyor or their smoke works magic on any sausage, because this was a far cry from a tailgater’s scarlet red, one-note bun-filler. It was more than worthy of what we tasted in Texas.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

BANKING ON REPUTATION

Tender Bar + Kitchen draws on expertise of cocktail “dream team” While Pittsburgh’s cocktail scene is growing in fame and sophistication, its bartenders aren’t household names. At least not yet: The new cocktail-focused Tender Bar + Kitchen suggests things might be changing. When he wanted to compile a list of innovative cocktails for his new Lawrenceville establishment, owner Jeff Catalina assembled a crack team of six bartenders: Fredrick Arnold, Sarah Clarke, Nathan Lutchansky, Craig Mrusek, Marie Perriello and Sean Rosenkrans. “We’d get together once a week,” says Mrusek. “We’d bring our own recipes in, try them out and critique them. Basically, through that process we winnowed them down” to the current list of 15. “You start to learn a person’s style. You can really start to see who made what,” adds Clarke. Each of the bartenders — dressed in speakeasythemed garb that reflects the stunning décor of the historic bank building — has a distinct pedigree. Clarke, Lutchansky and Mrusek all spent time behind the bar at Verde, which Catalina also owns. Perriello has recently been honing her craft at Acacia; Rosenkrans quietly toiled away as the city’s most underthe-radar craft-cocktail bartender at Silk Elephant. Arnold, new to Pittsburgh, bartended in Kansas City and New York. “This group of people is a bartending dream team,” says Arnold. “I adore their dedication and passion for creating layered and complicated tastes in cocktails.” His “The Van Buren” cocktail is a particular standout. The mix of Wigle Ginever, green Chartreuse, Benedictine, dry vermouth, rhubarb bitters and rose water is a balanced, herbaceous delight. In addition to the original libations, there’s also the “Banker’s List,” a collection of 30 classic cocktails. The Navy grog is potent and spicy, and Mrusek, the city’s resident tiki expert, has a couple pleasing South Pacific powerhouses. The initials of the bartender responsible for developing each cocktail are stamped underneath the drink’s description. So although you might not yet be familiar with each bartender’s passion, Tender is banking that you will be soon.

“YOU START TO LEARN A PERSON’S STYLE.”

The Trail Boss Sampler, with ribs, pulled pork, chopped brisket, smoked turkey and sides

Selma’s (carefully sourced) catfish, though not barbecue per se, is not to be missed. With a crunchy cornmeal coating surrounding succulent, flaky fish, this was the one “meat” that didn’t need any enhancement with sauce. Selma’s sides were great, too, especially the creamy mac-andcheese and firm baked beans. Cooked collard greens were bland on their own, but responded nicely to a dollop of Carolina mustard sauce stirred in. At Selma’s, the better meats are as good as they get, the excellent sauces provide choices for every diner, and the sides transcend the perfunctory. If you’re headed out to the airport but don’t feel like getting on a plane to the Lone Star State, you can still get pretty good Texas barbecue at Selma’s. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

4300 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522 or www.tenderpgh.com

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

AWARD-WINNING CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN CUISINE

“Toast can serve as an upscale bar for after-work drinks or late-evening conversation. It’s casual and inexpensive enough to go to “just because,” but also serious enough to be a special occasion destination”

HEY BROWN BAGGER, EAT YOUR LUNCH AT STEELHEAD! Pittsburgh Marriott City Center 112 Washington Place, Downtown 412-471-4000 for Reservations www.thesteelhead.com

- China Millman, Pgh Post-Gazette

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS AVAILABLE

TOAST!

KITCHEN & WINE BAR

5102 BAUM BLVD. SHADYSIDE Scan to View Steelhead Menus

www.toastpgh.com 412-224-2579

Traditional. Simple. Delicious. And Now Organic.

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

BELLA FRUTTETO. 2602 Brandt School Road, Wexford. 724-9407777. Adjacent orchards are one of the attractions at this comfortable, clubby suburban restaurant. The Italian-inspired menu features the fruits of these orchards in several apple-based dishes, including apple ravioli and apple bruschetta. Bella Frutteto combines an innovative but unfussy menu with friendly service and congenial seating. KE BIGHAM TAVERN. 321 Bigham St., Mount Washington. 412-4319313. This Mount Washington spot has all the pleasures of a local pub in a neighborhood best known for dress-up venues. It offers pub grub with a palate, such as burgers topped with capicola and green peppers. There is also a dizzying array of wings, including a red curry-peanut, linking a classic American bar snack to the flavors of Asian street food. JE CAFÉ DES AMIS. 443 Division St., Sewickley. 412-741-2388. A genuine French café — with rustic wooden tables, chalkboard menus and display cases full of sophisticated salads, sandwiches and desserts. A perfect spot for that relaxed, multi-hour meal that is France’s greatest export: Thus, dinner can be anything from croque monsieur to shepherd’s pie or roulades of beef. J

Poor Richard’s Wexford Alehouse {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} scallops-three-ways to roasted peppers stuffed with ricotta. KE CAFFE DAVIO. 2516 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1119. By day, a tiny store-front diner, serving omelets and pancakes, and by evening, an authentic and delightful Italian restaurant. The menu — both prix fixe and a la carte — focuses on the authentic flavors of Sicily, such as pasta Norma and veal alla Palermitana, while occasionally invoking the short-order tradition, as with the hash of potatoes, peppers and onions. KF

trendy and traditional. Some dishes are sophisticated classics, like pan-seared flounder with fresh tomato and asparagus. Others are ever-popular workhorses like the BLT and fish tacos, or reinventions such as a Thai empanada or Pittsburgh’s own “city chicken”(skewered pork). KE MAD MEX. Multiple locations. www.madmex.com. This local chain’s several lively, funkily decorated restaurants boast an inventive selection of Cal-Mex cuisines. Mad Mex is a good stop for vegetarians, with dishes such as chick-pea chili and eggplant burrito. It’s not genuine Mexican by a long shot, but if there were a country with this food, it’d be great to vacation there. JE

CUCINA BELLA. 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., Bridgeville. 412-257-5150. This casual eatery offers an unassuming menu of pizzas and pasta that are prepared with a commitment to fresh ingredients and an open-minded, thoughtful MEAT AND POTATOES. approach to flavor profiles. 649 Penn Ave., Downtown. For instance, pizzas range 412-325-7007. This restaurant from traditional tomato combines several current and cheese to arugula trends, including and prosciutto to the revisiting staples of adventurous rosemary the American pantry, and pistachios, the gastro-pub and . www per ricotta, sausage, and nose-to-tail cooking, a p ty pghci m green olives. KF all in the lively .co Downtown space. GRAN CANAL CAFFÉ. Expect everything from 1021 N. Canal St., Sharpsburg. marrow bones to burgers, 412-781-2546. The menu here flatbreads and chicken pot pie, is classic coastal Mediterranean. as well as pots of rhubarb jam Even dishes rarely seen at other and hand-crafted cocktails. LE Italian restaurants — such as snails and penne stuffed with POOR RICHARD’S WEXFORD seafood — are traditional, ALEHOUSE. 10501 Perry not made up to satisfy eclectic Highway, Wexford. 724-935contemporary tastes. The 9870. This bar and restaurant cannelloni alone merits a visit to delivers top-notch pub grub, one of Gran Canal’s cozy, familyplus a well-curated beer friendly dining rooms. KE menu. Among the offerings: the Buffalo, N.Y. classic IO. 300A Beverly Road, Mount sandwich, roast beef on weck, Lebanon. 412-440-0414. The a Germanic roll with caraway revamped Io’s (formerly Iovino’s) seeds; and mac-and-cheese, new simplified menu seems a made with Buffalo hot sauce. near-perfect distillation of tasty, Well-prepared burgers, wings,

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Café Notte {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} CAFÉ NOTTE. 8070 Ohio River Blvd., Emsworth. 412-761-2233. Tapas from around the globe are on the menu at this charmingly converted old gas station. The small-plate preparations are sophisticated, and the presentations are uniformly lovely. Flavors range from Asianstyle crispy duck wings and

CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013


So thern South rn Hospititalit Hosp lity. Who said you can’t find

Real Soul Food in Pittsburgh?

Come See Uncle Troy! Soul Food at Monroeville Mall Located in the Food Court

412.858.5155

B2\-*" -’2"+2 I-*22%4 ...and this year it’s on Sunday!

GRAND

Finding eggs is easy at the Shiloh brunch. Join us Sunday for the usual cornucopia of goodies including live before-your-eyes omelettes, local pastries, smoked salmon, famous frozen mimosas, and much, much more!

MARCH 31st Only $24.95 • Kids Buffet $24.95 • Kids under 4 eat free!

Please call for reservations.

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Carving Station • Omelette Station • Bloody Mary Bar

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Any Slice,Any Time!

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DURING MARCH BASKETBALL GAMES!

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35¢ Wing Nights Mon thru Thu 5-9PM

Pens Hockey Special: $10 Labatt Blue Buckets $1 Slices

Weekend Entertainment!

412-481-0480 2126 EAST CARSON ST. Open for Lunch, Dinner and Late Night Mon - Sun DELIVERY AVAILABLE!

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COOKING SCHOOL Club provides students with culinary experience

TIN FRONT CAFÉ. 216 E. Eighth Ave., Homestead. 412-461-4615. Though the menu is brief, inventive vegetarian meals push past the familiar at this charming Homestead café. The emphasis is on fresh, local and unexpected, such as asparagus slaw or beet risotto. In season, there’s a charming rear patio. JE

UP MODERN KITCHEN. 5500 Walnut St., Shadyside. 412688-8220. This contemporary restaurant offers a sophisticated sensibility and eclectic approach to fresh, local and seasonal cuisine. The globally influenced menu ranges from “bites” to “small plates” to entrees, as well as soups, salads and sandwiches. The variety is such that it’s hard to imagine a diner unable to find something enticing. KE VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. 424 S. Main St., West End. 412-458-0417. This warm, welcoming, and satisfying Italian restaurant is a reason to brave the West End Circle. The menu offers variety within a few narrowly constrained categories: antipasti, pizza and pasta, with the pasta section organized around seven noodle shapes, from capelli to rigatoni, each paired with three or four distinct sauces. KE

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013

{BY AMYJO BROWN}

STONEPEPPER’S GRILL. 1614 Washington Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-854-4264. Though seemingly calculated to be just another chain, StonePepper’s relies on good proportions and expert preparations to give some distinction to familiar fare like pizza, burgers and salads. Don’t miss the signature dessert: cinnamon-bun pizza. KE

TOAST! KITCHEN & WINE BAR. 5102 Baum Blvd., Bloomfield. 412-224-2579. In this intimate restaurant, the emphasis is on local, seasonal ingredients simply yet inventively prepared. Menu items change frequently and feature combinations both straightforward (shrimp and grits) and unexpected (add habañero cheddar and brownsugar butter to that). Or try the chef’s tasting, a unique fourcourse dinner just for you. LE

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offMenu

PORK-N’ NAT. 8032 Rowan Road, Cranberry. 724-776- 7675. This family-run BBQ joint does two things right: There’s a lot of smoke flavor in their meat, and the kitchen takes its rub seriously. The ribs, for instance, are studded with cracked pepper and intensely flavored with spices — spicy and crusty without, perfectly moist and tender within. Add in: four sauces, plus traditional sides such as mac-and-cheese or baked beans. JF

Bobby Fry teaches a student how to sharpen her knife. {PHOTO COURTESY OF ALAINA WEBBER}

ANGKO

fish and chips, and sandwiches round out the menu. KE

WHEN THE NEW after-school cooking club launched at Barack Obama Academy in East Liberty, 15-year-old Joel Macklin was one of the first to sign up. “I don’t know how to cook,” he says, adding that as a sophomore, he’s been thinking about what it will be like being on his own in college. “I was really interested in learning how to do basic cooking, like make an egg.” He’s learned that and more. “It’s been a blast. Last week, we learned how to make pancakes. I’m ecstatic about that. We did crab cakes, too. It’s not that hard.” The club, led by one of the partners in the Strip District’s Bar Marco restaurant, Bobby Fry, and the “head lunch lady” at the Environmental Charter School, Kelsey Weisgerber, features rotating guest chefs from Pittsburgh restaurants, many of whom also helped host a dinner raising $ 9,000 to buy the students their own knives, cutting boards and cookbooks. It also paid for the tables, silverware and glassware needed in the classroom. “It’s been an awesome experience for the students,” says Obama principal Wayne Walters. Fry says he and Weisgerber hatched the idea to sponsor a cooking club after talking with Jamie Oliver, the host of the TV show Food Revolution, during last year’s One Young World Summit. “I’m very passionate about making sure young people have the opportunity to be exposed to good food,” Fry says. Fry is also working with students at Brashear High School to establish a salad bar — a project he took on after visiting the class and seeing how defeated they were at not being able to make changes to the lunches they are served. “Let’s get a salad bar one day a week. If nothing else,” he says. “These kids just need a base hit.” Fry hosted a community meeting earlier this month, rallying support. Pittsburgh School Board director Bill Isler, who attended, says a lot depends on the district’s budget, but he thinks Fry’s effort is “fabulous.” “Just having the involvement of the restaurants and the chefs [in the district], really makes us want to step up,” Isler says. A B ROW N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


LOCAL

BEAT

“IT’S LIKE A TALENT-DEVELOPMENT FACTORY.”

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

THE NOISE OF ART

OUT OF THE

SHADOWS Promo art for White Wives’ NOISE appearance, designed by Wall-to-Wall Studios

Few things are more irresistibly interactive than bubble wrap, which is why Doug Dean and Bill Krowinski used it to cover the posters and handbills promoting their design-and-music event, NOISE. Both senior designers at North Sidebased design agency Wall-to-Wall Studios, Dean and Krowinski set out to create an event that would combine their two loves. “Our thinking was, showcasing design professionals who also played music,” Dean says. “It was geared as an event to engage our design community.” His zombie-themed band, The Wakening, and Krowinski’s band, The Velcro Shoes, both played the inaugural event — NOISE V1 — at Lava Lounge in 2011. They projected photos of album art, T-shirts, logos and promo material during the show. “We wanted to do a design event that also showcased music in equal levels,” Krowinski says. For 2012’s NOISE V2, at 6119 Penn, which featured The City Buses and The Red Western, they widened the scope. “Since every band has band art, we decided to open V2 up to any band and labeled it a ‘design/music experiment,’” Dean says. This way, they could draw a design crowd, as well as a wider selection of general music fans. They’re calling the third installment “an interactive design/music experience,” and — with Commonwealth Press’ South Side warehouse at their disposal — they have space and flexibility to do much more than they could at most clubs or bars. For V3, they enlisted Chris “#2” Barker and his band, White Wives, both to play and to help plan. “I knew he was artminded,” Dean says. “I went to him and said, ‘I think White Wives would be perfect.’ Right off the bat, Chris was stoked.” They’ll be accompanied by painter Mike Egan, who will making art live during their set. The Wakening also appears, and — among other things — NOISE will feature a crowed-sourced show-flier wall, with posters sent from all over the country, and an interactive sound installation by Maurice Rickard, which involves an entire room covered in bubble-wrap that will be amplified with microphones. White Wives will showcase what Dean calls their “vast amount of fan art.” “All this,” Dean says, “is driven by the [desire] to showcase art and make it a living thing.”

{BY KATE MAGOC AND RORY D. WEBB}

I

N RECENT YEARS, there’s been no

shortage of media hype touting Pittsburgh as a haven for artists and young people. But back in the ’90s, when Justin Strong was just starting at the University of Pittsburgh, the city didn’t seem quite so attractive. “When I graduated from Allderdice [High School] in ’96, the majority of my friends left,” Strong remembers. “They went to Atlanta, D.C. and New York.” But while his friends were going off to

MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NOISE featuring WHITE WIVES, THE WAKENING, MIKE EGAN, MAURICE RICKARD. 5-8 p.m. Sun., April 7. 2315 Wharton St., South Side. Free. www.welcometonoise.com N E W S

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ANNA LEE-FIELDS}

Focused on the music: Gordy Greenawalt spins soul at Shadow Lounge.

bigger cities, Strong was beginning to envision the idea of Shadow Lounge, the East Liberty venue that opened in 2000 and would become legendary for its role in Pittsburgh hip hop and art in general. The idea first took root in a crappy South Oakland apartment. “My house growing up was always the place where everybody gathered,” says Strong. “So it’s kind of like you’re a product of your environment.” When Strong went to Pitt, he recalls, he and his roommates “were just throwing parties. The first one we did was our sophomore year, in our apartment in Oakland.” S t r o n g a lway s wanted to make sure there was something to do — and in the process, he involved friends who would become important parts of the Pittsburgh music scene. But just as that scene is gaining new traction, Shadow Lounge itself is

closing. A combination of factors — business disagreements, the headaches of owning a liquor license, the pressures of neighborhood development — have led Strong to shutter the club. It will close this weekend, with a pair of send-off shows that will feature many of the artists who’ve called the venue home.

