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EVERYTHING OLDHAM IS NEW AGAIN: BONNIE “PRINCE” BILLY COMES TO OAKLAND 17


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013


EVENTS 1.25 – 8pm OFF THE WALL 2013: TAMMY FAYE STARLITE: CHELSEA MÄDCHEN Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

1.26 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: BONNIE “PRINCE” BILLY, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, TITLE TK Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) Co-presented with Carnegie Museum of Art, in conjunction with the exhibition Cory Arcangel: Masters Tickets $18/$15 Members

1.31 – 8:30pm JOHN WATERS: INTIMATE GALLERY TALK REGARDING WARHOL: SIXTY ARTISTS, FIFTY YEARS Tickets $150 (30 person capacity)

2.1 – 8pm JOHN WATERS: THIS FILTHY WORLD Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

2.8 – 8pm OFF THE WALL 2013: SHANA MOULTON AND NICK HALLETT: WHISPERING PINES 10 Co-presented with Carnegie Mellon University, School of Fine Art Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

2.22

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2.23 – 8pm

OFF THE WALL 2013: DAVID CALE: HARRY CLARKE Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013


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VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 04

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{ADMINISTRATION}

“What’s clear in hindsight is a

irony: a city so eager 26 devastating to prove that the system worked

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

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{EDITORIAL}

01.23/01.30.2013

JOIN US FOR A GLOBAL DAY OF ACTION

STEEL CITY MEDIA

“He mouthed ‘This is awesome’ to his mother and told her she could leave him to finish his homework.” — Catherine Sylvain describes a scene at after-school program The LAB

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

[LAST PAGE]

my thoughts and prayers 47 “Alice, go out to you. Now get the hell

out of the car.” — Congressman Keith Rothfus to his daughter, according to the script of an ad we just totally made up

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 11 EVENTS LISTINGS 32 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 39 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 41 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 46 N E W S

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“I’M THE ONE WHO HAS THE INTEREST OF THE PEOPLE.”

INCOMING Allegheny County Council asked to move forward on natural-gas drilling at Pittsburgh International Airport (Jan. 17, online only) Natural gas is the future of energy. It is replacing dirty, old coal plants, and dangerous, expensive nuclear plants. It will fuel cars, trucks, vans, buses, locomotives, aircraft, ships, tractors, air conditioners, engines of all kinds. It costs far less. It will help keep us out of more useless wars, where we shed our blood and money. — Web comment from “Ron Wagner”

Activists call on mayor, county executive to “hold UPMC accountable” (Jan. 17, online only) Perhaps we can expect the mayor to hold others accountable when he takes some accountability for his own actions — or lack thereof. It’s amazing this city has made the progress it has under his “leadership.” How many days until the election? — Web comment from “Brady Burgher”

CORRECTION In the Jan. 16 Green Light column, “Prep ... or Transition,” prepper Dave Powell was misidentified as “Dave Roberts.”

“Let’s keep it real. I blitz the South Side every weekend. Just this time I’m bringing more cops with me.” — Jan. 16 tweet from parody Twitter account “Lou Kravenstahl” (@LouKravenstahl)

“Wow … who knew that you can fight crime, vandalism, public urination with tow trucks … and building inspectors!” — Jan. 19 tweet from the Twitter account of South Side restaurant Dish Osteria (@dishosteria)

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FIGHTING

FITZGERALD County exec steamrolls through first year in office {BY LAUREN DALEY}

S

TANDING ALONG Smallman Street in the Strip District, County Executive Rich Fitzgerald eyeballs the cars and trucks speeding by. And then, after a moment’s hesitation, dashes across, through the rain — and nearly into the path of an oncoming car. “We call that ‘the Fitzgerald’,” says his spokeswoman, Amie Downes, with a laugh. “When you just go for it.” Fitzgerald has been county executive for just over a year, and his hard-charging style has become almost as well known as his accomplishments. On just his third day in office, he threw a monkey wrench into a courtordered property reassessment, prompting speculation he might be found in contempt of court. He has since taken an active role in setting policy at nominally independent agencies like the Port Authority and the Board of Health. And he has slugged it out with high-profile politicians, ranging from legendary former coroner Cyril Wecht to Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravenstahl. “Since he’s become county executive — and this isn’t unique to me — there are many folks that have shared similar stories about the fact that it’s Rich’s way or the highway,” says Ravenstahl. “If you disagree with Rich, he tends to make it personal and it becomes, in many cases, vindictive.” “He’s a lovable bull in a china shop,” acknowledges U.S Rep. Mike Doyle (D-Forest Hills), who’s known Fitzgerald most of his political career. “Sometimes he just charges ahead with his heart.” But as Doyle points out, whatever else can be said about Fitzgerald, “This is a guy who gets things done.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald has made an impact during his first year in office.


FITZGERALD, whose day job had previously

been heading the engineering firm Aquenef, came to the county executive post by way of Allegheny County Council, where he served for 11 years. County councilors have little public visibility, and when Fitzgerald announced his 2011 executive bid, it appeared he faced an uphill climb against Mark Patrick Flaherty, then the county controller. But Fitzgerald beat out Flaherty, then trounced Republican D. Raja in November. And he quickly set about making a name for himself. Fitzgerald took the oath of office on Jan. 3, 2012. On Jan. 5, as he promised on the campaign trail, he stood up to Common Pleas Judge Stanton Wettick, refusing to send out newly assessed property values that Wettick had ordered in a county-wide reassessment. Wettick threatened to hold Fitzgerald’s underlings in contempt of court if they didn’t comply. Fitzgerald didn’t waver. “If the Court believes that removing the elected officials from this process … will result in my stopping this fight — the court can think again,” he said in a statement. Ultimately, the new values did go out, though Wettick delayed their use by a year. “Rich is fearless when he gets behind an issue,” says Doyle. “He’s the guy you want in a foxhole with you.” And indeed, Fitzgerald hasn’t wasted time fulfilling some campaign pledges. The county’s Human Relations Commission, for example, had spent two years pressuring Fitzgerald’s predecessor, Dan Onorato, to approve domestic-partner benefits for county employees in same-sex relationships. Fitzgerald approved the benefits almost immediately; they’ve been available since April 1. And in September, Fitzgerald made a bold move to thwart a state-mandated “Voter ID” requirement. Taking advantage of a provision that allowed voters to present

IDs issued by nursing homes and colleges, Fitzgerald had the county-run Kane Regional Centers and CCAC begin offering IDs for residents — even if they lacked ties to the institutions. (A judge later suspended the voter-ID requirement.) Fitzgerald’s biggest win, though, may have been averting a massive 35-percent service cut at the Port Authority. State officials were refusing to provide additional funding without more money from the county and concessions from the transit agency’s biggest union. Rather than allow authority brass to handle talks on their own, Fitzgerald inserted himself directly into negotiations. Steve Palonis, president and business agent of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 85, said that without Fitzgerald’s involvement, a contract would not have been reached in time to avert cuts. “Rich was instrumental in getting in touch with us and [the Port Authority]” early, Palonis says. “He kept both sides to the fire.” “We had to take over those negotiations or we would have had cuts. … I’d do it again in a heartbeat,” Fitzgerald says. Boards and authorities, in his view, simply lend advice and expertise. “Where directors and folks are running things in an efficient manner, I’ll be hands-off as much as I can be,” Fitzgerald says. Still, he says, “None of the boards are independent,” and as the elected official, “I’m the one who has the interest of the people.”

“I THINK RICH LIKES LOYALTY.”

BUT FITZGERALD’S hard-charging style has also opened him up to complaints that it’s not the people’s interests he’s looking out for. Especially on environmental issues. Earlier this month, the Allegheny County Board of Health approved new guidelines to regulate toxic air emissions by county polluters. But the rule was weaker than a measure the board passed last year: Instead of measuring emissions at a facility’s CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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FIGHTING FITZGERALD, CONTINUED FROM PG. 07

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property line, ofďŹ cials would sample air quality at the nearest habitable structure. “They were supposed to be that way originally ‌ as a compromise,â€? says Fitzgerald, who says he met with board members before they voted to loosen the requirements, as well as industry, business and environmental representatives. “Maybe there was a little miscommunication between the environmental community and industryâ€? as to what the regulations should be. But questions have been raised about how independent the board is. Early last year, board members voted to remove Dr. Bruce Dixon as county health director, a position he held for two decades. In an ensuing lawsuit, Dixon’s attorney has argued that Fitzgerald compelled board members to sign undated resignation letters. Such letters could allow Fitzgerald to remove a board member whenever he wished. Environmentalists are also concerned by the way Fitzgerald has gone about a proposal to allow gas-drilling on county-owned land near the Pittsburgh International Airport. “The people were not involved with this in any meaningful way nor were their opinions sought,â€? says former city councilor and environmental activist Doug Shields. “There was never a larger discussion forwarded to the community for our consideration. That’s just wrong.â€? Fitzgerald’s hard-driving approach toward independent authorities hasn’t just raised the eyebrows of environmentalists. Such boards “technically are all independent,â€? says Jim Roddey, Allegheny County’s ďŹ rst county executive. And although “that independence is limited by the fact that the county executive appoints board members,â€? Roddey says, “Rich really wants them to function more like a department that reports directly to him rather than as

{PHOTO BY LAUREN DALEY}

Rich Fitzgerald speaks to constituents at a monthly meeting of the American Council of Engineering Companies in Carnegie on Jan. 11.

an independent entity.â€? Roddey, who lost a re-election bid amid outrage over an earlier battle over countywide property reassessment, also faults Fitzgerald’s handling of the issue. “I guess I’m old-fashioned, but when I raise my hand to uphold the law, I think I ought to obey the law and obey court orders,â€? says Roddey. “[Fitzgerald’s] deďŹ ance had nothing to do with the right or wrong of the law. It was about currying the favor of the voters.â€? Still, Roddey credits Fitzgerald with an “outstandingâ€? work ethic and says, “He tries to be involved in all aspects of the community. I think in that regard he’s doing a very good job.â€? NOT EVERY politician is so forgiving.

Fitzgerald was elected at the same time as County Controller Chelsa Wagner, but

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the two began feuding almost before they were sworn in. Wagner said the disagreements began in the waning weeks of 2011, when county council passed a 1-mill tax increase — just before Fitzgerald took ofďŹ ce as county executive. Wagner says Fitzgerald “demandedâ€? that she issue a press release supporting the hike. “I said, ‘I think I’ll decide what my press releases are, but I would be happy to call council members and tell them I support them,’â€? Wagner recalls. Fitzgerald says Wagner went back on an agreement she made on the campaign trail. “She had indicated she was going to support it ‌ and then she reneged,â€? he says. The two have since tangled over issues like the handling of property-tax assessments and whether the county’s Bureau of Weights and Measures — whose inspection stickers have previously advertised the name of the county controller — should remain in Wagner’s ofďŹ ce. Fitzgerald has also squabbled with Cyril Wecht, an outspoken ďŹ gure who wanted to return to the county medical examiner’s ofďŹ ce after a federal case against him collapsed. Fitzgerald discussed that possibility, but among other things the two disagreed over Fitzgerald’s demand that Wecht clear media requests through the executive’s ofďŹ ce. Fitzgerald “totally liedâ€? about his willingness to hire him, Wecht now says. Despite the fact that Wecht had received dozens of letters of support from local leaders and forensics experts, “It became obvious, as obvious as the lack of hair on the top of my head: It didn’t make a goddamn difference if he heard from God — he had his mind made up. He had been bullshitting me all along.â€? Fitzgerald says he wanted his adminisCONTINUES ON PG. 10


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tration to have a common message: “You cannot have individuals who work for the administration not supporting what the administration does.” But perhaps Fitzgerald’s most contentious foe is Ravenstahl. Both men acknowledge that they don’t have a working relationship … and that’s about all they agree on. Ravenstahl says things soured when Fitzgerald “took a cheap shot” at him after his election victory, telling the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette he’d work with the mayor even though Ravenstahl “doesn’t always show up for things and he doesn’t always work every day.” At the time, the two pledged to get beyond such resentments, and to meet twice a month. Those meetings are no longer being held: Fitzgerald says Ravenstahl attended only two; Ravenstahl disputes that claim but says the meetings ended because “Rich was more interested in getting information from me about my [mayoral opponent Bill Peduto] than helping the region. He’s more focused on politics than on policy.” Fitzgerald disputes such claims, though he doesn’t back down from his original criticism. “I have a pretty good track record of getting along with a whole lot of folks,” he says. Ravenstahl, he says, is “one mayor out of 130” in the county. “I get along with 129 other mayors. … It’s hard to work with a mayor who doesn’t show up.” And as Fitzgerald’s endorsement of Peduto suggests, he’s clearly hoping to

replace that 130th mayor. Peduto was an early backer of Fitzgerald’s campaign, but the two haven’t always been allies. Fitzgerald and Peduto had a falling-out during the 1996 congressional campaign of Peduto’s former boss, thencouncilor Dan Cohen. Fitzgerald abandoned Cohen over attacks that he later called a “slime campaign” against incumbent Democrat Bill Coyne. Of Fitzgerald’s bluntness, Peduto says today, “It’s refreshing in politics because so many people can be sly.” Nor is Fitzgerald’s support just quid pro quo for Peduto’s own backing, he says. Peduto says that during the county-executive campaign, when he asked Fitzgerald if he would pledge his future support, Fitzgerald answered, “I can’t make that deal.’” But last fall Fitzgerald moved in a hurry, announcing his support of Peduto before Peduto even entered the race, and before a third Democrat, City Controller Michael Lamb, declared his candidacy. Those who know him say that’s vintage Fitzgerald — getting ahead of things. Fitzgerald jumped “before the field was flushed out and [without] consulting other elected officials,” says county councilor and longtime friend Barbara Daly Danko. “I think Rich likes loyalty.” And he’s in a position to expect it in return. “I think some people are reluctant to disagree with him,” Danko adds. “But I think that’s true with any executive.” L D A L E Y @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

{BY MATT BORS}

IDIOTBOX


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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

“Fulton Jail Will Get Working Cell Locks,” read the Dec. 19 Atlanta JournalConstitution headline. The county commission serving Atlanta had finally voted to break a longstanding 3-3 tie that prevented buying new jailhouse locks — even while knowing that inmates could jimmy the old ones at will and roam the facilities, threatening and assaulting suspects and guards. The three recalcitrant commissioners were being spiteful because a federal judge had ordered various improvements to the jail, costing $140 million so far, and the three vowed to spend no more. The 1,300 replacement locks will cost about $5 million — but will not be installed right away.

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The Chinese fashion designer “Ms. Lv” told China Newsweek in N ovember that her sales had “quintupled” since she began using her 72-year-old grandfather to model her clothing styles for girls. “[It’s] helping my granddaughter,” Liu Xianping said. “I’m very old,” he said, and “I have nothing to lose.”

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Challenging Business Plans: (1) British “medical illustrator” Emily Evans recently created eight pricey, bone-china dinner plates emblazoned with the microscope images of tissue slides of the human liver, thyroid, esophagus and testicles ($60 per plate, $200 for a set of four). (2) In October, a shop in London’s St. Bart’s Pathology Museum ran a special sale of cupcakes as part of a sexually transmitted disease awareness campaign. Each pastry’s icing was crafted to resemble the lesions, boils and warts of gonorrhea and other maladies.

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Biologist Phil Torres, working from the Tambopata national park in Peru, revealed in December that he had witnessed a tiny Cyclosa spider construct a replica of an eight-legged spider in a web made of leaves, debris and dead insects. Since the real spider was found nearby, Torres hypothesized that the wily arachnid had built a decoy to confuse predators.

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Artist Maria Fernanda Cardoso, already known for her “circus” of performing fleas at Australia’s Sydney Festival 10 years ago, has since become a legitimate academic expert on the sex organs of fleas and other insects. She debuted the Museum of Copulatory Organs last year near Sydney, teaching visitors such esoterica as: In many insect species, females are promiscuous; snails are hermaphrodites in which one shoots sperm “darts” that form rigid chastity-beltlike blockages on his mate; and a male flea copulates for eight hours straight (but only mates three times in his life).

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A team of French researchers writing recently in the journal PLOS ONE described a species of European catfish, growing to a length of five feet, that feeds itself pigeons by lunging out of the water (“cat”-like) and snatching them, even if the leap carries it to shore. Like Argentinian killer whales, the catfish are able to remain on land for a few seconds while wriggling back into the water where they can enjoy their meal. The lead researcher said he filmed 54 catfish attacks, of which 15 were successful.

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The Jiangdu District kindergarten recognizes that providing a quality education requires supporting the child emotionally as well as helping develop reading and other skills. Toward that end, it now requires teachers to hug each pupil twice a day — provided that the parent has paid the monthly “hugging fee” of the equivalent of about $12.80. An educationagency investigation is under way, according to a December Shanghai Daily report, but one teacher defended the trial program as boosting a child’s confidence and establishing a “good mood” for learning.

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Demarco Thomas, 30, was arrested in Tucson, Ariz., in N ovember, as a drug courier for what the Arizona Daily Star called a “local cartel,” after Thomas himself had called police the day before. Thomas feared being whacked by the cartel because he had come up $20,000 short in the latest delivery. According to police, Thomas brought money in suitcases from N orth Carolina to his Tucson contact — except for a little bit that he had somehow “misplaced.” A police search of Thomas revealed almost exactly $20,000 on his person, and Thomas, about to be arrested, allegedly asked officers if they would please write a note to the cartel informing them that police had merely seized the $20,000 — and not that Thomas had tried to steal it. They declined.

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Prosecutor’s Delight: (1) Police in Guntersville, Ala., suspected that Tara Hampton had resumed dealing drugs, in violation of a first-offender’s program that had kept her out of jail, and they knocked on her door to ask about some evidence they had come across. According to the police report, when Hampton opened the door for them, she was absentmindedly holding a bag of crack in her hand. (2) William Cook Jr., 27, was arrested after a manager at a Wendy’s restaurant in Rome, Ga., complained that Cook was acting strange and disturbing customers, and when police asked for his ID, he provided bogus information. In a search, officers found a note in his pocket, reading, “How Bill Cook intends to rob the Wendy’s on Martha Berry and get away with it,” followed by lists labeled “Plan A” and “Plan B.”

