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TALE OF THE TAPE: HOW PITTSBURGH MATCHES UP ON THE NATIONAL MUSIC SCENE


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013


EVENTS 3.21 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: MASON BATES AND IONSOUND Co-presented with The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Tickets $18/$15 Members, students & PSO Members FREE parking in The Warhol lot Media sponsor 91.3 FM WYEP

3.23 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: NOW ENSEMBLE Co-presented with Music on the Edge, University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Advance Tickets $15/$10 students; Door Tickets $20/$15 students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

4.12 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: DEERHOOF, WITH SPECIAL GUEST PEOPLE GET READY Tickets $18/$15 Members & students Media sponsor: 91.3FM WYEP

4.13 – 2pm AUTHOR TALK AND BOOK SIGNING, THANK YOU ANDY WARHOL BY CATHERINE JOHNSON Tickets FREE

4.19 & 4.20 – 8pm OFF THE WALL 2013: NORA CHIPAUMIRE: MIRIAM Kelly Strayhorn Theater Co-presented with Kelly Strayhorn Theater Tickets $15 – 25

4.27 – 8pm OFF THE WALL 2013: SANDRA BERNHARD: I LOVE BEING ME, DON’T YOU? Byham Theater Co-presented with Pittsburgh Cultural Trust Tickets: $35 – 40

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013


Over 21 • 9pm - Midnight

ROCK & BOWL! {EDITORIAL}

03.20/03.27.2013

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers AMYJO BROWN, LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns TRACEY HICKEY, JEFF IHAZA, JOHN LAVANGA

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 12

{COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} SPECIAL THANKS TO GET HIP RECORDINGS FOR PHOTOSHOOT LOCATION

{ART}

[NEWS] caught a half of a drum stick from 06 “IEddie Money’s drummer.” — Pittsburgh City Councilor and mayoral candidate Bill Peduto on his first concert

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“It’s truly not a good idea to walk barefoot in the stream.” — Watershed advocate Brenda Smith on the pollution still afflicting Nine Mile Run

[TASTE] sweetness of the creamy, mashed 17 “The celeriac root was a perfect foil to slightly bitter rapini.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Lola Bistro

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“Pittsburgh had a weird reputation for a long time as a place that was very skippable.” — Windish Agency booking agent Sam Hunt, who notes in our annual Music Guide that Pittsburgh is overcoming its old rap

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[MUSIC]

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FRE E WI- FI

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers MICHAEL ARTMAN, SHEILA LETSON, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, CHRIS JURAN, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, JEANNE MUMFORD, EMILY POZZUTO, MICHAEL RANALLO Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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“No one wants to pay their dues. It’s what American Idol has done to music.” — North Carolina-based singer Paleface, who’s in it for the long run

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[SCREEN] isn’t initially a likable character 44 “Barbara until we learn how her cold, aloof nature is a necessary defense mechanism.” — Al Hoff, reviewing the film Barbara

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

[ARTS]

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

be feminist is to be actively involved 48 “To with a process of thinking and acting and engaging with the whole world.” — Curator Hilary Robinson, quoted in a review of her Feminist and … show at the Mattress Factory

[LAST PAGE]

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“We jammed together. We messed up a lot of blues.” — Pittsburgh jazz musician Tony Campbell on paying his musical dues

NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 54 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 67 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 69 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 74 +

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INCOMING

“I CAUGHT A HALF OF A DRUM STICK FROM EDDIE MONEY’S DRUMMER. IT COULD HAVE IMPALED SOMEONE.”

Dragged Down: Promoter wants to bring drag shows to a wider audience, but many worry whether he’s the guy to do it (March 13)

POLITICAL BEAT

Your paper’s attack [on] John DeBartola was missing a lot of information. John may have drama with his queens; however he uses that for the good of the community. He works countless unpaid and thankless hours for AIDS awareness, suicide prevention, HIV testing, raising money for local HIV and cancer charities, even benefits to help pay funeral cost when a member of the local area pas[sed] away. I don’t see the so-called queens that trashed him doing oneeighth of what he does. I have been beside John for many years and know him to be one [of] the most giving [people] that I have ever met especially when his work is taken for granted. — Elizabeth Folta, Altoona

Candidates for cityy office reflect on the shows they’ve y seen

VOTERS USE ALL KINDS of criteria when deciding whom to vote for. Some use party affiliation or endorse-

ments. Others might even want to know where a particular candidate stands on the issues. But what about their musical tastes? Could we not have avoided a lot of heartache if we’d known that Mayor Luke Ravenstahl was a fan of Toby Keith and Snoop Dogg, right from the get-go? As a public service, we asked candidates running for city office this year to tell us the first concert they attended, and the last one. And while Eddie Money appears to exert a disturbingly strong influence on our public leaders, the answers were as varied as the candidates themselves. COMPILED BY LAUREN DALEY, CHRIS POTTER AND AMYJO BROWN

PITTSBURGH MAYOR CITY COUNCIL PRESIDENT

Awesome Books Sold (online only, March 14) Glad to hear of [new Awesome Books owner] Eric Ackland, his bravery and inspired vision. We at Caliban Books hope he and his fiancée do well in their lives and in the book biz here in Pittsburgh and will pledge to do everything we can to support them — the more bookstores the better, and it makes our city that much more attractive and worthy. — Web comment from “John Schulman”

Gimme Bioshelter: Garfield Community Farm advancing major project (March 6) Two years of paperwork to build a greenhouse. Anybody still wonder why this city is on the ropes? What? I’m not allowed to ask that question, I didn’t get the right permit and have three public hearings? — Web comment from “Maker Dog”

Steelers looking to sign Beanie Wells, as long as he meets our “2 fumbles per game” requirement.

DARLENE HARRIS

says FIRST CONCERT: Harris concerts, she hasn’t had time for d in school though she participate . “I think I ool sch in ile musicals wh she admits. s,” line ng only had speaki ERT: Harris MOST RECENT CONC to a show was says the closest she got ic Arena Civ the yed pla s when Elvi r’s Pittsburgh on New Yea husband Eve, 1976. “I wanted my didn’t he but … ets tick buy to is] and I missed him and [Elv . passed away,” she recalls

on could not remembe r hi first concert, bu s t says his most recent concert was Esperanza Spalding at the Byham Th eater last fall. He admits he doesn’t see many shows. “I’m a theater guy; I love play s,” he says. But, he adds, “Maybe — maybe, if my duties allow it — I might go catc once I’m electe h a show d.”

— March 15 tweet from from “Evil Mike Tomlin” (@EvilMikeTomlin)

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A.J. RICHARDSON Richards

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

CITY COUNCILOR

CITY CONTROLLER

BILL PEDUTO

MICHAEL LAMB

FIRST CONCERT: The city con troller admits that at the ages of 14 and 15, he and his buddies “were big Foreigner fans” and caught the classic rockers at the Civic Arena in the late 1970s. “We had the first Foreigner album where ever y song on it was a hit, like ‘Cold as Ice.’” MOST RECENT CONCERT: U2 at Heinz Field, two summers ago.

JACK WAGNERCharles at the

FIRST CONCERT: Ray 1960s. “He Civic Arena in the late was magnificent.” ERT: The Roger MOST RECENT CONC CJ’s in the Strip at sion Ses Humphries Jazz Jam and Pittsburgh er mm District, produced by dru ey have some of the “Th s. hrie mp Hu er Rog native t city but probably the bes best jazz, not just in the jazz anywhere.”

FIRST CONCERT: Boston, with Eddie Money opening in 1978 at the Civic Arena. “It was the ’70s and it was a rite of passage,” Peduto says. And it may have launched his career in public service: “I caught a half of a drum stick from Eddie Money’s drummer. It could have impaled someone.” MOST RECENT CONCERT: Haitian musician Yves Jean at Stage AE.

STATE REP.

JAKE WHEA

FIRST CONCER TLEY T: Run-D.M.C. on the Walk This Way tour in Detroit in the 1980s. “Run-D .M.C. was one of th e big, major up and-comers,” Wheatley says . “It was one of th e biggest thin gs to do. It was just beautiful.” MOST RECENT CONCERT: Rick at Consol Ener Ross gy Center last year.

JOSH WANDER

candidate, FIRST CONCERT: The Republican , saw nship citize i srael who has dual U.S./I 1980s. Eric Clapton in Jerusalem in the late reggae sh Jewi : CERT CON NT RECE T MOS Library Music Hall performer Matisyahu at the Carnegie of Homestead last month.

CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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POLITICAL BEAT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

PITTSBURGH CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT 2

PofE T the

WEEK

ITH THERESA KAIL-SM g

FIRST CONCERT: Growin up, the West End councilor recalls her father “made us ts attend different cultural even to got she en Wh th.” once a mon se choose, “I almost always cho the symphony.” She went MOST RECENT CONCERT: ers ZZ Top rock see to and with her husb Arena. in the early 2000s at Mellon concert.” “I left in the middle of the

DISTRICT 4 JOHN LEE

FIRST CONCERT: “I think it was The Eagles back in like 1979. It was down in the Civic Arena. They were big at the time.” MOST RECENT CONCERT: “Springsteen in Philly this past Labor Day weekend. That show lasted three hours and 43 minutes to be exact, and the only reason he quit was that Max Weinberg couldn’t freakin’ pick up another drumstick.”

DISTRICT 6 DANIEL LAVELLE ory

FIRST CONCERT: “If mem serves me, my first concert was Whodini.” MOST RECENT CONCERT: at the “Sean Jones and Company ter.” Cen on Wils ust Aug

TONYA PAYNE

FIRST CONCERT: “The Commodores.” MOST RECENT CONCERT: “The Dixie Chicks.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

FRANCO “DOK” HARRIS FIRST CONCERT: “Michael Jackson — I was in sixth grade.” MOST RECENT CONCERT: “Bon Jovi at Consol.”

RUDIAK NATALIAER T: The

FIRST CONC st n’t recall her fir incumbent ca member re “I , ys sa t show, bu ol, pol in high scho going to Metro e ag rb Ga d Apple an and I saw Fiona in the same year. d all and Radiohea st concert ve been my be That might ha en like be ve ha would year ever. This ’96 or ’97.” diak saw CONCERT: Ru MOST RECENT Hall this winter. “It was z in Morrisey at He e feel old, but it made m a good show, e, I was like, er th w ody I sa because everyb 45. I remember when like ‘Wow, you’re band.’” a in e er w u yo

DISTRICT 8 LARK JEANNE C ERT: “[Folk-

FIRST CONC Phil Ochs: singing lefty] chusetts, sa as M in as w It adored Phil I . 68 19 in probably rite songs vo fa y m of Ochs, and one is going ch hi w ne,’ is ‘When I’m Go y funeral, if people m at ed to be play ises.” keep their prom NCERT: CO NT CE RE T OS rgh M s at the Pittsbu ad re Th on m “Com s It’ . ar ye Arts last r Center for the s been active fo a group that ha rgeous political go awhile. They do derful music.” folk, and won

DAN GILMAN

FIRST CONCERT: “It was the Beach Boys with Eddie Money opening, at Three Rivers Stadium, I think in 199 5. What I can remember most was the crowd going crazy for ‘Take Me Home Tonight.’” MOST RECENT CONCERT: “It would have been Girl Talk this past summer at Stage AE. It was an incredib le show, and that’s an incredib le venue outdoors.”

SAM HENS-GRECO FIRST CONCERT: “Uriah Heep at the Civic Arena. I don’t even think I was a big fan — I may have known a song — but a friend wanted to go. I couldn’t tell you the year, but they opened the Arena roof, and it was like being in a smokestack.” MOST RECENT CONCERT: “It’s not going to be exciting, but the Renaissance City Choir’s holiday-season concert this past December. They do ‘The 12 Days of Christmas’ which is always fun, because they make each part of the audience engage in a role. We were the lords a-leaping.”


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

THEY’RE OFF Large field of mayoral hopefuls meet in first debate {BY CHRIS POTTER} BY DECIDING NOT to seek re-election amid a

swirl of controversy, Mayor Luke Ravenstahl has settled some questions about the city’s future. But he also raised a new one: “Who are all these people?â€? Ravenstahl’s original challengers — City Controller Michael Lamb and City Councilor Bill Peduto — have now been joined by four other contenders: City Council President Darlene Harris; political neophyte A.J. Richardson; former state Auditor General Jack Wagner; and Hill District state Rep. Jake Wheatley. So how to make a choice in the May 21 primary? The ďŹ rst post-Ravenstahl debate — a March 17 gathering at East Liberty’s Pittsburgh Obama 6-12 School — featured all six Democrats, and a crowd of more than 200. But the discussion offered few strong points of contrast. The format limited responses to 60 or 90 seconds, without rebuttal, and the candidates refrained from challenging each other. Still, some early trends are starting to emerge.

Ravenstahl: Not gone, but already forgotten? Judging from crime statistics and local headlines, wrongdoing in Pittsburgh seems to be on the decline everywhere except City Hall. Yet Ravenstahl’s departure will likely de-emphasize ethics questions. At the debate, candidates were asked to demonstrate their reformist bona ďŹ des. Harris, for one, touted her North Side neighborhood-activist roots: “I’ve never been sold, and I never will be.â€? Peduto, Ravenstahl’s sharpest critic on council, boasted about opposing the mayor on a slew of issues; Lamb touted his ofďŹ ce’s “Open Book Pittsburgh,â€? a website that tracks city contracts alongside campaign contributions. (“Guess what? There’s overlap,â€? Lamb said.) Wheatley groused about a lack of transparency in city contracting procedures.

{PHOTO BY CHRIS POTTER}

“The six Democratic mayoral candidates posed for photos withstudent organizers after the March 17 debate at Pittsburgh Obama 6-12 School.�

But there was hardly any discussion about the ongoing problems in the city’s police bureau, which have dominated headlines this year. Instead, candidates were asked about their own public safety plans ‌ and most of them focused on putting more police on the streets. Peduto stressed “decentralizingâ€? the bureau, transferring more decision-making to individual zone commanders. Lamb pledged to turn over more deskwork to civilians, freeing police to hit the streets. Only Richardson suggested there could be too much policing: “More cops on the streets means more money out of our pockets,â€? the self-described community activist said.

Some hot-button issues are things candidates can’t do much about. While concerns about the city’s pension fund, for example, went ignored, candidates were united in arguing that large nonproďŹ ts like UPMC weren’t contributing enough in taxes. But tax law is set by the state, and it wasn’t clear how calls for “accountabilityâ€? from nonproďŹ ts — or for-proďŹ t companies who paid workers too little — would translate into action. (Although Lamb, for one, routinely cites his advocacy of a “community paramedicâ€? program, in which UPMC and Highmark are training city paramedics to visit chronically ill city residents during slow periods.) Wagner especially raised issues — like CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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THEY’RE OFF, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

state education-funding formulas — on which Harrisburg sets the policy. He also touted his role championing a 1993 citywide assault-weapons ban — a measure he boasted was “20 years ahead of the issue” — though state law blocked the law from going into effect. Peduto, for his part, scored the debate’s biggest applause line by calling for a “21st century transit system.” Transit is a county operation, but Peduto touted his close political ties with county executive Rich Fitzgerald: “We need a mayor who works with our county executive.”

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A poll by fledgling outfit Keystone Analytics shows 30 percent of voters backing Peduto, with Wagner at 20 percent and other candidates lagging. Peduto also appears to have the most extensive campaign apparatus: His backers were the most vocal and visible during the March 17 debate, and he has racked up endorsements from local officials and unions. Still, Lamb has the coveted party endorsement — he was the sole contender once Ravenstahl withdrew — and Wagner has the ingredients for a ready-mix campaign. Having served eight years as the state’s auditor general, he can leverage statewide support, and a family that includes County Controller Chelsa Wagner, his niece, and brother Pete Wagner, chair of the South Hills’ vote-rich 19th ward.

Yet Wagner is no shoo-in. Of the $209,475 in campaign contributions he raised in 2012, only one contribution came from an individual living in Pittsburgh. And during the 2010 gubernatorial primary, he trailed eventual Democratic nominee Dan Onorato almost everywhere in town outside the South Hills.

… But anything can happen That Keystone Analytics poll also showed 22 percent of voters undecided. And with the exception of Richardson, this year’s candidates too have familiar names and builtin constituency. Peduto is the lone East Ender, Harris the only North Sider and the lone female. Wheatley and Richardson are both black. A candidate with a sufficiently active base need not be popular citywide to win. In some ways, the 2013 race is shaping as a reprise of the 1989 primary, which featured five well-known Democrats. That year, incumbent Sophie Masloff was able to win with just 28 percent of the vote, beating a field that included the city and county controllers, civil-rights champion Byrd Brown and future mayor Tom Murphy. What’s more, in November the Democratic nominee will likely face Republican Josh Wander. Wander has some name recognition of his own after appearing on a reality-TV show about “preppers” who stock supplies for future catastrophes. Voters might want to follow his example: It could be a long campaign. C P OT T E R@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

{BY MATT BORS}

IDIOTBOX


[GREEN LIGHT]

JUST PLAIN CRAP A new study reminds us just how far Nine Mile Run has to go {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} AS PITTSBURGH knows too well, pollution

can be relative. For instance, Pittsburgh’s air remains among the dirtiest in the nation — but remember how bad it used to be? Likewise, Pittsburgh has few environmental stories prouder than the restoration of Nine Mile Run. Decades ago, most of this stream was buried ’neath our eastern neighborhoods and suburbs. What remained in daylight was a typically trashed urban waterway flowing through Frick Park … and past a steel-mill slag heap. In 2006, the City of Pittsburgh and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed a $7.7 million restoration of the day-lit portion of the stream (plus a tributary in Frick). Now, for the mile-and-a-half before it joins the Monongahela River — from Braddock Avenue on down — Nine Mile Run looks more like it should, with a reconstructed streambed and accompanying wetlands, native trees and wildflowers. Even in the shadow of I-376 — and that slag heap’s pricey housing development — it’s an oasis. Yet this mission isn’t accomplished. A new study reminds us just how far Nine Mile Run has to go. It’s about nitrogen, which can starve waterways of oxygen. Excess nitrogen helps create “dead zones” like the Gulf of Mexico’s, an infamous patch of water the size of New Jersey where nothing grows. There, the culprit is runoff from farms — especially artificial fertilizer — in the Mississippi River watershed. But for the two-thirds of its length upstream of Braddock Avenue, where it’s buried in concrete, Nine Mile Run isn’t fed mostly by streams and groundwater. Rather, it’s supplied by storm sewers in its 6-square-mile watershed, which includes Wilkinsburg, Edgewood and parts of Pittsburgh. Sources of nitrogen include automobile engines and power plants, whose emissions coat roofs, roads and parking lots. Stormwater washes them into waterways, along with things like road salt and trash. Another big source of nitrogen is, well, poop. Contamination of waterways by leaky sewers is a problem long known but little studied. But following a two-year investigation, University of Pittsburgh researchers recently estimated that as much as 12 percent of the sewage produced in the watershed leaks into Nine Mile Run. That’s up to 20 tons of nitrogen. Excess nitrogen can cause problems like suffocating algae blooms. “It’s just not

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF NINE MILE RUN WATERSHED ASSOCIATION}

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good,” says Marion Divers, the Pitt doctoral candidate who was the study’s lead author. It’s unclear, though, how all this nitrogen is affecting Nine Mile Run. In fact, since the restoration, the stream is returning to health in many ways: A 2010 survey, for instance, found 14 species of fish, up from just five in 2007. And the estimated total mass of those fish was up 1,000-fold. But nitrogen pollution isn’t the only problem from leaky sewers. Everybody knows that many of the region’s aging sewers were designed to overflow into streams during storms, and that you shouldn’t play in the river for a while afterward. In smaller urban streams, that bacteria problem is magnified. In Nine Mile Run, for instance, levels of E. coli and fecal coliform are unsafe for humans year-round, storm or no. Even when the water looks clear, “It’s truly not a good idea to walk barefoot in the stream,” says Brenda Smith, executive director of the Nine Mile Run Watershed Association, the group tasked with protecting the stream. At the culvert where Nine Mile Run first sees daylight, you can smell the sewage. The Watershed Association’s new strategic plan focuses on reducing the flow of both raw sewage and stormwater runoff. It’s a tall order, but the good news is that we know what works. Fixing buried pipes is costly, but you can reduce runoff by increasing surfaces for water to soak into — things like green roofs and permeable pavement. This also helps with nitrogen. “The more water you put back into groundwater, you’re creating an environment that’s conducive to denitrification [the process of removing or reducing the nitrogen],” says Pitt’s Divers. Moreover, bacterial contamination in Nine Mile Run is dramatically lower downstream of the culvert, simply because of the riffles, or mini-waterfalls, that oxygenate the water. Streams want to be clean. We just have to let them.

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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one parent. But, protested a peer-pressured boaster, “[Y]ou must dress like this, even if you live in a shack.”

Leaders of the ice-fishing community, aiming for official Olympics recognition as a sport, have begun the process by asking the World Anti-Doping Agency to randomly test its “athletes” for performance-enhancing drugs, according to a February New York Times report. However, said the chairman of the U.S. Freshwater Fishing Association, “We do not test for beer,” because “everyone would fail.” Ice-fishing is a lonely, frigid endeavor, rarely employing strength but mostly requiring guile and strategy, as competitors who discover advantageous spots in the lake must surreptitiously upload the hauls lest competitors rush over to drill their own holes. Urine tests have also been run in recent years on competitors in darts, miniature golf, chess and tug-of-war, and in 2011, one chess player, two minigolfers and one tugger tested positive.

India’s annual “Rural Olympics” might be the cultural equivalent of several Southern U.S. “Redneck Olympics” but taken somewhat more seriously. This year, for instance, corporate sponsorships (Nokia and Suzuki) helped fund the equivalent of about $66,000 in prize money for such events as competitive pulling using only one’s ears or teeth. “We do this for money, trophies, fame and respect,” one ear-puller told The Wall Street Journal in February. This year, in the four-day event in Punjab state, the 50,000 spectators could watch a teeth-lifter pull a 110-pound sack upward for about eight seconds and an ear-puller ease a car about 15 feet.

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A frequent sight on Soweto, South Africa, streets recently is crowds of 12-to-15-year-old boys known as “izikhotane” (“boasters”) who hang out in their designer jeans, “shimmering silk shirts, bright pink and blue shoes, and white-straw, narrowbrimmed fedoras,” according to a February BBC News dispatch. Flashing wads of cash begged from beleaguered parents, hundreds may amass, playing loud music and sometimes even trashing their fancy clothes as if to feign an indifference to wealth. Since many izikhotanes’ families are working-class survivors of apartheid, they are mostly ashamed of their kids’ behavior. “This isn’t what we struggled for,” lamented

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Weird Japan: (1) A generous local businessman recently graced the city of Okuizumo with funding for replicas of two Renaissance statues (“Venus de Milo” and Michelangelo’s “David”) for a public park. Agence FrancePresse reported in February that many residents, receiving little warning, expressed shock at the unveiling of “David” and demanded that he at least be given underpants. (2) Fax machines, almost obsolete in the U.S., are still central to many tech-savvy Japanese families and companies (who bought 1.7 million units last year alone), reported The New York Times in February. Families prefer faxes’ superiority to e-mail for warmly expressing Japan’s complex written language, and bureaucrats favor faxes’ preserving the imperative of paper flow.

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The 14 guests at a jewelry party in Lake City, Fla., were initially incredulous that home-invader Derek Lee, 24, meant to rob them, but when they saw that he was serious (because he put his gun to the head of one woman), the hostess went into action. “In the name of Jesus,” she shouted, “get out of my house now!” Then the guests chanted in unison, “Jesus! Jesus! Jesus!” over and over. Lee, frightened or bewildered, sprinted out the door empty-handed and was later arrested.

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The president of the National Black Church Initiative told the Associated Press in January that its pastors are generally free to ordain new pastors as they wish, and that consequently Bishop Wayne Jackson of Detroit did nothing wrong in his ordination ceremony (which was surreptitiously video-recorded and uploaded to YouTube), even though it consisted of Jackson in robes, praying while lying on top of the new bishops, who were also praying. (The AP noted that Bishop Jackson had been the target of that’s-so-gay YouTube comments.)

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In February, an off-duty Tampa police officer and an off-duty sheriff’s detective from nearby Hernando County were awarded the sheriff’s office’s highest honor, the Medal of Valor, for exemplary bravery in an October incident in which a 42-year-old naked woman was shot to death by the officers. The woman was holding a gun and had made threats, and a 5-year-old boy was inside a truck that she wanted to steal. However, even though a neighbor had simply wrestled the woman down earlier, the officers still thought their only move was to shoot to kill. Said the woman’s brother,

“They shot a mentally disturbed, naked woman. Is that valor?”

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Lee Wildman, 35, and Adrian Stanton, 32, pleaded guilty in connection with a burglary at Durham (England) University’s Oriental Museum, in which they heisted artwork worth the equivalent of about $2.7 million and hid it in a field in April 2012. However, they have been unable to help authorities locate the bounty (even with the reward of sentence-reduction) — because they have forgotten exactly where they stashed it. Eventually, hikers unconnected with the case discovered it and notified police. Said Judge Christopher Prince, “This is not an offense that can be described as sophisticated.”

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Two brothers, celebrating a winning lottery ticket in Wichita, Kan., in February, bought a stash of marijuana, but then, attempting to light a bong using butane lighter fluid, one accidentally blew up the family home. That brother was hospitalized with second-degree burns, and the other was arrested for marijuana possession.

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Megan Thode, 27, went to trial in February in Easton, Pa., suing Lehigh University, accusing a professor of illegally discriminating against her with a C-plus grade in a class in 2009 in the school’s graduate counseling program, in which a B was the minimum required to continue. Thode demanded $1.3 million for future damage to her career (but not a tuition refund — as she had matriculated for free because her father is a Lehigh professor). Four days after the trial began, the judge ruled against her.