SHADOW LOUNGE LEGACY SERIES

FEATURING FORMULA 412, PHAT MAN DEE, MEGA DEF, JASIRI X, MANY MORE 7 p.m. March 29-30. Shadow Lounge. $20 for each show or $30 for both. 412-363-8277 or www.shadowlounge.net

“It definitely was a learning experience for the last 13 years,” says Strong. “I’m just glad I started when I was 21 ... at least one of my knees is still good,” he adds with a laugh. Not that anyone should count Strong out in the future. The adjoining AVA dance club will remain open, and Strong plans to open a new Shadow space elsewhere, though not immediately. “That place took a good 10 to 12 years CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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But once Shadow opened in 2000, other businesses began appearing nearby. “All of the businesses were vacant at the time; there was nothing but I think a Bell Telephone,” recalls Brian Brick, owner of Timebomb Shop, a hip-hop clothing store that moved a few blocks from the lounge soon after its opening. Strong “envisioned what he wanted to do — without a liquor license, without food,” says Brick. ”It was reKnowledge and Jon Que ally the first revival st at Rhyyme me Calisthenics {PHOTO COURTESY OF VAUGHN WALLACE} of the art commu“I REMEMBER all nity as a whole.” the way back to A lot of art1998 when Justin would hold parties at his house,” says Emmai Alaquiva. ists — Kellee Maize, for one — were trans“‘The 305 Spot,’ he ended up calling it,” formed just by spending time at Shadow because of its location at 305 Meyran Ave. Lounge. Maize’s history with Strong dates Alaquiva, owner of YaMomzHouse Record- back to an acting class they took at the ing Studio, located above Shadow Lounge, University of Pittsburgh. She’s since develwas Strong’s first doorman when Shadow oped into one of the city’s best-known MCs, opened in East Liberty. He’s since become a although she was admits having been shy well-known producer, directing videos for when she first began performing. “My first performance ever was at the Questlove’s company Okayplayer, and winning a regional Emmy award for his work Shadow Lounge,” says Maize, a former City Paper employee. “When I went there, it on a WQED documentary. “Working for Justin always felt like was so comfortable and I could just be myworking with Justin,” Alaquiva says. “That self. So I would say it changed me in that did a lot for my self-esteem and that it created a community for me to grow as did a lot for me wanting to go out after an artist.” my dream.” {PHOTO COURTESY OF WILLIAM FEAGINS JR.} Nate Mitchell, known as Nate da Phat Barber — he’s both a DJ and a barber, in addition to coowning 720 Music, Clothing and Cafe in Lawrenceville — was involved with Strong’s events back in the 305 Spot days. Hip-hop/ “I was putting together events spoken-word duo Middle East with him,” Mitchell says. “When the Shadow Lounge opened, it wasn’t long after they first opened the doors that I hosted my first event. Now I’ve had, I don’t know, 30 or 40 or 50 events at the Shadow Lounge over the years.” Maize also runs Nakturnal, an event“I definitely can give the Shadow Lounge credit for being a catalyst for the promotion and media company, with partchange that you see in East Liberty,” Ala- ner Leigh Yock; she says Shadow inspired quiva adds. “When the Shadow Lounge that effort as well. In addition to a variety of local and naopened, those of us who had been in and around East Liberty for the past 20 years tional events that were booked at Shadow, the venue consistently hosted open-mic knew what it was.” What it was, Mitchell explains, was nights that welcomed both aspiring and largely abandoned, thanks to a combina- veteran artists to collaborate and hone tion of 1960s urban renewal and suburban their skills. “The Shadow Lounge has a reputation flight: “Anything inside [Penn Circle] just of being a venue of talent development,” exstarted to die.” to build up what it’s built up,” says Akil Esoon, a regular Shadow Lounge performer. “I think Justin himself is a brilliant businessman, and I think that his team [knows] what they’re doing. They’ve been doing this long enough to know that all they need to do is get another venue, and once that happens, I think they’ll pick up right where we left off — probably even better because the talent in this city is evolving.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013


OPUS ONE PRESENTS

plains James Armstead Brown, keyboardist for the venue’s weekly open-mic series and co-founder of the Rhyme Calisthenics MC Competition. The latter event introduced popular local rappers Mac Miller and Real Deal, among others. “There’s always been an open mic, ever since the Shadow Lounge opened — hip-hop open mics, acoustic open mics, poetry slams. It’s like a talentdevelopment factory.” “It was such a nexus of different types of people,” adds Brown, “that it allowed people who might not normally see hip hop to see the real talent level of the MCs that were competing. I think that’s why it helped launch careers for Mac Miller and other folks — because it’s a wide network of people.” “The Shadow Lounge is one of the few places on the planet where you can go and express ideas and have fun and be a pure artist around other genius-level artists as well,” agrees Akil Esoon, who has performed at the Shadow Lounge as a member of bands Akil Esoon Quintet, Beam and Formula 412. FOR TIM GUTHRIE, known as SMI, the jour-

ney has been both rewarding and aggravating. Guthrie first came into the Shadow Lounge as a DJ in 2002, and bought in as a co-owner in 2004. Shadow acquired a liquor license after Guthrie’s buy-in, and added the adjoining AVA Lounge and the Blue Room. Guthrie was just back from living in Washington, D.C., when he got involved at Shadow. “Having someone that lived in multiple cities and who could bring those experiences to the table definitely helped,” says Strong. “Our idea is that we want to have good art, good music and good people around — and not do Top 40,” says Guthrie, who’s performed as a rapper with groups such as Eviction Notice and as a DJ at several of the monthly Classic Material hiphop parties. But Guthrie and Strong’s relationship began to sour in 2008. Disagreements ranged over a variety of issues: managerial decisions, disagreements over whether to install a kitchen for day-time business, s h ow b o o k i n g s and more. And while still a part-owner, Guthrie moved to California last year — an attempt, he acknowledges, to distance himself from rising frustrations. “I’m always gonna

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Shadow Lounge founder Justin Strong

have memories, like DJing for KRS-One,” says Guthrie. But the distractions were mounting. “It’s not just that you have two owners that need to yin and yang, bounce off each other. You need to make sure the train is running and still going strong.” “Eventually, you have to start making business decisions. It can’t be party-time all the time,” says Strong. ”Over the years, it seemed like every so often we were instituting a new policy that was taking away from the original kind of Pee-Wee’s Playhouse feel of the Lounge. That said, with any type or form of growth, you’re gonna have that, especially with the responsibility of a liquor license.” “It’s a two-man operation, and most of the time it was myself putting in the hours,” Strong adds. “So that kind of takes its toll. But we always appreciate the musicmind that [Guthrie] brought in as a great artist and DJ. It was just unfortunate on the business end that it didn’t pan out.” There were also concerns that as East Liberty attracted more interest from developers, the very revitalization that Shadow presaged was creating a more hostile climate. Last summer, there were concerns about anonymous zoning complaints — first reported in City Paper — which many club supporters

04/04 PURITY RING 04/05 THE CYNICS & MEETING

OF IMPORTANT PEOPLE

04/12 LOS AMIGOS INVISIBLES

MELINDA & KEVIN BOWE + THE OKEMAH PROPHETS CRY FIRE (LATE) THE WHEALS (EARLY) AMETHYST BELLYDANCE (LATE) EVERYONE'S OUT TO GET YOU: A BECK 'SONG READER' PERFORMANCE 04/05 THE STONE FOXES (LATE)

03/29 03/29 03/30 03/30 04/03

04/09 WOVENHAND 04/10 IAMDYNAMITE

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CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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attributed to upscale development nearby. Some regulars say they detect an increased undercover police presence at events. “I really don’t appreciate all of the politics and weirdness that’s going on now,” says a regular Shadow Lounge MC and musician who goes by the name Free. “I don’t feel that a lot of these places would be here if it weren’t for the Lounge,” says Free, who fronts a band called Mega Def, formed from the camaraderie of Shadow artists. “Or maybe it would’ve taken them a lot longer. It says a lot that it has been there for this long.” But taken together, there were too many obstacles to sustaining the club in its current form, Strong says. Shadow Lounge, LLC — the company run by Strong and Guthrie — is being dissolved. Strong says AVA and the future Shadow location will fall under the umbrella of 7th Movement LLC, which is headed up solely by Strong, and which is taking on the debt accrued by Shadow Lounge. As Strong puts it, “The financial summary of the Lounge has been a ‘dollar short and a day late’ scenario most of the time.” STILL, THE PENDING closure hasn’t overshadowed the club’s legacy. “Most venues don’t have that long a lifespan,” says Free. “They open and close and change names. I don’t feel that Shadow Lounge necessarily gets the credit it deserves for its longevity, for what it has done and contributed.” Among those who do celebrate those contributions is Gordy Greenawalt, who, along with DJ J. Malls, ran the Title Town soul night and its predecessor, Vipers Soul Club. (Title Town moved to Brillobox this year when Shadow announced its impending closure.) “There was some discussion about, you know, two white kids playing funk and soul music in East Liberty,” Greenawalt says with a laugh. “But at the end of the day, I honestly didn’t think about any of that. It was really so focused on the music that racial implications didn’t even come to mind.” “What Justin did was play a major role in bringing new people to the neighborhood,” adds Greenawalt. “He created a space for people to come together, and I think that’s one of the big things that he played a part in.” And Brick, of Timebomb, has faith that Strong will continue to do so. “Every day, I say [Justin] should just [run for] city council; he probably could get elected. There are people in this community that you can trust; he’s one of those guys. He treats everyone fair, and that’s why I think everyone respects the Lounge.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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CRITICS’ PICKS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF TOM HINES}

Grizzly Bear

[AVANT-ROCK] + FRI., MARCH 29 Douglas McCombs’ Brokeback broke its silence with a new record this year; the Tortoise bassist and guitarist hadn’t released anything with his side project in a decade. McCombs’ new Brokeback lineup — including members of Head of Skulls! and Pinebender — has been playing together since 2010, perfecting eclectic tunes that are jazzy, math-y and thoughtful, and never boring. Brokeback plays the Smiling Moose tonight with Grand Piano and Smooth Tutors. Andy Mulkerin 6:30 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. 412431-4668 or www. smiling-moose.com

[ACOUSTIC] + FRI., MARCH 29

Dave Hause

Minneapolis songwriter Kevin Bowe has had plenty of success — though mostly through songs he wrote for other people. Jonny Lang, Etta James and Kenny Wayne Shepherd have all recorded songs that Bowe had a hand in creating, and you’ve heard his material on ESPN as well. He and his band, the Okemah Prophets, recently released Natchez Trace, their first album since 1999. It’s good stuff from a talented guy; tonight, he plays Club Café with the band, and local singer Melinda. AM 6 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $8. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

[INDIE ROCK] + SAT., MARCH 30

Since its latest album, Shields, was released last July, Grizzly Bear has become the standard by which indie-rock bands are judged. With a softer sound that marries detailed, well-produced ambience with structures that are distinctively poppy, the band has achieved a level of nearuniversal likability without losing credibility as a group of skilled musicians. It’s the sort of music that can gain traction among reasonably hip parents and college radio stations alike. The

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attention to detail and intricacy of some of the tracks will fit nicely into the old-timey setting of the Carnegie Music Hall, where Grizzly Bear will be rocking out with Owen Pallett on Saturday. John Lavanga 8 p.m 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $29.50. 412-622-3131

[INDIE POP] + SUN., MARCH 31 Not to bash on Winnipeg, but it’s not exactly the Canadian city that comes to mind when discussing burgeoning art scenes. Still, there’s some good stuff happening out there on the frozen prairie, like delightfully poppy rockers Boats. The group has been releasing music in some form or another since 2003, and last month’s release, A Fairway Full of Miners, is clearly the culmination of years of honing its spacey, analog synth-assisted sound. It’s upbeat, driven by crisp, laid-back bass lines, accentuated by the playful use of synthesizer, and sprinkled with just a hint of that psychedelic, out-there vibe. At Howler’s Coyote Café tonight with The Lopez and Dean Cercone. JL 8 p.m. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412-682-0320 or www.howlerscoyotecafe.com

[ACOUSTIC] + WED., APRIL 3 It’s not a revival in the speaking-in-tongues sense, but the Revival Tour has become something of a ritual for fans of punk bands from 10 or 15 years ago. Each year, the tour brings around a traveling band of songwriters with their acoustic guitars — many, like tour founder Chuck Ragan of Hot Water Music and Dave Hause of The Loved Ones, veterans of punk outfits. Tonight, the tour stops at Altar Bar; filling out the bill are Toh Kay, Rocky Votolato and Jenny Owen Youngs. AM 7 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $22-24. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

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THU 28

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28

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013

CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Langhorne Slim & the Law, Whitehorse. South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONE’S. Rice Cultivation Society. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. LAVA LOUNGE. DÊtective, The Red Western, Brass Chariot. South Side. 412-431-5282. REX THEATER. Modestep. South Side. 412-381-6811. STAGE AE. A Day To Remeber, Of Mice & Men, Chunk! No, Captain Chunk! North Side. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Turkuaz. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 29 99 BOTTLES. Ray Lanich Band. Carnegie. 412-279-1299. ALTAR BAR. The Ghost Inside That 1 Guy. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Terrance Vaughn. O’Hara. 412-696-0111. CLUB CAFE. Melinda Colaizzi, Kevin Bowe + the Okemah Prophets (Early) Cry Fire, Grain (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. THE DEAD HORSE CANTINA & MUSIC HALL. Gone South. McKees Rocks. 412-973-3295. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. No Sir E, Chase Smith, Liability. GarďŹ eld. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Guests of Guests, Bryan McQuaid, more. Ricky Bates BMX Banned Together Charity Show. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. Smokin’ Section. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HEINZ HALL. Elvis Lives. A multi-media & live musical journey. Downtown. 412-392-4900. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Supervoid, Borracho, Neon Warship. BloomďŹ eld. 412-682-0320. KOPPER KETTLE. Tenique’ & These Guys. Washington. 724-225-5221. LATITUDE 40. No Bad JuJu. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Frightened Rabbit, Wintersleep. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

OBEY HOUSE. Lenny Smith & The Ramblers. Crafton. 412-922-3883. REX THEATER. In This Moment. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Brokeback, Grand Piano, Smooth Tutors (early) Sathanas, Lythem, Perdition, No Reason to Live (late) South Side. 412-758-4087. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Shockwave Riderz, Majeure, General Fantasy. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WOOLEY BULLY’S. The Dave Iglar Band. New Brighton. 724-494-1578.

SAT 30 ALTAR BAR. Protomen. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. Forgetters, Nic Lawless, Look Left. BloomďŹ eld. 412-621-4900. CAFE NOTTE. The Sidewinder

Band. Emsworth. 412-761-2233. CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL. Grizzly Bear, Owen Pallett. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CLUB CAFE. The Wheals, Between Two Rivers (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Soundshift. Robinson. 412-489-5631. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Fabulous Booze Brothers Showband & Revue. South Side. 412-431-4090. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Half Dozen Krackerz, Super Ego Star. Aliquippa. 724-375-5080. GOOSKI’S. Januzzi Watchmen, Red Hook Winery. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HEINZ HALL. Elvis Lives. A multi-media & live musical journey. Downtown. 412-392-4900. THE R BAR. Norm Nardini. Dormont. 412-445-5279.

MP 3 MONDAY STEEL CLOVER

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from Irish-folk artist Steel Clover; stream or download “Pride of Ireland� on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


SMILING MOOSE. Heaf, Staleen, Sam Rockwell Machete Champion Through These Walls, Long Time Divided. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPEAL’S TAVERN. T.K. & George. New Alexandria. 724-433-1322. SPENCER’S DOWN UNDER INC. The Teardrops. West Mifflin. 412-462-4337. STAGE AE. Crash City. North Side. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Darryl & Kim. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

SUN 31 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Boats, Dean Cercone, The Lopez, Holy Daze. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. REX THEATER. Lady, Lee Fields. South Side. 412-381-6811.

MON 01 GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Datagram Lanyard, Gorgeous Suntan, 8 Cylinder, Sub Mistress. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

TUE 02 31ST STREET PUB. Exhumed, Abysme, Liquified Guts, Meth Quarry. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. OTEP. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Marco Benevento, Alex Talbot. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Black Bear Combo, Lungs Face Feet, Lonesome Leash. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Chelsea Light Moving. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. Floor, Thrones, Molasses Barge, Secret Tombs. South Side. 412-431-4668.

SAT 30 6119 PENN AVE. Jacques Renault. East Liberty. BELVEDERE’S. Down n Derby Disco Skate. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. CIP’S. Porky Chedwick. Dormont. 412-668-2335. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. MEXICO CITY. DJ Juan Diego VII. Salsa & Latin music. Downtown. 412-980-7653. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3730. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

THU 28

@edgarsnyder (Edgar Snyder & Associates)

Shoutout to the hometown kid @MacMiller who made it big. Points from Pittsburgh @edgarsnyder (Edgar Snyder & Associates)

A big welcome to all of our @macmiller fans and new followers. Thanks for your support.

FRI 29

SAT 30 SHADOW LOUNGE. Eviction Notice, Formula412, Jasiri X, Nikki Allen, Abby Ahmad, Phat Man Dee, more. The Legacy Series. East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

FULL LIST E ONwLwIN w.

paper pghcitym .co

THE PRAHA. Jill West & Blues Attack. Tarentum. 724-224-2112. ROOSTERS ROADHOUSE. The Eldorado Kings. Bridgeville. 412-221-1543. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Pawnbrokers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. THE VALLEY HOTEL. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Jefferson Hills. 412-233-9800. WIGHTMAN SCHOOL. Sweaty Betty. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1623.

JAZZ

TUE 02

THU 28

6119 PENN AVE. Pac Div. East Liberty.

ANDYS. Maggie Johnson. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

BLUES THU 28 CHAMP’S SPORTS GRILL AND LOUNGE. The Fabulous Mr. “B” & the Bad Boyz Mr. B & the Bad Boys Band. North Versailles. 412-829-5100.

FRI 29 EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The South Side Groove Squad feat. Bill Toms. South Side. 412-431-4090. KEYSTONE BAR. Jill West & Blues Attack. Ellwood City. 724-758-4217.

SAT 30 FRANK’S PUB & GRILL. Billy Price. Bethel Park. 412-833-4606. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. The Rhythm Aces. South Side.

FRI 29

ANDYS. Kenia. Downtown. 412-773-8884. GANDY DANCER SALOON. Artist 3. Station Square. 412-261-1717. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Velvet Heat. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Ken Karsh Band. Downtown. 412-392-2217. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Greensburg. 412-370-9621.

BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Juan Vasquez. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000.

FRI 29 BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Ronni Weiss. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Jeff Campbell. Harmony. 724-400-6044. MOONDOG’S. Missy Raines & the New Hip. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PETER B’S. Blake & Dean. Sarver. 724-353-2677. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Bobby V. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

SAT 30 BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Brad Yoder. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. ELWOOD’S PUB. John Farley. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

BELVEDERE’S. DJ T$. Lawrenceville. 724-312-4098.