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Unlucky Gary Haines, 59, was arrested in December in Charlotte County, Fla., after he was spotted stealing a trailer by hitching it to his own truck and driving off with it. The “spotter” was the trailer’s owner, David Zehntner, who was out flying in his private plane and happened to be passing over his property at the moment Haines was hitching up. He easily followed Haines from the air and called in Haines’ destination to police.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013

SQUIRREL HILL, 5862 Forbes Ave. 412-422-2123 DORMONT, 2904 West Liberty Ave. 412-341-6591 ROSS TOWNSHIP, 4864 McKnight Rd. 412-635-3170 SOUTH SIDE, 1709 E. Carson St. 412-488-7001 ROBINSON TOWN CTR., 6533 Robinson Ctr. Dr. 412-787-5134 MONROEVILLE, 4053 William Penn Hwy. 412-373-1000 OAKLAND, 3613 Forbes Ave. 412-482-9026 DOWNTOWN, 416 Smithfield St. 412-261-1007 CHECK OUT OUR NEWEST STORE! DOWNTOWN, 967 Liberty Ave. 412-391-3065


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THE BURGER — MADE OF BRISKET, SHORT RIB AND SIRLOIN — WAS TENDER AND JUICY

JUICED

RAISING

{BY CHRIS POTTER} “We are a bar on the South Side,” Jackie Day acknowledges, “but we don’t contribute to the trouble” plaguing Pittsburgh’s bar district. If anything, “We help aid in the next day’s recovery.” Day owns The Enchanted Garden, a garden shop and juice bar located just off East Carson Street. “People walk by and don’t know what this is,” says Day. But those who venture inside will find a café area in back, furnished with lava lamps and a drop ceiling painted to match the sky. And they’ll find Day herself, who whips up more than a dozen smoothies and juices with names like “Orange Yinz Thirsty” and “Incredible Hulk.” Ingredients range from acai berries and carrots to beets and kale. (Yes, kale. “I don’t eat much kale,” says Day, “but added to an Incredible Hulk, it’s amazing.” Your correspondent, also not a kale fan, can attest to its palatability: The smoothie tastes of nothing so much as coconut.) Prices start at $3.50. Day began selling juices in September, serving a neighborhood whose customer base includes a nearby yoga studio, the offices of WYEP and the occasional visiting metal band. And Day is one of her own best customers: “For the past 10 days, I’ve been on a diet of vegetarian chili and juice,” she says. She’s not the only person on the South Side living on a liquid diet. But she’s probably one of the few who feels better off the next day. CPOTTER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

73 S. 13th St., South Side. 412-377-2765

the

FEED

SOUP N’ AT. It’s part art, part soup and part community get-together. For $10, attendees get a meal (soup, bread and dessert), as well as a ballot to vote on artists’ presentations. (The artist with the most votes gets the proceeds.) BYOB, or Penn Brewery beverages with donation. 6 p.m. Sun., Jan. 27. Brew House, 2100 Mary St., South Side. www. soupnat. wordpress. com

THE BAR

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

I

N THIS trying economy, upscale dining has become harder to sustain. Many restaurateurs are making it work by introducing limited menus of economical foods, such as noodles, waffles or burgers, and embellishing them in a variety of thoughtful if not extravagant ways in settings which are chic yet blue-jean friendly. This strategy for blurring the line between upscale and downscale happens to work well in our contemporary, more casual lifestyle. The latest example of note is Benjamin’s Western Avenue Burger Bar on the North Side, where the menu consists of a matrix of burgers (two sizes, nine topping combos, beef or veggie patty, and optional glutenfree bun) and four other sandwiches. Additionally, there are eight beer-friendly “snacks,” which range from roasted almonds to a Crested Duck charcuterie platter. Prices aren’t diner-cheap — the basic cheeseburger is eight bucks, with a “Top Shelf” option for $1.50 more — but neither does every option aspire to the refinement of a burger with red-wine-braised onion and truffle mustard. The BLT, for instance

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Burger with rosemary-balsamic goat cheese and green apples

comes with American cheese, and there’s the inevitable breakfast burger with fried egg, bacon and home fries on top. Benjamin’s interior reflects its casualchic aspirations as well, hitting a sweet spot between hip lounge and casual hangout. A gas fireplace in the dining area opposite

BENJAMIN’S WESTERN AVENUE BURGER BAR 900 Western Ave., North Side. 412-224-2163 HOURS: Sun.-Thu 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. PRICES: Burgers and sandwiches $8.25-14.25; snacks $2.25-10.95 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED the bar provides a warm focal point amid substantial wood tables and seating on a simple padded bench. Up a half-story is the billiard lounge, with cushy couches that feel modern but unpretentious. Our snack of “pickled stuff” was a surprise hit with Angelique, who isn’t a fan of most things under that general head-

ing, but relished the piquant bites of cauliflower, beet and hard-boiled egg. The secret was a balance that was neither too sour nor too sweet, but employed a judicious mix of spices; the flavor went well beyond typical European mustard-and-dill into Middle Eastern, even Indian territory, punctuated with an assertive bolt of heat. The egg both explained the popularity of those weird jars of purple eggs you’ve seen in bars, and rebuked them; it was seasoned by the pickling spices without becoming rubbery or overwhelmed by acid. We ordered a Regular Guy beef burger topped with rosemary-balsamic goat cheese and green apple. The burger itself — made of brisket, short rib and sirloin — was excellent, tender and juicy. The flavorful cheese made a neat circle — it seemed to have been melted and then placed on the burger — and the apples had been cleverly cut into slaw-like matchsticks, so that their crispness didn’t become a distraction. Benjamin’s also makes its own veggie burger from sweet potatoes, chick peas and herbs. It made for a delicious patty with a CONTINUES ON PG. 14

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creamy, not crumbly, texture that even got some crisp edges on the grill. Angelique’s only quibble with hers — a Mexican-style concoction topped with green chiles, salsa and chipotle sour cream — was that the tomatoes were cut into the same large chunks as in the side salad, so that they rained out of the burger instead of staying put. Pulled pork had the meaty chunks we associate with the patient process of handpulling, as opposed to the fine threads that result from mechanical shredding, and the house barbecue sauce walked a satisfying line between a sweet tomato base and a peppery mustard one. House slaw on top added its own kicky flavor rather than mere bland creaminess. The whole comprised a better sandwich than most local barbecue places can claim, let alone most generalservice restaurants.

Our final sandwich was the irresistible house-made lamb sausage with peppers and onions. The vegetables were cut thin and cooked to nearly melting tenderness, while the sausage dripped with juices. Rather than conveying greasiness, however, the effect was the kind of richness you get with long-cooked short ribs or pork shoulder, and a topping of hot-sauce mayo provided perfect counterpoint. This was all contained — barely — on a Breadworks roll that had just enough crust without too much resistance. A side of home fries, made of a medium dice of potato, was nearly perfect, tender inside, occasionally crisped, and studded with caramelized onion. Other than a smidge too much salt, these home fries were among the best we’ve ever had, and put most breakfast places to shame. Show up at Benjamin’s in jeans or in post-party formalwear, and you’ll feel equally at home. The atmosphere is comfortable and welcoming, the food is simply outstanding, and the pool table is in great condition. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013

THE PURSUIT OF HAPPY HOURS Local group tours area bars

Louis Kroeck and Doug Sechler at 1947 Tavern {PHOTO COURTESY OF MATT PIERCE}

Cook Blake Murphy

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

Thursday evenings are for exploring different places, knocking back a couple of beers or cocktails, and making some new friends. That’s the idea behind the weekly meet-up called Pittsburgh Happy Hour. The group, organized by Lou Kroeck and Krista Bland, has been touring Pittsburgh-area bars and restaurants for the past 18 months. Although the original sessions were planned as meet-ups to merge two groups of friends, the roving happy hour now attracts participants through its wide social network. “It’s a really mixed crew,” Kroeck says. “Tonight we even have two folks from Reddit. They learned about it on there and just showed up.” Kroeck says that newcomers shouldn’t be afraid to join the fun. “As long as you’re willing to talk to people and be social, it’s not an issue,” he says. “Everyone is very welcoming. At some point we’ve all been the newcomer.” Matt Pierce took that advice to heart on his first visit. He’d been tracking the group through its Facebook page (which boasts more than 750 followers), and decided that his birthday would be a good time to join in. “I just randomly showed up, not knowing anybody, and ended up having such a great time. I’ve been back for every one since then,” he says. Pierce says that, in addition to the fun group of people, the big draw is the diversity of locations the group takes in. Recent happy-hour themes have ranged from bars known for craft beers (Carson Street Deli) and pub grub (Redbeard’s), as well as self-styled dives (Rock Room). “One week you’re at a really wellknown place, the next week you’re at a hole in the wall you didn’t know existed, and now it’s one of your favorite places,” Pierce says. Kroeck says that there are a few things he looks for when scouting out locations: “a great drink special, a great staff — and not too crowded so we can socialize.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

pghhappyhour.blogspot.com and www. facebook.com/pittsburgh.happyhour


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

Little

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

CAFÉ DU JOUR. 1107 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-9695. This Euro-style bistro is “openkitchen cozy” with a quaint courtyard for intimate outdoor dining. A modestly sized yet thoughtful menu offers smallto-large plates, highlighting Mediterranean- and Europeaninfluenced California cooking with an emphasis on fresh, seasonal produce and excellently prepared meats. KF

Verde {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} DORMONT DOGS. 2911 Glenmore Ave., Dormont. 412-343-0234. This is an actual hot-dog (and veggie-dog) restaurant, with an emphasis on top-quality frankfurters, local bakery buns and fresh, innovative toppings. Try the Texas Avenue Dog, topped with chili sauce, cheddar,

AUTHENTIC THAI CUISINE DINE IN / TAKE OUT

BYOB ALL LUNCHES

AT THE RIGHT PRICE!

$

3 COURSES FOR $12.00 BASIL PONZU SALMON CHICKEN BRUSCHETTA SHRIMP DIABLO

Sun Penang {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} sour cream and Fritos, or the Bruschetta Dog, with marinated tomatoes, pesto and parmesan. J FAT HEADS. 1805 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-7433. This place seems to expand every few years, with reason: terrific beer selection, chicken wings and industrial-sized sandwiches. There’s outdoor eating on the “fatio,” but timing is everything: No matter how many tables they add, you may end up waiting for one. JE

summer. Unusual meats — elk, ostrich — are combined with fresh, local ingredients in preparations that join classic and contemporary … and offer the exquisitely rare experience of eating art. LE

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Fri-Sun

1906 Penn Ave. Strip District 412-586-4107

4428 LIBERTY AVE BLOOMFIELD 412-683-1448 delsrest.com

LITTLEBANGKOK INTHESTRIP.COM

Marisqueira

FULL LIST ONLINE

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Mon 11:30-3:00

11:00-9:00

IBIZA. 2224 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-325-2227. An urbane wine bar and tapas restaurant, Ibiza is the sister restaurant to its next-door favorite, Mallorca. Ibiza’s menu starts in Spain but includes delicacies from Portugal, Argentina and other countries. Accompanied by a wide international selection of wines, Ibiza offers a transportive dining experience. KE

GREEN FOREST. 655 Rodi Road, Penn Hills. 412-371-5560. Tucked into a nondescript office plaza is this churrascaria — a Brazilian all-you-caneat restaurant. Servers JIMMY WAN’S. www. per pa pull barbequed meats 1337 Old Freeport pghcitym .co right off the rotisserie Road, Fox Chapel. grill and present them 412-968-0848. This at your table, ready to upscale eatery delivers what carve off as much freshly cooked Americans expect from a Chinese meat as you like. There are restaurant, plus fare with a hot and cold buffets as well, modern, pan-Asian approach, but savvy diners load up on the complete with Japanese and juicy meats. KE French influences. Wan’s offers inventive appetizers such as HOT METAL DINER. 1025 sashimi ceviche, traditional and Lebanon Road, West Mifflin. creative sushi, dim sum and 412-462-4900. This new-oldChinese-American entrees both fashioned diner with a Harley familiar (Peking duck) and theme offers a traditional menu less so (dan dan noodles). KE with super-size portions. The thick, fluffy “mancakes” hang LOS CHILUDOS. 325 off the platter, and the huge Southpointe Blvd., Suite 300, breakfast burrito is like a Spanish Canonsburg. 724-745-6791. omelet wrapped in a tortilla. This casual neighborhood For lunch, there are burgers, taqueria offers classic Mexicansandwiches and fresh pie. J American fare sprinkled with more authentic options such HYEHOLDE. 1516 Coraopolis as tinga (saucy stewed pork) Heights Road, Moon Township. and sopes, thick cornmeal 412-264-3116. Half cottage, cakes. Los Chiludos excels with half castle, Hyeholde is housed Americanized Mexican dishes, in a little fantasy building imbuing them with authentic dating to the 1930s. The ingredients and preparations splendidly landscaped grounds that recalls the fresh, flavorful host outdoor pig roasts, fast food as it’s prepared clambakes and picnics in the in Mexico. JF

7-$9

THE FRESHEST LOCAL PRODUCE FROM THE STRIP

Choose From

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BURMA-TOKYO RESTAURANT. 320 Atwood St., Oakland. 412802-6163. This tiny restaurant run by two siblings offers sushi as well as a selection of cooked dishes from their native Burma and several neighboring countries. Among the intriguing selections: The Burmese shan tribe noodles, with a distinctive, intensely flavored sauce and varied vegetables; and the Kyae oae soup, with rice vermicelli, mustard greens, a variety of meatballs and tofu. JF CAFÉ DES AMIS. 443 Division St., Sewickley. 412-741-2388. A genuine French café — with rustic wooden tables, chalkboard menus and display cases full of sophisticated salads, sandwiches and desserts. A perfect spot for that relaxed, multi-hour meal that is France’s greatest export: Thus, dinner can be anything from croque monsieur to shepherd’s pie or roulades of beef. J

ANGKO

BAR & RISTORANTE

MEDITERRANEAN

BISTRO

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Pittsburgh’s FINEST Portuguese Cuisine Serving Lunch and Dinner 7 Days a Week

24th & East Carson St.

225 Commercial Ave. I Aspinwall For reservations call 412-696-1130 www.marisqueirabistro.com

“In The South Side” 412.390.1111

www.doublewidegrill.com

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MENDOZA EXPRESS. 812 Mansfield Road, Green Tree. 412-429-8780. The décor is pure kitsch — sombreros on the walls, etc. — and the location is a bit obscure. But the menu is ample, and the food is as authentic as you’ll find in Pittsburgh. (Try the rebozo, a scramble of chorizo, peppers and cheese.) JF OSTERIA 2350. 2350 Railroad St., Strip District (412-281-6595) and 100 Wood St., Downtown (412-586-7743). You won’t get better casual Italian cooking for your money than here. The menu has been pared to the essentials of Italian cuisine: antipasti, pizza, panini and pasta — and their preparations represent a unique marriage of Old-World recipes and local ingredients. Highlights include the parsnips antipasti and gnocchi. JE ROSE TEA CAFÉ. 5874 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-4212238. This bubble-tea café has broadened its offerings to include high-quality, authentic Chinese cooking. The menu is dominated by Taiwanese dishes, including a variety of seafood items. In place of the thick, glossy brown sauces which seem all but inevitable at most American Chinese restaurants, Rose Tea keeps things light with delicate sauces that are more like dressings for their fresh-tasting ingredients. KF SUN PENANG. 5829 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-7600. Sun Penang’s aesthetic is Asian — simple but not austere — and to peruse its menu is to explore the cuisines of Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore. The Pangan ikan is a house specialty, and the Malaysian kway teow (practically the country’s national dish) may be the best you ever have without a tourist visa. JE TRAM’S KITCHEN. 4050 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412682-2688. This tiny family-run storefront café packs in the regulars. Most begin their meal with an order of fresh spring rolls, before moving on to authentic preparations of pho, noodle bowls and friedrice dishes. The menu is small, but the atmosphere is lively and inviting. JF VERDE. 5491 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-404-8487. The menu here isn’t straight Mexican, but presents some traditional items, including tablesideprepared guacamole and grilled corn-on-the-cob, with reconceived classics, invented, fusion-y dishes like tacos with roasted sweet potatoes, fried chickpeas and Mexicanstyle tzatziki. There is also an extensive tequila list and a patio for warm-weather dining. KE

offMenu {BY AMYJO BROWN}

BIG PLANS

Public Market hoping new location brings positive changes BECKY RODGERS, executive director of Neighbors in the Strip, is full of ideas for the space that will be the Pittsburgh Public Market’s new home. Booths equipped for cooking. A commercial kitchen for prepping. A stage for entertainment. Possibly a restaurant to anchor it. “The market council has been looking for over a year at different spaces,” she says. And it may well have found that perfect spot. At press time, it was reviewing a lease for a roughly 20,000-square-foot space in the Strip, which would more than double the market’s existing footprint. The lease is awaiting signatures, Rodgers says. Then “we’ll be able to disclose the location.” If all goes as planned, the market could open in the new spot as soon as May 1. If it doesn’t, the market will still need a Plan B. The Buncher Company, which hopes to acquire the building from the city, plans to demolish the portion of it occupied by the market as part of a redevelopment project. Plans to move the market elsewhere in the structure have been scuttled, Rodgers explains, because rents are expected to be “costprohibitive” once development occurs. The market’s lease expired Dec. 31, and it is monthto-month now, Rodgers says. The Buncher Company has not set a deadline for when the market would need to move. Vendors, however, are looking forward to the changes — even with so much up in the air. “The public market has still vastly unrealized potential,” says Kevin Costa, owner of Crested Duck Charcuterie. “Relocating will be a really good opportunity to start again.” The number of vendors joining the Friday-throughSunday market has fluctuated since it opened in 2010. Vendors sign month-to-month leases, in part to help incubate startups. But that has also led to frequent turnover and the appearance at times of too much vacancy. “There’s a slight disappointment in how things turned out,” says Nathan Holmes, of Clarion River Organics, who added that he had envisioned a version of Philadelphia’s Reading Terminal Market or Cleveland’s West Side Market. Rodgers says those feelings are understandable. “It was a tentative location. A lot of people didn’t want to commit to being there,” she says, adding that the new location will address many of the issues that have inhibited the market’s growth. And, indeed, discussions of a new space, particularly one that will permit on-site cooking, bring hope. “I think it will be a nice chance for it to rebrand itself, start a little fresh,” Holmes says. “I’m excited about it.”

VENDORS ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO THE CHANGES.