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When you get the big idea, express it in the vehicles that come in extra large. Transit advertising gives you all the room you need. Puts your message in front of a huge audience of consumers. And really lets you stretch your budget. So if you have something big to say, do some advertising on the side. The back. The inside. Or all over the bus or T. Call Terri Landis 412.566.5475

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THE MENU HEWS TOWARDS THE FAMILIAR WHILE APPLYING UP-TO-THE-MINUTE SENSIBILITIES

ENLIGHTENED ROAST {BY LAUREN DALEY} Michael Witherel carefully pours boiling water over Burundi coffee beans, nestled in a filter above a Mason jar. The base of the jar turns a rich brown color. And voila, you have single-pour coffee. “This way provides a cleaner-tasting coffee,” he says. Witherel, the owner of Coffee Buddha in the North Hills, is skilled in various brewing methods, like the single pour, the Chemex, aeropress and the trifecta machine. Each coffee, and each brewing method, has its own requirements, including water temperature and how the beans (which Coffee Buddha buys from Commonplace Coffee Co.) are ground. That’s only part of the glory of Coffee Buddha, which opened in July, 2011. The coffeehouse composts its coffee grounds, and grows its own herbs in a garden out back. Most everything is scratch-made, including the flavored syrups. The upper floor has a foosball table and gathering spaces for community events, hanging out, board games, reading — even massages from a local masseuse. You can nosh on treats from a private local baker or take the kids out back to the Zen garden/sandbox. The porch and outside seating are pet-friendly. It’s all part of Witherel’s mission to provide a space where people feel comfortable and part of a community. “If you go into certain shops you get attitude,” he says. “But if you’re spending $3 on a coffee, you can eat the mug for all I care.” LDALEY@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Coffee Buddha, 964 Perry Highway, North Hills. 412-837-2595 or www.thecoffeebuddha.com

FriedFish

Report

ZELIENOPLE MEMORIAL SKATE PARK’S FISH FRY FRIDAYS American Legion Post 474, 308 W. New Castle St., Zelienople 724-831-4570 Fridays, through March 29 Ten bucks nets a huge piece of goldenbrown fried cod and a side of mac-andcheese, plus coleslaw with the perfect proportion of dressing and onion. Drink and dessert included. NEWS

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{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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T’S THE HOLY grail of dining: the neigh-

borhood bistro with an atmosphere you’d like to experience every night, and food good enough to do the same. Lola Bistro, in a sweet little space at the corner of Western Avenue and Galveston Street, isn’t in our neighborhood. But we felt at home the moment we entered, thanks to cozy lighting, an appealing display of original paintings on the walls and a jazz soundtrack that was not too hot and not too cool. Adding to the homey feel was a kitchen that was open, not through a well-lit aperture or showy chef’s table, but via the simple expedient of wide-open doors. This casual connectivity of dining room and kitchen afforded an intimate view of chef Michael Barnhouse in his element, carefully assembling dishes just so. And what went on in that kitchen was most enticing. The menu calls it “contemporary comfort cuisine,” and we found that a pretty apt description of a selection that hews to the familiar — meat and fish, pot pie, pasta Bolognese — while applying up-to-the-minute sensibilities to

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Artisan cheese and house charcuterie

the details: house-cured meats, infused oils, coconut milk in the Moroccan vegetable stew. Jason always welcomes the promise of pelmeni, the Russian dumpling somewhere between a pierogi and gyoza, but he’s never had a really good one — until now. Barnhouse’s wife (who also serves as

LOLA BISTRO 1100 Galveston Ave., Allegheny West. 412-322-1106 HOURS: Tue.-Sat. 5-10 p.m. PRICES: Starters $8-10; charcuterie and entrees $18-24 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED front-of-house manager and pastry chef) is herself Siberian, and her pelmeni were superb. They offered a thick, tender dough wrapped around a moist, richly flavored filling of ground beef and lamb. A drizzle of dill sour cream and white-wine vinegar enlivened the hearty plate and anointed a rapidly disappearing appetizer.

Apple-cider-braised rabbit on bruschetta resembled pulled pork on a thick slab of toast that got a touch soggy in the middle. Prune mustard sounded grandmotherly but tasted just grand, the hint of sweetness in the zesty Dijon a good match for the rich, dark meat. Lime Caesar salad was the perfect combination of creamy, crispy and bright, while a lomo and mushroom salad dressed up tender greens with an unusual and successful trio of star ingredients. Lomo, cured pork loin that’s prepared a bit like gravlax, contributed a salty-savory flavor and a silken yet chewy texture. The texture was a near-match for that of sautéed and marinated oyster mushrooms. Though the salad’s earthy flavor profile was distinctive, both the mushrooms and the lomo provided it with deep umami character. Hazelnut oil and crushed hazelnuts rounded out the flavor, and the crunch of the nuts contrasted well with the succulence of the mushrooms and pork. Angelique vacillated between the Moroccan vegetable stew, with garbanzos in CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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A BISTRO TO CALL HOME, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

a tomato-hazelnut base served over Israeli couscous, and the decidedly un-vegetarian lamb Bolognese, made with orange-infused Castelvetrano olive oil and served over house-made fettucini. Ms. Barnhouse’s testimony that the Bolognese is a dish that brings people back helped seal the deal. However, the densely meaty sauce struck Angelique as somewhat under-seasoned. And although it was presented very attractively in a ring around a nest of noodles in the center, the proportion of pasta to sauce ended up being unbalanced; when all the noodles had been eaten, plenty of unaccompanied Bolognese remained.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

BAR CODING Local firm offers drink-list app

Jason ordered the daily local meat special, a rib-eye steak, and found it on the chewy side, perhaps from being cooked rare. But the flavor was good, and chili compound butter made for a well-suited topping. Celeriac chips weren’t crisp enough, but the same root in creamy, mashed form was light and delicious. Best of all, its considerable sweetness was a perfect foil to slightly bitter rapini, while the aforementioned chili added another flavor dimension. This illustrates what might be the kitchen’s singular strength: building up the interplay of disparate elements into a sort of dynamic balance that belied the idea of bland comfort food, all without distracting from the simple pleasure of the meal. Lola’s appetizers were exquisite, its entrees appealing, its atmosphere alluring and its service impeccable. When all was consumed and done, though we were full and the hour grew late, we wished to stay… to linger in the warmth and satisfaction of Lola.

There seems to be an app for everything these days: Find where your friends are hanging out with FourSquare, summon a cab with TaxiMagic, even arrange to vacation in a stranger’s apartment with Airbnb. The crowdsourcing of food reviews is one of the most successful app applications; tools like Yelp and Urbanspoon offer heaps of information to hungry consumers. And what goes better with food than booze? So Pittsburghbased Rhomania, a scrappy startup spurred by technology incubator AlphaLab, has slowly been building a network to serve discerning drinkers. Their app, released in February, is called Grail (and can be found in the app store under “Grail Menu”). Grail’s base function is to supplement a restaurant’s static, paper drinks menu with a dynamic, searchable list beamed straight to a customer’s phone. Grail users at Joseph Tambellini’s in Highland Park will find vivid descriptions of the contents of the restaurant’s mammoth wine list, written by Mr. Tambellini himself. At Verde in Garfield, meanwhile, Grail provides detailed descriptions of the 150-plus tequila and mezcal offerings. Such compendiums of information could easily overwhelm — or appear pretentious to — guests if they were printed on paper. When you dig deeper into the data, the potential technological advantages quickly become apparent. At Verde, for instance, consumers are invited to add their own ratings and reviews to the tequila list. Marketing director Chip Homer says that beer, wine, and other spirits can also be reviewed and that those reviews are portable: A beer review in one restaurant will pop up if the same beer is offered in another Grail-equipped restaurant. “The idea of connoisseurs having a list of ratings and reviews they can take from restaurant to restaurant is huge,” says Homer. Indeed, Rhomania’s quest for The Grail hinges on the success of this feature, and its current challenge is to expand access: With only six restaurants online, the socialmedia advantage for consumers is limited. “We need the traction,” says Homer. “We just want to start that upward curve, and we’ll be in a good place.”

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Chef Michael Barnhouse and his wife and co-owner, Yelena

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

AJI PICANTE. 1711 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0220. There is no mistaking the Latin and Spanish themes on the menu of this Peruvian restaurant: Fried banana, guacamole, even paella are all on offer. Yet all the preparations are unique, from ceviche served with Andean fried corn kernels to a mildly Asianinfluenced steak stir-fry. Distinctly native flavors include potatoes, quinoa and white-bean cake. KF AZUL BAR Y CANTINA. 122 Broad St., Leetsdale. 724-2666362. Colorful and convivial, Azul dishes up Southern Californiastyle Mexican cooking in a festive atmosphere. The menu offers the familiar fajitas, tacos and burritos — to be washed down with margaritas — as well as quirkier fare such as crunchy sticks of jicama and fried ice cream. JE

Traditional. Simple. Delicious. And Now Organic.

DOR-STOP. 1430 Potomac Ave., Dormont. 412-561-9320. This bustling, homey familyrun venue is everything a breakfast-and-lunch diner ought to be. The food is made from scratch: Alongside standards (eggs, pancakes, and hot and cold sandwiches) are also distinctive options, including German potato pancakes, ham off the bone and a sandwich tantalizingly called a “meatloaf melt.” J

Come find out which of your favorite breads are now made with organic ingredients.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Sewickley Speakeasy

Corner of Murray and Hobart

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Mon.-Sat. 7am-7:30pm & Sun. 7am-7pm

412-422-5623 20

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

HOKKAIDO SEAFOOD BUFFET. 4536 Browns Hill Road, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1422. This buffetstyle restaurant rises above the scourge of the steam table to offer some true gems among its panoply of East Asian offerings. There’s standard ChineseAmerican fare, but also sushi, hibachi-style Japanese cooked to order, popular offerings such as crab legs and roast Peking duck, and even frog legs. KF INDIA GARDEN. 328 Atwood St., Oakland. 412-682-3000. Some Indian places barely last as long as Bollywood films, but this venue has been winning awards in City Paper readers’ polls for years. How? The food holds its own, of course. But the Garden also knows its college-driven market — offering ample lunch buffets, half-off dinner specials and late-night hours. JE

or unexpected ingredient mash-up, such as Thai red curry wings, fried green beans, an Irish-Cuban sandwich and a BLT with salmon. JE NICKY’S THAI KITCHEN. 856 Western Ave., North Side ( 412321-8424) and 903 Penn Ave., Downtown (412-471-8424). This restaurant offers outstanding Thai cuisine — from familiar options to chef’s specials that are truly special, such as gaprow lad kao (a Thai stir-fry) and salmon mango curry. The flavors here are best described as intense, yet without overwhelming the fresh ingredients. KF

PINO’S CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN. 6738 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-361-1336. The menu at this Italian eatery spans from sandwiches that hearken back to its pizzeria days, through pastas of varying sophistication, to inventive, modern entrees. Some dishes pull out the stops, including seafood MARISQUEIRA. 225 Newburg lasagna and Commercial Ave., veal with artichokes, Aspinwall. 412-696peppers, olives and . www per 1130. This fine-dining wild mushrooms over a p ty pghci m restaurant offers risotto. But don’t forgo .co the bold flavors and the flatbread pizzas, confident preparations of many with gourmet classic Portuguese cuisine — options like prosciutto and from thick, meaty Iberian octopus sweet-pea pesto. KE tentacles, broiled with Portuguese bleu cheese, to sausage, flambéed PUSADEE’S GARDEN. 5321 en route to the table. Entrees Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-781include steak in a red-wine sauce, 8724. Traditional Thai sauces and chicken cooked with Portuguese curries from scratch are among peppers, pork with clams and, the reasons to stop by this of course, fish. LE charming eatery, which boasts an outdoor patio. Don’t miss MONTEREY PUB. 1227 the latke-like shrimp cakes, the Monterey St., North Side. classically prepared tom yum gai 412-322-6535. A welcoming soup, perfectly prepared tilapia neighborhood bar with a or the spicy duck noodles. KF menu of classic pub grub and Irish standards (such as “bangers ROOT 174. 1113 S. Braddock and mash”) But there is also Ave., Regent Square. 412-243the occasional Asian flourish 4348. The foundation of the

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ALLEGRO HEARTH BAKERY 2034 MURRAY AVE. * SQUIRREL HILL

Monterey Pub {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} which meat and veggies are mixed with rice. KE

GREEN PEPPER. 2020 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill 412-422-2277. At this family-run restaurant, diners will find authentic Korean recipes refreshingly not reconstituted for timid Americans — no egg rolls or ChineseAmerican stir-fries. Dumplings contain kimchi, and the soup is pumpkin. Entrees include the more-familiar bulgogi (barbecued beef), as well as bibimbap, in


offMenu

menu is also a basic formula: fresh, local and seasonal ingredients. To this, add an adventurous selection of meat products, such as bone-marrow brûlée and smoked salmon sausage. Dishes have lengthy ingredient lists, but it all comes together in satisfying and surprising ways. LF

{BY AMYJO BROWN}

FARMERS OFFERING NEW TWISTS ON CSA OPTIONS

SALT OF THE EARTH. 5523 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-4417258. Salt embodies a singular vision for not just eating, but fully experiencing food. The ever-changing but compact menu reflects chef Kevin Sousa’s hybrid style, combining cutting-edge techniques with traditional ingredients to create unique flavor and texture combinations. Salt erases distinctions — between fine and casual dining, between familiar and exotic ingredients, between your party and adjacent diners. LE

Options range from bushels for canning to planting your own veggies ELLIOTT LENGEL, one of three partners in the Mercer-area

THE SMILING MOOSE. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. 412431-4668. The Carson Street bar and nightclub now offers a top-notch sandwich and salad menu, by bringing creativity, quality preparation and a knack for well-selected ingredients to the burgers, sandwiches and appetizers. Options include: shrimp skewers with smoked peppers, corn-andblack-bean fritters and a roster of inventive sliders. JE

Farmers at a CSA fair Saturday {PHOTO BY AMYJO BROWN}

SEWICKLEY SPEAKEASY. 17 Ohio River Blvd., Sewickley. 412-741-1918. This little restaurant has the charm of a bygone era and oldfashioned food whose pleasures are worth rediscovering. The Continental menu offers chestnuts like duck á l’orange and Virginia spots, as well as more distinctive dishes, such as tournedos dijon bleu and French Acadian porterhouse. LE SIMMIE’S RESTAURANT & LOUNGE. 8500 Frankstown Road, East Hills. 412-731-4689. Craving soul food and Maine lobster tails? A well-prepared selection of fresh fish tops this menu of Southern-style comfort food. Simmie’s also has a regular menu of seafood specialties, such as jumbo sea scallops and snow-crab leg clusters, as well as steaks, pork chops, sandwiches and burgers. KF

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YAMA SUSHI. 515 Adams Shoppes, Rt. 228, Mars. 724591-5688. This suburban eatery offers honest, straightforward Japanese cooking without hibachi theatrics or other culinary influences. Besides the wide sushi selection and tempura offerings, try squid salad or entrees incorporating udon, Japan’s buckwheat noodles. KF

Lengel Brothers Farm and Market, is trying something different this year in his Community Supported Agriculture program (CSA): offering the option of pre-ordering bushels of vegetables for canning and freezing. “Once people sign up, we’ll make up a schedule with them,” he says, explaining that as tomatoes, peppers, snap beans, peas and corn hit the right point in the season, he’ll put together the bushels they’ll need. Jennifer Montgomery, co-owner of Blackberry Meadows Farm in Natrona Heights, is also offering something new: a Garden Share. Instead of delivering vegetables ripened on the vine throughout the season, members of the Garden Share CSA pick up the organically sown seedlings to plant in their own plots, following the farm’s schedule for greens, radishes, beans, carrots, tomatoes, tomatillos, cucumbers, peppers and squash, among others. The CSA members get advice along the way for how to plant and care for the seedlings. “It’s kind of a system to put ourselves out of business,” Montgomery says, “but we figure if we lose a [traditional] CSA customer, we’ve been a success.” Lengel’s and Montgomery’s twists on the typical CSA are attempts to distinguish themselves over the next few weeks, as customers interested in CSAs choose the farms they will subscribe to for the season. Other farmers, meanwhile, are offering the right to visit the farm and pick your own veggies throughout the growing season. There are more than two dozen CSA options in the wider Pittsburgh area, according to the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture. Many will accept CSA orders for just a short window — deadlines range from mid-April to early May — as they plan and budget for their spring and summer plantings. CSAs help farmers and consumers alike, says Martha Matthews of Washington County’s Matthews Family Farm. Customers get a “wholesome” food supply throughout the growing season, while also helping the farmers who spent the winter with little cash flowing into their operations. The pre-orders, she says, give the farmers the “money when they need it: at the beginning of the season.” For a list of local CSA options, visit www.buy localpa.org/western-pa-csa. ABRO WN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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2013

C I S U M E D I U G Pittsburgh plugss into cene the national music scene

W

ITH THE RECENT global success of several Pittsburgh-based rgh-based musical talents — mashup artist Girl Talk, rappers Wiz Khalifa halifa and Mac Miller — there’s a feeling in Pittsburgh that this might ight be an important moment, the time for the world to recognize Pittsburgh’s h’s contributions to music. Of course, Pittsburgh has popped up many times mes on the national radar, from Porky Chedwick DJing early rock ’n’ roll to The e Silencers and Donnie Iris helping usher in the video era on MTV. For this year’s Music Guide, we’ve decided to look at how Pittsburgh relates to the national music landscape — and it’s not always in ways that are traditional, or obvious. Mac Miller has a TV show and a new w label for Pittsburgh artists. Bands like Meeting of Important People and d Donora are turning up on your TV set too, but in more subtle ways. And Altar TV is bringing short films on national and local bands to your computer. We also decided to look at the previous Pittsburgh moment nt — the mid-’90s, when rock bands like The Gathering Field, The Clarks and nd Rusted Root were signing with major labels — to see how it compares, and what Pittsburgh musicians of today might learn from it. And we talked alked to a national booking agent to see exactly how Pittsburgh fits into bands’ ds’ plans. We hope it all gives this moment in Pittsburgh music a little more re context, and reveals some ways in which Pittsburgh is connecting to the rest of the world. And the next time your friend from Nashville asks what Pittsburgh’s ttsburgh’s music scene has to offer, you’ll have a few more answers. BY ANDY Y MULKERIN

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL / MAC MILLER STYLIST: MICHELLE PACIS}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

Mac Miller


O T S T C A NEW R E B M E M E R EBB}

{BY RORY D. W

S

ince moving to Los Angeles in 2012, Pittsburgh musician Mac Miller has continued to develop himself and his Most Dope brand. Along with business partner Quentin Cuff, he landed a MTV2 television series that’s currently at midseason, and they recently launched their own record label, REMember Music. Although it wasn’t something they initially considered or planned for, the television show has become a platform for introducing Pittsburgh-bred businesses and artists to the national audience. Viewers may have noticed the clothing brand THC, which was started by Miller’s hometown friends Peanut, who is featured on the show, and Tree-Jay. Additionally, on this past week’s episode, which is available for stream on MTV’s website, several REMember Music artists showed face — including Vinny Radio and Franchise of Braddock-bred rap duo The Come Up. In the coming pages, we profile the artists on Miller’s new label, which run the gamut from a pop songwriter to a street-hardened trap-music rapper. In addition to these REMember Music artists, Chambersburg native Choo Jackson and Miller’s alter-egos, Larry Fisherman and Larry Lovestein, have become staples for the label. With the Larry Lovestein EP released last year, Miller added a No. 2 iTunes-charting jazz album to his list of credentials. With the REMember Music label, Miller and his team have created a platform for creative Pittsburgh music to reach the rest of the nation.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

The Come Up (Vinny Radio and Franchise)

When we last checked in with Braddock-bred duo The Come Up, they were preparing to set out as an opening act on Miller’s Macadelic Tour. Since that time, they’ve released their Change of Plans album, which was the second official release on REMember Music. It’s received more than 50,000 hits on popular free-music server DatPiff. “We’re all friends,” explains Franchise, referring to Miller’s team. “When they brought the idea of the label to us, we just wanted to keep rocking together.” Before the group’s new mixtape, which is slated for a summer release, Vinny will be sharing his collaborative EP, titled Broke, with Pittsburgh hip-hop producer P. Fish. Meanwhile, Franchise has begun working on a solo EP to be released in October. “It’s great to have something together now, where we have artists like Vinny and Fran moving forward in their careers,” explains Miller. “We’re taking music that we love, that maybe not everybody knows about, and we’re exposing it to them.” Vinny finds that having the label behind the group has changed their approach. “It’s 10 times more professional,” he says. “Before it was just, like, you finish your project and you put it out. You’d try to shoot videos whenever you can or whatever you can afford, and you just hope somebody notices. With this, there’s definitely strategy involved.” CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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NEW ACTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

I KNOW THAT TUNE! {BY JOHN LAVANGA}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BEA CHIAPPELLI}

We all know that it’s hard out there for the independent musician, but Josh Verbanets, guitarist and songwriter of upbeat local rock band Meeting of Important People, has managed to find a way to make things work. Thanks to MTV shows like Teen Mom and The Real World, he was able to give up his day job and dedicate himself to music full-time. Verbanets, like many of his indie contemporaries, has figured out one way to harness the power of the digital age in order to make ends meet. The key: the power of “placements,” those songs you can hear playing along in the background of popular television shows and ads.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Donora

After linking up with the digital label Authentik Artists, Verbanets and Meeting of Important People found that many of their songs were being piped directly into shows created by production company Bunim/Murray. Though there’s usually no up-front pay and the songs often play at levels that are barely audible, the band receives a royalty each time an episode airs with its music. By Verbanets’ estimate, he and his band have had 15 different songs placed into shows. Then, in 2011, Verbanets says that Bob Bradley from Authentik “came to me and said, ‘Hey man, can you write an entire batch of songs that are, like, fake other-band songs?’” The idea was to have a crop of songs specifically for placements. Verbanets decided to take a crack at it, and, perhaps surpisingly, really enjoyed himself. “I had a blast … I played drums in the morning, bass right before lunch, I’d flip the guitars on in the afternoon.” CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

Dylan Reynolds

While much of the REMember Music roster consists of hip-hop artists, singer-songwriter Dylan Reynolds is a refreshing alternative. His friendship with Miller dates back to their adolescence. “I lived on Reynolds Street and he lived on Lexington,” explains Reynolds. “We used to play sports together when we were about five. And then we started a band together, in which I played drums and he was a guitar player and singer.” The 21-year-old Reynolds, who now plays a guitar and sings vocals of his own, was introduced to the world last year with two singles, “Happy Birthday” and “Tightrope.” The latter will be re-worked and included on his debut album, which is currently in its final stages of production. Reynolds is planning to release his “Looking Up” single on April 22, which he says will be followed by another single titled “Famous Friends,” before the full album is released in June. Although no tour is booked yet, Reynolds plans to take his live performance nationwide after the release of his album.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Primavera Vills

A hip-hop artist on REMember Music who has developed a reputation as one of Pittsburgh’s most gifted lyricists is Cuff’s cousin, Primavera Vills. In 2008, he teamed up with Miller, The Come Up, and several others to form a hip-hop crew known as the East End Empire. “We were just all spittin’ back then,” he explained of the crew’s rapping skills. “We all had the same agenda and wanted the same thing.” Vills has since established himself as a solo artist, while continuing to build a bond with both Cuff and Miller, which led to his involvement with REMember Music. His first release on the label, Anti-Flu Anniversary, is set to be released on April 12. For better or worse, Vills describes his vision in one self-created slang word, “trayb” (pronounced as it looks). “When my nephew was, like, two, he used to say ‘crazy’ like ‘trazy,’” Vills explained with a laugh. “So, I just made it trayb, like,‘everything is trayb,’ and it just caught on with everybody. I made the definition a few weeks later, and it’s just, like, anything spontaneous, or it could be something related to sexual activity, or something vague. It’s all about the context you use it in, so it could be whatever you want, for real.” Vills’ “trayb” movement will certainly reach a new peak with his Too Trayb 4 TV music video series, which will help promote his mixtape release. Some of the music will be very Pittsburgh-centric, including his song “Giant Eagles,” for which the video was shot at the Giant Eagle grocery store in the North Side. CONTINUES ON PG. 26


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NEW ACTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24 I KNOW THAT TUNE!, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

ALWAYS

PICKING, ROLLING SHOOTING NOTHING-BUT-NETTING

BREWING

By the end of the session, he’d written a whole collection of tracks, including “a fake White Stripes song, a fake country song, a fake Killers song.” It was released last year by Authentik under the name The Borough Fields. Fun aside, Verbanets suspects it was just a one-time thing. “I don’t think I’m very good at it,” he says with chuckle. Meeting of Important People isn’t the only band in town jumping on the placement train. Poppy threepiece Donora has also been extremely successful in this regard, and is featured prominently in a couple of national advertisements. Most recently, the band had the song “I Think I Like You,” from its 2008 debut album, featured in a Nationwide Insurance commercial. It’s one of the few songs that Donora actually wrote for placement — though it wasn’t for Nationwide.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

Hardo

“That song was written for a specific scene in a movie,” explains lead singer Casey Hanner. Though the band started fighting for placements early on through various licensing forums such as Taxi (an online A&R service), Donora has since picked up a licensing agent. For Verbanets, placements occupy a weird space in the evolving world of music. He admits that even “a decade ago, people would’ve seen that as traitorous.” But at this point, given the challenges of selling music, he’s adamant that “the only way that an independent artist can actually make a sustainable living out of music is to seek placement.” Placements are, of course, more viable for some bands than others — Teen Mom probably won’t be contracting with any black-metal artists anytime soon. But Meeting of Important People and Donora both fit the clean, poppy bill, and their songwriters say they haven’t found themselves changing in order to make more placements. “When we go into the studio, we’re just trying to write the best songs that we can,” Hanner says.

In addition to Vills, one of REMember Music’s best-kept secrets is Wilkinsburg native Hardo. The 20-year-old rapper generated a buzz in 2012 with a series of music videos, four of which eclipsed 100,000 Youtube views. Soon after his “Stressin’” music video was released earlier this year, Hardo ended up incarcerated in Greene County, where he remains; he’s been in and out of jail in the past on charges related to drug possession and distribution. “I just went about a couple things wrong when I was out there,” Hardo says via telephone. “I got a chance to do something that a lot of people don’t get a chance to do. On the strength of being back in here, and just looking at it … like, it could be something that quick that could take away the dream and put me right back into the street life.” An alternative to street life has been making music. Hardo’s history working with Miller dates back to his 10th- and 11th-grade years at Taylor Allderdice High School, which both attended. The two lived near one another and would make music at Miller’s studio. “After school we used to take the school bus and go to his crib and record,” explained Hardo. “I recorded two or three songs at his house, and he told me, like, ‘Yeah man, you might be the hardest motherfucker that ever came through my crib and recorded some shit.’” Hardo also contributes to his own group’s Trap Illustrated movement. The Trap Illustrated crew’s mixtape will be made available in the coming months, around the time of Hardo’s release from jail. While incarcerated, he’s been writing songs for a solo mixtape that he will present this summer. “I done seen a lot, and I’ve been through a lot, and I’ve done a lot,” he says. “So it’s like, for somebody who actually lived the life that a lot of people rap about and never been through, it’s easier for me to think about so much shit [to write about] that I’ve seen or that happened to somebody that I’ve been with. We come from this trap shit, this street shit, but that’s not all we can bring to the table. We have fun with it.”

