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WISCONSIN’S RESOURCE FOR ALL ANIMALS January 2012

Lakeshore Edition

FREE

Volume 3, Issue 1

New Dog Sellers Law (Act 90) Improves Conditions for Wisconsin Dogs by Kathy Pobloskie, Pet Journal Contributor Act 90 has been in effect for only 6 months and it is already having effects. I am going to try to give you a brief recap on what has been going on. This has become a controversial topic and the following is anecdotal and based on my perspective. But at the end of the day, when all is said and done, are conditions better for dogs better with the law than before? I believe the answer is yes. I have kept an informal tally over the last few years of the number of USDA licensed breeders operating in Wisconsin. These are the breeders that are able to supply pet stores. In 2008, the highest number of active licenses that I noted was 117. In 2009, the number dropped to 95. By early January 2011, there were 44. I just checked (late December 2011) and there are now 33. Have some of these breeders stopped selling to pet stores and are now selling on the Internet? Probably. But there are also some that have stopped breeding, or moved out of state, because of the pressure of the new law. USDA standards were easy to comply with. Act 90 standards are much tougher, ensuring that dogs have proper exercise and socialization.

Photo courtesy of Legacy Studios

G ET Y OUR G AME D AY G EAR H ERE...

Act 90 was signed into law in early December 2009. Act 90/ATCP 16 went into effect on June 1st, 2011. ATCP 16 are the accompanying rules to Act 90. This new law, called the Commercial Dog Sellers law requires everyone who sells or offers to sell 25 or more dogs per year to be licensed and regulated.

see

Act 90 on page 9.

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PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

ABOUT

OUR

COVER MODEL

January 2012 3

Editors Notes

Dear Readers,

Thank you for reading the January issue of Pet Journal. The staff of Pet Journal would like to wish all of our readers a very Happy New Year.

Would you like to see your pets in Pet Journal? Email a picture of your pet(s) to petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com and we will feature them in our Pet Pictures Page. No email? No problem. Mail a copy of the picture to the Pet Journal mailbox, listed below. All pictures received by mail will be returned after scanning.

Our columnists would love to hear your questions. Contact information is found at the end of their respective columns! Please feel free to send us your Have you seen the updated events story ideas and photos. We want to page on the Pet Journal website yet? be the publication you look forward to It now features an interactive calendar reading each and every month. by goggle, as well as, the event posters and event listings it had before. To acAre you interested in Advertising in cess the events page go to the Pet JourPet Journal? For more information on nal home page and click on the events advertising in this edition of Pet Journal page link at the top of the page. email lakeshoreadvertising@petjour, Editor nalmidwest.com. If you would like to have pet journal delivered to your business for you staff or clients please email our distribution department at distribution@petjournalmidwest.com

Lee J Schneider

Our January cover model is Christy our “New Years Pup” who is welcoming in the New Year. Christy (Christmas) is an 8 week old Bearded Collie. His human companion is Cindy R. of Theresa, WI. Photo courtesy of Legacy Studios, Sheboygan.

Become a friend of Pet Journal on Facebook! Join the growing group of Pet Journal readers following us, and upload a picture of your pets, it could be featured as our pet of the week!

Table of Contents 1 - New Dog Sellers Law (Act 90) Improves Conditions for Wisconsin Dogs by K. Pobloskie

3 - About our Cover Model Publishers Notes 4 - Holistic & Natural Options for your Pets Hosted K. Hoelzel

Keeping Your Pets Safe During the Holidays: Post Holiday Edition

by Pet Journal Editors

5 - Ask Scrappy Q & A

Hosted by Scrappy the Pit Bull

Eco News: Mid-Winter Boost by K. Diedrich

6 - Calendar of Events 7 - Help Algae is invading my Fish Tank!!! by P. & M. Verner

Ask the Alpha Dog

Pet Journal newspaper is published by LSRB Media, LLC, on a monthly basis and is available free of charge to readers at various locations in the region that it is printed. The views represented by Columnists or Contributors in Pet Journal do not necessarily represent the views of Pet Journal or its parent company LSRB Media, LLC. Questions or comments regarding content in this edition can be made to lakeshore@petjournalmidwest.com or by calling our offices at: (920) 393-4818. Pet Journal is always on the lookout for new advertiser’s if you are interested in advertising with us please contact the Lakeshore Region advertising department at lakeshoreadvertising@petjournalmidwest.com. To contact Pet Journal by mail please send all correspondence to our mailbox at: Pet Journal, attn: Lakeshore Region Advertising 3120 S. Business Dr., Suite 270, Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524. If you have a questions for a specific columnist please use the email at the end of their respective columns. If you have a questions for a specific department, please contact them via their email address listed below. General Information................... petjournal@petjournalmidwest.com Advertising Department............. advertising@petjournalmidwest.com Distribution Location Requests... distribution@petjournalmidwest.com Pet Journal Archives...................... archives@petjournalmidwest.com Pet Photo Submissions................. petphoto@petjournalmidwest.com Our Website........................................ www.petjournalmidwest.com

Hosted by T. Pool

8 - Ask the Vet

Hosted by Dr. K. Strickfaden

Skunk Odor Cure!! by kimmerluvsk9

9 - Pet Adoption Section 10 - Winter at a Wisconsin Zoo by A, Kawski

10 - Looking Back by K. Ahrens

11 - Myths & Lessons for Backyard Nature by B. Brebner

Wisconsin Pet Expo Press Release 12 - Photos of your Pets 13 - Reiki ~ A Gift for Animals in Shelters, Sanctuaries and Rescues by A. Noyce

Pet Product Reviews

by S. Minaker

14 - A Wholistic view of Seperation Anxiety by L. Ledbeter

December Word Search Answers 15 - Grooming your Pet Hosted by D. Schmidtl

Coming in October The Amazing Sense of Smell

from CatsInternational.org

This is Garbage Gut

from The Practical Pet Vet

16 - Classified Ads Event Posters 18 - Pet Journal Word Search


PET JOURNAL

January 2012 4

Holistic & Natural Options for Your Pets by Karey Hoelzel, Critters Pet Nutrition holistic-and-natural-lake@petjournalmidwest.com Supplements such as Barley Grass Ah – a New Year, and a or Spirulina are beneficial because they reflection on the Summer of are rich in antioxidants. Dogs and cats 2011. both need greens in their diets. Vitamin C, B-Complex and CoQ10 enzyme are It was for the most part rather opexcellent added to their meals in rotapressive, humid and uncomfortable for tion with a good multi-vitamin. There most of us and our pets. Fall was cool, are some fine resources for animal supand December brought a smattering of plements such as Herbsmith, Dr. Harsnow flurries, but no real sustained cold, vey’s, and Animal Essentials to name a and as of yet, not the kind of winter us few. These herbal and natural blends Wisconsinites are used to. All of this are made specifically for your companconsidered, this last year was the perion pets special needs. Independent fect recipe for growing fungus bacteria, retailers are more likely to offer one mold and viruses. Good reasons to conon one nutritional assistance and are a sider making a New Year’s Resolution wealth of good information. Specialty to provide our pets with a head start shops will carry high quality products to better health by introducing vitamins and take time to work with you. and supplements into their diets. Dry skin, brittle coats and itching are all signs of a body in need of proper nutrition. Don’t make the mistake of relying on their dry food to be balanced, because it isn’t. You won’t find “balance” in a bag, there is no such thing. You can achieve balance overtime by controlling it yourself. Adding vitamins and supplements by your own hand gives you an excellent way of insuring the amount and frequency specific to the needs of your pet.

For most pets who don’t have any specific health issues, a goof herbal multi-vitamin is best paired with an Essential fatty acid such care for fish oil, coconut oil, hemp oil, or borage oil are a good substitute. Don’t overdo, start with small amounts, ¼ teaspoon added to food once daily, and slowly work up to a daily amount appropriate for the size of your pet.

Natural raw diet in my opinion is the best, dogs and cats are carnivores not corn-ivores and we as responsible careEssential fatty acids (Omega 3) are takers of our companion animals need just that, “essential” for health and wellto educate ourselves about proper nutribeing, not only for us humans, but our tion and supplementation. pet as well. Digestive enzymes and probiotic supplements should be added to Make wise choices for your pets, the their food as these will help with digesonly voice they have is yours. When we tion and elimination of waste. Probiotall know better, we do better, and our ics have a number of healthful functions animals are going to benefits from the including enhancing digestive functions, knowledge we gain. maintaining control over potentially hostile yeast and pathogenic bacteria. Even I wish all of you and your pets a a dollop of unsweetened natural yogurt health-filled New Year. Gain knowledge on top of your dog’s daily meal will go a and pass it forward... long way toward helping them maintain intestinal health. How simple is that?

see

www.petjournalmidwest.com

Keeping Your Pets Safe During the Holidays by the Editors of Pet Journal

Editors Note: Keeping your pet safe column will appear in months where there is a holiday that could have items that are potentiality dangerous to your pets. Once again, we face the aftermath of the Christmas/New Year’s holidays. The bills, the clean up, the hangovers, and of course, the extra weight brought on by all the various feasts we’ve overindulged in. It’s also the time we begin to take down the decorations for another year. With all that’s going on, it’s important to remind ourselves of the precautions we took regarding our four legged family members and the holidays. Much of what we discussed regarding putting up decorations, also applies to taking them down. As you know, our little buddies are curious and love to be involved with whatever were up to. The noise and activity of taking down decorations and boxing them up is extremely interesting to them. This means we have to be especially on guard for situations that could potentially cause them harm. The best case would scenario would be to keep them out of the area while working. Though we all know how persistent and persuasive they can be when they want something. With this in mind, here are a few suggestions. When removing decorations, have a storage container ready for them. Leaving small, fragile or glass ornaments laying about where curious pets can find them can lead to disaster. Especially with so many ornaments that look like the kind of toys they are used to playing with. They can easily be picked up and

carried off to be chewed on, causing mouth or internal damage when broken or swallowed. This also covers objects including, hooks, string, ribbons, garland, strands of lights, and so on. A number of decorations not only cause intestinal blockage and internal damage, but can also cause skin and eye irritation due to low-level toxins in the decoration. These include angel hair (made from spun glass), tinsel, artificial snow and flocking. Simply make sure they are properly disposed of or placed in appropriate packaging. If you have a live tree, it’s a good idea to thoroughly vacuum anywhere the tree has been to catch all the fallen needles. Desiccated needles become very rigid and sharp. They can easily puncture paws, cause mouth, and intestinal damage if swallowed. You also need to dispose of any left over water in the tree reservoir before thirsty pet decide to drink any. This water may contain preservatives and pesticides from the tree. If your tree is artificial, be sure to keep branches off the floor. Branches look very inviting to pets who love to chew. Being the core to the branch is often made of metal, chewing can result in painful broken teeth and damage to the mouth. As mentioned in previous columns, simply knowing where your pets are can solve all of these potential problems. Dede and I hope all of our readers had a wonderful Christmas and want to wish them a safe and happy New Year. I wish to thank Dede for her valuable assistance in this month’s column.

