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THE

PRINCE GEORGE

Your 2013 Guide to Northern BC Parks

CITIZEN THE CITIZEN

Northern Explorer PRINCE GEORGE

N O R T H T O F O R T S T J O H N | S O U T H T O Q U E S N E L | E A S T T O VA L E M O U N T | W E S T T O T H E H A Z E LT O N S


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explore yours to

Fort George Park, Prince George. - Lori Smith

cover on the

Climbing near Foothills. – Crystal Patten

THE PRINCE GEORGE

CITIZEN THE

PRINCE GEORGE

The Citizen thanks all those who submitted photos for this publication. Unfortunately not all the great photos we received can be included due to limited space. Provincial Park information courtesy of http:// www.env.gov.bc.ca/ bcparks/ Regional Park information courtesy of http://www. rdffg.bc.ca/

CITIZEN THE CITIZEN

Northern Explorer is a product of the PRINCE GEORGE

A product of

Available on-line at www.pgcitizen.ca General Inquiries 250-562-2441 Publisher: Colleen Sparrow Editor: Neil Godbout Reader Sales: Alan Ramsay Creative: Colleen McComb

Please Recycle northern explorer | 3 | may 2013


parkfinder the

PROVINCIAL PARKS

Arctic Pacific Lakes 56 Bearhole Lake 40 Beatton 44 Beatton River 44 Beaumont 24 Bijoux Falls 38 Bobtail Mountain 18 Bocock Peak 39 Bowron Lake 48 Bull Canyon 47 Butler Ridge 44 Cariboo Mountains 48 Cariboo River 48 Carp Lake 38 Cedar Point 49 Charlie Lake 44 Close To The Edge 57 Crooked River 19 Dahl Lake 16 East Pine 39 Erg Mountain 57 Eskers 19 Evanoff 56 Finger-Tatuk 24 Fort George Canyon 12

Fraser River 12 Giscome Portage Trail 18 Gwillim Lake 40 Heather-Dina Lakes 39 Hole In The Wall 40 Holliday Creek Arch 60 Horsefly Lake 49 Jackman Flats 61 Kakwa 60 Kiskatinaw 41 Kiskatinaw River 41 Kluskoil Lake 46 Lower/Upper Raush 60 Moberly Lake 39 Monkman 40 Mount Pope 30 Mount Robson 62 Mount Terry Fox 61 Mudzenchoot 30 Nazko Lake 47 Nechako Canyon 24 One Island Lake 41 Paarens Beach 25 Peace River Corridor 44 Pine Le Moray 39

Pine River Breaks 39 Pinnacles 46 Ptarmigan Creek 57 Puntchesakut Lake 46 Purden Lake 22 Pyramid Creek Falls 62 Rearguard Falls 61 Slim Creek 57 Small River Caves 60 Sowchea Bay 25 Stuart Lake Marine 30 Stuart River 24 Sugar Bowl-Grizzly Den 56 Sukunka Falls 40 Swan Lake 41 Taylor Landing 44 Ten Mile Lake 46 Three Sisters Lake 16 Tudyah Lake 38 Wapiti Lake 41 West Lake 16 West Twin 60 Whiskers Point 38 White Pelican 47

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REGIONAL PARKS Berman Lake 10 Cedarside 54 George Hicks 54 Giscome Portage 10 Harold Mann 10 John Dahl 38 Koeneman 54 Kristian Winther 10 McMillan Creek 12 Ness Lake 12 Wilkins 12


prince george & area

Wildlife is abundant in the Prince George region and moose is one of the more abundant species visitors can view. I captured this photo at sunrise of a young bull moose sky lined against a red sky last fall. - Greg Blackburn

Spring time in Prince George – frolicking resident eagles at Cottonwood park. A gem of a park situated at the confluence of the Nechako and Fraser rivers with wild life abound. – Jan Bosmann

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prince george & area

These photos were taken on the Norman Lake road, west of Prince George! I would highly recommend a visit to this area, there are many beautiful lakes, and you’ll never know what you’ll spot while traveling down the back roads. – Dollie Morgan I took this photo out at Bobtail Lake, west of Prince George. This little hummer was so friendly, and apprently liked coffee. - Dollie Morgan

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prince george & area

Outdoor activities for young and young at heart abound in the Prince George area. Find your fun on sandy beaches at local lakes or in the bunkers at a local golf course. – Kathy Baker al store, blacksmith shop, barns and other heritage buildings.

Harold Mann Regional Park

Berman Lake Regional Park

Berman Lake Regional Park is located 45km west of Prince George via Highway 16 and Norman Lake Road. The 38 ha park has 3 km of trails. Many of the trails follow the shoreline and naturally formed eskers, which enable access to view a variety of wildlife and the habitat in which they live. Facilities including picnic tables, fire pits, toilets, change houses, canoe launch and a beach with a swimming area. Camping is not permitted.

Giscome Portage Regional Park

Welcome to the Huble Homestead Historic Site located on the scenic Fraser River, 40 km north of Prince George just off highway 97. It is operated by the Huble Homestead-Giscome Portage Heritage Society. Crossing the Arctic Continental Divide, which separates the Pacific and Arctic watersheds, the Giscome Portage provided a short overland link for north and south water-bound travelers. The site includes an original 1912 dovetail log house, genernorthern explorer | 10 | may 2013

Harold Mann Regional Park is located 50 km northeast of Prince George via Highway 16 East and Upper Fraser Road on beautiful Eaglet Lake. The park is 13 ha in size and provides opportunities to view wildlife, especially birds, on the short but scenic trail along the creek, marsh and lake.The large open area of grass provides an open invitation to relax and look at the lake and mountains, or for the more active, a place to put on a friendly game. Facilities include picnic tables, fire pits, toilets, swimming area and change houses.

Kristian Winther Regional Park

Kristian Winther Regional Park is located on the south shore of the Salmon River, 30 km north of Prince George, via the Hart Highway 97. The park is 70 acres in size and has a short ‘loop’ trail (700 metres) that travels along the Salmon River and back through some new growth forest. While on the trail keep an eye out for deer, moose and bear tracks or look into the trees for holes where birds may be nesting. Facilities at the park include picnic tables, fire pits and toilets. Camping is not permitted.


prince george & area

Connaught Hill offers a peaceful and colourful setting for picnics, weddings and quiet contemplation. Walk the perimeter and enjoy the views of Prince George. – Kathy Baker

Kayaking can get you right up close...front row seats for many performances. These ducks put on a show for us in a secluded spot on Dahl Lake, after the cow moose and her calf lumbered off the shore line. – Kathy Baker

The lakes around Prince George provide endless opportunities to explore and photograph nature in all its serene beauty, from early spring until late fall. Kayaking is a peaceful and ecologically sensitive way to go. – Kathy Baker

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prince george & area

McMillan Creek Regional Park

McMillan Creek Regional Park is situated within the City of Prince George . The Park is accessed via the Hart Highway 97 North off Hoferkamp Road. The Park includes the Nechako River cutbanks, and provides a scenic view of Prince George and surrounding landscapes. McMillan Creek passes through a deep ravine surrounded by towering Douglas fir trees. A scenic 2.5 km trail system, starting at the main parking lot, winds through several ecosystems allowing an opportunity to view various different plant species. A shorter, and much easier, 1 km trail brings you directly to the lookout on the cutbanks. Facilities include a picnic table, toilets, interpretative signs regarding the geographic history of Prince George and a safe and scenic view of the city from the cutbanks. Camping is not permitted.

Stone Creek is a short drive from Prince George.. A great place to visit after work, cool off in the creek, go fishing, or spend a weekend at the campground. - Pat Suter

Ness Lake

Regional Park Ness Lake Regional Park is located 35 km northwest of Prince George via Highway 97 and Chief Lake Road. The 14 ha park has 1.2 km of trails within its boundaries. The trails provide an easy walk to view all of the wildlife and plant life of the park. A beach provides access to the lake. You can launch a canoe, go swimming. Facilities include picnic tables, fire pits, toilets, change houses and a beach with a designated swimming area. Camping is not permitted.

Fort George Canyon Provincial Park About This Park: This small 178

hectare park consists of two parcels on either side of the Fraser River south of the city of Prince George. Public recreation opportunities and trail access is available on the west side of the river. Rapid and dangerous, this canyon abounds in whirlpools and massive, jagged rocks close to the surface. The park is dayuse only. A historic canyon on the Fraser River, the park protects the historic winch site used by paddle-wheeled boats in the early 1900’s and related portage, a native fishing site and popular hiking trail. Activities: Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Hunting, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets How To Get There: A 4.8 km trail provides access to the west side

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of the river. The trailhead is located off West Lake Road, 24.5 km from Prince George via Highway 16 west and Blackwater Road. From the edge of the plateau down to the river, the trail is in the park. The park is not road or trail accessible from the east side.

Fraser River

Provincial Park About This Park: This 4,899 hect-

are provincial park is located on the west bank of the Fraser River. The area has high wildlife values and provides excellent deer and moose winter range. Activities: Horseback Riding, Hunting, Pets on Leash Facilities: None How To Get There: The park is located on the west bank of the Fraser River, on Hwy 97 South, approximately 35 kms from Prince George.


prince george & area

Wilkins

Regional Park

PG fishing! We love it here. It’s awesome for outdoors. - George Danilec and son Jaxon

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Wilkins Regional Park is located 15 km west of Prince George via Otway Road. The 57 ha Park has a large system of trails offering scenic views of the enormous cottonwood trees, the Nechako River and at certain times of the year, salmon can be viewed moving up the river to spawn. After enjoying a gentle walk or ski on the trails, the picnic shelter can be used as a meeting point where you can warm up beside the wood stove or roast some hotdogs for lunch. Facilities include a picnic shelter with a wood burning stove, toilets, picnic tables, fire pits, a boat launch and a large area of lawn. Camping is not permitted.


prince george & area

Photos by Dennis McLaren

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prince george & area

West Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: West Lake is

a 256 hectares day-use park where visitors can enjoy fishing, boating, swimming, and hiking. There is a group picnic site and a picnic shelter with wood stove, horseshoe pits, fire circle and play field is available. Activities: Canoeing, Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Waterskiing, Wildlife Viewing, Windsurfing Facilities: Boat Launch, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit and Flush Toilets, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: West Lake Provincial Park is located 22 km southwest of Prince George on the Blackwater Road on the north shore of West Lake.

