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WISCONSIN’S RESOURCE FOR ALL ANIMALS GB/FC Region

October 2011

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Volume 1, Issue 3

Finders Keepers... Not! by Kathy Pobloskie, Wis. Voters For Companion Animals The other day I was walking along the sidewalk in downtown Milwaukee and I saw a bicycle leaning against a building. It was a bit sad looking - it’s paint was faded and chipped, it’s tires looked like they needed some air, and the seat had seen better days. Poor thing. I glanced around for an owner but saw no one. It had been abandoned. I decided to take it home and give it some love. I was going to give it the life it deserved! I was going to be a hero! I was going to be a bicycle rescuer! What a wonderful thing I was doing. I would be able to tell the story for years to come to my friends and family about the poor neglected, abandoned bicycle that I had saved. I hope you see where I’m going with this. Of course I wouldn’t take the bicycle. That’s called STEALING. Bicycles are property. Cars are property. A wallet is property. Dogs are property. Why do people think that it is somehow okay to keep a dog that they have found?

Photo courtesy of Legacy Studios

In This Issue Rocky of the Free Roamers

Uromastyx

Keeping Your Pet Safe During the Holidays - Halloween Edition

Family Pet or Family Member

- page 4

- page 5

- page 9

- page 13

Evie

Digital Imaging

- page 14

- page 7

We very seldom have dogs intentionally stolen (premeditated theft) in Wisconsin. But lately we have had a few cases of lost dogs that have been picked up and kept by well-intentioned, but misinformed Good Samaritans. These are lost dogs that have owners who are desperately looking for them. This is illegal. Let me say it again. Dogs are property. We have a very clear law* that states how lost property must be handled in Wisconsin and how you must make every effort to find and return the property to its owner. The details are spelled out and I encourage you to read them. As we work through these cases with Lost Dogs of Wisconsin we smile and delicately and diplomatically negotiate the return of these dogs (if we know where they are). But behind the scenes - my head is about to explode with the words “GET YOUR OWN DAMN DOG”. It isn’t like there’s not enough dogs in our shelters and rescues that need a good home.

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October 2011

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Green Bay/Fox Cities Region

ABOUT

OUR

PET JOURNAL

COVER MODEL

October 2011

Editors Notes

Dear Readers,

Thank you for reading the October Anniversary Edition of Pet Journal! This month marks the first year Anniversary of the Lakeshore Edition. I want to take this moment to thank our faithful readers for their unwavering support of Pet Journal. The valuable input of our readers has allowed Pet Journal to grow and thrive. The staff of Pet Journal sincerely thanks you.

Our October cover model is Max, a Domestic Shorthair who is 10 years young. His human companion is Theresa T of Sheboygan Falls. Photo courtesy of Legacy Studios, Sheboygan, WI in 2009.

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Become a friend of Pet Journal on Facebook! Join the growing group of Pet Journal readers following us, and upload a picture of your pets, it could be featured as our pet of the week!

Would you like to see your pets in Pet Journal? Email a picture of your pet(s) to petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com and we will feature them in our Pet Pictures Page. No email? No problem. Mail a copy of the picture to the Pet Our coulunists would love to hear your Journal mailbox, listed below. All picquestions. Contact information is found tures received by mail will be returned at the end of their respective columns! after scanning. Please feel free to send us your story Have you seen the updated events ideas and photos. We want to be the publication you look forward to reading page on the Pet Journal website yet? It now features an interactive calendar each and every month. by goggle, as well as, the event posters Are you interested in Advertising in and event listings it had before. To acPet Journal? For more information on cess the events page go to the Pet Jouradvertising in this edition of Pet Journal nal home page and click on the events email lakeshoreadvertising@petjour- page link at the top of the page. nalmidwest.com. If you would like to have pet journal delivered to your busi, Editor ness for you staff or clients please email our distribution department at distribution@petjournalmidwest.com

Lee J Schneider

Table of Contents 1 - Finders Keepers... Not!

10 - Uromastyx Care Sheet

4 - Holistic & Natural Options for your Pets

11 - Photo from the Fox River Valley Cat Show

by K. Pobloskie

Hosted C. Larson

Rocky of the Free Roaming Felines by K. Beer

5 - Ask Scrappy Q & A

Hosted by Scrappy the Pit Bull

Keeping Your Pets Safe During the Holidays - Halloween Edition

by Pet Journal Editiors

6 - Calendar of Events 7 - Digital Imaging by B. Fisher

Ask the Alpha Dog

Hosted by T. Pool

8 - Ask the Vet

Hosted by Dr. K. Strickfaden

Pet Journal newspaper is published by LSRB Media, LLC, on a monthly basis and is available free of charge to readers at various locations in the region that it is printed. Questions or comments regarding content in this edition can be made to GBFC@petjournalmidwest.com or by calling our offices at: (920) 393-4818. Pet Journal is always on the lookout for new advertiser’s if you are interested in advertising with us please contact the Lakeshore Region advertising department at GBFCadvertising@petjournalmidwest.com. To contact Pet Journal by mail please send all correspondence to our mailbox at: Pet Journal attn: GB/FC Region Advertising 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270, Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524. If you have a questions for a specific columnist please use the email at the end of their respective columns. If you have a questions for a specific department, please contact them via their email address listed below. General Information................... petjournal@petjournalmidwest.com Advertising Department............. advertising@petjournalmidwest.com Distribution Location Requests... distribution@petjournalmidwest.com Pet Journal Archives...................... archives@petjournalmidwest.com Pet Photo Submissions................. petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com Our Website........................................ www.petjournalmidwest.com