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THE PITTSBURGH MOMENT

Bloomfield

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

SOMETIME AROUND 1995, Bill Deasy, along

with his then-band The Gathering Field, stumbled upon a little fame in the traditional way: by writing a song that a lot of people really liked. Deasy wrote “Lost in America” one morning, rather quickly, and it became the hit at their regular Thursday-night gig at Nick’s Fat City. When WDVE started playing a demo of the song a few weeks later, Deasy chuckles, “The phones lit up.” “Suddenly, instead of playing Thursday nights,” he says, “we switched to Fridays and Saturdays. Instead of playing for free, people were paying a $10 cover, and we were selling out one night, then two nights, then three nights. I remember people around the block, it was just awesome. And everybody knew that song. It was really just one of those magical experiences.” Today, it’s hard to think of any local artist who could sell out a 600-capacity venue three nights in a row — of course, having a regular night in a mid-sized club is itself largely a thing of the past. Most bands stick to small DIY venues and bars. And for those who are able make the leap to venues like Stage AE — or even arenas like Consol Energy Center, as Wiz Khalifa did last year — the gestation period tends to be shorter. Things were a little different in the preInternet, major-label-dominated mid-’90s,

and many Pittsburgh musicians, especially those playing radio-friendly alternative or country-tinged rock, look back on the decade as something of a golden age. “It was just a great time,” recalls Doug Edgell, then a member of modern rockers Sleeping Giants, who attracted some attention after winning a national talent search and appearing on Late Night with Conan O’Brien in 1997. “A thousand people would show up to see a group on a Thursday night. I was playing music, at that time, as my only source of income, and all the musicians that we knew at that time, they did it for a living. It was wonderful.” Bands like Brownie Mary and Vibro Kings dominated marquees, and Billboard Magazine hyped up-and-comers The Clarks, who — among other accomplishments — had only begun winning their long series of “Best Band in Pittsburgh” contests. For some, it seemed a gold rush was coming. “There was definitely that sense that Pittsburgh was the next Seattle,” Deasy says, referring to the attention that city experienced as the center of grunge a few years earlier. The near-overnight success of “Lost in America” attracted attention from Atlantic Records, which — likely hoping to repeat the label’s multi-platinum success with Hootie and the Blowfish’s hit CONTINUES ON PG. 29

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THE PITTSBURGH MOMENT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

record Cracked Rear View — signed the band in 1996. “It was a sturdy time, in terms of loyalty and the relationship between bands and a Pittsburgh audience,” Deasy says. “Something just happened with music and young people in Pittsburgh.” THERE ARE parallels between Deasy’s

experience and what some might consider a new golden age of Pittsburgh music. However, while artists like Mac Miller and Wiz Khalifa are locally based to one extent or another — and while they inspire a sense of “Local Boy Does Good” in many fans — these acts seemed to blow up on a national and global scale before they were household names in Pittsburgh.

While fans of the Gathering Field and other bands of that era gathered in clubs shows on a regular basis, fans of Mac and Wiz, among others, gather around the Internet. “Black & Yellow” and “Frick Park Market” aside, it’s hard to pinpoint what emotionally ties this stuff to Pittsburgh. That’s not because the artists didn’t hustle hard in Pittsburgh early on, but because the live hip-hop scene locally in the mid-’00s wasn’t huge, and the mechanisms for “breaking” as an artist weren’t as closely tied to local success as in the ’90s rock scene. One of the city’s all-time biggest exports, Rusted Root, once might have inspired some similar questions about regional identity. After forming in 1989, the band’s multiCONTINUES ON PG. 30

WHY BANDS PLAY WHERE

The COLLEGE BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS ARE HERE! It’s a Slam Dunk with Yuengling at these locations:

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

Sam Hunt has been a booking agent with the Chicago-based Windish Agency since shortly after the agency began in 2004. He’s represented acts including Girl Talk, Diplo, Animal Collective and Black Moth Super Rainbow. He talked with us about what goes into routing a tour, and why your favorite band hit Pittsburgh last year — or why it skipped us. WHAT ARE THE FACTORS THAT GO INTO WHERE YOU ROUTE A TOUR IN BETWEEN THE BIG MUST-HIT CITIES? WHAT GOES INTO DECIDING WHETHER AN ARTIST HITS PITTSBURGH OR CLEVELAND OR COLUMBUS? Sometimes it’s a matter of how many days you have to tour. Columbus, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Detroit, Cincinnati to some extent, are all between the major cities on the East Coast and the major cities in the Midwest. If you’re on a five- or six-week tour, maybe you’d hit two or three of those cities. If you’re on a two-week tour and just blazing around the country, you realistically only have time to hit one. There’s also things to consider like: Do you have history there? Do you know that you have a lot of fans in one city versus another? Are the venue options good and appropriate? Is college in session? If so, maybe you want to hit Columbus over Cleveland. And things that seem like they shouldn’t or wouldn’t make a difference do often make a difference. If you have 10 fans in Columbus who email the band every single day, it’s likely that that will have an impact. The band will say, “We’ve always wanted to play in Columbus; I feel like we have a lot of fans there.” IT SEEMS LIKE IN THE PAST FIVE OR SIX YEARS IN PITTSBURGH, THERE HAVE BEEN MORE VENUES GETTING MORE DESIRABLE TOURS. Yeah, definitely. There weren’t many good, or at least tried-and-true, venue options. I’ve booked a lot more in Pittsburgh in the past two or three years than I did in the five or six years preceding.

DOES THAT HAVE TO DO WITH VENUE SIZE, LOCATION, REPUTATION? It has to do with reputation more than anything else. There are promoters in town that have really grown in the past few years, that have developed relationships with agents and with artists; people trust them. Pittsburgh had a weird reputation for a long time as a place that was very skippable. And a couple people, I think, have worked very hard to convince people otherwise, and have succeeded. It still doesn’t make it onto the three- or fourweek tour plan that most bands want to do, but it’s part of the conversation now. And as well, there are some excellent venues — Stage AE is an excellent venue, for any city. UNTIL RECENTLY, I’D SAY PITTSBURGHERS REALLY HAD TO SEE A BAND WHEN IT WAS STILL PLAYING SMALL ROOMS — BECAUSE THEY’D COME THROUGH THEN, BUT THEY WOULDN’T COME BACK FOR A LONG TIME ONCE THEY GOT POPULAR. Right, exactly. And it’s not that there have not been people working hard at that level. Every agent knows who [promoter Manny Theiner] is and has probably worked with him. And he provides a very specific and relevant and important service for the Pittsburgh music scene. He’s on it; he knows to ask about a band before they get big. To have someone who’s paying attention and can cherry-pick good new bands when they’re in that position, that goes a long way. That’s the difference between playing Pittsburgh and not playing Pittsburgh in a lot of cases. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NEWS

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Olive or Twist

Belevedere’s

Big Dogs

Downtown

Lawrenceville

Plum

Beer Nutz Bottle Shop

Penn Monroe

Stack’d

Monroeville

Shadyside

Fox Chapel

Packs & Dogs

Blind Pig Tavern

Mike & Tonys

Mt Washington

South Side

Heidelberg

Pizza Sola Oakland

We buy all day-every day

BRICOLAGE PRODUCTION COMPANY PRESENTS

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THE PITTSBURGH MOMENT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

instrumental global fusion — which didn’t necessarily fit in with the straightforward rock that so many others were playing — took off almost immediately. Its first show was the Graffiti Rock Challenge, an annual battle of the bands named for the nowdefunct Baum Boulevard venue: Rusted Root came in fourth out of 152 entries. The band released an independent debut CD, Cruel Sun, in 1992 and, thanks in part to extensive touring, sold around 40,000 copies. Then things started to get a little crazy. In a 1993 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette profile, frontman Michael Glabicki described feeling sick from the smoke and heat of a typically overwhelming crowd, adding, “We’ll definitely have to start turning people away so that it remains enjoyable for all of us.” As P-G writer Tony Norman put it, “Increasingly uncomfortable with mass adulation, Rusted Root has begun demythologizing itself.” And that’s before they had a national hit. In 1994, the band signed with an enthusiastic Mercury Records, and released When I Woke, which — with the help of a song called “Send Me on My Way” — went platinum. Though Rusted Root was easily associated with popular bands like Blues Traveler and Dave Matthews Band (Spin made fun of all three in a 1995 piece called “Hippies al Dente”), Liz Berlin, a founding member of the band, attributes its success to what was missing from music, both locally and nationally. “There was a lot of amazing talent in Pittsburgh,” she says. “But I think we were a really new sound, and a really new musical phenomenon. The only people who were really doing anything like it at the time were Peter Gabriel and Paul Simon.” Mercury sent Rusted Root to record When I Woke in Pasadena — a typical move at the time. But in the wake of the industry’s more recent decline, local musicians have more opportunities to record close to home. Wiz Khalifa, Anti-Flag and Centipede Eest, among many others, have worked with folks from ID Labs, Mr. Small’s (which is owned by Berlin and her husband, Mike Speranzo) and Treelady Studios. And despite garnering national attention, Mac Miller and Wiz Khalifa have both taken the relatively fresh route of signing with a small, locally based label, Rostrum Records.

ness of its aesthetic, and the fact that band members don’t really care what the haters say. In 2012, for example, “Send Me on My Way” was featured non-ironically in an Enterprise Rent-a-Car commercial, and somewhat ironically in an episode of Fox’s The New Girl. The band can also still draw a crowd, and recently finished a tour supporting its new record, The Movement. Things turned out a little differently for Deasy and The Gathering Field, who were

The Gathering Field circ

a the mid-’90s

lost in the shuffle at Atlantic, and eventually got out of their contract. “We did kind of fall victim to the belief in the old model where you sign a deal and your ticket’s written for you. We lost a little bit of our edge when we were kind of in that limbo period,” Deasy admits. “It was the end of the really traditional rock-star model of the record industry, where there was just a certain way you did things. We were right at the end of what we didn’t quite know was a dying beast.” That was hardly the end for Deasy, however. He’s enjoyed a long career as a singer-songwriter — Good Morning America used his song “Good Things are Happening” as their theme for four years — and he’ll release a new solo record, Start Again, in April. Ultimately, it’s hard to say how much national attention Rusted Root brought the region, or how much thought their fans across the country gave to where the band came from. But at the very least, Berlin argues, the band was responsible for an attitude shift. “Pittsburgh as a whole had a really big inferiority complex,” she says. “I think it has a lot to do with the potential consumers who just weren’t impressed by anything. And I feel like us breaking out helped to remedy that because we were so new and because we had such huge success.” “It doesn’t matter if you’re from Pittsburgh,” she adds. “In fact, being from Pittsburgh can be strength. It was strength for us.”

“SOMETHING JUST HAPPENED WITH MUSIC AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN PITTSBURGH.”

OVER THE YEARS, Rusted Root has managed to adjust to changing times as well, thanks to the sometimes divisive weird-

M W E L S H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


{PHOTO COURTESY OF ALTAR TV}

The COLLEGE BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS ARE HERE! It’s a Slam Dunk with Yuengling at these locations:

Barely Bird records a session at Altar TV last November

TV ON THE INTERNET {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

tors; there’s currently no revenue strategy ing musicians coming through Pittsburgh. based on fees or ads.) The majority of the acts that Altar TV Many go to Jerry’s for record-shopping, and works with are national-level bands, plenty stop at Primanti’s or Pamela’s to whom Mohler books through conget some of the notable local cuisine. tacts developed during his years But lately there’s a new side trip ALTAR in PR. But the site also features that’s gotten popular, albeit by inTV E AT: a number of locals, from Antivite only: the Altar TV studios on IS ONLIN www. Flag to Lovebettie and Adventhe North Side. altaormtv tures. Most of the site’s content Altar TV began in 2011 as a .c is focused on punk and indie-rock marketing tool for Altar Bar, the bands, though everything from pop Strip District venue. But it’s since taken on a life of its own, and is no longer to hip hop is covered. Most Altar TV staffers have been in associated with Altar Bar (aside from a common investor). In January of this year, bands before. (Drizos and Mohler, origithe company — headed up by Alex Drizos nally from the outskirts of town, moved and Alex Mohler — moved to its new North to the West Coast with their old band IsaSide digs, right near PNC Park. It has a full- dora and stayed there for a few years betime staff of six (including occasional CP fore returning to Pittsburgh.) That’s one contributor Alex Gordon), having bought of the things that sets Altar TV apart, in their eyes. Quanti Studios, a company “We wanted the interstarted by Art Institute views to be set up so they’re grads, and hired its employnot like a press interview,” ees. And it’s been making says Drizos. “We’ve been in a name for itself working bands, we’ve been on tour, with artists from Imagine we want to just have conDragons to Snoop Dogg. versations with the artists.” The Altar TV platform Drizos hints that Altar is like an online network. TV has been approached Within the larger Altar TV brand, there are numerous series, like Live by TV networks about airing some of its at the Show (which is just what it sounds shows, but for now, “the Internet is our like — footage from local venues) and Stu- medium,” he says. And by mixing videos dio Diaries (which follows bands through of up-and-coming Pittsburgh acts with their entire recording process). All of the segments on big names like Hot Wacontent is online and in HD, and it’s all free. ter Music and Christina Perri, Altar TV (The company is “still in the startup stage,” is helping put Pittsburgh artists on the says Drizos, meaning it’s funded by inves- radar globally.

THERE ARE a few requisite stops for tour-

Bella Notte

Brookline Pub

Albert’s Lounge

Strip District

Brookline

Dormont

Bonnie & Clydes

Pennsbury Pub

Smiling Moose

Wexford

Crafton

South Side

Caliente

Mexicasa

Duke’s Upper Deck

Bloomfield

Dormont

Homestead

Gator’s Grille Glenshaw

“WE’VE BEEN IN BANDS, WE’VE BEEN ON TOUR, WE WANT TO JUST HAVE CONVERSATIONS WITH THE ARTISTS.”

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LOCAL

BEAT

“I HEARD ABOUT AMY WINEHOUSE AND THOUGHT, ‘THAT SHOULD HAVE BEEN ME.’”

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

GIVING GIRLS THE STAGE There’s one thing organizer Hannah Shaw wants to make clear about Girls Rock Pittsburgh’s Rock Camp for Girls: It’s not your average summer camp. “What’s unique about it is that it’s women mentoring girls,” Shaw explains. “All of the staff that will be at camp are seasoned musicians and activists and community leaders, showing girls they can do anything and be anything they want. It’s a very loud and proud camp.” Girls’ rock camps have been popping up all over: Shaw, a sometimes-Pittsburgher, spent two years working on one in North Carolina. But this year’s camp, put together by Shaw and Angela Stich, is the first of its kind in Pittsburgh. Open to girls ages 8-16, the camp takes place Aug. 5-9. More than a music workshop, it’s an allinclusive band experience, and campers will learn about everything from DJing to silk screening — along with intangibles like being comfortable with one’s body image. No prior musical experience is necessary. Besides in-person volunteer help, the camp could use assistance in a number of ways, including donations and loans of instruments, and monetary donations for its scholarship fund. At the end of the camp, the bands that the campers form will perform a live show at the Mr. Roboto Project. “What’s so impressive is that on the first day, all of the girls are so shy and nervous,” says Shaw, recalling her experiences with the North Carolina camp. “But by the end of it, they’re onstage screaming their heads off at a local venue, and it’s so impressive what they’re able to do in a week. Most adults wouldn’t think they could get together and write songs and play instruments they’ve never played, in a week.” Registration is $300 for the camp, and no instruments are necessary (though if a camper wants to bring her own, she’s welcome to). Scholarships will be available for those in need.

“WE SHOW GIRLS THEY CAN DO ANYTHING AND BE ANYTHING THEY WANT. IT’S A VERY LOUD AND PROUD CAMP.”

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

For more on registering, donating or volunteering for Girls Rock Pittsburgh: www.girlsrockpittsburgh.org

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FACING THE MUSIC {BY NICK KEPPLER}

T

HERE WAS a small controversy in the

Charlotte, N.C., music scene when The Avett Brothers, the biggest band to emerge from the city since … well, ever … tapped singer/songwriter Paleface to tour with them. It wasn’t that Paleface had said or done anything objectionable. It was that Charlotte’s fledging bands thought opening for the Avetts was a ticket to immediate fame, and they were miffed it was going to a war-torn 20-year indie-folk veteran, who seemed comfortable forever slouching beneath the radar. “Everybody wants to get famous instantly these days,” says Paleface. “No one wants to pay their dues. It’s what American Idol has done to music.” Paleface, an ever-scowling modernday troubadour, has paid his dues and then some. And he has the 17 albums and wrecked liver to prove it.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

{PHOTO COURTESY OF STATON CARTER}

From NYC to NC: Paleface and Mo Samalot

He was just a kid living in New York City in 1989 when he had a chance encounter with now-well-known outsider musician Daniel Johnston, in town to record his first proper studio album. It turned out that Johnston didn’t know how to finish a record on a label’s deadline, but he did know

PALEFACE

WITH THE ARMADILLOS, MODERN NATURE 9 p.m. Sat., March 23. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $8. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net

the intuitive basics of songwriting, and he taught them to the young Paleface. “My first songs were my attempts at writing Daniel songs,” he says. He roomed with Beck when both

were NYC anti-folk artists and he earned his nickname for his colorless skin, the result of sleeping through all the suntanning hours so he could play bars and open mic nights. (He refuses to reveal his real name, adding to the mystery around his persona.) Eight years of that kind of living took its toll. “I lost the lead I had in the business because I became an alcoholic,” says Paleface. “I ended up in the hospital almost dead. I had alcohol hepatitis.” His trademark pasty skin turned yellow. “It was that lifestyle when you are out five nights a week and everyone is throwing back beers. I heard about Amy Winehouse and thought, ‘That should have been me.’” But it wasn’t. He made a recovery and lived to experience the last glory days of the Lower East Side, when The Moldy Peaches and Regina Spektor congregated at


NEW RELEASES

the SideWalk Café, a few years before the yuppies and banking class priced the artists and musicians out of the neighborhood on their long march to ruin everything But before Paleface headed to where an indie singer/songwriter could make rent, he met his current musical partner, drummer and vocalist Monica “Mo” Samalot. Samalot is an even more unlikely career musician than Paleface. She was out of college and working at an architecture firm when she first picked up a drumstick. “I needed a creative outlet and I was really enjoying the Lower East Side scene,” she recounts. “The drums were a natural choice. I feel like I have rhythm in my blood. I grew up in Puerto Rico and all the music there is heavy on percussion.” After six years, she dropped her full-time job to dedicate herself to the drums and Paleface. It turned out he would need a drummer by his side in North Carolina. “In New York, the audiences are quiet and hang onto every word. In the South, they more want to get down to a good beat,” he says. As a result, his music has become less lyric-focused and more rhythmic: He now tours as part of a trio with Mo and electric guitarist Soren Mattson. His latest, One Big Party, has an almost Mardi Gras-like feel, with guest appearances from six-piece Greensboro band Holy Ghost Tent Revival. But don’t be mistaken: The words still matter, the mission is still storytelling and dark irony is still at work. The title track was inspired by a particularly depressing incident. “One day I was at a Laundromat and I saw a woman with a cast on her arm and she was drinking out of a paper bag in the middle of the day,” Paleface recalls. “I went home and wrote that song.” “I can tell by the look you’ve got on your face you are so full of doubt,” it goes. “You say you don‘t know why / You don‘t understand / How it got so out of hand.” The decision to turn lead vocals over to Mo gives the song a sisterly quality. Paleface says his own noonday drinking is a thing of the past but he still feels its effects. A few years ago, he suffered variety of ailments while touring the U.K. and took six months off from music. “I guess this is going to be something I do every 10 years,” he says glumly. But the twosome have managed to convince one person of the worth of the rock and roll lifestyle: Mo’s father. “He is an engineer and he thought I was throwing my life away,” she says. “I tried to explain that I was trying to be the best drummer I could be and it was all about the art, but he didn’t understand until he saw us live. Now he is the first one to watch any video we post online.”

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

SHOCKWAVE RIDERZ 12” (SELF-RELEASED)

One-sided vinyl EP from the trio featuring two Modey Lemon vets. Lots of synthetic sounds and psyche-y effects swirl around this one, on which Phil Boyd provides drums and combines with synth player Sara McElhaney on vocals. (Paul Quattrone is responsible for processed electronic sounds, not drums, which is a move akin to Jimi Hendrix starting a band in which he played piano.) Easily digestible, mostly danceable songs with intense grooves and some noiserock breakdowns. At times, the primal percussion merges with the synthetic overtones to create something at once prehistoric and postindustrial. Three tunes total, so this one’s just a sample — but one that suggests that you might want to check them out live as soon as humanly possible.

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New Amsterdam

Beermuda

Claddagh

Lawrenceville

New Kensington

South Side

Rosecliff Tavern

Oakmont Tavern

The Beerhive

Monroeville

Oakmont

Strip District

Johnny’s Wife’s Place 1

Knuckleheads

The Rose

Ross Township

White Oak

Jeanette

The Palm Hopewell

GREG SORCE CITYSCAPE (SELF-RELEASED)

Pop-rock from an Erie-based singer and songwriter who came up in Boston, playing with Semisonic’s Dan Wilson. Some jangle here, some heavy-drumsand-slinky-bass there; Sorce’s more of a thinking songwriter than a genre specialist. He’s also more songwriter than singer, for what it’s worth; this record’s best for those who are interested in teasing out the story within the song, and not so much for those looking for a smooth voice and sweet groove. The story within ranges from the poignant (returning home from military service) to, well, thinking about dying. The guitar work in some spots — especially on the closer, “Two Ladies” — is excellent. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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THURSTON’S MOVING ON {BY IAN THOMAS} Thurston Moore’s new band, Chelsea Light Moving, delivers everything one would expect from the guitarist, post-Sonic Youth. Moore is no stranger to sideline endeavors: In addition to his solo albums, he has collaborated with everyone from Yoko Ono to DJ Spooky. As if to cement his place in the canon of mid-’90s alternative sainthood, he even performed in the Backbeat Band, the supergroup formed to promote the Beatles biopic Backbeat, alongside the likes of REM’s Mike Mills and Afghan Whigs’ Greg Dulli.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CARLOS VAN HIJFTE}

Chelsea Light Moving (Thurston Moore, at right)

Though eclectic, Moore’s career to date has been informed by and anchored in Sonic Youth. There, Moore could depend on the husky growl of Kim Gordon (his now-former wife), with whom Moore shared songwriting duties, to provide counterweight to his own lyrical delivery, which is alternately whispered, purred, or brattily sneered and rarely, if ever, rises above the emotionality of nonchalance. While this dynamic never appeared to hinder Moore’s expression, Chelsea Light Moving proves that Moore is still willing and able to map new aural territory. The extended tracts of guitar noise from Sonic Youth are still there, but they are delivered with more glam-rock confidence and seasoned with more spices, like the metal crunch with which “Groovy and Linda” is peppered. Moore has already built a formidable career in the off-kilter lyrics and damaged guitar jangle of Sonic Youth. SY fans need not worry, as these are on full display in Chelsea Light Moving. Sonic Youth always felt more like an art project than a band: rock-star posturing as commentary on rock-star posturing. In Chelsea Light Moving, Moore has made it clear that he wishes to continue a career of deliberately confounding. It is never quite clear how seriously Moore takes any of it, but it is seriously good. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CHELSEA LIGHT MOVING with MARCO FUSINATO. 8 p.m. Tue., April 2. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $16-18. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013


HITS spring FOR

ANTHRAX

CLUTCH

COHEED AND CAMBRIA

CULT OF LUNA

ANTHEMS

EARTH ROCKER

AFTERMAN - THE DECENSION

VERTIKAL

ICONA POP ICONIC EP

ROTTING CHRIST KATA TON AAIMONA EAYTOY

DAVID BOWIE THE NEXT DAY

JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE

KROKUS

LEGZ DIAMOND

THE 20/20 EXPERIENCE

DIRTY DYNAMITE

THE PURPLE GANG 9 PISTOLAS

SUN

SOILWORK

THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS

SOMETHING UNTO NOTHING

THE LIVING INFINITE

NANOBOTS

SQUIRREL HILL, 5862 Forbes Ave. 412-422-2123 DORMONT, 2904 West Liberty Ave. 412-341-6591 ROSS TOWNSHIP, 4864 McKnight Rd. 412-635-3170 SOUTH SIDE, 1709 E. Carson St. 412-488-7001 ROBINSON TOWN CTR., 6533 Robinson Ctr. Dr. 412-787-5134 MONROEVILLE, 4053 William Penn Hwy. 412-373-1000 OAKLAND, 3613 Forbes Ave. 412-482-9026 DOWNTOWN, 416 Smithfield St. 412-261-1007 CHECK OUT OUR NEWEST STORE! DOWNTOWN, 967 Liberty Ave. 412-391-3065

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OPUS ONE PRESENTS

CRITICS’ PICKS

San Cisco

[NEW MUSIC] + THU., MARCH 21

[INDIE POP] + SUN., MARCH 24

Last fall, Mason Bates began his term as the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra’s composerin-residence. Tonight, he continues his reign in a performance with the local new-music ensemble IonSound. The night’s programming will range from the electronic beats Bates is known for to a composition by Martin Matalon that scores Luis Buñuel’s (in)famous film Un Chien Andalou, which will screen as the piece is played. It all takes place at the Andy Warhol Museum. Andy Mulkerin 8 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $15-18. All ages. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

Deeming a band’s music “catchy” can carry some negative connotations. Sometimes, “catchy” is just code for the sort of vapid, fleeting stuff that no one’s going to remember five years down the road. Still, it’s difficult to use any other word to describe indie-pop combo San Cisco. The band’s newest EP Awkward is full of sunny guitar riffs, cheery hand claps and irresistable back-and-forth between vocalists Scarlett Stevens and Jordi Davison. Even the most straight-laced listener will find himself “do-do-do”-ing along in no time. The band plays Brillobox tonight with Chaos Chaos. JL 4104 Penn Ave., Lawrenceville. 9:30 p.m. $12. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

Caspian

[ALT-COUNTRY] + WED., MARCH 27

[POST-ROCK] + FRI., MARCH 22

PURITY RING TRISTAN PRETTYMAN HATEBREED GALACTIC

03/21 03/22 03/22 03/23 03/29 04/02 04/04 04/05

DAVE HAMMER'S POWER SUPPLY THE WRECKIDS, LOBO MARINO, BROKEN FENCES (EARLY) THE STEEL CITY COMEDY TOUR (LATE) JOE GRUSHECKY AND THE HOUSEROCKERS MELINDA & KEVIN BOWE + THE OKEMAH PROPHETS MARCO BENEVENTO BRIAN VANDER ARK (OF THE VERVE PIPE) THE STONE FOXES (LATE)

03/30 FORGETTERS

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

Eight or nine years back, the Beverly, Mass.based post-rock outfit Caspian was a collection of wannabes looking to crack into the genre. Since then, the band’s really come into its own, creating the sort of carefully crafted music that the members admired in their idols. [DANCE-POP] + WED., MARCH 27 This is especially evident on their 2012 release Now then, to set some things straight: It’s Hank Waking Season, an & Cupcakes, not Hank album full of tracks that and the Cupcakes. There are all uniquely cineare two of them, and matic, each one building they’re from Tel Aviv via from its own peaceful Brooklyn, and they have a beginning to a stunlot of fun. Cupcakes plays ning apex. It’s a versatile drums and sings, while album as well, making Hank holds down the bass use of the sounds from line, and they make catchy a glockenspiel, a music dance-pop while giving box, and a smashed car an over-the-top live show windshield, among other that’s not to be missed. things. With Native And they play tonight and Nevada Mountains at Howlers; Ocean Icon, at the Smiling Moose. Your 33 Black Angels and Sal Farina also play. AM John Lavanga 6 p.m. Hank & Cupcakes 1306 E. Carson St., South 8 p.m. 4509 Liberty Ave., Side. $12. All ages. Bloomfield. $7. 412-682412-431-4668 or www. 0320 or www.howlers smiling-moose.com coyotecafe.com {PHOTO COURTESY OF ROBIN SOUMA}

04/04 04/07 04/09 04/10

There’s a bit of Alabama and a bit of Brooklyn in Matthew Houck, and there’s a bit of each in his musical project, Phosphorescent, too. The basis of the music is often country-ish, but there’s a wave of ambient psychedelia over much of it. His latest — recorded with other musicians, but not really as a “band” per se — is Muchacho, issued this week by Dead Oceans. It starts with a beautiful, harmony-laden opening called “Sun, Arise!” and rolls on from there, as much synth as twang. It’s a keeper, and Houck brings Phosphorescent to Club Cafe tonight; Philadelphia’s Strand of Oaks opens. AM 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $15. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com


NEWS

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

THU 21 31ST STREET PUB. The Convalescence, Kleos, Pipewrench, Shesinpain. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Soilwork. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Kate Nash, Supercute! Millvale. 866-468-3401. REX THEATER. BoomBox. South Side. 412-381-6811.