Supplements on pg. 8.

Plant Eating and Digging from catsinternational.org What could be more fun for a little tiger than to have the jungle brought into his home! From Kitty’s point of view a potted plant is a snack, an entertainment center, and sometimes a latrine, all-in-one. What could be more perfect! (Unfortunately owners seldom see plants that way). Wise cat owners will check the poisonous plant list before bringing greens into the home. Rubbing moistened black pepper onto the leaves and placing stones on top of the dirt will dissuade Kitty from tasting or digging in the plant. Let’s be fair... why not plant a pot of healthy greens just for Kitty?

Editors Note: Cats International was founded by Betsy Libscomb, a cat behavioral expert. If you would like more information on Cats International or for cat behavioral assistance, please visit the Cats International website, www.catsinternational.org. Reprinted with permission.


Lakeshore Region

PET JOURNAL

January 2012 5

ECO NEWS

ASK SCRAPPY! by Scrappy, the Lovable Pit Bull askscrappy@petjournalmidwest.com

Howdy Doodle to all my friends! I hope everyone had a great Christmas and a Happy New Year (depending on when you’re reading this). I also hope you didn’t overindulge too much on all the yummy food, treats, and Christmas magic. Though I’m not sure that Christmas magic has any caloric content, but better safe than sorry. My holiday came and went without much fanfare or excitement. My eternally promised bed did not arrive, though I did receive an extremely lame IOU. Misty was smug over this until I reminded her of her gift shortcomings this year. At that point all I saw was a flash of teeth, a hiss, and she was gone. I thought I heard something smash somewhere in the house, but I thought it safer not to go looking for the source of the noise. The last thing I want to do is meet up with an angry Misty in a dark room where she could be sequestered anywhere, plotting and waiting. It’s actually safer to sleep with one eye open and be on guard for late night visits from the princess of doom. Oh well, I’ll let you all know how things turn out in my next column. If it goes bad, Misty will be writing this column. Actually, she isn’t really all that bad, but there are moments at night when I wake up and see two glowing venomous eyes glaring at me from the darkness and then they’re gone. At those moments I wish I had installed a panic room or slept in a heavily barricaded kennel. We have, unfortunately, arrived at that time of the year I loathe the most, winter. Yes, that tail freezing, always cold, time of the year. So, in this column I would like to go over some of the issues we face outside in winter weather. I know it’s not been too bad so far, but winter is sneaky and I’m sure I’ll be up to my nose in snow soon. At this time it’s a good idea for our human friends to take into consideration our special needs. First off, we get cold too! Yeah, we have fur and such, but temperatures can quickly drop into negative numbers when it’s windy. During these times we can’t stay outside for extended periods. We can suffer from hypothermia and frostbite, just like you do. Generally, I don’t give such conditions time to bother me. I’m out the door, perform my unmentionables, do a couple of loops around the yard, check on the scheming bunnies, and I’m back in the house. Though some of us, sadly, aren’t that smart and will stand there with their tongues hanging out and freeze to death. Too many dogs get their role

Mid-winter Boost by Kim Diedrich, Chief Naturalist, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary econews@petjournalmidwest.coml Although our winter has been mild so far, we have to remember that this is Wisconsin and “old man winter” is going to rear his wintry head at some point. I have to admit that it has been nice running my holiday errands without a heavy coat and not having to carry packages or drive through a snowy parking lot has been a treat, but this mild weather has thrown wildlife for a bit of a loop.

models from cartoons and figure we can withstand anything. If that were the case then we should be able to talk, make startling discoveries in science and medicine, and fly (which, of course, I can, but choose not to. I don’t like to make the other dogs feel bad!). That’s where you come in and save the day by dragging us back in house. I understand there are some of us who must be outside for various reasons. In this case we need a safe, warm, insulated shelter protected from the elements, as much as possible. Make sure there is plenty of warm bedding available that we can snuggle into to help keep in body heat. A pet approved heated mat is a great option for the shelter, but never use heat lamps, space heaters or any device not approved for us. If the shelter you provide is a garage, make sure not to start your vehicle in a closed garage with us still inside. Like you, carbon monoxide poisoning is dangerous to us as well. Also make sure the garage is clear of antifreeze leakage or any other chemicals which may be dangerous to us. As for kitties, I know Misty would never dream of going outside. She will occasionally saunter over by a window, look outside at the snow, shudder, and faint. She will then have to be rushed to a large luxurious pillow, wrapped in a cashmere blanket, be arrayed with selection of the finest cat foods and treats, and have the latest copy of Cat Fabulous close at paw. She’s such a pretentious snob, but we deal with it be cause she can be a vicious pretentious snob. If your kitty isn’t the aloof furball Misty is, you should limit their time outside during the winter and you should never leave them out overnight during the harsh cold. Cats have this annoying habit of finding the worst and most dangerous places to hide out and keep warm. Namely, vehicle engine compartments and wheel wells. This is where you, once again, come to our aid. Before you start your vehicle in the morning, honk your horn briefly. This will scare the kitties away and annoy your neighbors immensely. The way I look at it is, this will save a kitty’s life and your neighbors can get over it. Besides, I’m not suggesting you lay on your horn like you’re trying to scare a monster away; just a short burst will do it. FYI, horns rarely scare monsters away, it generally just makes them angrier and more inclined to hang around longer.

There are a few more considerations to discuss. In a word, paws. When were out running around outside, snow and ice can collect on our paws and between our toes. This can form clumps that can be painful to walk on and it’s really, really cold. Freeze some ice cubes to your feet and walk around on them and you’ll get the idea. So, when we come in, make sure you wipe all the snow and ice off our paws. This will also remove all the harmful chemicals you humans use to clear ice off your walkways. Removing these chemicals is important because, like humans, eventually we’ll stick our foot in our mouths and ingest them. We, at least, do this for cleaning purposes. If your buddy will allow it, all of this can be remedied with some sweet looking footwear. Something flashy, yet understated enough to worn to any function. I, myself, prefer au natural. My final thoughts are on food and drink. During the cold winter months those of us who spend a lot of time outdoors may need more food and water. We need the food for all the energy expended running around like mad trying to stay warm. The extra food will also help us maintain body heat and prevent us from becoming petsicles. I know, it’s a tired joke, but you were expecting it. We also need extra water to keep us hydrated during all of the above mentioned running around and snow simply won’t cut it! Well, that’s pretty much it for this month. Once again, I hope everyone had a safe holiday and didn’t forget about your best friends (like some people I know). I look forward to another year of sharing my thoughts and wisdom with all of you. As terrifying a thought as this is, I may even let Misty helm the column every so often. Talk to you next month,

Scrappy Editors Note: Scrappy love to get mail and questions from his readers; please email him at askscrappy@petjournalmidwest.com or by mail: Pet Journal Attn: Ask Scrappy! 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

Raccoons and opossums have still been seen moving around and not as many birds have been visiting the feeders. Why should they, when there is plenty of natural food still out in the open?! But we do know that the weather is going to change eventually and become more of a “normal” cold, snowy time. What can we do then to help wildlife? A fun and easy activity that you can do, is to “re-gift” your real Christmas tree. Make sure to remove all the garland, ornaments, lights and hooks and then put the tree outside in your yard. By just leaving it natural, you are providing a windbreak and hiding place for squirrels, rabbits, mice and birds. You can lay the tree on its side or stand it upright. You can also enhance the tree by again decorating it, but this time use items that will supply a food source for the critters and entertainment and beauty for you! Cheerios, popcorn, raisins or cranberries can be strung on pieces of yarn. Tie whole peanuts or other nuts with yarn and hang as ornaments. Cut an orange or grapefruit in half and hollow out the peel then fill it with a mixture of suet and birdseed and hang it up. Roll pinecones in peanut butter and birdseed. Take pieces of day old bread, spread with egg white and sprinkle with birdseed. These are simple, fun ideas that kids and adults will enjoy making. Not only are you supplying wildlife with some much needed energy for the cold, but they will often use the yarn for their nesting material too. If it is bitter cold without much snow on the ground, don’t forget about providing a water supply as well. Electric heaters can be purchased for bird baths or you can be vigilant and add fresh water daily to a pan or flipped over garbage can lid. Don’t get discouraged if you don’t notice activity right away. Many creatures are nocturnal or will hunker down tight if the weather is really nasty. Look for tracks or signs that your tree has been visited and turn it into a game by keeping track of the number and different kinds of animals and birds that visit your “recycled” treat tree!

Editors Note: Kim and the staff of the Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary will be bringing you a topic of interest in Eco News to you each month. If you have a question for the staff that you would like to see in a future issue of Pet Journal please email her at: econews@petjournalmidwest.com.


PET JOURNAL

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JANUARY 2012 SUNDAY

MONDAY

1 New Years Day 2

TUESDAY

3

WEDNESDAY

4

THURSDAY

5

FRIDAY

6

Lincoln Park Zoo Open Manitowoc, WI Monday - Saturday 7:00 am - 3:00 pm

SATURDAY

7 Two Left Paws at Pet Supplies Plus, 1817 N 8th St., Sheboygan, 11 AM - 3 PM. Two Left Paws at Feed Bag, 10900 N Port Washington Rd., Mequon, 11 AM - 3 PM.

8

9

10 Save the

11

12

13

Eagles Day

14 8th Annual Chilli Cook-off Route 43 Harley-Davidson, Sheboygan, 10 AM - 2 PM. See listing on page 10 for more information.

Two Left Paws at Pet Smart, 4013 Hwy 28 at Deer Trace, Sheboygan, 11 AM - 3 PM..

21 15

16 Martin Luther 17

18

19

20

King Jr.

Two Left Paws at Pet Smart, 4013 Hwy 28 at Deer Trace, Sheboygan, 11 AM - 3 PM.

Two Left Paws at Pet Smart, 4013 Hwy 28 at Deer Trace, Sheboygan, 11 AM - 3 PM. Two Left Paws at Petco, 4144 Harbor Town Ln., Manitowoc, 11 AM - 3 PM. Hyper Tails Agility Club Soup Wars and Open House, 635 Co. Rd. PP, Sheboygan Falls, 12 PM - 4 PM.

22

23 Chinese New 24

25

26

27

Year

Training Seminars, Canine Good Citizen Testing, and wish list collection for SCHS.

28 Christa McAuliffe Day (Challenger Day)

29

30

31

All Events that appear on this page are also available for viewing on the Events page of the Pet Journal website, www. petjournalmidwest.com. Events will be posted to our website first and then added to the Print Edition as space allows. If you have a smart phone with a barcode reading program you can scan the code on the facing page to right to go to the events page.

February 4 February 25 March 4 Upcoming Events

Great Lakes Pet Expo, hosted by AWARE at the Wisconsin Exposition Center at State Fair Park in West Allis, WI, 10 AM - 5 PM. See press release on page 11.