9 - Uromastyx

by D. Enockson

Pet Adoption Section

from the EWHSR

12 - Photos of your Pets 13 - Family Pet or Family Member from CatsInternational.org

Who are the Free Roamers? by K. Beer

14 - Evie

by L. Ledbeter

15 - Grooming your Pet Hosted by D. Schmidtl

Coming in October Your Cats Social Life from CatsInternational.org

16 - Classified Ads 17 - Event Posters 18 - Pet Journal Word Search 19. - Litterbox Problem Solutions from CatsInternational.orgr


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October 2011

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Holistic & Natural Options for Your Pets by Cheryl Larson, Down to Earth Nutrition holistic-and-natural@petjournalmidwest.com How can you navigate the pet’s health. Many pet foods contain low quality ingredients and grains that maze of pet allergies? your pet is not designed to get nutriDogs, cats and other pets can be tion from, however there are many new affected by every allergy that bothers raw, grain-free, human quality options humans, including reactions to drugs now available. Once your pet is eating and chemicals, food sensitivities, pollen a whole, natural diet, taking nutritional and mold, contact dermatitis and insect supplements and herbs for digestion will bites. The most common symptoms oc- be the next big step. A large portion of cur as skin irritation: itching, licking and the immune system is located in the wall gnawing at the skin to the point of raw of the gut and a healthy immune system sores. Chronic ear infections are an- will help the animal deal naturally with other common symptom, and occasion- allergens. Aloe, dandelion root, and ally nasal or eye discharge, coughing, milk thistle help detoxify and cleanse sneezing, inflamed toes, or anal itch- the bowel. Adding beneficial bugs (proing. Symptoms can ultimately result in biotics or natural bacteria) to your pets’ seizures, arthritis, chronic urinary tract food will also be helpful. Essential Fatty infections, or even inflammatory bowel Acids from fish or flax oil have a natural anti-inflammatory effect and licorice disease. root or yucca may take some of the itch Essentially, allergy is the result of away. an immune system that has run amok, frequently it takes several years for the allergy to become evident in your pet, making it difficult to find the culprit. However, well-nourished animals don’t tend to get allergies and animals that have them often get rid of them if they eat a well-balanced, natural, raw diet. So this is the single most important step you can take to improve your

Additionally, pure filtered water, dining from glass or stainless steel dishes, (plastic bowls are a common cause of feline acne) exercise, several hours of natural sunlight, and reduced stress improve your animals’ health and immune system. This approach may seem to take longer than conventional Western medicine but you will want to keep in mind that you are bringing your pet back to a state of health in which he will be better able to deal with all exposures and illness. Western medicine tends to use chemical warfare to eliminate symptoms; however, they tend to shut down the immune system leaving the door open for infection and other complications. You will need to consider the adverse reactions of medication before choosing this approach. There are times when relief from scratching will be beneficial to everyone’s sanity, but this approach should be limited and combined with improvements to the animals’ immune systems. Here’s what you can do: enhance the immune system with high-quality food and make sure to rotate foods to prevent food insensitivities, consider nutritional support for pets already compromised in some way and don’t challenge the immune system with vaccinations (a titer blood test can be given instead). Herbs and essential oils can be safely used to repel fleas and ticks, vinegar and dish soap are safe cleaning supplies to limit your pets’ exposure to chemicals, don’t use pesticides on your lawn or in your home, consider mold if people and/or pets in your home are ill, and consider a quality household air filter for everyone’s benefit.

see

Allergies on page 8.

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Rocky of the Free Roaming Felines by Kathy Beer, Free Roaming Felines, Manitowoc, WI nate him. He also would have difficulty in fighting off any other animals who might stalk him.

I usually write Roamer biographies in the first person. It allows the reader to make a more personal connection with the Roamer. It doesn’t use a third party to tell a story which can be told so much better from the Roamer’s point of view. However, this biography will not be done this way. It won’t be done this way because it is difficult to imagine what trials and tribulations Rocky experienced before he was admitted to the Roamer program. In all my years of feline work, I have never seen a feline with the multiple wounds and scars that Rocky has.

I don’t see alot of the Roamers that come into the program. Some of them are picked up immediately after their surgeries by their caregiver. Horse barns and dairy farms who want to enroll their outside felines in the Roamer program also drop off and pick up their Roamers when the surgeries are completed and I don’t meet these Roamers either.