FRI 22 6119 PENN AVE. The 1975. East Liberty. ALTAR BAR. Here Come The Mummies. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BELVEDERE’S. Oh Shit They’re Going To Kill Us, Nomad Queen, Liebestod, Flora Fauna, Come Holy Spirit. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Charlie Hustle, The Grifters. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Steelesque, Spooky Sounds of the Zeros. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GOOSKI’S. Bunny Five Coat, Mud City Manglers, The Bloated Sluts. Polish Hill. 724-681-4364. HAMBONE’S. Hellfire Club, Ryan Taylor. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARVEY WILNER’S. Extremely Loaded. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. MR. SMALLS THEATER. KMFDM, Legion Within, Rein[Forced]. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PLUM AMERICAN LEGION. Daniels & McClain. Verona. 412-795-9112. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Wicked. Greensburg. SMILING MOOSE. Caspian, Native, Nevada Mountains. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Ikebe Shakedown. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Lou Ross Band. Robinson. 412-489-5631. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The Bloody Seamen, Thunder Vest, Grumpy. South Side. 412-431-4090. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Wings For Armor, Motometer, Agnes Wired For Sound. Aliquippa. 724-375-5080. FRANKIE’S. theCAUSE, Jeff Mattson. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027. HAMBONE’S. Mo Nelson Band. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARVEY WILNER’S. 3 Car Garage. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. KENDREW’S. The GRID. Aliquippa. 724-375-5959. MOONDOG’S. 8th Street Rox. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Delusions Of Grandeur, Save Us From The Archon, Dematus. Bloomfield. 412-335-8824. THE R BAR. Kings Ransom. Dormont. 412-445-5279. SMILING MOOSE. Four Nights Gone Masters of the Universe, The Shadow Rats, Romance Ponies. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Chris & Izzy. New Alexandria. 724-433-1322. TEAMSTER TEMPLE. badj, The Nieds Hotel Band. Lawrenceville. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Paleface, The Armadillos, Modern Nature. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TOWER LOUNGE. Total Package.

Kennedy Township. 412-458-1894. THE WAC CLUB. Daniels & McClain. Clairton. ZANDERZ SPORTS BAR. Badd Newz. Plum. 724-387-2444.

SUN 24 ALTAR BAR. Gloriana. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. San Cisco, Chaos Chaos. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. PALACE THEATRE. Ted Neeley & The Little Big Band. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. SMILING MOOSE. Single Mothers, Slaves BC, With No Disguise, Head Made of the Ground All Them Witches, Come Holy Spirit, Lost Realms. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Enemies, Ray Lanich Band, Mo Nelson, Brothers Graham Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

MON 25 ALTAR BAR. Hed PE. Strip District. 412-263-2877. AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Kristen Ford. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Silent Old Mountains, Sarah Lou Richards, The Marbits. Garfield. 412-361-2262. MR. SMALLS THEATER. As I Lay Dying, The Devil Wears Prada, For Today, The Chariot. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

MP 3 MONDAY GRAND PIANO {PHOTO COURTESY OF JAKE REINHART}

ROCK/POP

SAT 23 31ST STREET PUB. Twin Guns, King Fez, Retro Agents. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Ash. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BLVD PUB & KITCHEN. Lucky Me. Canonsburg. 724-746-2250. CLUB CAFE. Joe Grushecky & the HouseRockers. South Side. 412-431-4950.

38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from Grand Piano; stream or download “Trainhound” free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


SMILING MOOSE. Helen Money, Bear Skull, Cascade & Columbine. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 26 GARFIELD ARTWORKS. The Soil & The Sun, Kellen & Me, Homeless Gospel Choir. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GOOSKI’S. MTNS, Laughters, Free Clinic, Super Fun Awesome Party Band. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. KOPEC’S. Dendritic Arbor, Wrought Iron, Call of the Void, Ambassador Gun. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0892. SMILING MOOSE. Jonny Craig, Kurt Travis, Hail The Sun, Native Suns OC45, Sablowskis, Scattergun. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Darwin Deez. North Side.

WED 27 CLUB CAFE. Phosphorescent, Strand Of Oaks. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Ocean Icon, Hank & Cupcakes, Your 33 Black Angels, Sal Farina. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Badfish (Sublime tribute), The YJJ’s. Millvale. 866-468-3401. ROCK BOTTOM. Good Brother Earl. Waterfront. 412-462-2739. SHADOW LOUNGE. Abby Ahmad. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. SMILING MOOSE. Howl, Nomad Queen. South Side. 412-431-4668.

DJS THU 21 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 22 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BRILLOBOX. Chalga. Guilty pleasures & Balkan Sleaze w/ Pandemic & Preslav. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Harry Lurker. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3730. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 23 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. Motown Night. w/ PghSoulDj. Classic Motown, Rare Soul, Funk. South Side. 412-431-5282.

MEXICO CITY. DJ Juan Diego VII. Salsa & Latin music. Downtown. 412-980-7653. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Vex. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3730. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

THE R BAR. Kings Ransom feat. Craig King. Dormont. 412-445-5279. SUNNY JIM’S TAVERN. The Blue Bombers, Patrick Scanga. Kilbuck. 412-761-6700. THE VALLEY HOTEL. Ron & The RumpShakers. Jefferson Hills. 412-233-9800. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Mark Shuttleworth Trio. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

SUN 24

WED 27

BRILLOBOX. Sweet Jamz w/ Pandemic Pete. All vinyl anything goes set. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. RIVERS CASINO. DJs Bill Bara & Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

CAFE NOTTE. Billy Heid. Emsworth. 412-761-2233.

JAZZ

MON 25 ROYAL PLACE. Jerry Lucarelli Jazz Jam Session. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000.

FULL LIST ONLINE

WED 27

FRI 22

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 22

SAT 23

BLUES FRI 22

SAT 23

SUN 24

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M A I N F E AT U R E

BAND NIGHT

TUE 26 ANDYS. Eric Susoeff. Downtown. 412-773-8884. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Lilly Abreu. Shadyside. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series feat. Erik Lawrence. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

ANDYS. Lisa Bleil. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. SEWICKLEY HOTEL. Daval/ Stater Guitar Duo. Sewickley. 412-427-9979.

Every Thursday!

MARCH 21 DEVILS CUT, MYSTIC COWBOYZ, STONE COLD KILLER

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MUSIC

MARCH 27 DETECTIVE (LA), BRASS CHARIOT, THE RED WESTERN

@PGHCityPaper

ACOUSTIC

APRIL 4

THU 21

CORONADO, LOCKS & DAMS

BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Songwriters In Harmony. Songwriters Workshop. Harmony. 724-452-0539. CAFE NOTTE. Acoustic Cafe w/ Bucky. Emsworth. 412-761-2233.

$1.75 PBR Drafts Everyday 9-11

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282

CONTINUES ON PG. 42

THUR, MAR 21 • 9PM CLASSIC COUNTRY/ROCK

SLIM FORSYTHE'S GOSPEL & WESTERN HOUR

Weddings, Nightclubs, Proms, Corporate Events... We’ll do our part to make it perfect.

PLUS BEN SHANNON AND

THE AFTER PARTY FRI, MAR 22 • 9PM AFRO-FUNK

IKEBE SHAKEDOWN SAT, MAR 23 • 9PM AMERICANA/FOLK ROCK

PALEFACE WITH THE ARMADILLOS SUN, MAR 24 • 8PM CELTIC ROCK/FOLK ROCK

OFFIC OF THE P IAL DJ ITTS CELEBRAT BURGH ION!

THE ENEMIES (IRELAND) PLUS RAY LANICH BAND,

MO NELSON, BROTHER GRAHAM BAND MON, MAR 25 • 9:30PM

OPEN STAGE WITH CRAIG KING TUES, MAR 26 • 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES FEATURING

PROUD PARTNER

ERIK LAWRENCE

OPEN FOR LUNCH

Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

NEWS

Follow us on

WED 27

THU 21

ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. Two Wheel Pass. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. ANDYS. Joe Negri. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. BELVEDERE’S. CLUB CAFE. Dave DJ T$. Lawrenceville. . Hammer’s Power 724-312-4098. www per a p ty ci Supply, Faithful Sinners, pgh m .co Dewey Marquee. South Side. 412-431-4950. AVA BAR & LOUNGE. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & DJ Outtareach. East Liberty. Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. 412-363-8277. Downtown. 412-392-2217. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. 412-325-6769. ANDYS. Trevor McQueen. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Vex. BAR MARCO. The OrtnerRoberts Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SAVOY RESTAURANT. Latin Savoy Duo. The Union Hall Drive In featuring Charlie Chaplin in The Night. Strip District. 412-281-0660. Rink & One A.M. Strip District. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day 412-471-1900. chill. House music. aDesusParty. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & East Liberty. 412-362-6001. SPEAKEASY. Hendrik Meurkens. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Velvet Heat. Downtown. 412-392-2217. SMILING MOOSE. Fortified PhonetX. South Side. 412-431-4668. ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BAR MARCO. The OrtnerRoberts Duo. The Union Hall Drive In MOONDOG’S. Studebaker John & featuring Charlie Chaplin in The the Hawks. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. Rink & One A.M. Strip District. OBEY HOUSE. The Rhythm 412-471-1900. Hawks, the Bo’Hog Brothers. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD Crafton. 412-922-3883. CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Billy Price Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. & the Lost Minds. Shaler. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday 412-487-6259. Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. SHEREE’S TAVERN. Bobby 412-642-2377. Hawkins Back Alley Blues. LITTLE E’S. Eddie Brookshire Sutersville. 724-872-9918. Quartet. Downtown. THE WOODEN NICKEL. 412-392-2217. Groove Doctors. Monroeville. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. 412-372-9750. Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Shot O’ RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Soul. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. Bridgeville. 412-370-9621. ELWOOD’S PUB. Wendy Koulouris, Larry Belli, Mike Huston. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. ELWOOD’S PUB. Jeff Pogas. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB Cheswick. 724-265-1181. & SPEAKEASY. Sweaty Betty. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB North Side. 412-904-3335. & SPEAKEASY. The Etta Cox MR. MIKE’S PUB. Bobby & Al Dowe Band. North Side. Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Irwin. 412-904-3335. 724-864-0444. UP MODERN KITCHEN. Dave

TUE 26

Roth. Jazzed-up brunch. Shadyside. 412-688-8220.

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ARCHIE’S

Rich ’s

Hotel

$7

$2

$2

LARGE $2 16oz

Pitchers

Pints

Bottles

Draughts

East Carson Street

SOUTH SIDE

Parkside Den

Route 22

MONROEVILLE

Donner Street

MCKEESPORT

Route 51

JEFFERSON

MARCH IS DIFFERENT

$2 20oz Draughts Linden Avenue

EAST PGH

STEEL CITY

MONGOLIAN GRILL

$2 Bottles SouthSide Works

SOUTH SIDE

GARAGE DOOR S A LO O N 5 FOR $11 Buckets East Carson Street

SOUTH SIDE

40

$1 16oz Draughts East Carson Street

SOUTH SIDE

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

$5

Pitchers Oakland Avenue

OAKLAND

$2 Bottles Atwood Street

OAKLAND


TOWER LOUNGE

$2 20oz

$2

Draughts

Draughts

5th Avenue

22oz Draught + Fish Boat for $10.79

Pine Hollow Road

CORAOPOLIS

Market Square

KENNEDY TWP.

EVERGREEN $2 Draughts Penn Avenue

DOWNTOWN

PITTSBURGH

$1.50

®

Draughts East Ohio Street

NORTH SIDE

HARVEY WILNER’S

$1.75 Draughts Pennsylvania Avenue

©2013 Anheuser-Busch, Bud Light® Beer, St. Louis, MO

WEST MIFFLIN

py’s p i Z

— Saloon —

LEVEL 20

HELMET HEADS

$2 20oz

$4.95

$3 20oz

$7.50

Draughts

Pitchers

Draughts

Pitchers

SPORTS BAR

Brookline Boulevard

Paxton Drive

BROOKLINE

NEWS

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TA S T E

Library Road

BETHEL PARK

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M A I N F E AT U R E

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Bellefonte Street

BETHEL PARK

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Greg Reed, Bryan McQuaid, more. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

FRI 22 BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Brooke Smokelin. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin the Troubadour. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. PETER B’S. Blake & Dean. Sarver. 724-353-2677.

PHILADELPHIA {SAT., MAY 11}

James Blake

SAT 23 BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. John Raymon Originals. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. CIP’S. The Colin McCann Band. Dormont. 412-668-2335. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Curtis Eller’s American Circus. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. PITTSBURGH PUBLIC MARKET. Jack McLaughlin. Strip District. 412-281-4505.

Theatre of Living Arts

CLEVELAND, OHIO {THU., MAY 16}

Flying Lotus House of Blues

COLUMBUS, OHIO

MON 25 HAMBONE’S. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

{TUE., JUNE 18}

Alabama Shakes LC Pavilion

WED 27

& Hope

Experience the Love, Sacrifice

Easter at North Way. OAKLAND 120 McKee Place, Pittsburgh Good Friday Services Noon, 6 & 8pm, Friday, March 29 Easter Services 9 & 11am & 12:30pm, Sunday, March 31

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Weds. North Side. 412-321-1834. MOONDOG’S. Acoustic Open Stage. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PARK HOUSE. Dodgy Mountain Boys & the Park House Jammers. North Side. 412-596-2743. PENN HILLS COFFEEHOUSE. Songwriter Showcase. Penn Hills. 412-798-2127.

WORLD

EAST END 5941 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh

THU 21

Good Friday Service 7pm, Friday, March 29

SUN 24

Easter Services 9 & 11am, Sunday, March 31

AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Juan De Marcos & The Afro Cuban All Stars. Downtown. 412-258-2700.

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. World Kaleidoscope: Choro No Vinho. Oakland. 412-622-3151.

REGGAE

One Church. Multiple Locations. All Generations. 8&9'03%t0",-"/%t4&8*$,-&:7"--&:t&"45&/%

42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

PARK HOUSE. Slim Forsythe & his New Payday Loners. North Side. 412-224-2273.

CLASSICAL FRI 22 MASON BATES & EMANUEL AX W/ THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Feat. Bates’ The B-Sides & Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 25. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. THE NORDIC SOUND. Feat. music of Scandinavian composers. James Laughlin Music Center. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100.

FULL LIST E ONwLwIN w.

SAT 23

MASON BATES & EMANUEL AX W/ THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Feat. Bates’ The B-Sides & Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 25. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

paper pghcitym .co

FRI 22 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Pressure, The Forthrights, DJ Soulful Fella. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

COUNTRY northway.org/CityEaster 724-935-6800

FRI 22

THU 21 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Slim Forsythe’s Gospel & Western Hour, Ben Shannon & the After Party. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 24 AWADAGIN PRATT. Steinway Piano Series. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-922-0903. DUQUESNE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131. MASON BATES & EMANUEL AX W/ THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Feat. Bates’ The B-Sides & Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 25. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

STEVE ANISKO, HEINZ CHAPEL ORGANIST. Passion Sunday Concert. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157.

MON 25 CLASSIC GUITAR ENSEMBLE. PNC Recital Hall, Duquesne Univ., Uptown. 412-396-6080.

OTHER MUSIC THU 21 ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. IonSound w/ Mason Bates. North Side. 412-237-8033.

SAT 23 ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. NOW ENSEMBLE. North Side. 412-237-8300. ELJAY’S USED BOOKS. Cedric the Balladeer. Dormont. 412-344-7444. LEMONT. Mark Venneri. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

MON 25 LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Steel Drum Festival. Midland. 724-643-9004.

TUE 26 MARY PAPPERT SCHOOL OF MUSIC. Percussion Ensemble. Uptown. 412-396-4632.

WED 27 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes SingAlong. http://trustarts.culturaldistrict. org/event/3941/hello-donny-ashowtunes-sing-along. Downtown. 412-325-6769.


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

March 20 - 26 WEDNESDAY 20

What are Museums For? The Guerrilla Girls CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL Oakland. Tickets: cmoa.org or 412-622-3288. 7p.m.

They Might be Giants MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Moon Hooch. Over 14 show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 7:30p.m.

THURSDAY 21 Opening Night Carnegie Mellon International Film Festival 2013

Plain USA / Because I Am A Girl presents Kate Nash MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Supercute! All ages show. Tickets: 866468-3401 or ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Soilwork ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Jeff Loomis, Blackguard & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

BoomBox

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS. For more info & tickets visit: cmu. edu/faces. Through April 13.

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 17 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

FRIDAY 22

SOUND SERIES: Mason Bates and IonSound

TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER Downtown. 412-4566666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through March 23.

Jesus Christ Superstar’s Ted Neeley

Here Come The Mummies

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 7p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Gene The Werewolf. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

MONDAY 25

CELTIC WOMAN

KMFDM

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Legion Within & more. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

SATURDAY 23

(HED) PE

TUESDAY, MARCH 26 HEINZ HALL

Pittsburgh Power vs. Utah Blaze

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests The Lampshades & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 7:30p.m.

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through March 24.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Overdost, Demented & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

SUNDAY 24

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: consolenergycenter.com or 800-745-3000. 6p.m.

Madama Butterfly BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghopera.org. 2p.m.

Ash

Slatkin, Ax & Mozart

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. 412-237-8300. Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

With special guest For Today & The Chariot. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 7p.m.

Paige In Full: A B-Girls Visual Mixtape

Joe Grushecky and the HouseRockers

TUESDAY 26 Celtic Woman

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 7:30p.m.

The Devil Wears Prada / As I Lay Dying

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 9p.m.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447.

SPRING/SUMMER Golf Street

Earthkeepers® Jordan Pond Sandal

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Mike Baumann Mephisto/Allrounder Rusty Ortiz Allen Edmonds

108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

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STUDENT AFFAIRS

IN THIS POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT, PERSONAL CONTACT IS SUBJECT TO PARANOIA

{BY AL HOFF} In today’s fraught academic environment, a film such as Admission seems a sure bet. Paul Weitz’s light comedy is adapted from Jean Hanff Korelitz’s novel, which told the behind-the-scenes tale of how the admissions department at Princeton picks the oh-so-very-few students from the zillions who apply.

She who chooses: Tina Fey

The tale, related by one admissions officer, seemed to spill enough insider dirt to almost qualify as a manual, and it cut the hows and whys of the paperwork with more familiar storylines, including a light satire of academia and a multigenerational melodrama about love and family. The film, alas, mostly focuses on the latter, turning Admission into mildly amusing rom-com. Admissions vet Portia (Tina Fey) finds her life and judgment coming undone after meeting John (Paul Rudd), the charming head of an alternative high school, who approaches her to pitch a prospective student. Things get tangled –— and mildly unethical — quickly, but no circumstance or emotion is ever in danger in this frothy exercise. Fey and Rudd are likable, and you can almost forgive them their rom-com stupid scenes. (And who doesn’t like seeing supporting actors Lily Tomlin and Wallace Shawn in anything?) But this is mostly a less frantic, slightly more mature version of the same old rom-com — you know, hardly Princeton material. Starts Fri., March 22. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE CROODS. A prehistoric family emerges from its cave and takes an eye-opening road trip through fantastic antastic landscapes in this animated adventure, dventure, from om Kirk De e Micco and nd Chris hris Sanders. anders. Starts tarts Fri., ri., March 22.

TRUST

ISSUES {BY AL HOFF}

“N

OBODY CAN be happy here.”

So says Barbara, a doctor, referring to life in East Germany in 1980. She’s particularly bitter; in a disciplinary action, she’s been transferred from a prestigious hospital in East Berlin to a small rural clinic. What unfolds after her move is the subject of Barbara, a meditative, character-driven thriller from Christian Petzold. Barbara (Nina Hoss) keeps to herself, making no friends and rejecting the friendly overtures of her boss, Andre (Ronald Zehrfeld). Yet she is caring with the patients, particularly Stella, a troubled teen-age girl, injured while escaping a labor camp. And she is warm and playful during her clandestine meetings with her Danish lover, who is helping her plot a defection. But in this political environment, personal contact is subject to paranoia. Anxiety and distrust is as pervasive and disruptive as the constant strong wind. Some of it is forefronted, such as when

Against the wall: Nina Hoss, as Barbara

the Stasi arrive to search Barbara’s house and person, but much of it is just an inability to know whom to trust. Are Andre’s personal enquiries about Barbara because he cares, or has he been tasked with keeping tabs on her? Even the motivations of patients are questioned. And

BARBARA DIRECTED BY: Christian Petzold STARRING: Nina Hoss and Ronald Zehrfeld In German, with subtitles. Starts Fri., March 22. Harris

CP APPROVED in this murky world, what right does Barbara have to expect truth from others when she is engaged in subterfuge? Petzold’s film is a slow-burner, in which information is judiciously revealed. (Among the film’s sly hints, Barbara chooses to read the classic novel of rebellion and escape, Huckleberry Finn, to the similarly inclined Stella.) Barbara

isn’t initially a likable character until we learn how her cold, aloof nature is a necessary defense mechanism. Likewise, circumstances cause Barbara to re-evaluate those around her, and to weigh the protection of her life against the lives of others. The background issues are fraught, but the execution here is low-key, even pleasant. Despite the grim, gray concrete we associate with life in the Eastern Bloc, these events take place over a sunny summer in a charming pastoral place. The actors deliver understated performances, and Hoss has one of those great faces that can be impassive while simultaneously conveying submerged emotions. One aspect of the final reel might strike some viewers as too pat, a bit of audience-pleasing after an hour-and-a-half of free-floating anxiety. But all is not lost for those for those who favor subtler pleasures, as Barbara ends on an enigmatic note better suited to its cautious journey. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THE INCREDIBLE BURT WONDERSTONE. This comedy, written by John Francis Daley of Horrible Bosses fame, follows a bestfriend duo of Las Vegas magicians and their misadventures as they try to remain relevant in a viral-video age of magic. The eponymous Mr. Wonderstone — played by Steve Carell — is a predictably arrogant and unlikable character who relies so heavily on overwrought Will Ferrell-style antics that even Carell’s charms can’t salvage him. Steve Buscemi, whose discomfort playing his role is almost captivating, plays Wonderstone’s sidekick, Anton. The unbearable cheesiness that ensues makes for a long hour and 40 minutes that’s far from incredible. (Jeff Ihaza)

   

  

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you.

OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN. Terrorists have taken the White House, but luckily there’s a disgraced former White House guard on site. I smell victory and redemption! Aaron Eckhart and Gerard Butler star; Antoine Fuqua directs. Starts Fri., March 22. SPRING BREAKERS. The latest from buttonpushing director Harmony Korine (Gummo, Mr. Lonely, Trash Humpers) is surely his most mainstream venture yet: a crime drama about four best-girlfriend college pals who get in over their heads on spring break thanks to a drug dealer named Alien (played by James Franco). Also starring the till-now-squeaky-clean Vanessa Hudgens, Selena Gomez and Ashley Benson. Starts Fri., March 22.

wyep.org

The Incredible Burt Wonderstone special effects that date other older fantasy films. As Wonka, Gene Wilder is a delight, warm yet somehow malevolent. He doesn’t seem to care at all when bratty kids disappear. Sure, he says they’re coming back … What wicked pleasure to see irksome kids just vanish into psychedelic machinery. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 20. AMC Loews. $5. (Al Hoff) RUN LOLA RUN. Lola (Franka Potente) has 20 minutes to find and deliver 100,000 Deutsche marks to her boyfriend waiting across town, or he’ll incur the probably fatal wrath of his gangster boss. Yet director Tom Tykwer spins out a clever and entertaining thriller. With a frenetic mix of media — film, video, still photography, animation, techno music — and technique (slow motion, jumpcuts, split screens, color tinting), Lola’s short footpounding journey through the Berlin streets is presented three times. Three identical beginnings are altered slightly (Lola trips in one version) so that subsequent events occur on a different timeline and culminate with three wildly different conclusions. Run Lola Run has great fun inverting how thrillers — even arty European thrillers — are expected to end. The 1999 film wraps up a month-long, Sunday-night series of suspense films. In German, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., March 20. Melwood. $2 (AH)

CP

THE WE AND THE I. In this new film from Michel Gondry (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind), a group of teens from a South Bronx high school ride a city bus home on the last day of school. As expected, they’re keyed up — loud and obnoxious, their catcalls and pranks spilling over the seats and across the aisles, irritating the few adult passengers. Working almost exclusively within the bus, Gondry’s cameras are equally kinetic, bouncing from teen to teen, teasing out a hodgepodge of stories. But there’s no real narrative, just flashes of insight as these various threads unfold and intertwine. The title plays on the dreadful paradox of late adolescence — of being a newly formed individual, but still desiring to belong to a group, even at the cost of the self — and much of the conflict revolves around this tension. As the bus rolls on, they gradually lose the energy to posture and their encounters become more revealing. The ensemble cast are real Bronx teens, whom Gondry workshopped this film with, and the authenticity shows (even if the acting is a bit wobbly). The work is filmed in more-or-less real time, with a few

AN ADRENALINE SHOT” TO THE CEREBRAL CORTEX! – Marshall Fine, HUFFINGTON POST

CP

Olympus Has Fallen STOKER. An already unstable family gets further disrupted when an uncle comes to stay. Mia Wasikowska, Nicole Kidman and Matthew Goode star in this drama directed by Chanwook Park (Old Boy). Starts Fri., March 22. AMC Loews, Manor

REPERTORY WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE CP WILLY FACTORY. Mel Stuart’s 1971 adaptation of Roald Dahl’s story is heartwarming without being gooey and still deliciously weird. It’s a slow set-up while we wait out all the winners of the trip into Wonka’s secret candy factory — but once inside, the wonder, wackiness and even danger begin! The sets are wonderful color-saturated structures, free from the dumb

CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

Carnegie Mellon® International Film Festival FACES OF MEDIA March 21-April 13, 2013

Thursday, March 21 Melwood Screening Room 7:15 - The We and the I (USA) Friday, March 22 McConomy Auditorium, CMU 7:00 - Crocodile in the Yangtze (China) Saturday, March 23 Melwood Screening Room 5:00 - Suspiciously In Love (Poland) 7:00 - InContact (Israel/USA) Sunday, March 24 Melwood Screening Room 3:00 - Tahrir- Liberation Square (Italy) McConomy Auditorium, CMU 5:30 - Sushi: The Global Catch (Japan)

www.cmu.edu/faces

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Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