HIP HOP/R&B

BAND NIGHT

ACOUSTIC

Everybody follow @edgarsnyder he’s a true Pittsburgh legend.

TUE 02

THU 28

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BELVEDERE’S. Obvious Presents Residents Showcase. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. MEXICO CITY. DJ Juan Diago vs. Pandemic. Salsa, bachata, merengue, & reggaeton. Downtown. 412-246-2042. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3730. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Lou Donaldson. Downtown. 412-325-6769. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

@MacMiller (Mac Miller)

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Give Me A Break Sunday Night Soul. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. RIVERS CASINO. DJs Bill Bara & Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

DJS

FRI 29

TUE 02

Recent dispatches from the music Twittersphere

SUN 31

SHADOW LOUNGE. Eviction Notice, Formula412, Jasiri X, Nikki Allen, Abby Ahmad, Phat Man Dee, more. The Legacy Series. East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

LOCAL TWEETS

Every Thursday!

MARCH 28 DETECTIVE (LA), BRASS CHARIOT, THE RED WESTERN APRIL 4 CORONADO, LOCKS & DAMS APRIL 11 BOULEVARD OF THE ALLIES, THESE LIONS, GARY MUSISKO $1.75 PBR Drafts Everyday 9-11

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282

WORLD

SAT 30 ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BONNIE & CLYDE’S. RML Jazz. Wexford. 412-370-9621. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Gordon Grottenthaler Quartet. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. The Kim Hassara Band. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

SUN 31 ELWOOD’S PUB. Jeff Pogas. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Salsamba Latin Jazz. North Side. 412-904-3335. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Framk Cunimondo & Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. RML Jazz. Greensburg. UP MODERN KITCHEN. Dave Roth. Jazzed-up brunch. Shadyside. 412-688-8220.

MON 01 PARK BRUGES. Slide Worldwide. Highland Park. 412-661-3334.

FRI 29 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Azucar. Downtown. 412-456-2621.

SAT 30 REX THEATER. Bajofondo, DJ Rich. South Side. 412-381-6811.

REGGAE

THUR, MAR 28 • 9PM BROOKLYN POWER FUNK

TURKUAZ

SAT 30 MOONDOG’S. The Flow Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

COUNTRY

FRI, MAR 29 • 9PM ROCK/POP

SHOCKWAVE RIDERZ PLUS

THU 28 ELWOOD’S PUB. Midnight Rooster. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

SAT 30 HARVEY WILNER’S. Steeltown. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331.

CLASSICAL

MAJEURE

SAT, MAR 30 • 9PM BLUES

THE PAWNBROKERS MON, APR 1 • 9:30PM

OPEN STAGE WITH CRAIG

FRI 29

LUX AETERNA. An Evening of Good Friday Music & Readings. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 29

KING

TUES, APR 2 • 9PM JAZZ

SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES OPEN FOR LUNCH

CAFE NOTTE. Sal Ventura. Emsworth. 412-761-2233.

Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

SAT 30 LEMONT. Mark Venneri. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

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What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

March 27 - April 2 WEDNESDAY 27

All ages allowed. Free Event. Through March 31.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guest Vampires Everywhere, Davey Suicide & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

THURSDAY 28

Orgy

Muchacho Tour 2013: Featuring Phosphorescent CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guest Strand Of Oaks. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Badfish, a Tribute to Sublime MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Tropidelic & The YJJ’s. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opsuone. All ages show. 8p.m.

Treasures of the Hard Rock HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

Kenny Wayne Shepherd CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. With special guests Jeff Fetterman Band. All ages show. Tickets: librarymusichall.com. 7:30p.m.

Turkuaz THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

AZIZ ANSARI

THURSDAY, MARCH 28 HEINZ HALL

Aziz Ansari HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 7p.m.

FRIDAY 29

Pittsburgh Power vs. Jacksonville Sharks CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: consolenergycenter.com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

Melinda Colaizzi / Kevin Bowe + The Okemah Prophets CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 7p.m.

That 1 Guy ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With

special guest CAPTAIN AHABS MOTORCYCLE CLUB. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10:30p.m.

newbalancepittsburgh.com

In This Moment

Little Gem

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

CITY THEATRE South Side. 412-431-CITY. Tickets: citytheatrecompany.org. Through May 5.

The Ghost Inside

Amethyst

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Stick To Your Guns, Stray From the Path & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 5:15p.m.

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guests Tom Moran & Janelle Burdell. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 10:30p.m.

Elvis Lives

Lee Fields & The Expressions

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org/elvis. Through March 30.

SATURDAY 30 Protomen

ALTAR BAR Strip District. Smokin Section 412-263-2877. With special HARD ROCK CAFE Station guests Winters Descent, Square. 412-481-ROCK. Tommy Magik and The Over 21 show. Tickets: Wonderfulls & more. All ages ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 10p.m. 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

SUNDAY 31

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 2 29 Otep

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests One Eyed Doll, Picture Me Broken & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

NB PSYCHE PERSONALIZED SPORTS BRAS

SMARTER

BY DESIGN

WEXFORD

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

Discover Anue, our thoughtfully crafted yoga collection that moves with you.

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

OAKLAND

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KE E P MOTION TO A M I N I M U M

PITTSBU RG H’S L ARG EST SELECTI O N O F N EW BAL AN CE SH O ES I N SIZES AN D WI DTHS

30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 newbalancepittsburgh.com

FACEBO O K.CO M / N EWBAL AN CEPG H


KOREAN TAKE-OUT

SALLES’ MOODY, ENERGETIC FILM IS MORE ENJOYABLE THAN KEROUAC’S BOOK

{BY AL HOFF} Antoine Fuqua’s Olympus Has Fallen is pretty much “Die Hard in the White House.” After North Koreans (not a typo) take the building, the Prez (Aaron Eckhart) is held captive in the basement bunker by the moustache-twirling villain. The Prez’s only chance comes from the lone remaining Secret Service agent (Gerard Butler), who trained at the StalloneSchwarzengger-Willis School For American Ass-Kicking (majoring in Guns and Quips, with a minor in Knives).

BETTER FILMED THAN WRITTEN

Manly men, unafraid of their manliness: Gerard Butler and Aaron Eckhart

I imagined watching this B-grade actioner with an actual U.S. president, as he called out: “This is bullshit! There’s no secret panel behind that painting of Lincoln!” I can’t speak to the panel, but this film is bullshit, from its idiotic premise that the White House is simultaneously a secure and insecure facility and its groaner dialogue, to its flag-waving endorsement of ultra-violence tinged with xenophobia and macho posturing. The screening audience enjoyed it, laughing at bloodshed and cheering for the “good guy,” who singlehandedly restores justice, liberty and so on, by acting like a crack-fueled gangster with intimacy issues. Olympus is a comic-book fantasy, cravenly designed to assuage our anxieties about America in the 21st century. But it’s a twisted tonic, reinforcing the worst of our national impulses. And it’s so outlandish Fuqua might as well have saved the White House by having a unicorn ride in and sprinkle lovey-dovey dust on everybody. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Tyler Perry’s Temptation: Confessions of a Marriage Counselor is my favorite film title of the year. The melodrama starring Jurnee Smollett-Bell (Friday Night Lights) promises:

soul searching, pretty people in chic clothing (or not), lessons about love, and a Kardashian. Starts Fri., March 29.

{BY HARRY KLOMAN}

H

Lost in America: Dean Moriarty (Garrett Hedlund) and Sal Paradise (Sam Riley)

OW DO YOU make a watchable

movie out of an unreadable book? “That’s not writing, it’s typing,” Truman Capote famously said of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road, and who am I to disagree? But so what? Legends must be dealt with, and in his film, director Walter Salles captures the melancholy exuberance of the story and the stylized cadence of its dialogue without our having to waste time on the book’s jagged prose. On the Road is partly famous for what it’s not: Intending to write an autobiography, Kerouac had to change the names of his characters, thus creating one of the 20th century’s most famous romans à cléf (which no doubt further maddened Capote, whose own Answered Prayers destroyed him). So Kerouac becomes the reticent Sal Paradise (Sam Riley), Neal Cassady is the tragic Dean Moriarty (Garrett Hedlund), Allen Ginsberg is a charismatic Carlo Marx (Tom Sturridge), the reedy odd-

ball William S. Burroughs becomes the cocky Old Bull Lee (Viggo Mortensen). And of course, there’s the nightmare girl: LuAnne Henderson, renamed the ne-plus-ultra-American Marylou, and played by a significantly down-to-earth Kristen Stewart.

ON THE ROAD DIRECTED BY: Walter Salles STARRING: Sam Riley, Garrett Hedlund, Viggo Mortensen Starts Fri., March 29. Regent Square

CP APPROVED Like the name says, Sal and Dean go on the road for adventure, circa late 1940s: There’s love, sex, drugs, alcohol, bebop, drugs, sex, drama, pathos, chaos, sex, loss — the usual subjects in a Bildungsroman of emerging writers like Sal (and Carlo, who sleeps with Dean). Sal and Dean both have daddy issues, and they dedicate their adventures to “the

good old demented men we loved.” The ambisextrous Dean is clearly the object of Sal’s hidden affection, but at least in this veiled telling, all Sal finally does is watch and inwardly yearn. Salles’ moody, energetic film is more enjoyable than Kerouac’s book, but that should be no surprise: Who doesn’t like to watch beautiful young people engaging in a romantic tragedy and a mad dash for life — watching them “burn, burn like Roman candles across the night.” Who wouldn’t want to live like this, as long as you live through it, which Sal and Dean (i.e., Kerouac and Cassady) more or less didn’t. (Ginsberg turned out OK.) The actors are outstanding, spirited and comfortable, effecting gentle imitations of their historic counterparts. The sole exception is Stewart, the Kerouac of her acting generation, who isn’t half bad. The period feels right, too: the cars, the landscape and the bittersweet sensation of aimlessness in all of the people that the sojourners meet. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

the hero. Wolfgang Petersen directs this 1984 family adventure film. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 27. AMC Loews. $5

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

CP

BUBBA HO-TEP. After Elvis Presley (Bruce Campbell) secretly traded places with a lowbudget impersonator, he ended up in a rest home, forced to live out his days as a nobody. When things go weird at the home, Elvis bonds with another resident, an elderly black man who claims to be President John F. Kennedy (Ossie Davis). Together they discover that a misplaced Egyptian mummy who eats souls to survive has made the home his personal Old Country Buffet. This 2003 film sounds cheesy, but director Don Coscarelli has created a surprisingly lowkey black comedy. Bubba wisely plays on the worst fears we all have: that our bodies will fail us, that the meaning of our lives will slip away, and our world will shrink to the dimly lit hallways of a shabby rest home. 7:30 p.m. Thu., March 28; 9:15 p.m. Fri., March 29; 5 p.m. Sat., March 30; and 4 p.m. Sun., March 31. Hollywood (AH)

NEW G.I. JOE: RETALIATION. The action-figureinspired ass-kicker is back and still waging a battle against Cobra. Expect big guns, explosions and not a lot of story. Jon M. Chu directs; Channing Tatum and Dwayne Johnson star. Starts Thu., March 28. THE HOST. Andrew Niccol directs this thriller, adapted from Stephenie Meyer’s novel, about a young woman (Saoirse Ronan) trying to prevent an unseen force that’s wiping out people’s memories. Starts Fri., March 29. LEONIE. Hisako Matsui’s recent film is a bio-pic of Leonie Gilmour, whose primary entry in the historical record was being the influential mother of renowned sculptor Isamu Noguchi. But the film doesn’t forefront this, instead choosing to highlight Gilmour’s remarkable life as a protofeminist, educator and free spirit in the early 20th century. Despite a few confusing jogs in time, the story follows Gilmour (Emily Mortimer) from her Bryn Mawr education through her marriage to Japanese poet Yonni Noguchi (whose work she edited) to her struggles as a divorced, single mother in both California and Japan. Matsui makes the most of what appears to be a small production budget, even finding occasional moments of lyricism, and the capable Mortimer elevates the occasionally trite script. In English, and Japanese, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Fri., March 29; 3 p.m. Sat., March 30; and 1 p.m. March 31. Hollywood, Dormont (Al Hoff)

Lore

CP

LORE. After all these years and all these films, it seems remarkable that someone could deliver a new angle on World War II, Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. But Cate Shortland’s quietly devastating coming-of-age story, adapted from Rachel Seiffert’s novel The Dark Room, is just that. As the Allies take Germany, a 15-year-old girl named Lore (Saskia Rosendahl) confronts a hard reality: Her high-ranking SS parents have been arrested, and she must escort her four younger siblings on a cross-country journey to an aunt in Hamburg The formerly privileged Hitler Youth kids set off across a country reeling from defeat, a place

of privation, danger, anger and confusion. Food and comfort have a price — if not a financial and sexual one, then a post-war reality-check. One shelter provides food only after displaced Germans examine photos of concentration-camp victims. Lore’s struggles are further complicated when a strange young man joins the rag-tag family. Shortland’s feature is smartly filmed, and relates its story in a low-key but potent manner. (It’s summertime, and the film matches the horrors of a war-torn country with the nature’s inevitable beauty.) Rosendahl gives an assured performance: She deftly navigates Lore’s tumultuous interior journey, which careens between pride, fear, horror, betrayal and even sexual awakening. Few escape the effects of the war, and while some outcomes were clearly worse than hers, Lore’s re-ordered and re-assessed life is still a bitter pill. In German, with subtitles. Starts Fri., March 29. Manor (AH)

THE MAN WHO SOULED THE WORLD. Mike Hill’s 2007 documentary recounts the story of Steve Rocco, who helped develop skateboard culture’s DIY scene in the early 1990s. Presented by local skate shop Scumco & Sons. 7:30 p.m. Sat., March 30. Melwood. $5.

CP

NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD. Arguably, George Romero’s locally produced, low-budget 1968 nail-biter started American filmmakers’ late-20thcentury fascination with zombies. Romero’s depiction of flesh-munching was ground-breaking for its time, but what really makes this horror flick resonate still is its nihilism and sense of futility: No heroes, no easy resolutions — something terrible is just outside the door, and it’s gonna get us. Midnight, Sat. March 30. Manor (AH) MARNIE. Alfred Hitchcock’s 1964 thriller about a thief named Marnie (Tippi Hedren), who has some serious psycho-sexual issues, and the man (Sean Connery) who pursues her, concludes a Sunday-night series of Hitchcock films. Less seen than Vertigo, but similarly weird vis-à-vis memory and mental health. 8 p.m. Sun., March 31. Regent Square

NO. In 1988 Chile, a man comes up with an advertising campaign to sway voters against Augusto Pinochet. Gael Garcia Bernal stars; Pablo Lorrain directs. In Spanish, with subtitles. Starts Fri., March 29. Manor STOKER. After the head of the Stoker family dies, his teen-age daughter, India (Mia Wasikowska), and his chilly wife (Nicole Kidman) get a visit from his brother, the sort-of charming, sort-of creepy Charlie (Matthew Goode). Korean director Chan-wook Park’s first English-language film doesn’t have the outlandish brio of the best of his past work (like 2003’s Oldboy), but he definitely puts his mark on this slow-burner of a psychological thriller that peels the already-cracked veneer from a dysfunctional family. It’s handsomely filmed, with both amusing visual puns and some icky close-ups of bodily fluids. The story is something of a riff on Hitchcock’s Shadow of a Doubt. (The screenplay was written by Prison Break’s Wentworth Miller.) India is both repulsed by and attracted to the globe-trotting and sophisticated Uncle Charlie, and his presence completes her journey from child to adult, with plenty of disturbing mileposts at sex and violence. The film isn’t for everyone — it’s slow, melancholy and more a series of set pieces than a straightforward narrative. It also feels somewhat neutered compared to Park’s more in-your-face films. But for the patient viewer, it’s an intriguing 100 minutes, even if all its expertly rendered stray bits of malice and beauty never quite add up to a wholly satisfying work. AMC Loews, Manor (AH)

REPERTORY THE NEVERENDING STORY. A book leads a bullied boy into a fantasy land where he has a chance to be

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Leonie STEVE NICKS: IN YOUR DREAMS. Catch up with former Fleetwood Mac chanteuse Stevie Nicks as she collaborates on a new album with Dave Stewart, formerly of The Eurythmics. This documentary was co-directed by Nicks and Stewart. 7 p.m. Tue., April 2. SouthSide Works. $10 BLOOD IN THE MOBILE. When Danish filmmaker Frank Poulsen learns that rare-earth minerals used in his cell phone might be fueling destructive civil wars in the Democratic Republic of Congo, he investigates. Visits to the Finland HQ of the world’s largest cellphone supplier, Nokia, get the corporate run-around. But his off-the-grid trek to remote parts of eastern


Stoker Congo proves more illuminating. While it’s hard to definitely prove how money flows in this notoriously dysfunctional country, Poulsen does uncover plenty of sobering material in the squalid, lawless mining camps, run by armed gangs and staffed by child miners. Screens as part of CMU’s Faces of Media festival. In English, and some French, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Wed., April 3. McConomy Auditorium, CMU campus, Oakland. www.cmu.edu/faces. $8 ($5 students/seniors)

CP

REAR WINDOW. The convalescing photographer L.B. “Jeff” Jefferies (Jimmy Stewart) is an involuntary but enthusiastic couch-potato prototype: Bored to distraction, he needs to spy on his Greenwich Village neighbors. So while Alfred Hitchcock’s thriller is a characteristically terrific entertainment, it’s also a witty, probing look at spectatorship and voyeurism centered on a man who wants to see without being seen, and what happens once that’s no longer possible. 7:30 p.m. Wed., April 3. AMC Loews. $5. (Bill O’Driscoll) GAAMER. In Oleg Sentsov’s drama, a teen from Ukraine is an Internet star known for his mastery of Quake, even as his real-life skills suffers from lack of attention. Screens as part of CMU’s Faces of Media festival. In Russian, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Thu., April 4. McConomy Auditorium, CMU campus,

“A LYRICAL, DEEPLY AFFECTING study into a rarely seen legacy of the Holocaust. ” -Megan Lehmann,

Oakland. www.cmu.edu/faces. $8 ($5 students/seniors) IT WAS THE SON. A family hopes to receive a settlement after a tragedy, but will a cash award make things better or worse? Daniele Ciprì directs this 2011 drama. The film opens a festival of recent Italian films, presented by the University of Pittsburgh. 7 p.m. Thu., April 4. Frick Fine Arts, Pitt campus, Oakland. Free. www.italianfilmfests.org/pittsburgh ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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[STAGE]

NAKED JOY

THE U.S. WAS LARGELY BUILT ON SQUATTING.