I did see Rocky. His caregiver picked him up at the veterinary clinic and stopped to chat a bit before he took Rocky home. I knew that his wounds must have been numerous because of his lengthy confinement. However, I didn’t think 90% of his body would be covered with them. The wounds were healing nicely. There was no infection present. His coat was starting to shine Rocky came into the Roamer proand just beginning to partially cover the gram last week from the City of Manipuncture wounds on his body. towoc. He had been livetrapped and when the officer called me, I was told It’s hard to imagine the terror and that the Roamer had some war wounds. fear with which this Roamer has lived. War wounds are typical for street cats. I Cats that are out and about have very didn’t think much about it when I spoke little time to relax. They must always with the officer and I figured the wounds be on guard, especially in city neighborwere the normal scrapes and scratches. hoods where there are numerous strays About two hours later, I received a call that prowl about. Hunting for them is from Dr. Katz’s clinic in Two Rivers. not sport, like it is for many housepets The feline that was brought in had bite who use hunting skills when they play wounds so numerous and diversified, with a catnip mouse. Hunting for street it would be legally necessary to quarcats means survival. While on the hunt, antine the felinle for 180 days instead they must use caution and always be of the standard 10 day rabies hold bein tune with what is going on around cause it was difficult to tell what kinds of them. Rocky had been a housecat animals had attacked this feline. I was at some point in his life. Casting him asked what should be done. My choices out is the equivalent of one of us being were either a long quarantine or euthaabandoned in a jungle. nasia. I responded that I would make some phone calls. I had several things Rocky is doing well in his foster in mind. The Roamer program requires home. He’s learning to trust again. He’s plans and backup plans. If one thing starting to “talk” to his caregiver. He’s doesn’t work, we try another. I called starting to play with toys again, for the one of our foster homes and asked if time being, when noone is looking. He’s the foster was game for the situation we stretching out in the sun without the had. I explained that the feline would fear of being pounced upon by another have to be “in residence” with this fosanimal. He is a very healthy feline and ter for 180 days, which is six months. his physical wounds are healing. That’s Without too much hesitation the foster easy. A much harder task is to help heal parent agreed to take “Rocky.” This tatthe emotional wounds form a previous tered and torn feline was life that was not the best. His coat is going to get a new identity through starting to shine. His eyes are bright, the Roamer program. Like a characfocused, and interested in everything ter in the program “Plain Sight,” Rocky that’s going on around him. Rocky is a would immerge as a different feline after Free Roamer. He’ll be available for adophis stretch of 180 days. tion in November. Rocky had been declawed on all four paws, but not neutered. This is almost criminal. When he found himself out on the street, he had no way of defending himself and because he was not neutered, he would be “stalked” by other street Toms. He would be competition for them and they would seek to elimi-

To find more about the other free roaming felines program see the article on page 13. To find out more on Rockys, please call 920-686-8899 or visit their website: www.freeroamingfelineprogram.com.


PET JOURNAL

Green Bay/Fox Cities Region

ASK SCRAPPY!

October 2011

5

Keeping Your Pets Safe During the Holidays

by Scrappy, the Lovable Pit Bull askscrappy@petjournalmidwest.com

by the Editors of Pet Journal Editors Note: Keeping your pet safe column will appear in months where there is a holiday that could have items that are potentiality dangerous to your pets.

Greetings to all my two and four legged friends! I hope you’re enjoying our first days of glorious fall. I love it! Like I said last month, it’s my favorite time of the year. Not too hot, not too cold. Is everyone looking forward to Halloween like I am? Not really sure what I’m going as yet, though I’ve received many suggestions. My human mom had suggested going as Donkey from Shrek and having my cohort Misty, going as Puss in Boots. I brought this idea up to the ever temperamental Misty and all I received for my inquiry was a hiss and threats about sleeping with one eye open. Come on, how much of a stretch is it to go as a cat when you’ve already got the cat part down pat. Besides, she gets a cool hat, boots, and a sword. I would have thought the idea of carrying around sharp weapon would have appealed to her sensibilities, but alas not. Cats are so like humans, I just don’t get ‘em. I thought it might be fun to go as a hamster. You know, catch everybody off guard. Maybe as Cujo, but I figure my breed already has enough bad press. Whichever I choose, I hope you all have a safe and fun Halloween. Now on to the meat of my column. I have to have something of value or I’ll be out of a job and being a homeless Pit Bull isn’t the best predicament to be in. This month I thought I would tackle a question that has been brought to my attention many times. Why do dogs roll in the worst smelling stuff imaginable? Well, there are actually two very good answers to that question. First, we like the smell of it and want to share it with our loved ones; even though they may think, in their uncultured way, that it smells repulsive. Though when you consider we have over 220 million olfactory receptors in our noses compared to a human’s measly 5 million, who would you say knows more about what smells good. Besides, you can’t imagine what some of the stuff you spray on yourselves smells like to us. Think about that the next time you grab a bottle of that overpriced stinky water and spray far too much on yourself. I know that you do it to attract attention of prospective mates, but do you need to get the attention of somebody a county away. I’ll stick with checking out tails, thank you very much. The other answer is, we do because it’s an instinctual trait handed down to us by our wild wolf brethren. Wolves and other predators roll in stinky stuff to cover their own scent. So when they are hunting for dinner, the animal