8th Annual Mardi Paws Casino Night benefiting the Eastshore Humane Association in Chilton at the Holiday Inn Neenah Riverwalk, Neenah, 6 PM - 10:30 PM. See event poster on page 17.

Pet Journal provides this calendar as a service to the local community. If you have an event that you would like listed please email us at: petjournal@ petjournalmidwest.com, with the following information: date(s) and time(s) of event, your contact information, a short description of what will be happening, if it is a fundraiser please list who the proceeds are going to, and please list the subject as “PJ Calendar Submission.” Please send this to us no later than the 23rd of the month for inclusion into the next months issue. Thank you.

Pins for Pups benefiting Furry Bottoms Rescue in Plymouth at Maple Lanes Bowling Alley in Sheboygan, 1:15 PM - ???. See ad on page 11.


Animal Foundation & Pet Pantry of Wis. Keeping pets at home by providing food assistance for animals.

We are here to help those who may of lost their job, have poor health, or are shut-in. Our economy has forced many to surrender their companions because they can’t afford to feed or get them proper health care. With donations we are able to assist individuals in keeping their pets fed and at home.

www.AFPPW.org

PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

Bus: 920-428-PETS (7387) Toll Free: 888-924-2333 E-mail: petsathome@yahoo.com

The Animal Foundation & Pet Pantry is a 501 (C) (3) not-for-profit orginization

January 2012 7

Ask the Alpha Dog by Alpha Dog - Tamara Pool, 4-Paws Private Training, Sheboygan, WI alpha-dog@petjournalmidwest.com Do you walk your dog or does he walk you? When we watch movies and TV shows and we see people walking their dogs with their arms stretched out in front of them holding the leash, we see how happy they are and we all think that is how it’s supposed to be. WRONG!! You should never let your dog be in front of you. The dog should remain at your side or behind you. When in the correct position, you retain leadership over the dog. Think of a pack of dogs pulling a sled. The “lead dog” is in front. The lead is not turning around to say “Are you guys coming?” He leads, they follow. Who are you in the pack? There are several ways to teach your dog to walk beside you…but it’s more than that. Your dog needs to be on a “loose leash” at your side. This means that s/he needs to be paying constant attention to you. When you turn a corner, they should be right there with you. Not anticipating your moves, but feeling the move as it happens instead of when the leash becomes tight. The pack follows the lead because they are constantly watching and looking for small, non-verbal cues from the lead. These could be as subtle as a head turn to look in the direction of where you will be heading. The dog will see and follow. One way to teach them to pay attention is through “point-to-point” walking. This means that as you start walking, every time you feel the dog is pulling

ahead, turn and go the other way while giving a correction such as “eh.” This will teach them to watch you. The abrupt turns and tugs on the leash will eventually teach them to pay attention. Be careful not to slow down and anticipate them pulling ahead. And don’t watch the dog either. This will only put the power in their hands and take it away from you. The lead doesn’t watch the pack, it’s the other way around. Another method of teaching LLW is to simply stop. When walking, if your dog pulls out in front, stop dead in your tracks and wait for them to return to you and sit. This method takes a lot of patience. You still can’t look at your dog as with the other method. Whatever method you use, be sure to keep it consistent and don’t give up. Even if your dog is doing better, don’t miss even one correction. This could derail everything you are trying to accomplish. Good luck and remember, the Alpha Dog leads the pack…not the other way around.

Editors Note: Alpha Dog, Tamara welcomes your questions on pet training, please email her at the email above or by mail: Pet Journal, Attn: Alpha Dog 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

HELP, ALGAE IS INVADING MY FISH TANK!!! Patrick and Melissa Verner, The Betta Boutique, LLC, Appleton, WI Algae, algae, algae it is one of the sure your tank is receiving the correct phates, then your tank may be overmost prevalent problems encountered hours of lights per day. Tanks should crowded ( a general rule for stocking fish in the fish keeping hobby. Two major also not be placed in direct sunlight. If that stay relatively small is one inch of causes of Algae are too much light and you place a tank in a window where the fish per gallon of water. However, this excessive amounts of nutrients in your sun hits it for several hours a day, you rule does not apply to every species. For water. However, algae can be controlled are asking for trouble. Not only is the instance, 3 goldfish will produce much and this article will discuss both the amount of light important in the growth more waste than 3 yellow lab. cichcauses of excessive algae growth and of algae, but the type of lights you lids), you may be overfeeding, and you the major methods used to control it. have. For instance, actinic lights began may not be keeping up on your water You will never be able to completely in the salt water realm, but are seeing changes. Frequent water changes will stop algae from growing and as long as increased use in fresh water systems. also help reduce the nitrate concentrait doesn’t become excessive, it does not Did you know that actinic bulbs can lead tion as will vacuuming the substrate. A harm your fish. Simply wipe off algae to algae outbreaks. There are numer- thorough vacuuming is often a key missfrom places such as the front glass and ous examples of people who switched ing element in fish maintenance, but it is it should take a week or two before you out their actinic or 50/50 bulbs and had very useful in getting any uneaten food need to wipe it off again. If it is growing their algae decrease rapidly. Bulbs that out of the substrate and removing fish back within a couple of days, you should have temperatures of 6500 K or below waste. Following a regular maintenance read the rest of this article and learn seem to be the best in terms of not pro- schedule as we have listed below will moting algae outbreaks. If you have help keep your tank algae free or at the how to properly control your algae. tried reducing your lighting period and very least reduce the amount of algae. If you want to rid algae from your still are having algae problems, investiaquarium, it is vital that you understand gate the temperature of your bulbs and Week 1: Ten percent water change, why it grows in the first place. Algae see if that is the root cause. wipe down inside of tank requires light and nutrients from the Did you know that excessive nu- Week 2: Gravel vac while performwater. Without these key components, ing a ten percent water algae will have a difficult time taking off trients in your water promote algae change. It is okay if you do in your tank. growth? These nutrients are usually in a little more. Remember to the form of nitrates or phosphates. It take our your decorations Most people think that their fish is, therefore, helpful to test your water need light to see and leave their aquar- for Nitrates and Phosphates if you are and clean them. ium lights on for over 10 hours a day, having algae problems. If your tests Week 3: Ten percent water change, however this is the key factor in pro- show high levels, first test your tap wawipe down inside of tank moting algae growth. We recommend ter to see if it is naturally high in either Week 4: Replace filter cartridge and keeping your aquarium light on for less of these compounds. If it is, you may do a ten percent water than 8 hours a day as this will help re- have to use half tap water and half rechange duce your algae growth tremendously. verse osmosis water. If your tap water Timers are very helpful in that they en- is not naturally high in nitrates or phos-

By doing the four week cycle that we have laid out for you,will help you have a healthy clean tank. Adding a good algae predator can be a very effective means of eradicating algae in your tank. Before good algae predators are discussed, a common misconception needs to be addressed. Many people rush out to the local fish store to buy a common pleco when they see they have an algae problem. In general, a common pleco is not a good solution to getting rid of algae. The common plecostomus will eat some kinds of algae when it is young, but stops eating algae all together when it reaches a length of around 5-6”. From this length on, not only does it not eat your algae, but it contributes greatly to the load on your tank as it produces a great deal of waste and eventually becomes a very large fish. Some of the more effective algae-eaters include otos (tend to be the best option for smaller tanks), bristlenose plecos, American flagfish, and rubberlip plecos. Remember that most algae problems can be solved by doing the recommend water changes, reducing the hours of light, changing the temperature of the light, reducing the amount of food, reducing the number of fish, adding live plants, and adding an algae eater.

see

Algae on page 8.


PET JOURNAL

January 2012

www.petjournalmidwest.com

8

Ask the Vet by Dr. Karen M. Strickfaden, Countrycare Animal Complex, Green Bay, WI ask-the-vet@petjournalmidwest.com

Diabetes in Pets Diabetes mellitus, commonly called “sugar diabetes” or just “diabetes”, is a disease caused by failure of the pancreas to produce adequate amounts of insulin. Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine diseases of pets and occurs in both cats and dogs. Importance of Insulin Insulin has been called the cells’ gatekeeper. It attaches to the surface of cells and permits glucose (blood sugar) to enter the cells from the blood. When insulin is absent or present in insufficient amounts, glucose builds up in the blood resulting in high blood glucose levels. Importance of Glucose Glucose is one of the body’s primary energy sources. When insufficient amount of glucose are available to the cells, the body looks for alternate sources of energy (fat and protein). Eventually, these energy demands lead to weight loss. This weight loss causes the animal to eat more in an attempt to make up for the “energy drain”. Also, the body attempts to remove excess blood glucose by spilling it into the urine. Since glucose attracts water, tremendous amounts of water follow this glucose into the urine. This loss of water causes dehydration and the pet must drink more to counteract it.

and non-insulin dependent (Type II) diabetes. Dogs only experience Type I diabetes and therefore must always be regulated with insulin. Rarely, cats will experience insulin resistance that must be treated by other means. Treatment of Diabetes Treatment of Diabetes in pets requires administering the insulin that the body is unable to produce itself (generally every 12 hours). Injections are made under the skin with a tiny needle. The technique is very well tolerated by most pets. Treatment Phases The first phase of treatment is called the regulation phase. It involves determining the correct type and dose of insulin that the pet requires to keep the blood glucose in the correct range throughout the day. Pets are often hospitalized for short periods of time and monitored with blood glucose curves in order to achieve this goal. The second phase of treatment is the maintenance phase. This means that the pet is regulated and has the appearance and behavior of a normal pet. The signs of Diabetes disappear as long as the pet remains regulated. Sometimes a pet’s need for insulin changes and adjustments must be made to insulin levels or feeding programs.

Early Diagnosis/Treatment If your pet is experiencing any of the symptoms listed here, make sure to have him/her tested for Diabetes. Uncontrolled Diabetes will create many other problems and can cause a diabetic ketoacidosis crisis that can result The four classic signs of Diabetes are: in death!! 1. WEIGHT LOSS 2. EXCESSIVE APPETITE Editors Note: Dr. Strickfaden wel3. INCREASED URINATION comes your questions on general pet 4. INCREASED THIRST health topics, please email her at askthe-vet@petjournalmidwest.com or by Diagnostic Tests for Diabetes These symptoms can also be present mail at: Pet Journal with other conditions. Therefore, diagAttn: Ask the Vet nostic test must be done to diagnose 3120 S Business Dr Suite 270 diabetes. The two most important tests Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 are blood glucose level and urinalysis to check for glucose in the urine.

The Symptoms of Diabetes Therefore, high blood glucose levels result in four typical signs of diabetes. Not all 4 signs are readily seen in every patient with diabetes, but you can expect to see at least two of them.

Types of Diabetes In humans, there are two types of diabetes, insulin dependent (Type I)

A 501 (c)(3) Non-Profit Exotic-Bird Organization

CARE’s mission is to provide for the needs of all exotic birds. This is done through advocacy, activism, educating the public about the needs of exotic birds, providing permanent housing for any exotic birds not able to live in a typical home enviroment (excluding birds with contagious diseases), and finding a loving, responsible, and permanent home for adoptable birds.