Gondry flourishes. He uses cell-phone footage for flashbacks, and even indulges in a spot of stopmotion animation. There’s also a notable bending of time and space, as this journey through the Bronx never seems to end and day turns to night. Screens as part of CMU’s Faces of Media film fest, followed by a reception. 7:15 p.m. Thu., March 21. Melwood. $15 ($10 seniors/students). www.cmu.edu/faces (AH) LONG DISTANCE REVOLUTIONARY: A JOURNEY WITH MUMIA ABU-JAMAL. Stephen Vittoria’s new documentary profiles the life and impact of the political activist, now serving life in prison. 7:30 p.m. Thu., March 21; 7:30 p.m. Sat., March 23; and 7 p.m. Sun., March 24. Hollywood MISS REPRESENTATION. Jennifer Siebel Newsom’s recent documentary looks at a number of issues affecting contemporary women and girls: the underrepresentation of women in positions of business and political power, and the cumulative effects of mass media, which often emphasizes only women’s appearance or “girliness.” Among the well-known interviewees: Nancy Pelosi, Condoleezza Rice and Rachel Maddow. Presented by Women in Film and Media Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh. 6 p.m. Fri., March 22. Frick Fine Arts Building, Pitt campus, Oakland. $10 (tickets at www.wifmpit.org); free for students. FACES OF MEDIA. Carnegie Mellon’s annual International Film Festival runs through April 13. This year’s theme is Faces of Media. Crocodile in the Yangtze is Porter Erisman’s documentary about Jack Ma, China’s first Internet entrepreneur (7 p.m. Fri., March 22; McConomy Auditorium, CMU campus, Oakland). A social-media program becomes the conduit for young Israeli women to examine the role of spectacle and performance in their lives in Ann Oren’s film, InContact (7 p.m. Sat., March 23; Melwood). Stefano Savona’s documentary Tahrir: Liberation Square tracks three young Egyptians in the winter of 2011, as they join the street throngs clamoring for regime change (3 p.m. Sun., March 24; Melwood). For complete schedule, see www.cmu.edu/faces. $8 ($5 students/seniors) GUMNAAM. This 1965 Bollywood film is a thriller — with musical numbers, natch — in which a group of young people are taken to an isolated island as a prize for winning a dance contest, then killed one by one. Among the film’s musical numbers is “Jaan Pehechaan Ho,” memorably featured in the opening of 2001’s Ghost World. Live music from King Fez in the lobby at 8 p.m. 9 p.m. Fri., March 22. Hollywood

Sushi: The Global Catch KILL BILL — VOL. 1. Quentin Tarantino’s 2003 film is Charlie’s Angels Gone Bad, crossed with a Japanese samurai movie, crossed with a spaghetti Western, and crossed yet again with a Hong Kong martial-arts throwdown. Our hero, The Bride (Uma Thurman), watched as Bill and her former assassination-crew comrades spoiled her wedding

SUSHI: THE GLOBAL CATCH. It’s a bad time to be a bluefin tuna. That’s one takeaway from Mark Hall’s sobering look at how the worldwide popularity of sushi is threatening to wipe out the ocean’s fish. Hall checks in with sushi chefs — including those committed to sustainable offerings — and the famous Tokyo fish market, where a single tuna fish can command six-figure prices. And he visits Australia, home to various fish farms, including one on land where tuna are being raised from eggs. We love sushi, and it’s healthful, but without care, we’ll eat the oceans empty. Screens as part of CMU’s Faces of Media film festival. In English, and Japanese and Polish, with subtitles. 5:30 p.m. Sun., March 24. McConomy Auditorium, CMU campus, Oakland. $8 ($5 students/ seniors). www.cmu.edu/faces (AH) NORTH BY NORTHWEST. This 1959 thriller is the source for not one but two of director Alfred Hitchcock’s most memorable scenes: Cary Grant running from a crop-duster, and the gravity-defying climax on the face of Mount Rushmore. Employing a popular Hitchcock theme — wrongly accused — an ad man (Grant) is mistaken for a spy and chased across the country. And then there’s that delicious banter between Grant and his co-star Eva Marie Saint. The film continues a month-long, Sunday-night series featuring Hitchcock’s leading ladies. 8 p.m. Sun., March 24. Regent Square (AH)

CP

The We and the I by killing everyone there, mistakenly leaving The Bride herself for dead. Now The Bride is out for bloody, fastest-sword-in-the-West (and East) revenge against her would-be murderers, including a cold-blooded yakuza boss (Lucy Liu), and

“AN ELECTRIFYING MASTERPIECE!” -Harry Knowles, AIN’T IT COOL NEWS

THE NEVERENDING STORY. A book leads a bullied boy into a fantasy land where he has a chance to be the hero. Wolfgang Petersen directs this 1984 family adventure film. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 27. AMC Loews. $5 BUBBA HO-TEP. After Elvis Presley (Bruce Campbell) secretly traded places with a lowbudget impersonator, he ended up in a rest home forced to live out his days as a nobody. When things go weird at the home, Elvis bonds with another resident, an elderly black man who claims to be President John F. Kennedy (Ossie Davis). Together they discover that a misplaced Egyptian mummy who eats souls to survive has made the home his personal Old Country Buffet. This 2003 film sounds cheesy, but director Don Coscarelli has created a surprisingly low-key black comedy. Bubba wisely plays on the worst fears we all have: that our bodies will fail us, that the meaning of our lives will slip away, and our world will shrink to the dimly lit hallways of a shabby rest home. 7:30 p.m. Thu., March 28; 9:15 p.m. Fri., March 29; 5 p.m. Sat., March 30; and 4 p.m. Sun., March 31. Hollywood (AH)

CP

SELENA LLENA ENAA VANESSA ESSA ESS SA ASHLEY LEYY RACHEL LE HELL JAMES GOMEZ GOM GO MEZ HUDG HHUDGENS UDGGENSS ANCO AN NCO

A FIFIL FILM LM BYY HA H

RINE RIN RI NE

Album featuring new score by Skrillex and Cliff Martinez available on Big Beat Records/Atlantic Records

STARTS FRIDAY MARCH 22 AT SELECT THEATERS! 46

ultimately puppetmaster Bill himself. Midnight, Sat., March 23. (Bill O’Driscoll)

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

CRANBERRY TOWNSHIP Cranberry 8 (724) 772-3111

PITTSBURGH Cinemark Robinson Township (800) FANDANGO #2153

TARENTUM Cinemark 18 (800) FANDANGO#2112

WEST HOMESTEAD AMC Loews Waterfront 22 (888) AMC-4FUN

ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org


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[BOOK]

ON DECK

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} With Opening Day approaching, locally sourced baseball books are doing what baseball books seem to do best: look back. The most colorful of the current lot is a kids’ book. You Never Heard of Willie Mays?! (Schwartz & Wade Books) is the follow-up to You Never Heard of Sandy Koufax?!, also written by Pittsburgh-based children’s author Jonah Winter. Again, a folksy narrator informs young fans about a star of yore, in this case the slugging centerfielder many regard as the greatest player ever. Mays, an Alabama native who started out in the Negro Leagues, signed with the New York Giants in 1951, and it’s easy to forget the racism he endured in segregated America. Winter’s demotic prose reminds us of that aptly, even while focusing on Mays’ winning personality and onfield majesty. Both aspects of the man are gorgeously captured in Terry Widener’s flowing, hand-painted illustrations in rich, muted colors. It’s a home run. History imprint Arcadia Publishing mines the past with Forbes Field. The 127page collection of mostly vintage photos, with supplemental text by locals David Finoli and Tom Aikens, traces that vanished local landmark from its 1909 construction to its afterlife as outfieldwall remnants. It’s not all Honus Wagner and Bill Mazeroski, though, or even Babe Ruth’s final three homers: Forbes also hosted the legendary Homestead Grays, great Pitt Panthers and mediocre Steelers gridiron squads, and Billy Conn bouts. Still, it’s baseball geeks who’ll most enjoy the book, right down to photos of obscure Pirates like Lee “Specs” Meadows, and half-forgotten greats like centerfielder Max Carey. Meanwhile, though Abby Mendelson’s novel The Oakland Quartet isn’t a baseball book per se, the game’s integral. The titular protagonists are a golden-gloved sandlot infield on the cusp of adulthood whose lives are shattered when they commit a terrible crime. A veteran freelance writer, Mendelson teaches English at local universities, has published several sports books and contributes to local outlets (including City Paper). His self-published novel takes place in 1958 — in a now-lost, workingclass-Irish Oakland where Pitt is barely a presence. It’s a neighborhood of bosses and fixers, vandals and street scrappers, with cameos by the likes of Pirates great Pie Traynor and Mayor David Lawrence. Mendelson vibrantly evokes this milieu, with its rough, crude denizens, and the hand of fate resting on “lives that never got past that summer.” Baseball, yes; nostalgia, no.

ROBINSON HAS SET OUT TO RECTIFY THE PERCEIVED FAULTS OF MANY RECENT “FEMINIST” BLOCKBUSTER EXHIBITIONS.

[ART REVIEW]

WOMEN’S WORKS {BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

G

IVEN THE misogynistic rhetoric of

the most recent election cycle, it is clear that feminism still has a crucial role to play in American politics. Last November, women voted in record numbers, and more women than ever were elected to Congress. And while people in the United States debate women in combat, women’s rights and gender equity are becoming a global conversation, especially in places where discussing sexual harassment and violence against women has previously been considered taboo. Women’s rights are inextricably linked to issues surrounding development, poverty, security, social justice and the environment. According to art historian Hilary Robinson, “feminism is a set of politics, dedicated to the analysis of gender and the liberation of all women in support of the improvement of all humankind. To be feminist is to be actively involved with a process of thinking and acting and engaging with the whole world.” As curator of the exhibition Feminist and … , at the Mattress Factory, Robinson — a former Carnegie Mellon University College of Fine Arts dean who

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

The painted word: Parastou Forouhar’s “Written Room”

recently returned to her native England — aims to demonstrate that feminism is “multi-vocal, multi-generational and multicultural.” The exhibition presents new work, created during residencies this past summer, by six women from three different countries and of different generations.

FEMINIST AND … continues through May 26. Mattress Factory, 500 Sampsonia Way, North Side. 412-231-3169 or www.mattress.org

Betsy Damon was active in the Women’s Movement in the 1970s. Her “Water Rules — Life, Pittsburgh: Seeking Lost Rivers, Living Waters of Larimer” fills an entire room in the basement. It could be interpreted as Zen garden, rivulet, tide-pool or flood. In 1991, Damon founded Keepers of the Waters, an organization that focuses on water stewardship. For this project, Damon researched Pittsburgh’s topography, its rivers, its water systems and its wastewater treatment. Her project includes Living Larimer,

a model for gathering rainwater that will help prevent devastating floods in an economically struggling urban area. Loraine Leeson’s video installation “Active Energy: Pittsburgh” also focuses on the regeneration of the urban environment through sustainable practices. Several screens show members of the Geezers Club, a group of British retirees who have contributed their knowledge to intergenerational projects related to renewable-energy options for underserved communities. Paired with these images are interviews with older adults from Pittsburgh who are struggling with dementia. While the installation seems to be about giving voice to disenfranchised seniors, the connection between these two groups is not entirely evident. Similarly obscure is Parastou Forouhar’s “Written Room,” where words in Persian script are written all over the walls, ceiling and floor, as well as on ping-pong balls strewn about. The piece is meant to comment on the exoticization of the “oriental,” since the words are merely ornament for those who do not understand the language. But the words themselves are


fragments, confounding any perceptible meaning even if one does understand the language. Ayanah Moor is also interested in muddling words through appropriation, revision, expansion and inversion. In her room-size installation “by and about,” she uses words of and about the poet Nikki Giovanni, the singer Billie Holiday, the painter Mickalene Thomas and others in a rich wash of burgundy screen-printed on layered newspapers. Carrie Mae Weems also samples words, through audio and video clips, in “Lincoln, Lonnie and Me — a Story in 5 Parts.” In this video-based installation, life-sized spectral figures are projected using a “Pepper’s Ghost” technique onto a red-velvet-draped proscenium. While the works by Leeson, Forouhar, Moor and Weems are all subtle to the point of obfuscation, Julia Cahill’s “Breasts in the Press” is comparatively too obvious. Projected onto an outrageously well-endowed reproduction of the Venus de Milo are videos that explore sexual imagery in popular media. As the youngest artist in the exhibition, Cahill is genuinely earnest, but her piece exposes the flaws of the exhibition as a whole.

Love changes all. Not always for the better. Puccini’s

D STAN R E D UN ORD:ed W Y EVER xts project

! h te Englis e the stage v o ab

Campaign by Creme Fraiche Design. Photo: David Bachman.

Live streaming: Betsy Damon’s “Water Rules — Life, Pittsburgh: Seeking Lost Rivers, Living Waters of Larimer”

Robinson has set out to rectify what she sees as the faults of many recent “feminist” blockbuster exhibitions that consider “feminist art” as historic, or ignore multicultural or global feminism, or try to define it as a single category limited to a specific time, place, style and aesthetic. But while Robinson claims that the ellipses in her show title allow “openness, inclusion, and spilling over,” her broad definition does little to tie these works together. The exhibition’s diversity is hindered by the fact that there are only six works — all by female artists — from only three different countries. In an abstract for her panel Feminism Meets the Big Exhibition: 2005 Onward, at February’s College Art Association Conference, Robinson writes “this period is pivotal for feminist curating … to welcome the next iterations of feminism in the art world.” Unfortunately, her show is so poorly curated that it adds little to the conversation.

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FINAL WEEKEND! MARCH 22 & 24 Benedum Center Tickets start at $10 412-456-6666 pittsburghopera.org

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ON SAL25EAT 9AM

MONDAY, MARCH

Sketch of a collaborative installation by Jeremy Boyle and Mark Franchino

[ART REVIEW]

FOUR EYES {BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

Collaboration can foster an exchange of ideas and alternative art practices that are not always possible when an artist works in isolation. Untitled I is the first collaboration between Jeremy Boyle and Mark Franchino. As both an exhibition of recent work by each artist and a central sculptural and sound installation, also called “Untitled I,” the exhibition is a result of conversations between the artists. Boyle and Franchino both teach in the art department at Clarion University, and working together fosters a continuous exchange of ideas, processes and materials. However, the only real collaborative piece in this show is a sculptural installation and preparatory sketch. Situated in the middle of the gallery, the sculpture looks like a treehouse propped on metal poles and cinder blocks. Made from repurposed shipping pallets, it has four differently colored cords emanating from it, each emitting a bird song. The piece conjures thoughts about home, garden and sustainability but it is also about materials and process. The house itself is small and inaccessible and appears to be halfway embedded in the ceiling. In their statement, Franchino and Boyle explain that the piece “combines their decade-long creative interests (systems, communication, definition, context and value) into a sculptural installation. With the conflation of cheap material, careful construction, high and low

tech, the work arrives in a simultaneous space of cynical observation and playful/ imaginative thought.” Pallets, containers, Dumpsters and treehouses figure prominently in Franchino’s exacting, architectural-style drawings. In one, a Dumpster is retrofitted with windows, open butterfly roof, and a porch made from pallets on which sits an inviting lawn chair. The image hovers in the middle of a white page, but the tiny house is clearly grounded while renderings of treehouses appear to float, accessible only by staircases or ladders. What both artists share is an eye for whimsy and the slightly absurd. Franchino’s homey spaces are welcoming yet clearly impractical. Likewise many of Boyle’s works. His “plug/plug,” a cord that plugs into two outlets, thereby

THE ARTISTS SHARE AN EYE FOR WHIMSY AND THE SLIGHTLY ABSURD.

TUESDAY JUNE 18 - 7 TUESDAY, 7:30PM 30PM HEINZ HALL FOR TICKETS, CALL 412.392.4900

OR VISIT PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG/JERRY GROUPS OF 10+ CALL 412.392.4819

UNTITLED 1: JEREMY BOYLE AND MARK FRANCHINO continues through April 7. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org

charging only itself, is both comical and poignant. Boyle’s other work includes electronics, sound, video, sculpture and drawing, all engaging and well presented. But the overall exhibition would have been enhanced by a more total collaboration with fewer individual works. Given the strengths of the presentation, any future collaboration between these artists would be a worthwhile endeavor. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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Pittsburgh Dance Council Presents

Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo

“ Vivacious splendor!”

— Cleveland Plain Dealer

“Outrageous as ever!” — Oxford Times, UK

Friday, April 5, 2013

»

Media Partner

8pm » Byham Theater » $19-$48

Pittsburgh Dance Council is a division of

Box Office at Theater Square » 412.456.6666 » TrustArts.org /dance » Groups 10+ 412.471.6930

Happy hour has never been so interesting! 20/20: Your Vision for Architecture This Thursday, March 21 Free; Cash bar 5:30–9 p.m. Happy Hour 6–7 p.m. Gallery Conversation 20/20 exhibition open until 9 p.m. John Sotirakis, principal at ThoughtForm, interviews curator of architecture Tracy Myers in the galleries of 20/20: Celebrating Two Decades of the Heinz Architectural Center. Get their views on topics like why architecture matters and what makes Culture Club is sponsored by buildings great. See where the Heinz Architectural Center has been and where it might go next! Have a drink and tell your architecture story in pictures, words, or video!

thursday night admission in march is FREE from 4–8 p.m. Free Thursday nights are made possible by a generous grant from The Jack Buncher Foundation. Normal parking fees apply.

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tues–sat: 10–5 | thurs: 10–8 | sun: noon–5 guided tours daily | members visit free cmoa.org | 412.622.3131 one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS...

LEND ME A TENOR A COMEDY-FARCE WRITTEN BY KEN LUDWIG DIRECTED BY - CORY MCCAFFERY SIGLER

1614 COURSIN ST. ST.

MARCH 22, 23, 24, 2013

McKEESPORT

Friday & Saturday performances at 8:00pm. Sunday matinees at 2:00pm. TICKETS CK S AR ARE $$15.00, 00 $$7.00 00 FOR OR SSTUDENTS D N S GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

(412) 673-1100 For Reservations www.mckeesportlittletheater.com

LANDMARKS HOUSING RESOURCE CENTER

— A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation 744 REBECCA AVENUE WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

Painting and Wood Care — SAT, MARCH 23 — 10-11:30am Landmarks Housing Resource Center, 744 Rebecca Ave, Wilkinsburg

Get ready for the Spring by reviving the paint on an old door or treasured piece of furniture. Stephen Shelton of Shelton Masonry + Contracting will present techniques and best practices for paint removal and wood care. Free and open to the public.

RSVPs are appreciated. Contact marylu@phlf.org or 412-471-5808 ext. 527.

T EX EK ! N E W

THE ULTIMATE ELVIS TRIBUTE ARTIST EVENT

{PHOTO COURTESY OF HARTFORD STAGE/T. CHARLES ERICKSON}

Jubilant Sykes (with Kecia Lewis in the background) in City Theatre’s Breath & Imagination

[PLAY REVIEWS]

DEEP BREATH {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

WOULD Breath & Imagination be such en-

3 SHOWS ONLY! MARCH 29 & 30, 2013

PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG/ELVIS | 412.392.4900 © Elvis Presley Enterprises, Inc. ELVIS TRIBUTE ARTISTS CONTEST and ELVIS LIVES LOGO are trademarks of Elvis Presley, Inc. All rights reserved.

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gaging musical theater without the massive talents of its three cast members? Jubilant Sykes, Kecia Lewis and Tom Frey fill the City Theatre mainstage with playwright Daniel Beaty’s images and imaginings of pioneering singer Roland Hayes. The well matched trio have perfected their roles in this coproduction (directed by Darko Tresnjak) with the Hartford Stage, where it received its world premiere at the start of the year. Hayes’ story is remarkable enough all by itself, and I slap myself for never having heard of him before. Born in 1877 into a tenant-farming family in Georgia, his mother a former slave, by the 1920s the gifted and trained vocalist was touring Europe, entertaining royalty. The first African American to achieve the musical and professional milestones that he did in both traditional spirituals and classical music, he fought to desegregate audiences and performances.

But whether a sharecropper farmboy or worldwide star, Hayes still faced racism and the indignities of Jim Crow. Central to the play is a real 1942 incident in a Georgia store; Hayes was beaten by police after protesting the treatment of his (offstage) wife and daughter for sitting in the “whitesonly” section of the shoe department while shopping. Beaty takes various liberties with other biographical facts, but the truth of Hayes’ greatness shines through.

BREATH & IMAGINATION continues through March 31. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-55. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

Operatic baritone Sykes fills that role not only with his remarkable voice, but also some laudable acting chops as he goes from cute little boy to scrabbling young man to confident maturity: innocence, anger, ambition, rage, hope. Opposite him as his Angel Mo’ (Hayes’ name for his mother), Lewis displays a daunting vocal range


The Palace Theatre Coming Attractions!

The Beach Boys

Nitty Gritty

Mar 20 Wed 8PM Mar 24 Sun 7PM Apr 4/5 Th/Fr 7:30PM

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH PUBLIC THEATER}

Montae Russell in Thurgood

and stage presence. The versatile Frey transforms himself — with discreet costume changes — into a supporting cast of friends, villains, men and one woman. More music than dialogue, Breath & Imagination most aptly tells its story with a mix of selected spirituals and Beaty’s original songs, sprinkled with classical pieces. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

counsel and fought segregation and Jim Crow laws for 30 years. He argued Brown v. Board of Education at the Supreme Court, served on the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals, became the U.S. Solicitor General and, in 1967, was appointed to the Supreme Court. And much of that, in fact most everything he did, can be prefaced with “First African American to …”

JUSTICE DONE

THURGOOD

{BY TED HOOVER}

continues through April 7. Pittsburgh Public Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-55. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

TONY KUSHNER opens the second half of

Angels in America with a character named The World’s Oldest Bolshevik ridiculing modern socialists as “pygmy children of a gigantic race.” It’s hard not to think of that watching Thurgood, about the late Thurgood Marshall, at Pittsburgh Public Theater. This one-man show makes the case that Marshall may be the last great Supreme Court Justice; even the few good contemporary ones are smallbore moderates reacting to, rather than leading, the times. And it’s our fault; we pygmy children who, through apathy and myopia, have midwifed a political system in which mavericks like Marshall can never again flourish. But it isn’t playwright George Stevens Jr.’s aim to show how far we’ve fallen from the path. Thurgood is, from start to finish, a Marshall hagiography recounting his life and times. Make that his remarkable life and historic times. Marshall was NAACP chief

Thurgood, truth to tell, isn’t really what you’d call a play. The “plot” is Marshall in his later years giving a speech at his alma mater, Howard University. Stevens has, in fact, just strung together enough anecdotes and generalized facts to fill 90 minutes. It should be dull, but when the anecdotes and facts are as sensational as Marshall’s, the evening is entertaining throughout. Ted Pappas directs Montae Russell in an unabashedly bravura performance. Russell never shies away from any outsized emotion. His ferocity is more than appropriate considering Marshall’s leonine nature, but I think a few moments of quiet, too, could allow both the performance and production to breath. Russell possesses a natural comedic flair, and a little more of that as well wouldn’t go amiss. I’m not sure we pygmy children deserve Marshall, but Thurgood shows how lucky we were to have him.

TED PAPPAS DIRECTS MONTAE RUSSELL IN AN UNABASHEDLY BRAVURA PERFORMANCE.

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Dirt Band

Buddy Guy

Elko Concerts presents Jewel Greatest Hits Tour with special guest Holly Williams Vestry presents Jesus Christ Superstar’s Ted Neeley University of Pittsburgh-Greensburg presents Eleanor: An American Love Story River City Brass’ Big Band and Doo Wop Brass Life Like Touring: Scooby-Doo Live! Musical Mysteries Latshaw Productions presents The Beach Boys Latshaw Productions: Branson’s Ozark Jubilee Latshaw Productions presents Michael W. Smith Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra presents Brilliant Brahms w/Pianist Angela Cheng Stage Right! presents Seussical The Musical Stage Right! presents Seussical The Musical John Noble’s 17th Westmoreland Night of the Stars Elko Concerts presents Tanya Tucker Westmoreland Columbus 500 presents Lights Out A Tribute to Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons WCT presents Nitty Gritty Dirt Band Latshaw Productions: Vicki Lawrence & Mama River City Brass’ Beach Blanket Brass WSO’s Pops Concert - Around the World with Disney Sanford-Brown Commencements Laurel Ballet Performing Company: Cinderella Elko presents Queensryche “25th Anniversary Tour of Operation Mindcrime” Elko Concerts presents Buddy Guy Westmoreland Cultural Trust presents Travis Tritt Drusky-Kirschner presents David Byrne-St. Vincent Elko: George Jones “The Grand Farewell Tour” Latshaw: Kenny Vance and The Planotones Latshaw Michael English & Special Guest The Easters Latshaw Productions presents Herman’s Hermits starring Peter Noone plus The Marcels

Travis Tritt

George Jones-Gran d Farewell Tour

The Palace Theatre, Greensburg 724-836-8000 • www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS +

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FOR THE WEEK OF

03.2103.28.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. {PHOTO COURTESY OF ANNALENA MCAFEE}

+ FRI., MARCH 22 {STAGE} Paige in Full is billed as “A B-Girls Visual Mixtape” — a fusion of poetry, dance, visual art and live music telling the story of a multicultural girl growing up in Baltimore. The sibling duo, comprised of writer and performer Paige Hernandez and musician Nick tha 1da, brings its brand of storytelling to the Peirce Studio at Downtown’s Trust Arts Education Center for four shows today and tomorrow as part of a national tour. Jeff Ihaza 10 a.m. and noon. Also 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Sat., March 23. 807 Liberty Ave. Downtown. $10. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

MARCH 26 Ian McEwan

{WORDS} “Some people say, / Live like you’ll never die, a prayer for idiots. / Instead, I will chant: Love is only fear of death. Love is only fear of death. / I don’t believe that either.” Between directing Carlow University’s creative-writing program and cohosting and producing public-radio show Prosody, Jan Beatty is a linchpin of the local poetry scene. Now the award-winning poet has a new collection of her own tough, distinctive work — The Switching / Yard (University of Pittsburgh Press), her fourth. Tonight’s book party, at the WYEP Community Broadcast Center, includes a reading, signing and reception. BO 7:30 p.m. 67 Bedford Square, South Side. Free. beattyjp@aol.com

{STAGE} In their fantasy world of blow-up furniture, pools and rainbow-colored liquids, Ringling Bros. and Cirque du Soleil veterans Doug Rougeux and Casey Carle go by the names “Bub” and “Yesac Elrac The Bubblemaniac.” Their touring show Bubble Time comes to the Byham Theater thanks to the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust and Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater. Each of the five performances this weekend features a soapy — hence the bubbles — fusion of visual arts and theater for both kids and adults. JI 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Also 11 a.m., 2 and 5 p.m. Sat., March 23. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $9.50 -11. 412456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

{SCREEN} So now there are more women in Congress than ever — 18 percent, about the same as, um, Tajikistan. How much of their underrepresentation in positions of influence is due to the way mass media portray women and girls? Jennifer Siebel Newsom’s new feature documentary, Miss Representation, is on the case. Opinions are sought from luminaries ranging from Gloria Steinem to Condoleezza Rice, Nancy Pelosi to Rachel

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Maddow. The free Frick Fine Arts Building screening is sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh and education and advocacy group Women in Film and Media Pittsburgh. Bill O’Driscoll 6 p.m. Schenley Plaza, Oakland. $10 (free for students). Register at www. wifmpit. org

{STAGE}

Given their penchant for gleefully turning beloved children’s stories into lurid explorations of society’s seamy underbelly, why would The Rage of the Stage Players stop at repopuWonderland, lating Alice in Wond and Peter The Wizard of Ozz a Pan with junkies, sex se fiends and other miscreants? So miscrea here’s the premiere premie of Winnie-the-Pooh Winnie-the-Poo and the Seven Deadly Sins. In S the troupe’s telling, “an tel older, more jaded, and jad openly gay Christopher C Robin” returns to the ret Hundred Hundre Acre Wood Woo to find his old pals consumed by co Envy En (Piglet), Lust L (Tigger), Gluttony G (Pooh) and (P more. The m fun f begins tonight at t Off O the Wall Theater. T MARCH 22 BO B 8 p.m. Paige aig ige e in in Full Fu ull ul ll Continues Co through thr April Apr 6. 25 W. Main St., M Carnegie. $15. Carne 724-292-8427 or 724-29 rageofthestage@ rageoft yahoo.com yahoo.c