A B ROW N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013


LOCAL

RESOLUTIONS? NOT UNTIL SPRING FOR BONNIE “PRINCE” BILLY

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

STARRING PITTSBURGH

NEW YEAR,

SAME OLDHAM Shadow Lounge’s Justin Strong in the HWIC-produced video for Public Enemy’s “Everything”

Last week, a new Public Enemy video hit the Internet: an uplifting tune called “Everything,” with a sweet, Motown-style riff behind it and a sing-songy delivery by Chuck D. The video begins with — hey, is that Justin Strong, from Shadow Lounge?! Wait, that second guy … that’s Davon Magwood, the Pittsburgh comedian, isn’t it? How did all of Pittsburgh end up in a Public Enemy video? It turns out it was the work of a married couple from Tarentum. David and Maura Snyder, along with David’s cousin, John Delserone, run HWIC Filmworks, a film-production company that’s made feature films and commercial videos, and serves as the official video crew for Chuck D’s SLAMjamz Records label. David first got in touch with Chuck D randomly in the late ’90s. “I was always a huge P.E. fan, and I sent him an email once on the off chance he’d read it — they were leaving Def Jam at the time, and were looking at their options — and he emailed me back, which I didn’t expect!” From there, the two kept in touch — collaborating in the long-distance group The Impossebulls, and eventually forming a partnership in which David would direct videos for SLAMjamz and Public Enemy. He’s also done remixes and produced tracks for Public Enemy. Maura — who works a day job in mental health and previously had no experience in video — has become a producer for HWIC. Some jobs are bigger than others — when Public Enemy was making videos for some older songs that had never gotten the treatment, for example. (“I was like, ‘You want me to make a video for “Welcome to the Terrordome?”’” David recalls with a laugh.) The idea behind the new video is to feature regular people — the song is an anthem about being proud regardless of one’s material possessions — and it features Pittsburghers who the Snyders know, from Strong and Magwood to Most-Wanted Fine Art Gallery’s Jason Sauer and Nina Gibbs (and son Rowdy), and Kahmeela Adams, of the 48 Hour Film Project, which HWIC won in 2011. It’s been having an effect on the folks who appear, too. “I got a text from one of the actresses,” says Maura. “She said she walked into her bank and the people there were like, ‘Didn’t we just see you in that Public Enemy video?’” More on HWIC at www.hwicfilm.com.

{BY AARON JENTZEN}

The “prince” who looks a pauper: Will Oldham

O

N DEEP MATTERS, such as his appreciation for The Everly Brothers, Will Oldham’s eloquent commentary illuminates. On more mundane topics, he’ll still surprise you. New Year’s resolutions? Not until spring. “It’s impossible, in these dark, heavy, cold dead days of winter, to do anything of value other than just sit and cogitate,” says Oldham, speaking via phone from the road. “Not being a specifically religious human, I still find celebrations of the spring — of May Day or Easter — to be relevant.” Best known for performing and recording under the name Bonnie “Prince” Billy, Oldham has worn many guises since his 1992 debut on Drag City Records — a shifting musical identity that has long evoked a certain mystique. His 20-year career shows remarkable vitality, thanks to varied projects — sometimes new material, sometimes recasting his old songs or reinterpreting others’ music — and a kaleidoscope of collaborators, ranging from Nashville session musicians and guitarist Matt Sweeney (Zwan, Chavez) to influen-

tial post-rock band Tortoise. Looking back over the past year, Oldham says “2012 was … pretty good.” But he learned some lessons: “I didn’t go on vacation,” he says. “I need to go on vacation.” Little wonder, considering his prodigious output in 2012: the collaborative album Marble Downs, with Trembling Bells; the six-song EP Now Here’s My Plan; two singles; and his autobiography, Will Oldham on Bonnie “Prince” Billy.

BONNIE “PRINCE” BILLY

WITH TITLE TK (CORY ARCANGEL, ALAN LICHT, HOWIE CHEN) 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 26. Carnegie Lecture Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-18. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

For the autobiography, long-time friend and collaborator Alan Licht interviewed Oldham, then distilled their conversations into the 400-page book, published in September by W.W. Norton. Oldham says he enjoyed working with Licht and the book’s

illustrators, but that the project was more involved than he anticipated, and more the publisher’s idea than a personal goal. “Steve Albini read the book and said, ‘You have a really good memory!’ And that was reassuring to me, that I still have something like a memory,” Oldham says. “Maybe it’s a good thing that [the book] exists, but yeah,” he says, laughing, “I definitely won’t do it again!” When Oldham plays at Carnegie Lecture Hall on Sat., Jan. 26, he’ll be backed by Emmett Kelly and Cheyenne Mize, musicians with whom he recorded 2009’s Chijimi EP. Over the years, Oldham says, the three have “toured a fair amount in a larger group but also as this trio.” Opening the show is a group called Title TK, consisting of the aforementioned Alan Licht, artist and curator Howie Chen and multimedia artist Cory Arcangel, whose Masters exhibit is currently on display at the Carnegie Museum of Art. (While Oldham and Arcangel produce very different work, Oldham says they might be said to share a “sense of challenge or sense of

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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annoyance or sense of fun.”) Oldham closed out 2012 with another milestone: his first holiday record. He likes Christmas music, and his favorites in the genre include the likes of The Jackson Five, Johnny Cash and Dwight Yoakam. (And James Brown: “The first time I heard it, I thought, ‘Wow, this singer’s amazing! It sounds like James Brown, but James Brown doesn’t sing this intimately.’ And then I found out it was James Brown.”) For his holiday single “Christmas Eve Can Kill You,” Oldham duets with Dawn McCarthy, their entwined voices rising and falling on lyrics like “The sound of one man walking through the snow can break your heart / but stopping doesn’t help, so on I go.” Oldham’s warble makes him an acquired taste for some, but here his voice is direct, expressive, entreating. Oldham learned this gut-wrenching ballad from an early 1970s recording by The Everly Brothers. Oldham and McCarthy’s new version strips away the weeping pedal steel and drums, leaving simple acoustic guitar and percussion, droning strings and organ. The song, released just in time for Christmas as a 7-inch single and video, serves to introduce a grander project: Songs the Brothers Sung. The album, due in February, finds Oldham and McCarthy tackling a collection of songs learned from Everly Brothers records. The Everlys are perhaps best known for their trademark close-harmony singing and 1950s hits like “Wake Up Little Susie” and “All I Have to Do Is Dream.” But Oldham, a longtime fan, finds much more in their music. “There’s something about the way they express intimacy,” Oldham says, “the way they push their voices when they’re getting fully out there, either in ecstasy or agony.” He finds Don Everly’s 1960s work particularly innovative: Instead of pushing his voice like a soul singer, Don “starts finding crazy notes that he can still hit clear as a bell, but the weirdness of the note is what expresses the emotion,” Oldham says. “Rather than distressing his voice, he distresses the melody.” Songs the Brothers Sung is intended to showcase the complex material the Everlys wrote and explored, says Oldham — especially their overlooked later work. “It’s kinda just wanting to dig in and make a fucked-up record, in the spirit of their great fucked-up records of the late ’60s and early 1970s.” Oldham’s New Year’s resolutions may have to wait until spring — “when you can actually take them on and do something about them” — but he’s already off to a great 2013. AJE NT Z E N@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013

NEW RELEASES

THE WILLIAMS BAND CALMER THAN YOU ARE (SELF-RELEASED)

Even for an EP, Calmer Than You Are is short — the longest of the four songs is under four minutes — but The Williams Band makes every second count. It’s got the big, polished, radio-ready, Southern-rock sound of a band like Kings of Leon, but with a cooler edge. And strangely enough, here and there, something in the melodies and the guitar tone suggests the Strokes, if the members had grown up in Alabama instead of New York City. BY MARGARET WELSH

THE WILLIAMS BAND EP RELEASE with CASINO BULLDOGS, TRIGGERS 9:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 25. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412-621-4900 MIKE STOUT IN YOUR FACE WITH LOVE (SELF-RELEASED)

For some, music is an escape; for others, it’s a motivator. Mike Stout is a longtime activist folk-rocker whose tunes often read like current-events lessons, and much of his new In Your Face fits the bill. Labor, the environment and the Occupy movement have a friend in Stout, who spells out his take on shale drilling (“Stop the Frack Attack”) and labor rights (“Triangle Shirtwaist Fire”) — and, more personally, his daughter and her partner (“Maura and Michael”). BY ANDY MULKERIN

PARTLY SUNNY SLEEP MONSTER (SELF-RELEASED)

Debut EP of indie rock that’s by turns aggressive, tender and epic. Some reference points would include Pavement and Modest Mouse — that vein of guitar-based music with rather, er, “indie” vocals. (They’re not always smooth, but they’re not grating — just charmingly wavery, and better when soft than when screamy.) Sometimes the recording falls flat, but it’s a debut that makes me want to hear more, and to see Partly Sunny live. BY ANDY MULKERIN


GIVING IT HER ALL IF NOTHING ELSE, the title of Joy Ike’s third album should tell you something about where she is as an artist. After the innocuous debut Good Morning and the more intriguing Rumors, Ike is laying it all on the line with a full-length called All or Nothing. “There’s kind of this recurring theme of not wanting to give up, wanting to push through and do everything you can, as hard as you can and as well as you can,” she explains. While there are plenty of ways to interpret the title, Ike admits it means a lot to her in terms of her professional life. “I don’t know if the title came out of that, or if now I’ve embodied the title,” she says with a laugh. It’s clear that Joy Ike is all in. The new album, recorded with Saul Simon MacWilliams (who tours with Ingrid Michaelson, and did sound engineering for the movie Beasts of the Southern Wild), combines the basics of Ike’s songwriting with some nextlevel instrumentation and production. It’s without a doubt her most engaging work to date — thematic, interesting, dynamic. In addition to her band of bassist Jason Rafalak, drummer Ryan Socrates and cellist Eleanor Graham, Ike got help from members of the Freye String Quartet to add depth to the recording. It was all made possible by a $12,000 haul from a Kickstarter funding project. While Ike had used Kickstarter for her previous album, this campaign was different. “The campaign was fiveand-a-half weeks long, and I think we were still at 40 percent of the goal at the fourweek mark. I got really nervous, and was pretty sure it wasn’t going to happen.”

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIAN COHEN}

Footwear optional: Joy Ike

several donors who had never heard my music before.” The songs on All or Nothing range from uplifting pop, like the opening cut “Everything You Have,” to serious storytelling, like the song “Promised Land.” “That one is a mix of a personal story and the story of a girl I met a couple of years back,” she says. “She was talking to me about someone who’d introduced her to my music — a guy she was really in love with. But she’s Indian and he wasn’t Indian, and her parents weren’t going to allow her to marry him or see him because of that. She mentioned that her parents would most likely set up an arranged marriage for her. We kind of bonded over that — we talked about how I was Nigerian and my parents are always trying to hook me up with fellow Nigerians. It was a bonding moment, and it was a burst of song that was probably waiting to come out for a while.” It’s that personal touch — and that gravity — that makes Ike such a strong lyricist and storyteller. And that makes All or Nothing so important to her. “This is it,” she says. “I’ve been working so hard over the last eight years or so, and it all culminates with this album. I don’t know what that means exactly, but I’m hoping for big things.”

IT’S WITHOUT A DOUBT HER MOST ENGAGING WORK TO DATE — THEMATIC, INTERESTING, DYNAMIC.

JOY IKE CD RELEASE WITH COLONIZING THE COSMOS

7:30 p.m. Sun., Jan. 27. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $12-30. All ages. 412-320-4610 or www.newhazletttheater.org

But then Kickstarter featured the campaign on its front page as a highlighted project — and things changed fast. “I think that’s really what the tipping point was,” she recalls. “I don’t even know what their process is — I guess they pick a type of project each day. There were

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013


CRITICS’ PICKS Motive

[SINGER-SONGWRITER] + FRI., JAN. 25

It’s that age-old story: The singer-songwriter who moved to another country to play professional basketball and is now returning home to make a living in music. OK, OK, so Mike Medved’s narrative isn’t exactly run-of-the-mill. The 26-year-old went to St. Vincent College and shipped out in 2009 to play for Leeds Carnegie in the U.K.’s pro-basketball league. Now he’s back with a full-time backing band and a desire to put his roots down here. He plays Club Café tonight, where you’ll recognize him as the really tall one. Mike Cali opens. Andy Mulkerin 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

the new stuff tonight when Wakey! Wakey! — in this case, just frontman Michael Grubbs playing acoustic — plays Club Café. Suzanna Choffel opens. AM 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

Wakey! Wakey!

[INDIE ROCK] + FRI., JAN. 25

Motive has it all: the suits, the riffs, the drummer who looks like Abe Lincoln. It’s the stuff that’s made the band rising darling of the MTV underbelly — the parts of the MTV empire that still cover music — and garnered it comparisons to The Strokes. Tonight, the Brooklyn rockers bring their show to Garfield Artworks; Breezewood and Dewey Marquee open. AM 8 p.m. 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield. $6. All ages. 412-361-2262 or www.garfieldartworks.com

[INDIE POP] + SAT., JAN. 26

If what’s been leaked so far is any indication, the forthcoming album from Wakey! Wakey! will be an Lucy art-pop ride in the Kaplansky vein of Passion Pit — squeaky-clean vocals, delicious pop hooks and lots of synths. The band found success with its 2010 album Almost Everything I Wish I’d Said the Last Time I Saw You, which landed it commercial deals and TV placements along with healthy record sales. Preview

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Lucy Kaplansky’s voice is not only beautiful but friendly — which likely benefitted the singer-songwriter during the years when she eschewed music in favor of work as a clinical psychologist. Fortunately for the folk world, she returned to music in the ’90s with the Shawn Colvinproduced The Tide; her latest, Reunion, does a good bit of reminiscing (and includes a guest spot by Jonatha Brooke). Tonight, she appears at the Roots Cellar, Calliope’s venue at the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. AM 7:30 p.m. 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. $25-28. All ages. 412-361-1915 or www.calliopehouse.org

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Win A 2013 BAIERL SUBARU COUNTRY MEGATICKET Like Pittsburgh City Paper on Facebook and join the contest event page for a chance to Win A Pair of Tickets to ALL EIGHT CONCERTS at First Niagara Pavilion!

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 24

ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Joel Lindsey. North Side. 412-322-1850. BRILLOBOX. Soundcrash, Pandemic, Titletown. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Brother Joscephus, Nightly Standard. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Eleven Dollar Bills, Midnight Special. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Who’s Bad - The Ultimate Michael Jackson Tribute Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Dive House Union. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 25

ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Mark Ferrari. O’Hara. 412-963-1514. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Terrance Vaughan. Richland. 724-444-7333. BRILLOBOX. Casino Bulldogs, The Williams Band, Triggers. The Williams Band CD Release Show. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Mike Medved Band, Mike Cali (Early) Overdost, Plutocrat Noose, Morbid Sikosis, Yung Bru (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. ELRAMA TAVERN. The Dave Iglar Band. Elrama. 412-384-3630. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Lullaby Engine, Sun Ray Shining Light, Patricia Wake. Aliquippa. 724-375-5080. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Motive, Breezewood, Dewey Marquee. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Fourth River. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Slices, Great Ants, Good Sport. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. Thirds & Fifths. South Side. 412-770-4983. SHADOW LOUNGE. EZ the Rockstar. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. SMILING MOOSE. The I Drive, Before You. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. The Used, We Came as Romans, Crown The Empire, MindFlow. North Side.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013

SAT 26

31ST STREET PUB. The Turbosonics, Jason Martinko Revue, The Semi-Supervillains. The Turbosonics CD release. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Mr. Greengenes. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Blue Redshift, Big Gypsy. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. BLVD PUB & KITCHEN. Three Car Garage. Canonsburg. 724-746-2250. BRILLOBOX. Akrasia, & the #’s, Nemo, GrianSquall. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. Bonnie “Prince” Billy, Title TK. Oakland. 412-237-8300. CLUB CAFE. Bill Deasy, Good Brother Earl, Thoth Trio, David Throckmorton Trio, more (Late) Wakey! Wakey!, Suzanna Choffel (Early) South Side. 412-431-4950. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Heroin T, Ernie & the Berts, Bob Kocher. Aliquippa. 724-375-5080.

HAMBONE’S. Bailey Park, Shane McLaughlin, Midnight Special. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARVEY WILNER’S. Xtremely Loaded. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Carousel, Microwaves, Whoarfrost, Crazy Scorpion Group. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. Sticky, Sound of Failure, Casper Slide. South Side. 412-381-3497. JOEY D’S. The Dave Iglar Band. Harmarville. 412-828-0999. MOONDOG’S. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Marduk, Moonspell, Inquisition, The Foreshadowing, Death Wolf. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PALACE THEATRE. Get the Led Out: The American Led Zeppelin. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. REX THEATER. Eliot Lipp. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROOSTERS ROADHOUSE. Daniels & McClain. Bridgeville.412-221-1543.

MP 3 MONDAY MADDIE GEORGI

Each week, we feature a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from Maddie Georgi, who recently released her second album, Glory Bound. Stream or download the title track on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com


SEVEN SPRINGS. Aces Full. Champion. 814-352-7777. SHADOW LOUNGE. Watermelon, The Van Allen Belt, MH The Verb, Max Mill. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. SMILING MOOSE. Featherlight, The Wise, Lacking Restraint, Ill Lament. Infantry Division CD Release “This Is OUR Scene Volume 1” Ben Dumm & The Deviants (late). South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Chrome Moses, The Me Toos, Fearles Beasts. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TJ’S HIDEAWAY. Earth Quakers. Evans City. 724-789-7858. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Judy Figel. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

SUN 27

BRILLOBOX. Ambassadors. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. SHADOW LOUNGE. Act of Pardon, Shannon M. Tomlin, Without Fail, TED J. Afton Showcase. East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

MON 28

THE DEAD HORSE CANTINA & MUSIC HALL. Eye Empire, 3 Years Hollow, Impending Lies. McKees Rocks. 440-915-6990.

TUE 29

ALTAR BAR. Black Veil Brides. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. Ramona Falls, Nevada Mountains, The Show. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Donora, Mark Ramsey, Greg Dutton. South Side. 412-431-4950. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series feat. Matt Booth. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 30

ALTAR BAR. Hot Water Music. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Jupiter Vinyl. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5993. CLUB CAFE. Kopecky Family Band, The Eastern Sea. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Gotobeds, Outside World. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. ROCK BOTTOM. Good Brother Earl. Waterfront. 412-462-2739.