As we come upon another holiday season, as animal caregivers we need to be aware of the potential hazards facing our companions. I know it’s the holidays and our four footed friends are an important part of our families and you want to share the joys and yummy treats of the season with them. You just need to keep in mind the hidden dangers that face them. In this series of articles I will try to break them down by holiday, though many of these issues cross over to other holidays during the rest of the year.

smells the stinky stuff and not them. Again, think about that when you’re spraying yourself with who knows what. Besides, what are you trying to cover up? At least we’ve got a legitimate reason to roll around in horrible things. Next month I’ll be reviewing a product called Fur-Zoff. It’s a stone that kinda looks like lava rock, but is actually made of recycled glass and is supposed to remove fur from any surface, including us! It’s gotten great reviews and I’m hoping to add mine to its long list. It’s produced and marketed by Green Bay native, John Beauchaine, and I’m really looking forward to putting it through its paces. Though most of the fur around the house is due to a certain cat, I do get blamed for quite a bit of it. Though I will say that she does have some traits in common with Puss in Boots, she has that big eyed “who me?” thing down pat. So whenever the subject of loose fur everywhere rears its ugly head, the eyes get absolutely enormous and all is forgiven. Suddenly my short black fur is the source of the long white fur around the house. I swear, I just give up. Well, that’s enough for me this month. I hope you all have a great October, I know I will. Don’t forget to send me any questions you need answered from a dog’s perspective. Remember to keep all those yummy treats out of our reach. Some of my friends are prone to eating whatever they find and asking questions later. Take Care

Scrappy Editors Note: Scrappy love to get mail and questions from his readers; please email him at askscrappy@petjournalmidwest.com or by mail: Pet Journal, Attn: Ask Scrappy! 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

Halloween

Misty, Assistant writer of Ask Scrappy!

One of my favorite poses!

First off, let’s talk about costumes. I know they’re cute and when you see your little buddy all dressed up for Halloween, you go nuts, grab the camera and snap until your finger is numb. Before you do this there are just a few issues to keep in mind. Make sure the costume fits properly and isn’t too tight or too loose. Elastic too tight around the neck can cause breathing problems, swelling and skin irritation on the neck or rest of the body if it works its way through dense fur down to the skin. If a costume is too loose, it could get caught on fences or scrubs and potentially choke an animal. Costumes with small plastic pieces can be chewed off and cause choking. A good general rule is, try to keep an eye on your pet whenever they are dressed in a costume. If you’re like most people, it’ll be hard not to look at how cute they are. Candy though delicious to us, can impact animal’s health dramatically. Sugar-free candies containing Xylitol (or any artificial sweetener) is very dangerous and can cause hypoglycemia and liver damage. We’ve all heard the story that chocolate is dangerous and it’s true. Depending on the amount consumed, chocolate can be potentially toxic to companion pets. Theobromine is the component in chocolate that makes it toxic. Though the various kinds of chocolate have different degrees of theobromine in them, milk chocolate having the least and bakers or dark chocolate having the most, they are all dangerous. Contact a veterinarian if you believe you pet consumed any amount of chocolate. Any candies, such as lollipops, that contain a wooden, rolled paper, or plastic stick can be a choking hazard and if consumed cause choking or serious internal injuries to a pet. Plastic, cellophane, or aluminum foil candy wrappers can also be a concern. Pets can find discarded candy wrappers, find they smell just like the candy they covered and eat them.

see

Safety on page 11.


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PET JOURNAL

October 2011

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OCTOBER 2011 SUNDAY

2

MONDAY

3

TUESDAY

4

WEDNESDAY

5

THURSDAY

6

FRIDAY

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Lincoln Park Zoo Open Lincoln Park Zoo Open Manitowoc, WI Manitowoc, WI Sundays Monday - Saturday 11:00 am - 3:00 pm 7:00 am - 3:00 pm For October

SATURDAY

1. 8 Furry Flurry Pet Walk, Riverside Park, Neenah. 9 AM – 1 PM see poster on page 17 for more information.

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10 Columbus

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Day

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Warm Hearts for Whiskers benefit for Cats Anonymous, Best Western Midway Hotel, Green Bay. 10 AM - 2 PM see page 17 for more information..

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21 Haunted Barn at Lincoln Park Zoo, Manitowoc 5 PM - 9 PM see page 17 for more information.

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28 Haunted Barn at Lincoln Park Zoo, Manitowoc 5 PM - 9 PM see page 17 for more information.