Free!Event It’s been out of town for a bit, but Zany Umbrella Circus is back with its new show “Cake.” This live-storybook-style show about a kid’s birthday gone awry incorporates clowning, juggling, aerial work and more: It will be performed outdoors in Market Square, three times daily Friday through Sunday, courtesy of the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership. Led by performer Ben Sota, the Zanies have performed as far away as Jordan, Ethiopia and Afghanistan, and these 10th-anniversary shows are accompanied by a school-bus museum exploring the troupe’s history. (That’s the bus pictured, along with troupe members.) Starting at 8:30 p.m. Fri., March 22, other Downtown activities include Hotspot, an outdoor group meditation for selected guests of performance artists and “willfully conjoined techno-mystics” the Sisters of the Lattice, held in the Sisters’ steam saunas, at 921-23 Liberty Ave. The idea is to “create a wireless network from the energy” of the meditation’s participants. Everyone not busy meditating is free to watch; there’s also a free screening of the Sisters’ feature-length film. On Saturday, it’s a three-fer: the Zanies, Hotspot, and a 6 p.m. happy hour at Tavern 245 relaunching the city Office of Public Art’s Pittsburgh Artist Registry. Bill O’Driscoll “Cake”: 2, 5 and 8 p.m. Fri., March 22. Also Sat., March 23, and Sun., March 24. Hotspot: 8:30 p.m. Fri., March 22, and 8:30 p.m. Sat., March 23. Downtown. Free. www.downtownpittsburgh.com

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Support Women Artists Now Day is marked by hundreds of events in two dozen countries. In Pittsburgh, standard-bearer No Name Players Theatre Company has recruited more than 80 local professional female musicians, dancers, poets, theater artists, visual artists, filmmakers and fashion designers to present worldpremiere short works inspired by filmed interviews with area women and girls. Today’s fifth annual Pittsburgh SWAN Day, at the New Hazlett Theater, includes the usual evening show for adults, plus a brandnew afternoon event for ages 10 and up. Proceeds benefit next year’s event. BO 1 and 8 p.m. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $5-30 ($35 with evening pre-show reception). www.nonameplayers.org

Carrie Mae Weems is known for using photographs, text, fabric, audio, digital images, installation and video in artwork exploring issue like family relationships, gender roles, racism and sexism. She is featured in collections around the world, including MoMA and The Williams College Museum of Art. Tonight, Weems speaks at Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Art lecture series in the Kresge Theater. JI 5 p.m. CMU campus, Oakland. Free. www.cmu. edu/art/lectures

{ART} Unless your Laundromat is a lot more fun than the ones we know, tonight is probably your only chance (this year, anyway) to party in one. It’s courtesy of artist Cheryl Capezzuti’s National Lint Project, a twodecade initiative that turns dryer lint into small, colorful sculptures. The Project’s latest incarnation is an art installation at Trey’s Laundromat and Brighton Café. Tonight’s opening party includes live music by saxophonist Hill Jordan and his jazz combo Slide Worldwide. BO 5-7 p.m. Exhibit continues through April 27. 3801 Brighton Road, Brighton Heights. Free. www. studiocapezzuti.com

MARCH 22 Bubble Time

Rustbowl conjures, not unpridefully, a sort of gritty desolation. Perhaps that’s what artist collective Monalloh Foundry is going for with tonight’s multigenre showcase. Musical acts

Andre Costello & the Cool Minors, Chet Vincent & Molly Alphabet, and The Faithful Sinners; poets Michael Simon, Brian DiSanto and Lucy Goubert; and a live puppet show by Zach Dorn comple-

The winner of the 2012 Yale Series of Younger Poets competition, Eduardo C. Corral, speaks tonight at Point Park University’s Writer’s Series. Born in Casa Grande, Ariz., Corral has had his work featured in Best American Poetry 2012, Beloit Poetry Journal, Jubilat and more. He’s currently a professor at Columbia University. Tonight he reads from his first book of poetry, Slow Lightning. JI 6 p.m. 201 Wood St., Downtown. Free. 412-392-8184 or www.pointpark.edu

As a portmanteau of “Rust Belt” and “Dust Bowl,”

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ment the artwork of Joe Mruk, who frames it all as “a landscape of twisting steel and branches” at The Shop. BO 7 p.m. 4312 Main St., Bloomfield. $5. www.monallohfoundry.com

{WORDS}

Carrie Mae Weems

{SHOWCASE}

NEWS

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MARCH 26

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Bigelow, Oakland. Free. 412624-6508 or pghwriterseries. wordpress.com

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In which Pittsburgh gets a visit from one of the English language’s most acclaimed novelists. Ian McEwan, author of Amsterdam, On Chesil Beach and, most famously, 2001’s Atonement, speaks tonight in the University of Pittsburgh’s William Pitt Union ballroom. The free talk, hosted by the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series, comes on the heels of McEwan’s latest, Sweet Tooth (Doubleday). BO 8:30 p.m. Forbes Avenue at

ARTS

+ WED., MARCH 27 {COMEDY} Comedian Nikki Glaser, one half of the MTV show Nikki and Sarah Live, performs her stand-up tonight at Carnegie Mellon University. Glaser got her start as a comedian after appearing on the reality show Last Comic Standing while she was still attending college. Her performance tonight at McConomy Auditorium is free. JI 6 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University. Oakland. Free. 412-268-2105 or www.activitiesboard.org

MARCH 27

Nikki Glaser

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

pm 9-11p 9

THEATER 8. Reading of a play about

TRIVIA with Big Tom

$2.50 Leinenkugel Brews $2.50 Well Drinks

THURSDAY 10 0p pm m

WEDNESDAY W

ACOUSTIC MUSIC

with Mike De Luca $2 YUENGLING $3 JACK DANIELS

KARAOKE with DJ Hyatt

$2 COORS LIG LIGH HT T $2.50 EVIL SHOTS BEST KARAOKE BAR WINNER 2006-2008-2009-2011-20 12 ON BARSMART.COM!

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

Proposition 8. Presented by Theatre Sans Serif. Fri., March 22, 8 p.m. Hillman Center for Performing Arts, Fox Chapel. 412-523-9882. ANTARKTIKOS. A writer in residence at the South Pole finds herself in an unlikely conversation w/ the leader of the 1912 British Antarctic expedition, while her daughter embarks on her own adventure w/ an insomniac EMT. Thu-Sun and Wed., March 27. Thru April 7. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. ARRIVEDERCI, AL!: DINNER W/ THE GODFATHER. Interactive dinner theater. Sat., March 23, 7 p.m. Kean Theatre, Gibsonia. 724-444-5326. THE BOOK OF MORMON. Musical comedy by Trey Parker & Matt Stone. Tue-Sun. Thru April 7. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-4800. BREATH & IMAGINATION. The story of Roland Hayes, the

1st African-American classical vocalist to be heard around the world. Tue-Sun. Thru March 31. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. CINDERELLA. Fri, Sat. Thru April 6. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. COREY & JUSTIN IN A ONE MAN SHOW. Feat. Corey Nile Wingard & Justin Zeno. Presented by Jude Pohl Productions. March 22-23. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. DODGE INTREPID RADIO ADVENTURE SHOW. A witty, live radio adventure about a time traveling librarian & his intern. Sat., March 23, 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. IT’S MY PARTY & I’LL DIE IF I WANT TO. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Sat., March 23, 6 p.m. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640. LEND ME A TENOR. Opera comedy by Ken Ludwig. Fri-Sun. Thru March 24. McKeesport

FULL LIST ONLINE

PUBLICNOTICES P UB L I CN OTI C E S@ PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Little Theater, McKeesport. Butler Little Theatre, Butler. 724-287-6781. 412-673-1100. SAMSON & DELILAH/ RUBY MADAMA BUTTERFLY. THE SALT OF THE EARTH. Presented by Pittsburgh Opera. 1-act plays from the members of Fri., March 22 and Sun., the Kuntu Writers’ Workshop. March 24. Benedum Center, Thu-Sun. Thru March 30. Kuntu Downtown. 412-456-6666. Repertory Theater, Oakland. MOON BABY’S TWIN FAWNS OPERA. Drag opera. Fri., March 22, 412-624-7298. THE SANDLOT: LIVE READ. 7 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. Screenplay reading feat. THE MUSIC OF STEPHEN Curt Wootton, Aaron SONDHEIM. Feat. Kleiber, Abby Fudor, Broadway singer more. Fri., March 22, Heather Lee. The 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Strand Broadway Comedy Theater, www. per Concert Series. a p Downtown. pghcitym March 22-23. Strand .co 412-339-0608. Theater, Zelienople. STRAIGHTENING 724-742-0400. COMBS. Kim El’s 1-woman PAIGE IN FULL: A B-GIRLS show about the repercussions of VISUAL MIXTAPE. The tale low self-esteem & overcoming of a multicultural girl growing depression in urban America. Thru up in Baltimore that is told March 31. Pittsburgh Playwrights through a mix of poetry, dance, Theatre, Downtown. visual arts & live music. Sat., THURGOOD. The life story March 23, 2 & 8 p.m. Trust Arts of Thurgood Marshall, first Education Center, Downtown. African-American Supreme Court 412-456-6666. Justice. Tue-Sun. Thru April 7. RABBIT HOLE. A drama by David O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. Lindsay-Abaire. Thru March 23. 412-316-1600. A TUNA CHRISTMAS. A sequel to the comedy Greater Tuna. Fri-Sun. Thru March 24. New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-654-3437. WINNIE-THE-POOH & THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS. A vulgar twist on the classic characters of A. A. Milne. Presented by The Rage of Stage Players. Thu-Sat. Thru April 6. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-292-8427. YOU SAY TOMATO, I SAY SHUT UP! A 21st century love story where “Happily Ever After” meets “It’s Complicated” Wed-Sun. Thru May 5. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. ZANY UMBRELLA CIRCUS: CAKE. A young child anticipates an exciting birthday surprise, but things do not go as planned. Also feat. Zany Umbrella Bus Museum & circus workshops. March 22-24. Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-1511.

COME EARLY STAY LATE!

OPENING NIGHT

SATURDAY, MARCH 23 vs UTAH BLAZE

COMEDY THU 21 THE BIG PAULIE PUMP SHOW. 9 p.m. Firehouse Restaurant & Lounge, Pitcairn. 412-373-4636. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru March 28 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

THU 21 - SUN 24 BRET ERNST. March 21-24 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233. CONTINUES ON PG. 58

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013


VISUAL

ART

A TRAVELING EXHIBIT FEATURING MUSIC’S EXCLUSIVE COLLECTION

“Bull Vessel” from A Kind of Alchemy: Medieval Persian Ceramics at the Frick Art & Historical Center

NEW THIS WEEK 3 G GALLERY. Release the Hounds. Photography by Harry Giglio. Opening reception: March 22, 6-9 p.m. Sales proceeds benefit Steel City Greyhound Rescue. Downtown. 412-288-4320. BE GALLERIES. Where I Live. Paintings by Paul Rouphail, poems by Maria Rouphail. Opening reception: March 23, 5-8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Audrey Nicola. Seneca Valley High School student’s Senior Show. Opening reception: March 22, 7-9 p.m. Harmony. 724-452-0539. THE BREW HOUSE. 42.8864° N, 78.8786° W. Feat. work by 10 artists from the Buffalo (NY) Arts Studio. Part of the Distillery 7 Exchange Program. Opening reception: March 23, 7-9 p.m. South Side. 412-381-7767. FUTURE TENANT. MM/DD/ YYYY. Artwork by current CMU School of Art undergraduate students. Opening reception: March 22, 7-10 p.m. Downtown. 412-325-7037. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. Point Park Project 1: Kaleidoscope. Work by Di-Ay Battad, Katie Mackowick, Chris McGinnis, & Daniel Luchman. Opens March 22. Downtown. 412-391-4100.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Indivisibler. Work by John Burt Sanders. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. Feminine Aesthetics. Women of Visions, Inc. group show feat. Denise “Mike” Johnson, Mary Martin, Vanessa German, JoAnne Bates, Christine McCray Bethea,

Richena Brockinson, more. Artist Talk: Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Dream. Paintings by Sue Vincent. Oakland. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Petals & Pearls. Photography & watercolors by Anne Michele Lyons & Kathleen McShea. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Platonic Folds & How to Make Sense of a Canyon. Printmaking & mixed media works on paper by Meghan Olson. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Free admission to Carnegie Museums of Art & Natural History from 4 - 8 p.m. every Thur. in March. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Revelation. Work by Artur Vasilevich. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. EASTSIDE GALLERY. Hats Off. Work by Sally Allen, Pat Kelly, Bernie Pintar, Sickles, more. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. FE GALLERY. Austerity & Self-Sustainability. Installation by John Eastman & Donovan Widmer. Lawrenceville. 412-860-6028.

FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. A Kind of Alchemy: Medieval Persian Ceramics. A look at the diversity of ceramics made in ancient Persia, now present-day Iraq, Iran, & Afghanistan. Feat. 10thcentury splashware, buffware, slip-painted ware, lusterware & 14th-century fritware, more. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. The Classic Collection: European & American Classical & Academic Styles. Early 19th & 20th century paintings. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Abstraction = M S x 2. Sculptures & paintings by Marjorie Shipe & Mary Culbertson Stark. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. All the Years Combined. Original lithographs & posters by Jerry Garcia. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Interiors. Oil paintings by Jonelle Summerfield. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GAY & LESBIAN COMMUNITY CENTER. Fractures & Israel. Photography by Torey Bocast. Downtown. 412-422-0114. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Illumination. Juried exhibition by the Pittsburgh Society of Artists & Greensburg Art Club. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. JAMES GALLERY. unwrapped. Shibori-dyed quilts by Jan Myers-Newbury. West End. 412-922-9800.

Limited time engagement

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VISUAL ART

FRI 22 BLUE STOCKING BABES. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. CHUCK KRIEGER, SEAN COLLIER, TOMMY KUPIEC, TONE BOCK, MORE (LATE). 10 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950. FRIDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Fri, 9 p.m. Thru March 29 Toros Performance Lounge, Friendship. 412-657-4245. MIKE WYSOCKI, STEWART HUFF. 8 p.m. Village Tavern & Trattoria, West End. 412-458-0417. PITTSBURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE W/ MIKE WYSOCKI. Fri, 9 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995.

FRI 22 - SAT 23 COLLIN MOULTON. March 22-23 Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 23 THE LAST LAUGH. 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MIKE CONLEY, MATT WOHLFARTH, DAVID KAYE. Norwin Rotary 3rd Annual Funny Fundraiser. 6 p.m. Pluma, Irwin. 412-996-2600.

MON 25 TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 26 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 27 COMIC WARS: EBONY & IRONY VS. HAMILTON BURR(NS). Stand-up & improv challenges. Every other Wed. Thru March 27 The Improv, Waterfront. 310-909-6446. JOKEE OAKEE. Comedy open stage hosted by Tonnochi:B. Wed Younger’s, North Side. 412-452-3267. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Juxtaposing prime examples of Warhol’s paintings, sculpture, & films with those by other artists who reinterpret, respond, or react to his work. North Side. 412-237-8300. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 20/20: Celebrating Two Decades CONTINUES ON PG. 60

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LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. LAROCHE COLLEGE. Positive Space. Student art showcase presented by La Roche graphic design students under faculty supervision. Wexford. 800-838-4572. MATTRESS FACTORY. Feminist and.. New work by Julia Cahill, Betsy Damon, Parastou Forouhar, Loraine Leeson, Ayanah Moor, & Carrie Mae Weems. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Featuring Ben Matthews & David Lewis. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Heaven Didn’t Want Them. New Works by Christian Breitkreutz & Mike Egan. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Uncommon Grounds. Group show highlighting the fluidity & transformative quality of glass. Feat. Jon Goldberg, Jan Kransberger, Mark Leputa, Leonard Marty,& Matthew Szösz. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MORRIS LEVY GALLERY. Salon des Femmes de la Yinz. Art exhibit in recognition of Women’s History Month. Lawrenceville. 724-331-9692. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Faces & Places: Photographs of Old Economy. Never before seen photography from the late 19th & early 20th centuries. Ambridge. 724-266-4500. PICTURESQUE PHOTOGRAPHY & GIFTS. Photography by Brenda Knoll. Lawrenceville. 412-688-0240. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Above Dusk. Paintings by Kara Ruth Snyder. Homographies. Installation by Lizzy De Vita. Inter-subjectivity. Work by Eli Blasko, Eric D. Charlton & Ian F. Thomas. NON-WORK. Work by David Montano. Public Lives. Watercolors by William McAllister. Slo Poke. Paintings & drawings by Jonathan Chamberlain. Somewhere In Between. Installation by Lenore D. Thomas. This May Not Take That Long. Audio/video installation by David Bernabo & Emily Walley. Transience. Work by Stephen Chalmers. Untitled 1. Work by Jeremy Boyle & Mark Franchino. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Consciousness. Flameworked

glass by Eunsuh Choi. Friendship. 412-365-2145. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Cameras & the Famous Photos They Took. Including a copy of Daguerre’s first camera, James Bond’s mini Minox spy unit, the Big Bertha that caught Bill Mazeroski rounding third base in 1960 Winning Series, more. North Side. 412-231-7881. SCHOOLHOUSE ART CENTER. The Lion & the Lamb. Oil paintings, pastels, photographs & sculptures by local artists. Bethel Park. 412-835-9898. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 12. Work by Melissa Cameron, Betty Vera, & Kevin Snipes. Strip District. 412-261-7003 x 12. SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART. Red, White & Blue in Black and White: The American Scene in Prints, Drawings & Photographs. 35-some works on paper from the museum’s collection, from photographs to lithographs. Ligonier. 724-238-6015. SPACE. Mean Girls. Work by Jenn Gooch, Sonja Sweterlitsch, Randie Snow, Vanessa German, more. Artists’ Talk: March 23, 1 p.m. Downtown. 412-325-7723. STOKE’S GRILL. A Female Perspective. Work by Kim Freithaler, June Kielty, Nadya Lapets & Vickie Schilling. Ross. 412-369-5380. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Student/ Instructor Exhibition. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. The Art of Akira. Production art from Katsuhiro Otomo’s film. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TRUNDLE MANOR. Sara K. Diesel. Illustrations. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. WEST PENN HOSPITAL. Welcome to the Gardens. Fine acrylic paintings by Maura Taylor. The Gallery of Art, Millvale Ave. Upper Lobby. Email maurataylor3@gmail. com for more information. Bloomfield. 412-578-5000. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. The Art of Ruth Levine. A pop-up gallery of Levine’s work. An Art(ist) in Motion. Work by Aaronel deRoy Gruber. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WILDCARD. everyday balloons. Work by Chris Bencivenga & Becki Hollen. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Power Pixels 2013. New selfgenerative video installations, includes the world premiere of Miguel Chevalier’s latest work, Digital-Archi (Meta Cities). Downtown. 412-471-5605.


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of the Heinz Architectural Center. Feat. timeline highlighting important exhibitions & events, a display of 20 objects from the collection selected by current or past curatorial staff, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Free admission to Carnegie Museums of Art & Natural History from 4 - 8 p.m. every Thur. in March. Empowering Women: Artisan Cooperatives that Transform Communities. Folk art objects illustrating the power of women working together to provide for their families, educate their children, promote equality, & give back to their communities. BugWorks. Feat. beautiful photography of insects, amazing specimens, & live bugs! Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. Ligonier. 724-238-4983.

KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. Tours of a restored 19th-century, University of Pittsburgh Jazz middle-class home. Oakmont. Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards 412-826-9295. from the International Hall of MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. includes jade and ivory statues DEPRECIATION LANDS from China and Japan, as well MUSEUM. Small living history as Meissen porcelain. Butler. museum celebrating the 724-282-0123. settlement and history of the NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. more than 600 birds from over 412-486-0563. 200 species. With classes, lectures, FALLINGWATER. Tour the demos and more. North Side. famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 412-323-7235. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 FIRST PRESBYTERIAN rooms helping to tell the story CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. stained-glass windows. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. Downtown. 412-471-3436. 412-624-6000. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL OLIVER MILLER CENTER. Ongoing: tours HOMESTEAD. This of Clayton, the Frick pioneer/Whiskey estate, with classes, car Rebellion site features & carriage museum. . w ww per log house, blacksmith Point Breeze. a p ty ci pgh m shop & gardens. South 412-371-0600. .co Park. 412-835-1554. HARTWOOD ACRES. PENNSYLVANIA Tour this Tudor mansion TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley and stable complex, and enjoy rides and exhibits. Includes displays, hikes and outdoor activities in the walking tours, gift shop, picnic surrounding park. Allison Park. area and Trolley Theatre. 412-767-9200. Washington. 724-228-9256. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. BOTANICAL GARDEN. Spring What We Collect: Recent Art Flower Show. Feat. bold blooms Acquisitions, 2007–2012. Botanical & sweet scents based on Frances illustrations from the early 19th Hodgson Burnett’s children’s century through the present. classic, The Secret Garden. 14 Oakland. 412-268-2434. indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the feature exotic plants and floral other Frank Lloyd Wright house. displays from around the world. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501.

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Oakland. 412-622-6914. PHIPPS GARDEN CENTER. Annual Orchid Show. Presented by The Orchid Society of Western Pennsylvania. Shadyside. 412-441-4442. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Cameras & the Famous Photos They Took. Including a copy of Daguerre’s first camera, James Bond’s mini Minox spy unit, the Big Bertha that caught Bill Mazeroski rounding third base in 1960 Winning Series, more. North Side. 412-231-7881. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 18811986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. 1968: The Year that Rocked America. Nearly a dozen interactive video presentations & more than 100 evocative artifacts that explore how the year 1968 helped shape our modern world. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. Scottdale. 724-887-7910.

HOLIDAY SAT 23 BUTLER COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY EASTER OPEN HOUSE. Pet & children can get photos w/ the Easter Bunny, Chinese auction, adoption specials, more. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Butler County Humane Society, Butler. 724-789-1150.

SUN 24 47TH ANNUAL UKRAINIAN EASTER EGG SALE. 11 a.m.4 p.m. SS Peter & Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church Hall, Carnegie. 412-527-5359.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Book Launch for Aubrey Hirsch’s Why we Never Talk About Sugar, East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield CRITIC: Scott Silsbe, 35, a bookseller from Garfield WHEN: Thu.,

March 14 I thought tonight’s event was a really great reading. I hadn’t been too familiar with Aubrey Hirsch’s work until today and it was nice to get a chance to hear her speak; she did a really good job reading. I got to buy a copy of her book. The atmosphere was great in this very classical-style book shop. I’m really glad I came; it’s always good to hear new fiction from young Pittsburgh writers. There was a really good turnout, which is good just to have these local voices heard by an audience. BY JEFF IHAZA

FESTIVALS SAT 23 33RD LATIN AMERICAN & CARIBBEAN FESTIVAL. Live music, food, crafts, children’s activities, more. 12 p.m. Wesley W. Posvar Hall, Oakland. 412-648-7394.

DANCE FRI 22 - SUN 24 SNOW WHITE. Presented by the Carnegie Performing Arts Center. March 22-24 Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-279-8887.

FLEA MARKET. Benefits Mount Alvernia Day Care & Learning Center. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sisters of St. Francis, Millvale. 412-821-4302. MONONGAHELA MAMBO. Dinner & line dancing party feat. instructors from Arthur Murray Dance Studios. Benefits the Monongahela Aquatorium. 6 p.m. Monongahela VFD Social Hall, Monongahela. 724-258-5905. ZUMBATHON FUNDRAISER. Benefits Silk Screen Asian Arts & Culture Organization. 9:30 a.m. Cranberry Township Municipal Center, Cranberry. 724-969-2565.

SUN 24

DANCE LIKE THE STARS SPRING SHOWCASE. 3 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

FUNDRAISERS

WED 27

FRI 22

RETRO TRIVIA NIGHT. 80s & 90s trivia. Benefits Miles Against Melanoma PA. 6-9 p.m. Steel Cactus, Shadyside. 412-901-2078.

SAT 23

PGH PARTY FOR A PURPOSE: GROWN IN LAWRENCEVILLE. Benefits the Lawrenceville Farmer’s Market. 9 p.m. Remedy, Lawrenceville. 412-302-4284.

SAT 23 BLACK & WHITE PARTY. Benefits Every Child, Inc. 7-10 p.m. Villa Southside, South Side. 412-665-0600. FIGHT FOR AIR CLIMB. Climb the 45 floors (897 steps) of One Oxford Center. Benefits the American Lung Association. 8:30 a.m. One Oxford Centre, Downtown. 412-321-4029.

POLITICS TUE 26 CONQUERING THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL: WOMEN OF COLOR IN PENNSYLVANIA POLITICS. Panel discussion feat. Judge Kim Clark, Ayanna M. Lee-Davis, Valerie McDonald Roberts, & Doris Carson Williams. 6-7:30 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-477-7158. CONTINUES ON PG. 62


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tending skills: “The atmosphere is youthful. There are only five of us and it is the same five working all the time. We’re really close. Like a little family.” Where can you find Jen when she isn’t working? At the library studying! If you do happen to see her out, her drink of choice is ABSOLUT and Cranberry juice.

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

Pittsburgh City Paper editor Chris Potter, every Wednesday and former Andy Warhol Museum director Tom Sokolowski, every Thursday

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WED 27 POLICY BRIEFING: HOW WILL THE STATE BUDGET IMPACT WOMEN? WGF’s annual report, panel discussion, more. 3-5 p.m. Women & Girls Foundation, Station Square. 412-434-4883.

LITERARY THU 21

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BOOKS IN THE AFTERNOON. Mrs. Kimble by Jennifer Haigh. 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Third and First Thu of every month The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323.

FRI 22

135 9th Street 412-281-7703 www.blushexotic.com

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

JAN BEATTY. Poetry reading & launch of the collection The Switching Yard. 7 p.m. WYEP Community Broadcast Center, South Side. 412-381-9131. OAKLAND OPEN MIC. Poetry, music & political speeches welcome. Second and Fourth Fri of every month, 7 p.m. 610-731-1804.

SAT 23 LITANALYSIS: READING FICTION W/ FREUD. The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes. 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. UNATTENDED FIRE BOOK LAUNCH. Reading by Kristofer Collins, Bob Pajich, Lori Jakiela, Dave Newman & Scott Silsbe. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-687-1780.

SUN 24 BLACK HOLES, BEAKERS, & BOOKS: AN EMPIRE OF ICE. Discussion of An Empire of Ice: Scott, Shackleton, & the Heroic Age of Antarctic Science by Edward J. Larson. 3:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

MON 25 BRING YOUR OWN BARD: SHAKESPEARE’S MUSIC. Informal scene night, actors & non-actors read works of Shakespeare. 7:30 p.m. Te Cafe, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-6406. EDUARDO C. CORRAL. Poetry reading w/ author of Slow Lightning. The Writers’ Series at Point Park. 6 p.m. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-392-3480.

TUE 26 IAN MCEWAN. Pittsburgh

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Contemporary Writers Series. 8:30 p.m. William Pitt Union, Oakland. 412-624-6508.