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

UNTITLED FEMINIST SHOW 8 p.m. Sat., March 30. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20-25. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

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[BOOKS]

THOUGHTS OF

HOME {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Y

OU MIGHT assume it’s illegal to live

Young Jean Lee’s Untitled Feminist Show

By forcing herself to explore subjects she’d rather not, and using theatrical forms that discomfit her, playwright Young Jean Lee pushes her work in fascinating directions. Previous touring shows by the Brooklyn-based Lee have addressed Korean-American stereotyping (Songs of the Dragons Flying to Heaven) and, in the searing The Shipment, racism. “I have a tendency to be somewhat apolitical, and so I tend to do a lot of political work,” says Lee in a phone interview. Her latest is 2012’s Untitled Feminist Show, part of The Andy Warhol Museum’s Off the Wall series. It’s virtually dialogueless — daunting enough for a playwright — and all six women performers are nude throughout. Partly, Lee meant to correct a theatrical bias. “I had never seen female bodies that deviated from an idealized norm [and] that I wanted to be like,” she says. “What could the world look like if people with female bodies had no shame and felt free to behave however they wanted?” Lee developed the show with performers from dance, cabaret and burlesque. “They were just really huge personalities, which I needed if they were going to be nude,” says Lee. The Pittsburgh show features four original cast members: cabaret artist Amelia Zirin-Brown, dancer Katharine Pyle, trans performer Becca Blackwell and performance artist Hilary Clark. Improvs were shaped by Lee and co-creators Faye Driscoll (choreography) and Morgan Gould (direction). The hour-long show, with music and video projections, unfolds as a series of scenes, from a ritualistic entrance to sequences in which pink parasols are used either as cabaret props or weapons. The show (co-commissioned by the Warhol) has gotten mostly positive reviews. New Yorker critic Hilton Als called it “one of the more moving and imaginative works I have ever seen on the American stage.” Lee says the nudity hasn’t distracted audiences very much. In fact, absent gender signifers like clothing and make-up, she says, “There’s something about nudity that makes the performers less gendered.” Some viewers, she says, have objected that a “feminist show” should be more politically confrontational than this one. But Lee says that criticism is itself telling. “I realized joy makes people uncomfortable,” she says. “Joy is seen as feminine. … People equate power with aggression.” But her performers, she says, “are powerful in their joy.”

in someone else’s abandoned property without permission. But things aren’t always that clear-cut in the world of squatting as explored by Hannah Dobbz in her engaging and provocative new book, Nine-Tenths of the Law: Property and Resistance in the United States (AK Press). “Property,” in the contemporary American mind, is sort of sacredly ossified, with legal title-holders assumed to have nearabsolute rights to use it — or not — as they wish. But in Dobbz’s historical panorama, from rural rent strikes to contemporary urban squats, the U.S. has been home to very different conceptions of the land. The local author is a former squatter who sees squatting as everything from a form of resistance to capitalist culture to “a pragmatic alternative to the housing crisis.” Given that Native Americans in colonial and frontier times had no notion of personal property, let alone “title,” the U.S. was largely built on squatting. Europeans erroneously called the land wilderness and claimed it by right of “civilization.” But as Dobbz writes, there was a twist: Land that colonists and, later, the U.S. government traded for or seized was assumed to have a market value. In other words, even during the government’s long history of awarding land to illegal settlers, that land’s “use value” as farm, ranch or timberland didn’t sufficiently account for its price. U.S. law gives primacy to market value, and that results in speculation and hoarding of land and buildings, even ones long abandoned. Highlights of Nine-Tenths of the Law include Dobbz’s account of an anti-rent movement in mid-1800s upstate New York, where for 26 years a sometimes-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013

Hannah Dobbz, author of Nine-Tenths of the Law

violent popular uprising fought a feudal arrangement under which a single wealthy family held vast tracts of land in perpetuity.

HANNAH DOBBZ speaks 3-5 p.m. Sat., April 6, as part of The People’s University series. Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh — Main Branch, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-622-3151

Although that particular landholding practice had been outlawed in England centuries earlier, the law and its armed deputies backed the property owners. Squatters’ associations that promoted squatter rights at the state and federal

level persisted into the 20th century. And the issues remain. To discuss challenges facing contemporary squatters, Dobbz draws on her own experience squatting in an abandoned Oakland, Calif., warehouse several years ago. (The experience inspired her fine 2007 short film “Shelter: A Squatumentary,” which in turn sparked Nine-Tenths of the Law.) In the wake of the 2009 mortgage meltdown, about 10 percent of this country’s 132.5 million housing units are vacant yearround, according to U.S. Census figures. The housing market is driven by what Dobbz calls “the myth of scarcity.” But in reality, she says, “There are more buildings and resources than can be utilized.”


D R ISC OLL@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

N E W S

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[DANCE]

SAY “CHEESE” {BY STEVE SUCATO}

Kelsey Bartman and Alan Obuzor of Texture Ballet Company {PHOTO COURTESY OF KATIE GING}

Dobbz juxtaposes these “peopleless homes” with homeless people. “If certain [property owners] … are monopolizing these resources or hoarding them, you’re squandering those resources,” she says. “It’s a distribution problem.” There are laws against breaking and entering. But once you’re in — and not all squatters need break in — possession, or nine-tenths of the law, is in your favor. Moreover, right of occupancy is a civil matter, not a criminal one (though police might try to charge you with trespass, for instance). Theoretically, squatters can even attain “adverse possession” of a property by simply occupying it. Meanwhile, the U.S. lacks any laws that address squatting per se. (European countries, traditionally more amenable to squatting, have seen a backlash, with the practice recently criminalized in Great Britain and Amsterdam.) U.S. squatters occupy a legal gray area. Those who improve their properties, get along with their neighbors and don’t face objections from titleholders might make out just fine. (This was Dobbz’s experience as a squatter.) Others might encounter police harassment or eviction. Dobbz, 28, is a native of Western Massachusetts who now lives in Lawrenceville. The former staffer at Pittsburgh’s Big Idea Cooperative Bookstore & Café has a wry sense of humor. At her interview with CP, she wore a necklace with a padlock and skeleton key. But her message is in earnest: Her book’s appendices include practical information on property law and researching titles. (Also see her blog at www.propertyandresistance.wordpress.com.) And the message is getting out there. So far, Dobbz’s speaking tour for the book has hit bookstores, universities, community centers and chapters of the activist National Lawyers Guild in cities including New York City, Philadelphia and Boston. After an upcoming Pittsburgh date, more talks are scheduled in towns from New Orleans and Chicago to Austin, Texas, and Los Angeles. Squatting, Dobbz emphasizes, is seldom an end in itself. It’s a means to an end. Some squatters want permanent, sustainable, affordable housing for themselves or others, including the homeless; others squat to draw attention to issues of housing justice. To her, squatting is just one aspect of a much larger issue. “It’s about housing and property, and that affects all of us,” she says.

The American Dairy Association may have been onto something in its ads touting “the power of cheese.” Anecdotal reports of increased creativity by Texture Contemporary Ballet’s dancers and choreographers from eating cheese led to the tongue-in-cheek title of their latest program, tongue in cheek tit About Fontina. The There’s Something A presents the mixed-repertory troupe pres program featuring six premiere works April 3-5 at the New Hazlett Theater. Among the premieres is Texture Textu artistic director Alan Obuzor’s “Can Reality Acutely Obuz Create Knowledge?” Cre Obuzor says that the O 19-minute contemporary 19 ballet for seven dancers, set to music by dan composer Max Richter and others, is a departure from his past ballets. “I wanted to stretch myself by putting the dancers in socks instead of pointe shoes,” says Obuzor. “It changes the dynamic of the steps, making them more grounded.” Obuzor and associate artistic director Kelsey Bartman co-choreographed three additional premieres for the program. There’s “Ice Ice,” a seven-minute trio with original music by Gabriel Smith; in keeping with the company’s joking attitude, the dancers will perform wearing one pointe shoe and one boot. The jazzy duet “Not While I Am Around” is set to singer Jamie Cullum’s rendition of the eponymous song from Sweeney Todd. And the relationshipbased duet “Ode to Divorce,” set to music by singer-songwriter Regina Spektor, is performed by Bartman and Obuzor. “We feed off each other,” says Obuzor of frequent collaborator Bartman. “I feel we create stuff together that reflects both of us as choreographers but looks different than either of our work done separately.” Also making its debut is Bartman’s quirky “Well … On the Other Knee,” danced to two of composer Philip Glass’ “knee plays” from Einstein on the Beach. Says Bartman of her choreographic style: “I like to take pedestrian movements that could be considered weird, such as a twitch, and make them beautiful.” The final premiere on the program comes from Murphy/Smith Dance Collective’s Jamie Murphy and Renee Smith. “Accidentally” is a modern-dance group work that explores accidental relationships. Rounding out the program will be former Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre dancers Aaron Ingley and Christopher Bandy’s comedic duet “Near” and Alexandra Tiso’s solo for dancer Shannon Biery, “Crest,” inspired by life’s wave-like rise and fall. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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TEXTURE BALLET COMPANY performs THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT FONTINA, 7:30 p.m. Wed., April 3; 7:30 p.m. Thu., April 4; and 8 p.m. Fri., April 5. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20. www.textureballet.org

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Tony Bingham and Amy Landis in Antarktikos, at the REP

[PLAY REVIEW]

SNOW JOB {BY TED HOOVER}

I HATE TO open with this, but: SPOILER

THE SIX BRANDENBURG CONCERTOS Fri, Apr. 5 · 8PM \ Sat, Apr. 6 · 8PM \ Sun, Apr. 7 · 2:30 PM Heinz Hall

Jeannette Sorrell, conductor & harpsichord Noah Bendix-Balgley, violin Randolph Kelly & Marylène Gingras-Roy, violas Lorna McGhee & Jennifer Conner, flutes Cynthia Koledo DeAlmeida, oboe George Vosburgh, trumpet Bach: The Six Brandenburg Concertos STUDENT AND SENIOR RUSH AVAILABLE TWO HOURS PRIOR TO PERFORMANCES.*

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ALERT. There’s no way to discuss the Pittsburgh Playhouse REP’s world premiere of Antarktikos, by Andrea Stolowitz, without giving away a little bit of a plot twist. So if you’re planning on going and you like surprises, stop reading right now. Actually, the twist comes early and isn’t that surprising. But it’s also the most interesting thing about the play and I feel bad diminishing what little oomph the script has. But forward we march.

ANTARKTIKOS

continues through April 7. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $24-27. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

Susan is a novelist of a certain age who, years ago, wrote one book and now is heading to Antarctica, where, thanks to all that snow-blasted isolation, she will attempt a second. Here’s the twist: In reality, Susan, while riding a bike in her hometown, was hit by a bus and she’s now in a coma, only imagining she’s in Antarctica. And she’s imagining a m eeting with Robert Falcon Scott, a Victorianera British explorer who led an expedition to the South Pole in 1912 and died there. Back in the real world, Alex, the collegeaged EMT who transported Susan to the hospital, remains bedside because he promised her he would look after her college-aged daughter, Hilary. (You don’t need a compass and map to see where that’s headed.)

Antarktikos toggles back and forth between scenes of Susan and Robert ruminating on life, death and legacy (which is mildly interesting) while over on stage left, Alex and Hilary are falling in love. These latter scenes, I regret to say, are not so interesting, ineptly written and stuffed with cliché. Although, in the world of Hollywood “meet cute,” meeting over the comatose body of your mother must count for something. From the start, it’s clear that Antarktikos has been developed, workshopped and dramturged to death. Stolowitz’s focus is all over the place. There are about five different plays stuffed into this slender evening, all of the characters feel like calculated conceits, and the final 10 minutes … well, let’s just move on. Stephanie Mayer-Staley’s set is of such high caliber you can thankfully spend much of the play’s intermissionless 100 minutes lost in her exquisite use of white-on-white shadow, given strong reinforcement by Todd Wren’s lights and Steve Shapiro’s sound design. Sheila McKenna directs with her usual ruthless honesty — there’s not a moment in which this production isn’t living fully inside this script. Billy Hepfinger manages to wring out a surprising amount of interest as the EMT. Meanwhile, Amy Landis and Tony Bingham, as Susan and Robert, create a few genuinely touching moments during their quiet, introspective scenes. There is, actually, an interesting story somewhere in here — namely the 100-year beatification, demolition and redemption of Robert Falcon Scott’s reputation. (Google it, it’s fascinating.) Maybe someone will write that. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013


AN IRISH COMEDY CHOCK FULL OF DUBLIN SLANG AND HILARITY

BY ELAINE MURPHY DIRECTED BY KIMBERLY SENIOR

MARCH 30–MAY 5, 2013

Three middle-class Irish women tell the story of one extraordinary year. “Amber, Lorraine and Kay seduce us with their humor and pluck.” —The New York Times

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FOR THE WEEK OF

03.2804.04.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ FRI., MARCH 29 {MUSIC} To mark Women’s History Month, musician Deryck Tines has organized The Female Gospel Legends Concert Weekend. (It’s also Easter weekend, after all.) The shows, tonight and tomorrow at Ebenezer Baptist Church, in the Hill District, include more than a dozen local singers performing classics made famous by everyone from Clara Ward and Mahalia Jackson to Sister Rosetta Tharpe. Scheduled performers include Deborah Moncreif, Brenda Collins, Yolanda Rodgers Howsie and the Pittsburgh Seniors Gospel Choir. BO 7 p.m. Also 6:30 p.m. Sat., March 30. 2001 Wylie Ave., Hill District. $20. 412233-0971 or 412-983-8895

APRIL 01

Pico Pi ico IIyer yerr ye

{STAGE}

+ THU., MARCH 28 {WORDS} During World War II, the U.S. Army hired famed photographer Dorothea Lange to photograph the internment of Japanese Americans — an imprisonment that most Americans then approved. But the Army censored these disturbing images. Tonight, New York University history professor Linda Gordon gives a lecture titled “Impounded: Dorothea Lange’s Censored Photographs of the Japanese Internment in World War II.” The talk at Carnegie Mellon University includes some of the stillrarely-seen photographs. Jeff Ihaza 5 p.m. (4:30 p.m. reception). Baker Hall, CMU campus, Oakland. Free. 412-268-2880 or www.history.cmu.edu

late, the long-running magazine holds its Spring Equinox Poetry Reading. Featured at ModernFormations Gallery are five notable local poets including Renée Alberts, Robert Isenberg (a regular CP contributor), Kris Collins, Angele Ellis and Lilliput

What’s funnier — or more serious — than America’s racial divide? Unless, that is, it’s being discussed at a funeral, or alongside the Holocaust? The Sisters Grey, a new play by local playwright and performer Gab Cody (Fat Beckett) and writer and Essex County College (N.J.)