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31 Halloween

22 Hiss & Howl Halloween Hullabaloo! A Benefit for Happily Ever After, Ramada Plaza, Green Bay.

6 PM - 10 PM see page 17 for more information.

Haunted Barn at Lincoln Park Zoo, Manitowoc 5 PM - 9 PM see page 17 for more information.

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November All Events that appear on this page are also available for viewing on the Events page of the Pet Journal website, www. petjournalmidwest.com. Events will be posted to our website first and then added to the Print Edition as space allows. If you have a smart phone with a barcode reading program you can scan the code on the facing page to right to go to the events page.

Pet Journal provides this calendar as a service to the local community. If you have an event that you would like listed please email us at: petjournal@ petjournalmidwest.com, with the following information: date(s) and time(s) of event, your contact information, a short description of what will be happening, if it is a fundraiser please list who the proceeds are going to, and please list the subject as “PJ Calendar Submission.” Please send this to us no later than the 23rd of the month for inclusion into the next months issue. Thank you.

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Saving Paws Animal Rescue’s 2011 Holiday Miracle Event, Darboy Club, Appleton 5 PM - ??? see page 17 for more information.


Animal Foundation & Pet Pantry of Wis. Keeping pets at home by providing food assistance for animals.

We are here to help those who may of lost their job, have poor health, or are shut-in. Our economy has forced many to surrender their companions because they can’t afford to feed or get them proper health care. With donations we are able to assist individuals Bus: in keeping their pets fed and at home.

www.AFPPW.org

PET JOURNAL

Green Bay/Fox Cities Region

920-428-PETS (7387) Toll Free: 888-924-2333 E-mail: petsathome@yahoo.com

The Animal Foundation & Pet Pantry is a 501 (C) (3) not-for-profit orginization

Have you adopted a pet from a rescue? Send us a picture of them along with a short description for a special photo section in November! Email your pictures to: rescuephotos@petjournalmidwest.com

or mail them to: Pet Journal 3120 S Business Dr. Suite 270 Attn: Rescue Pets Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 by October 15, 2011.

Digital Imaging Billie Jo Fisher, Wisconsin Veterinary Referral Center The cause of the emergency a chicken wing: The medical entry in the computer tells the story: 30 minutes ago at home, Shadow, a 2 year old Black Labrador, ingested an entire chicken wing whole without chewing. Her owner brings Shadow into the emergency room where she undergoes a variety of hightech attempts to identify where the chicken bone is. The case of the missing sock: Sophie, a 4 year old German Shorthair Pointer has been previously healthy except she has a history of eating socks. She had been seen at the emergency clinic last year for eating a sock and had surgery to remove another sock from her stomach nine months ago. This morning at 7 am, Sophie vomited a sock at home. The owner is concerned, as another sock may still be missing. Pets that have illnesses, infections, wounds, and of course, those like Shadow and Sophie that have eaten something they shouldn’t have, need special care and advanced treatments. Most veterinary hospitals take x-ray images of pets like Shadow and Sophie using standard conventional x-ray techniques that require the use of an x-ray table, a film cassette, a darkroom and an automatic film processor with chemicals.

It usually meant a delay of up to 10 - 15 minutes before the veterinarian was able to see the resulting image and in some cases, the x-ray would have to be re-taken if the pet had moved or the positioning or contrast needed to be adjusted. But just as digital cameras have made photography more efficient by eliminating film and the waiting time to have your pictures developed, digital radiography eliminates the processing time—allowing immediate viewing of the images. Since 2005 the Wisconsin Veterinary Referral Center (WVRC) has been utilizing digital technology for all of its diagnostic imaging. With digital technology, the veterinary technician can take a digital image of your pet without having to wait to develop a film. Not only does it require less equipment, but the time it takes from positioning to completed image takes only 4 seconds. Because digital technology minimizes the time a pet would need to spend on the x-ray table, it can receive treatment faster. The image can be evaluated immediately to ensure good positioning and technique of the areas in need of study.

see

Imaging on page 8.

October 2011

7

Ask the Alpha Dog by Alpha Dog - Tamara Pool, 4-Paws Private Training, Sheboygan, WI alpha-dog@petjournalmidwest.com I’ve decided this month’s column is story time, kids. This is the story of Tucker, a 6 1/2 year old Long-Coated German Shepherd. Tucker has been a student of mine for 2 1/2 years. His Alpha Dog, Julie, came to me in January of 2009 because Tucker had some issues she wanted to work on. Including accepting friendly strangers and dogs. He had some canine friends, but there was a time when Tucker couldn’t tolerate any other dog near him. This, of course, made it very difficult to go on a walk or to a pet store. This caused a lot of pain and frustration for Julie. She wanted to be able to walk along the street without worrying that Tucker would attack the first dog he saw, or worse, a person who only wanted to pet his fuzzy ears. Julie had moderate control over him, but needed a pinch collar on walks. Even with the challenges he presented, working with Tucker and Julie has been one of the most rewarding experiences of my training career. In early September, Julie was on a walk with Tucker. They were passing by a restaurant on Sheboygan’s South side where several cars were parked along the street. This was nothing new, as Julie passed there often. Suddenly, and without warning, a large, shaggy, brown dog came flying out a car window. He jumped right on Tucker’s back and knocked him to the ground and proceeded to attack. Seeing that this dog was leashed and connected to the inside of the car, Julie, and her quick thinking, gave Tucker the commands needed to get him clear of the dog’s reach and then into a down/stay. Knowing that he only had a buckle collar on and his pinch collar was hanging on a hook at home she did what she could, keeping him focused on her, and out of harms way. This may very well have saved Tucker’s life...or the life of the other dog as Tucker was about twice his size.