FRI 22 - SAT 23

WED 27 AUTHOR DAVE BORLAND & ARTIST KAREN LARSON. Discussing the collaboration of the written word & artwork, as well as the storyline of the newly published In A Moment’s Time. 7 p.m. Dormont Public Library, Dormont. 412-531-8754. CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. JIMMY CVETIC, BOB ZILLER. Poetry reading w/ authors of collections Secret Society of Dog & Van Gogh Surfing. 7 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg. 724-837-7040.

BUBBLE TIME. Unique circus performance presented by the Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater. March 22-23 Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FRI 22 - SUN 24 BUNNY TROLLEY. Fri, Sat, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun., March 24, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Thru March 23 Pennsylvania Trolley Museum, Washington. 724-228-9256.

SAT 23

COMMUNITY EASTER EGG HUNT. Ages 2-10. 10 a.m. Upper St. Clair Alliance Church, Upper St. Clair. 412-559-5103. EAST LIBERTY COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT ORCHESTRA. All levels of orchestra instruments are invited. Parents are invited to join & play w/ their children. Sat, 3-4:30 p.m. Thru March 23 East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 11. EASTER EGG HUNT. 9-11 a.m. Old Economy Village, Ambridge. 724-266-4500 x 101. For children 10 & under. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Angora Gardens, White Oak. 412-675-8556. BACKYARD EXHIBIT. JETER BACKYARD THEATER. Musical swing set, Theatricals for a young sandbox, solar-powered audience. 11 a.m., 1 & instruments, more. 3 p.m. Lincoln Park Ongoing Children’s Performing Arts Museum of Center, Midland. Pittsburgh, North Side. 724-643-9004. www. per 412-322-5058. pa PAJAMA SAFARI pghcitym .co CHARLIE & KIWI’S NIGHT. DinosaurEVOLUTIONARY themed games, ADVENTURE. Join Charlie as hands-on projects, more. he travels back to the Age 5:30-8:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Dinosaurs to discover how of Natural History, Oakland. evolution works. Feat. story 412-622-3289. theater & discovery area. SUPER SPECIAL CRAFTERNOON Presented by Commonwealth SERIES, PART 2: SILK Connections Academy. Tue-Sun. SCREENING W/ STEPH TSONG Thru May 12 Carnegie Museum & ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. of Natural History, Oakland. 1-4 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-622-3131. MOVE WITH ART. Pull levers to move a 10-foot wooden SPACEOUT! ASTRONOMY man, create images on a giant WEEKEND. Hands-on activities, Kaleidoscope, feed rubber balls solar system diplays, design to a life-size wooden cow & much your own planet cookie, more. more. Thru May 12 Children’s March 23-24 Carnegie Science Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. 412-322-5058. THE WONDERFUL WIZARD PHOTOS W/ THE EASTER OF OZ. Sat, Sun. Thru March 24 BUNNY. Thru March 30 The Theatre Factory, Trafford. South Hills Village, Bethel Park. 412-374-9200. 412-577-5140. ROBOTS & WRITING. Combine craft materials, robotic 3D PRINTING WORKSHOP. components & a custom visualSun, 1-4 p.m. Thru March 31 programming tool to build & Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, animate robotic creations. North Side. 412-322-5058. Middle school students only. AUTISM-FRIENDLY EASTER Thu, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Thru BUNNY VISIT. 9-11 a.m. March 28 Assemble, Garfield. South Hills Village, Bethel Park. 773-425-1531. 412-577-5140. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING WORKSHOP. Sun, 1-4 p.m. DANIEL TIGER PLAYTESTING. Thru March 31 Children’s Museum Test out a new game feat. of Pittsburgh, North Side. Daniel Tiger. Ages 4-6. Fri, 11 a.m.412-322-5058. 1 p.m. Thru March 29 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BROWN BAG LUNCH BUNCH. A

KIDSTUFF

THU 21 - WED 27

FULL LIST ONLINE

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lunchtime story for kids ages 3-6. Mon, 12:30 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. COMMONWEALTH CONNECTIONS ACADEMY INFO SESSION. K-12 public cyber school. 6:30 p.m. SpringHill Suites, Pittsburgh Mills, Tarentum. 717-214-2200. SPRING LITTLE SPROUTS: I EAT PLANTS! Learn about roots, stems, leaves & flowers. Ages 2-3 w/ adult. Mon, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru March 25 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

MON 25 - WED 27 WOODWORKING. Explore, design, & build using processes & tools of woodworking & electronics. March 25-30, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

TUE 26 - WED 27 IT WAS THE COLDEST YEAR. Show w/ puppetry artist Zach Dorn. March 26-30 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

WED 27 LEGO CLUB. Ages 7-12, registration required. 4 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

OUTSIDE SAT 23 MAPLE MADNESS. Nature walk, pancake breakfast, more. Presented by the Audubon Society of Western PA. 10 a.m.2 p.m. Succop Conservancy, Butler. 412-963-6100. THE RACHEL CARSON TRAIL QUEST. Hike the 34-mile trail in 4 sections, w/ a bonus hike to the still-developing Harmony Trail. Presented by Venture Outdoors. Sat. Thru March 30 412-255-0564. STEP INTO SNOWSHOES. Snowshoeing/skiing every Sat. w/ at least 4” of snow on the ground. Call Friday to confirm. Sat. Thru March 30 Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011.

SUN 24 MAPLE SUGARING. Presentation & guided walk. 2 p.m. Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011.

TUE 26 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 27 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.


[FILM]

OTHER STUFF THU 21 $10 RABIES CLINIC. Also feat. flea treatments & microchipping. Every other Thu, 1-3 p.m. Thru March 21 Animal Friends, Ohio Township. 412-847-7029. AARP TAX HELP. Free tax preparation and assistance to low & middle income taxpayers. Thu. Thru April 11 Baldwin Borough Public Library, Baldwin. 412-885-2255. ARTS, CULTURE & ECONOMIC PROSPERITY. Presented by Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council. www.pittsburghartscouncil.org 9:30 a.m. Hill House Kaufmann Center, Hill District. CARNEGIE LIBRARY ANNUAL MEETING. Discussion of 2012 accomplishments & plans for 2013. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, East Liberty. 412-622-8877. CITY DHARMA. Soto Zen Meditation. jisen@deepspringzen. org Thu, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. CULTURE CLUB. Salon-style conversation & happy hour. Third Thu of every month, 5:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. DR. SKETCHY’S ANIMEAZING ART SCHOOL. Anime-themed life drawing class. 7 p.m. The ToonSeum, Downtown. 412-232-0199. GLOBAL CHALLENGES & LOCAL IMPACTS: POVERTY. Panel discussion & Q&A. Presented by Global Solutions Pittsburgh. 6-8 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-471-7852. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MEDITATION & WHOLE LIFE TRANSFORMATION. Supreme Meditation & the Science of Transformation w/ Acharya Kedar. Free public program. Doors open at 7:15, seating ends at 8 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Winchester Thurston, Upper School, Shadyside. 724-420-5826. THE OCEAN BREATHES. Screening of a film by Zakk Heaps. Part of The Best of the MFA Series. 7 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1139. PITTSBURGH’S ANDY WARHOL. w/ Robert Gangewere, professor at Carnegie Mellon. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. TWILIGHT TOUR & RIBBON CUTTING. Tour of a renovated Victorian home. 1324 Woodland Ave., North Side. 5-7 p.m. 412-732-8152.

In 1916, the Mutual Film Corporation gave Charlie Chaplin his own studio, where he made a number of elaborate shorts, including “One A.M.” and “The Rink.” More recently, locally based composer and keyboardist Tom Roberts — at the request of the Pittsburgh Symphony — produced new scores for both. This weekend, The Union Hall Drive-In — presented by Classical Revolution Pittsburgh at Bar Marco — features screenings of both, with scores performed live by Roberts and Susanne Ortner-Roberts. Admission includes food and a donation to Classical Revolution. 7 p.m. Fri., March 22, and 7 p.m. Sat., March 23. 2216 Penn Ave., Strip District. $30. 412-471-1900 or www.classicalrevolutionpgh.org

UNCYCLED FASHION CHAMPAGNE PARTY. 6-9 p.m. Perle Champagne Bar, Downtown. 412-471-2058. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

THU 21 - WED 27 NORTH HILLS COMMUNITY OUTREACH FREE TAX PREP. To qualify, your 2012 income was up to $40,000 if filing jointly or up to $20,000 if filing as an individual. Appointments are available Mon & Tues afternoons through April 15. Call for appointment. Thru April 15 NHCO North Boroughs, Bellevue. 412-307-0069.

FRI 22 6TH ANNUAL NAWBO DAY. Feat. topics on big business branding for small business. 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m. DoubleTree Hotel, Green Tree. 412-854-4827. DRINKING SKEPTICALLY. Informal discussion group for skeptics, critical-thinkers & like-minded individuals. 7 p.m. Rock Bottom, Waterfront. 412-731-1901. THE LIFE & CONSTITUTIONS OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. w/ Dr. Cleon Cornes. Fri, 10 a.m. and Fri., April 5, 10 a.m. Thru March 22 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PUBLIC ART WALKING TOUR. Children’s Museum Entrance, Buhl Community Park, North

Side. 6 p.m. 412-391-2060 x 237. SWING DANCE. Lesson from 8-9 p.m., dancing from 9 p.m. on. 8 p.m. James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy, North Side. 412-904-3335. TANGO DANCE NIGHT. 8-11 p.m. Christine Frechard Gallery, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888.

FRI 22 - SAT 23 CHARLIE CHAPLIN FILM FEST. 3 films w/ live musical accompaniment by OrtnerRoberts Duo & a 1920s-inspired dinner. March 22-23, 7 p.m. Bar Marco, Strip District. 412-471-1900. SISTERS OF THE LATTICE: HOTSPOT. Outdoor group meditation centered around an 80-min film. 921-923 Liberty Ave., Downtown. March 22-23

SAT 23 9TH ANNUAL READING SESSION. Reading of new works by young composers. 11 a.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. BOTANICAL DRAWING I: FOUNDATION TECHNIQUES. Sat. Thru April 20 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. BUTLER YMCA INDOOR TRIATHLON. 1 p.m. Butler YMCA, Butler. 724-287-4733. INDIAN CLASSICAL DANCE CLASS. Sat. Thru April 20 Mookshi Wellness Center, Regent Square. 412-407-7829.

KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Korean grammar & basic conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MAGEE FAMILY HEALTH FAIR. Cooking demos, kids dance party, health & wellness resources, more. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. PITTSBURGH ARTIST REGISTRY LAUNCH PARTY. 6-7:30 p.m. Tavern 245, Downtown. 412-391-2060 x 233. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

Pizza & Beer Night tuesdays $15 large pizza & pitcher domestic beer FREE POOL all night

Wind Up wednesdays

$2 Miller Lite Drafts til 12am FREE POOL all night ½ off Select Appetizers 9-11pm

Thirsty thursdays

$7 Yuengling Pitchers til 12am Karaoke 9:30-1:30am

Eat, Drink & Dance

fridays & saturdays

03.22 Variety

Show Garden of Peace Project 03.23 Hanging Garden Goth/Industrial Night Now Booking Events, Parties & more Open 7 days a week for special events contact cattivo44@comcast.net 146 44th Street Lawrenceville PA 15201 412.687.2157 www.cattivo.biz Open Tues-Sat 4-2am Check our website & Facebook page for more events

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS

SUN 24 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. BRUNCH IN BLOOM. Seasonal & sustainably-grown brunch. Call for reservation. Sun, 11 a.m. & 1 p.m. Thru March 31 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. FREE FLY FISHING SEMINAR. Learn more about the basics of fly fishing. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-244-8458. NORTH HILLS CLUB COIN SHOW. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Zelienople American Legion, Zelienople. 412-269-0181. WASHINGTON ANTIQUES FAIR. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. CONSOL Energy Park, Washington. 724-250-9555.

VIDEO DJ’S

10:30PM -2AM

Pens Games g n ri u d TS IN P T H $3 MILLER LIG RDAY NIGHT TU A S T H FRIDAY NIG Clique Vodka Pinnacle Vodka Drinks for $3

MON 25 BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry, North Park. CABARET. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Mon, 7 p.m. Thru March 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

1060 Settlers Ridge Center Drive - Robinson Township

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[ART] THE DEN. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SCREENPLAY PLOT DEVELOPMENT COURSE. Presented by Pittsburgh Filmmakers. Mon, 6:45 p.m. and Mon, 6:45 p.m. Thru April 29 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282. TRACING YOUR IRISH & SCOTS-IRISH ANCESTORS. Presented by representatives from the Ulster Historical Foundation. 1-3 p.m. Westmoreland County Historical Society, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x 210.

TUE 26 ARTS, CULTURE & ECONOMIC PROSPERITY. Presented by Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council. www.pittsburghartscouncil.org 9:30 a.m. Butler County Community College, Butler. 724-287-8711. CARRIE MAE WEEMS. Part of the CMU School of Art lecture series. 5 p.m. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-279-2970.

WED 27

Art by Katie Mackowick

Point Park University and The Andy Warhol Museum launch the Point Park Project, a bi-annual series spotlighting regional talent at Downtown’s Lawrence Hall Gallery. Point Park Project 1: Kaleidoscope features four artists selected by four University of Pittsburgh students guided by the Warhol’s Nicholas Chambers. Starting Friday, look for work ranging from drawing and collage to animation and installation by Di-Ay Battad, Katie Mackowick, Chris McGinnis and Daniel Luchman. The gallery is open daily except Sundays; admission is free. Exhibit continues through May 12. Wood Street at Boulevard of the Allies. 412-392-8008 or www.pointparkproject.com

BASIC HORTICULTURE. Learn about soils, plant nutrition, & environmental factors that affect plant growth/development. Wed, 7-9 p.m. Thru March 27 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP. For Widows/Widowers over 50. Second and Fourth Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. 412-681-4318. St. Sebastian Church, Ross. PFLAG WASHINGTON. Support, 412-366-1300. education & advocacy for the ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). LGBTQ community, family & Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon friends. Fourth Wed of every Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. month First Presbyterian Church, 412-531-1912. Downtown. 412-471-3436. IN GOD WE TEACH FILM THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. SCREENING. Q&A w/ filmmaker A meeting of jugglers & spinners. Vic Losick following the screening. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. 7 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Union Project, Highland Park. Shadyside. 412-731-1901. 412-363-4550. KNOW THE SHOW PITTSBURGH SOUTH BEFORE YOU GO: ASIAN BRIDAL BOOK OF MORMON. SHOW. 5:30-9 p.m. Pre-performance . w ww per Omni William Penn, information session a p ty ci h pg Downtown. w/ theater critic, .com 412-436-0337. Chris Rawson. 6:30 p.m. SCOTTISH GAELIC Trust Arts Education CLASS. Introductory level Center, Downtown. class, reservations required. 412-456-6666. 6-7:30 p.m. Bottlebrush Gallery & LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice Shop, Harmony. 724-452-0539. conversational English. Wed, THE HISTORY & FUTURE OF THE 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. SITE OF THE PITTSBURGH BO412-622-3151. TANIC GARDEN. 7:30 p.m. Mount OBSCURE GAMES/PUB GAME NIGHT. Wed. Thru March 27 Lebanon Public Library,

FULL LIST ONLINE

Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS ATL-NYC PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for new TV show, I Want To Be Discovered. Log onto www. iwant2bdiscoveredonline.com & post video of group or individual talent. 3 minutes max. THE COMPANY OF PITTSBURGH. Auditions for 2013 season. March 24. Prepare One 32 bar cut of trad. musical theater & if asked, have a second 32 bar cut of Contemporary Musical Theater & a monologue. Bring head shot & resume. Equity and Non-Equity welcome. Email: auditionscopgh@gmail. com for a time slot. Appointment CONTINUES ON PG. 66

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recommended. James Centre, music. Accompanist provided. & write SALON APPLICANT in West End. 412 937-1414. Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. the subject line. Shadyside. COMTRA THEATRE. Auditions for THE SUMMER COMPANY. 412-363-5050. Nunset Boulevard. March 23-24. Auditions for 2013 season. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER Call for more information. April 13-14. Men/women age 17+, FOR IMAGINATION. Seeking Cranberry. 724-591-8727. 2-min. contemporary monologue. submissions for Automata, an FROG PRINCE THEATRICALS. Non-equity, walk-ins welcome. upcoming art show. Deadline Auditions for a staged reading Duquesne University, Uptown. for application: April 1. For more of Steve Hansen’s Rocka Mortis. 412–243-6464. information, email katydement@ Seeking talented singers w/ gmail.com. comedic ability. April 1. Actors JOHNSTOWN FILM FESTIVAL. should prepare 2 songs by the 14TH WARD INDEPENDENT Seeking original short films artists listed at www.frogprince DEMOCRATIC CLUB. Seeking of 30 min. or less. For complete theatricals.com. Email audition submissions for the Progressive rules & entry form, visit www. request to info@frogprince Visions Video Contest. For johnstownfilmfest.org. Thru theatricals.com Pittsburgh CLO more information, visit http:// May 1. Seeking original short Academy of Musical Theater, www.pgh14widc.org/. films of 30 min. or less. For Downtown. HOBNOB THEATRE COMPANY. Auditions for [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] William Shakespeare’s The Tempest. April 1-2. No prepared piece necessary, scenes & monologues will be posted to website. http://www.hob nobtheatre.com St. Peter’s The Westmoreland County Historical Society seeks Anglican Church, Butler. volunteers to serve at the reconstructed Historic Hanna’s 412-736-1204. Town, which was founded in 1773, held the first British LATSHAW PRODUCTIONS. court session west of the Alleghenies, and was destroyed Auditions for Viva Las Vegas. during the Revolutionary War. Positions are available March 31 & April 14. Female for volunteer tour guides and gift-shop personnel. For dancers only. Call for more information on upcoming training sessions, call 724information. 724-853-4050. LITTLE LAKE THEATRE 532-1935 x212 or visit www.westmorelandhistory.org COMPANY. Musical auditions for “Little Shop of Horrors,” March 24, & general auditions for ART ALL NIGHT: complete rules & entry form, 65th season of mainstage plays, LAWRENCEVILLE. Submit visit www.johnstownfilmfest.org. March 24 - 25. For “Little Shop” one (& only one) piece of OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. prepare 16-32 bars of up tempo artwork or sign up to perform. Seeking vendors for the Garden piece. Bring sheet music. Registration & other info at Mart to sell plants, products, more. Accompanist provided. Cold http://www.artallnight.org 724-266-4500 x 114. readings for general auditions. 412-235-1950. PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS Appointments advised. All ART IN ACTION. Seeking FESTIVAL. Now accepting details: www.littlelake.org artists for a one-day interactive 1-act plays that have never Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. art show. June 2. For more before been produced. 12 plays 724-745-6300. information & application: will be selected to be performed MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. http://www.artinaction-hf.com as mainstage productions for Ongoing auditions for actors ages Stone Pavilion, Washington. the festival’s 23rd season. For 18+ for murder mystery shows 724-413-4648. more information visit www. performed in the Pittsburgh area. BOYD COMMUNITY CENTER. pittsburghnewworks.org/ 412-833-5056. Seeking locally made, highplay-submission or email info@ THE PITTSBURGH quality work for the 2013 pittsburghnewworks.org. SAVOYARDS. Seeking a GardenFest & Artist 412-944-2639. Stage Director for Fall Market. Submissions SWEETWATER CENTER 2013 production of in mediums such as FOR THE ARTS. Seeking Princess Ida. Gilbert ceramics, glass, jewelry, contemporary fashion designs & Sullivan or other wood, leather, paper, created w/ repurposed & www. per Operetta experience a p photography & more, upcycled elements for Lost pghcitym preferred. Resumes & .co as well as handmade & Found: Sustainable High letters accepted through soaps & other small Fashion exhibition. http://www. April 20 to directorsearch@ sweetwaterartcenter.org/callitems are welcome. cschade@ pittsburghsavoyards.org. for-artists 412-741-4405. boydcommunitycenter.org 412412-734-8476. VERONA’S CREATIVE 828-8566. POOR YORICK’S PLAYERS. MARKETPLACE. Seeking artists, BRICOLAGE THEATER. Seeking Auditions for Taming of the food & product vendors for stories that are true, funny, & Shrew. April 6-7. Men/women, marketplace running Maybetween 1,500 to 2,000 words Shakespearean monologue under September. Call for more for WordPlay, a new storytelling 2-min. Call for appointment. Tall information. Verona Borough event. Email submissions to Trees Amphitheater, Monroeville. Building, Verona. 412-721-0943. alan@olifson.com. 412-537-1705. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM FPA SALUTING SERVICE PRIME STAGE THEATRE. OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking AWARDS. Nominate a Auditions for Walk Two Moons. individual artists & artist groups veteran who is making a April 1-2. Men/women age 14for month-long exhibitions difference through community senior citizen, 2-min. monologue. in a new transitional gallery service. Nominations accepted The Oakland School, Oakland. measuring. Artists will be online at http://www.fpa 724-773-0700. responsible for all aspects of SOUTH PARK THEATRE. Auditions pittsburgh.org 412-512-0589. their exhibition. Send images & THE GALLERY 4. Accepting for 2013 Mainstage Season & a brief introduction to the work visual art submissions for Salon Shakespeare in South Park. to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ Show 2013. Send image files March 23-24. For non-musicals, a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org of up to 5 finished pieces to prepare monologue, or cold & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. thegallery4@gmail.com. Include readings provided. For musicals, Greensburg. 724-837-1500. prepare 24 bars of song & bring title, dimensions, & medium(s)

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

DEAR READERS: I’m off this week. To tide all of your hot and/or kinky and/or sore asses over, here’s a column I wrote 15 years ago. Some newer readers might’ve missed this column when it originally appeared — those who were still in grade school, diapers or amniotic sacs back in 1998 — so I’m rerunning it because I still get questions about “gerbiling” on a daily basis. — Dan We were having an office debate about “gerbiling.” How does it work? Do all gay men do this? Does Richard Gere? Does the animal get shoved up the anus with a toilet-paper roll only to suffocate seconds later? Is it the scratching or the act of killing an animal that gets people off? Can’t this cause serious damage? CURIOUS COWORKERS

Every day, my mail contains at least three questions about “gerbiling.” In the eight years I’ve been writing this column, I have never addressed the gerbil issue, but now I am breaking my silence. Clip and save this column, for I will never discuss gerbils again. Ahem. To begin, I would like to make a controversial statement: I have never had a gerbil in my ass. This statement is not controversial in the “Hey! That’s uncalled for!” sense, like, say, a woman at a dinner party announcing that she doesn’t have a hedgehog in her vagina. That would be uncalled for, because no one would suspect her of concealing a hedgehog. But being a gay man or Richard Gere means always having to reassure people that you don’t have a gerbil in your ass. For while gay men and, I assume, Richard Gere don’t put gerbils in their asses, not a day goes by that someone — usually a straight 13-year-old boy — doesn’t try to shove one in, figuratively speaking. Hundreds of thousands of men and women leave high school convinced that gay men put gerbils in their asses on a semiregular basis. Gerbil-stuffing is a sexual practice that straight teenage boys in general, and Howard Stern in particular, suspect gay men in general, and Richard Gere (who is not gay) in particular, of engaging in. It works like this: Hold a gerbil in your left hand. Using pliers with your right hand, rip off the gerbil’s lower jaw. With the blunt side of the pliers, knock out the teeth in its upper jaw. Pull its legs off. Set aside. Take a cardboard papertowel roll, grease it up, and insert it into your rectum. Tie a string to the gerbil’s tail. Nudge the gerbil into the outside end of the paper-towel roll. If for no other reason than to get away from the person who knocked its teeth out, the gerbil leglessly scampers up the paper-towel roll. When the gerbil drops into the anal cavity, remove the wet paper-towel roll, leaving the string you’ve tied to the gerbil’s tail hanging out of your ass. The gerbil, now trapped inside your anal cavity, thrashes around, desperate for air. It is this thrashing that provides pleasurable sensations. Once the gerbil is dead, remove it by pulling on the string. Repeat.

Okay, three things: 1. The type of straight person who believes that gay men engage in “gerbiling” is likely to believe other gay stereotypes: We’re all prissy little swishes, for instance, with clean apartments and collections of original Broadway cast recordings. Yet the same person who believes gay men are prim sissies also believes we’re capable of holding a struggling rodent while ripping its lower jaw off, and then tearing its legs off and stuffing it up our butts — hardly a prim pastime. 2. There is nothing intrinsically “gay” about gerbil-stuffing. You don’t need two penises — you don’t need penises at all — or an original Broadway cast recording. All you need is one doomed gerbil and one willing butthole (and pliers, lube, tubes and string). Some straight people have a peculiar need to believe certain sex acts — usually disgusting ones — are practiced only by gay men, despite evidence to the contrary. This curious impulse extends to sex acts straight people themselves are the primary practitioners of. Child rape, for instance. 3. Inserting a wet cardboard paper-towel roll into your ass is simply not possible, as anyone who’s ever put anything in their ass can tell you. I feel I can write with some authority that no one has ever actually stuffed a gerbil up their butt. I’ve had conversations with hundreds of outrageously kinky people, who’ve told me the craziest shit: I once chatted for an hour with a guy who married his horse. (He was deeply offended when I asked if his horse was a he-horse or a she-horse. “I am not a homosexual,” the horse-fucker informed me.) Both in my professional and personal life, thousands of guys have admitted to doing the most out-there, dangerous, stupid, kinky stuff. But not once has anyone ever told me that he, or anyone he knows, has ever put a gerbil in his ass. Like the doomed gerbils themselves, this story has no legs. It is an urban legend. And I have proof. If gay men and Richard Gere stuffed gerbils in their butts, then the pet stores that serve the gay and Richard Gere communities would stock gerbils, right? Everything else that a perverse gay man needs is available in your average gay neighborhood, from poppers to butt plugs to bullwhips to sofa sectionals. But guess what? In San Francisco’s Castro neighborhood, gay ground zero, the pet store Petpourri sells only pet supplies — no gerbils. And they don’t stock cardboard paper-towel tubes or pliers, either. Animal Farm in West Hollywood, also a very gay place, sells only dogs and cats (which wouldn’t fit up anyone’s butt, not even Richard Gere’s). And not only do pet stores in California not sell gerbils, but it’s actually illegal for them to do so. According to Marshall Meyers, an attorney at the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council in Washington, D.C.: “California law prohibits the sale of gerbils because of desert conditions in that state. Gerbils were once a desert mammal, and the state was concerned that gerbils could escape and establish themselves in the wild.” It’s not because gay men stick them in their asses? “No, it’s strictly an ecosystem issue.”