Bee pollinating  a sunflower at Hart Highlands Elementary School garden project. – Crystal Patten

Three Sisters Lake

Looking up to her hero at the Terry Fox Run. – Crystal Patten

Provincial Park About This Park: This 968 hect-

are park includes three small lakes and unique canyon features on Government Creek. Activities: Canoeing, Fishing, Hiking, Hunting Facilities: None How To Get There: This park is located approximately 35 km southest of Prince George. Turn left on Stone Creek Road and travel east for about 7.5 km to the trail head.

Nechako Crossing view of the Nechako River. – Crystal Patten

Dahl Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: Dahl Lake

Provincial Park is a day-use park providing a wilderness atmosphere within an hours drive of Prince George. The park has a short walking trail, great canoeing and wildlife viewing opportunities. Motorized boats are prohibited on Dahl Lake. Park Size: 1,583 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Hunting, Swimming, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets How To Get There: Dahl Lake Provincial Park is located 60 km southwest of Prince George. The parking area is at Norman Lake 19 km south of Highway 16 on the Norman Lake road. Norman Lake road is 43 km west of Prince George.

Prince George cutbanks climb. – Crystal Patten

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prince george & area

Our grandson Taylor enjoying a day of tubing on Summit Lake, BC near Teapot Mountain.

With a littlel persistence and concentration, it is not hard to catch fish at Summit Lake. – Sharon Thring

Bobtail Mountain

Provincial Park About This Park: This 1,360

hectare park features an unusual outcropping of serpentine rock. The Bobtail Mountain trailhead is southeast of the park. This forest service trail is about 5 km in length with a change in elevation of 470 metres. It meanders up along the southern park boundary to a south facing viewpoint at the summit of Bobtail Mountain, ending at a north facing viewpoint where a small hut has

been built to provide shelter. Activities: Fishing, Hiking, Hunting Facilities: Cabins / Huts / Yurts How To Get There: The park is located about 55 km southwest of Prince George with access via the Gregg Creek forest service road. The nearest community, town or city is Prince George.

Giscome Portage Trail Protected Area About This Park: Giscome

Portage Trail is a designated Heritage Trail that is located 40 km north of Prince George and 6 km off Highway 97 North on Mitchell Road. The Giscome

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Portage is a route approximately 8.5 km in length, crossing the Continental Divide. Park Size: 160 Hectares Activities: Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Pit Toilets How To Get There: Giscome Portage Trail is located 40 km North of Prince George and 6 km off Highway 97 North on Mitchell Road. There is also another access point where the trail comes out at Barney Creek Road (close to Summit Lake), which is 48 km North of Prince George on Highway 97.


prince george & area

We were invited tubing for a day at Cluculz Lake. I don’t think the kids stopped smiling! Beautiful big lake, with a friendly neighbourhood atmosphere. – Kimberley Standeven

Eskers

Provincial Park About This Park: Eskers Provincial Park is a day-use park located 40 km northwest of Prince George. Encompassing 3,979 hectares of gently rolling terrain and many small lakes, the park conserves a portion of the 40 km long Stuart River Eskers Complex. These unique land forms, for which the park is named, are long sinuous gravel ridges. Visitors can enjoy walking and hiking, canoeing, fishing, nature study and wildlife viewing. A 3 km beginners loop is located just off the Pine Marsh parking area. For an additional challenge and exercise, skiers can enjoy the 6 km trail to Kathie Lake.

Crooked River Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: Eskers Provincial Park is located 40 km northwest of Prince George. Turn west off highway 97 north onto Chief Lake Road. Continue west for 27 km (at km 12 Chief Lake Road turns into Ness Lake Road). At the west end of Ness Lake turn north onto Ness Lake Road North. Follow this road for 1 km to the Eskers Provincial Park entrance.

Provincial Park About This Park: Crooked River

lies within the Fraser Basin, an irregularly shaped basin of gently rolling hills and shallow lakes covering much of North Central B.C. Three beautiful lakes are contained within this 970 hectare park. The centre of activity of this park, an hour’s drive north of Prince George, is beachfringed Bear Lake. The fine, sandy beaches are some of the best in the region and are favourites of swimmers and sunbathers. Fishing, hiking, camping and nature study are also popular activities with outdoor enthusiasts. Visitors like to hike to nearby Square Lake or along the willow-

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lined Crooked River, the original route of early explorers. A natural feature in the park is Livingston Springs a cold water springs that run year round). Activities:Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Wildlife Viewing, Windsurfing Facilities: Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit and Flush Toilets, Playground, Sani-Station/Dump, Showers, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: The park is located 70 km north of Prince George on Highway #97. This is approximately a one hour drive. The closest communities, towns and cities are Bear Lake and Prince George.


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prince george & area

Purden Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: Nestled in the

rolling mountains east of Prince George, Purden Lake Provincial Park, on the north shore of Purden Lake, is dominated by the Cariboo Mountains to the south and the McGregor range of the Rockies to the north. Densely forested upland with open areas near the lakefront provide pleasant surroundings for a shoreline stroll, swimming or angling for the lake’s resident rainbow trout. Park Size: 2521 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Waterskiing, Wildlife Viewing, Windsurfing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit and Flush Toilets, Playground, Sani-Station/Dump, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: Purden Lake Park is located 64 km east of Prince George on the Yellowhead Highway #16.

These photos were taken in Ginters Park in Prince George. The sun coming through the trees reflect the warmth of life that the park exudes. – Chace Keen

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west PRINCE GEORGE

Paarens Beach Provincial Park on lovelyStuart Lake, Fort St. James. A beautiful family campground and beach with great swimming and boating! A favourite family destination for many! What’s a camping trip to Paarens Beach without sneaking away to go fishing nearby at one of the 100’s of lakes teeming with rainbow trout! - Greg Blackburn

This picture was taken at the Vanderhoof Nechako River Bird Sanctuary. Hundreds of trumpeter swans and Canada geese gather on the river in early spring to enjoy the open water. - Marina Jamieson

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prince george W E S T

Finger-Tatuk

Provincial Park About This Park: Finger-Tatuk

Cadence and mom Candice Manahan Coyne take a break among the driftwood on the beach of Ootsa Lake. - Norm Coyne Cadence Coyne enjoying the cool breeze blowing along Takysie Lake. - Norm Coyne

Provincial Park surrounds Finger and Tatuk Lakes and extends south to include the smaller Turff, Vance, Cory, Bodley, and Harp Lakes south of the Tatuk Hills. Beautiful series of lakes and regionally significant recreational destination. Abundant populations of rainbow trout and kokanee are the main attraction for anglers in the area. Diverse and high-value habitat in the park provides for a range of animal species including grizzly and black bear, ungulates, small furbearers, waterfowl, shore-birds, and eagles. Park Size: 17,151 ha Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Waterskiing, Wildlife Viewing, Windsurfing Facilities: Boat Launch, Cabins / Huts / Yurts, Campfires, Pit and Flush Toilets, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: Finger-Tatuk Provincial Park is located 80 kilometres south of Vanderhoof and 115 kms southwest of Prince George. To access Finger Lake and the west end of Tatuk Lake, use the Kluskus forest service road near Vanderhoof. Access to the east end of Tatuk Lake is via the Pelican (Prince George) or Bobtail (Highway #16) Forest Service Roads.

Nechako Canyon

Protected Area About This Park: The Nechako

Canyon Protected Area includes the 7 km long Grand Canyon of the Nechako. This impressive gorge with sheer rock walls, towering pinnacles, and overhanging cliffs is now considered a special feature, providing a rare opportunity to observe these erosional features. More than 130 archaeological sites have been documented including a village site near Cheslatta Falls where pit depressions from dwellings and food caches can still be found. Just outside the protected area off the Holy Cross Road, is the Cheslatta River Recreation Site. From the recreation site, a forest service trail follows the Cheslatta River to meet the the Nechako River at the 18 metre high Cheslatta Falls. The Cheslatta

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Falls hiking trail is 1.2 km one way. Beware of steep drop-offs to the turbulent river and slippery footing at the falls. Stay on the marked trail. Activities: Fishing, Hiking, Hunting Facilities: None How To Get There: This 1,246 hectare protected area is located about 80 km southwest of Vanderhoof. Access is via the Holy Cross forest service road on the west side of the canyon, or the Kenney Dam Road to the east.

Stuart River

Provincial Park About This Park: River corridor

provides critical habitat for Chinook and Sockeye salmon, and red-listed White Sturgeon. Also a high value wildlife corridor for ungulates: includes deer and elk winter ranges. Activities: Canoeing, Fishing, Hunting, Wildlife Viewing Facilities Available: None How To Get There: This 21,021 hectare park takes in three-quarters of the 110 km long Stuart River corridor between Fort St. James and the Nechako River. Road access to the corridor exists at several points but the most efficient access is by boat.