Julie went to the door of the restaurant and flagged down a waitress. She gave the description of the car and the waitress went to find the owner. A man came out and listened with a blank stare as Julie explained what happened. He just gave the excuse of, “I didn’t think he’d do that.” For those of you reading this, never leave your dog in a vehicle with windows down far enough for them to even stick their head out. Vent the windows and check on them often. The first step to being a responsible dog owner is seeing what could happen and being prepared for it. “There was a time when Tucker would have retaliated and ripped this dog to shreds,” Julie said, as she recalled this horrifying incident, “Luckily, we have worked very hard at trusting each other through training, and he placed his trust in me to handle the situation.” Tucker was my student, however, Julie is the one who worked very hard for the past 2 1/2 years to gain Tucker’s trust and, in turn, gain trust in him. Julie, you’ve done an amazing job with Tucker and I am thrilled to know you. Whenever you are going for a walk, even if you’ve been there a hundred times, expect the unexpected and always have full control over your dog. Don’t assume that everyone will have control...there are irresponsible pet owners out there. Don’t be one. A true Alpha Dog will always have their dog’s trust.

Editors Note: Alpha Dog, Tamara welcomes your questions on pet training, please email her at the email above or by mail: Pet Journal Attn: Alpha Dog 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524


8

PET JOURNAL

October 2011

Ask the Vet by Dr. Karen M. Strickfaden, Countrycare Animal Complex, Green Bay, WI ask-the-vet@petjournalmidwest.com Overweight Pets Obesity related health problems for people in the U.S. are estimated to be in excess of $70 billion dollars every year. Unfortunately, our pets offer a reflection of our present society, both in life style and in physique. Obesity in our animal companions is defined as an excess of 15-20% body weight above ideal weight for an individual. Over 25% of dogs and cats are now considered obese, and the number is rapidly rising!

ty, fat content, protein source and label directions vary considerably. The container may tell you to feed six cups of the food per day, but that may be three times the calories that your pet needs based on his breed and exercise level. Also, most pet foods are high in fat content (that’s what makes them taste good). Fats are a major source of extra calories. Treats and table scraps are also very high in calories.

Exercise is Important Lack of adequate exercise is also a big As with people, overweight pets have a contributing factor to overweight pets. much higher incidence of health related Adequate daily physical exercise for problems. Overweight pets are much your pet cannot be overlooked. more prone to arthritic joint degeneration, disc disease, heart disease, diabeA Weight Loss Program tes, and Cushing’s disease. Your pet should have a complete physical exam and blood work prior to a weight reduction program to rule out Is my Pet Overweight? One major difference exists between any predisposing medical conditions. people and pets when it comes to beYour veterinarian can evaluate your ing overweight: pets are not responsible for their eating habits and lifestyle ... animal’s current nutrition and body conwe are! In order to make any progress dition and guide you through an approtoward reducing a pet’s ‘excessive bag- priate weight loss program for your pet. gage’, the first and often most difficult Proper nutrition needs to be maintained step is being aware of and admitting that and weight loss should not exceed more there is a weight problem. If you are un- than 1% of body weight weekly. sure of your pet’s ideal weight and body condition, consult your veterinarian. DifAn appropriate weight reduction proferent breeds can vary considerably, and gram requires an initial evaluation, freeven individuals within each breed vary quent monitoring, and maintenance in their ideal weight. guidelines in order to be safe and effective. Many options are available to keep Behavior Modification your pet from feeling ‘starved’: less enThe second major step in pet weight ergy dense foods, low calorie treats, reduction is behavior modification (of multiple feedings, etc. Remember that the humans). This requires all family proper weight is a very important part members (and even the neighbors that of keeping your pet healthy and happy may offer treats, etc.) be aware of the for years to come. problem. There must be a commitment to the feeding schedule, quantity of food intake, and the type and amount of Editors Note: Dr. Strickfaden welcomes your questions on general pet treats offered. health topics, please email her at askFood Choices the-vet@petjournalmidwest.com or by Now that everyone is aware of and mail at: Pet Journal committed to their pet’s weight loss Attn: Ask the Vet program, it is not just a matter of de3120 S Business Dr Suite 270 creasing food intake. Most pet foods are Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 balanced nutritionally in relation to energy intake (what we want to reduce). If energy intake is reduced by decreasing food consumption, essential vitamins & minerals may become deficient.