A Story of Friendship and Feathers,

3053 Beechwood Industrial Ct. Suite 1 Hubertus, WI 53033

by Jessica Hagedorn, 10% of the proceeds go to CARE cntrforavianrehab@sbcglobal.net

‡ Shelter ‡ Boarding ‡ Grooming ‡ Retail Store

Hours: Mon, Tue, Thru - 1 - 6 pm Saturday - 12 - 5 pm Wed, Fri, Sun - Closed

LIFE WITH BEN,

(262) 628-3719

Supplements from page 4.

There are some types of algae blooms where more extreme methods needs to be used, but the recommendations in the article will help in the control of most algae.

Karey Hoelzel is the owner of Critters Pet Nutrition, 2593 Fairview Road, Neenah, Wisconsin. Specializing in Natural Holistic and Organic Raw frozen, freeze dried meat based food and treats. All Natural Supplements. Her shop is open Monday – Friday 12 – 6 pm, Saturdays 10 – 2 pm. 920-7259434

On a side note, It is winter time again and your Tropical Fish like their water temperature to be between 76 and 84 degrees. Please remember to add a heater if you do not already have one. If you have a heater please check it to make sure it is working properly.

Editors note: Patrick and Melissa are the owners of Tropical Fish by The Betta Boutique, in the KK Center Mall in Appleton. For more information please visit their website: thebettaboutique.com.

Skunk Odor CURE! from kimberluvsk9 on hubpages.com

Master groomer reveals trade secret to remove skunk odor Have you been searching for a quick, easy and above all cheap method of ridding your dog of skunk odor that you havnt already tried? Chances are that over the years, you have tried many, if not all, of the products and home remedies available. Most are costly, messy and just irritating to the dog as well as the owner. Washing a stinky, skunked, dog in your bathtub is quite a challenge, even for professionals, but add tomato juice, vinegar, peroxide or chemical products, and you can only expect the worst. Not to mention tomato juice stains white dogs and hydrogen peroxide bleaches dark coats. I know from experience... I have been grooming dogs for 23 years and discovered this remedy a few years ago. Recently, my own dog was sprayed directly in her face and was in a lot of pain. It was 2:30 in the morning and my family was in from out of town... it was no problem though, I knew exactly what to do. After a salt bath, she was back to normal, even sleeping on my bed.

see

Center for Avian Rehabilitation & Education, Inc.

Get your copy of

Algae from page 7.

www.centerforavianrehab.org

Skunk Odor on pg 18.

Editors Note: Karey is filling in this month for Victoria Rabe of Victoria’s Pet Nutrition Center and Boutique our new columnist for the Lakeshore Edition. Victoria welcomes your questions on Holistic and Natural options, please email her at holistic-and-natural-lake@ petjournalmidwest.com or by mail: Pet Journal Attn: Holistic and Natural Lakeshore 3120 S Business Dr, Suite 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524


PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

Act 90 from page 1. It includes breeders, pet stores, flea markets, shelters and rescues. It is budget neutral. The licensing fees collected will pay for the enforcement of the regulations. Is it perfect? many laws are.

Of course not.

Not

manely cared for with exercise and socialization requirements. We have had some very sad cases of badly run shelters and rescues in this state - most notably the Thyme and Sage Ranch case which just recently resulted in the conviction of Jennifer Petkus on six counts of animal cruelty.2 Jennifer Petkus held the animal control contract for Richland County at the time.

With our new law, the situation at Is it better than what we had (which Thyme and Sage would never have rewas not much)? Yes. Will it shut down gressed to the point it did. puppy mills? Of course not. If the bill had been written to completely please the shelters and rescues, and omitted input from veterinarians and breeders, it wouldn’t have passed. There are a lot of players in this game and successful negotiations were key to getting an agreeable solution for all. The whole process was very transparent and there was plenty of opportunity for input from all parties involved.

To those of you who think that the bill should have attempted to shut down ALL breeding operations, here’s my question There is a demand for puppies and dogs. Do the math. There are an estimated four million cats and dogs that will be killed in shelters this year. Let’s say half of those are dogs (probably a high estimate, because we know the fate of cats is worse).

If there is any doubt in your mind that Act 90 was needed to oversee dog selling facilities in this state, I urge you to read the very comprehensive article “Puppy Hell” that was published by Milwaukee Magazine in January 2009.1 That article gave the bill the kick start it needed to expose the cruel conditions that Wisconsin dogs were enduring in commercial dog breeding facilities around the state.

So, two million dogs are killed. But, about 17 million people will add a new pet to their family pet year. Again, let’s say half of those people want to get a dog, 8.5 million. Even if you convinced everybody to adopt their new dog from a shelter; where would the remaining 6.5 million dogs come from?

Will Act 90 improve conditions for the dogs living in commercial breeding facilities? Yes. And, it is also the first step in ensuring that shelters and rescues are also maintaining reasonable standards of care. It will ensure that dogs are hu-

Of course, the whining and complaining about the new law has begun. Not by everybody; mostly reputable shelters and rescues are happy that the law passed. They realize that the inconvenience and cost will be more than made up for by the benefits to dogs in this state.

PETS AVAILABLE

Looking for a daisy that never stops blooming? Meet Daisy, a beautiful female 2-yearold Boxer/Shepherd mix who is ready to bring love into your home! This happy-golucky girl enjoys going on long walks, then afterwards settling down in front of the fire for belly rubs and relaxation time with you. She prefers a home with older children, and would enjoy meeting her potential canine buddy. For more information on Daisy, or any of our other canine companions available for adoption at the Wisconsin Humane Society Ozaukee Campus, please visit www.ozaukeehumane.org, or call (262)377-7580.

The Pet Journal Adoption Section Brought to by these sponsors: To find out how to have your business listed here call our offices at: (920) 393-4818

FOR

ADOPTION

Meet Evie a Jack Russel/Chinese Chrested mix, a very active young lady (about 2 years old). Evie has been the subject of two articles of Pet Journal (October and December 2011). For more information on Evie please contact Furry Bottoms Rescue at www.furrybottomsrescue.com.

January 2012 9

Any of you that know me personally know that I am not a huge fan of overregulation by the government. But, that being said, I also worked in an unregulated industry; horse training, breeding and riding instruction; for twenty years. I would have gladly paid a licensing fee and welcomed inspectors with open arms to my farm if I thought it would mean that the bad actors would have been regulated. A few bad actors can ruin the reputation of an industry as a whole, and then responsible players suffer.

Thank you to Representative Jeff Smith, Senator Pat Kreitlow, the Wisconsin Puppy Mill Project and everybody that worked hard to make it happen. For very detailed information on the law, I encourage you to check out the website of the Wisconsin Puppy Mill Project There aren’t many businesses that (www.nowisconsinpuppymills.com) who don’t require licensing. You have to have thoroughly documented the whole have a license to cut hair, sell Christmas process. trees or run a dating service in Wisconsin. But up until now - you could be reExternal References: 1 sponsible for the health and lives of dogs ) Puppy Hell, Milwaukee Magazine while running a rescue, shelter or comhttp://www.insidemilwaukee.com/ mercial dog breeding operation without Article/242011-PuppyHell 2 a license or any oversight, whatsoever. ) Thyme and Sage Ranch Case, Channel 3000 Some people will argue - Why should http://www.channel3000.com/ the “good guys” have to pay for the sins news/27166686/detail.html of a few? Well, that’s how our society works. We all have to register our veEditors Notes: Kathy Pobloskie, is hicles. The pool of money collected is the Director of the Wisconsin Voters used to enforce and regulate the rules for Companion Animals (http://wivoterof the road, even though most of us are sforcompanionanimals.com). responsible drivers. Hunters and fisherman have to buy licenses to hunt and In the next couple months we will be fish. Even though the vast majority are bringing you the views of Shelters, Resresponsible and follow the rules; the li- cues, Veterinarians, and yes even some censing fees helps enforce the rules for breeders on the good and points of Act those that aren’t. 90 and how it has affected them. Some rescuers are panicking that a The Pet Journal Facebook group has huge influx of dogs being “dumped” by been having a lively discussion on Act 90 breeders will overwhelm the system. and its affects, please consider “followWill it be a busy couple of years for ing us” to find out more. shelters and rescues as some breeders

AT

AREA RESCUES

AND

Meet Timmy a playful, energetic 2 year old Sheltie who is looking for a home through the Wisconsin Sheltie Rescue. For more information on Timmy and other Shelties available for adoption please go to www.wisheltierescue.com.

Eastern Wisconsin Herpetological Society & Rescue (920) 467-8610 1017 Fond Du Lac Ave, Sheboygan Falls

www.sheboyganfallsbeautysalon.com

downsize? Probably. But that still isn’t a good reason to oppose a law that will make conditions better for dogs for decades to come. The good shelters and rescues are prepared and have trained staff and volunteers in puppy mill dog rehabilitation.

PO Box 245 Plymouth, WI 53073 920 207-5642 easternwiherps.com

SHELTERS

Scooter is a fun loving 8 yr old Springer Spaniel looking for his forever home. Scooter loves to run and play in his yard and to snuggle up at the end of the day by your side. He is great with kids over 8 and is very eager and willing to learn. Will thrive in an active home that gives him exercise and hugs. Please read his full bio at http:// www.springerrescue.org/dogdocs/regions/available.php?reg=MW#WI

Don’t Shop, Opt to Adopt! 2451 Velp Ave. Howard (920) 434-LUBE


PET JOURNAL

January 2012

www.petjournalmidwest.com

10

Winter at a Wisconsin Zoo by Angela Kawski, Northeastern Wisconsin Zoo (NEW Zoo) Over 200 animals make their home at the NEW Zoo in Green Bay. These animals are native to habitats from all around the globe – from sweltering jungles to the chilly tundra – and the NEW Zoo must provide for and meet all of their individual needs. And as the Wisconsin winter sets in around us, it’s not food or space requirements that we worry most about. It is temperature, in fact, that becomes one of those needs that we must evaluate and address most seriously. Many of the animals that live at the NEW Zoo are native to North America – and even to Wisconsin. This means they are both physically and mentally capable of enduring the “winter weather” here in Green Bay. They are adapted to live in these temperatures. Many have thick fur or insulating feathers. Some of them, like the badger, will even gain weight, as a few layers of fat can provide great insulation and protection from the chill, allowing the core body temperature to stay where it should. Even though these native animals are “meant” to handle our Midwest winters, zoo staff members still take steps to ensure their comfort. For example, all the animals in outdoor exhibits are provided with different types of shelters. As you visit the zoo, keep an eye out for these. You will notice things like hollow logs, lean-to’s, dens, and other natural, as well as man-made, structures that will provide a wind-block for these animals. Once the animal is protected from the wind, its natural adaptations nearly always enable it to stay toasty warm. For those individuals that

need “extra help,” like some of the eldest animals, for example, we can provide them with blankets, extra bedding, and other items to line their dens and give them a little extra warmth. Just taking these few steps ensures their safety and comfort throughout even the coldest Wisconsin winters.