Beaumont

Provincial Park About This Park: Beaumont

Provincial Park lies within the Nechako Plateau bordered to the west and north by the Hazelton, Skeena and Omineca mountains. The park offers a beautiful, sandy beach for swimming and sunbathing and a variety of facilities for water-oriented activities enhance visitor enjoyment. Park Size: 191.8 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Waterskiing, Wildlife Viewing, Windsurfing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit and Flush Toilets, Playground, Sani-Station/ Dump, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: A 134 km drive west of Prince George on Highway 16. The closest communities, towns and cities are Vanderhoof, Fraser Lake and Fort Fraser.


prince george W E S T

Stuart Lake. - Ian Baird

Paarens Beach

Provincial Park About This Park: Situated on

the south-west shore of beautiful Stuart Lake, Paarens Beach is a delightful small provincial park, an ideal base from which to explore the rich history and enjoy the multitude of recreational opportunities around Stuart Lake and the nearby community of Fort St. James. A boat launch is also located within the park to access Stuart Lake. Stuart Lake, one of the largest natural lakes in the province at about 70 kilometres long, is the southernmost in a chain of three lakes. The Stuart-Takla chain includes Stuart Lake, the Tachie River, Trembleur Lake, the Middle River, which has been designated a Provincial Heritage River, and finally the remote and spectacular Takla Lake. Takla is the fifth largest natural lake in the province at close to 90 kilometres in length. Park Size: 43 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Waterskiing, Windsurfing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Playground, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Wheelchair Access

How To Get There: Paarens Beach is located less than a two-hour drive northwest of Prince George on the south shore of Stuart Lake and about 11 kilometres from the community of Fort St. James. From Prince George take Highway #16 west one hundred kilometres to Vanderhoof, at which point it is another 54 kilometres north on Highway #27.

Sowchea Bay

Provincial Park About This Park: This is a busy

destination for boaters and anglers, with a single lane concrete boat launch available with limited parking. Park Size: 13 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Fishing, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Waterskiing, Windsurfing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Vehicle Accessible Camping How To Get There: From Prince George travel 100 km west on Highway 16 to Vanderhoof. From Vanderhoof travel 55 km north on Highway 27 to Fort St. James. From Fort St. James travel 20 km west on Sowchea Bay Road.

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prince george W E S T

We took a drive on Sackner Road (Vanderhoof) to explore. We stopped to take in the magnificent view of the river and the distant fields. Natives were putting out their fishing nets below in the Nechako River. - Dyanne Dimassimo

Cheslatta Falls is located a short ways from Kenney Dam. The falls are the upper portion of the Nechako River. What a spectacular sight and sound of the mighty Nechako River. A wonderful area to spend the day with a picnic lunch and walking the trail along the falls. - Dyanne Dimassimo

I took these moose photos in Smithers. - Pat Suter Taken on Tatuk Lake in the Finger-Tatuk Provincial Park south west of Prince George. A no fee remote island campground can be a great way to get away from it all. This site ensures absolute privacy. - Monty Manahan

At the top of Mount Pope. - Crystal Patten

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prince george W E S T

Mount Pope

Provincial Park About This Park: Mount Pope

is a 2,030 hectare day-use park popular with hikers and rockclimbers. A 6.5 km hiking trail to the peak provides a panoramic view of Stuart Lake and the mountains to the north. Thirtynine climbing routes have been documented.

Natural values of Mount Pope park include rare plants and animal species associated with limestone rock formations and caves, as well as valuable winter range for mule deer. Activities: Climbing, Cycling, Hiking, Hunting, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: None How To Get There: Mount Pope is located about 7 kms northwest of Fort St. James on the northeast side of Stuart Lake. Proceed through Fort St. James on Stuart Drive and turn left (west) on Stones Bay Road. The trailhead parking lot is 4 kms down Stones Bay Road on the right.

Stuart Lake Marine Provincial Park About This Park: The Stuart-

Trembleur-Takla Lake boating system is located in north central British Columbia and comprises nearly 300 km of waterway. These long, narrow lakes are among the region’s most significant recreational features. The lakes offer great sports fishing opportunities for rainbow and lake trout, burbot, kokanee, and mountain whitefish. With more than 630 km of lakeshore to explore, few developed facilities, and sparse levels of use, this chain of lakes provides a remote wilderness experience. A series of small parks have been established along the system providing protected anchorages or attractive beaches. Stuart Lake is one of the largest natural lakes in the province at 90 km long with 270 km of shoreline. The community of Fort St. James is located on the southeast end. The main body of the lake is between 6 to 10 km wide and is road accessible at many locations. The northwestern arm of the lake is narrower, has limited road access, and more of a wilderness feel. This portion of the lake is very scenic with numerous bays, points, and islands. Wildlife viewing, boating, hunting, and angling northern explorer | 30 | may 2013

are popular pursuits in the area. Stuart Lake Marine Park consists of four lakeside sites protected as part of the Stuart-TrembleurTakla Lakes boating system. The Tachie River connects Stuart Lake to Trembleur Lake. The 26 km of river can be a challenge to navigate with fast water and small rapids. Trembleur Lake is almost 50 km long. It has an irregular shoreline with sheltered bays and coves and a scenic wilderness setting. The Middle River flows from Takla Lake into Trembleur Lake. The river, designated as a Provincial Heritage River, is 22 km long and navigable. At 96 km in length, Takla is the fifth largest lake in the province. Almost 250 km of undisturbed shoreline with sandy beaches and isolated bays are available to explore. There is sporadic road access on the east side of the lake. Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Swimming Facilities: Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

How To Get There:

Two Islands - located close to the midpoint of the lake, these are the two nearest island due south of the Stuart Lake site. Stuart Lake - 32 km northwest of Fort St. James on the north shore of Stuart Lake; road access from Fort St. James is 30 km on Tachie Road and south 2 km to the lake on Hibiscus Road. Jus K’etl’o Bay - located on the north shore 15 km west of the Tachie River on the northwestern arm of the lake; boat access only. North Arm - located on the north shore 12 km northwest of Jus K’etlo Bay and 27 km west of the Tachie River on the northwestern arm of the lake; boat access only.

Mudzenchoot

Provincial Park About This Park: The high eleva-

tion area is characterized by dry meadows featuring unique vegetation types including cotton grass, erigerons, and aster type species. Park Size: 644 hectare Activities: Fishing, Hunting, Pets on Leash Facilities: None How To Get There: The park is located about 90 km northwest of Fort St. James. The nearest road access is the Witch forest service road off the Germansen Landing North road.


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north PRINCE GEORGE

Carp Lake Provincial Park approximately 2 hours north of Prince George. Two families get together for a long weekend camping trip on one of the many islands of Carp Lake Provincial Park. – Greg Blackburn Kids group photo on island. From left, Mary-Grace and Suzie Maurice, Mya and Andrew Blackburn and Zachary Maurice.

In photo below,Mya holding one of the giant burbot from Carp Lake along with her brother Andrew and friends Zachary and Mary-Grace!

In above photo, Zachary and Mya pose with 2 large burbot from Carp Lake! northern explorer | 37 | may 2013


prince george N O R T H

Whiskers Point

Provincial Park About This Park: Whiskers Point

John Dahl

Regional Park

John Dahl Regional Park, jointly developed by the District of Mackenzie and Regional District of Fraser Fort George, is located within the District of Mackenzie. The Regional Park contains the 2.2 km long Barb Dahl trail, the 1.5 km long Dick Dauphinee trail, and viewpoints overlooking Morfee Lakes. There is also a playground area for children. Trails remain open year round and provide walking/ hiking experiences in spring, summer and fall. Camping is not permitted.

Provincial Park supplies a welcome stop-over point as well as a relaxing destination for an extended family retreat. Lakeside camping is at its best in this quiet, forested park situated on a peninsula reaching into historic McLeod Lake, creating seclusion and a sheltered southern exposure. Campers marvel at the magnificent sunsets over the lake. There is ample opportunity to swim, fish or take a stroll through the woods. A playing field, horseshoe pits, adventure playground and volleyball net provide something for every member of the family. Park Size: 116 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Fishing, Hiking, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Waterskiing, Wildlife Viewing, Windsurfing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit and Flush Toilets, Playground, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: Located 130 km north of Prince George on

Highway 97. Communities close to this park include Mackenzie, Mcleod Lake, Bear Lake and Prince George.

Carp Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: Long famous

for its rainbow trout, Carp Lake Provincial Park is nearly in the exact centre of the province, offers some of the best fishing in the Central Interior. The park includes Carp Lake, nearby War Lake, numerous smaller lakes and streams, and the 8-kilometre waterway that connects Carp and War Lakes and which forms the beginning of the McLeod River. The northern shoreline of Carp Lake has extensive sand beaches with broad belts of sand extending up to 300 metres offshore. Two popular campgrounds offer a total of 102 fully maintained campsites. Boaters and canoeists can choose among three island campsites which offer secluded camping after a day spent exploring and fishing the lake’s many bays and isolated stretches of shoreline. A short walk from the park’s second primary campground at War Lake brings visitors to War Falls, a spectacular cascade of water that comprises two distinct waterfalls separated by about 100 meters of rushing, white water. Portions of the original aboriginal route to Fort McLeod have been developed into an exciting interpretive loop trail that departs from the main campground; this 3-km hike also provides access to Rainbow Lake and fine fly fishing on the McLeod River. Interpretive trail signs are located along the trail to first beach, McLeod River Trail and the War Falls Trail. Park Size: 38,149 ha Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Group Camping, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Playground, Sani-Station/Dump, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: Carp Lake Park is two hours drive northwest of Prince George. The main access road to the park joins Highway 97 (the John Hart Highway) at the community of McLeod Lake,

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141 km north of Prince George. It is 32 km from McLeod Lake to the Carp Lake campground. This gravel road is single lane over part of its length, and has some rough surfaces and tight corners. The road may not be suitable for cars or trailers during the spring break-up period. Some portions of the road must be shared with industrial traffic. The closest communities, towns and cities are Prince George, Bear Lake, McLeod Lake and MacKenzie.