Obesity is the #1 health risk for pets!!

All pet foods and pet treats are not created equal. Fiber level, energy densi-

Happily Every After’s 4th Annual Happily Ever After

+,66  DQG  +2:/ +$//2:((1 Sanctuary Inc. +8//$%$/22 Human and PAnimal et

er 22, 2011 Saturday, Octob 0 pm 6:00 pm to 10:0 en Bay re G , za Ramada Pla Way 2750 Ramada

Coustume C ontests! Animal Com municator Silent Aucti on Food and C ash Bar

See th Poste e Event r on p a for m ge 17 o inform re ation!

www.petjournalmidwest.com

Imaging from page 7.

Allergies from page 4.

The clarity of the images are of an extremely high quality, but digital technology allows the veterinarian to enhance the image even further, if necessary, in order to examine the images in more detail and begin immediate and accurate treatment, something not possible with conventional film.

Remember that anti-inflammatory herbs and supplements are available T for relief and don’t give up hope! The maze may seem long and complicated, but getting back to basics will make a big difference in your friend’s health and alternative medicine has many options to try.

Once the digital image is taken, it is instantly routed to a high-grade computer server. This allows your veterinarian to have immediate access to your pet’s radiographic images and other digital exams such as CT, ultrasound, endoscopy and fluoroscopy from any computer with Internet access.

Editors Note: Cheryl welcomes your questions on Holistic and Natural options, please email her at holisticand-natural@petjournalmidwest.com or by mail: A Pet Journal Attn: Holistic and Natural 3120 S Business Dr Suite 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

Thankfully, Shadow and Sophie had successful outcomes. They both required surgery to resolve their foreign body ingestions, but have fully recovered from their mishaps. Digital radiography played a large part in identifying their problems quickly so they could be treated successfully. Sophie, who is nestled between two blankets with her head resting on a pillow, indeed looks like she appreciates being tucked in so comfortably, and in the kennel next to her sleeps Shadow, dreaming of chicken wings. Billie Jo Fisher Hospital Manager Wisconsin Veterinary Referral Center Wisconsin Veterinary Referral Center (WVRC) is the Midwest’s leader in veterinary specialty and emergency care. Open 24 hours/7 days a week, WVRC is staffed by full-time emergency veterinarians and veterinary specialists in Emergency/Critical Care, Surgery, Cardiology, Anesthesia/Pain Management, Diagnostic Imaging, Ophthalmology, Oncology, Dentistry, and Internal Medicine. WVRC has offices located in Waukesha and Grafton. For more information visit www.wvrc.com


PET JOURNAL

Green Bay/Fox Cities Region

In the big picture - this is one of the reasons that I am really happy that dogs ARE property. This protects my rights as their owner. The law is on my side if my dogs are lost. Good Samaritans take note. We appreciate that you get the lost dog safely off the street and to a warm, dry place. If you feel that a dog is neglected or abused, contact a humane officer or police officer in your community. But do not think that you are doing anybody any favors by keeping a dog that is not legally yours. “Think Lost, Not Stray” - Kat Albrecht, Missing Pet Partnership

* http://www.animallaw.info/statutes/stuswist170_07_12.htm Kathy Pobloskie, Director WISCONSIN VOTERS FOR COMPANION ANIMALS http://www.facebook.com/wivoters http://www.wisconsinwatchdog. blogspot.com http://www.facebook.com/findfido “Advocating for Animals Through Informed Voting”

by Deb Enockson, Eastern Wisconsin Herpetological Society and Rescue The Uromastyx lizard or Uro for from approx. $100 and up for a young short is a fairly rare lizard to see in individual. Color varies dramatically bea reptile collection. I have had the tween varieties and gender. Behavior pleasure of having one and becoming also differs between varieties and indiaquainted with the species. These liz- vidual lizards. Adaption to captivity is ards have only become popular over the variable. Uromastyx ornatus is rumored last decade or so. There are approxi- to have a death rate of as high as 80% mately 13 species in the genus Uromas- during the first couple of months of tyx. They are adapted to arid regions captivity. Uromastyx aegypticus seems and are found from northwestern India to be hardier and with proper treatment throughout southwestern Asia, the Ara- adapts to captivity. The Uromastyx is bian Peninsula and the Sahara of Africa quite territorial and will defend their (Moody 1987). They are often called territory from other Uromastyx, other spiny-tailed lizards or dabb lizards. Sev- lizard species and other animals. Two en species (U. aegypticus, U. ornatus, males will fight and can have adverse U. maliensis, U. ocellatus, U. acanthinu- effects on the loser’s health. Feeding rus, U. hardwicki, and U. benti) are oc- may diminish and growth rates can be casionally available in the United States. shunted. A male and a female may live The other six are hardly ever imported. comfortably together, although most The largest member of the species is U. keepers only introduce the two during aegypticus, which can weigh in at sever- mating season. al pounds and be 30” or more in length. Other varieties are generally less than 14” in length. The most popular being the U. maliensis or Mali for short. The variety that I had the pleasure of owning for several years, until he passed away from old age, was a U. hardwicki that a troop of Boy Scouts named Arnold. Arnold was shy, but gentle and a big hit at any presentation he appeared at. He had probably been captured in the wild and sold here at either a pet store or a flea market. I was asked to take him in when he was seized from a condemned house along with a Leopard Gecko and a Boa Constrictor. None of them was in very good shape when I took them in, but they all recovered. I still have the Gecko and Boa. The Uromastyx is becoming more popular and there are breeding programs for them now, although captivebred Uros are fairly expensive, ranging