But – you must be wondering about the species that live at the zoo who are NOT native to the Midwest, or to other places that experience such extreme cold temperatures. So, what do we do for those animals? Well, the answer to that question is, “it depends on the animal.” Some of those species, like the African Lions, actually don’t need anything extra. Believe it or not, an African Lion that lives in Wisconsin grows extra thick fur in the wintertime, and he stays warm even in the snow! Our lions seem to truly enjoy playing in the snow, and they are even more active in the wintertime than they are in the summertime, because they have more energy when it’s not so hot out. does tend to nap for most of the winter!). Several birds spend their winter in the Riley Building, by the moose exhibit, while our Hyacinth Macaws live in a large enclosure within our Animal Hospital.

Other non-native animals, like the giraffes and penguins, have built-on “winter housing” units that are attached to their outdoor exhibits. These buildings are heated, and equipped with everything the animals will need to make it through the winter. The giraffe building, for example, includes a viewing area, where the public can interact with the giraffes and feed them rye crackers. The building also has several rooms inside of it, which allows the zookeepers to rotate the giraffes to one room while they clean another. However, not all our exhibits are equipped with these winter facilities. Some animals, such as the parrots and the white alligator, must be moved to different exhibits or buildings entirely for the winter. Our alligator, for example, is moved into a holding area inside a portion of the giraffe barn. There, he has heat, basking lights, and a large pool of water for swimming (even though he

The NEW Zoo is open from 9 am to 4 pm daily. Admission is $6 per adult (16 and up) and $4 per child (to age 15) and for seniors (over 62). Ages 2 and under are free. Admission is half-price in January and February!

Pictures: (this article) Far Left: Animal Hospital Room 1: Winter home for Cockatoos and the Porcupine Center Left: The Lion Cubs having some playtime in the new snow Center Right: A Hyacinth Macaw enjoying its winter space Above: Animal Hospital Room 2: Winter home for Pied Crow, Guinea Pigs, and Armadillo Photo’s courtesy of NEW Zoo.

Looking Back

8th Annual Route 43 Harley-Davidson Chili Cook-off Saturday, January 14th, 2012 10 AM - 2 PM The date has been set for the best chili cooks in the area to compete in the annual Chili Cook-off! For more information or to enter call Brenda at 920-458-0777 Sponsored by:

No matter where they are in the zoo, it’s important to note that every winter housing enclosure gives the animals the space and heat that they need to make it through the winter. Zookeepers even provide all of these animals with extra toys and treats, to keep their bodies and minds active. While not all of the NEW Zoo’s animals can remain on exhibit year-round, all of them are well cared for, and always put back into their outdoor exhibits as soon as temperatures allow each spring. And don’t forget, the animals that do stay on exhibit at this time of year tend to be more active now than they are at any time of the year – so it’s a great time to be here. Not only do you get to enjoy the animals, but you get to have the zoo nearly to yourself.

So don’t let a little winter weather keep you away! Come out to visit, and you just might find yourself with a new winter pastime the whole family can enjoy.

Benefiting:

by Kristin Ahrens, K&R Small Animal Sanctuary, kr_small_animal_sanctuary@yahoo.com This past year has been another one This process would not be possible successful for K&R Small Animal Sanc- without our great foster homes and voltuary. We have made new contacts this unteers. A huge thank you to our five year to help in our mission to save small star foster homes: Alissa + Matt, April, animals. We have continued to educate Dawn, Donna, Kat, and Melissa as well the public. We have gained new volun- as their families. The Dog House has teers and foster homes. Also we have become one of our foster partners which continued to find new homes for our keeps our rabbits in the public eye. You fuzzy rescued “kids”. have all been such a big help!! Also thanks to Amy (and family) our above Each animal that joins us becomes and beyond volunteer. one of ours for its whole life. We care for them at first, possibly rehab them This year (with the help of Facebook) a bit, and then the go into a new fam- we have reached more caring people ily. We never look at that as the end of who want to help our foster rabbits. the story. We still like to be updated on They have turned out to donate more to their progress and love getting pictures us this year than ever before!! We can to see how they are doing. If some- hardly believe the generosity of others thing terrible happens to the stability during such unstable economic times. of the family they have joined they are The bunnies and guinea pigs apprecialways welcomed back to start the pro- ate all the extra treats, hay, food, toys, cess over! We have had some ups and and bedding that we received this year. downs as always but we have managed to place quite a few critters into great see on page 18. homes.

K&R


PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

January 2012 11

Myths and Lessons for Backyard Nature Lovers by Barbara Brebner, For the Birds, De Pere, barbara@forthebirdsdepere.com How about we dispell a couple of wild bird feeding falsehoods. Every day, working at my nature store, For The Birds in De Pere, customers come in and ask me questions I have heard before, ideas that have become urban legends.. sometimes it feels like correcting these legends is the biggest part of teaching our guests about backyard birds. Example; “I don’t want to start feeding the birds because we travel in winter and they become dependent upon our feeders.” Wrong! To be accurate, birds generally only get 20% of their diet from our offerings. There is a lot of food out there in the neighborhood and, unless there is solid snow cover, seeds, pinecones and tree seeds can be found in quantity. Birds and wild animals can aptly survive without us. Feeding birds is something we do for ourselves. To enjoy their songs, to enjoy the beauty of flying flowers decorating the yard makes us happy. When we feed them, we support them by making life a little easier in the wild. With ample food, broods are larger and survival of nestlings is enhanced. Female birds are healthier when laying eggs so nestlings hatch with a good start.

Example: “Hummingbirds migrate riding on the backs of geese.” Impossible! Even if a hummingbird could hold on to a slick and feathered goose back, they would surely starve without the geese stopping at flowers all the way

south. Hummingbird physiology requires them to consume vast amounts of nectar as they travel to winter climes. Geese, on the other hand, spend much of the journey dabbling in ponds and wetlands, probably not where hummingbirds thrive during chilly fall days. This old wives tale is a delightful myth that grannies insisted was true. If it was, there would have been proof in hunting season when hummingbirds would have been found in shotgunned geese. The idea is lovely, but quite simply, it is impossible and untrue. The rule still stays, leave your hummingbird feeder out a week or two after you see your last hummingbird. Needing any food they can get, your feeder might be the only drink of energy they get before traveling a couple thousand miles to flowered islands and gulf temps.

Myth: “I don’t need to feed finches right now, they are all gone, south.” No, they are not. They are here still and loving your feeders. The American Goldfinch returns to drab, non-breeding plumage during the fall and early winter. Because the brown birds look like sparrows during the winter, they are still here and relishing the nyger seed and sunflower chips you offer. Like the other wild critters, they will emerge from winter with more weight and gusto, again, making the breeding season successful. During the winter, you might notice the goldfinches do sometimes vanish,

that is what we call a regional migration, moving around the Midwest or even just the state, many bird species that are endemic to our area will shuffle around in search of food sources. They do not do a complete migration but take advantage of food sources not gleaned by others.

Let’s talk wildlife now. There are some old-timers who remember the days when foxes were under a bounty. The state would pay hunters to kill foxes and other predator/scavengers hoping to increase populations of upland game species and field birds for hunters. This kind of management has been proven to be horribly wrong and short-sighted. Fox populations clean up the ecosystem by taking injured animals for food and remove the genetically weak individuals so they do not breed. Natural selection works well to ensure strong and thriving wildlife. Poisoned foxes have been found in De Pere and I’d like the person responsible to tell me why. When a poisoned animal decays in the wild it becomes a food source for dozens of other species. The poison, distributed among

many unintended victims takes a whirl in the food chain, killing hawks, raccoons, and any other hungry creatures that might snack on the corpse. Poison is a very cruel and painful death. Suffering and confused animals can become aggressive and unpredictable. Notify the Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary or a local licensed rehab facility to report unusual behavior. And please, do not poison, not even mice who, while running about in a warfarin bleed, are easy targets for predators who scoop them up with the poison in a meaty package. Poisoning is the cruelty of stupid humans taking the easy and cruel way out of sealing homes and garages. Over time, I hope to continue this surprising and hopefully, interesting offering. If you have questions, please forward them to me at my email address. It’ll be great to hear other bird lore and your experiences.

Until then, keep looking for Snowy Owls that have migrated to northeast Wisconsin from the Canadian tundra in search of our plentiful mouse supply. More on that later.


PET JOURNAL

January 2012 12

PHOTO GALLERY

River, a Yellow Lab, looking for attention, Kathy Z., Sheboygan Falls, Wis.

If you would like to see your pet(s) on this page, please email them to us at petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com with a short description including: your pets name, your name, city, and a little statement about what they are doing in the photo. If you do not have email and would like to mail a glossy photo, please mail it to our mailing address: Pet Journal, attn: Pet Photos, 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270, Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 (all photos received by mail will be returned after they have been scanned for print.) All photos received will also be posted in our online photo gallery at http://images.petjournalmidwest.com/ gallery.html, due to space limitation’s some submissions may not be printed in Pet Journal the same month they are received.

Use your Smartphone with a barcode scanning program to go to the Pet Journal gallery section.

OF

www.petjournalmidwest.com

READERS PETS

Maggie Mae, ____, trying to look inconspicuous, Mary S., Columbus, Wis.

“Modern Veterinary Medicine with Old-Fashioned Caring”

Country Care is a complete care center - all of your pet’s needs under one roof

Dr. Richard A. Barr Dr. Karen M. Strickfaden

Comprehensive Medical & Surgical & Holistic Care for Dogs, Cats & Horses Surgical Services include: ‡ Othopedic ‡ Soft Tissue ‡ Dentistry Holistic Alternatives include: ‡ Acupuncture ‡ Spinal Manipulation (animal chiropractic) ‡ Bioresonance Therapy ‡ and a wide range of Herbal Supplements

4235 Elmview Rd, Green Bay, WI 54311 ‡ www.countrycareac.com ‡ (920) 863-3220

PHOTOS OF OUR FRIENDS WHO ARE GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN

Cinder Lee, A mommas boy who was dearly loved during the 2 short years you were with me, you overcame many hardships during our time together, rest in piece my darling you will be dearly missed. Cinder passed away on October 23, 2007 at the age of four from FIV. Sandra B., North Fond Du Lac, Wis.


PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

Largest Selection of Freshwater Fish in the Fox Valley Area! *** January Special *** Buy one Fish and get one Half Off of equal or lesser value.

920 716-1137

thebettaboutique.com

Including all special orders: Freshwater, Brackfish, and Saltwater Fish.

January 2012 13

Not your everyday Fish Store. We carry Exotic Fish and Traditional Everyday Fish!