Tudyah Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: Tudyah Lake

Provincial Park, on the southern shore of Tudyah Lake, offers a lakeside haven for travellers to MacKenzie or the Pine Pass. A good concrete boat launch gives access to fine fishing and waterskiing on the lake. The lake is also a convenient base for fishing on the nearby Parsnip River. Park Size: 56 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Waterskiing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Group Camping, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: Located 9 km north of McLeod Lake on Highway 97. Tudyah Lake lies in a wide, open section of the Rocky Mountain Trench, just before highway 39 branches off toward Mackenzie.

Bijoux Falls

Provincial Park About This Park: Bijoux Falls

Provincial Park is a day use park only. This park is easily accessible off Hwy 97 and provides a view of Bijoux Falls with excellent photography opportunities and a pleasant highway rest stop. Park Size: 40 hectares Activities: Hiking, Pets on Leash, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: Bijoux Falls Park is located 44 km north of McLeod Lake on Highway 97. The nearest communities, towns and cities are Prince George, MacKenzie, Chetwynd and McLeod Lake.


prince george N O R T H

Pine Le Moray

Provincial Park About This Park: Tucked amidst

the rugged Hart Ranges of the Rocky Mountains, Pine Le Moray Provincial Park and Protected Area provides scenic splendor and a welcome retreat for visitors travelling the Hart Highway. The camping area is located adjacent to Heart Lake and is a picturesque and tranquil location. Try your luck for rainbow or brook trout as you paddle the smooth water or take a wilderness hike to the alpine. Please note: no gas powered boats allowed. Park Size: 43,245 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: Pine Le Moray Provincial Park and Protected Area is located on the east and west slopes of the continental divide, 70 km southwest of Chetwynd and 50 km northeast of McLeod Lake. The park’s northern and northwestern boundary is adjacent to Highway 97 near Pine Pass. The park can also be accessed via a forest service road on the east side along Le Moray Creek.

Heather - Dina Lakes Provincial Park About This Park: This newly

designated park is located along the eastern edge of Williston Lake, approximately 25km north of Mackenzie, British Columbia. The park is comprised of mature, mixed forest and is dotted with numerous, small lakes. Visitors are able to camp, fish, canoe, hike, and view wildlife within a beautiful wilderness setting. Park Size: 5,786 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Wildlife Viewing

Facilities:

Boat Launch, Campfires, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Walk-In/ Wilderness Camping How To Get There: The Parsnip West Forest Service Road (PWFSR) can be reached from Highway 39 by heading north from the closest community of Mackenzie for approximately

10km. There are two main entry points into the park, both of which are accessed from the PWFSR. The gravel road is suitable for most two-wheel drive vehicles during the summer, but four-wheel drive vehicles are recommended during wet weather. A sign near the 25km marker of the PWFSR indicates the turnoff to Heather Lake and the site is located less than 1km from the turnoff. The Dina Lake site is also marked with a sign and is located approximately 31km on the PWFSR.

Bocock Peak

Provincial Park About This Park: Bocock Peak

Provincial Park is a remote, high elevation park located on the continental divide in the headwaters of the Peace River. It contains distinct geological features such as limestone cave systems and preserves important wildlife habitat. Park Size: 1,143 hectares Activities: Caving, Cycling, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Hunting, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Campfires, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: Bocock Peak Provincial Park is located south of the Peace Arm of Williston Lake and adjacent to Eleven Mile Creek, approximately 70 km west of Hudson’s Hope. There are no designated trails to this remote area.

How To Get There: Located approximately 25 kilometres northwest of Chetwynd on Highway #29; 3 km paved road access.

Pine River Breaks Provincial Park About This Park: Pine River

Breaks Provincial Park with its open grassland hillsides protects a scenic landscape along the Pine River. Visitors to this unique area can access it via a short hike from the Sundance Pit Road or by boat along the Pine River. Park Size: 615 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Campfires, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: Pine River Breaks Provincial Park is located on the north side of the Pine River, approximately halfway between the District of Chetwynd and East Pine River, near Sundance Lakes on Highway 97. The site is sev-

Moberly Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: Moberly Lake

Provincial Park is situated on the southern shore of Moberly Lake which is situated on the boundary between the Rocky Mountain foothills to the west and the Peace plateau to the east. The lake itself lies in a broad shallow valley of the Moberly River, about 96 km from its junction with the Peace River. Head down to the lake for a swim or to test your luck fishing for northern pike, bull trout, lake trout and lake whitefish. Park Size: 98 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Waterskiing, Windsurfing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Playground, Sani-Station/Dump, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Wheelchair Access northern explorer | 39 | may 2013

eral kilometres north of Mount Wartenbe in the extreme southern portion of the Peace Lowlands. Access is via Highway 97, and south at Sundance Lakes along a trail through private property, or through Sundance Pit Road that leads towards a trail on crown land and into the park. Visitors can also access the area by using the boat launch located at East Pine Provincial Park and boating up the Pine River.

East Pine

Provincial Park About This Park: Situated near

the junction of the East Pine and Murray Rivers in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, East Pine Provincial Park provides visitors with fishing, canoeing and boating opportunities on both rivers. Park Size: 14.2 ha Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Pets on Leash Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires How To Get There: Located 30 km east of Chetwynd on Highway 97.


prince george N O R T H

Last summer family and friends spent a weekend at Great Beaver Lake, north of Prince George. We had a wonderful time, and I highly recommend it. The scenery is lovely, and it’s a great lkae for swimming and fishing. This is my great niece Cara, who was enjoying herself immensely, catching minnows. – Dollie Morgan

Hole-in-the-Wall

Provincial Park About This Park: Hole-In-The-

Gwillim Lake

Sukunka Falls

Provincial Park provides a peaceful outdoor experience. Set in the picturesque Rocky Mountain Foothills on Highway 29, a halfhour’s drive from Chetwynd and Tumbler Ridge and the massive Northeast Coal development, visitors can enjoy canoeing, kayaking, swimming, hiking, fishing and a viewpoint that provides a panoramic vista of the superb Rocky Mountain scenery. Park Size: 32,326 ha Activities: Canoeing, Climbing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Scuba Diving, Swimming, Waterskiing, Wildlife Viewing, Windsurfing Facilities: Boat Launch Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Playground, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: Located 56 km southeast of Chetwynd; take Highway 29 south off Highway 97 (paved access).

of the Rocky Mountains, the Sukunka River highlights a scenic vista as it cascades over vertical bands of bedrock layers in a series of waterfalls and rapids. Three sets of falls are located in the park, the northernmost being the most impressive of the series. Unique viewing opportunities are offered of the Sukunka Falls and rapids from roadside locations. Park Size: 360 hectares Activities:Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding. Pets on Leash, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Campfires, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: This park is located approximately 45 km south of Chetwynd via the Chetwynd-Tumbler Ridge Highway and the Sukunka Forest Service road. At km 21 of the Sukunka Forest Service road, there is a pullout which provides visitors with a good view of the falls, rapids and parkland.

Provincial Park About This Park: Gwillim Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: With a backdrop

Wall Provincial Park is named after the resurgence spring which emerges from a limestone rock wall. This type of feature occurs when water travels underground through a complex series of caves and either works its way down to a level of impermeable rock or until it reaches the top of the water table. The water flow may then travel along the surface of the impermeable rock until it reaches the surface as a spring. Visitors will be amazed by the size and sheer volume of water. Surrounded by lush vegetation and a spectacular vertical blue-gray wall of limestone, this geological feature is impressive and easily accessible via a short 40 m walk from the road. Park Size: 137 hectares Activities: Hiking, Horseback Riding, Pets on Leash, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Campfires, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: Hole-in-theWall Provincial Park is located 50 km along the Sukunka Forest Service Road. The closest communities, towns and cities are Tumbler Ridge and Chetwynd.

Bearhole Lake

Provincial Park and Protected Area About This Park: Watch moose

wade through the marsh and lake shallows or observe beaver busily chewing bark off of willow or aspen twigs. Bird enthusiasts will enjoy seeing nesting trumpeter swans or listening to many of the warblers found in and around the area. Park Size: 17460 hectares

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Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Hunting, Swimming, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: Bearhole Lake Provincial Park and Protected Area is located 25 km east of Tumbler Ridge on the Alberta Plateau. Access is via 20 km west along the Kiskatinaw Forest Service Road You can access the Forestry Road from the Heritage Highway.

Monkman

Provincial Park About This Park: Monkman

Provincial Park, nestled in the Hart Ranges of the Central Rocky Mountains and Foothills, covers 62,867 hectares of diverse natural landscapes encompassing extensive alpine meadows, jagged mountain peaks, forested valleys, thundering waterfalls and clear alpine lakes. Scenic rapids, waterfalls, streams and lakes all contribute to the dramatic visual impact of the landscape. The northern section of Monkman Provincial Park features Kinuseo Falls, where the Murray River plunges 60 metres over a geological fault to the river bed below. This thunderous cascade of water is higher than Niagara Falls and provides many visitors with the highlight of their trip. Despite the rugged grandeur of the park, prime areas of it can be easily accessed. Activities: Caving, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: Monkman Provincial Park is located on the Murray River Road, 60 kilometres south of Tumbler Ridge. Several roads provide access to this community. Turn south off highway 97 at Chetwynd onto Highway 29, or turn south off of Highway 97 onto highway 52 approximately 17 km west of Dawson Creek. Visitors travelling on Highway 2 to or from Dawson Creek can also turn south on Highway 52, near the BC/Alberta border.


prince george N O R T H

Wapiti Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: Nestled in the

Rocky Mountains, Wapiti Lake Provincial Park with its fast flowing rivers, crystal clear lakes and surrounding mountains provide outstanding scenic viewing, fishing and wilderness camping opportunities. At Wapiti Lake visitors have the choice of tenting or using the backcountry cabin. Please keep this cabin clean and in good condition for the next visitor. Park Size: 16 809 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Cabins / Huts / Yurts, Campfires, Pit Toilets, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: Wapiti Lake Provincial Park is located about 60 km south of Tumbler Ridge in the upper portions of the Wapiti River drainage. It is accessed via the Ojay Main Road. Follow this road to kilometre 29 and turn right onto the 2500 road (at approx 25 km) a road that leads to an old well site. The trail starts at the southwest corner of this site. The trail is approximately 19

km and follows the north side of the Wapiti River and the shores of a few smaller lakes. A view of Wapiti Falls can be achieved by following a short 200 metre trail off the main trail at kilometre 7.