MARCH 28

“Impounded”

{WORDS} Even among small-press publications, Pittsburgh’s Lilliput Review is distinctive: It’s dedicated to poems of 10 lines or less, and its quarterly print edition has smaller dimensions than an index card. Tonight, just a week

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013

editor Don Wentworth. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. 4919 Penn Ave., Garfield. $5 or covered dish (admission includes two issues of Lilliput Review). www.sites.google.com/site/ lilliputreview/home

professor Lori Roper (both pictured), sounds like a real high-wire act. Two sisters-inlaw, one black and one Jewish, face each other and themselves in this comedic drama about race, history and social


{PHOTO COURTESY OF STACEY DRUMMOND, SNICKERTY FEET PHOTOGRAPHY}

sp otlight

Gia Cacalano and troupe return to Wood Street Galleries with the latest Gia T. Presents production, The Frequency of Structure and Flow. The 75-minute work, like 2012’s sold-out Blink, is a collaboration between Cacalano’s international troupe of dancers and musicians and an exhibit at the gallery. The Frequency of Structure and Flow responds to Paris-based technological artist Miguel Chevalier’s digital-media work “The Origin of the World,” part of his exhibition Power Pixels 2013. CP critic Robert Raczka described “The Origin of the World” as resembling “an animation of cell division or abstracted rippling water.” The work, which is partially triggered by movement sensors, provides Cacalano’s work with its main theme — that the dancers represent pixels that have somehow escaped from the exhibit. But the work is so visually stimulating that Cacalano and company have had to devise ways to temper their collaboration so as not to overwhelm audiences with too much simultaneous activity. Cacalano says the dancing — which like the music will be improvised — will be performed in mostly solos and duets, and the dancers will be costumed in monochromatic colors that complement the exhibit. Says Cacalano: “Clarity of movement will be our primary focus.” Steve Sucato 8 p.m. Fri., March 29, and 8 p.m. Sat., March 30. 601 Wood St., Downtown. $15-20. Limited seating; reservations at giatc3@yahoo.com.

class in contemporary America. The play was developed through the August Wilson Center’s Great Collaborations series. In this fully staged workshop production, opening tonight, Sam Turich directs a cast of six top local actors, including Bria Walker and Theo Allyn. BO 8 p.m. Continues through April 7. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $25. www.AugustWilsonCenter.org

+ SAT., MARCH 30 {ART} The Carnegie Museum of Art offers a rare glimpse into Japanese art from the early years of the Carnegie Institute (which later became the Museums of Art and Natural History) with today’s opening of the exhibit Japan Is the Key. At the turn of the century, poet Sadakichi Hartmann organized the Institute’s first exhibitions of prints from Japan; meanwhile, H.J. Heinz was quietly collecting ivories on business trips to Japan and donating them to the Institute. The exhibit includes works by masters including Hiroshige, Hokusai and Utamaro. JI 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through July 21. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11.95-17.95. 412622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

Anne Spear and Robin Walsh. Tonight is the first performance. JI 5:30 p.m. Continues through May 5. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $22-55. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

Art by Katsushika Hokusai {IMAGE COURTESY OF THE CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART}

{WORDS}

{WORDS}

Just to be clear, the Mean Girls exhibit at SPACE Gallery is not in favor of mean girls, or so far as we know a showcase for them. We’re not bullying anybody here, OK? But we do strongly advise you to check out tonight’s Mean Girls: A Reading. As organized by fiction writer Sherrie Flick, it features nine acclaimed local poets and writers including Jennifer Bannan, Yona Harvey, Sarah Leavens, Ellen Smith and Lois Williams, all reading original work about girl-bullying. And all without actually bullying anyone. BO 7 p.m. 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. www.meangirlsartexhibit.com

{SCREEN} This BYOB isn’t about booze; and though it stands for “Bring

MARCH 30

Japan Is I the th Key K

Your Own Beamer,” it’s not about luxury cars. Rather, it’s an international series of informal one-night arts events for artists and their projectors. Unsmoke Systems Artspace’s take, TBA/ BYOB, is described as a “user-

contact aduulterie@gmail.com in advance. The line-up already includes some 30 artists from local to international, including co-organizers Patrick Quinn and A. Bill Miller. BO 8-11 p.m. 1137 Braddock Ave., Braddock. Free. www.usmokeartspace.com

generated, ad hoc exhibition, inside and outside of the building, presenting as many GIFs, MOVs and other various movement-based media as possible.” Anyone can play, but if you lack your own projector, please

MARCH 29

{WORDS}

The Si Sisters isters t Grey Gre

{MUSIC} If you’re looking for an all-star roundup of veteran local jazz talent, you’d do worse than tonight’s fundraiser for the Black Political Empowerment Project. The eighth annual B-PEP Jazz Concert, in the “Bridges” space at Oakland’s Wyndham Hotel, features an astounding 70 performers, including Sean Jones and his Quartet, Michelle Benson, Etta Cox, Kenny Blake, Roger Humphries, Spider Rondinelli, Flo Wilson and vocal group Artistree. The host is DJ Tony Mowod, and celebrity emcees

Irish playwright Elaine Murphy’s Little Gem opens tonight at City Theatre. The play follows an Irish family of women over the course of one year. Their trials and tribulations unfold through monologues driven by dry, sometimes dark humor. Little Gem marks Chicago director Kimberly Senior’s City Theatre debut and features actors Hayley Nielsen, Cary

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A man of travels is Pico Iyer — and the famed author and essayist has shared them in Harper’s, Time magazine and books including Video Night in Kathmandu and The Open Road: The Global Journey of the Fourteenth Dalai Lama. This week — following on his latest book, The Man Within My Head, about the influence of Graham Greene — Iyer makes his first visit to Pittsburgh. Tonight’s “An Evening With Pico Iyer” is a Q&A at the Carnegie Library’s main branch. Tomorrow, at Carnegie Mellon University’s Adamson Writers Series, Iyer delivers the lecture “Moving and Sitting Still in Our New Global Order.” BO 6-7:30 p.m. (4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland; free; 412-622-3114). Lecture: 5-7 p.m. Tue., April 2 (Porter Hall, CMU campus, Oakland; free; ashley.karlin@gmail.com).

+ MON., APRIL 01 + WED., APRIL 03

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are promised. Some proceeds benefit B-PEP’s Coalition Against Violence. BO 5:3011:30 p.m. $20-25. 412-7587898 or www.b-pep.jazz.org

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New York Times best-selling author Andrew Gross appears tonight at Mystery Lovers Bookshop, in Oakmont. Gross is credited with suspense novels like 15 Seconds, Eyes Wide Open, The Blue Zone and Reckless; he’s also coauthored several best-sellers with James Patterson. Tonight, Gross will read an excerpt from his latest novel, No Way Back. The novel tells the story of a chance meeting in a hotel that leads to murder. JI 7 p.m. 514 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. Free. 412-828-4877 or www.mysterylovers.com

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residence at the South Pole finds herself in an unlikely conversation w/ the leader of the 1912 British Antarctic expedition, while her daughter embarks on her own adventure w/ an insomniac EMT. Thu-Sun. Thru April 7. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. THE BOOK OF MORMON. Musical comedy by Trey Parker & Matt Stone. Tue-Sun. Thru April 7. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-4800. BREATH & IMAGINATION. The story of Roland Hayes, the 1st African-American classical vocalist to be heard around the world. Tue-Sun. Thru March 31. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. CINDERELLA. Fri, Sat. Thru April 6. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. LITTLE GEM. Three generations of middle-class Irish women tell the story of one extraordinary year. Tue-Sun. Thru May 5. City Theatre,

South Side. 412-431-2489. NOT MY WILL. A Resurrection Drama presentation. March 29-30, 7 p.m. Macedonia Church of Pittsburgh, Hill District. 412-281-8437. SAMSON & DELILAH/ RUBY THE SALT OF THE EARTH. 1-act plays from the members of the Kuntu Writers’ Workshop. Thu-Sun. Thru March 30. Kuntu Repertory Theater, Oakland. 412-624-7298. STRAIGHTENING COMBS. Kim El’s 1-woman show about the repercussions of low self-esteem & overcoming depression in urban America. Thru March 31. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. TAHRIR. L.M. Bogad navigates through the conflicting & haunted memories of his 5-week journey in the streets of revolutionary Cairo. Performance begins at dusk. Thu., March 28. Mattress Factory, North Side. 412-231-3169. THURGOOD. The life story of Thurgood Marshall, first AfricanAmerican Supreme Court Justice. Tue-Sun. Thru April 7. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600.

COMEDY THU 28

AZIZ ANSARI. 7 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu,

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

UNTITLED FEMINIST SHOW. Burlesque/dance performance exploring gender politics. Presented by Young Jean Lee Theater Company, part of the Andy Warhol Museum’s Off The Wall Series. Sat., March 30, 8 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-320-4610. WINNIE-THE-POOH & THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS. A vulgar twist on the classic characters of A. A. Milne. Presented by The Rage of Stage Players. Thu-Sat. Thru April 6. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-292-8427. YOU SAY TOMATO, I SAY SHUT UP! A 21st century love story where “Happily Ever After” meets “It’s Complicated” Wed-Sun. Thru May 5. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

COME EARLY STAY LATE!

FRIDAY, MARCH 29 vs JACKSONVILLE SHARKS

9 p.m. Thru March 28 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

THU 28 - SAT 30 CHRIS KATTAN & FRIENDS. March 28-30 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 29 FRIDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Fri, 9 p.m. Thru March 29 Toros Performance Lounge, Friendship. 412-657-4245. PITTSBURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE W/ MIKE WYSOCKI. Fri, 9 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. PLAYER ONE IMPROV: TRUTH IN ADVERTISING. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

FRI 29 - SAT 30 JOHN EVANS, GENE COLLIER. March 29-30 Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 30 DEEP DISH CHICAGO IMPROV, BESS BOUGHAN. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. IMPROV DOUBLE FEATURE: CRIME SCENE IMPROV & HUSTLEBOT. 10:30 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

MON 01

TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 02 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 03 COMEDY NIGHT AT BUCKHEAD SALOON. First Wed of every month Buckhead Saloon, Station Square. 412-232-3101. JOKEE OAKEE. Comedy open stage hosted by Tonnochi:B. Wed Younger’s, North Side. 412-452-3267. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Juxtaposing prime examples of Warhol’s paintings, CONTINUES ON PG. 41

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013


“Braid” by Catherine Willett, from 40.425503° N, 79.976156° W at the Brew House Gallery

VISUAL

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NEW THIS WEEK BARCO LAW BUILDING. The Art of Japanese Noh Drama Tsukioka Kogyo, 1869-1927. Japanese woodblock prints from the collection on Richard & Mae Smethurst. Opening reception March 29, 5-8 p.m. Oakland. 412-648-1490. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Japan is the Key: Collecting Prints & Ivories, 1900–1920. Collections from the early years of the Carnegie Institute. Opens March 30. Oakland. 412-622-3131. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Basement Miracle. Masters of Fine Arts candidates present their final work. Feat. Scott Andrew, Felipe Castelblanco, Craig Fahner, Steve Gurysh, Luke Loeffler, Dan Wilcox & Erin Womack. Opening reception March 28, 6 -8 p.m. Oakland. 412-268-3618. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Continuum. Work by Doug DuBois & Aaron Blum. Gallery talk & reception April 12, 6-8:30 p.m. South Side. 412-431-1810. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. TBA/BYOB BRADDOCK. User-generated ad-hoc exhibit feat. .gifs, .movs & other movement based media. Artists include Kevin Clancy, Julie Mallis, Dan Wilcox, Isla Hansen, Patrick Quinn, A. Bill Miller, Jenna Kelly, more. Opens March 30, 8-11 p.m. One night only. Braddock. 415-518-9921.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Indivisibler. Work by John Burt Sanders. Downtown. 412-325-7017.

709 PENN GALLERY. Feminine Aesthetics. Women of Visions, Inc. group show feat. Denise “Mike” Johnson, Mary Martin, Vanessa German, JoAnne Bates, Christine McCray Bethea, Richena Brockinson, more. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BE GALLERIES. Where I Live. Paintings by Paul Rouphail, poems by Maria Rouphail. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Audrey Nicola. Seneca Valley High School student’s Senior Show. Harmony. 724-452-0539. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Petals & Pearls. Photography & watercolors by Anne Michele Lyons & Kathleen McShea. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Platonic Folds & How to Make Sense of a Canyon. Printmaking & mixed media works on paper by Meghan Olson. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. 42.8864° N, 78.8786° W. Feat. work by 10 artists from the Buffalo (NY) Arts Studio. Part of the Distillery 7 Exchange Program. South Side. 412-381-7767. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Free admission to Carnegie Museums of Art & Natural History from 4 - 8 p.m. every

Thur. in March. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Revelation. Work by Artur Vasilevich. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. EASTSIDE GALLERY. Hats Off. Work by Sally Allen, Pat Kelly, Bernie Pintar, Sickles, more. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. FE GALLERY. Austerity & Self-Sustainability. Installation by John Eastman & Donovan Widmer. Lawrenceville. 412-860-6028. THE FRAME GALLERY CARNEGIE MELLON. 15th Annual Kaleidoscope Exhibition. Work by students in Carnegie Mellon University’s BXA Intercollege Degree programs. Through April 6. Squirrel Hill. 412-268-2000. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. A Kind of Alchemy: Medieval Persian Ceramics. A look at the diversity of ceramics made in ancient Persia, now present-day Iraq, Iran, & Afghanistan. Feat. 10thcentury splashware, buffware, slip-painted ware, lusterware & 14th-century fritware, more. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. MM/DD/ YYYY. Artwork by current CMU School of Art undergraduate students. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. The Classic Collection: European & American Classical & Academic Styles. Early 19th & 20th century paintings. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Abstraction = M S x 2. Sculptures & paintings by Marjorie Shipe & Mary Culbertson Stark. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. All the Years Combined. Original lithographs & posters by Jerry Garcia. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Interiors. Oil paintings by Jonelle Summerfield. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Illumination. Juried exhibition by the Pittsburgh Society of Artists & Greensburg Art Club. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. JAMES GALLERY. unwrapped. Shibori-dyed quilts by Jan MyersCONTINUES ON PG. 43

sculpture, & films with those by HUNT INSTITUTE FOR other artists who reinterpret, BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. respond, or react to his work. What We Collect: Recent Art North Side. 412-237-8300. Acquisitions, 2007–2012. Botanical BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large illustrations from the early 19th collection of automatic roll-played century through the present. musical instruments and music Oakland. 412-268-2434. boxes in a mansion setting. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the Call for appointment. O’Hara. other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 412-782-4231. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. 20/20: Celebrating Two Decades Tours of a restored 19th-century, of the Heinz Architectural Center. middle-class home. Oakmont. Feat. timeline highlighting 412-826-9295. important exhibitions & events, a MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY display of 20 objects from the LOG HOUSE. Historic homes collection selected by current open for tours, lectures and more. or past curatorial staff, more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. Oakland. 412-622-3131. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF more than 600 birds from over NATURAL HISTORY. Free 200 species. With classes, lectures, admission to Carnegie Museums demos and more. North Side. of Art & Natural History from 412-323-7235. 4 - 8 p.m. every Thur. in March. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 Empowering Women: Artisan rooms helping to tell the story Cooperatives that Transform of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. Communities. Folk art objects University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. illustrating the power of women 412-624-6000. working together to provide OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church for their families, educate their features 1823 pipe organ, children, promote equality, & Revolutionary War graves. Scott. give back to their communities. 412-851-9212. BugWorks. Feat. beautiful OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. photography of insects, amazing This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion specimens, & live bugs! Ongoing: site features log house, blacksmith Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In shop & gardens. South Park. Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-835-1554. 412-622-3131. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. MUSEUM. Trolley rides and Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome exhibits. Includes displays, walking (planetarium), Miniature tours, gift shop, picnic area Railroad and Village, and Trolley Theatre. USS Requin submarine, Washington. and more. North Side. 724-228-9256. 412-237-3400. PHIPPS CARRIE FURNACE. CONSERVATORY & ww. r w Built in 1907, Carrie BOTANICAL GARDEN. pe ghcitypa p Furnaces 6 & 7 are Spring Flower Show. .com extremely rare examples Feat. bold blooms & of pre World War II sweet scents based on iron-making technology. Rankin. Frances Hodgson Burnett’s 412-464-4020 x.21. children’s classic, The Secret CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. Garden. 14 indoor rooms & 3 University of Pittsburgh Jazz outdoor gardens feature exotic Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards plants and floral displays from from the International Hall of around the world. Oakland. Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. 412-622-6914. DEPRECIATION LANDS PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Cameras MUSEUM. Small living history & the Famous Photos They Took. museum celebrating the Including a copy of Daguerre’s settlement and history of the first camera, James Bond’s mini Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. Minox spy unit, the Big Bertha that 412-486-0563. caught Bill Mazeroski rounding FALLINGWATER. Tour the third base in 1960 Winning Series, famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. more. North Side. 412-231-7881. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. museum & players club. West View. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass 412-931-4425. windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG FORT PITT MUSEUM. AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 Reconstructed fort houses museum animals, including many of Pittsburgh history circa endangered species. Highland French & Indian War and Park. 412-665-3639. American Revolution. Downtown. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL 412-281-9285. HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the FRICK ART & HISTORICAL Homestead Mill. Steel industry and CENTER. Ongoing: tours of community artifacts from 1881Clayton, the Frick estate, with 1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. classes, car & carriage museum. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. CENTER. 1968: The Year that HARD ROCK CAFE. Treasures Rocked America. Nearly a dozen of the Hard Rock. Traveling interactive video presentations memorabilia exhibit. Station & more than 100 evocative Square. 412-481-7625. artifacts that explore how the year

FULL LIST ONLINE

1968 helped shape our modern world. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. Scottdale. 724-887-7910.

HOLIDAY FRI 29

EASTER BAKE SALE. 10 a.m.5 p.m. St. John the Baptist Orthodox Greek Catholic Church, Ambridge. 412-749-0675.

SAT 30

EASTER BAKE SALE. 9:30 a.m.4 p.m. Animal Friends, Ohio Township. 412-847-7000.

DANCE THU 28 THE BIG READ: DANCE & DRAMA PERFORMANCE. 7 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456.

SAT 30 AMETHYST W/ TOM MORAN & JANELLE BURDELL. Bellydancing & music. 10 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950.

WED 03 THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT FONTINA. Performance by Texture Contemporary Ballet. April 3-5 New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-552-3114.

FUNDRAISERS SUN 31 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

MON 01

B-PEP JAZZ. 6-hour jazz marathon fun-raiser for the Black Political Empowerment Project. 5:30 p.m. Holiday Inn Select, Oakland. 412-682-5745. CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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TUE 02 LIGHT IT UP BLUE W/ AUTISM SPEAKS. Information materials, donation collection, more. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Fifth Avenue Place, Downtown. 412-456-7800.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Sam Perry’s Twin Fawns drag opera at Assemble Gallery, Garfield

POLITICS MON 01

CRITIC: Marya Kiselova, 27, an artist

AFTER CHAVEZ: WHAT’S NEXT FOR VENEZUELA. Policy discussion & luncheon w/ Miguel Diaz. 12-1:45 p.m. Rivers Club, Downtown. 412-391-5227.

from Homestead WHEN: Fri.,

March 22

LITERARY THU 28 facebook.com/rivertowne.brewing @rivertownebeer

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ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SPRING EQUINOX. Lilliput Review Poetry Reading. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274.

FRI 29

PALS BOOK CLUB. Seniors only. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

SAT 30 MEAN GIRLS: A READING. Readings that explore girl bullying. Feat. Yona Harvey, Chauna Craig, Sarah Shotland, Lori Jakiela, Lois Williams, more. 7 p.m. Space, Downtown. 412-325-7723. POETRY READING & BOOK FAIR. Presented by Umbra Pittsburgh Writers & United Black Book Clubs of Pittsburgh. 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Homewood. 412-418-2459.