DJS THU 24

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Throwdown Thursdays w/ Tracksploitation. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. Transmission: Classic Alternative Dance Party. South Side. 412-381-3497.

FRI 25

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff

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Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. CABARET AT THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ CABARET AT THEATER Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. SQUARE. Salsa Friday. Downtown. 412-325-6769. 412-325-6769. SAVOY RESTAURANT. Latin Savoy CATTIVO. Tongue & Groove. Night. Strip District. 412-281-0660. Queer, trans, lez, gay dance SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day party feat. DJ Real Estate, chill. House music. aDesusParty. Tiny Whiny & Bratty Lil Sis. East Liberty. 412-362-6001. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. House Music w/ Hana. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Yo Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Mammas Big Fat Booty Downtown. 412-874-4582. Band. Lawrenceville. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. 412-682-0177. Mt. Washington. 412-344-7619. www. per ROWDY BUCK. Top pa pghcitym 40 Dance. South Side. .co 412-431-2825. MOONDOG’S. Jimmy RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night Adler Band. Blawnox. w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-828-2040. 412-381-1330. ROY’S BY THE TRACKS. Ruff House. Finleyville. 724-348-7118.

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 25

FULL LIST ONLINE

BLUES FRI 25

SAT 26

1139 PENN AVE. Hot Mass. Late Night Dancing. Disco, House, Techno. 21+ BYOB. 2am-8am Sunday morning. Downtown. BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. CATTIVO. Superstar DJ Terry Kicks. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CJ’S. DJ Mighty Men. Strip District. 412-642-2377. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Do Sum’n Saturday Reggae w/ Dan Dabber. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Vex. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Mt. Washington. 412-344-7619. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

SUN 27

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Give A Man A Break. Sunday night soul w/ DJ Ian Friend. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. RIVERS CASINO. DJs Bill Bara & Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 29

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Groove Tuesdays. Djs provided by 720 Music. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

WED 30

AVA BAR & LOUNGE. DJ Outtareach. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611.

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DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Gary Belloma & The Blue Bombers, Pat Scanga. Robinson. 412-489-5631. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. MOUSETRAP. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Beaver. 724-796-5955. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. The Olga Watkins Band. Downtown. 412-471-9100. THE R BAR. Jimmy Adler. Dormont. 412-445-5279. ROMAN BISTRO. The Witchdoctors. Forest Hills.

CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CROWNE PLAZA HOTEL. NAT w/ Walt Maddox. A tribute to Nat King Cole. Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roby “Supersax” Edwards. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Laura Wiens Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

THUR, JAN 24 • 9PM ROCK/BLUES FROM BUFFALO NY

DIVE HOUSE UNION (BENEFIT FOR PROJECT BUNDLE UP) $5 SUGGESTED DONATION FRI, JAN 25 • 9PM FUNK/SOUL

SUN 27

YO MAMMAS BIG FAT BOOTY BAND

CROWNE PLAZA HOTEL. NAT w/ Walt Maddox. A tribute to Nat King Cole. Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. ELWOOD’S PUB. Jeff Pogas. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Kenny Blake. North Side. 412-904-3335. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Jazz Conspiracy. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

SAT, JAN 26 • 9PM ROCK

CHROME MOSES, THE ME TOOS, AND FEARLESS BEASTS MON, JAN 28 • 9:30PM

OPEN STAGE WITH CRAIG KING TUE, JAN 29 • 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES

TUE 29

ANDYS. Mark Strickland. Downtown. 412-773-8884. WQED MULTIMEDIA. Jesse Cook. Oakland.

MATT BOOTH LEADS A TRIBUTE TO THE MUSIC OF GUITARIST BILL FRISELL OPEN FOR LUNCH

WED 30

Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

ANDYS. Lisa Hindmarsh & Daniel May. Downtown. 412-773-8884. DANTE’S RESTAURANT & LOUNGE. Jerry & Lou Lucarelli. Brentwood. 412-884-4600.

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017

CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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www.thunderbirdcafe.net

WED 30

CAFE NOTTE. Billy Heid. Emsworth. 412-761-2233.

JAZZ THU 24

ANDYS. Joe Negri. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

FRI 25

ANDYS. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CROWNE PLAZA HOTEL. NAT w/ Walt Maddox. A tribute to Nat King Cole. Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Horn Guys, The Boilermaker Jazz Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Andrea Pearl Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

SAT 26

ANDYS. Trevor McQueen. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593.

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

ACOUSTIC THU 24

BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Brian Belonzi. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. SHADOW LOUNGE. Steve Thompson. East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

LOCAL TWEETS

Recent dispatches from the music Twittersphere @DJBonics (DJ Bonics)

The most important thing about djing is TIMING. @jdeicher (JD Eicher)

FRI 25

OUTTA MY HEAD DIGITAL EP

Now Available On iTunes

SAT 26

See Craig at

The Altar Bar February 1st 7:30pm

thealtarbar.com

BRUSHCREEK INN. Jay Wiley of The Hawkeyes. Warrendale. 724-935-9141. ELWOOD’S PUB. Jeff Pogas, Mike Huston. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. MARS BREW HOUSE. Rick Bruening. Mars. 724-625-2555. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. OLIVER’S POURHOUSE. Matt Otis. Greensburg. 724-836-7687. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band, Grand Ole’ Ditch. North Side. 412-224-2273. PENN BREWERY. Steve, Charity, & Bill of Big Leg Emma. North Side. 412-237-9400. TWIN OAKS LOUNGE. The Seams. White Oak. 412-916-6962.

SUN 27

HAMBONE’S. Ukulele Jam Session w/ Steel City Ukuleles. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

Three incredible interpreters of song…. World-class trumpeter Sean Jones teams up with international jazz star Gregory Porter and renowned songstress Carolyn Perteete for an unforgettable Valentine’s Day celebration of music, love and passion.

Cabaret Theater February 12, 2013 • 7:30 & 9:30 For tickets, call 412 456 6666 or visit trustarts.org

Oh good, the “Free Bird” shouter left the show early

COUNTRY THU 24

ELWOOD’S PUB. Midnight Rooster. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

SAT 26

RODNEY’S LOUNGE. Michael Christopher. Irwin. 724-864-3222.

CLASSICAL FRI 25

WED 30

SAT 26

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. MOONDOG’S. Acoustic Open Stage. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PARK HOUSE. Dodgy Mountain Boys & the Park House Jammers. North Side. 412-596-2743.

WORLD FRI 25

PENN BREWERY. Autobahn Band. North Side. 412-237-9400.

REGGAE HARD ROCK CAFE. Ana Popovic. Station Square. 412-481-7625.

OF LINCOLN CENTER WINDS & PIANO. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131. ONE SINGULAR SENSATION. Tribute to Marvin Hamlisch feat. Idina Menzel, Lucie Arnaz, Robert Klein, more. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 25

BOCKTOWN BEER & GRILL. Singer Songwriter Night. North Fayette. 412-788-2333.

THU 24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013

@opusoneprod (Opus One Production)

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Mozart’s Symphony No. 40 feat. Michael Francis, conductor & Christian Tetzlaff, violin. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

TUE 29

24

If your songs are like your children, then I think recording might be like sending them off to college.

ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin The Troubadour. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Bill Ali & Matt Barranti. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. SEWICKLEY HOTEL. Jay Wiley of The Hawkeyes. Sewickley. 412-741-9457.

THE WOODEN NICKEL. Gary V. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

SAT 26

LEMONT. Sal Ventura. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

FULL SUN 27 LIST E EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN ONLwIN w.

w CHURCH. Chancel Choir. paper pghcitym PITTSBURGH CIVIC Biblical Broadway feat. .co ORCHESTRA. Upper St. songs from Joseph & the Clair High School, Upper Amazing Technicolor DreamSt. Clair. 412-279-4030. coat, Godspell, Jesus Christ Superstar, PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY more. East Liberty. 412-441-3800. ORCHESTRA. Mozart’s Symphony HEINZ CHAPEL. University of No. 40 feat. Michael Francis, Pittsburgh String Quartet. Oakland. conductor & Christian Tetzlaff, 412-624-4157. violin. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Balcony Big Band. Warrendale. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY 724-799-8333. ORCHESTRA. Mozart’s Symphony No. 40 feat. Michael Francis, conductor & Christian Tetzlaff, CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. violin. Heinz Hall, Downtown. Hello Donny: A Showtunes 412-392-4900. Sing-Along. http://trustarts. culturaldistrict.org/event/3941/ hello-donny-a-showtunes-singCHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY along. Downtown. 412-325-6769.

MON 28

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WED 30

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January 23 - 29 WEDNESDAY 23 Heartless Bastards

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Dead Confederate. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Reel Big Fish ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests The Pilfers & Dan P. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

THURSDAY 24

Sean Jones Presents... Duets: Sean & the DJ AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. 412-338-8742. Tickets: culturaldistrict.org. 7p.m.

Who’s Bad The Ultimate Michael Jackson Tribute Band JERGELS RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. Tickets: jergels.com. 8p.m.

newbalancepittsburgh.com guest Suzanna Choffel. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 7p.m.

Ana Popovic HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests Mia Z & Jeff Fetterman Band. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

SUNDAY 27

The Tender Land by Aaron Copland

FRIDAY 25

CHOSKY THEATRE Oakland. Tickets: music.cmu.edu or 412-268-2407. 2p.m.

Take Action Tour feat. The Used STAGE AE North Side. With special guests We Came As Romans, Crown the Empire & Mindflow. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

Off The Wall 2013: Tammy Faye Starlite: Chelsea Mädchen ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. 412-237-8300. Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

MONDAY 28

THE USED

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25 STAGE AE

Balcony Big Band

greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

Mozart’s Symphony No. 40

Comedian Mark Eddie & Dueling Guitars

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through Jan. 27.

LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Over 18 show. Tickets: latitude40pitt.com/ tickets. Through Jan. 26. 8p.m.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets:

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9:30p.m.

Emancipator

CULTURAL DISTRICT Downtown. 412-456-6666. Free. For more info visit trustarts.org. 5:30p.m.

JERGELS RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. No cover. For more info visit jergels.com. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 29 Black Veil Brides

REX THEATER South Side. 412ALTAR BAR Strip District. 381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: 412-263-2877. With special greyareaprod.com. 9p.m. guests William Control & T uesdays Too Late. All ages Wakey! Wakey! show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or CLUB CAFE South Side. 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m. 412-431-4950. With special

SATURDAY 26 Get The Led Out

Gallery Crawl

Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band

Mr. Greengenes

PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 8p.m.

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25


MUSICAL MEMORIES

THE CASE WAS FUELED BY ANXIETIES AND TENSIONS RATHER THAN CAREFULLY INVESTIGATED

{BY AL HOFF} Things at the well-appointed country estate for retired musicians are about to be shaken up by a new resident, but with a bit of understanding, it all gets sorted out. That’s Quartet in a nutshell, but you won’t be seeing Dustin Hoffman’s light, cozy comedy, adapted from Ronald Harwood’s play, for the plot. The film boasts an A-list of gracefully aging British actors — Maggie Smith, Tom Courtenay, Michael Gambon, Pauline Collins and Billy Connolly — as well as a deep back bench of lesser-known opera singers, classical musicians and assorted performers (including “Manuel” from Fawlty Towers).

SYSTEM FAILURE Half a quartet: Pauline Collins and Maggie Smith

There’s some piffle about a benefit concert, which lets Hoffman slip in some musical numbers, and a not-particularlymelodramatic subplot about an operatic quartet long ago fractured by romantic failings. (Courtenay and Smith are the still-aggrieved parties.) These characters all exist in one of those rarefied, tightly curtailed British bubbles (similar to last year’s Exotic Marigold Hotel) where the rest of the world, and much of modern life, barely seem to intrude. But what of reality in a home for the aged and theatrical? The film’s pleasures are in seeing old friends bantering, sniping and simpering, as well as celebrating the game supporting players, who are still warbling and trilling away after all these years. Starts Fri., Jan. 25. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Jason Statham never gets tired of playing the cheeky criminal who shoots, jumps and recklessly drives his way out of (or into) trouble. Parker is another one: In this actioner from Taylor Hackford, Statham plays a thief looking to get back at the crew that double-crossed him. Starts Fri., Jan. 25.

{BY AL HOFF}

E

VERY NOW and then, a not-so-uncommon crime explodes into national consciousness, and becomes the flashpoint for other larger, unresolved societal issues. So it was on April 19, 1989, when a young white female jogger was beaten and raped in New York City’s Central Park. Amid a media frenzy, five black and Puerto Rican teen-age boys were swiftly apprehended and charged; later, they were convicted and sent to jail. More than a decade later, the sentences were vacated; they hadn’t done it. What happened — what went very wrong and why — is the focus of The Central Park Five. The documentary is co-directed by Sarah Burns (who wrote a book on the case), her father (and noted documentarian) Ken Burns and her husband, David McMahon. Because the response to the crime reflected the time and place, the filmmakers first set the scene. In the late 1980s, New York City was a city reveling in a new period of ostentatious wealth, but also reeling from institutional poverty,

Center of the storm: Yusef Salaam, during the trial

violence spurred by the crack wars and youth gangs, and media-driven racial flare-ups. It was the perfect Petri dish for the jogger case to be blown up and fueled by anxieties and tensions rather than carefully investigated. For the psychic good of the city, the crime simply had to be solved.

THE CENTRAL PARK FIVE

DIRECTED BY: Ken Burns, Sarah Burns and David McMahon Starts Fri., Jan. 25. Regent Square

CP APPROVED In contemporary interviews, the Central Park Five — Antron McCray, Kevin Richardson, Raymond Santana, Kharey Wise and Yusef Salaam — recount the events of that night, their subsequent interrogation, and how, in matter of hours, they confessed to a crime they didn’t commit. From the start, the city roared — from bombastic media (who

coined the term “wilding”) and outraged citizens, to politicians and other public figures eager to advance agendas. The filmmakers chiefly use archival footage here, though the occasional journalist, lawyer or public figure reflects back. (There are no interviews with the cops or prosecutors.) Even armchair jurists will be alarmed at how the investigation, interrogation and subsequent trial unfolded. Despite the resolution, this is a grim story. What’s clear in hindsight is a devastating irony: a city so eager to prove that the system worked ultimately only proved how the system failed. It’s a sobering film that details a past injustice, but also puts us on notice. If such an emotionally and racially loaded incident happened today, would the system work any better? Would the media be less complicit and reactionary, and would we just accept the “facts” because they fit a believable story supported by our own prejudices? We can hope, but it seems unlikely. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013


England town, much consternation and several cover-ups ensue — though perhaps not what you’d expect. John Forsythe and Shirley MacLaine star in Alfred Hitchcock’s breezy 1955 comedy, which is closer to a slamming-door stage farce than a murder thriller. 10 p.m. Fri., Jan. 25, and 10 p.m. Sat., Jan. 26. Oaks (AH)

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW

FLASHDANCE. In this heartfelt 1983 drama from Adrian Lyne, plucky Pittsburgh welder and performance artiste Alex (Jennifer Beals) won’t let any of life’s roadblocks keep her from her dream of dancing for the ballet. Or, in this howlingly funny camp classic, a disco-driven bimbo gyrates her wet-T-shirted way out of South Side titty bars and changes classical ballet forever with her bumpand-grind routine. What a feeling! To be screened in Hecklevision, in which derisive live tweets appear on screen, supplied by comedy crew Hustlebot. 9 p.m. Sat., Jan. 26. Hollywood. $10.

HAN SEL AN D GRETEL: WITCH HUN TERS. Jeremy Renner and Gemma Arterton star as a re-imagined Hansel and Gretel, bounty-hunters who track witches. Tommy Wirkola directs this actioner. Starts Fri., Jan. 25. MOVIE 43. A lot of big names — Naomi Watts, Hugh Jackman, Kate Winslet, Halle Berry, Richard Gere and many more — show up in this raucous comedy. It’s a compendium of short films, stitched together by a plot device that should inspire caution: Three kids search the Internet for the best (worst?) banned movies. Also, there are 12 directors listed. Starts Fri., Jan. 25.