One Island Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: Located in the

Alberta Plateau, this small park is situated by a clear lake noted for its fishing opportunities. Activities include bird watching, fishing, swimming and just relaxing. Park Size: 59 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Pets on Leash, Scuba Diving, Swimming, Waterskiing, Windsurfing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Playground, Vehicle Accessible Camping How To Get There: Located 60 km southeast of Dawson Creek. Take Hwy #2 east of Dawson Creek for 30 km and look for the Park signs.

Swan Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: A small pic-

turesque lakeshore park that

offers boating, swimming, a grassy campground and day-use area, baseball diamonds and playground area. Park Size: 82 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash, Scuba Diving, Swimming, Waterskiing, Windsurfing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Playground, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: Located 35 kilometres southeast of Dawson Creek, 2 km gravel access off Highway #2.

Kiskatinaw

Provincial Park About This Park: The park is

located along the banks of the Kiskatinaw River on the original Alaska Highway, near a historic wooden curved trestle bridge. From Kiskatinaw Provincial Park, visitors can take a stroll to the bridge and reflect upon the unique history of the Alaska Highway. Jump in the river for a refreshing swim or spend the day fishing. Park Size: 154 ha

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Activities: Cycling, Fishing, Pets on Leash,

Swimming

Facilities: Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Playground, Vehicle Accessible Camping How To Get There: Located 28 km north of Dawson Creek off Highway 97 (Alaska Highway) on the Old Alaska Highway.

Kiskatinaw River

Protected Area About This Park: Visitors to

Kiskatinaw River Protected Area will enjoy the scenic grasslands and have a good opportunity to view wildlife, such as mule deer, on the open hillsides. Bald eagles and other raptors can be seen regularly flying along the river corridors. Park Size: 198 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Hunting, Swimming, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: None How To Get There: Kiskatinaw River Protected Area is located at the confluence of the Kiskatinaw and Peace Rivers about 10 km from the Alberta border. There is no road access to this park.


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prince george N O R T H

Taylor Landing

Provincial Park About This Park: BC Hydro con-

trols water levels in the Peace River. These levels may increase or decrease without notice. It is suggested to check with BC Hydro before setting out on your trip. Boaters should watch out for gravel bars. While boating along the Peace River watch for beaver, bald eagles and other birds of prey, Canada geese, moose, mule and white-tail deer, black bear and many other animals. Park Size: 2.4 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Fishing, Pets on Leash Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Pit Toilets

How To Get There: Located at Mile 36 of the Alaska Highway, 1 kilometre south of the community of Taylor on the south side of the Taylor Bridge.

Butler Ridge

Provincial Park About This Park: Located on

the north shore of Williston Lake’s Peach Reach, Butler Ridge Provincial Park provides boat access to B.C.’s largest man-made lake and offers excellent opportunities for wildlife viewing, fishing and hiking. The hiking along Butler Ridge is spectacular. The ridge itself extends 15 km south to north throughout the entire length of the park and is accessed via a trail on the park’s south side. Park Size: 6024 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Wildlife Viewing

Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Pit Toilets, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: Located 40 km west of Hudson’s Hope off Highway 29; gravel road access.

Beatton

Provincial Park About This Park: Beatton

Provincial Park is a year round recreational facility located on the shores of Charlie Lake. This 320 hectare park is a popular summer recreation destination for swimming, fishing and hiking. Activities:Canoeing, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: None How To Get There: This park is located 13 km northwest of Fort St. John off Highway #97 on the 244 road, approximately a 20 minute drive.

Beatton River

Provincial Park About This Park: Beatton River

Provincial Park protects rich riparian habitat at the confluence of the Beatton and Peace Rivers. Visitors to the area can best access the park by boat. Enjoy a picnic, watch wildlife or relax on the river’s edge and appreciate the surrounding scenic views. Park Size: 186 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Waterskiing, Windsurfing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Playground, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: Beatton River Provincial Park is located at the

confluence of the Beatton and Peace Rivers. The park is approximately 40 km from Fort St. John.

Charlie Lake

Peace River Corridor

Provincial Park is situated on the southwestern shore of 13 km long Charlie Lake. Covering some 92 hectares, the park lies within the rolling landscape of the Interior Plains. Wander a forested trail or watch children enjoying the play area in the centre of the campground. Park Size: 176 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash, Swimming Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Playground, Sani-Station/Dump, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: The park is located 11 km north of Fort St. John at the junction of the Alaska Highway and Highway 29.

Provincial Park About This Park: Peace River

Corridor Provincial Park protects a series of islands within the Peace River Canyon as well as some scenic grassland habitats on the Peace River shoreline. Park Size: 2014 hectares Three distinct areas have been identified: Peace River Corridor Island Site: this area, along the south shore of the Peace River, west of Kiskatinaw Creek, provides visitors with good fishing, boating, wildlife viewing, camping and picnicking areas along the river and around Raspberry Island. Wak’anaahtaah: translated means a place to look at. On the north shore of the Peace River west of Alces Creek, geological formations called hoodoos have developed. Alces River: at this location, there is a scenic viewpoint and picnic site overlooking the Peace River. The area is sparsely treed with grasslands dominating the south facing slopes Activities: Canoeing, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Campfires, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: Peace River Corridor Provincial Park is located 40 km southeast of Fort St. John along a section of the Peace River 25 km upstream of the Alberta border. Road access is via Highway 97 and rural roads.

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Provincial Park About This Park: Charlie Lake

Know before you go Recreation • Swimming areas protect swimmers within marker buoys. • All watercraft and water-skiers must stay outside markers. • Lifeguards are not in attendance in BC Parks. • Trails are planned to take you safely through the most interesting and beautiful parts of our parks without damaging sensitive and unique plant and wildlife habitats. Stay on the trails.


south PRINCE GEORGE

Hixon is a small quiet community that offers full camping services along with fresh air, wildlife and outdoor activities. – Pat Suter

Visit the Hixon Falls and listen to the power of water, or take a swim. A walk along the creek always fills your pockets with agates and unique rocks of different shapes and colours. – Pat Suter

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prince george south

Ten Mile Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: Ten Mile Lake

is a very popular recreational destination for local residents and visitors. It offers a large picnic area, three sandy beaches, a boat launch, and great fishing not to mention attractive, treed campsites, showers and flush toilets. A 2-km nature trail to a large beaver pond, through forest and along an abandoned rail road is very rewarding to hike. Park Size: 260 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Waterskiing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit and Flush Toilets, Playground, Sani-Station/Dump, Showers, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: Approximately 12 km north of Quesnel on Highway #97.

Visit Barkerville Historic Town, it is a nice day trip from Prince George, and you are almost guaranteed to see wildlife like a bear and cubs. – Pat Suter

Pinnacles

Provincial Park About This Park: Pinnacles

Provincial Park comprises approximately 124 hectares of pine forest overlooking Baker Creek. The park is a popular day-use area and is easily accessible from Quesnel. From the Pinnacles viewpoint, visitors enjoy the unique formation of “Hoodoos”, and a picturesque view of the city of Quesnel and Baker Creek. The park is open year-round for day-use and sightseeing despite the locked gate at the entrance; camping is not permitted. The park provides an opportunity for a pleasant 1 km hike along a well maintained trail to the viewpoint; allow 15 minutes for access. Activities: Hiking, Pets on Leash, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Pit Toilet How To Get There: The park is located 8 km from downtown Quesnel. It can be accessed via Pinnacles Road (paved) in west Quesnel off of Highway 97.

Puntchesakut Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: Puntchesakut Lake Provincial Park comprises approximately 38 hectares of gently rolling aspen forest.

Located on the east side of Puntchesakut Lake, the park offers 1200 metres of waterfront, including a beautiful stretch of sandy beach and is easily accessible from Quesnel. Angling for trout in the spring and fall is perhaps the most popular pursuit, with anglers often catching trout up to 3 lb in size. Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Waterskiing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets How To Get There: The park is located approximately 40 km west of Quesnel. It can be accessed via Nazko Road and the trip takes approximately 25 minutes.

Kluskoil Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: Kluskoil Lake

Park provides a variety of recreational opportunities, and protects valuable wildlife habitat in Sub-boreal Pine-Spruce forest and wetlands. Park Size: 15,548 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Swimming Facilities: Pit Toilets, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: The park is located 100 km northwest of Quesnel. To get there, travel 10 km west on the Nazko Highway to the Bouchie Lake School.