MON 01

I thought tonight’s event would be very different from what it ended up being. I thought this evening would be very funny and very campy, and while it was all of those things, it also had a lot of truth to it and a lot of reality to it, because truly it was someone baring their absolute soul and revealing things about their sexuality and the demons in their closet. I think that is something that we can all connect with and be inspired by, someone that is entertaining you but also revealing these truths. It is a very valuable experience and I enjoyed it. BY JEFF IHAZA

month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. PICO IYER: MOVING & SITTING STILL IN OUR NEW GLOBAL ORDER. Lecture & book signing. Adamson Writers Series. 5-7 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. UNBELIEVABLE STORIES FROM A BELIEVABLE LIFE: AN EVENING W/ DAVID HARRIS-GERSHON. Storytelling, examining the divide between writing & telling stories, more. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

WED 03

CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. IVAN RODDEN. Point Park Informal knitting session. Wed, Writers’ Series . 6 p.m. Point 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. Park University, Downtown. 412-622-3116. 412-392-3480. OPEN POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. First Mon of ROBOTS & WRITING. every month, 7-10 p.m. Combine craft Brentwood Library, www. per materials, robotic pa Brentwood. pghcitym components & a custom .co 412-882-5694. visual-programming tool READING ROUND to build & animate robotic TABLE. Feat. plays from creations. Middle school students August Wilson & new works only. Thu, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Thru by up & coming playwrights. March 28 Assemble, Garfield. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. 773-425-1531. August Wilson Center for African VIRTUOUS ACADEMY OPEN American Culture, Downtown. HOUSE. Accepting grades 3-7. 412-258-2700. 6-8 p.m. Virtuous Academy, Duquesne. 412-543-8897. JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue IT WAS THE COLDEST YEAR. of every month, 6 p.m. Show w/ puppetry artist Zach Carnegie Library, Oakland. Dorn. Thru March 30 Children’s 412-622-3151. Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS 412-322-5058. BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013

PHOTOS W/ THE EASTER BUNNY. Thru March 30 South Hills Village, Bethel Park. 412-577-5140. WOODWORKING. Explore, design, & build using processes & tools of woodworking & electronics. Thru March 30, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 28 - WED 03

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. CHARLIE & KIWI’S EVOLUTIONARY ADVENTURE. Join Charlie as he travels back to the Age of Dinosaurs to discover how evolution works. Feat. story theater & discovery area. Presented by Commonwealth Connections Academy. TueSun. Thru May 12 Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. MOVE WITH ART. Pull levers to move a 10-foot wooden man, create images on a giant Kaleidoscope, feed rubber balls to a life-size wooden cow & much more. Thru May 12 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 29 DANIEL TIGER PLAYTESTING. Test out a new game feat. Daniel Tiger. Ages 4-6. Fri, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Thru March 29 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 30 BREAKFAST W/ DINOSAURS. Breakfast, hands-on activities, more. 8-10 a.m. Carnegie Museum


VISUAL ART

Penn Hills Game Exchange

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Newbury. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. LAROCHE COLLEGE. Positive Space. Student art showcase presented by La Roche graphic design students under faculty supervision. Wexford. 800-838-4572. MATTRESS FACTORY. Feminist and.. New work by Julia Cahill, Betsy Damon, Parastou Forouhar, Loraine Leeson, Ayanah Moor, & Carrie Mae Weems. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Featuring Ben Matthews & David Lewis. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Uncommon Grounds. Group show highlighting the fluidity & transformative quality of glass. Feat. Jon Goldberg, Jan Kransberger, Mark Leputa, Leonard Marty,& Matthew Szösz. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MORRIS LEVY GALLERY. Salon des Femmes de la Yinz. Art exhibit in recognition of Women’s History Month. Presented by LUPEC. Lawrenceville. 724-331-9692. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Faces & Places: Photographs of Old Economy. Never before seen photography from the late 19th & early 20th centuries. Ambridge. 724-266-4500. PICTURESQUE PHOTOGRAPHY & GIFTS. Photography by Brenda Knoll. Lawrenceville. 412-688-0240. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Above Dusk. Paintings

of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288. MOST “EGG-CELLENT” EGG HUNT. Ages 12 & under. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

SUN 31

by Kara Ruth Snyder. Homographies. Installation by Lizzy De Vita. Inter-subjectivity. Work by Eli Blasko, Eric D. Charlton & Ian F. Thomas. NON-WORK. Work by David Montano. Public Lives. Watercolors by William McAllister. Slo Poke. Paintings & drawings by Jonathan Chamberlain. Somewhere In Between. Installation by Lenore D. Thomas. This May Not Take That Long. Audio/video installation by David Bernabo & Emily Walley. Transience. Work by Stephen Chalmers. Untitled 1. Work by Jeremy Boyle & Mark Franchino. Artist talks by Eli Blasko, David Bernabo, Eric Charlton, Jeremy Boyle, Mark Franchino, Kara Snyder, Ian F. Thomas, & Emily Walley. March 30, 1 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Consciousness. Flameworked glass by Eunsuh Choi. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. Point Park Project 1: Kaleidoscope. Work by Di-Ay Battad, Katie Mackowick, Chris McGinnis, & Daniel Luchman. Downtown. 412-391-4100. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Cameras & the Famous Photos They Took. Including a copy of Daguerre’s first camera, James Bond’s mini Minox spy unit, the Big Bertha that caught Bill Mazeroski rounding third base in 1960 Winning Series, more. North Side. 412-231-7881. SCHOOLHOUSE ART CENTER. The Lion & the Lamb. Oil paintings, pastels, photographs & sculptures by local artists. Bethel Park. 412-835-9898. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin Turner: New Work. Sculpture. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 15. SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART. Red, White

TUE 02

CHESS CLUB. For kindergarten7th grade. Every other Tue, 6:30 p.m. Thru April 16 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. TUESDAYS WITH TESS. Tue, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

3D PRINTING WORKSHOP. Sun, 1-4 p.m. Thru March 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING WORKSHOP. Sun, 1-4 p.m. Thru March 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

WED 03

MON 01

SAT 30

BROWN BAG LUNCH BUNCH. A lunchtime story for kids ages 3-6. Mon, 12:30 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

& Blue in Black and White: The American Scene in Prints, Drawings & Photographs. 35-some works on paper from the museum’s collection, from photographs to lithographs. Ligonier. 724-238-6015. SPACE. Mean Girls. Work by Jenn Gooch, Sonja Sweterlitsch, Randie Snow, Vanessa German, more. Downtown. 412-325-7723. STOKE’S GRILL. A Female Perspective. Work by Kim Freithaler, June Kielty, Nadya Lapets & Vickie Schilling. Ross. 412-369-5380. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Student/ Instructor Exhibition. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. The Art of Akira. Production art from Katsuhiro Otomo’s film. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TRUNDLE MANOR. Sara K. Diesel. Illustrations. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. WEST PENN HOSPITAL. Welcome to the Gardens. Fine acrylic paintings by Maura Taylor. The Gallery of Art, Millvale Ave. Upper Lobby. Email maurataylor3@gmail. com for more information. Bloomfield. 412-578-5000. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. The Art of Ruth Levine. A pop-up gallery of Levine’s work. An Art(ist) in Motion. Work by Aaronel deRoy Gruber. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WILDCARD. everyday balloons. Work by Chris Bencivenga & Becki Hollen. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Power Pixels 2013. New selfgenerative video installations, includes the world premiere of Miguel Chevalier’s latest work, Digital-Archi (Meta Cities). Downtown. 412-471-5605.

OUTSIDE THE RACHEL CARSON TRAIL QUEST. Hike the 34-mile trail in 4 sections, w/ a bonus hike to the still-developing Harmony Trail.

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March 30th! Unlimited play in our arcade is just $5

Monday-Friday: 5:30pm - 10:00pm • Saturday and Sunday: Noon - 10:00pm

The City’s Hottest Live Music Scene!

UPCOMING NATIONAL SHOWS

SHOWS K THIS WEE

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 03 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 28

AARP TAX HELP. Free tax CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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GRAND OPENING Saturday

Buy/sell/trade from our selection of hundreds of classic video games! Nintendo! Sega! Xbox! Playstation! And much more! Imports and other hard-tofind titles! We modify and repair consoles from the NES to the Xbox! Play over 75 classic arcade games on our giant projection screens!

Presented by Venture Outdoors. Sat. Thru March 30 412-255-0564. STEP INTO SNOWSHOES. Snowshoeing/skiing every Sat. w/ at least 4” of snow on the ground. Call Friday to confirm. Sat. Thru March 30 Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011.

TUE 02

WRITING & ART WITH TESS. Story & craft-time for kids ages 5 & up. First Wed of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

431 Rodi Rd, Penn Hills PA 15235 • 412-371-0386

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Thu Fri Sat Sun

3.28 3.29 3.30 3.31

Visit jergels.com/calendar for a complete list of shows & to buy tickets!

VELVEETA // 80’s cover // 8 pm // $7 TONY JANFLONE // blues rock // 9 pm // $7 BON JOURNEY // covers // 9 pm // $7 VENUE CLOSED, HAPPY EASTER!

103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086

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Pizza & Beer Night tuesdays $15 large pizza & pitcher domestic beer FREE POOL all night

Wind Up wednesdays

$2 Miller Lite Drafts til 12am FREE POOL all night ½ off Select Appetizers 9-11pm

Thirsty thursdays

$7 Yuengling Pitchers til 12am Karaoke 9:30-1:30am

Eat, Drink & Dance fridays & saturdays

DJ 9-2am, Kitchen open til 1am

03.30 Disco

Inferno DJ Terry Kicks

Now Booking Events, Parties & more Open 7 days a week for special events contact cattivo44@comcast.net 146 44th Street Lawrenceville PA 15201 412.687.2157 www.cattivo.biz Open Tues-Sat 4-2am Check our website & Facebook page for more events

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS

VIDEO DJ’S

10:30PM -2AM

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1060 Settlers Ridge Center Drive - Robinson Township CadillacRanchGroup.com

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Find us on Facebook: Cadillac Ranch Pittsburgh

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

preparation and assistance to low & middle income taxpayers. Thu. Thru April 11 Baldwin Borough Public Library, Baldwin. 412-885-2255. ARTS, CULTURE & ECONOMIC PROSPERITY. Presented by Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council. www.pittsburghartscouncil.org 9:30 a.m. California University, California. 724-938-4000. BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. CITY DHARMA. Soto Zen Meditation. jisen@deepspringzen. org Thu, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ESSENCE OF LEADERSHIP BREAKFAST SERIES. Feat. Liz Moore Pessaro, Founder Bluebird Kitchen. Presented by Dress For Success Pittsburgh. Omni William Penn, Downtown. 412-201-4204 x 227. EVERYTHING AFTERSCHOOL! Free networking event for after-school program providers & organizations that provide enrichment opportunities & resources to them. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-1910. GAS RUSH STORIES FILM SCREENING & PANEL DISCUSSION. Examines the impact of shale gas drilling in Pennsylvania. 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MARGARET MORRISON DISTINGUISHED LECTURE IN WOMEN’S HISTORY. Discussion of Impounded: Dorothea Lange’s Censored Photographs of the Japanese Internment in World War II 4:30 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2830. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. STARS ON BUTLER KARAOKE CONTEST. 9:30 p.m. Round Corner Cantina, Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279. STARTING OUT AS A SCREENWRITER W/ MATT LOHR. 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Filmmakers, Oakland. 412-681-5449 x 217. TIME FOR ME: A WOMEN’S CREATIVE CIRCLE. 7-9 p.m.

Bottlebrush Gallery & Shop, Harmony. 724-452-0539. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

[COMEDY]

THU 28 - WED 03 NORTH HILLS COMMUNITY OUTREACH FREE TAX PREP. To qualify, your 2012 income was up to $40,000 if filing jointly or up to $20,000 if filing as an individual. Appointments are available Mon & Tues afternoons through April 15. Call for appointment. Thru April 15 NHCO North Boroughs, Bellevue. 412-307-0069.

“Does this situation happen to you?” asks

Aziz Ansari

FRI 29 4TH ANNUAL PRAYER 4 PEACE MARCH. Begins at Westinghouse High School, Homewood. 9:30 a.m. 412-638-5979. BUTLER YMCA GOOD FRIDAY BREAKFAST. 7 a.m. Butler YMCA, Butler. 724-287-4733. IN PASSING. Photography lecture w/ Chloe Isadora Reison. Speaking Light Series. 6 p.m. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-392-4730.

. “You’re sitting at your computer, working on something really important. And then you think, ‘Man, I wonder if Home Alone 2 made more money than Home Alone 1. I gotta look into this NOW. Sorry, important work, something more pressing has come up.’” The comedian, known as the shallow and sarcastic Tom Haverford on Parks and Recreation, brings his complaints about the Internet, rude people and more to Heinz Hall this week. 7 p.m. Thu., March 28. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $25-35. Call 800-743-8560 or visit pittsburghsymphony.org.

SAT 30 4TH ANNUAL LEGACY AWARDS have a basic understanding of LUNCHEON. Presented by Korean & are interested in the National Council of Negro Women. 12-3 p.m. Hosanna House, increasing proficiency. Sat Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. Wilkinsburg. 412-351-2885. PSYCHIC FAIR. Last Sat of every AFRICAN DRUM & DANCE month, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Chapel of WORKSHOP. w/ Mamadouba Oneness, West Mifflin. 412-770-4961. (Mito) & Mouminatou Camara. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA Skibo Small Gym. 3-4:30 p.m. CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by Carnegie Mellon University, dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Oakland. 412-403-7502. Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. BOTANICAL DRAWING I: SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. FOUNDATION TECHNIQUES. Sat. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing Thru April 20 Phipps Conservatory follows. No partner needed. & Botanical Garden, Oakland. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace 412-441-4442 x 3925. Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. BREAKFAST W/ THE RABBITS. 412-683-5670. Learn the basics of rabbit care. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Animal Friends, Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, Ohio Township. 412-847-7055. 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public FAMILYTIME SERIES: SUNSTARS Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. IN THE MAKING. Music, SPANISH CONVERSATION workshops & conversations GROUP. Friendly, informal. with women in the arts At the Starbucks inside 2-4 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Theater, East Liberty. Target - East Liberty. 412-363-3000. 412-362-6108. GOLD LINE DANCING SWING CITY. Learn & PARTY. 8-11 p.m. www. per pa practice swing dancing Diverse Banquet pghcitym o .c skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Hall, Homewood. Wightman School, 412-867-8404. Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. IMPROV WORKSHOP W/ PAUL GRONDY. 4 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL 412-339-0608. HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly INDIAN CLASSICAL DANCE letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. CLASS. Sat. Thru April 20 Mookshi Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. Wellness Center, Regent Square. BRUNCH IN BLOOM. Seasonal 412-407-7829. & sustainably-grown brunch. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Call for reservation. Sun, 11 a.m. Korean grammar & basic & 1 p.m. Thru March 31 Phipps conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Carnegie Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. Oakland. 412-622-6914. KOREAN II. For those who already

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 31

MON 01 AFTER CHAVEZ: WHAT’S NEXT FOR VENEZUELA? Discussion w/ Latin America analyst, Miguel Diaz. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. AN EVENING W/ PICO IYER. Informal Q&A session. 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3114. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SAHAJA MEDITATION. 7:30 p.m. and Mon, 7:30 p.m. Thru April 29 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SLOVAK HERITAGE: LIFE OF A TAMMY. w/ Katka Gallagher, a Duquesne University Tamburitzan. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 02 FORUM ON ENDING GUN VIOLENCE. 7-9 p.m. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-414-9035. MT. LEBANON CONVERSATION SALON. Discuss current events w/ friends & neighbors. For seniors. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.


PYUUPIRU. Part of the CMU School of Art lecture series. 5 p.m. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-279-2970.

WED 03 CELEBRATE THE RAIN! WATERSHED AWARENESS & RAIN BARREL WORKSHOP. Presented by Nancy Martin of the PA Resources Council. 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-388-7490 x247. EMPOWER YOUNG GIRLS: BODY IMAGE & THE MEDIA. Sponsored by Women of Southwestern PA. Register by emailing mdaniel@ memorialparkchurch.org 78:30 p.m. Memorial Park Church, Allison Park. 412-364-9492. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FAILED EVIDENCE: WHY LAW ENFORCEMENT RESISTS SCIENCE. Talk by David A. Harris. www.acslaw.org 6 p.m. Barco Law Building, Oakland. 412-648-1490. HUMOR IN CRAFT W/ BRIGITTE MARTIN. 2 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. RENTAL REAL ESTATE & YOUR TAXES. 6:30-8 p.m. Westmoreland County Community College, New Kensington, New Kensington. 724-339-1922. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. TACKLING TOUGH TOPICS: TALKING TO CHILDREN ABOUT ILLNESS & DEATH. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. TEA CLASS & TASTING. History of tea, steeping techniques, Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea samples & European cookies will be served. First Wed of every month, 7 p.m. Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606. URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS ATL-NYC PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for new TV show, I Want To Be Discovered. Log onto www. iwant2bdiscoveredonline.com & post video of group or individual talent. 3 minutes max. THE DOCHERTY AGENCY. Open auditions for adult models & actors. First Tue of every month.

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Downtown. 412-765-1400. FROG PRINCE THEATRICALS. Auditions for a staged reading of Steve Hansen’s Rocka Mortis. Seeking talented singers w/ comedic ability. April 1. Actors should prepare 2 songs by the artists listed at www.frogprincetheatricals. com. Email audition request to info@frogprincetheatricals.com Pittsburgh CLO Academy of Musical Theater, Downtown.