Holy Motors

REPERTORY

VIN TAGE SKATEBOARD MOVIES. Catch a 1976 short, “Skateboarding Safety,” to be followed by a rare screening of Jason Cameron’s 1975 Australian doc The Ultimate Flex Machine. Presented by local skate shop Scumco & Sons. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 23. Melwood. $5 REVEAL THE PATH. A bicycle documentary from the same team that brought you last year’s Ride the Divide. In this film, Mike Dion’s cameras follow world-class bikers as they pedal through some of the world’s most visually stunning — and physically challenging — locales. Filmed on four continents, the riders traverse mountains (Nepal), valleys (Scotland), beaches (Alaska) and deserts (Morocco). The screening is a benefit for BikePGH. 7 p.m. Thu., Jan. 24. SouthSide Works. $10 in advance at www.imathlete.com/events/ revealthepath; $15 at door GENOCIDE: WORSE THAN WAR. Mike DeWitt’s 2009 essay, which originally screened on PBS, follows Daniel Jonah Goldhagen as he examines various genocides across the globe. Screens as part of Duquesne’s Human Rights Film Series. 7 p.m. Thu., Jan. 24. 105 College Hall. Duquesne University, Uptown. Free. www.duq.edu SUSHI GIRL. Kern Paxton directs this crime thriller about an uneasy reunion of thieves. One has just been released from prison, after spending six years keeping his mouth shut. But at the celebratory dinner — sushi served on the body of a naked woman at an isolated restaurant — tensions run high. Who’s hiding what, and why? 7:30 p.m. Thu., Jan. 24; 9 p.m. Fri., Jan. 25; and 7 p.m. Sun., Jan. 27. Hollywood

OF MR. BAKER. It’s a strong sign CP BEWARE you’re in for a wild ride when this documentary opens with its subject — legendary rock drummer Ginger Baker — smashing the director, Jay Bulger, in the face with his cane. As we learn, Baker is prone to outbursts of bad or inexplicable behavior, even in his dotage, but fortunately, he’s also an amusing raconteur. His interviews with Bulger form the narrative spine of this biographical doc. It begins in Baker’s troubled youth and his early digressions into jazz and drugs (both lifelong love affairs), through the formation of the massively influential rock band Cream and seemingly a dozen other mind-bending, short-lived rock bands, to his current stint on a South African horse farm. Bulger checks in with various estranged colleagues, including Cream’s other two members (Eric Clapton and Jack Bruce), as well as family members and stilladoring contemporary musicians. There’s a great store of archival footage, from demented-looking 1960s British TV shows to Baker wandering through Nigeria in a dashiki. You may have reckoned that the infamously self-destructive, drug-addled madman of the drums was long dead. Well, he ain’t, and he’s got the swinging cane to prove it. 7 p.m. Fri., Jan. 25; 7 p.m. Sat., Jan. 26; and 4 p.m. Sun., Jan. 27. Hollywood (AH) HOLY MOTORS. Leos Carax’s film about film (and other things) is a heady and headchallenging ride. We tag along with “Oscar” (Denis Lavant), an actor portraying various characters throughout the day, using his limo as a dressing room. When Oscar exits the limo, he is variously a wild man, a grumpy dad, an assassin, an old woman and so on. The scenes likewise run the gamut from melodrama, satire and digitally rendered fantasy. Reduced as such, Holy Motors sounds coherent, but

instead it’s an audacious romp through a funhouse of narratives, themes and visuals. By turns, it’s frustrating and funny, tedious and thrilling, oblique and obvious. Much about Holy Motors is openended: It could be a satire, a character(s) study, an homage to performance and cinema (plenty of nods here for the cineaste), a rumination on everyday role-playing, a poke in the eye from some arthouse elitist, or all of the above. In French, with subtitles. Fri., Jan. 25, through Tue., Jan. 29. Melwood (AH)

A CLOCKWORK ORAN GE. In Stanley Kubrick’s 1971 adaptation of Anthony Burgess’ satiric novel, we follow the exploits of young Alex (Malcolm McDowell), a troubled youth of the near future with a penchant for ultra-violence, who is ordered by the authorities to undergo “reconditioning.” The film continues a Saturdaynight series of Oscar classics. Midnight, Sat., Jan. 26. Manor BLAZIN G SADDLES. OK, so cowboys and beans don’t mix, but Mel Brooks’ riotous send-up of Westerns, riddled with gleefully offensive jokes, holds together just fine. Brooks’ 1974 laughfest starring Gene Wilder, Cleavon Little and the incomparable Madeline Kahn concludes a monthlong, Sunday-night series of films that were mindblowing when released. 8 p.m. Sun., Jan. 27. Regent Square SAVIN G FACE. The 2012 Oscar-winning short, from Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy and Daniel Junge, documents doctors in Pakistan who help women scarred in domestic attacks. Also screening: “Killing Us Softly 4,” the latest program in Jean Kilbourne’s series, this one focusing on gender bias in advertising. Screens as part of Duquesne’s Human Rights Film Series. 7 p.m. Tue., Jan. 29. 105 College Hall. Duquesne University, Uptown. Free. www.duq.edu GROUNDHOG DAY. In this neo-classic 1993 charmer from Harold Ramis, Bill Murray plays a Pittsburgh weatherman who gets trapped in a time loop while covering the annual festivities in Punxsutawney. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Jan. 31. AMC Loews. $5

CP

Movie 43 THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY. When a dead body is discovered in the woods outside a sleepy N ew

AN DY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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27


[ART REVIEW]

“HEY, MAYBE YOU’D NEVER COME TO AN ART GALLERY, BUT YOU SHOULD CHECK THIS OUT.”

REC-ROOM PUNK {BY ROBERT ISENBERG}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ROMPER ROOM continues through Feb. 3. SPACE Gallery, 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7723 or www.spacepittsburgh.org

28

[ NI [I [INITIATIVE] NITI TIAT TI ATIV AT IVE] IV E]]

SPREADING

THE WORD

Cat-alyst: Romper Room

Romper Room, now showing at SPACE Gallery, is supposed to be about youth. And really, what could be more sophomoric than a skateboard ramp, walls of graffiti and racks of knickknacks? To mature adults (read: sellouts), Romper Room looks less like installation art than a giant roomful of debris — action figures, drawings, an overturned shopping cart, etc. But to a messy young punk rocker, the seven-artist exhibit is a rebellious utopia. Taken as a whole, Romper Room is as noisy as a teen-ager’s bedroom, but when you zoom in on the details, the in-jokes surface. One standout is Jae Ruberto’s pair of hanging photographs, “Kevin Driscoll: Boston’s Only Professional Santa and Ventriloquist.” Another is Jen Cooney’s “Tree Fort,” a makeshift tent filled with significant kitsch. You are encouraged to crawl inside, lie on the quilt of rugs and admire the confined scenery. For this critic, Romper Room is eerily nostalgic, because it harkens back to Oakland in the late 1990s. New undergrads won’t recall Tela Ropa, Club Laga, Sombrero Man, the Graffiti Rock Challenge or art films at the old Beehive Coffeehouse. All of these icons have been usurped by chain stores. Fifteen years ago, Forbes Avenue was a place of gritty landscapes and perceived danger, where anarchists skulked in the alleyways and everybody looked stoned, particularly the Miami Subs cashiers. Adventure lurked behind every spray-painted Dumpster. Blink, and you’d find a drum circle beneath an old bridge. If your youth was vibrant and flirted with self-destruction, Romper Room will likely trigger this feeling. To see that rebellious expression revived in SPACE Gallery is a surreal experience, because it’s like trapping a venomous frog in a Mason jar. Romper Room is quirky, eerie, laugh-out-loud funny, but it’s also harmless. Here, adult artists replicate the iconography they surely worshipped as younger people. The guest curator, Ladyboy, has done a commendable job of creating atmosphere, and the place is worth a visit. But there’s a problem: The surfaces aren’t sticky, and the air doesn’t smell of burnt coffee or cigarettes. In real life, this kind of clutter takes slackers months and years to collect. Hippie feng shui is deliberate, yet not forced. If you want to see homage, Romper Room is a creative diversion. If you want to see the genuine article, try Belvedere’s on a Friday night.

{BY CATHERINE SYLVAIN}

A

NYONE WHO’S been to an 826 Na-

tional Chapter knows that they’re .something special. The youth writing and tutoring centers operate behind quirky storefronts in eight cities nationwide, including Washington, D.C., Los Angeles and New York. The organization takes its name from the original 826 Valencia St. address in San Francisco where it was conceived by author and McSweeney’s founder Dave Eggers in a “Pirate Supply Store.” Since July, a nonprofit based on the 826 template called The LAB (“Literary Arts Boom”) has been operating in Garfield, overseen by “lead experimentalist” Paula Levin. Open for business in Penn Avenue’s Assemble gallery is a “Mad Science Supply” pop-up store that provides an outreach tool for The LAB. Behind an array of surreal products for sale — including “Time Travel Capsules” and “Transparent Person Detectors” —there’s a space where kids ages 6 through 18 can come after school for free weekly homework help and tutoring sessions run by volunteers. “Teachers are really crunched for time

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

The LAB’s Paula Levin does a timed writing exercise with Tyrek, age 11, where they exchange work and take turns critiquing and proofreading.

and resources,” says Levin, 32, who began the project as part of her public-policy masters’-degree studies at Carnegie Mellon University “Having a space that’s outside of that system and that pressure is good for everybody.”

THE LAB AT ASSEMBLE 4-6 p.m. Mondays (“Experi-Monday” workshops, free); 3:30-6 p.m. Tuesdays (homework help, free). 5125 Penn Ave., Garfield. 773-425-1531 or www.literaryartsboom.org

Particularly when that space is a little wacky. Along with homework help, The LAB holds free youth workshops every Monday. These “Experi-Monday” sessions provide innovative ways to improve literacy. Past workshops have been devoted to “Choose Your Own Adventure,” kinetic poetry and a four-week “Comics Club” that resulted in a chapbook of student work being published and sold in the storefront. “I read in a report that kids in elementary

school now are going to write more than any previous generation,” says Levin. “It’s technology. So much of the world is sending emails and we’re [inundated] with them. Kids need to be able to write clearly.” The LAB was given a Spark Award by the Sprout Fund, and Levin holds a fellowship from CMU’s Heinz College that allows her to work on the project full time. After six months, The LAB has had more 200 youth participants, 40 volunteers and a regular crowd at the Tuesday homework help sessions. While kids from any community are welcome, most who have visited so far are from surrounding neighborhoods. At one I attended, in December, Levin hadn’t finished chalking the blackboard that advertises the two-hour open house before R.J., 10, had snuck up behind her and tickled her. A Garfield local, R.J. attends Arsenal School and has been coming for homework help consistently enough to have a rapport with the volunteers. After completing The LAB’s weekly writing prompt, he attempted to charm his way out of doing his math


“Ten, 15 years ago, you wouldn’t want to walk through this neighborhood at night,” says Boyer. “It’s great to know there’s a place you can drop your kids off in a healthy, creative environment where they are safe and there’s a structure where they can learn. The more you reach out to the community and say, ‘Hey, maybe you’d never come to an art gallery, but you should check this out,’ the better.” Levin is branching out from the 826 model by incorporating forays into science. One writing workshop was devoted to hybrid inventions, and Levin is interested in having LAB students involved in creating the mad-science-themed products for the storefront. She is eager to collaborate with those with scientific backgrounds as well as artists and teachers. “We can’t be everything,” Levin repeatedly laments. She intends The LAB to eventually become 826 Pittsburgh — though applications for 826 affiliation are closed until next January — and move into its own location. For the time being, The LAB is still experimenting.

IN THE MOMENT {BY STEVE SUCATO}

Wendell Cooper {PHOTO COURTESY OF KARIM PARRIS}

Volunteer tutor Karryn Lintelman reads The Tortoise and The Hare to Faith, age 5.

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

[DANCE]

homework so he could paint the mural in Assemble devoted to expressing “Why I love Garfield.” The “Mad Science” storefront proved a lure for Obi, 9, who attends Waldorf School. He had decided to drop in for the first time after his mother purchased him some Mix N Cats toy-cat parts in the store. He mouthed “This is awesome,” and told his mother she could leave him to finish his homework and discuss fantasy novels with the volunteers. “Mad Science” seems an apt metaphor for how The LAB blends groups and ideas. Aside from sharing space with Assemble, Levin frequently collaborates with the artand-technology gallery on programming. The LAB creates a structure in which artists who are new to Garfield can connect with more established neighborhood families. Volunteers at The LAB have included mixed media artist Sam Perry, 23; comic-book artist Everett Glenn, 27; and Gene Boyer, 46, president of a local construction company.

TA S T E

Gia Cacalano says it was the lure of the ocean’s smell and distant sound that beckoned her and her 7-year-old daughter to continue a long hike that led them to an as-yet-unseen Atlantic. The pair’s nature adventure this past summer, in Bangor, Maine — coupled with the anticipation of her daughter seeing the ocean for the first time — inspired the dancer-choreographer’s new solo work, “The Property.” It’s the first of three pieces on her latest Gia T. Presents program at Wood Street Galleries on Jan. 26. Set to an original electronica score composed and performed live by longtime collaborator Jeff Berman, the 25-minute work, like all of her dances, is what Cacalano refers to as an “instant composition.” It’s a form of improvisation she describes as “choreography in the moment of choice.” The work will also feature an abstract background video by guest artist Wendell Cooper (a.k.a. Complex Stability). In addition to providing video compositions for all three works on the program, Cooper, a Pittsburgh native now living in New York City, will dance in two of them, including a 20-minute version of his solo work “[Bodied].” Cooper is a practitioner of naturebased healing. Like Cacalano, he subscribes to a form of instant composition in his dance works. In “[Bodied]” (which contains adult subject matter), he will improvise a blend of urban dance forms including breakdancing and voguing with contemporary modern dance. He’ll also rap and sing to create a performance experience that he says “began as a memoir and channels a powerful stream of my family karma as a queer, indigenous, multimedia performance-based healing artist.” In a video clip of a prior performance on Cooper’s website, the work revealed a marriage of the flamboyance of gay night-club dancing with a complex narrative about fragmented sensory perception and how our minds and bodies process stimuli and information. The final piece on the program, “Duet,” will pair Cacalano and Cooper in a 15-minute dance framed around several preconceived choreographic phrases that the two will use as jumping-off points for their “instant composition.” Following this Pittsburgh premiere, Cacalano and Cooper will perform the program in late February in Manchester, England.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

a aSTEVEN DIETZ kKIM MARTIN

FEBRUARY 1-17

GET TICKETS NOW AT

412-392-8000 41412 2-39 3922-88000 39 80 0 WW WWW.PITTSBURGHPLAYHOUSE.COM WWW W PITT TTSB SBURG Ronald Allan-Lindblom artistic directors%ARL(UGHESproducing director

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GIA T. PRESENTS 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 26. Wood Street Galleries, 601 Wood St., Downtown. $10. Reservations at giatc3@ yahoo.com +

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[PLAY REVIEW]

LESS MIZ {BY TED HOOVER}

VIVE LA RÉVOLUTION! Meet me at the barricade, comrades, and we’ll overthrow the nasty French aristocracy! But first, let’s sing about it for three hours. To celebrate the 25th anniversary of its Broadway premiere, the fourth national tour of Les Misérables pulls into town as part of the PNC Broadway Across America series. The sweep! the saga! the spectacle! ... haven’t necessarily made it onto the tour bus, but God knows you get a hell of a lot of music. Les Miz (as we glitterati like to call it) was an entry in, and driving force behind, the “popera” musical-theater movement of the ’80s. Beginning with CATS, these shows were entirely through-sung, with no dialogue and lots of lush melodies, intense romanticism and — above all — tons and tons of stage pageantry. Taken from the Victor Hugo novel, Les Miz is about this guy named Jean Valjean, who was jailed for stealing a loaf of bread and 17 years later is still being chased by Inspector Javert. (That

But it’s a huge hit, so what do I know? I also must confess that this tour leaves me cold. Touring productions are, by design, cut down and streamlined. It’s an economic necessity. But the only thing CATS, Les Miz et al. have going for them is spectacle. Les Miz is known for its famous revolving stage and physical grandiosity. But this is Les Miz-lite; no revolve and limited proportions, with projections on the back wall meant as a replacement. Which turns out to be a problem: Take away the spectacle of Les Miz and you’re left with, well, Les Miz — which, since it’s based on a 1,300-page novel, is really only a musicalized version of a Cliff’s {PHOTO COURTESY OF DEEN VAN MEER} Notes’ Les Misérables. The Les Misérables cast asks, “Where did the rest of the Broadway production go?” Andrew Varela sings the role of Javert Atkins Diet really screws you up.) Along chael Schönberg’s score is both overblown with a great deal of power and intenthe way Valjean adopts a little girl, dedi- and underdeveloped and the English lyr- sity, serving as a perfect counterpoint to cates his life to God and ends up fighting ics, by Herbert Kretzmer (original French the lyrical yearnings of Peter Lockyer’s Valjean. I’d hate to be Genevieve LeClerc, in a French Revolution that’s not the one who, playing Fantine, has to sing “I you’re thinking of. LES MISÉRABLES Dreamed a Dream,” which I overheard It’s impossible to overstate what a continues through Sun., Jan. 27. many people in the lobby calling “the Suworldwide phenomenon Les Miz has Benedum Center for the Performing Arts, 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-456-6666 san Boyle song.” But LeClerc has a great become. In some countries, theaters were or www.pgharts.org voice and does very well. built specifically to house the show; it’s All in all, it’s a very professional probeen on Broadway two different times; text by Alain Boublil and Jean-Marc Na- duction of a somewhat reduced theatrical and now, of course, there’s the movie. I can’t really say I’m a fan. Claude-Mi- tel), are what is known as “serviceable.” juggernaut. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

POWER PIXELS 2013 Miguel Chevalier Music: Jacopo Baboni Schilingi

Wood Street Galleries Opening Reception + Gallery Crawl: Friday, January 25th, 5:30–9pm WoodStreetGalleries.org 412 471 5605 Wood Street Galleries is FREE and open to the public. Miguel Chevalier, The Origin of the World, 2012

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013

A project of:


GALLERY CRAWL

fourth floor, cont.

Eclectic Laboratory Chamber Orchestra (E.L.C.O.) > Music from Beck’s only-available-assheet-music album, Song Reader. Performances at 6:15, 7:15 and 8:15pm.

Pittsburgh Print Group > Examining the end of time.

2. SPACE 812 Liberty Avenue

6. Harris Theater

Romper Room > Jen Cooney, Jae Ruberto, Jacob Ciocci,

809 Liberty Avenue

Matt Barton, Thad Kellstadt, Jim Lingo and Ladyboy. Guestcurated by Ladyboy. Music by DJ Dave Zak. Human Touch Project > The newest body of sculptural work by artist Phoenix Savage.

Harris Theater Short Films > Selections from the

3. Cell Phone Disco Tito & Exchange Way A surface that visualizes the electromagnetic field of an active mobile phone. Several thousand lights illuminate when you make or receive a phone call near the installation.

4. Shaw Galleries 805 Liberty Avenue

2nd Annual Bad Art Sale! > Bad art, picture frames, mats, art books, gently used art supplies!

5. Trust Arts Education Center 805-807 Liberty Avenue Peirce Studio (lower level)

CONSOL Energy Hot Spot > Re-energize with this Pittsburgh-based producer of coal and natural gas. Continuum Dance Company > Excerpts of THE MOVEMENT, created by Sarah Parker. Performances at 6, 7 and 8pm.

2012 Three Rivers Film Festival competitive shorts program.

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All official Gallery Crawl locations are marked with a CULTURAL DISTRICT STOP sidewalk sign. FREE BIKE PARKING where designated. All locations universally accessible unless noted.

19. 709 Penn Gallery

947 Liberty Avenue

709 Penn Avenue

StarKist Charlie’s Hall of Legends > Original

Fabrizio Gerbino > Paintings, drawings and installations inspired by our post-industrial landscape.

pieces from the ToonSeum permanent collection, featuring some of the world’s most iconic cartoon characters.

12. August Wilson Center for African American Culture 980 Liberty Avenue

20. 707 Penn Gallery 707 Penn Avenue

Craig Freeman: Cartoon Nihilism > Nihilism, depression and suicide through the cartoon world.

Glamazonia by Mario Epanya > Images of Black women celebrate the beauty and diversity of the Diaspora.