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Turn right onto the Blackwater Road until it joins the Batnuni Road. Follow the Batnuni Road, and turn off to the left at the 108 km mark. This track will lead to the upper crossing of the Euchiniko River (at the south end of Titetown Lake). This crossing is several feet deep most of the year, and even higher during spring runoff. From here one can travel 18 km to Kluskoil Lake on the Alexander Mackenzie Heritage Trail Lake by foot, horseback, mountain bike, ATV or high clearance 4x4. 
Kluskoil Lake can also be accessed by float plane.


prince george south

Nazko Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: Nazko Lake

Park provides canoeing, fishing, camping and wildlife viewing in a natural environment, while protecting extensive wetlands for moose and aquatic furbearers. This is a wilderness park, offering a two to three day wilderness canoe circuit, along with three rustic, vehicle-access campgrounds at Summit, Loomis and Deerpelt Lakes. Please note that Summit and Loomis Lakes are NOT connected to the canoe chain. Park Size: 12,419 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash, Swimming Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Pit Toilets, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Walk-In/ Wilderness Camping How To Get There: The park is located in the northern part of the Chilcotin Plateau northwest of Alexis Creek. Access is on logging roads and a dirt track. Drivers of two wheel drive vehicles should have no problems, provided they do not go beyond Deerpelt Lake. Described below are two access routes.

The first route is a little quicker, with less travel on dirt roads, but in the spring and fall it can be very muddy and slippery. The alternate route is recommended during wet weather. These roads are active haul roads, and you may encounter logging trucks at any time. Nazko Lake Park Access: Take Highway 20 west from Williams Lake. Pass through the village of Alexis Creek (111 km from Williams Lake). Bull Canyon Park is six km further on. At the top of the hill past this small park, look for the Alexis Lakes Road and turn right. Travel approximately 32 km on the Alexis Lakes Road then turn left onto the 4600 Road (Clusko-Aneko Forest Service Road). The road to Loomis Lake and the Nazko Lake Canoe Chain is at kilometre 11.5, on the right, just past the 4645 marker sign. Loomis Lake is 11 km from the 4600 Road, and Deerpelt Lake, where the Canoe Chain starts, is about another 2.5 km. Alternate Route: Travelling west on Highway 20 approximately 67 km west of Williams Lake (or 21 km west of Riske

Creek), turn right on the 1300 Road (also called Bush Road or Alex Graham/Raven Lake Forest Service Road). Continue on the 1300 Road for approximately 44 km. Just past the 45 marker sign on the 1300 Road turn left onto the 4600 Road. Travel for 45.5 km. The access road to the Nazko Lake Canoe Chain is on the right, just past the 4645 marker sign. Continue as above.

Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: Six kilometres west of the community of Alexis Creek, off Highway 20. The nearest communities, towns and cities are Alexis Creek, Redstone, Hanceville and Williams Lake.

Bull Canyon

within White Pelican Provincial Park, is closed to the public from March 1 - August 31 every year to protect the White Pelican nesting colony. During this time canoeing, boating, hunting, trapping, discharge of firearms, aircraft operation below 600 metres in elevation, and aircraft landing are prohibited. This colony of American White Pelicans is the only nesting colony in British Columbia. Pelican viewing opportunities exist at Nazko Lake Park and in other lakes in the Chilcotin.Park Size: 2763 hectares How To Get There: White Pelican Park is located approximately 60 km northwest of Williams Lake on the Chilcotin Plateau.

Provincial Park About This Park: This park is

located in a beautiful canyon, with the glacier blue Chilcotin River flowing past the campground. There is a short walking trail beside the river, and the surrounding area supports excellent fishing lakes, birdwatching and wildlife viewing opportunities. People can view shallow caves in Bull Canyon Mountain on the Chilcotin River Interpretive Trail. Bull Canyon Park is often used as a base to explore the Chilco. Activities: Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash Facilities: Campfires, Drinking Water,

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White Pelican

Provincial Park About This Park: Stum Lake,


prince george south

Bowron Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: Bowron Lake

Park is a large 149,207 hectare wilderness area situated on the western slopes of the Cariboo Mountain Range. The worldrenowned Bowron Lake Canoe Circuit encompasses a 116 km chain of lakes, waterways and connecting portages. This wilderness canoe trip takes from 6 to 10 days to complete, depending on your time frame and skill level. For those looking for a shorter trip, the west side of the circuit can be paddled in 2 to 4 days. It is recommended that those who attempt the circuit have some wilderness canoeing experience. Bowron Lake Park also has a very pleasant 25 unit drive-in campground. The campground is located near the Registration Centre a short distance from Bowron Lake itself. There are also a few short walking trails nearby. Get information on the nearby community of Wells and local services. Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash, Swimming Facilities: Boat Launch, Cabins/Huts/ Yurts, Campfires, Drinking Water, Group Camping, Pit Toilets, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: Bowron Lake Park is located about 120 kilometres east of Quesnel. Drive north on Highway 97 through Quesnel, then follow signs onto Highway 26, which leads through Wells.  Approximately 1km before the historic townsite of Barkerville, turn left onto the Bowron Lake Road.  From there it’s another 27 km to the park entrance on a wide, well-graded dirt road where a 25 unit frontcountry campground and the 116 km wilderness canoe circuit are located.

Cariboo River

Provincial Park About This Park: This 3,211 hect-

are linear park protects a large portion of the upper Cariboo River and surrounding wetlands, from Kimball Lake downstream to where the river enters Cariboo Lake. It is critical habitat for wildlife, especially moose and waterfowl. The waterfalls, oldgrowth and estuaries at this park

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can be accessed via canoe or power boat. Activities: Canoeing, Fishing, Hunting Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, WalkIn/Wilderness Camping How to Get There: Vehicle access is on logging roads from Likely or Barkerville in snow free months only. The park is located approximately 90 km from the town of Likely on the 8400 Road or 70 km from the town of Barkerville on the 3100 Road. Please drive with caution on these active logging roads. Use your headlights at all times. The closest communities, towns and cities are Wells, Likely, Barkerville, Quesnel and Williams Lake.

Cariboo Mountains Provincial Park About This Park: Cariboo

Mountains Provincial Park is true wilderness, dominated by high serrated peaks and glaciers, and densely forested valleys featuring attractive lakes and lush wetlands. The Park is situated in the interior wet belt between Bowron and Wells Gray Provincial Parks. These parks now create one continuous protected area in the Cariboo Mountains that is over 760,000 hectares in size. The park incorporates a diverse landscape ranging from mountain peaks and tarn lakes in hanging alpine valleys, to extensive meadows, large wetland complexes, and ancient red-cedar and hemlock forests. These diverse habitats support an equally diverse array of wildlife species. Though current use levels are low, Cariboo Mountains Provincial Park offers extensive (though undeveloped) opportunities for backcountry adventures. Vehicle access camping is available at Ghost Lake. This small, remote site features views down the lake and up into the surrounding mountains, and is adjacent to the scenic Matthew River Falls. Activities: Canoeing, Fishing, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Swimming Facilities: Campfires, Pit Toilet, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: The park is located northeast of Likely and east of Quesnel.


prince george south The Ghost Lake camping area can be accessed by travelling to Barkerville from Quesnel via Highway 26, and then taking the 3100 Forestry Road (gravel) from Barkerville. The park is located approximately 70 km (allow 1.5 hours) from Barkerville on the 3100 road. This is an active logging road: please drive cautiously with headlights on. Turn left onto a sign-posted 4-km access road, which leads to the camping area. Another route to Ghost Lake is via Likely (about 90 km). The 8400 Road (Cariboo Lake Road) from Likely leads north past Cariboo Lake, and eventually connects up with the 3100 Road. Follow this to the Ghost Lake turnoff (signed), turn right and drive another 4 km to the campsite. The park can also be accessed from the McBride Valley via the Castle Creek Forest Service Road, which leads up Castle Creek and ends about 5 km from the park boundary. Cariboo Mountains Provincial Park can also be accessed from Quesnel Lake by boat or along logging roads. However, no trails link Bowron Lake and Wells Gray Provincial Parks to Cariboo Mountains Provincial Park.

Cedar Point

Provincial Park About This Park: Cedar Point

Park is 8 hectares and situated on Quesnel Lake, six km from the town of Likely. Old growth cedars are located throughout the park including the campground area. Quesnel Lake offers spectacular scenery and excellent swimming, boating and fishing. The park offers a unique outdoor “mining museum” featuring mock shafts, adits (horizontal entries to a mine) and old machinery. Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Waterskiing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Group Camping, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Playground, Sani-Station/ Dump, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: Drive to Likely via 150 Mile House (120 km northeast) or via McLeese Lake (about 120 km due east) off Hwy 97. The park is 6 km beyond

Cadence apprehensively making her way into the waters of Mcleese Lake. – Norm Coyne

Likely. The closest communities, towns and cities are Likely, Horsefly and Williams Lake. 

Horsefly Lake

Provincial Park About This Park: This park offers

a popular 23 site campground and day-use area which has a developed beach, a horseshoe pit and a nature trail. This is a large, deep lake and is usually fished on a troll - included are a number of smaller lakes excellent for fly-fishing. Fishing for rainbow trout is a favourite pastime of many visitors. Fir, spruce, birch and cedar clothe the slopes along the lower reaches of Dillabough Creek at the west end of Horsefly Lake - a semi-wilderness water body penetrating the Quesnel Highlands. There are old growth cedars and Douglas firs throughout the park. There are two unnamed lakes in the park, once the site of a hatchery operated to restore the run of sockeye to the Horsefly River. Park Size: 148 hectares Activities: Canoeing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash, Scuba Diving, Swimming, Waterskiing, Wildlife Viewing, Windsurfing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilets, Playground, Showers, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: The park is located on Horsefly Lake, approximately 65 km from 150 Mile House off Highway 97; 55 km of the route is paved, and 10 km is well-maintained gravel. The closest community is Horsefly, located 13 km southwest of the park. Other communities are Likely and Williams Lake.