SUBMISSIONS 14TH WARD INDEPENDENT DEMOCRATIC CLUB. Seeking submissions for the Progressive Visions Video Contest. For more info, www.pgh14widc.org. ART ALL NIGHT: LAWRENCEVILLE. Submit one (& only one) piece of artwork or sign up to perform. Registration & other info at http://www.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

NORTH HILLS COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Interfaith organization North Hills Community Outreach seeks volunteers to serve 15 to 40 hours a week assisting older Pittsburghers in their homes as Senior Companions. Volunteers receive a small stipend, meal allowance and monthly training. Call 412-307-0069 or visit www.nhco.org for more information. HOBNOB THEATRE COMPANY. Auditions for William Shakespeare’s The Tempest. April 1-2. No prepared piece necessary, scenes & monologues will be posted to website. www.hobnobtheatre.com/ St. Peter’s Anglican Church, Butler. 412-736-1204. LATSHAW PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for Viva Las Vegas. March 31 & April 14. Female dancers only. Call for more info. 724-853-4050. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Seeking a Stage Director for Fall 2013 production of Princess Ida. Gilbert & Sullivan or other Operetta experience preferred. Resumes & letters accepted through April 20 to directorsearch@pittsburgh savoyards.org. 412-734-8476. PITTSBURGH SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARKS. Auditions for Romeo & Juliet. April 20. AEA/ non-union actors, prepare a brief Shakespearean monologue. Frick Park, Blue Slide Playground, Squirrel Hill. 412-404-8531. POOR YORICK’S PLAYERS. Auditions for Taming of the Shrew. April 6-7. Men/women, Shakespearean monologue under 2-min. Call for appointment. Tall Trees Amphitheater, Monroeville. 412-537-1705. PRIME STAGE THEATRE. Auditions for Walk Two Moons. April 1-2. Men/women age 14senior citizen, 2-min. monologue. The Oakland School, Oakland. 724-773-0700. THE SUMMER COMPANY. Auditions for 2013 season. April 13-14. Men/women age 17+, 2-min. contemporary monologue. Non-equity, walk-ins welcome. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412–243-6464. THE TALENT GROUP. Open casting for models and actors 1st Monday of every month. 11:45 AM, 5:45 PM. 412-471-8011.

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artallnight.org/ 412-235-1950. ART IN ACTION. Seeking artists for a one-day interactive art show. June 2. For more info & application: http://www. artinaction-hf.com/ Stone Pavilion, Washington. 724-413-4648. BOYD COMMUNITY CENTER. Seeking locally made, high-quality work for the 2013 GardenFest & Artist Market. Submissions in mediums such as ceramics, glass, jewelry, wood, leather, paper, photography & more, as well as handmade soaps & other small items are welcome. cschade@ boydcommunitycenter.org 412-828-8566. BRICOLAGE THEATER. Seeking stories that are true, funny, & between 1,500 to 2,000 words for WordPlay, a new storytelling event. Email submissions to alan@olifson.com. FPA SALUTING SERVICE AWARDS. Nominate a veteran who is making a difference through community service. Nominations accepted online at http://www.fpa pittsburgh.org/ 412-512-0589. THE GALLERY 4. Accepting visual art submissions for Salon Show 2013. Send image files of up to 5 finished pieces to thegallery4@ gmail.com. Include title, dimensions, & medium(s) & write SALON APPLICANT in the subject line. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY FLYNN. Seeking work by film & visual artists to display in new gallery. McKees Rocks. 412-969-2990. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Seeking submissions for Automata, an upcoming art show. Deadline for application: April 1. For more information, email katydement@ gmail.com. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Seeking vendors for the Garden Mart to sell plants, products, more. Call for details. 724-266-4500 x 114. PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS FESTIVAL. Now accepting 1-act

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plays that have never before been produced. 12 plays will be selected to be performed as mainstage productions for the festival’s 23rd season. For more information visit www.pittsburghnewworks.org/ play-submission or email info@ pittsburghnewworks.org. 412-944-2639. THE PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 67th Annual International Aqueous Open exhibition. http://www. pittsburghwatercolorsociety.com 412-731-0636. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail.com SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking entries for 8 x 8 PHOTO PARTY showcase. One digital submission per person. Digital, film, or cell phone cameras allowed. http://silvereye. org/8x8registrationform.pdf 412-431-1810. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Seeking contemporary fashion designs created w/ repurposed & upcycled elements for Lost & Found: Sustainable High Fashion exhibition. http://www. sweetwaterartcenter.org/callfor-artists 412-741-4405. VERONA’S CREATIVE MARKETPLACE. Seeking artists, food & product vendors for marketplace running MaySeptember. Call for more info. Verona Borough Building, Verona. 412-721-0943.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

My brother is 22 years old and mentally ill with social anxiety on the scale of agoraphobia (officially diagnosed). He’s stuck on the fact that he’s a virgin, and he is convinced that he will only be able to pursue a job, have a social life, and tackle other obstacles after he loses his virginity. Financially, it would be easy for me to drive him to Nevada and eliminate the virginity issue. My family isn’t hung up on “purity” where sex and virginity are concerned, so we’re open to this. I don’t have any illusions that this will solve his problems, but my mom and I are hopeful that it would eliminate an excuse that’s keeping him from taking positive steps forward. Should I offer to take him? Or force him to sort it out on his own despite his crippling social issues? SOCIALLY INTERACTIVE SISTER

haggling, no prying for personal information, his personal-hygiene needs to be impeccable, and he should know the basics on protection and STI transmission. Above all, he needs to treat her with respect.” Listen to The WhoreCast at thewhorecast. com. Follow Siouxsie Q on Twitter @WhoreCast. I’m a straight guy who recently got out of a long-term relationship. Physically, she rocked my world. Unfortunately, she rocked my world mentally, too. We ended things a few months ago. I finally feel ready to date again, and last week I met this dropdead gorgeous girl. Intelligent, successful, positive — an unbelievable catch. But there is just one thing, and it’s killing me: In the past, I’ve always dated women with curves. This girl is gorgeous and athletic but she’s also skinny. Am I objectifying women’s bodies here? Am I fetishizing curvy girls too much? What is my dick thinking here?

SOME WILL OBJECT TO YOUR HIRING A SEX WORKER TO HELP YOUR BROTHER OUT, BUT YOU CAN TELL THOSE PEOPLE TO GO FUCK THEMSELVES.

“I want to commend SIS for considering the services of a sex worker in such a positive and nonjudgmental way,” said Siouxsie Q, a San Francisco-based sex worker and the creator and host of The WhoreCast, a weekly podcast that seeks to humanize people working in the sex industry. “The right provider is out there for her brother.” Some will object to your hiring a sex worker to help your brother out, but you can tell those people to go fuck themselves — or you can tell them to rent The Sessions. In that acclaimed 2012 film, John Hawkes played a poet who is paralyzed from the neck down. Helen Hunt played a sexual surrogate — a clinical/ glorified sex worker — that the poet, with the blessing of his priest, hires to take his virginity. No one had a problem with the sex-work aspect of The Sessions because Hawkes’s character is so profoundly disabled that audiences sympathized with his plight. Your brother’s disability is no less real for being invisible. So I don’t see why anyone should object to your brother getting a little professional assistance with his plight. So hire a sex worker, if you think it will help. And there’s no need to drive to Nevada. Siouxsie suggests you look for an “experienced” (read: somewhat older) escort with an online presence in your area. A sex worker who’s over 25 or 30 and maintains her own website — and has writeups on escort-review sites — is not just less likely to be trafficked or exploited, she’s far more likely to be experienced and patient. She may have even worked with men like your brother before. So what do you do once you locate a prospective sex worker? “Send an email explaining the situation,” said Siouxsie. “There are sex workers out there who specialize in working with clients with disabilities, and many have experience working with clients who might be very similar to her brother.” If the first woman you contact doesn’t work with men like your brother, she may be able to refer you to someone who does. Once you find your local Helen Hunt, prep your brother. “Give him a pep talk,” said Siouxsie. “Let him know about etiquette and protocol: no

MY DICK, MY ANNOYANCE

The dick wants what it wants. That said, sometimes the dick wants more than the guy attached to it realizes. You might discover, once you start fucking around with this girl, that your dick must have curves and this girl is just too skinny for you. Or you might discover that you want her so bad — that you’re so attracted to her — that your dick can make the leap for her alone, i.e., she’s the lone exception to your curvy-girl rule. Or you might discover, as so many men have, that your dick wants more than one narrow type. Sometimes it takes meeting someone wonderful who isn’t the ideal you’ve locked onto to realize that your dick was into more than one thing, but your brain — your bigger and more powerful sex organ — was shutting your dick down. I’m a 23-year-old bi female from Vancouver, and I’ve been heavily sub-identified since I started having sex. But lately, with the guidance of my lovely boyfriend, I’ve been realizing I have a very pronounced dom streak. Do you have any pointers on starting out? I read The N ew Topping Book, by Dossie Easton and Janet Hardy, and it was helpful, but I was wondering if you had any tips. I’m nervous about doing it wrong. ANOTHER NOVICE TOP

Give yourself permission to do it “wrong.” I don’t mean “wrong” in the accidentally-injure-or-killthe-boyfriend sense. I mean “wrong” in the goyour-own-way sense. You’ll be less nervous if you relax and give yourself permission to be yourself, i.e., nervous and inexperienced, a little awkward in your new role. You don’t have to be the perfect snarling dominatrix the very first time you pick up a crop. You don’t have to be a snarling dominatrix ever, if that’s not who you want to be. Check out the wonderful Beyond the Valley of the FemDoms — beyondthevalleyofthefemdoms. tumblr.com — for some insight on being your own dominant woman. Good luck!

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

03.27-04.03

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I was too lazy to write your horoscope this week, so I went to a website that hawks bumper stickers and copied a few of their slogans to use as your “advice.” Here you go. 1. Never follow a rule off a cliff. 2. Have the courage to honor your peculiarities. 3. It’s never too late to have a rebellious adolescence. 4. Criticize by creating. 5. Never make anything simple and efficient when it can be elaborate and wonderful. 6. Complex problems have simple, easy-to-understand, morally clear, wrong answers. APRIL FOOL! I lied. I wasn’t lazy at all. I worked hard to ensure that all the suggestions I just provided are in strict accordance with the astrological gestalt.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It’s a perfect time to watch the cult-classic film Night of the Day of the Dawn of the Son of the Bride of the Return of the Revenge of the Terror of the Attack of the Evil, Mutant, Alien, FleshEating, Hellbound, Zombified Living Dead. It will provide you with just the right inspiration as you deal with your own problems. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Don’t you dare watch any horror movies. You’re in a phase when you can make dramatic progress in transforming long-standing dilemmas — but only if you surround yourself with positive, uplifting influences.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The coming week will be an excellent time to wash dishes, clean bathrooms, scrub floors, vacuum carpets, wash windows, do laundry and clean the refrigerator. The more drudge work you do, the better you’ll feel. APRIL FOOL! I lied. The truth is, you now have astrological license to minimize your participation in boring tasks like the ones I named. It’s high time for

you to seek out the most interesting work and play possible.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You know what would be a really cool prank to pull off this April Fool’s Day? Arrange to have rubber tires airlifted into a dormant volcano, then set them on fire. Smoke will pour out the top. Everyone who lives nearby will think the volcano is getting ready to explode. Don’t forget to videotape the event for YouTube. Later, when you reveal the hoax, your video will go viral and you’ll become a celebrity. APRIL FOOL! I don’t really think you should try this prank. It’s old hat. Back in 1974, a guy named Porky Bickar did it to Alaska’s Mount Edgecumbe. Here’s my real oracle for you: It is a good time to boost your visibility by doing something funny. Or to build your brand by being mischievous. Or to demonstrate your power by showing off your sense of humor.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

In the animated TV show The Simpsons, 10-yearold Bart is constantly getting into trouble be-

cause of the monkey business he loves to perpetrate. His teachers punish him by compelling him to write corrective declarations on the classroom blackboard. It so happens that some of those apologetic statements should be coming out of your mouth in the coming week, Leo. They include the following: “I will not strut around like I own the place. I will not claim that I am deliciously saucy. I will not instigate revolution. I will not trade pants with others. I will not carve gods. I will not Xerox my butt. I will not scream for ice cream.” APRIL FOOL! I lied. The truth is, you SHOULD consider doing things like that. And don’t apologize!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The sport of ferret-legging is an endurance contest. Participants vie to determine who can last longest as a live ferret runs loose inside their pants. The current record is five hours and 26 minutes, held by a retired British miner. But I predict that a Virgo will soon break that mark. Could it be you? APRIL FOOL! I misled you. I don’t really think you should put a ferret in your pants, not even to win a contest. It is possible, however, that there will soon be a pleasurable commotion happening in the area below your waist. And I suspect that you will handle it pretty well.

catch up to it. Once you grab it, you strap it on and open the chute, ideally before you hit the earth. This is the kind of beyond-ballsy activity that would be perfect for you right now. APRIL FOOL! In truth, I don’t recommend banzai skydiving now or ever. Plain old skydiving is fine, though. The same principle applies in relation to any adventurousness you’re considering: Push yourself, yes, but not to an absurd degree.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Should you relocate to Kazakhstan and grow sunflowers? Is it time to think about getting a job in Uruguay and living there for the next 10 years? Can you see yourself building your dream home in Morocco on a bluff overlooking the Atlantic Ocean? I suggest you spend some quality time thinking way, way outside the box about where you belong on this earth. APRIL FOOL! I went a bit overboard in my recommendations. It is true that you should brainstorm about the kind of home you want to create and enjoy in the future. But that probably means revising and refining your current situation rather than leaving it all behind and starting over.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Risk being a crazed fool for love, Libra. Get as wild and extreme as you’ve ever been if it helps you rustle up the closeness you’re hungry for. Get down on your knees and beg, or climb a tree with a megaphone and profess your passion. APRIL FOOL! I was exaggerating a little. It’s true that now is an excellent time to be aggressive about going after the intimate connection you want. But I suggest you accomplish that by being ingenious and imaginative rather than crazy and extreme.

Your brain has a bigger capacity than you realize. According to professor of psychology Paul Reber, it can hold the equivalent of three million hours’ worth of television shows. As I’m sure you know, your brain is not even close to being full of that much data. And in accordance with the current astrological omens, I suggest you cram in as much new material as possible. APRIL FOOL! I told you a half-truth. While it’s correct that now is an excellent time to pour more stuff into your brain, you should be highly discerning about what you allow in there. Seek out the richest ideas, the most stimulating information, the best stories. Avoid trivial crap.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

British comedy team Monty Python did a sketch in which a policeman apprehends a criminal. The bad guy says, “Yes, I did it, but society is to blame.” And the cop says, “Right! We’ll arrest them instead.” You should adopt this attitude, Scorpio. Blame everyone else but yourself for your problems and flaws. APRIL FOOL! I lied. In fact, the truth is the opposite of what I said. It’s time to take more responsibility for your actions. Bravely accept the consequences of what you’ve done — with your sense of humor fully engaged and a lot of compassion for yourself.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Banzai skydiving is a step beyond ordinary skydiving. To do it, you hurl your folded-up parachute out of the airplane, wait a while, and then leap into mid-air yourself. If all goes well, you free-fall in the direction of your parachute and

July 2012 was a sad time in the history of mythic creatures. The National Ocean Service, a U.S. government agency, made a formal proclamation that there are no such things as mermaids. But I predict those stuffy know-it-alls will soon get a big shock, when a Piscean scientist presents evidence that mermaids are indeed real. APRIL FOOL! I was exaggerating. I don’t really foresee the discovery of a flesh-and-blood mermaid — by a Pisces or anyone else. I do, however, suspect that your tribe is now highly adept at extracting useful revelations and inspirations from dreams, visions, and fantasies — including at least one that involves a coven of Buddhist Ninja clown mermaids. What quality or behavior in you would most benefit from healthy self-mocking? Tell how you keep yourself honest. Write Freewillastrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013


FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 49 + SERVICES 50 + STUDIES 51 + WELLNESS 52 + LIVE 53

WORK HELP WANTED Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

HELP WANTED Paid In Advanced! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-station. com (AAN CAN)

Do you like to work on the issues you care about? Would you like to prepare for your future? Want to get paid to make a difference?

$1,400/Month Health Care and Child Care $5,550 Education Award and Federal Student Loan Deferment Hands on Leadership Development, Coaching, and Nonprofit Career Based Training Information Sessions will be held from March – May

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Help Wanted! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www.howtoworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN)

Live like a popstar. Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-777-2091 (AAN CAN)

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

ARTIST Tattoo Artist wanted.

Well established shop seeks artist to supplement our crew. Portfolio and experience a must.

724-226-1999

Established female band doing Country, Classic rock, Top 40. Need lead female vocalist. 724-322-3515

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

University Club, Sodexo at the University of Pittsburgh

Barista, Waitstaff, Banquet Servers, Bartenders, Cook, Utility Worker, Banquet Houseman Full and Part time positions available, competitive wages, immediate openings. Applications are accepted Monday-Thursday 9am-4pm. Please contact sodexoupitt@gmail.com or 412-624-2347 for more information. Sodexo values workforce diversity. EOE, M/F/D/V

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

   

  

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you.

Spokesmodel National Promotional agency is seeking Spokesmodels to conduct promotions for a leading tobacco product within nightlife and retail establishments in Pittsburgh and surrounding areas. This part time position is ideal for attractive, outgoing young men and women who are looking for an interesting, challenging position within the nightlife and retail scene that will allow them to make good money and have fun.

wyep.org

Position Requirements: • 20 – 25 hours of daytime and/ or evening availability over 3 – 7 days per week. • Clean neat appearance and outgoing personality excellent verbal and people skills • Prior Face-to-Face Promotional Experience preferred • MUST be at least 21 years old

For more information, visit www.publicallies.org or Contact Branden Ballard at 412-258-3022 or brandenb@publicallies.org

Application Deadline May 24th

Responses can be sent to HR@MSPromotions.com and must include resume, references and comp card/recent photo.

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

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SERVICES HEALTH SERVICES

ART/ARTISTS

UP TO $1,375 in compensation for participation in clinical trials and FREE study-related care by LOCAL DOCTORS. Arthritis, Crohn’s, Gout, COPD, Low Back Pain, and Pediatric Depression. 1-888-288-3755 (AAN CAN)

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

COUNSELING

Specializing in Treatment of Depression and Anxiety Now Accepting New Clients with BC/BS and UPMC Insurance 412.848.1117 george@ssmha.net www.ssmha.net

CLASSES

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069 NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 Void in Illinois/New Mexico

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www.CenturaOnline. com(AAN CAN)

CLASSES AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

Call Today to Advertise Your Business in Pittsburgh City Paper!