Internet Prices without the Hassle and Cost of Shipping!! 4055 E Calumet Ave KK Centre Mall Suite D, Appleton

Reiki ~ A Gift for Animals in Shelters, Sanctuaries and Rescues by Ann Noyce, Animal Hearts Wellness Center, a division of Two Paws Up Bakery “A house is not a home without a pet.” Reiki complements and supports ~ Anonymous other conventional therapies and techniques used to help animals. Some arThere are so many animals in the eas that Reiki supports include: care of animal shelters, sanctuaries and • Physical issues, such as reducing rescues that would love to be chosen pain and inflammation and speedas that pet that would turn someone’s ing healing house into a loving home. These ani- • Lessening the side effects of other mals come to the shelter for a variety of medical treatments reasons and may be experiencing any • Behavior issues & aggression number of physical, emotional or be- • Mental/emotional issues, such as havioral issues resulting from their past. helping abused animals heal from Reiki is a complementary tool in the past mental/physical trauma toolbox of support programs that animal • The dying process organizations can offer these wonderful • Preparing animals for their forever animals to help prepare them to find home their forever home. Shelter Animal Reiki What is Reiki? Association (SARA) Reiki (Ray-key), a Japanese word Two years ago, I joined an orgatranslated to mean universal life force nization called SARA or Shelter Animal energy, is a system of energy heal- Reiki Association so that I had a plating created by Mikao Usui in the early form for introducing Reiki for Animals 20th century, utilizing specific Japanese to interested shelters, sanctuaries and meditative practices and breathing tech- rescues in Wisconsin. niques. Reiki has been successfully used with humans to support healing in variSARA’s purpose is three-fold: ous medical settings such as hospitals, • To promote and teach a standardcancer centers and hospices all over the ized, ethical approach for offering country. The use of Reiki with animals is Reiki to animals in shelters, sancgrowing as more people experience the tuaries and rescues for their relaxbenefits and want to share it with their ation, stress-relief, and healing. animal friends. Reiki may be even more • To educate others about the benpowerful when working with animals. efits of Reiki for animals in need and their human caretakers Why Reiki is Ideal for • To pioneer the use of treatment Shelter Animals documentation to show Reiki’s efReiki is an ideal complementary fects for educational and research therapy for animals and especially for purposes. animals in shelters, sanctuaries and rescues. When animals are stressed, sick As a SARA Animal Reiki Teacher, I or injured, they are energetically imbal- volunteer Reiki for the animals at the oranced. The primary purpose of a Reiki ganizations I work with, and also teach treatment is to create a state of bal- Reiki and Reiki for Animals to interested ance, deep relaxation and stress relief staff, volunteers and the public so that to promote self-healing. Reiki can do more animals and their caregivers can no harm and will support the issues that experience the benefits of Reiki. The need it most, even if those issues are Reiki classes also serve as a fund-raiser unknown to the practitioner. for the sponsoring animal organization. Animals at shelters and sanctuaries are usually very open and responsive to Reiki energy if we use an ethical approach when offering Reiki to them. We first ask the animal’s permission and then give them a choice in how they wish to receive Reiki. It is often best to offer Reiki to an animal from several feet away (either in their kennel/cage or in a separate room depending on circumstances) and allow them to come forward for hands-on if and when they wish. Some animals are open to handson treatments and others will prefer to lie down near the practitioner and possibly fall into a “Reiki sleep”. The Reiki treatment can be adapted to many different situations and animal temperaments.

Helping Boots Find Her Forever Home About a year ago, I met Boots, a sweet 8 year old black & white Tuxedo kitty, at the Fox Valley Humane Association. Boots had come to the shelter because her family had too many animals and could no longer take care of her. She had been there for awhile when I was asked to offer Reiki to Boots and her suite-mate Smudge. After one session, both soon left for their forever homes. Unfortunately, at my weekly visit a couple of months later, I learned that Boots had returned because she wasn’t fitting in well with the other animals at her new home. Boots was sad and felt rejected, and had been screaming in her cage for a couple of days.

I offered Reiki to Boots during my next three visits. During the first and second sessions, Boots started out being a little nervous wandering around the room, sometimes sitting in the corner or brushing my legs. She eventually sat on a table a couple of feet from me looking out the window. Her eyes then closed as she sat there peacefully, and by the end of the treatment, she had lied down falling into a deep Reiki sleep. During the third session, she quickly jumped in my lap and lied down cradled in my hands sleeping the entire session. The Reiki sessions helped Boots become calmer and better able to cope with being back at the shelter. And it wasn’t long before Boots was adopted into a loving home. I truly view Reiki as a gift that we can offer to our animal friends, and would like to help make this gift available to as many animals as possible in Wisconsin. Hopefully more of these animals will find their forever home sooner. If you are interested in learning more about Reiki for animals or exploring a SARA program at your organization, contact Ann Noyce at animalhearts@ twopawsupbakery.com or visit www. twopawsupbakery.com.

Pet Product Reviews by Seth Minaker, Pet Journal Staff Writer SMinaker@petjournalmidwest.com Brushing your pet is important, not only to make them look nice, but to reduce shedding. When I first got my dog, (K9, a Jack Russell Terrier) I purchased a multi-surface brush at the local pet store. It worked fine, keeping his hair sleek and shiny. But especially during his first winter, his shedding would increase, and so would the noticeable hair on the floor. During that time, I became aware of a de-shedding comb, the FURminator. Weary to purchase, because of the steep price ($30 for medium, dog) I did my research. I found out that FURminator works by “grabbing” the dead hairs trapped in the undercoat, the cause of shedding. I also found it got rave reviews everywhere, so I decided to purchase one. When I first brushed K9, I was amazed at the amount of hair it grabbed. In literally a few strokes it obtained a handful of hair. I was surprised, as he is a very small dog (16” from collar to tail). Proceeding, more and more hair was caught, and I ended up with a baggy full. K9, who will squirm if in any discomfort, didn’t mind it at all. His fur was still full, but when you’d pet him, his hair wouldn’t shed off. He also stayed sleek for a week or more, rather than a few days with his previous brush. If I fail to use the FURminator on him for a few weeks, I will notice his hair finding its way onto everything. A year later, the FURminator is still in perfect condition, a very strong, well built product. I would recommend this product not only for shedders, but also as a great grooming product for your pet. FURminators come in models for short hair, long hair, dogs or cats. For dogs it’s available in 5 sizes, for cats in 2. Prices depend on what model/size, and your place of purchase. FURminator brand also carries a wide range of other helpful de-shedding products, which include brushes, sprays, shampoos, and much more. FURminator brand is carried almost everywhere you find brand name pet supplies. For more information, testimonials, and their other products, please visit www. FURminator.com. Hope your 2012 is off to a great start!

Editors Note: Have a product you would like reviewed? Email Seth at: sminaker@petjournalmidwest.com


January 2012

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www.petjournalmidwest.com

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A Wholistic View of Separation Anxiety by Linda Ledbeter, Animal Connections This month I would like to talk about Separation Anxiety in our pets. I know I touched on this subject before, yet in light of the number of cases of dogs with this issue, discussing it again may help others in seeking professional help. Separation Anxiety is not and I repeat NOT a behavioral issue. The majority of the time it cannot be corrected with training alone. We see the behavior as destructive and respond to the behavior, missing the fact it is completely rooted in the emotional field. Animals have emotions; they think, feel, plan, and react according to their emotional stability. Some, like most people cannot shake traumas without extra help. We often confuse “putting something out of our mind” with releasing the emotional memory from the physical and mental body. The body in both animal and human, remembers every experience, and is stored in the root chakra, more commonly known as the Flight or Fight center. Wild animals naturally shake off escaping the near miss of a collision with the car or being someone’s lunch. Domesticated animals have adapted so well to the human world, they have unfortunately taken on the human traits. Animals who have survived repeated abuse and neglect literally need to learn and adapt to feeling safe and calm. This is an alien sensory, completely out of their knowledge and awareness. This is the same for children and adults in abusive environments. Smells, voices, sounds and actions will trigger the memory, thus triggering a response. All domesticated animals can experience separation anxiety without having experienced abuse or neglect. It can be triggered by boredom, loneliness, poor diet, and lack of exercise, illness, death in family, divorce and possibly genetics. They can and will literally mirror your own emotional frame of mind. Fear of thunderstorms is another form of anxiety. Unlike Separation Anxiety, fear of thunderstorms is directly related to the energetic shifts in the atmosphere. The animal’s sensory system is far greater than ours and can be felt in the planetary shifts hours or even days before a storm arrives or the earthquake is experienced. So why does one dog in the pack overreact

to storms? You will hear a variety of thoughts on the subject from experts, I have been watching and studying this very topic and have my own theory. We know our pets respond to our moods and life changes and thus have some significance to anxiety. I have had two dogs who suffered anxiety due to the weather. The first dog, after applying Healing Touch for Animals techniques quickly shifted and lived the next 10 plus years without fear of storms. When she did become anxious it was a huge storm which gave me warning to be on watch. The second dog, I have discovered, is empathic. Empathic abilities have their pros and cons. Having empathic abilities means an individual can literally feel and experience another’s physical pain/discomfort, emotional fears or joy. This can become confusing and certainly unsettling if you are not aware of this ability. It takes great practice to discern between it being yours or someone else’s problem. Dogs that have this empathic ability have been known to help their owners pin point the tumor, alert to a heart attack, stroke, seizures etc. My dog Angel is empathic and has yet to establish a healthy balance. This means if I get frustrated and my voice rises, she cowers and looks to me to regain control of myself. She reacts to the thunderstorms in the same manor. The sooner you acknowledge and accept anxiety in any form will not heal itself, and seek help; you will be ahead of the Eight Ball. Take a moment and think about something you may be afraid of. Is it going away just because you don’t think about it, or deny the fear exists? Without treatment the long term conditions that will most likely develop will be increased destruction of property, health issues such as heart and decreased immune system. I cannot promise a 100% recovery for every pet, but I can say positive changes will occur. I have been amazed after one visit how many have shifted into a peaceful state of being, while others take several visits and some may need medication and/or Thundershirts. The choice is yours, ignore and pretend it will go away or call for help and save yourself time, money and start enjoying life with your pet.

AT THESE

LOCATIONS

Central Bark Doggy Daycare 3513 S 32nd St Sheboygan, WI 920-451-9663

Cedarburg Veterinary Clinic N144 W5660 Pioneer Rd Cedarburg, WI 262-377-2460

Chelstar’s Bed & Biscuit N4890 US Hwy 45 Fond Du Lac, WI 920-921-9024

Joys of Grooming 1706 N Main St West Bend, WI 262 338-2506

Doggie Do’s by Lou 311 E Main St Chilton, WI

Lincoln Tropical Fish & Pets 10 S Main St Hartford, WI 262 673-7470

The UPS Store - Sheboygan 3120 S Business Dr Sheboygan, WI 920 453-5934

Falls Salon & Spa 1017 Fond Du L:ac Ave. Sheboyga Falls, WI 920 467-8610

Marshals Convenience Stores Sheboygan, Plymouth, Glenbulah, Kewauskum, Elkhart Lake and Cascade

Serve’s Countryside Store W4037 State Hwy 23 Fond Du Lac WI 920 921-4042

Sud-Z-Paws 2525 S. Business Dr. Sheboygan, WI 920 457-7297 Walgreen’s Drugstores Chilton, Fond Du Lac, Manitowoc, Plymouth, Sheboygan, & Two Rivers, WI Walgreen’s Drugstores Cedarburg, Grafton, Hartford, Jackson, Saukville, &West Bend, WI

For more locations please visit our website at: www.petjournalmidwest.com and click on the link “Where can I find Pet Journal..”