21. Symbiotic Collusion

The Nazi Olympics: Berlin 1936 > Exploring the

131 Seventh Street Appalachians in Charge of Visual Culture by Derek Reese.

courage and triumph of athletes who boycotted, participated in or were barred from the Games. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix > Imagery, film and oral history narratives dedicated to honoring and preserving Black culture in Southwestern Pennsylvania. 971 Liberty Avenue, 2nd Floor Gallery [not universally accessible] Art by Keith Schmiedline and live music by Dylan Reynolds.

7. 811 Liberty Avenue

14. Urban Pathways Gallery

Arcade Comedy > The brand new Arcade Comedy

914 Penn Avenue

Theater in the Cultural District, featuring Pittsburgh’s best sketch, improvisational and alternative comedy year-round. Time to Play! arcadecomedytheater.com

The Heart is Lonely... > Student artwork based on the works of Jacob Lawrence; Poetry Slam at 6 and 7:30pm; plus the Sounds of Steel steel pan band.

8. Catholic Charities Susan Zubik Welcome Center

15. CAPA 111 Ninth Street

212 Ninth Street

Future Memories, Future Myths > Works by CAPA

Creative Reuse > During the fall of 2012, students

Visual Arts students and curated by Rafael Abreu-Canedo.

at Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild took part in a unique after-school art course, creating art from materials supplied by the Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse.

16. Future Tenant

9. Awesome Books

created from reclaimed and urban wood.

929 Liberty Avenue An independent bookstore offering new and used books.

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11. Toonseum

linocuts inspired by classic films.

second floor

materials, you supply the creativity.

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Celebration: Associated Artists of Pittsburgh >

Carnegie Library > Button-making! We supply the

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Loren Kantor > Prints from carved woodcuts and

10. 937 Liberty Avenue

fourth floor

8 6 7 AWB

Tiny Harris Gallery

third floor A showcase of AAP’s members’ work.

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sponsors:

new, self-generative video installations, including the world premiere of Digital-Archi (Meta Cities).

REET

Text “CRAWL” to SMASH (76274) to receive special exclusive offers and more!

Power Pixels 2013: Miguel Chevalier > Two

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Visit TrustArts.org or call 412-456-6666 for more info.

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Presented by THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST Department of Education and Community Engagement. All information and locations are subject to change.

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FREE ADMISSION TO ALL EVENTS.

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Friday, Jan. 25, 2013 5:30–9pm

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in the Cultural District

21. Night Market 3 131 Seventh Street Bringing together some of Pittsburgh’s most creative independent vendors, artists and desserts to an indoor market.

22. Katz Plaza Seventh Street & Penn Avenue Steel Town Fire: Intricate moves on poi, snakes, swords and other burning props. 6:30, 7:30 and 8:30pm.

23. Backstage Bar 655 Penn Avenue

Symphony of Colours > Work by Kim Freithaler, June Kielty, Nadya Lapets and Vickie Schilling. Live Music by Jason Kendall Duo.

24. Arthur Murray Dance Studio 136 Sixth Street (above Melange Bistro) [not universally accessible]

Free Dance Lessons and Demos > Swing at 7:30pm. Bachata at 8pm. Salsa at 8:30pm.

819 Penn Avenue

Best of Arbor Aid with Tree Pittsburgh > Works

25. Boutique 208 208 Sixth Street A retail boutique featuring locally-handmade wares.

17. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council

26. Robot Repairs

810 Penn Avenue, Suite 200

Six x Ate: Sound, Time, Space > Local artists from

by Fran Gialamas that reflect the past steel industry.

210 Sixth Street Is your robot experiencing technical difficulties? Consider visiting this place for a potential fix.

an ongoing dinner and lecture series of the same name.

18. Bend Yoga

27. Dream Cream Parlor

808 Penn Avenue, 2nd Floor

539 Liberty Avenue Designated ice cream flavor sales are contributed to causes in exchange for community service of the recipient.

Art on the Walls: Steel-Life II > Photo assemblages

Pittsburgh Playwrights Theater Lobby (third floor) Twinning Photography > Trying to twin one hundred Africans with their African American lookalikes.

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Free Yoga Class at 7pm > Pre-registration is recommended. Email: mcallan@bendyoga.com.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

01.2401.31.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., JAN. 24

Rutledge (Camelot’s Hayden Tee). Tonight is the first preview performance, with opening night set for Feb. 1. Ted Pappas directs. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Show continues through Feb. 24. O’Reilly Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15-60. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

{OPERA}

In Italian composer Domenico Cimarosa’s 18th-century opera il Matrimonio Segreto, Paolino and Carolina secretly marry. Complications arise in this complex romantic comedy, newly staged by Pittsburgh Opera at Downtown’s CAPA Theater. The show, conducted by Sarah Jobin, stars Pittsburgh Opera resident artists, with tenor Juan Jose de Leon as Paolino and soprano Meredith Lustig as Carolina. The opera is performed in Italian, with English text projected above the stage. Tonight is a special preview performance, with four more to follow. Jeff Ihaza 7 p.m. Show continues through Feb. 3. 111 Ninth St., Downtown. $40.75 (additional performances $50.75). 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghopera.org

{STAGE}

With its cast of 26, plus an orchestra, 1776 is billed as Pittsburgh Public Theater’s biggest production ever. And that’s not even counting the larger-than-life characters and storyline in the 1969 Sherman Edwards and Peter Stone

+ FRI., JAN. 25 {DANCE}

JAN. 25

Mark Eddie

musical about the drama surrounding the signing of the Declaration of Independence. The show, a critical and commercial Broadway success, was successfully revived in 1997. It centers on the efforts of Congressman John Adams (played by George Merrick, pictured) to corral signatories. Other luminaries include Jefferson (Keith Hines, from the Public’s Camelot), Franklin (Steve Vinovich) and Edward

The Pillow Project keeps seeking new twists on dance. This weekend, Pearlann Porter’s company premieres the feature-length version of her Backlit in a Whole New D. The approach matches the improvisational style Porter calls “Freejazz” with an innovative lighting scheme that makes everything pop in an extra dimension … after you put on those familiar goofy glasses, that is. The hour-long, non-narrative work features dancers Riva Strauss, Zek Stewart, Grant Haralson, Anna Thompson and Taylor Knight performing to instrumental music by The Beastie Boys. Plus, enjoy “mini-martini/jazz sessions” before and after each of the four performances. BO 8 and 11 p.m. Also 8 and 11 p.m. Sat., Jan. 26. $10. 412-225-9269 or www.pillowproject.org

{ART}

JAN. 25

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CASSIE KAY}

Backlit In a Whole New D

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013

World-renowned French digital artist Miguel Chevalier unveils new work at Wood Street Galleries. This pioneer of virtual art is known for works like his interactive virtual island in Sao Paolo and “Seconde Nature,” a permanent virtual garden in Marseilles. (In 2006, he exhibited his animated video map “RGB Land” at Wood Street.) Power Pixels 2013 includes the world premiere of Chevalier’s self-generative video installation, “Digital-Archi (Meta Cities).” The opening is part of the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s quarterly Gallery Crawl, an evening of free live music, visual art, comedy and more at 27 Downtown venues. BO 5:30-9 p.m. Wood Street:


sp otlight

601 Wood St. Gallery Crawl: Cultural District. Downtown. Free. www.pgharts.org

{COMEDY}

+ SAT., JAN. 26 {STAGE}

In solidarity with a march for gun control in Washington, Live comedy makes its way to the Latitude 40 entertainment D.C, Pittsburgh PACT (Public complex, in Robinson. Starting Action Communitarian Theater) hosts an event tonight, the expansive, VegasDowntown today featuring styled entertainment center opens the doors of its newly opened Latitude Live room to touring comedian Mark Eddie. Eddie, a former Pittsburgher, was a professional rocker before he turned to comedy. He’s known for blending acoustic guitar — and adaptations of hit songs — with his JAN. 31 comedy in a fashion Mária Majda that is “unmatched,” Guessous according to no less an authority than Doors guitarist Robbie Krieger JI 8 p.m. 200 Quinn Drive, Robinson. $5-25. 317-813-6565 or works by a variety of writers www.latitude40pitt.com and performers. The event includes short plays, essays, {ART} monologues and more by local Silver Eye Center presents authors as well as national new exhibits by the winners and international submissions of its annual Fellowship 13 received by New York-based International Photography activist troupe NoPassport Competition. International for a similar event in D.C. Fellowship honoree Diane The works will staged at Meyer offers Time Spent That Might Otherwise Be Forgotten, the California-based artist’s series incorporating cross-stitch embroidery into photographs. The Keystone Award winner (for a Pennsylvania photographer) is Ross Mantle, whose California, Pennsylvania reflects the experience of road trips from California, Pa., to the Golden State. The opening reception is tonight, a gallery talk by the artists tomorrow. BO 6-8:30 p.m. Gallery talk: 10 a.m. Sat., Jan. 26. Exhibit continues through March 16. 1015 E. Carson St., South Side. Free. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereye.org

Bricolage Productions’s space with help from area actors, directors and other stage artists. Local groups CeaseFirePA and One Pittsburgh are co-sponsors. JI 4 p.m. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. pghpact@gmail.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ANGFAZZ PHOTOGRAPHY}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LISA RAYMOND}

What costume shall the poor girl wear? Nico donned many roles, from model and actress to Warhol superstar, Velvet Underground chanteuse and cult-favorite solo artist. The German-born Nico died in 1988, a seeming enigma. But to performance artist Tammy Lang — best known as her evangelical country-singer alter ego Tammy Faye Starlite — Nico is graspable, if mysterious. In 2010 stage show Chelsea Mädchen, Starlite embodies Nico in what’s largely a recreation of a wide-ranging 1986 radio interview. Interspersed are incharacter renditions of Nico’s Velvets classics (like “All Tomorrow’s Parties”) and signature covers: Bowie’s “Heroes,” The Door’s “The End,” “My Funny Valentine,” backed by a live band. She also dishes on Lou Reed, John Cale and paramours like Bob Dylan and Jim Morrison. A performance for The Andy Warhol Museum’s Off the Wall series is the show’s first outside New York or Los Angeles. Starlite, long smitten with Warhol, loves Nico’s Warholesque interviews. “I’m a big fan of non sequiturs,” she says in a phone interview, and Chelsea Mädchen is surprisingly comic. She sees Nico as less mysterious than nihilistic, or simply fatalistic: “I don’t think the surface of the world mattered to her.” But Nico’s music rang true. “There was nothing false about any way that she sang,” says Starlite. “There was nobody like her.” Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Fri., Jan. 25. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $20-25. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

+ SUN., JAN. 27 {STAGE}

Each year, Dreams of Hope and its youth performance troupe create an original stage show to raise awareness about LGBT issues. Employing spoken word, movement, drama, percussion and song, they visit community centers, churches, universities, high schools, corporate-diversity events and union halls, and conclude each show with a youth-led discussion. But before this year’s Department of Hope hits the road, they’re previewing it for free today, at the August Wilson Center for African American Culture. Department of Hope imagines an academy where “agents of change” expose policies and rules that work against people with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or

JAN. 30

Sheet Cake

allied identities. BO 4 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. www.dreamsofhope.org

Besides hits like “The Way We Were,” Hamlisch was known for his long association with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, for which he was Principal Pops Conductor. Tonight, the PSO honors him with One Singular Sensation, a star-studded tribute featuring the likes of Idina Menzel (singing “What I Did for Love” and more), Lucie Arnaz, Robert Klein, Kevin Cole and many more. Net proceeds benefit the Marvin Hamlisch Pops Artistic Excellence Fund. BO 7:30 p.m. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $35200. 412-392-4900 or www. pittsburghsymphony.org

+ TUE., JAN. 29 {MUSIC}

By the time of his death this past August, at age 68, there was almost no big award Marvin Hamlisch hadn’t won for his composing, from three Oscars to a Pulitzer.

+ WED., JAN. 30

JAN. 24

{COMEDY}

1776

A good sheet cake is one that effortlessly — and deliciously — blends its component parts. The members of improv group Sheet Cake are bakers in this regard, blending the longform wit of Sara Micnowski’s troupe The Leaky Basement

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH PUBLIC THEATER}

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with Neva Boyd and Viola Spolin’s short-form work. Their newfangled comedic confection is served at the Pittsburgh Improv tonight, in the group’s debut. JI 8 p.m. 166 E. Bridge St., West Homestead. $5. 412-462-5233 or www. pittsburgh.improv.com

+ THU., JAN. 31 {MUSIC}

Award-winning folk singer Mária Majda Guessous, known as Mesi, brings traditional Hungarian music to Hazelwood today, with a multicultural twist. Mesi, whose father is Moroccan, also includes Turkish and Moroccan tunes in her repertoire. As part of her U.S. tour, she and two accompanists on traditional instruments perform tonight at the First Hungarian Reformed Church of Pittsburgh. The concert is co-sponsored by New York’s Hungarian Cultural Center. BO 6:30 p.m. 221 Johnston Ave., Hazelwood. $10-12. 800-848-7366 x136 C L A S S I F I E D S

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VISUAL TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

ART

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

THEATER 1776. Story of how we went from 13 colonies to the United States of America. Tue-Sun. Thru Feb. 24. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. THE CHELSEA ARMS. A musical by Ernest McCarty, Jr. Thru Feb. 2. Carnegie Library, Homewood. 412-731-3080. DEPARTMENT OF HOPE PREVIEW SHOW. Through “secret agent” themed acts, the Dreams of Hope Youth Performance Troupe explores the idea of serving as agents of change. Sun., Jan. 27, 4 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700. FLIGHT FROM HIMSELF. One-man show by Mark C. Thompson about a man who looks back on his life & discovers a way to escape his fear. Fri, Sat. Thru Jan. 26. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 412-489-5840.

ITALIAN AMERICAN Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. RECONCILIATION. A comic 412-237-8300. folktale by John Patrick Shanley. Thru Jan. 26. Butler Little Theatre, Butler. 724-287-6781. LES MISERABLES. Tue-Sun. Thru Jan. 27. Benedum Center, COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK Downtown. 412-456-4800. MINTO. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, NO CLUE. Murder Mystery Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. Dinner Theater presented PITTSBURGH IMPROV by Musical Mysteries JAM. Thu. Thru Feb. 28 & More. Sat., Jan. 26, Cabaret at Theater 6:30 p.m. Lamplighter Square, Downtown. Restaurant, Delmont. 412-325-6769. 724-468-4545. SCHITZ N GIGGLZ w. w w SEMINAR. Four COMEDY NIGHT. er hcitypap g p aspiring, young novelists Hosted by Brad Ryan. .com learn that the hardest 8:15 p.m. Obey House, part of writing fiction is Crafton. 412-922-3883. facing the facts. Tue-Sun. Thru Feb. 10. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. COMIC WARS: EBONY & TAMMIE FAY STARLITE: IRONY VS. HAMILTON CHELSEA MÄDCHEN. BURR(NS). Stand-up & improv Tribute to Nico, feat. musical challenges. 8 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & performances as well as dialogue Grill, North Side. 310-909-6446. based on actual encounters FRIDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. the German model had w/ Fri, 9 p.m. Thru March 29 Toros journalists. Fri., Jan. 25, 8 p.m. Performance Lounge, Friendship. 412-657-4245. PITTSBURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE W/ MIKE WYSOCKI. Fri, 9 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995.

COMEDY THU 24

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 25

FRIDAY NIGHTS

FRI 25 - SAT 26

BEN BAILEY. Jan. 25-26 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233. MARK EDDIE & DUELING GUITARS. Jan. 25-26, 8 p.m. Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

VIDEO DJ’S 10:30PM -2AM

FRIDAY NIGHT $3 Miller Lite 16oz Drafts

$3 Pinnacle Vodka Flavored Cocktails

$5 MARTINIS

SAT 26

DAVID KAYE, LIONEL HAMILTON, LISA DAPPRICH. Funny Fundraiser. 6:30 p.m. Port Vue Fire Hall, McKeesport. 412-672-4303. JOHN EVANS, SALLY BROOKS, RON PLACONE. Funny Fundraiser. 6 p.m. Monessen Elks #773, Monessen. 724-288-0331. MATT WOHLFARTH COMEDY SHOW. 8 p.m. Troy Hill Volunteer Firehall, Troy Hill. 310-909-6446. SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. For new & experienced improvisers. Sat, 6:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, North Side. 412-322-1000.

MON 28

TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, North Side. 412-322-1000.

TUE 29 1060 Settlers Ridge Center Drive - Robinson Township CadillacRanchGroup.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013

ANTHONY KAPFER, JOE PERA, DAVE MAJOR, DICKIE CONTINUES ON PG. 35

“Yellow” by Jardley Jean-Louis, from the 12th Annual Art Inter/National Exhibition at Box Heart Gallery

NEW THIS WEEK

937 LIBERTY AVE. SIX x ATE: Sound, Time, Space. Feat. work by David Bernabo, Lizzy De Vita, Ben Hernstrom, Sara McCool, Nina Sarnelle, more. Opening Jan. 25, 5:30 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-471-6070. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Urban Gurlz Go Downtown. Installation art by Marylloyd Claytor Dance Company. Jan. 25, 5 p.m. Downtown. 412-882-5509. AWESOME BOOKS DOWNTOWN. Moon Calling. Paintings by Richard Rappaport. Opening Jan. 25, 6 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-1899. CULTURAL DISTRICT. Gallery Crawl in the Cultural District. Free, festive showcase of arts & entertainment at galleries & arts spaces throughout the Cultural District. Jan. 25, 5:30-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. MASTERPIECE CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Grand Opening & Meet the Artists. Jan. 26-27, Feb. 2 & 3. North Versailles. 412-888-6188. SHAW GALLERIES. Bad Art Sale. Jan. 25-26. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Projects by Diane Meyer & Ross Mantle. Work by Fellowship 13 photography competition winners. Opening reception: Jan. 25, 6-8:30 p.m. Gallery talk: Jan. 26, 10 a.m. South Side. 412-431-5777. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Miguel Chevalier: Live. New self-generative video installations, includes the world premiere of Miguel Chevalier’s latest work, Digital-Archi (Meta Cities). Opening reception Jan. 25, 5:30 - 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

ONGOING

707 PENN GALLERY. Cartoon Nihilism. New Works by Craig Freeman. Downtown. 412-456-2962. 709 PENN GALLERY. The Painting as Object. New work by Fabrizio Gerbino. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Jeremy Kost: Friends w/ Benefits. Photography. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. Printwork 2012. National juried print exhibition feat. over 20 artists. North Side. 412-321-8664. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Dream. Paintings by Sue Vincent. Oakland. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOXHEART GALLERY. The 12th Annual Art Inter/National. Invitational group show exploring space and how the immediate environment affects the artistic process. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Cory Arcangel: Masters. Repurposed readymade digital technology. Yours Truly: Privately Collected Photographs. 80 vintage prints by some of the most celebrated photographers of the 20th century. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. EASTSIDE GALLERY. Ruth Levine. Estate sale of paintings & drawings. East Liberty. 724-433-1179. FE GALLERY. Words for Poems.