Cadence Coyne and Grandpa Monty Manahan enjoying a moment together on the dock of Mcleese Lake. – Norm Coyne

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east

PRINCE GEORGE

In photo below; Yes! On top of the world! Raven Peak, Sugarbowl Grizzly Den Provincial Park and Protected Area. – Greg Blackburn

Uncle Tom’s cabin. Belinda Blackburn sits and rests at the end of the steep hike! Mount Robson can be seen shrouded in clouds above the roof. If you really want to explore. Tucked away in the mountains within the Robson Valley is a little known trail called the Dunster Trail and in the alpine, is Uncle Tom’s cabin. A steep hike yet rewarding views in whch on a clear day you can see Mount Robson clearly from the cabin doors. Take a refreshing dip in the cool lake! – Greg Blackburn

My daughter Mya drinking clear cold mountain water! In a world where oil pipelines, natural gas fracking and mining dominate headlines, this photo is truely synonymous to the clear and clean fresh water we still have in many places today and sends a powerful message for today’s and future gnerations! – Greg Blackburn northern explorer | 53 | may 2013


prince george E A S T

Cedarside

Regional Park

Cedarside Regional Park is 18.5 ha in size and is located 3 km south of Valemount on Little Cranberry Lake. Cedarside Regional Park is a very popular spot to enjoy a swim in the lake or just laze in the sun on the large sandy beach. In the winter, the park offers trails to ski or snowshoe and a hill that is popular for sledding. Facilities include a large parking area, toilets, picnic tables, fire pits and easy access to a large sandy beach. Camping is not permitted.

George Hicks Regional Park

George Hicks Regional Park is 2.5 ha in size and is located at Valemount, BC along Swift Creek. The Park has a small trail and lookout platform that provides excellent salmon viewing opportunities in late July to mid August. The Chinook Salmon come from the Pacific Ocean, up the Fraser River and then enter Swift Creek to spawn. Facilities at George Hicks include bus parking, an information kiosk, picnic tables, toilets and a viewing platform.

Koeneman

Regional Park

Photos from Scott McWalter northern explorer | 54 | may 2013

Koeneman Regional Park is located in McBride. The 4.5 ha park provides a pastoral picture on the east side of the Fraser River. A notable feature is the dovetail cornered log house. The house is no longer available for community activities. Facilities include picnic tables, fire pits, toilets, and a large open field. A new picnic shelter is under construction. Camping is not permitted.


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Sugarbowl - Grizzly Den Provincial Park & Protected Area About This Park: This park is

24,765 hectares and includes the Grand Canyon of the Fraser. This park protects a component of old growth interior cedarhemlock, and provides excellent habitat for grizzly bear, martin and caribou. The area includes a developed trail system that offers popular alpine backcountry recreation opportunities. Activities: Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Hunting, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Cabins / Huts / Yurts, Campfires, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: The park is located about 95 km southeast of Prince George on Highway 16. To access both the Grizzly Den Trail and Raven Lake Trail drive east following Highway 16 to Hungary Creek, a distance of approximately 88 km from the east end of the Yellowhead Bridge in Prince George. As you travel along Highway 16 east you will pass by the Sugarbowl Trailhead (80 km) and the

Viking Ridge Trailhead (85 km), both within the boundaries of Sugarbowl - Grizzly Den Provincial Park. About .3 kms past Hungary Creek, turn right on to the Hungary Creek Forest Road and drive south keeping on the main road. After about 13 kms you will reach the Grizzly Den Trailhead parking lot, and about 2.6 km beyond this parking lot you will reach the Raven Lake Trailhead parking lot.

Evanoff

Provincial Park About This Park: This 1,473

hectare park is situated in the Hart Ranges of the Canadian Rockies. This park protects one of the most remarkable caves, the nationally significant Fang Cave complex, which includes the ninth longest cave in Canada. Other caves include the Tooth Decave and Window on the West. The park also provides a scenic, easily accessible destination for backcountry recreation. It includes picturesque alpine bowls, three small alpine lakes, and distinctive limestone pin-

nacles and ridges. Two separate trails, the Fang Trail and Torpy Trail provide access to small alpine basins, with a connection over Fang Mountain. The Torpy Trail continues outside the park to Torpy Mountain. Activities: Caving, Hiking, Hunting, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: The park is located approximately 121 km east of Prince George along Highway 16, the Bowron Forest Service Road and Pass Lake Road in the McGregor Mountains. There are two points to access the park - one from the west end just to the north of Pass Lake and one from the Upper Torpy Road and then through a logging block up to the south boundary.

Arctic Pacific Lakes

Provincial Park About This Park: The main fea-

ture of the 13, 887 hectare park is three small lakes that straddle the Continental Divide in a narrow, steep-sided glacial overflow channel. Arctic Lake is located in the headwaters of the Parsnip

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River that eventually drains into the Arctic Ocean. Portage and Pacific Lakes drain via James Creek into Herrick Creek and the McGregor River, which empties into the Fraser River on the way to the Pacific. The park protects very high value fall and spring grizzly habitat, and year-round caribou habitat. Lakes and streams support diverse fish populations, and provide excellent opportunities for fishing.
Diverse fish populations including lake trout, bull trout, rainbow trout, kokanee, dolly varden, mountain whitefish, redside shiner, lake char, and chinook salmon, and arctic grayling in Arctic Lake. Activities: Canoeing, Fishing, Hiking, Hunting, Swimming Facilities: Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: This protected area is located in a remote area 90 km Northeast of Prince George. A logging road in the Parsnip Valley provides access to within a short distance of the park, boat access is also possible via the Parsnip River and Arctic Creek. The closest community, town and city is Prince George.


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Close To The Edge

Provincial Park & Protected Area About This Park: This 702 hectare

park/protected area is situated in the Dezaiko Range of the Rocky Mountains. This park protects the internationally significant Close To The Edge cave, which has the deepest shaft and is the third deepest overall cave (472m) in Canada. The cave was bottomed in 2001. The primary shaft drops 255 m straight down, and its diameter varies considerably (up to 30m).There are also additional, smaller caves in the park. Activities: Caving, Hiking, Hunting Facilities: None How To Get There: This park/protected area is located approximately 160 km northeast of Prince George, and is accessible via the Pass Lake forest service road to Gleason creek. There is logging road access within 5 km of the park/protected area. The closest community, town or city is Prince George.

Slim Creek

Provincial Park About This Park: Slim Creek

Provincial Park protects an oldgrowth cedar-hemlock forest, alluvial terraces and wetlands. Park Size: 506 hectares Activities: Fishing, Hunting Facilities: None How To Get There: Slim Creek Provincial park is located along highway 16, approximately 110 kms east of Prince George. 
The closest communities are Prince George and McBride.

Erg Mountain

Provincial Park About This Park: This 1011 hect-

are park protects interior cedar hemlock forests on a valley slope above the Upper Fraser Trench, leading to alpine/sub-alpine area at the top of Erg Mountain. Erg Mountain has historically been a hiking destination, and offers an excellent viewpoint of the Upper Fraser Valley and surrounding mountains. On a good day, Mt. Sir Alexander in Kakwa Provincial

Park is clearly visible. Extensive alpine ridge-top hiking outside of the park is accessible from the peak of Erg Mountain. Mt. Vista views. Activities: Fishing, Hiking, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: The entrance to the park is about 5 km west of Crescent Spur, about 165 km east of Prince George along the Yellowhead (Highway 16) corridor approximately 500 m west of Catfish Creek. Erg Mountain Provincial Park is close to the Ptarmigan Creek Protected Area, and the two parks share the same access road and trailhead. The trailhead is 8 km in from Highway 16. The closest communities, towns and cities are Prince George and McBride.

Ptarmigan Creek

Provincial Park & Protected Area About This Park: Ptarmigan Creek Provincial Park and Protected Area is a narrow, steep-sided

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valley at the north end of the Cariboo Mountains Ecosection above the Upper Fraser Trench. The park protects 4,633 hectares of the complete, intact watershed of the east branch of Ptarmigan Creek, a tributary to the Fraser River. The park protects an entire watershed and habitat for Caribou and Grizzly Bears. Activities: Fishing, Hiking, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Campfires, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: The access road to the park and protected area is about 5 km west of Crescent Spur, about 165 km east of Prince George along the Yellowhead (Highway 16) corridor, approximately 500 m west of Catfish Creek. Ptarmigan Creek Provincial Park is close to Erg Mountain Provincial Park, and the two parks share to same access road and trail head. The trailhead is 8kms from highway 16. 
The closest communities to this park are Prince George and McBride.


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Another great day at the Ancient Forest only 116km east of Prince George. Take an afternoon and enjoy the giant old growth cedars and the rain forest ecosystem, you won’t be sorry. This is a great easy to moderate hike for the entire family. – Alan Ramsay

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Kakwa

Provincial Park & Protected Area About This Park: Kakwa Provincial

Park showcases iceclad mountains, extensive alpine meadows and a section of the Continental Divide. Main physical features include Mount Sir Alexander (3270 m), Mount Ida (3189 m) and Kakwa Lake. The wide range of species diversity gives excellent opportunity for wildlife viewing. Visitors interested in photography will appreciate the incredible beauty of the remote area. Kakwa Provincial Park, together with Kakwa Wildlands Park in Alberta and Willmore Wilderness Park in Alberta, make up the first Interprovincial Park for B.C. and Alberta called “Kakwa - Willmore Interprovincial Park.” Activities: Climbing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Cabins / Huts / Yurts, Campfires, Pit Toilets, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: Located approximately 70 km north of McBride in British Columbia. The Kakwa Provincial Park can be accessed from McBride in B.C., Grand Prairie in Alberta, or by air charter. The closest communities, towns and cities are McBride, Prince George and Valemount.