D e c e m b e r Wo r d S e a r c h A n s w e r s


PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

January 2012 15

Grooming your Pet by Diana Schmidt, Happy Tails Pet Grooming and Boarding groomingyourpet@petjournalmidwest.com across the back, over the sides, chest, Brushing Your Dog legs and tail. Mats are commonly found Properly brushing your dog at home behind the ears, in the armpit, the will help keep his coat in optimal condi- backs of the legs and at base of the tail. tion, and make his trips to the groomer Another area to examine is between the less traumatic. If you bathe your dog toes. These mats are best removed with at home in between grooms, proper the soft slicker brush. Position yourself brushing is a must. For most breeds, in front of your dog and hold his paw only two basic grooming tools are in your hand, brushing away from you needed: a metal grooming comb and a to bring the hair out from between his soft wire slicker brush. For breeds with toes. Comb through the hair to finish extra long coats, a wide-toothed rake removing any mats or loose hair. works well. This process can be time consuming Before you bathe your dog, you in a heavily matted dog. Give your dog must remove all mats and loose hair a break every 30 minutes or so. When from his coat. If your dog’s coat is all mats have been removed and you matted, bathing him will make things can comb through your dog’s coat withworse, and the mats will hold moisture out snagging on any mats he is ready and bacteria and can cause skin prob- for bathing. lems. Any mats you cannot get out with a wire slicker brush or comb probably Editors note: Diana welcomes need to be removed with electric clippers. Never use scissors to cut mats your questions on grooming; please because some form right up next to the email her at groomingyourpet@petjourskin. If you try to cut these types of nalmidwest.com or by mail at: Pet Journal mats loose, you could poke or snip your Attn: Grooming your Pet dog’s skin. 3120 S Business Dr Ste 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 With your dog standing or sitting, start at the head and work your way

Coming in February With New Years behind us, winter is here in force and Valentines Day is coming up fast! Look for the February issue of Pet Journal at one of our many distribution locations. Coming in the February issue we will be bringing to you the following:

Eco News & more articles of Pet/Animal interest. More from our columnists: Ask the Alpha Dog Ask Scrappy! Grooming your Pet Holistic & Natural Options for your Pets Ask the Vet Pet Journal Word Search Pictures of your Pets and more!

This is Garbage Gut

The Amazing Sense of Smell from catsinternational.org The Cat’s sense of smell, not vision, is its primary resource for identifying the individuals and objects in its environment. The cat’s visual acuity is 10 times less then that of humans. However, they have 200 million odor-sensitive cells in their noses compared to only 5 million for humans. Cats live in a sensory world completely apart from ours. The sense of smell plays a very insignificant role in human relationships and in our response to our environment, while for cats, it is all-important and may result in some puzzling and disturbing behaviors. Consider the following: 1) The owner puts a scented litter in the litterbox-the cat refuses to use it because perfume is actually a repellent for cats. 2) The owner comes home after visiting a friend and petting her friendly, lap-sitting cat-she is greeted with hisses and growls from her cat.

3) A new piece of furniture is moved into the house. The unfamiliar scent is upsetting to the cat and impels it to mark it with its own signature scent. (This can be accomplished by rubbing on it, scratching it, or by spraying urine on it.)

Editors Note: Cats International was founded by Betsy Libscomb, a cat behavioral expert. If you would like more information on Cats International or for cat behavioral assistance, please visit the Cats International website, www.catsinternational.org. Reprinted with permission.

from The Practical Pet Vet It may seem like a matter of semantics but vomiting and diarrhea are not normal in a dog. They may be common (depending on the dog), but they are not a normal and simply over-lookable occurrence. Vomiting and diarrhea are common and vague symptoms of illness in dogs (and cats!). Sometimes, like in people, these problems are mild and self-limiting. The causes of innocent short term GI upset range from non-threatening viruses to eating something that “disagrees” with the pet. On the other hand, vomiting and diarrhea can also signal more serious problems such parasite infestation, pain, infection, organ failure, intestinal blockage and cancer! The good news is that these latter causes are far less common than the former! Dogs, especially those that enjoy moderate levels of freedom in their dayto-day activities, very frequently ingest things that make them barf. To most dogs, edible is an all encompassing descriptive term that includes decomposing animals, poop from just about any other living thing, and refuse--among other things. Many times, “dietary indiscretion” results in a short bout of decreased appetite, soft stool, and possibly vomiting.

But sometimes “garbage gut” produces such severe gastrointestinal discomfort that dogs require veterinary intervention and medications. In the worst case scenarios, a dog’s dining habits may result in life threatening pancreatitis or surgery to remove a foreign body!

What do you do if your dog starts having soft stools, vomits or rejects his dog food? You know your dog best. I find that owners are often a good judge of the severity of their pet’s illness (denial is, of course, a powerful and detrimental part of medical cases and can unfortunately delay treatment of serious problems). If you are not sure, it’s never a bad idea to call your veterinarian and describe your dog’s symptoms Editors Note: The Practical Pet Vet is a blog written by Dr. Kim Everson of St. Bernard’s Animal Medical Center, Van Dyne, WI. Reprinted with permission.


PET JOURNAL

January 2012

www.petjournalmidwest.com

16

CATS COZY INN Luxur y Countr y Boarding Suites For “Cats Only” ‡ No Dogs Allowed ‡ Large Guest Suites with Windows

‡ No Cages ‡ Grooming ‡ Private Outdoor Patios, Weather Permitting

LARGE PLAY AREA www.catscozyinn.com

Family Owned & Operated Closed Sundays & Holidays for Check-in or pickups 5726 Elderberry Ln. Oshkosh

Easy Access to Hwys 41 & 45

920 426-2250

PET JOURNAL CLASSIFIEDS Pet Journal classifieds are a free service for our readers. Classifieds are for free or paid services offered by individuals or families, such as a teenager looking for a dog walking job over the summer. Classifieds are also available for our Local Humane Societies/Shelters and Animal Rescues to post their needs lists. Please contact the respective Humane Society/ Shelter/Rescue if you have questions or would like to donate an item or two. Events from our advertisers and readers will also be printed as space allows. To place your classified ad please email Pet Journal at: petjournal@petjournalmidwest. com. Please include the following when submitting your classified: Name, Phone, email, best time to call (in case there is a problem with your classified ad), what text you would like in your ad. Please limit to 25 words and keep your wording clean. Remember this is a family paper. How many months you would like the listing to be available for, and list in the subject of your email “PJ Classified”. If you would prefer to mail it to us, you may do so, with the same items as requested above. Mail it to: Pet Journal attn: PJ Classified’s 3120 S. Business Dr. STE 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 Please submit your classified no later than the 20th of the month to make the next edition.

Section 1: Individual/Family Classifieds Section 1.1: Puppies for Sale

Shih-Yzu puppies for sale. They are ACA RegisAKC Gordon Setter Pups Ready for forever home. Champion show blood lines. Vet checked, shots, wormed, dew claws removed. Both parents on site. 920-757-5699/920-213-7440

Section 2: Humane Societies & Animal Rescues/Shelters Needs Lists Section 2.1: Humane Societies Eastshore Humane Association of Chilton, WI is looking for: • Non-scoopable Cat Litter • Purina Cat Chow -or• Purina Complete • Purina Dog Chow • Laundry Detergent

EASTSHORE HUMANE ASSOCIATION COLLECTS WEIGHT CIRCLES FROM PURINA CAT AND DOG FOOD PRODUCTS Please help out by sending us the weight circles. The Purina products include: Purina dog and cat food products such as Pro Plan, Purina One, Purina Cat Chow & Kitten Chow, Kit ‘N Kaboodle, Happy Cat, Purina Veterinary Diets. These weight circles enable Eastshore to earn points toward the purchase of Purina products for the shelter animals. As an added bonus, the weight circles from Purina dog food products can also be used to help Eastshore Humane pay the veterinarian bills! To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Eastshore Humane Association at: 920.849.2390, by email at: ehashelter@gmail.com or you may visit their website: www.eastshoreha.org.

Fond Du Lac Humane Society of Fond Du Lac, WI is looking for: • Dog Needs • Kong’s and kong rubber balls • Dog toys • Peanut butter • Cheese whiz • Plain yogurt • Dog Treats • Easy-walk Harnesses (all sizes) • Durable Leashes • Kuranda dog beds (check our website) • Any dog related items • new or used • Cat Needs • Kitty Litter (non-clumping) • Purina Cat and Kitten Chow • Chicken or Turkey baby food (human) • Toys and Cat trees • Kitten milk replacer • Any cat or kitten related items - new or used • Small Animal Needs • Pellet rabbit food • Timothy Hay • Bedding & Litter (no pine or cedar please) • Any small animal related items - new or used • Other Needs • Bleach • Q-tips • Band-aids • First Aid & Medical supplies • Rubbing Alcohol • Laundry Detergent • Garbage Bags (20 gal or larger) • Dawn dish soap • Mop heads (heavy duty) • Paper towels • Sandwich Bags (Ziploc or fold top) • Small paper plates & paper cups • Copy paper - white or color • Stamps To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Fond Du Lac Humane Society at: 920.922.8873 or visit their website: www.fonddulachumanesociety.org. Lakeshore Humane Society of Manitowoc, WI is looking for: • Purina Dry Dog and Cat Food • Dog and Cat Treats (especially dog biscuits) • Clay Cat Litter • Hard to destroy Dog Toys • Cat Toys • Creamy Peanut Butter • Small Animal Bedding • Small Animal Water Bottles • Small Animal Supplies (Hay, Feed, Treats and Toys) • 8.5” x 11” Copy Paper • Post-It-Notes • Stamps (First Class and Pst Card) • Bleach • Tall Kitchen Bags & 39 Gallon Garbage Bags • Hand Sanitizer • Paper Towels • Toilet Paper • Dawn Dishwashing Soap To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Lakeshore Humane Society at: 920.684.5401 or visit their website at: www.lakeshorehumae.com. Ozaukee Humane Society of Saukville, WI is looking for: • Digital Camera with rechargeable battery, at least 7 megapixel preferred • Dish Soap • Small Dog Training Treats • Laundry Detergent (for High Efficiency Washers) • Postage stamps • Kongs • Fabric - large, colorful solid material • 8 oz. - 12 oz. disposable cups