Installation by Laurie Trok. Lawrenceville. 412-254-4038. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Revealing Place: Photographs from Missouri, Pennsylvania & Texas. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Best of Arbor Aid. Artwork created from salvaged & reclaimed wood initially displayed at Tree Pittsburgh’s annual Arbor Aid fundraiser. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALLERIE CHIZ. Architectural Perspectives: Places & Planes. Work by Guglielmo Botter & Ben Saks. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Genexodus. Handmade paper cuttings by Theodore Bolha. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GAY & LESBIAN COMMUNITY CENTER. Royal Portrait Show. Drag portraits. Downtown. 412-422-0114. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Valencia. 724-316-9326. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Landscape Expressions. Work by Lynn Fero. Downtown. 412-392-8008. MATTRESS FACTORY. Feminist and.. Group show. Ongoing Installations. North Side. 412-231-3169. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Imperfect Health: The Medicalization of Architecture. Feat. photographs, sculpture, architectural models & drawings, that together examine the relationships CONTINUES ON PG. 36


EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

LEFTFOOT. NYC Comedy Night. 9 p.m. Shadow Lounge, East Liberty. 412-363-8277. OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

Let Freedom Sing! EVENT:

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. tribute, Sixth Mount Zion Baptist Church, East Liberty

WED 30

IMPROV W/ SHEET CAKE. 8 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233. JOKEE OAKEE. Comedy open stage hosted by Tonnochi:B. Wed Younger’s, North Side. 412-452-3267. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

CRITIC: Denise Hughes, 40, a media and communications consultant from East Liberty

WHEN: Sat.,

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. The Nazi Olympics: Berlin 1936. An exhibit exploring 1936 Olympic Games including use of propaganda, the boycott debate, history of the torch run, & the historic performance of Jesse Owens. Curated by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Inventing the Modern World: Decorative Arts at the World’s Fairs, 1851–1939. Furniture, metalwork, glass, ceramics, textiles, & jewelry produced by Herman Miller, Tiffany, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Empowering Women: Artisan Cooperatives that Transform Communities. Folk art objects illustrating the power of women. BugWorks. Feat. beautiful photography of insects, amazing specimens, & live bugs! Life: A Journey Through Time & Population Impact thru Jan., Winging It: Experimental Gallery About Birds thru March, Lord of the Crane Flies thru April. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501.

Jan. 19

I was so happy to come tonight as a way to express and honor the work of Dr. Martin Luther King. This year’s celebration brought the best of the best in terms of choirs and in terms of races. It’s beautiful to see all races from black, white to Asian all here celebrating the legacy of Dr. King. It’s very important and beautiful to see. My favorite performance was the multi-choir that features a lot of high school choirs as well as the Sixth Mount Zion Choir in Pittsburgh. I especially loved their performance of “Total Praise,” one of my favorite gospel songs. B Y JE F F IH AZ A

FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501.

features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Orchid & Tropical Bonsai Show. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Tintypes. Photographs on polished steel that brought the first lower-cost, indestructible photos within price

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE

In the 1800s, Old Economy Village was home to the Harmony Society, a Christian communal group. Now a National Historic Landmark, the site has been restored to give visitors a firsthand look at 19th-century life. Historically minded volunteers are currently needed to be tour guides. Recruitment meetings will be held at 10 a.m. on Sat., Jan. 26, and Wed., Jan. 30. Call 724-266-4500 x110 or visit www.oldeconomyvillage.org for more information. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church

range of the average person. North Side. 412-231-7881. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 18811986. Homestead. 412-464-4020.

Pizza & Beer Night tuesdays

SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the antislavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Badges & Buttons, Waistcoats & Vests. Highlights badges by 20 makers from the US & the UK. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 12. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. Scottdale. 724-887-7910.

$15 large pizza & pitcher domestic beer FREE POOL all night

Wind Up wednesdays

$2 Miller Lite Drafts til 12am FREE POOL all night ½ off Select Appetizers 9-11pm

Thirsty thursdays

$7 Yuengling Pitchers til 12am $4 Absolut Vodka 10-12pm

Eat, Drink & Dance fridays & saturdays S.I.N sundays

FESTIVALS SAT 26

$2 Bud Light Drafts til 12am

7TH ANNUAL WISR WINE FESTIVAL. 2-5 & 6-9 p.m. Days Inn, Butler, Butler. 724-283-1500.

01.25 Tongue & Groove Dance Party 01.26 Hanging Garden goth/industrial night

DANCE SUN 27

146 44th Street Lawrenceville PA 15201 412.687.2157 www.cattivo.biz Check our website & Facebook page for more events

WORLD KALEIDOSCOPE: CHILE TRADICIÓN. 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, 412-622-3151.

FUNDRAISERS THU 24

POUR FOR A CURE. Beer sampling w/ 27 beers, hors d’oeurves, music, more. Benefits the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 5:30-8:30 p.m. The Wintergarden, Downtown. 412-395-2868. REVEAL THE PATH SCREENING. Benefits BikePGH. 7 p.m. SouthSide Works Cinema, South Side. 412-381-7335. TRANSPLANT FUNDRAISER. Silent auction, pasta & appetizer bar, more. Proceeds help Geri Whalen offset the cost of kidney & pancreas transplants. 5 p.m. Del’s Restaurant, Bloomfield. 412-860-8805.

SAT 26

FROSTBITE 5K. Benefits ABOARD Autism Connection of PA. 8 a.m. North Park Boathouse, Allison Park. 412-980-0085. SOPA HOOPS SATURDAY. Pitt-Greensburg vs. Pitt-Bradford women’s/men’s basketball tournament. Benefits Special Olympics Pennsylvania Westmoreland County. 2 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg. 724-837-7040.

EDNESDAY WE

ACOUSTIC MUSIC

SUN 27

ALLEY UP FOR ANIMAL FRIENDS. Bowling event benefiting Animal Friends. 12-2 & 3-5 p.m. Legacy Lanes, Baldwin. 412-847-7055. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by

with Mike De Luca $2 Yuengling

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KARAOKE with DJ Hyatt $2 Coors Light

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

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appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. SOUP N’AT. A community meal to help raise funds for local artists. 6-8:30 p.m. The Brew House, South Side. 505-449-7108.

LITERARY THU 24

3 NIGHTS ONLY! NEXT: Girlfriend Film’s XXX Star, is HERE LIVE:

Angela Sommers

CHRIS GUILLEBEAU. Author of The $100 Startup. Hamburg Hall. 12 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. Thu The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323.

FRI 25

FEBRUARY 13-16 AMATEUR

Wed. Jan NITE . 23 135 9th Street 412-281-7703 www.blushexotic.com DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

OAKLAND OPEN MIC. Poetry, music & political speeches welcome. Second and Fourth Fri of every month, 7 p.m. 610-731-1804.

SAT 26

BATTLE OF THE SLAMS. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Collective. 7 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 814-229-3393.

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 34

between design & health. Oakland. 412-268-4754. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Healthy Artists Movie Poster Exhibition. 20 local artists compete to design a poster representing the Healthy Artists documentary series. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MONROEVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY. Watercolors by Phiris. Work by Phiris Katherine Sickels. Monroeville. 412-372-0500. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Cheers, Salute, L’chaim To The Next 50! Group show. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Get Drawn. Work by Sylvia K. & Sarina Meester. Garfield. 412-328-4737. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Kodachrome Works. Work by Sam Ditch. Bloomfield. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Faces & Places: Photographs of Old Economy. Ambridge. 724-266-4500. PANZA GALLERY. Play. Group show. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PICTURESQUE

FINDING THE FUNNY: HOW TO CREATE COMEDY FROM DAILY LIFE EVENTS. Talk by Mike Buzzelli, author of

PHOTOGRAPHY & GIFTS. Photography by Brenda Knoll. Lawrenceville. 412-688-0240. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 12. Work by Melissa Cameron, Betty Vera, & Kevin Snipes. Strip District. 412-261-7003 x 12. SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART. Red, White & Blue in Black and White: The American Scene in Prints, Drawings & Photographs. Ligonier. 724-238-6015. SPACE. Romper Room. Group show. Curated by Ladyboy. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Architecture Transformed. Printmaking & fiber art by Barbara Westman. Here & Now. National printmaking exhibition. Juried by Barbara Westman. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Your Art Needs You. 177 faded or damaged works which visitors can adopt, funding restoration. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

Below Average Genius. 12:301:30 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456.

SUN 27

BLACK HOLES, BEAKERS, & BOOKS: THE HOUSE OF WISDOM. Discussion of the book The House of Wisdom: How Arabic Science Saved Ancient Knowledge & Gave Us the Renaissance by Jim Al-Khalili. 3:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

MON 28

BRING YOUR OWN BARD: SHAKESPEARE’S FAVORITES. Informal scene night, actors & non-actors read works of Shakespeare. 7:30 p.m. Te Cafe, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-6406. OUT OF THE GUTTER: GRAPHIC NOVEL DISCUSSION GROUP. 6:30 p.m. and Third Mon of every month, 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

KIDSTUFF THU 24 - WED 30

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. CHARLIE & KIWI’S EVOLUTIONARY ADVENTURE. Join Charlie as he travels back to the Age of Dinosaurs to discover how evolution works. Feat. story theater & discovery area. Tue-Sun. Thru May 12

407 Cinema Drive, SouthSide Works • 412-381-4800 claddaghirishpubs.com 36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013


Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. MISSING LINKS (THE RAINBOW JUMPY). Bounce, jump, roll, run & walk through a 30-foot inflatable “jumpy” art piece created by Felipe Dulzaides. Thru Feb. 3 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

[POETRY]

make a real connection

5.13.01

FRI 25

GIANT EAGLE CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERIES: HEALTHY NUTRITION. 11 a.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. YOUTH MAKER NIGHT. Experience the MAKESHOP after hours. Ages 10-15. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

Every Thursday!

for the same reasons oxygen masks will fall from overhead compartments on doomed airliners crashing.

JANUARY 24

THE DRESSED FRETS JANUARY 31

You were my first collapsed lung of the summer,

FRI 25 - SUN 27

PINKALICIOUS THE MUSICAL. Story of a girl who turns pink after eating too many pink cupcakes. Presented by Stage Right. Jan. 25-27 Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-832-7464.

ROUND BLACK GHOSTS

the rust-colored ink spots scribbled on the page of every poem I never wrote.

FEBRUARY 7

SAT 26

MOVE IT! JUST DANCE TOURNAMENT. 1-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 26 - SUN 27

TARZAN & JANE. Sat, Sun. Thru Feb. 3 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464.

MON 28

WINTER LITTLE SPROUTS: MY FIRST GARDEN. Sing songs, read stories & pot plants to take home. Ages 2-3 w/ an adult. Mon, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

Saturday, the PPC hosts Battle of the Slams at the Union Project. Twenty poets from five cities — including James — will share their work in two rounds, each competing for a spot at the National Poetry Slam. 7 and 9 p.m. Sat., Jan. 26. 801 N. Negley Ave., Highland Park. $5 for one round; $8 for both. Visit www.pghpoetry.org for information.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

SAT 26

TUE 29

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

OTHER STUFF THU 24

CITY DHARMA. Soto Zen Meditation. jisen@deepspringzen. org Thu, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. A GARDEN PRIMER. Beginners vegetable gardening workshop. Presented by Grow Pittsburgh. Thu, 7-9 p.m. Thru Jan. 24 East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-362-4769 x 102.

CITY BUSES

By William James, champion of the Pittsburgh Poetry Collective’s Steel City Slam 2012 Grand Slam. Originally published in Resurgo Magazine.

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MEDITATION & WHOLE LIFE STEP INTO TRANSFORMATION. SNOWSHOES. Supreme Meditation . w Snowshoeing/skiing w w & the Science of paper every Sat. w/ at pghcitym Transformation w/ .co least 4” of snow on Acharya Kedar. Free the ground. Call Friday public program. Doors to confirm. Sat. Thru open at 7:15, seating ends March 30 Jennings Environmental at 8 p.m. 7:15 p.m. Winchester Center, Slippery Rock. Thurston, Upper School, Shadyside. 724-794-6011. 724-420-5826.

OUTSIDE

Call Livelinks. The hottest place to meet the coolest people.

BAND NIGHT

I loved you in the same way I cannot shoot crippled horses,

THU 24 - SAT 26

BE THE BEST YOU ARE BASEBALL CLINIC. Lead by Skip Bertman. Email bethebest@ optimum.net. Jan. 24-26 Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 412-833-5300.

FRI 25

FRONT STREET W/ SARA MCCOOL. A live performance of video artist Sara McCool’s talk show. 5:30-9 p.m. 937 Liberty Ave, Downtown. PHOTOGRAPHER ANDY BLOXHAM. Speaking on “Fictional Photography.” Part of the Speaking Light series. Thayer

Try it Free!

412.566.1861

$1.75 PBR Drafts Everyday 9-11

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282

Ahora en Español 18+

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Hall. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-391-4100. PROJECT POP UP: NIGHT MARKET III. Artists, crafters & food vendors. Part of the Gallery Crawl. 131 7th St., Downtown. 5:30-9 p.m. ROE V. WADE RUBY JUBILEE. Celebrate Roe v. Wade’s 40th birthday w/ drinks, games, & a 1973 inspired dance party. 5:30 p.m. Birmingham Bridge Tavern, South Side. 412-258-9861.

SAT 26

5TH ANNUAL WINTER FROLIC: CELEBRATING OUR AMERICAN HERITAGE. Witness a naturalization ceremony, hors d’oeuvre buffet, live music, more. 6-9 p.m. Westmoreland County Courthouse, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x 215. COMMUNITY ARTS ACTION FOR GUN CONTROL. Readings & performances by local artists, scenes, monologues, reflective essays, video, more. Presented by Pittsburgh PACT. 4 p.m. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999. COMPLIMENTARY FINANCIAL WELLNESS WORKSHOP. 1-2 p.m. Mookshi Wellness Center, Regent Square. 412-407-7829.

Proudly y Served At:

BREWSTONE BEER COMPANY

BELLA LUNA TRATTORIA

RICKS SPORTS BAR & GRILLE

3466 William Penn Hwy Pittsburgh, PA 15235

5060 William Penn Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146

5400 William Penn Hwy Export, PA 15632

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HEALTHY SOUL FOOD EXPO. Taste testing, screening of Soul Food Junkies, more. 1-3 p.m. YWCA, Homewood. 412-361-6433.

[KIDSTUFF]

SAT 26 - SUN 27

MILITARY MONDAYS

BRING IN YOUR MILITARY ID FOR FREE ADMISSION ALL NIGHT LONG!

2 FOR 1 TUESDAYS

2 PEOPLE GET IN FOR THE PRICE OF 1

LADIES

EVERY SATURDAY

THE MEN OF CLUB EROTICA SHOW STARTS AT 9PM!

FREE DRINKS! FREE LIMO PICKUP TO THE CLUB! CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM 18 AND OVER

824 Island Ave. McKees Rocks

(412) 771-8872

cluberoticapittsburgh.com

NUCLEAR COWBOYZ. Freestyle motocross show. Jan. 26-27 Consol Energy Center, Uptown. 412-642-1800.

SUN 27

1ST ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION & OPEN HOUSE. Maternity & baby clothing swap, giveaways, more. 1-4 p.m. Shining Light Prenatal Education, Lawrenceville. 412-915-61671. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. JCC’S 14TH BIRTHDAY BASH. Fitness demos, scuba lessons, children’s activities, more. Jewish Community Center of the South Hills, Scott. 412-278-1975 x 204. KEAN QUEST TALENT SEARCH. Voice competition in six rounds benefiting St. Barnabas Free Care Fund. Sun., Feb. 24, Fri., March 1, Sun., March 10, Sun., March 17 and Fri., April 5 Kean Theatre, Gibsonia. 724-443-0800 x 5310. MYSTICAL PSYCHIC FAIR. 12-5 p.m. West Mifflin Fire Hall #3, West Mifflin. 724-348-8063. STEEL CITY ROLLER DERBY: BATTLE OF THE ‘BURGH. 5 p.m. Romp & Roll Skating Rink, Glenshaw. 412-486-4117.

TUE 29

FINANCIAL FORECASTING SEMINAR. w/ Marc Tannenbaum. 11 a.m. Longwood at Oakmont, Verona. 1-877-214-8410. GARDENING FOR FOUR SEASONS OF INTEREST. Class focusing on landscaping for a different season, along w/ ideas for hardscape. Tue, 7-9 p.m. Thru Jan. 29 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

WED 30

BASIC HORTICULTURE. Learn about soils, plant nutrition, & environmental factors that affect plant growth/ development. 7-9 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. CARNEGIE SCIENCE AWARDS. 6 p.m. Carnegie Science Center Omnimax, North Side. 412-237-3400. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013

The story of Tarzan has seen many manifestations, in literature, video games and live-action and animated films. Gemini Children’s Theater offers its take on the well-loved vine-swinger and his lady friend with an original musical, Tarzan and Jane. The play is interactive, so audience members can step on stage and become part of the story. 1 and 3:30 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays through Feb. 2. 7501 Penn Ave., Point Breeze. $10-12. Call 412-243-5201 or visit www.geminitheater.org.