West Twin

Provincial Park & Protected Area About This Park: This 22,317

hectare provincial park was established to protect the rich wildlife values and the wide biogeoclimatic representation. Most of all, this park contains the only protected corridor across the Robson Valley trench. The area runs from the Cariboo Mountains in the south, through the main Robson Valley trench, and up the fronting ranges of the Rocky Mountains. From the Alpine areas, there are incredible views of the valley. Activities: Hiking, Hunting, Pets on Leash Facilities: Cabins / Huts / Yurts, Picnic Areas, Pit Toilet, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping How To Get There: Located approximately 180 km southeast of Prince George by Highway 16 there is a pull out with a Forestry Interpretation Trail.

These photos are from the Vineyards, a beautiful hike east of Prince George, around the Raven Lake / Grizzly Den trailheads. We hiked the Vineyards trail in late summer and camped at the top in the beautiful alpine greenery. There are some amazing views of the McGregor Mountain Range at the top, and being a bit harder to access the trailhead, we saw very few people on the hike. Seeing the alpine flora in full bloom was well worth the climb to the top. - Amanda Nolan

To access Boulder Mountain Hike, drive 166 km from Prince George on Highway 16 toward McBride and at the Goat River Forestry Road, turn in and drive another 1 km. Where a side road turns left park your vehicle. This is where the hike begins. There is a popular hiking trail off the West Dore River Road (just northwest of McBride). This hike is 7 km to the cabin and then the hike can extend to various areas of the park.

Holliday Creek Arch Protected Area About This Park: This small, 395

hectare protected area showcases a magnificent natural stone arch, a very rare feature of provincial significance. In excess of 80 metres wide and 18 metres high, this arch spans a steep, rocky gully. Mountain goats frequent this area, providing visitors an opportunity to view one of the most interesting geological features in the province. The park has no road access, but it can be reached via an 8 km hiking trail from Highway 16. This trail is extremely steep and rough and can be subject to snow, rock and debris slides. Only hikers in excel-

lent physical condition should attempt this trail. Activities: Hiking, Hunting, Pets on Leash, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: None How To Get There: This protected area is located between the communities of Dunster and McBride, north of Highway 16.

Small River Caves

Provincial Park About This Park: Small River

Caves Provincial Park protects a provincially important karst/ cave system. It is considered to be a very dangerous cave system that should only be attempted by highly experienced cavers. This 1,818 hectare park lies at the transition zone between Engelmann Spruce-Subalpine Fir (ESSFmm1) and the Alpine Tundra (AT) biogeoclimatic zones. The Small River logging road accesses the drainage but one must be aware of logging truck traffic at all times. Activities: Caving Facilities: None How To Get There: Located on the west side of the Small River drainage, high above the valley bottom, this cave complex is

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remote and difficult to access. The closest communities include McBride and Valemount.

Lower & Upper Raush

Protected Area About This Park: While the Upper Raush (5,582 ha) and Lower Raush (1,279 ha) are two distinctly separate protected areas, their adjacency and similarity warrant we document them as one unit. These protected areas protect portions of an undeveloped, relatively pristine watershed. As part of the Northern Columbia Mountains Ecosection, these protected areas contain four biogeoclimatic subzones. The Lower Raush protects excellent riparian wildlife habitat, while the Upper Raush protects a variety of biogeoclimatic subzones. Activites: Hunting Facilities: None How To Get There: Located on the south west side of the Fraser River, just south of McBride, these protected areas have no road access or facilities of any kind. 
There is an old road on the east side of the Raush River, on private land, and permission from the owner must be obtained.


prince george E A S T

Meadow below Viking Ridge. – Crystal Patten

Rearguard Falls

Provincial Park About This Park: The Rearguard

Falls viewpoint provides an excellent opportunity for travelers to witness the end of a long journey by the Chinook, largest of the Pacific salmon. These fish have survived several years at sea to return to the river of their birth, the mighty Fraser. From its estuary in British Columbia’s lower mainland to this point, the Chinook have traveled upstream over 1200 km. Some may be successful battling over these falls to reach the gravel above, but for most, Rearguard Falls marks the end of their journey. Park Size: 48 hectares Activities: Fishing, Hiking, Pets on Leash, Wildlife Viewing

Facilities: Campfires, Pit Toilets How To Get There: 285 km east

of Prince George on Highway 16. The closest communities are Tete Jaune Cache, Valemount and McBride.

Jackman Flats

Provincial Park About This Park: Jackman Flats

Provincial Park is a product of ice and wind at the end of the last ice age. This created an ecosystem considered unique in British Columbia. Rare plant communities and shifting sand dune structures now exist in this rather small park. Excellent recreational opportunities have been enjoyed by Robson Valley residents for many years in this special area. An extremely dry area, where

drought conditions generally exist through the summer season, Jackman Flats is vulnerable to excessive recreation use. Hiking is permitted on existing trails only. Excellent opportunities exist for bird watching and plant identification. The fragile nature, distribution and abundance of these lichens can be preserved by staying on designated trails. Tread lightly and enjoy one of BC Parks most unique landscapes. Park Size: 615 hectares Activities: Hiking, Horseback Riding, Hunting, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Picnic Areas, Pit Toilet How To Get There: Jackman Flats Provincial park is located 10 km north of Valemount, on Highway 5, minutes from Mount Robson Provincial Park.

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Mount Terry Fox

Provincial Park About This Park: Mount Terry Fox

Provincial Park is a 1930 hectare day-use park with no road access. A Highway 16 viewpoint 7 km west of Mt. Robson west gate provides a view of the mountain. This park is historically significant as a park dedicated to Terry Fox for his outstanding achievements. Activities: Hiking, Pets on Leash Facilities: Campfires, Picnic Areas, Flush Toilets How To Get There: Located adjacent to the west boundary of Mt. Robson Provincial Park, 3 hours from Prince George. Communities close by include Tete Jaune Cache, Valemount and McBride.


prince george E A S T

Know before you go Campfires Where campfires are permitted, and approved fire-rings or pits are not available, follow these guidelines when building your campfire: • Prepare your campfire by removing all leaves, twigs and other flammable material from an area extending at least 30 centimetres around the fire. • Be sure to scrape or dig down to mineral soil. • Build your campfires at least three metres from any log, stump, snag, standing tree or wooden structure • Campfires cannot be larger than 0.5 metres in height and 0.5 metres in diameter, or roughly a foot-and-a-half by a foot-and-a-half. People must also have a shovel or eight litres of water nearby, and build a fireguard around their campfires by scraping down to the dirt and clearing away twigs, leaves and needles.
Having a fire larger than 0.5 metres in height and 0.5 metres in diameter could result in a fine of $345. • Equip yourself with a shovel or a pail of water containing at least 8 litres and keep near the fire at all times. • Attend your campfire at all times and be certain it is extinguished before leaving it. Sift the ashes with your fingers to be sure.

Pyramid Creek Falls Provincial Park About This Park: A spectacular

waterfall from a hanging valley is protected by this park. Park Size: 13 hectares Activities: Hunting, Pets on Leash Facilities: None How To Get There: 30 km north of the community of Blue River. Pyramid Creek Falls is visible from Hwy #5 and from Canadian National Railway. Access to the falls is limited as the park is on the east side of the North Thompson River. The closest communities to this park are Clearwater, Vavenby, McBride and Kamloops.

Mount Robson

Provincial Park About This Park: Mount Robson

Provincial Park, the second oldest park in British Columbia’s park system, is truly one of the world’s crown jewels. The mountain for which the park is named guards the park’s western entrance. At 3,954 metres, Mount Robson, the highest peak in the Canadian

Rockies, towers over the lesser surrounding peaks; this is one of the finest views in the Rocky Mountains. Designated as a part of the Canadian Rocky Mountains World Heritage Site, Mount Robson provides everything from developed, vehicle-accessible camping to remote valleys that seldom see a human footprint. Mount Robson Provincial Park also protects the headwaters of the Fraser River. From its pristine alpine source, the Fraser River gains strength and size to match any of the world’s major rivers. Flora and fauna are typical of the western slope of the Rocky Mountains, North Continental Range. One is able, on some trails, to travel between three different vegetation zones during a day hike. Over 182 species of birds have been documented in the park. Mule and Whitetail Deer, Moose, Elk and Black Bear call the lower elevation home while Grizzly Bear, Caribou, Mountain Goat and Mountain Sheep inhabit the higher elevations. With over 217,000 hectares of mostly undisturbed wilderness available,

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wildlife populations are allowed to ebb and flow with minimal intervention by humans. There are excellent wildlife viewing opportunities throughout the park. From mountain goats on the many cliffs and rockslides to moose in Moose Marsh, the patient observer will be suitably rewarded. Activities: Canoeing, Caving, Climbing, Cycling, Fishing, Hiking, Horseback Riding, Pets on Leash, Swimming, Wildlife Viewing Facilities: Boat Launch, Campfires, Drinking Water, Group Camping, Picnic Areas, Pit and Flush Toilets, Playground, Sani-Station/ Dump, Showers, Vehicle Accessible Camping, Walk-In/Wilderness Camping, Wheelchair Access How To Get There: The park is located in east, central British Columbia, just west of the British Columbia/Alberta border and Jasper National Park. Approximately 4 hours north of Kamloops, BC on Highway 5; 3 1/2 hours east of Prince George, BC on Highway 16; and 5 hours west of Edmonton, Alberta on Highway 16. The closest communities to this park are Valemount, Tete Jaune Cache and McBride.


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Northen Expolorer