Randi & Chuck 1-888-223-7941

ANNOUNCEMENTS

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/ GordonShoes The Think And Grow Rich of the 21st Century! Revolutionary breakthrough for success being released! For a FREE CD, please call 1-800-385-8470 (AAN CAN)

HAULING

ADOPTING your newborn is our dream. Joyfilled home, endless love, security awaits.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

412-316-3342

D & S HAULING Reliable Low Rates Call NOW

412-877-0730

CITIZEN POLICE REVIEW BOARD

DANCE INSTRUCTOR Looking for your next tenant? Advertise in City Paper’s “LIVE” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds! Call 412316-3342 TODAY!

Pre-Hearing Conference CPRB Case #12-242 Tuesday, 3/26/13 @ 5:30 p.m. Banksville Park Crane Ave and Carnahan Rd Pittsburgh, PA 15220 CPRB monthly board meeting immediately following at 6p.m. Questions may be directed to 412-765-8023

CPRB PITTSBURGH

PITTSBURGH STEEL CITY STEPPERS CHICAGO-STYLE STEPPIN’ DANCE LESSONS Wednesdays 7 -8:30 PM Wilkins School Community Center CONTACT: steelcitysteppers@ hotmail.com “friend” us on Facebook and Meetup.com

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

Sealed proposals shall be addressed to and deposited at the School District of Pittsburgh, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, on April 9, 2013, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for: • Install Backflow Preventers Various Locations General and Plumbing Primes

• Asphalt Paving Various Locations General Prime

• New Entrance Doors and Frames Roof Replacement Pittsburgh Colfax K-8 2332 Beechwood Blvd. General Prime

• Replace HVAC in Security Room Pittsburgh Milliones 6-12 3117 Centre Ave. Mechanical Prime

• Window Replacement Pittsburgh Fulton Pre K-5 5799 Hampton St. General Prime

• New Walk-In Cooler and Freezer Pittsburgh Montessori Pre K-8 201 S. Graham St. Mechanical and Electrical Primes

Sealed proposals shall be addressed to and deposited at the School District of Pittsburgh, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, on Tuesday, April 9, 2013 until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for: Security System Integration King PreK-8 Lincoln K-8 Pioneer/South Brook 6-8 Science and Technology Academy 6-12 Electrical Prime

Project Manual and Drawings for bidding purposes will be available for purchase by Contractors March 4 and March 11, 2013 at Modern Reproductions, 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 from 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Modern Reproductions may be contacted by Phone at 412-488-7700 or Fax at 412-488-7338 to determine the cost of the Project Manual and Documents. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual.

Project Manual and Drawings for bidding purposes will be available for purchase by the Contractors on March 27, 2013 at Modern Reproductions, 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 from 9 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Modern Reproductions may be contacted by Phone 412-488-7700 or Fax 412-488-7338 to determine the cost of the Project Manual and Documents. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual.

We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent hotline: 412-622-7920/www.pps.k12.pa.us

We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent hotline: 412-622-7920/www.pps.k12.pa.us

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013


STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com.

The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Blood Pressure and

The Brain Research study with one MRI and two interview sessions seeks healthy adults ages 35-60. Cannot have low blood pressure, hypertension, heart disease, or diabetes. $150 compensation. Will be invited to repeat study in 2 years with additional compensation. Contact Kim Novak 412-246-6200 novakkj@upmc.edu

ASTHMA?

Want to make a difference? Healthy Volunteers Needed for Hormonal Vaginal Ring Research Study You may be eligible to participate if you are:

Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

18-39 years old In general good health Have regular periods Not pregnant or breastfeeding • Are willing to abstain from sexual activity, OR are sexually active and willing to use condoms, OR you are sterilized OR with one partner who has a vasectomy • Are willing to come to MageeWomens Hospital for up to 54 visits over 8 months • • • •

412-650-6155

IBS? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

412-650-6155

VAGINAL DRYNESS?

Your ad could be here

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

412.316.3342

See what our clients are saying been very In the past two years, I’ve ads and our of ign des the satisfied with both When I know I have ke. evo they e ons resp the subjects in the 24-35 to advertise for research k of using the City age group, I immediately thin Paper.

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

CONSTIPATION?

Participants will be compensated up to $2,930 for their time and travel For more information please contact:

The Center for Family Planning at

412-641-5496

or visit: www.birthcontrolstudies.org

— Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

Are you interested in a long-term method of birth control?

Schizophrenia Research Study Participants Needed

YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE IF YOU:

Do you or someone in your family have schizophrenia? This UPMC research study examines the effects of schizophrenia on cognition. We are seeking families affected by schizophrenia to take part. Participation involves 1-2 visits; during these visits, you will complete diagnostic interviewing and cognitive testing, provide a blood sample, and complete a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI).

• Are a non-pregnant woman between 16 and 35 years old • Are in need of contraception • Have regular periods • Are willing to come to Magee-Womens Hospital to complete up to 14 or more visits over a five year period The Center for Family Planning Research is conducting a research study of an investigational contraceptive intrauterine device (IUD). Participants will receive study-related exams and study-related birth control at no cost.

Participants will be reimbursed $175 for completing all study procedures.

For more information, please call

ABDOMINAL PAIN? BLOATING? DIARRHEA?

Healthy Controls Needed for Research Study

If you have abdominal pain and diarrhea from irritable bowel syndrome, call about our research study of an investigational medication.

412-246-6356 or 1-800-994-8182

(UPMC Oakland) This study of cognition and schizophrenia is looking for healthy controls of European descent over the age of 30. Participation involves 1-2 appointments lasting a total of between 5-9 hours and the completion of diagnostic interviewing and cognitive testing, donation of a blood sample, and taking part in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI).

To see if you qualify, please call the Center for Family Planning Research at 412-641-5496 or visit our website at www.birthcontrolstudies.org.Participants will be reimbursed up to $1030 over five years.

Adults who qualify receive study-related care and study medication at no cost, and compensation for time and travel may be available for each completed visit. FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL:

Participants will be reimbursed $175 upon completion of study procedures. Men and women ages 40 and above with no history of psychotic illnesses and no current problems with substance abuse may be eligible.

412-650-6155

PGHCityPaper

For more information, please call 412 246 6356 or 1 800 994 8182 N E W S

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Addiction & Recovery Health Services

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings. Now accepting Highmark and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

WELLNESS COUNSELING Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 ;;;;;;;;;;;;

SELF-ESTEEM WORKSHOPS 412-400-7159 selfesteemworkshops.com

JADE Wellness Center

SUBOXONE We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug Addiction Includes Med Management & Therapy LOCATIONS IN: Oakland, PA Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA West View, PA Butler, PA

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL -

a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

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Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

WELLNESS CENTER

PSYCHIC

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104 3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

Psychic Development Intermediate Class ~ 6 Thursdays ~ Starts April 4 7 – 9 p.m. ~ $215 Friends Meeting House 4836 Ellsworth Ave 15213 For more info/ registration:

412-271-4474

massage

Zhangs Wellness Center

412-401-4110 $40/hr DOWNTOWN 322 Fourth Ave.

Therapy

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 STAR Superior Chinese Massage Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

China Massage $50/HR Free Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

(1st Floor)

Phoenix Spa

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE FOR MEN

New Young Professional Free Table Shower w/60 min. Open 10-10 Daily 4309 Butler Street

Sports, Swedish, Shiatsu. $50/Hour Northside Location Near Heinz Field Call Rick: 412-512-6716

MIND & BODY

412-621-3300

www.pittsburghbodyworks.com

Mingkun Massage

Health and Wellness Directory

Aming’s Massage Therapy

• $40 per 60 min massage • 2hr free valet parking at the Concourse with the purchase of a 60 or 90 min massage 125 W. Station Square Dr. Station Sq. Freight Shops

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

724-519-7896

(Lawrenceville)

DEEP TISSUE MASSAGE

MIND & BODY

Xie LiHong’s

Chinese Tuina Massage

minkunmassage.com

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

WE have been there. WE know your pain. Don’t Wait Any Longer!

www.ThereToHelp.org

We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health - And Many Others

Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe. com.

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PH. 412.389.8637

412.434.6700

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

Now Hiring for LPC/LCSW MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013

Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116


LIVE

GRAND OPENING!

TIGER SPA

Judy’s Oriental Massage

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

FULL BODY MASSAGE

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

$40/hr Now with Vichy Shower 4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Accepting All Major Cards

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

HOUSE FOR SALE

HOUSE FOR SALE

Cheaper than Rent $ 47,900 - Stowe Twp. Well Maintained - 2 BR, Frame Cape Cod set on a large level, fenced-in lot. Features a gas furnace with central air. Ready to move in. Call George E Lucas Today. 412-771-8400

New Price $ 360,000 - Mexican War Street Totally Renovated3-story, brick, 3 BR, 2 BA home. Original details, mantels, with 5 fireplaces. Beautiful woodwork & copper downspouts. Extra lot included. Call George E Lucas to see. 412-771-8400

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

MOVING SERVICES ABC SELF STORAGE5x10 $45, 10x10 $65, 10x15 $95. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

REAL ESTATE SERVICES AMERICA’S BEST BUY! 20 acres-only $99/ month! $0 down, no credit checks, MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. Owner financing. West Texas beautiful Mountain Views! Free color brochure. 1-800-755-8953 www. sunsetranches.com (AAN CAN)

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Ross Twp 3 Bedroom 1 ½ Bath, Family Room, Game Room, Integral Garage, Nice House in aNice Neighborhood. $1200/Mon. +

412-334-4542

Xin Sui Bodyworks

MONTOUR SCHOOL DISTRICT $ 149,900 Kennedy Twp. Beautiful-Brick, 3 BR, 1.5 BA Ranch with formal dinning room.Updated Kitchen, Bath and 150 amp Electric. Semi-Finished Basement. one car int/grg. Lovely, level backyard with a new patio. Must see.

Call George E Lucas 412-771-8400 #1 Choice Real Estate

Grand Opening

There is light at the end of the tunnel.

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

Find your next job in the City Paper’s “WORK” section. N E W S

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Ink Well

THIS JUST IN

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

get your

yoga on! Power Vinyasa Yoga: Light your practice on fire at Inner Hearth Yoga, offering alignment-focused group classes in Point Breeze.

It’s not just for Shadyside anymore. 4519 Liberty Ave, Bloomfied www.clayyoga.com 412-335-1332

$5 Session Preview Week April 8-14!

www.innerhearthyoga.com 54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.27/04.03.2013

ACROSS

1. Be very single-minded 7. Hurl 11. “Pal” 14. Scrilla 15. Person in a congressional sex scandal, perhaps 16. Gp. that sets up international tours for bands 17. Big name in truffles 18. Doomsday weapon operated by George Michael? 20. Classic anime picture 22. State with controversial ID laws 23. Ancient Greek author’s gig? 29. Vichyssoise vessels 30. Doing much more than cqtm 31. Blue and yellow big-box 32. Feel blue or see red 35. Certain striated muscle, briefly 38. “Arrrr, keep your electroshock weapon away from this here chicken stock!” 42. “That’s the whole story?” 43. Text in any of several Eastern religions 44. State where Paul Newman was born 45. Protested during a national anthem, say 46. Vibe 49. Part of the year marking everything being OK?

53. Smurfette’s old man 54. Genre most white people hated until “Saturday Night Fever” 55. Interplanetary graffiti artist’s action? 58. Epoch with lots of fish 63. Big name in stereo cables 64. Indiana Democrat Evan who retired in 2010 65. More likely to scowl at puppies and such 66. Letters on guns at the ballpark 67. Send from office 68. Mitt Romney’s roof-dog’s name

DOWN

1. 2010 Usher hit featuring will.i.am 2. Word that might fix a spastic diaphragm 3. Links surface 4. Yale of Yale 5. Columnist Dan who coined “santorum” 6. Frightened 7. Napoleonic blade 8. “For Whom the Bell Tolls” lady 9. Domain ender that UC Berkeley was one of the first schools to adopt 10. Soaked 11. Mexican ass 12. Bolt who ran a 9.58 in the 100 13. Dudes, in ‘90s pop culture names 19. Try to grab, as a cab 21. Be firm

23. Peak for Zeus 24. Golden potato 25. Have a hot hashtag 26. James gang? 27. Plant that’s bad for dogs and cats 28. Stiff area? 33. Article for Marx 34. Reputations 35. Frequent subject for TMZ 36. Like badly hung paintings 37. Egyptian god with a baboon head 39. ___ Bomba (hydrogen bomb nickname) 40. Erotic opening? 41. Fantasy sports league option 45. Obeyed the dentist 47. Big Pun and Lil Wayne

48. J.B. who plays Leon on “Curb Your Enthusiasm” 49. Benjamin Jealous is its CEO 50. Kingmaker of Drs. Phil and Oz 51. Occasions for many Facebook greetings, briefly 52. What dying people might see, with “the” 53. Curltastic ‘80s style 56. “Girls” airer 57. Letter that some feel should have its own day, rather than pi having Pi Day 59. “Argo” org. 60. West ___ (fancy furniture store) 61. Krautrock band that split from Kraftwerk 62. -ists’ relatives {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


TARNISHED BRASS A police chief holds himself accountable {BY LAUREN DALEY}

“HERE HE COMES,” a reporter said quietly as former Pittsburgh versial history, was caught on videotape accosting a South Side Police Chief Nate Harper walked down the ninth-floor hallway of reveler and berating a crowd of St. Patrick’s Day onlookers, while the federal courthouse. A cautious gaggle gathered in front of the waving around a Taser. And those are just the most recent headlines. Harper’s tenure doors of courtroom 9B as Harper approached, a few steps behind included the controversy surrounding the beating of Homewood attorneys Robert Leight and Robert Del Greco. teen-ager Jordan Miles, and the case of Paul Abel, an of“How ya doing, Nate?” another reporter asked. ficer who, while off duty, accidentally shot a South Harper, his tan sport coat fitting loosely, Side man in a case of mistaken identity. seemed visibly diminished since Mayor Luke Harper has defended some of those ofRavenstahl pressured him to resign Feb. 20. ficers, and promoted others. But even He tipped his head to the side and walked when the city sought to discipline or rein, saying nothing. move an officer — as it tried to do with It was not Harper’s first appearAbel — the decision was reversed by a ance in federal court. It wasn’t even labor arbitrator. his first appearance that week: Days Such obstacles were around before, he’d listened to testimony long before Harper took command. in a civil suit against a former city In the late 1990s, voters approved detective, Bradley Walker, who’d ala civilian-review board to look into legedly assaulted a motorist after a claims of police misconduct, while fender-bender. federal officials subjected bureau But this time, Harper was the deFormer police chief Nate Harper, management to a court-ordered confendant, accused of not filing federal tax with Mayor Luke Ravenstahl. sent decree. But the decree was lifted, returns and misdirecting $71,000 in pub{PHOTO BY LAUREN DALEY} and the review board has no disciplinary lic funds to an off-the-books account, and power — and the complaints about a lack of using nearly half the money for personal use. accountability continue. Harper sat between Leight and Del Greco in “The worst part is not [that] these incidents the courtroom’s wooden pews, reading the 13-page occurred,” ACLU-PA Legal Director Vic Walczak said Feb. 27, indictment through thick-rimmed black glasses. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Robert Cessar and Lee Karl shook his hand and called during a press conference where civil-rights advocates urged a him chief — just moments before Harper stood before Judge Rob- thorough search for Harper’s replacement. “But who’s taking responsibility [by] standing up to say they won’t happen again?” ert C. Mitchell and asked for a jury trial.

IN THE CITY’S POLICE BUREAU, SUSPECTS AREN’T THE ONLY ONES BEING QUESTIONED ANYMORE. He likely won’t need it. “He takes full responsibility,” Leight said a short time later at a press conference. The accusations, Leight and Del Greco said, were “unambiguous, overwhelming and indefensible.” But the verdict on Harper may already have been handed down. In the city’s police bureau, which Harper has led since 2006, suspects aren’t the only ones being questioned anymore. Walker, for one, is no longer on the force after his 2010 altercation with driver Jarret Fate. But he’d been the subject of more than 30 citizen complaints over the previous decade, and Fate’s attorneys were suing the city because, they said, he should have been disciplined more effectively, even terminated long before 2010. On March 25, a jury cleared the city, finding that because Walker had been acting as a private citizen when he attacked Fate, the city wasn’t liable. But another officer, Garrett Brown, is awaiting a criminal trial in an alleged road-rage incident involving a delivery truck. Brown, who was terminated from the force, was named in more than two dozen citizen complaints prior to the incident, attorneys for the delivery drivers allege. Meanwhile, Detective Frank Rende, an officer with his own contro-

It will have to be someone other than Nate Harper. An hour after his court appearance, his attorneys spoke with reporters at their offices in PPG Place. Harper did not join them — too mortified by the accusations, they said. “If he would have showed,” Del Greco said, “I know he was prepared to indicate he is embarrassed and sad and humbled and contrite.” Leight and Del Greco said they hoped to work out a plea deal: Federal sentencing guidelines allow for up to nine years in prison, though the lawyers hope to soften that to a sentence of between 10-16 months, possibly on house arrest. Still, they say, Harper’s misdeeds have cost him his career, and possibly his pension. Even prosecutors took little pleasure in the charges. “This is a sad day for many of us — we worked with him,” U.S. Attorney David Hickton said at a press conference announcing the indictment. Yet Harper’s shame may offer a bit of redemption. His hands have often been tied, whether by contract provisions, or policy, or internal politics. But at the end of his career, Harper finally found a police officer he could discipline publicly. Himself. L DAL E Y @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Earn 250 same day base points on day of sign up and receive a FREE Grand View Buffet Buffet offer will be valid on your NEXT visit. Earn 250 same day base points beginning at 6am. You must return to the Rush Rewards Players Club to see if you have reached your point threshold to receive your buffet voucher. Offer valid on all days except Friday nights Seafood Buffet. Must be a Rush Rewards Players Club member. Rush Rewards Players Club cards are free and available to any member of the public at the Rush Rewards Players Club. Must have valid state ID.

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March 27, 2013