I FEEL I CAN WRITE WITH SOME AUTHORITY THAT NO ONE HAS EVER ACTUALLY STUFFED A GERBIL UP THEIR BUTT.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

03.20-03.27

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You are not for sale. Remember? Your scruples and ideals and talents cannot be bought off for any amount of money. You will not be cheated out of your birthright and you will not allow your dreams to be stolen. Although it’s true that you may have to temporarily rent your soul from time to time, you will never auction it off for good. I’m sure you know these things, Pisces, but I suspect it’s time to renew your fiery commitment to them.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Nourish beginnings, let us nourish beginnings,” says poet Muriel Rukeyser in her poem “Elegy in Joy.” “Not all things are blest,” she continues, “but the seeds of all things are blest. The blessing is in the seed.” I urge you to adopt this perspective in the coming weeks, Aries. Be extra sweet and tender and reverent toward anything that is just sprouting, toward anything that is awakening, toward anything that invokes the sacredness of right now. “This moment,” sings Rukeyser, “this seed, this wave of the sea, this look, this instant of love.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): As you seek more insight on your current situation, consider the possibility that the bad guys may not be as bad as they seem. They might simply be so deeply under the spell of their own pain that they can’t see straight. And as for the good guys: I wonder if they are as purely good as they would like you to imagine. It might be the case that they are at least partially serving their own self-interest, while pretending to be utterly altruistic. If there’s any truth to these speculations, Taurus, you’d be wise to stay uncommitted and undecided for now. Don’t get emotionally riled up, don’t get embroiled in conflict, and don’t burn any bridges.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Here’s your mantra: “I get fresher under pressure.” Say it 10 times right now, and then repeat it in 10-repetition bursts whenever you need a tune-up. What it means is that you stay cool when the contradictions mount and the ambiguities multiply. And more than that: You actually thrive on the commotion. You get smarter amidst the agitation. You become more perceptive and more creative as the shifts swirl faster and harder. Tattoo these words of power on your imagination: “I get fresher under pressure.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Stories happen to those who tell them,” said the ancient Greek historian Thucydides. Modern radio journalist Ira Glass goes even further. “Great stories happen to those who can tell them,” he has said. Let’s make this strategy a centerpiece of your life plan in the weeks ahead, Cancerian. I have a suspicion that you will need first-hand experience of novel, interesting stories. They will provide the precise nourishment necessary to inspire the blooming of your most soulful ambitions. One way to help ensure that the best stories will flow your way is to regale receptive people with transformative tales from your past.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Dear Rob: I’m spreading the word about Beer Week in your town, and I’d love to see you and your beer-loving readers at some of the events.

Any chance you can include some coverage of Beer Week celebrations in your upcoming column? Cheers, Patricia.” Dear Patricia: I don’t do product placement or other forms of secret advertising in my horoscopes. To allow it would violate the sacred trust I have with my readers, who rely on me to translate the meaning of the cosmic signs without injecting any hidden agendas. It is true that Leos might be prone to imbibing great quantities of beer in the coming week, simply because they’d benefit from lowering their inhibitions, getting in touch with their buried feelings, and expanding their consciousness. But to be frank, I’d rather see them do that without the aid of drugs and alcohol.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Hoping to stir up some fun trouble, I posted the following message on my Facebook page: “Don’t judge someone just because they sin differently than you.” A torrent of readers left comments in response. My favorite was from Sue Sims, who said, “Yeah, they might be better at your kind of sin and you might learn something!” That advice is just the kind of healing mischief you need right now, Virgo. It’s a bit ironic, true, but still: Take it and run with it. Study the people who have mad skills at pulling off the rousing adventures and daring pleasures and interesting “sins” that you’d like to call your own.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): On the one hand, menopausal women are no longer able to bear children. On the other hand, they often overflow with fresh possibilities and creative ideas. More time is available to them because their children have moved out of the house or don’t require as much care. They can begin new careers, focus on their own development, and devote more attention to their personal needs. So in one way their fertility dries up; in another way it may awaken and expand. I suspect that whether or not you are menopausal, you are on the cusp of a comparable shift in your fecundity: one door closing, another door swinging open.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The TV reality show Freaky Eaters profiled a woman named Kelly who had eaten nothing but cheesy potatoes for 30 years. Her average intake: eight pounds of potatoes and four cups of cheese per day. “I love cheesy potatoes,” she testified. “They’re stewy, gooey and just yum-yum-yummy. They’re like crack to me.” I’m a bit concerned that you’re

flirting with behavior comparable to hers. Not in regards to cheesy potatoes, of course, but to some other fetish. I will ask you to make sure that you’re not starting to over-specialize. It would be wise to avoid obsessing on a single type of anything.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

In the 17th century, polite people referred to mountains as “warts” and “boils on the earth’s complexion.” So says Robert Macfarlane in his book Mountains of the Mind. Annie Dillard describes the peculiar behavior of educated European tourists in the 18th century. When they visited the Alps, she writes in Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, “they deliberately blindfolded their eyes to shield themselves from the evidence of the earth’s horrid irregularity.” Don’t be anything like those dumb sophisticates, Aquarius. When you spy irregularities in the coming weeks, consider the possibility that they are natural and healthy. This will allow you to perceive their useful beauty. Describe what you’d be like if you were the opposite of yourself. Write Freewillastrology.com.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The French verb renverser can be translated as “to turn upside-down” or “to reverse the flow.” The adjectival form is renversant, which means “stunning” or “astonishing.” I think you may soon have experiences that could be described by those words. There’s a good chance that a dry, impoverished part of your life will get a juicy, fertile infusion. A deficiency you have worried about might get at least half-filled. An inadequacy that makes you feel sad may be bolstered by reinforcements. Alas, there could also be a slight reversal that’s not so gratifying. One of your assets may temporarily become irrelevant. But the trade-off is worth it, Libra. Your gains will outstrip your loss.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Professor Martyn Poliakoff creates short YouTube videos to help teach the public about chemistry. In one video, he explains why an explanation he gave in a previous video was completely mistaken. “It’s always good for a scientist to be proved wrong,” he confesses cheerfully. Then he moves on to speculate about what the right answer might be. I love humility like that! It’s admirable. It’s also the best way to find out the truth about reality. I hope you will summon a similar attitude in the coming weeks, Scorpio: a generous curiosity that makes you eager to learn something new about stuff you thought you had all figured out.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

SERVICES 70 + WORK 70 + STUDIES 75 + WELLNESS 76 + LIVE 77

SERVICES REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069 Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

CLASSES AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-4923059 (AAN CAN) Advertise Here Today!

CLASSES

HAULING

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ADOPTION

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www.CenturaOnline. com(AAN CAN)

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 Void in Illinois/New Mexico

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

D & S HAULING Reliable Low Rates Call NOW

412-877-0730

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be addressed to and deposited at the School District of Pittsburgh, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, on April 9, 2013, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for: • Install Backflow Preventers Various Locations General and Plumbing Primes

• Asphalt Paving Various Locations General Prime

• New Entrance Doors and Frames Roof Replacement Pittsburgh Colfax K-8 2332 Beechwood Blvd. General Prime

• Replace HVAC in Security Room Pittsburgh Milliones 6-12 3117 Centre Ave. Mechanical Prime

• Window Replacement Pittsburgh Fulton Pre K-5 5799 Hampton St. General Prime

• New Walk-In Cooler and Freezer Pittsburgh Montessori Pre K-8 201 S. Graham St. Mechanical and Electrical Primes

Project Manual and Drawings for bidding purposes will be available for purchase by Contractors March 4 and March 11, 2013 at Modern Reproductions, 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 from 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Modern Reproductions may be contacted by Phone at 412-488-7700 or Fax at 412-488-7338 to determine the cost of the Project Manual and Documents. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent hotline: 412-622-7920/www.pps.k12.pa.us

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds! Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

ADOPTING your newborn is our dream. Joyfilled home, endless love, security awaits. Randi & Chuck 1-888-223-7941

ART/ARTISTS

CITIZEN POLICE REVIEW BO ARD Pre-Hearing Conference CPRB Case #12-242 Tuesday, 3/26/13 @ 5:30 p.m. Banksville Park Crane Ave and Carnahan Rd Pittsburgh, PA 15220 CPRB monthly board meeting immediately following at 6p.m. Questions may be directed to 412-765-8023

CPRB PITTSBURGH

WORK HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkgreatpay.com (AAN CAN)

Help Wanted! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www.howtoworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN)

Paid In Advanced! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-station. com (AAN CAN)

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

COUNSELING

Live like a popstar. Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-7772091 (AAN CAN)

Your ad could be here

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

Specializing in Treatment of Depression and Anxiety Now Accepting New Clients with BC/BS and UPMC Insurance 412.848.1117 george@ssmha.net www.ssmha.net

412.316.3342

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 70

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013


LIFEGUARDS (AGE 16 & OVER) Needed during the 2013 Swimming Season at Allegheny County facilities in Boyce, North, South, and Settler’s Cabin Parks. Interested applicants are required to complete an Aquatics Examination given on Saturday March 30, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. At the NORTH ALLEGHENY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, 10375 PERRY HIGHWAY, WEXFORD, PA. 15090

ARMOR SECURITY TRAINING INSTITUTE www.alleghenycounty. us/parks

SALARY STRUCTURE: • Junior Lifeguards: $8.25 • First Year Lifeguards: $9.25 • Senior Lifeguards (2 or more seasons) $9.50 Candidates must have physical examination PRIOR to participation in Aquatics Exam on March 30, 2013. No test given without doctor’s certification on physical examination form.

www.leathalweapons. state.pa.us

brandenb@publicallies.org

CANDIDATES MUST PRESENT FOLLOWING AT TEST SITES: • Complete physical examination form. • Completed Employment Application from Lifeguard Packet. • Minimum of four references on back of application.

www.panerabread.jobs

PRIOR TO MAY 27, 2013 ALL CANDIDATES MUST PRESENT: • Current Lifeguard Training certification • Current First Aid certification • Current Adult, Child and Infant CPR certification www.paguard.com

Contact the Central Park Office at 412-350-2478 to obtain forms and additional information.Forms and driving directions may also be obtained from the Parks Department Home Page @ www.alleghenycounty.us/parks

careers@aaaec.com

The next Career Corner Section will run April 17th.

Klingensmith Clinical Care Integrated Home Care Services

OPENING DATE FOR 2013 SWIMMING SEASON:

Reserve Your Space Today!

hrdirector@klingshc.com

JUNE 1, 2013 (Weather & Conditions Permitting)

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Western PA’s newest home health agency specializing in providing superior respiratory services. Currently looking for candidates to fill openings south of the City of Pittsburgh- full time, part time & per diem RNs, OTs, and PTs. Competitive salary & benefits. Qualified individuals can email, fax or send resume to: hrdirector@klingshc.com, fax to 724-763-4284, Klingensmith Health Care, P. O. Box 151, Ford City, PA 16226, Attn: HR Director.

Do you like to work on the issues you care about? Would you like to prepare for your future? Want to get paid to make a difference? $1,400/Month Health Care and Child Care $5,550 Education Award and Federal Student Loan Deferment Hands on Leadership Development, Coaching, and Nonprofit Career Based Training Information Sessions will be held from March – May

ARMOR SECURITY TRAINING INSTITUTE Act 235 Courses Apr 20, 21, 25, 26, 27 Renewal Classes: April 25 THIS IS THE LAST CLASS AVAILABLE UNTIL THE FALL www.lethalweapons.state.pa.us

State Police Approval Letter Required

KCC’s mission is to keep patients healthy in their homes & avoid hospital admissions. For more information, visit www.publicallies.org or Contact Branden Ballard at 412-258-3022 or brandenb@publicallies.org

Application Deadline May 24th

724-728-8029 3645 Brodhead Rd Monaca, PA 15061

Registration Necessary THREE WEEKS Prior to the First Day of Class

NOW HIRING All Levels of Management

Opportunities available in All Cafes in Pittsburgh ›Room for advancement ›Great Salary and Benefits › ›Bonus Program ›

JOIN OUR TEAM www.panerabread.jobs 72

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AAA East Central has excellent, full-time Emergency Road Service opportunities available at our East Liberty/Shadyside headquarters. We offer an outstanding benefits package including: medical, dental and vision coverage, paid time off, a 401(k) with a generous match and more!

We are hiring for the following positions:

GREAT

Drivers

PAY FOR ONE DAY!

ERS Service Counselors and Dispatchers • High school education or equivalent required. • Exceptional communication and customer service skills required. • Strong sense of caring and empathy. • Ability to successfully work in a fast paced environment.

WANTED Pittsburgh City Paper needs friendly drivers to work (early morning hours) to distribute the paper in the Pittsburgh area. Interested candidates must have a clean DMV history and current proof of insurance. Regular lifting of up to 50 lbs is required. Heavy, bulk retail delivery to CP sites weekly.

Dispatch Supervisor • Post-secondary education; 3 years related work experience and 1 year management experience. • Ability to supervise employee groups of 7 – 12 people. • Strong interpersonal skills and ability to work effectively with wide range of customers. • Knowledge of computer-aided dispatch operations preferred.

Must have a full-size truck/van. CONTACT >> 412.316.3342 x173 JIM for an application

Classified Advertising Representative

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE WANTED!

The Pittsburgh City Paper is currently seeking qualified candidates for a FULL TIME inside sales position. Previous web sales/ inside sales experience is preferred.

If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding career opportunity please forward your resume to Andrea James Classified Advertising Manager. Email: andreaj@steelcitymedia.com FAX: 412-316-3388

TA S T E

AAA Preferred Service Providers are also now hiring for full and part-time positions throughout the Pittsburgh and Allegheny County areas. Tow Truck Operators, Service Drivers and Battery Service Technicians • Ability to lift up to 40 lbs. • Valid driver’s license required. • Ability to pass a pre-employment background screening and drug test.

Submit resume or email: Steel City Media, Attn: Chris Kohan, 650 Smithfield Street, Suite # 2200. PGH., PA 15222 or c.kohan@steelcitymedia.com No phone calls please. EOE.

Pittsburgh City Paper is an equal opportunity employer +

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Steel City Media is seeking F/T A.E. FOR WRRK and WLTJ radio. 2 yrs min. sales experience, possess excellent verbal skills & a self-starter. Requires own vehicle and auto insurance.

Pittsburgh City Paper offers a competitive wage and incentive package, medical, and 401K.

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All available positions include weekend hours

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Ink Well

CODE OF SILENCE

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

get your

yoga on! Power Vinyasa Yoga: Light your practice on fire at Inner Hearth Yoga, offering alignment-focused group classes in Point Breeze.

It’s not just for Shadyside anymore. 4519 Liberty Ave, Bloomfied www.clayyoga.com 412-335-1332

$5 Session Preview Week April 8-14!

www.innerhearthyoga.com 74

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

[Note: The circled letters comprise a three-word instruction that, when applied to one square in the completed grid, reveals a group who might follow a code of silence]

ACROSS

1. Former UN leader Hammarskjöld 4. Private invasion, with “the” 8. Wells’s genre 13. Card game with its own deck 14. Major microcredit organization 15. “Shoot!” 16. Certain mind tricks 19. Networking event, often 20. Singer Mann with a “Big Lebowski” role 21. Eisenhower Executive Office Building figs. 22. White stuff, commercially 23. Common Asian place suffix 24. Salinger and Souther, e.g. 27. “Buy it for looks. Buy it for life” sloganeer 28. Aussie airport code 29. Texted question of concern 30. Means of transport when you’re late? 32. Unhelpful implements in janitors’ closets 34. Like some urban legends 37. Name in soccer cleats 38. Butt byproduct 41. “Greetings, friend!” 42. Palindromic Dutch city 43. Harper’s Bazaar artist

44. ___ Maria 45. They’re shorter than full-lengths 48. Producer of material for bats 49. Pageant winner who also won at the “USA” and “Universe” levels in 2012 54. Making-of 55. Eats into, as rock 56. Bombeck who wrote “Motherhood: The Second Oldest Profession” 57. Magician Geller who beefed with James Randi 58. Exchange numbers? 59. One unlikely to veg out 60. Hotmail owner

DOWN

1. Fool 2. Fixed payment 3. Runs through the neighborhood naked and covered in oatmeal, say 4. Perfume with famously racy ads 5. Actor’s delivery 6. It’s in the same family as Budget 7. Opaque campaign supporters, briefly 8. Holds’ cousins, for baseball relievers 9. Lit ___ 10. Baby’s first tooth, often 11. Voldemort portrayer 12. “You’re never getting that

thing back” 15. Like, super intense to think about 17. Countenance 18. Place to get a title: Abbr. 24. Group of twelve, often 25. Period 26. FaceTime alternative 27. Hungry niño’s request 29. Tear 30. You can’t go there again, it’s said 31. Org. to be headed by Gina McCarthy, soon 32. Org. currently headed by Michele Leonhart 33. It may be slung 34. Senate room

35. Mediterranean resort area 36. Visible range 38. Piece of esoterica 39. Wake and bake practitioners 40. Enters 43. Fashion magazine since 1945 45. Beach birds 46. Degs. that result in jobs, eventually, I hope 47. “No! No! Tzat guy’s try to take my drink way but I not finisht!” speaker 48. Leave ___ (mark permanently) 50. Fries or slaw, say 51. Only batted, briefly 52. Gateway Arch designer Saarinen 53. “Woe ___!”

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

Blood Pressure and

The Brain Research study with one MRI and two interview sessions seeks healthy adults ages 35-60. Cannot have low blood pressure, hypertension, heart disease, or diabetes. $150 compensation. Will be invited to repeat study in 2 years with additional compensation. Contact Kim Novak 412-246-6200 novakkj@upmc.edu

CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

GOUT? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

DIABETES AND ON METFORMIN? CALL TODAY!

VAGINAL DRYNESS?

412.363.1900 CTRS

CALL TODAY!

IBS? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

412-650-6155

18-39 years old In general good health Have regular periods Not pregnant or breastfeeding • Are willing to abstain from sexual activity, OR are sexually active and willing to use condoms, OR you are sterilized OR with one partner who has a vasectomy • Are willing to come to MageeWomens Hospital for up to 54 visits over 8 months • • • •

Participants will be compensated up to $2,930 for their time and travel For more information please contact:

The Center for Family Planning at

412-641-5496

or visit: www.birthcontrolstudies.org

Are you interested in a long-term method of birth control?

Healthy Controls Needed for Research Study

Schizophrenia Research Study Participants Needed

Participants will be reimbursed $175 for completing all study procedures.

412-650-6155

You may be eligible to participate if you are:

— Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

Do you or someone in your family have schizophrenia? This UPMC research study examines the effects of schizophrenia on cognition. We are seeking families affected by schizophrenia to take part. Participation involves 1-2 visits; during these visits, you will complete diagnostic interviewing and cognitive testing, provide a blood sample, and complete a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI).

Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

been very In the past two years, I’ve ads and our of ign des the satisfied with both n I know I have Whe ke. evo they e ons the resp subjects in the 24-35 to advertise for research k of using the City thin tely edia imm I p, age grou Paper.

MENSTRUAL CRAMPS?

Healthy Volunteers Needed for Hormonal Vaginal Ring Research Study

ASTHMA?

See what our clients are saying

412.363.1900 CTRS

Want to make a difference?

(UPMC Oakland)

YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE IF YOU:

This study of cognition and schizophrenia is looking for healthy controls of European descent over the age of 30. Participation involves 1-2 appointments lasting a total of between 5-9 hours and the completion of diagnostic interviewing and cognitive testing, donation of a blood sample, and taking part in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI).

• Are a non-pregnant woman between 16 and 35 years old • Are in need of contraception • Have regular periods • Are willing to come to Magee-Womens Hospital to complete up to 14 or more visits over a five year period

Participants will be reimbursed $175 upon completion of study procedures. Men and women ages 40 and above with no history of psychotic illnesses and no current problems with substance abuse may be eligible.

For more information, please call

The Center for Family Planning Research is conducting a research study of an investigational contraceptive intrauterine device (IUD). Participants will receive study-related exams and study-related birth control at no cost.

For more information, please call 412 246 6356 or 1 800 994 8182

412-246-6356 or 1-800-994-8182

To see if you qualify, please call the Center for Family Planning Research at 412-641-5496 or visit our website at www.birthcontrolstudies.org.Participants will be reimbursed up to $1030 over five years.

PGHCityPaper NEWS

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Addiction & Recovery Health Services

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings. Now accepting Highmark and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

WELLNESS COUNSELING Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 ;;;;;;;;;;;;

massage

412-400-7159

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

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Wellness Center

SUBOXONE We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug Addiction Includes Med Management & Therapy

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy

LOCATIONS IN: Oakland, PA Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA West View, PA Butler, PA

• NOW Treating Pregnant Women

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

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Psychic Development Intermediate Class ~ 6 Thursdays ~ Starts April 4 7 – 9 p.m. ~ $215 Friends Meeting House 4836 Ellsworth Ave 15213 For more info/ registration:

412-271-4474

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

MIND & BODY Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Therapy

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

STAR Superior Chinese Massage Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

Chinese Tuina Massage Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104 3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

CHINESE MASSAGE 412-308-5540 412-548-3710 3348 Babcock Blvd. Pittsburgh

China Massage $50/HR Free Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

724-519-7896 THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE FOR MEN

Sports, Swedish, Shiatsu. $50/Hour Northside Location Near Heinz Field Call Rick: 412-512-6716 www.pittsburghbodyworks.com

MIND & BODY

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

Zhangs Wellness Center

Mingkun Massage DEEP TISSUE MASSAGE • $40 per 60 min massage • 2hr free valet parking at the Concourse with the purchase of a 60 or 90 min massage 125 W. Station Square Dr. Station Sq. Freight Shops

412-401-4110 $40/hr DOWNTOWN 322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor)

Phoenix Spa New Young Professional Free Table Shower w/60 min. Open 10-10 Daily

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

PH. 412.389.8637

4309 Butler Street (Lawrenceville)

minkunmassage.com

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-621-3300

412-595-8077

WE have been there. WE know your pain. Don’t Wait Any Longer!

www.ThereToHelp.org

We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health - And Many Others

PSYCHIC

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL -

Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe. com.

SELF-ESTEEM WORKSHOPS selfesteemworkshops.com

JADE

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Now Hiring for LPC/LCSW MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013

Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116


LIVE

GRAND OPENING!

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

Judy’s Oriental Massage Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr Now with Vichy Shower 4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Accepting All Major Cards

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

ROOMMATES

HOUSE FOR SALE

HOUSE FOR SALE

Cheaper than Rent $ 47,900 - Stowe Twp. Well Maintained - 2 BR, Frame Cape Cod set on a large level, fenced-in lot. Features a gas furnace with central air. Ready to move in. Call George E Lucas Today

New Price $ 360,000 - Mexican War Street Totally Renovated3-story, brick, 3 BR, 2 BA home. Original details, mantels, with 5 fireplaces. Beautiful woodwork & copper downspouts. Extra lot included. Call George E Lucas to see.

NORTH FOR RENT

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper. NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Ross Twp 3 Bedroom 1 ½ Bath, Family Room, Game Room, Integral Garage,

MOVING SERVICES ABC SELF STORAGE5x10 $45, 10x10 $65, 10x15 $95. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

MONTOUR SCHOOL DISTRICT

Nice House in aNice Neighborhood.

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

$1200/Mon. +

412-334-4542

Xin Sui Bodyworks

$ 149,900 Kennedy Twp. Beautiful-Brick, 3 BR, 1.5 BA Ranch with formal dinning room.Updated Kitchen, Bath and 150 amp Electric. Semi-Finished Basement. one car int/grg. Lovely, level backyard with a new patio. Must see.

Call George E Lucas 412-771-8400 #1 Choice Real Estate

Grand Opening

There is light at the end of the tunnel.

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

Find your next job in the City Paper’s “WORK” section. NEWS

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OFF THE CHARTS

Tony Campbell’s noteworthy career brings him back to Pittsburgh {BY ABBY MENDELSON} IT’S A RAINY Tuesday night at the Backstage Bar, Penn Avenue, Downtown. With the rhythm section laying down some phat beats, the tenor plays slow, smooth, soulful. The jazz standard “Body and Soul” ends with an extended, Coltrane-like series of trills and turns. Saxophonist Tony Campbell — a small, dapper man, dressed in a brown pinstriped three-piece suit — closes the set, nods his head, smiles at the applause. Backed by a tight trio, Campbell plays with a surety and style befitting his years of training, time on the road and attention to detail. He’s equally comfy with traditional Gershwin (“Summertime”) and avant-garde Monk (“Epistrophy”). Composer of a host of strong, swinging originals — “TC’s Groove,” “Mr. C” and others — he’s the quintessential professional musician: writing, playing, leading, producing. And lately, Campbell has been playing all over town: Jazz Surgery with Tony Campbell at CJ’s Saturday afternoons, James Street Tavern on Sunday nights. The Backstage Bar, Tana, the Savoy, Ciopino’s, and plenty more.

Woodshedding with the finest emerging talent of the generation — including Branford Marsalis and fellow Pittsburgher Jeff “Tain” Watts — “I was in the midst of the young-lions thing,” Campbell recalls. “We jammed together. We messed up a lot of blues.” All careers — perhaps jazz careers most of all — have turning points. For Campbell’s, it was the road not taken. Going to see the great Art Blakey, another Pittsburgh native, Campbell had hoped to join the band. For some 40 years, the Jazz Messengers had served as a finishing school for some of jazz’s finest players: from Keith Jarrett to Kenny Garrett, Wynton Marsalis to Kevin Eubanks. But Blakey, notoriously imperious, wouldn’t even let Campbell unpack his horn, much less audition. “I was discouraged,” Campbell recalls. “But it taught me never to give up.” Gigging hither and yon, Campbell played New York City in the ’80s and ’90s. A 16-week tour with Sophisticated Ladies in ’93 gave him a taste of steady work. After signing on for cruise-ship duty,

“I LIKE TO PLAY WITH FEELING AND EMOTION. I LIKE TO SWING AS HARD AS I CAN.” “We’ve been on tour,” Campbell says with a laugh. “It’s either feast or famine.” These days, no one is going hungry. Performing regular gigs while sitting in with other bands, teaching and giving private music lessons … it all runs him more or less ragged, which is just the way Campbell wants it. Keeping his head and hands and chops nice ’n’ sharp is good for any jazz player, but especially one like Campbell who craves work. It’s been a long time coming. The Pittsburgh native and future Jazz Society Hall of Famer grew up in the Hill and picked up the clarinet at age 10. Woodwinds, he quickly discovered, were his destiny. In a friend’s basement, he auditioned for the Del-Tones, a legendary ’70s funk band. Showing up with his latest love, a saxophone, Campbell was commanded solo! With no idea what to do, Campbell just took a deep breath and blew. Somehow it worked. He joined the band and “started making money right away,” Campbell recalls, smiling at the memory. By the time he got to Schenley High, Campbell had decided to study music. At legendary Berklee, in Boston, he not only expanded his chops — so as not to be blown off the bandstand — but also learned harmony and theory.

Campbell literally sailed the world, playing behind such headliners as Ben Vereen, Maureen McGovern, Marvin Hamlisch and Diahann Carroll. His music grew as tight as tight gets. As the century turned, it was time to come ashore and settle down a bit. Campbell now teaches music at Urban Pathways Charter School, serves as musical director of the Homewood Jazz Workshop, and has become a mainstay in Pittsburgh’s rich jazz community. “I like to play with feeling and emotion,” Campbell says, and his trio nods in agreement. “I like to swing as hard as I can. I want passion in my music.” Oiling up to play such larger festivals as Montreal, Canada, and Montreux, Switzerland, Campbell is nevertheless happy playing all these small rooms. “I’m ecstatic that I came back,” he says. “The high level of music that I play here — with all these talented guys — I couldn’t have this in New York. It’s wonderful. “I love playing in Pittsburgh,” Campbell adds. “I love playing for these people. I have an affinity with them. They were so supportive of me when I came up. They gave me direction. I took that from Pittsburgh and went all over the world with it. So giving something back gives me a charge.” INF O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.20/03.27.2013


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March 20, 2013