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Real Estate Weekly

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Saturday, June 17, 2017


Saturday, June 17, 2017

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Real Estate Weekly

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Real Estate Weekly

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Saturday, June 17, 2017


Saturday, June 17, 2017

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Real Estate Weekly

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Real Estate Weekly

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Saturday, June 17, 2017


Saturday, June 17, 2017

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Real Estate Weekly

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Real Estate Weekly

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Saturday, June 17, 2017


Saturday, June 17, 2017

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Real Estate Weekly

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Real Estate Weekly

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Saturday, June 17, 2017


Saturday, June 17, 2017

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Real Estate Weekly

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Real Estate Weekly

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Saturday, June 17, 2017


Saturday, June 17, 2017

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Real Estate Weekly

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Real Estate Weekly

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Saturday, June 17, 2017

Cut energy costs at home Homeowners spend thousands of dollars per year on energy. Whether a home is big or small, energy costs are a concern for homeowners. Though some of the costs of home ownership are beyond a person’s control, there are some steps homeowners can take to reduce energy costs and save substantial amounts of money as a result. • Address any leaks. One of the most effective ways to cut energy costs is to weather strip doors and windows throughout the house. Doing so will keep warm air in the house when it’s cold and prevent drafts that occur when cold air enters the home through cracks and leaks. If a home has an attic, be sure to seal pipes, chimneys or ductwork. Addressing leaks can save homeowners as much as 10 percent on their annual home energy costs. • Use compact fluorescent lightbulbs instead of incandescent lightbulbs. CFLs use one-quarter to one-third less energy than traditional incandescent lightbulbs. In addition, the Alliance to Save Energy notes that CFLs can last up to 10 times longer than traditional lightbulbs. • Be mindful of the thermostat. Most homeowners and their families spend a good portion of their day out of the house. Home heating costs can be reduced by as much as 20 per-

cent if homeowners simply lower the thermostat during the day by 10 F. For homeowners who feel they won’t remember to do so on a regular basis, a programmable thermostat will do the job on its own. • Lower water temperature. Lowering water temperature can also lead to substantial savings. Homeowners can save as much as five percent on their water bill by lowering the temperature on their water heater by as little as 10 F. When doing so, touch the outside of the water heater. If the outside is cold, the water heater has sufficient insulation If the water heater is hot to the touch, wrap a water heater jacket around it to increase efficiency. • Replace older appliances. Older appliances, be it an older central air conditioning unit or an older water heater, often need to expend more energy than they did when they were new. What’s more, especially older appliances might not meet Energy Star standards, which can cost homeowners substantial amounts of money over the course of a year. Homeowners who replace such appliances might be eligible for tax credits when buying more energy efficient products.


Saturday, June 17, 2017

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Real Estate Weekly

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Real Estate Weekly

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Saturday, June 17, 2017

Factors that might hurt a home’s value Nowadays, homeowners looking to sell their homes know it’s not as easy to do so as it might have been a few years ago. A struggling economy has made it difficult for many homeowners to sell their homes for a price they’re comfortable with. But the sagging economy is not the only thing can make it difficult to sell a home. In fact, a host of other things, some obvious but some not so obvious, can hurt a home’s value as well. • Location: A home’s location is arguably its best or worst selling point. A home in a great location won’t be as difficult to sell as a home in a bad neighborhood. But location goes beyond a neighborhood’s reputation, especially in recent years. Homeowners who live in a neighborhood or development with many foreclosures might find those foreclosed properties are hurting their own home’s value. Lots of foreclosures could negatively affect a neighborhood’s reputation, which might make a home within that neighborhood less attractive to prospective buyers. • Appearance: A home’s appearance is another obvious variable that might affect its resale value. Homeowners might want their home to reflect their own individuality, but that’s not going to help when the time comes to sell the home. If the exterior paint is out of the ordinary, then it might be wise to choose a more traditional or conservative color before erecting the “For Sale” sign out front. The same goes for a home’s interior. If the interior design is especially unique, a more traditional interior decor might help the home sell faster. • Size and style: Another thing to consider when selling a home is its size and style. A home that stands out on the block might be an attention-grabber, but that’s not always attractive to prospective buyers. For instance, a colonial sitting in the middle of a street filled with contemporary homes will stand out, but likely for all the wrong reasons. It will likely appear dated and out of place, which is something buyers might not want. In addition, if the home is considerably larger or smaller than the surrounding homes, then this could hurt its value.


Saturday, June 17, 2017

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Real Estate Weekly

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Real Estate Weekly

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Saturday, June 17, 2017


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www.pgcitizen.ca | Real Estate Weekly

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Real Estate Weekly

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Saturday, June 17, 2017

Check your home’s insides before renovating Specialists in the industry suggest that any homeowner planning to renovate should not be too hasty in applying the ‘cosmetics’ of a renovation without investigating the home’s insides first. Homeowners are advised to review the foundations of a home -- the insulation and the infrastructure -- beforehand. Adequately considered, these areas can add significant value to a home. Bringing in an energy rater, inspector or appraiser to examine the home will give a better sense of the required work and avoid any subsequent costly headaches. Replacing traditional insulation with a more energy efficient modern alternative like spray foam insulation can help homeowners address potential problems, such as air leakage and poor insulation. Spray foam insulation, like that available from innovators like Icynene, addresses concerns of airborne irritant and moisture infiltration while reducing monthly energy bills. Inclusion of this modern material may even help increase the market value of the renovated home if put up for sale. Understanding the needs of a home during a renovation rewards homeowners over the long-term. Additional information can be found at www.icynene.com.


Saturday, June 17, 2017

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Real Estate Weekly

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How to create a paver walkway or patio Creating a walkway or patio out of paving stones can add aesthetic appeal to a property. Pavers are less permanent than concrete and decking. As a result, it is easier to change the design later on if you want to give the space a new look. Homeowners who install their own pavers can save a considerable amount of money. Because installing paving stones can be laborintensive, landscape contractors may charge a premium for installation. However, this is a project that can be tackled by the do-it-yourselfer. 1. Measure and plot out the area that will become the path or patio. The area of the space can be figured out by multiplying length times width. This will help you determine just how much material you will need. 2. Visit the home improvement store or a supplier of stone and other masonry supplies to determine the style and color of the paving stones you will use in the project. Some homeowners prefer to have the materials delivered to their home to save the hassle of extra heavy lifting and moving. 3. Using a shovel or a tiller, dig down and remove the grass to a depth of four to six inches from the area that will become the path or patio. 4. Fill in the area you dug out with a paver base material, using a tamper (either manual or power-driven) to tamp down the paver base until it is level and smooth. 5. Apply about one inch of paving sand to further level out the path or patio. This will be the material on which the paving stones are laid. 6. Begin laying the paving stones. Leave the appropriate distance

between stones desired by your pattern. If the paving stones will not have any gap and serve as a continuous patio, leave only the smallest gap between them. 7. Spread more paving sand on top of the paving stones and, using a broom, sweep it over the stones and into the crevices between them to set the stones. 8. Create the rest of the garden design around the patio or pathway using gravel, plants and even edging material to finish the look. Over time you may need to sweep more paving sand over the stones to keep them secure.


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Real Estate Weekly

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Saturday, June 17, 2017


Saturday, June 17, 2017

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Real Estate Weekly

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Real Estate Weekly

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www.pgcitizen.ca | Saturday, June 17, 2017

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