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

45-gallon garbage bags Aspen Bedding Bleach Bottle Brushes Cardstock paper Cat-nail clippers (scissor type) Cat toys Copy paper, white & color, 8.5” x 11” Dog toys (Nylabones, squeaky toys, ropes, hard rubber balls, ect.) Hand Sanitizer Highlighters Kitchen scrub brushes with handles LaserJet mailing labels (Avery 5160) Lingerie bags (for washing small toys) Mailing envelopes, 9 x 12 or 10 x 13 Manila folders (letter size only) Paper towels Peanut butter Pens Post-it-notes Printer ink cartridges ◊ Canon (5PGBK, 8C, 8M, 8Y) ◊ HP (23, 45, 92, 94, 95) Rabbit pellets (no fruit or seed mix) Rechargeable AA batteries, with charger Scissors Soft Dog Toys Staples Steno notepads Stretch & “Scratch” cardboard scratching pads Swiffer Dusters Timothy hay Toilet paper Vinyl (non-latex) gloves Wild birdseed

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Ozaukee Humane Society at: 262.377.7580, by email at: info@ozaukeehumane.org or you may visit their website: www.ozaukeehumane.org. The Sheboygan County Humane Society of Sheboygan, WI is looking for: • Monetary donations • Gift cards for gas • Gift cards for pet supplies • Gift cards from retail stores • Cat toys • Canned cat food • Kitty litter (non-clumping) • Litter pans • Litter scoops • Laundry soap • Non-clorox bleach • Dish detergent • Paper towel • Scotch scrubbing pads • Rawhide chews for dogs • Dog toys and tennis balls • Science diet pet foods • Copy paper • Office supplies • Foster Homes • Volunteers To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Sheboygan County Humane Society at: 920.458.2012 or visit their website at: www.mySCHS.com. Washington County Humane Society of Slinger, WI is looking for: Items marked with a * are priority needs. • Animal Needs ◊ Dog Needs ● “Natures Variety Instinct” or Grain free Dog Food* (for dogs with special dietary needs) ● Purina Puppy chow ● Liver Sausage (to hide medication for dogs) ◊ Cat Needs ● Non-scoopable cat litter* (we always need litter) ● “Before Grain” dry food* (for cats with special dietary needs) ● Septic Swaps* (can get at Walgreens)

● Baby Food* ● Feliway Spray ◊ Small Animal Needs ● Hamster/Gerbil food* ● Aspen bedding* (can get at Fleet Farm - called Horse Cubes) ● Timothy Hay* ● Carefresh pet bedding* (any color) ● Vita drops* ● Ferret Vite* ● Guinea Pig food ● Toys/Treats ● Plastic Slinkys ● Rat pellets ● Ferret food • Shelter Needs ◊ Nurtical* ◊ Paper plates ◊ Toilet Paper ◊ Oster shaver blades - #40 ◊ Fabuloso floor cleaner ◊ Plastic clipboards - 9” x 12” ◊ 75 to 100 ft. Industrial strength hoses ◊ New or working Dehumidifiers ◊ New or working Chest Freezers ◊ Postage stamps ◊ Thick “Welding” leather gloves (should go to the elbow) ◊ Eraser board markers ◊ Heating Pads with temp adjustment ◊ Gift Cards (Walmart, Office Max, Fleet Farm, Menards, Gas Cards) ◊ Toner for printers: ● HP DeskJet 990cse #78 - color ● HP DeskJet 990cse #45 - black ● HP #28 - Tricolor ● HP #27 - Black ● HP LaserJet 2200d #96A - black To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Washington County Humane Society at: 262.677.0388, by email at: wchs@washingtoncountyhumane. org or visit there website at: www.washingtoncountyhumane.org.

Section 2.2: Animal Rescues & Shelters All Animal Rescue Center project of the Eastern Wisconsin Herpetological Society & Rescue of Plymouth, WI is looking for: • Reptile Cage Thermostats • Storage Space • Cargo Tailers • Livestock Trailers • Tow behind RV • Mini Van or Full Size Van • Kennel Fencing • Commercial/Large Capacity Washers/Dryers • Chest Freezers/Walk-in Coolers • Animal Control Equipment • Office Furniture • Gift Cards for Hardware or Home Improvment Stores • Lumber and 3/4” Plywood • Cash Donations To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the EWHSR at: 920.207.5642, by email at: info@allanimalresourcecenter.com or visit their website: www. allanimalrescuecenter.com. Care (Center for Avian Rehabilitation & Education) of Hubertus, WI is looking for: • 1/2” or 3/4” Plexiglass (10 4’ x 8’ panels) • First Class Postage Stamps • Hefty 39 Gallon Garbage Bags • Tall Kitchen Garbage Bags • Gloves for cleaning, doing dishes, ect. • Large Rubbermaid or equivalent containers • Used towels, hand towels and wash cloths - in good condition • 1cc syringes, vet wrap, 2x2’s, 4x4’s (veterinary supplies) • Cheerios, especially Honey Nut • Fresh Fruits and Veggies (no Avocados)


PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

January 2012 17

PET JOURNAL CLASSIFIEDS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Frozen Mixed Vegetables Mixed Nuts (Unsalted in Shells) Ground Walnuts (found in the bakers section of your local grocery store) Paper Towels, Kleenex, Toilet Paper Laundry Detergent (free and clear of dyes and smells) No. 10 Grip-seal Security Envelopes Printer Paper Gasoline Cards Lexmark Pro901 ink cartridges ° 105 (Black Ink) ° 1000 (Yellow, Cyan, and Magenta Ink) Van (Now or Used - needs to be reliable) 100% Cotton Material and/or 100% Fleece Material Gift Cards for WE Energy, Piggly Wiggly, Pick ‘N Save, Walmart, Menards, Home Depot, Sendiks, and Woodman’s Cash Donations Cash Donations for Vet bills - made payable to Brook-Falls Veterinary Hospital Volunteers to help with cleaning and feeding - more than 5 hours a month, mornings, afternoons and weekends Pressure Washer Volunteer - to pressure wash cages in the Summer Handyman Volunteer - for Maintenance projects at the Shelter, preferably Weekends

Section 3: Event Posters

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact CARE at: 262.628.3719 or by email at: cntrforavianrehab@sbcglobal.net. Furry Bottoms Rescue of Plymouth, WI is looking for: • 4 - 4-shelve storage units on wheels To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Furry Bottoms Rescue at: 920.449.5084, by email at: info@furrybottomsrescue.com or visit their website: www.furrybottomsrescue.com. Mecca’s Pit Bull Rescue of Sheboygan, WI is looking for: • Paper towels • Lysol Spray • Dog toys • Puppy food - moist and dry • Bowls • Leashes • Collars • Volunteers • Wisconsin Foster Homes To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Mecca’s Pit Bull Rescue at: 920.627.6727, by email at: mecca@meccapitbullrescue.com or visit there website at: www.meccapitbullrescue.com. Two Left Paws of Sheboygan, WI is looking for: • Dog/Cat food (Evo, Fromm, Wellnes, Feliade, Canide) • Canned wet food (any kind) • Clumping litter (any kind, non-sented) • Litter scoops • Puppy pads • Dog/Cat treats • Dog/Cat toys • Dog/Cat beds • Towels • Paper towels • Disposable gloves • Kennels • Cages • Live traps for Small Animals • Fleet Farm gift cards To donate any items on this list or if yoou have any questions, please contact Two Left Paws Animal Sanctuary at: 920.331.0100 or via their website at: www.twoleftpaws.org.

See members of the War Dogs group at the Great Lakes Pet Expo on February 4th. 2011. See the press release on page 11 for more information on the Great Lakes Pet Expo.


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Skunk Odor from page 8.

K&R from page 10.

I am giving you my trade secret and lifetime of experience...all you have to do is try it. The best part is that it costs practically nothing and works the very first time, without the use of harmful chemicals, and it is so easy!

We have been able to keep our critters happier than ever before! Thanks to all those who have donated this year!

What I do is dilute some dish soap by mixing it with water (any kind is fine). I use an empty milk jug or shampoo bottle from the recycling to make it easy to saturate the coat. I would guess about 1/2 cup per gallon... I then add salt into the diluted soap, about 1/4 to 1/2 cup per gallon. I shake well and apply the soap/salt solution, saturating the skin and coat completely. After the dog soaks, I rinse thoroughly, and the odor is gone. You can adjust the soap to make it sudsier or add water to make it less sudsier... the main thing is that the dog gets a good washing in sudsy, salt water. If the poor dog gets sprayed in the mouth or eyes, just use a little plain salt water to rinse. Whenever possible, use all natural sea salt, and of course, to achieve the best results, always brush and dry the coat thoroughly after the bath.

Editors note: Blogger kimberluvsk9 the owner of Studio K-9 in Sheboygan. For more of her blogs, please visit her Hubpages page: http://kimberluvsk9. hubpages.com. Reprinted with permission

We have also continued to educate the public on better bunny care, the benefits of spaying and neutering and the reasons all bunnies should get to live indoors. Our adoption events at The Dog House and visits to The Building for Kids (both in Appleton) have helped a great deal with that part of our mission. We continue to search for opportunities to spread the word about the values of rabbit ownership. Since we have such great partnership with Bay Area Humane and Animal Hospital of Oshkosh we have been able to have our rabbits vet checked and spayed and neutered at a reasonable cost. This allowed us to take in a few medical rabbits and guinea pigs this year as well as insure the better health of others. Thank you to the doctors and staff of these great facilities! All in all this has been a good year for K&R Small Animal Sanctuary. We look back happily on the work we have done this past year with an eye on the future as well. We hope this next year will be even more wonderful than the last! If you are looking for a way to help our small animals we are always looking for more foster homes and volunteers!! Please contact us by email or on facebook.

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ADOPTION AVIAN CANINE COLDWEATHER EAGLES FOXES HOLIDAY MIDWINTER NEWYEAR PETEXPO RABBTIS RESCUE SHELTER SNOWYOWL SUPPLEMENTS VOLUNTEER

ALGAE BIRDS CHILICOOKOFF DIABETES FELINE FURMINATOR MARDIPAWS MYTHS NUTRITION PINSFORPUPS REIKI SENSORY SKUNKODOR STRESS THUNDERSHIRT WINTERHOUSING

Words to find, they can go across, up or down, diagonally. Answers will appear in next months issue or on the Pet Journal website about the 20th of the month, on the Lakeshore Region page.


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/HJDF\6WXGLRV Trish Brunner Have your pet professionally photographed by National Award Winning Pet Photographer, Trish Brunner

ur o y r o f l ecia p s g ing n r i u h d t e n e m o k ta e r u Need s t c i p ea in v t i a t H e g ? t d r an y r a u Sweetha n a of J h y! t a n D o s m e e n i h t lent a V r o f time

/HJDF\6WXGLRV 1402 S. 12th St. Sheboygan, WI 53081 Appointments fill fast! Please call early. 920.803.8880 1.866.751.8880


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