AUDITIONS CARNEGIE PERFORMING

ARTS CENTER. Auditions for Cinderella. Feb. 9. Ages 5+, call for time slot & more information. Carnegie. 412-279-8887. KEAN THEATRE. Kean Quest Talent Search Vocal Competition is accepting registrations. All ages. http://www.keantheatre.com/ Gibsonia. 724-443-0800 x 5310. MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. Accepting resumes & inquiries for anyone interested in directing a main stage or www. per fundraiser show. a p pghcitym Deadline is .co Feb. 28. Send resumes to timmylovesursala@ yahoo.com McKeesport. 412-673-1100. NEW HORIZON THEATER, INC. Auditions for Black Pearl Sings! Black female in late 20s to early 40s & white female in early 20s to late 30s. Call 412-431-0773 & leave your contact information. RWS & ASSOCIATES ENTERTAINMENT, INC. Auditions for paid roles in productions that will take place across North America. Feb. 3. Male/female singers, dancers, actors & musicians. Auditions@RWSandAssociates.com Point Park University, Downtown. 212-391-1795.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUBMISSIONS CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD OF PITTSBURGH NEW MEMBER SCREENING. Open to 3dimensional artists living within 100 miles of Pittsburgh. Drop off work at 12:15pm Feb. 10, at Pgh Center for the Arts. Applicants should submit 6 original works of art, completed within the last 2 years. For information, visit www.craftsmensguild.org or email jimwinegar@gmail.com. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SIGNIFICANT & SUBLIME: THE CRITICAL ROLE OF ART TEACHERS IN PUBLIC EDUCATION. Seeking paintings, drawings, photography, sculpture, prints, & mixed media by current public school art teachers. Submit 3-5 JPEG images, artist statement & questions to: significantand sublime@gmail.com Panza Gallery, Millvale. 412-821-0959. WILDCARD. Accepting art based on theme of “love” for upcoming show, I Heart Art. Visit http://wildcardpgh.com/ for entry form. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.


{BY DAN SAVAGE}

A friend of mine is a crossdresser considering transitioning. He came out to a female friend he hadn’t seen in awhile, and she told her that she wanted her to come to her house fully dressed for some hot sex. I told her to go for it, saying gender-transgression play is potentially hot. This girl (hereafter known as “Evil Bitch”) backed out as soon as my friend arrived, but took her out to dinner (still fully dressed) as consolation. N ow my friend is telling me that Evil Bitch messaged a bunch of mutual friends he wasn’t out to, outing my friend to them. After my friend told Evil Bitch that what went down between them was private, Evil Bitch just responded with “LOL k,” and THEN posted pictures from their dinner date — fully dressed — on her Facebook. Is there anything my friend can do? She’s freaking out and thinks Evil Bitch ruined her life.

for doing this has NOTHING to do with religion and everything to do with AVOIDING PREGN AN CY. And, yes, I think it would be nice to give the man I marry a rare gift on our wedding night. And with my experiences over the past seven years, I believe I will be able to keep my future husband quite happy in the bedroom. NO NAME

Anal is a highly effective birth-control method, and there’s only one known case of someone getting pregnant through oral sex. (Google around.) But anal intercourse is also the most effective means of HIV transmission — 18 times more effective than vaginal intercourse — so I hope you’re using condoms. And one quibble: If technically you’re still a virgin, then technically my husband is a virgin, too. Yeah … no. Your vagina might be a virgin, but you’re not.

YOUR VAGINA MIGHT BE A VIRGIN, BUT YOU’RE NOT.

FRIEND OF CROSSDRESSER BETRAYED BY EVIL BITCH

Your pronouns are all over the place. Your friend is a he, then a she, then a he, then a she. So I’m gonna stick with “Your Friend,” despite how clunky it makes my response, because I can’t tell how Your Friend identifies. Twenty years ago, Your Friend could’ve told Your Friend’s relatives and friends that Your Friend got dressed up for a laugh — and that Your Friend can’t understand why Evil Bitch is misrepresenting what they did that night. But I can only assume that Your Friend and Evil Bitch exchanged emails, swapped texts, etc., so Your Friend shouldn’t accuse Evil Bitch of lying. That will prompt Evil Bitch to post emails and texts to Facebook, which will make things worse. Since Your Friend can’t turn this around, Your Friend can only get out in front of it. Your Friend is out about the crossdressing now, at least, and Your Friend should embrace being out with as much grace and courage as Your Friend can muster. Paradoxically, the more at peace with being out Your Friend appears to be, the fewer people Your Friend will be outed to. If Your Friend acts like Your Friend couldn’t care less who knows, malicious assholes will be less likely to spread it around. I’ve known a few people who were outed by malicious shits — outed as gay or kinky or swingers or poly or all of the above. It hurts and it can turn a person’s life upside down. But most of the people I’ve known who were outed looked back on the experience a year or two later with … well … not with gratitude, but they woke up one day happy to be free of the stress of keeping their big secret. Maybe Your Friend will feel the same way. In the meantime, offer Your Friend your support, and get in the face of anyone who gives Your Friend any grief. I just read your column about evangelical girls “saddlebacking” (having anal sex in order to preserve their virginities). I am a 21-year-old and have been sexually active since age 14. I engage in oral and anal sex. I have never had vaginal intercourse, so technically I am still a virgin. My reason

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PAULIN E “DEAR ABBY” PHILLIPS: I grew up reading both Eppie “Ann Landers” Lederer in the Chicago Sun-Times and Pauline “Dear Abby” Phillips in the Chicago Tribune. I always preferred Ann’s column — did you know they were twin sisters? — and I’m actually sitting at Ann’s desk, which I bought at auction after her death, as I write this. But I have a newfound appreciation for Abby after reading Margalit Fox’s terrific obit in the New York Times (read it here: tinyurl.com/ abbyobit). The obit ends with the most famous three-word response in the history of the advicecolumn racket: Dear Abby: Two men who claim to be father and adopted son just bought an old mansion across the street and fixed it up. We notice a very suspicious mixture of company coming and going at all hours — blacks, whites, Orientals, women who look like men, and men who look like women. This has always been considered one of the finest sections of San Francisco, and these weirdos are giving it a bad name. How can we improve the neighborhood? — Nob Hill Residents Dear Residents: You could move. Phillips wrote that decades ago — back when adult gay men often resorted to adopting their adult partners because it was the only way to secure legal protection for their relationships. I don’t think anyone working in this genre will ever top it. My sympathies to Jeanne Phillips, Pauline’s daughter and the current author of the Dear Abby column. QUEER READERS: Help advance psychosocial research, and include the LGB community in research, while examining critical questions about the effect of rejection in the lives of LGB people. Adults (18–49) of all sexual orientations are needed for an important study on the relationship between sexual orientation, rejection and the attachment system. Go to surveymonkey. com/s/attachmentandalienation to learn more and participate.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

01.23-01.30

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “N obody can be exactly like me. Even I have trouble doing

whom you might evolve into at some later date, and instead just love your crazy, mysterious life exactly as it is.

it.” So said the eccentric, outspoken and hard-partying actress

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

Talullah Bankhead (1902-1968). Can you guess her astrological sign? Aquarius, of course. Her greatest adventure came from trying to keep up with all the unpredictable urges that welled up inside her. She found it challenging and fun to be as unique as she could possibly be. I nominate her to be your role model in the next four weeks. Your assignment is to work extra hard at being yourself.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

The Dardanelles Strait is a channel that connects the Black Sea to the Mediterranean Sea, separating Europe from Asia. In some places it’s less than a mile wide. But the currents are fierce, so if you try to swim across at those narrow points, you’re pushed around and end up having to travel five or six miles. In light of the current astrological omens, I’m predicting that you will have a comparable challenge in the coming days, Pisces. The task may seem easier or faster than it actually is. Plan accordingly.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

The German government sponsored a scientific study of dowsing, which is a form of magical divination used to locate underground sources of water. After 10 years, the chief researcher testified, “It absolutely works, beyond all doubt. But we have no idea why or how.” An assertion like that might also apply to the mojo you’ll have at your disposal, Aries, as you forge new alliances and bolster your web of connections in the coming weeks. I don’t know how or why you’ll be such an effective networker, but you will be.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

The United States Congress spends an inordinate amount of time on trivial matters. For example, 16 percent of all the laws it passed in the last two years were devoted to renaming post offices. That’s down from the average of the previous eight years, during which time almost 20 percent of its laws had the sole purpose of renaming post offices. In my astrological opinion, you Tauruses can’t afford to indulge in anything close to that level of nonsense during the next four weeks. I urge you to keep timewasting activities down to less than five percent of your total. Focus on getting a lot of important stuff done. Be extra thoughtful and responsible as you craft the impact you’re having on the world.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

What if your unconscious mind has dreamed up sparkling answers to your raging questions but your conscious mind doesn’t know about them yet? Is it possible you are not taking advantage of the sly wisdom that your deeper intelligence has been cooking up? I say it’s time to poke

around down there. It’s time to take aggressive measures as you try to smoke out the revelations that your secret self has prepared for you. How? Remember your dreams, of course. Notice hunches that arise out of nowhere. And send a friendly greeting to your unconscious mind, something like, “I adore you and I’m receptive to you and I’d love to hear what you have to tell me.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

In his book Our Band Could Be Your Life, Michael Azerrad says that the Cancerian singersongwriter Steve Albini is a “connoisseur of intensity.” That means he’s picky about what he regards as intense. Even the two kinds of music that are often thought of as the embodiment of ferocious emotion don’t make the grade for Albini. Heavy metal is comical, he says, not intense. Hardcore punk is childish, not intense. What’s your definition of intensity, Cancerian? I see the coming weeks as prime time for you to commune with the very best expressions of that state of being. Be a connoisseur of intensity.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

There’s a butterfly sanctuary at the Como Park Zoo and Conservatory in Saint Paul, Minn.. It’s called the Enchanted Garden. As you enter, you see a sign that reads, “Please do not touch the butterflies. Let the butterflies touch you.” In other words, you shouldn’t initiate contact with the delicate creatures. You shouldn’t pursue them or try to capture them. Instead, make yourself available for them to land on you. Allow them to decide how and when your connection will begin to unfold. In the coming week, Leo, I suggest you adopt a similar approach to any beauty you’d like to know better.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

Do you ever fantasize about a more perfect version of yourself? Is there, in your imagination, an idealized image of who you might become in the future? That can be a good thing if it motivates you to improve and grow. But it might also lead you to devalue the flawed but beautiful creation you are right now. It may harm your capacity for self-acceptance. Your assignment in the coming week is to temporarily forget about

N ovelist Jeffrey Eugenides says he doesn’t have generic emotions that can be described with one word. “Sadness,” “joy,” and “regret” don’t happen to him. Instead, he prefers “complicated hybrid emotions, Germanic train-car constructions,” like “the disappointment of sleeping with one’s fantasy” or “the excitement of getting a hotel room with a mini-bar.” He delights in sensing “intimations of mortality brought on by aging family members” and “sadness inspired by failing restaurants.” In the coming days, Libra, I think you should specialize in one-of-a-kind feelings like these. Milk the nuances! Exult in the peculiarities! Celebrate the fact that each new wave of passion has never before arisen in quite the same form.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

After analyzing your astrological omens for the coming weeks, I decided that the best advice I could give you would be this passage by the English writer G. K. Chesterton: “Of all modern notions, the worst is this: that domesticity is dull. Inside the home, they say, is dead decorum and routine; outside is adventure and variety. But the truth is that the home is the only place of liberty, the only spot on earth where a person can alter arrangements suddenly, make an experiment or indulge in a whim. The home is not the one tame place in a world of adventure; it is the one wild place in a world of set rules and set tasks.”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

My general philosophy is that everyone on the planet, including me, is a jerk now and then. In fact, I’m suspicious of those who are apparently so unfailingly well-behaved that they N EVER act like jerks. On the other hand, some people are jerks far too much of the time, and should be avoided. Here’s my rule of thumb: How sizable is each person’s Jerk Quotient? If it’s below 6 percent, I’ll probably give them a chance to be a presence in my life — especially if they’re smart and interesting. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, Sagittarius, this gauge may be useful for you to keep in mind during the coming weeks.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

The French painter Cezanne painted images of a lot of fruit in the course of his career. He liked to take his sweet time while engaged in his work. The apples and pears and peaches that served as his models often rotted before he was done capturing their likenesses. That’s the kind of approach I recommend for you in the coming days, Capricorn. Be very deliberate and gradual and leisurely in whatever labor of love you devote yourself to. No rushing allowed! With conscientious tenderness, exult in attending to every last detail of the process.

DELIGHT

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

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See what our clients are saying been very In the past two years, I’ve of our ads and ign des the both with satisfied When I know I have the response they evoke. jects in the 24-35 sub arch rese for se to adverti k of using the City thin age group, I immediately Paper. — Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

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You may be eligible to participate if you are: 18-39 years old In general good health Have regular periods Not pregnant or breastfeeding • Are willing to abstain from sexual activity, OR are sexually active and willing to use condoms, OR you are sterilized OR with one partner who has a vasectomy • Are willing to come to MageeWomens Hospital for up to 54 visits over 8 months • • • •

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013


STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES

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We are looking for persons in general good health, and on no prescription or illicit drugs to participate in our paid out-patient studies. Please call our Recruiting Department today at 1-800586-0365

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Are you interested in a long-term method of birth control? YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE IF YOU: • Are a non-pregnant woman between 16 and 35 years old • Are in need of contraception • Have regular periods • Are willing to come to Magee-Womens Hospital to complete up to 14 or more visits over a five year period The Center for Family Planning Research is conducting a research study of an investigational contraceptive intrauterine device (IUD). Participants will receive study-related exams and study-related birth control at no cost. To see if you qualify, please call the Center for Family Planning Research at 412-641-5496 or visit our website at www.birthcontrolstudies.org.Participants will be reimbursed up to $1030 over five years.

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LIVE

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ACROSS

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The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others. 46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.23/01.30.2013

TRACK CONVERSION

1. They’re outside the main stream 7. Quad bike 10. End of the count at the beginning of Kraftwerk’s “Numbers” 14. Bob Fosse Broadway revue 15. Nation with a National Hurling League (NHL) 16. Tri-color side, sometimes 17. With 18-Across, converted version of a 1975 Pink Floyd song 18. See 17-Across 20. Hard dudes, briefly, in ‘90s rap 21. Bespangled Swedish quartet 22. Drink served at a stand 23. Icon on a pole 26. Sheen’s birth name 28. Genre for Peter Gabriel’s “Shakti Monkey,” say 32. Withered 33. European mountain pasture 34. Dear companion? 35. Grammy winner for “Lady Marmalade” 37. See 59-Across 41. One may be wild or golden 42. “Yeah, brah” 43. Certain slitherer 46. Military gp. that can be called into active duty 49. Converted version of 50 Cent’s biggest hit 51. Tabloid’s scoop 54. Back a back, say

55. “Stop. Who would cross the Bridge of Death must answer me these questions three, ___ the other side he see.” 56. Type of stick with a spring 58. Emulating 59. With 37-Across, converted version of an LL Cool J classic 61. Subject of a certain absolute monarchy 65. Device with the digital slave Siri 66. Org. that I kind of just can’t write clues for anymore 67. Person of interest? 68. Man caves, perhaps 69. Foxy? 70. Trembling trees

DOWN

1. Roman 405 2. Bollywood megastar Aishwarya 3. Coast Guard rank: Abbr. 4. Bounced off the walls, say 5. Commissioner of a noted labyrinth 6. Pouch tobacco relative 7. ‘80s hi-fi brand 8. Host for Jennings, Craig, Pahk, and Watson, among others 9. Bump and grind, e.g. 10. Cuban’s remains 11. Create a rift 12. Getting it on demand 13. Remove an eyebrow hair, say

19. Put away some dishes? 23. Ludacris’s “Disturbing ___ Peace” 24. It may be crude or refined 25. NJ has a busy one 27. Birthright renouncer 29. Upvotes 30. Acorn producer 31. Aerosmith video in which Alicia Silverstone’s middle finger was blurred by MTV 35. Sierra Club founder John 36. Hot studio session, perhaps 38. One who may bust you for a dime 39. Off 40. Cautionary ___

44. Try to make things right, in a way 45. MGD alternative 46. Easily forgotten information for a rarely checked account 47. Mexican shawl 48. Ted Nugent, e.g. 49. Starlet of note, for now 50. Use a line on 52. FedEx rival 53. Hands out for a bit 57. Anita of mid-century jazz 58. Beach tone 60. Craigslist postings 62. “___ you threatening me?” 63. Stimpson J. Cat’s partner 64. Agcy. with a filing season {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


IRREGULAR GUY {BY CHRIS POTTER}

EARLIER THIS MONTH, newly elected Western Pennsylvania Congress-

man Keith Rothfus took his first substantive vote — by opposing $9 billion in flood insurance for victims of Superstorm Sandy. Only a small number of hardline conservatives opposed the bill; even local Republicans Tim Murphy and Mike Kelly supported the aid. Rothfus explained that while his “thoughts and prayers go out” to storm victims, disaster aid should be paid for with cuts elsewhere in the budget. Many Pennsylvanians may have been surprised by Rothfus’ vote.

Last year, he campaigned as a “Regular Guy” — a concerned dad who worried about deficits, but was still an actual human being. What about those ads showing him mowing the lawn and fixing his kids’ bicycles? City Paper has learned that the Rothfus team is already working on his 2014 re-election bid. And we’ve gotten an advance copy of a Rothfus TV ad, which suggests how he’ll reconcile his family-guy persona with his extremist beliefs. Here’s a preview. C P OT T E R@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

“I’m Congressman Keith Rothfus. And I believe that governments — just like families — need to have a budget and stick with it. And in the Rothfus family, that means making some tough choices.”

“Sure, I know how to fix things, honey. But only in ways that are revenue-neutral. That’s why I’m taking parts from your bike to fix your sister’s.”

“Our basement flooded last week, doing $20,000 of damage. But I refuse to go into debt to pay for it. Which means that having two Alices in the family is a luxury we can no longer afford.”

“I can’t kick out my mother, because that would alienate seniors — and I won my first election by pretending Democrats endangered Medicare. But Little Alice here ain’t creating any jobs, and we’re wasting a lot of money on education and other ‘social services.’ So …”

“Alice, my thoughts and prayers go out to you. Now get the hell out of the car, and don’t come back until you’ve found a job of your own.

“Now that we no longer have to listen to your little sister whining, there’ll be more capital-gains revenue for the rest of us!”

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

47


EARN ENTRIES

NOW THROUGH JANUARY 31 FOR THE DRAWING ON

FEBRUARY 24 AT 7:15PM 1st place $12,000

4th place $2,000

3rd place $3,000

Wild Card

2nd place $7,000

5th place $1,000

$500 FSP

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January 23, 2013