PETS AVAILABLE

Scout gets along with everyone--dogs, cats and kids. Scout was surrendered to us because his family moved. Shortly after he arrived we discovered Scout had a urinary tract infection. We treated the infection and got him back to his happy self but the vet recommends he stay on a prescription urinary health food for life. Scout has been patiently waiting at the shelter for a new family to come and take him home. Come see Scout at the Neenah Animal Shelter, 951 County Rd. G, Neenah, or call them at 920.722.9544 or visit their website at: www.neenahanimalshelter.com.

The Pet Journal Adoption Section Brought to by these sponsors: To find out how to have your business listed here call our offices at: (920) 393-4818

9

Uromastyx

Keepers from page 1. I have two shy, sensitive dogs. They’re also very physically fit. They would only have to be lost a couple of days and I’m sure they would appear underfed and abused - cowering and thin. Would someone find them and assume I was a horrible owner and didn’t deserve them back? Would they keep them and call themselves heroes - not even trying to reunite them with me?

October 2011

FOR

ADOPTION

Meet Maggie, she is a 8.5 year old Yellow Lab. Maggie came to saving paws because her owners could no longer give her the time she needed. She gets along good with cats, children and other dogs! Maggie is very friendly and happy-go-lucky, she is also house-trained and well behaved. She really needs someone that will exercise with her on a regular basis, so if you are looking for a walking partner she is your gal! If you are interested in meeting Maggie, please contact Saving Paws Rescue at (920) 209-PAWS (7297) or (920) 470-PAWS (7297) or email dogs@savingpaws.com.

The Uromastyx are a deep desert lizard, so they are used to hot, arid desert conditions. Daytime you should offer a hot side at 110-120°F and the cool side at 80-90°F. Nighttime temperatures should be 70-80°F. Do not let the temperature drop below 65°F. These lizards live in the arid desert therefore they need NO humidity. The habitat setup should represent a desert. Sand, dirt and newspaper are often used as a substrate. Make sure that you include rocks and a hide. Uromastyx are natural burrowers, and sometimes the ability to do so will make them more com-

AT

AREA RESCUES

AND

Frank Male Neutered, 4 year old DSH Buff Tabby Frank is a big boy with tons of love to give! He is extremely playful and loves to eat :) Frank is a very special cat because he has FIV (better thank Feline Leukemia). Frank needs to live with other FIV cats or no other cats at all. Please do not let this scare you away. Frank is very healthy and if given the chance he could live a long happy life. Call Saving Paws Rescue at 920-830-2392 to set up a appointment to meet Frank Eastern Wisconsin Herpetological Society & Rescue PO Box 245 Plymouth, WI 53073 920 207-5642 easternwiherps.com

fortable. Make sure that your rocks will not collapse on top of your lizard should they burrow under them. I actually had the best luck with millet bird seed. The Uro can burrow, not get stuck and won’t get impacted if they eat some of it with their food. Ultraviolet B (UVB) Lighting is imperative. UVB is important to these lizards and direct sunlight (not through glass) is recommended. If you can’t give them direct sunlight a florescent UVB bulb should be used 10-12 hours a day. These bulbs should be replaced routinely every six months. Some varieties of Uros are herbivorous, while others are omnivorous. They should be offered a mixture of feeder insects and a salad. Wax worms, mealworms, crickets and super worms will suffice for the meat. The salad should consist of a wide variety of vegetables and fruit: greens (kale, collard, mustard greens, dandelion greens and flowers, turnip greens), sweet potatoes, carrots, apples, strawberries, corn, split peas, green beans and a bird seed mix. You can use frozen/thawed mixed vegetables to provide a variety of good veggies. They are very efficient at getting moisture from their food and do not need, nor should they be provided with a water bowl. A water bowl in their habitat would only serve to raise the humidity level of their environment which may be detrimental to their health. If you are interested in having a Uromastyx lizard as a pet, make sure you do your homework and research everything you can about them, before you pick your pet.

see

Uromastyx on page 10.

SHELTERS

Hi, I’m Abby, a 5-year-old female mixed breed dog, and I’m all ready for Halloween! I am one of the sweetest, most affectionate dogs you’ll ever meet . And I am so very smart - I know “sit”, “down” and “shake”. I love to play - I could fetch all day! I get along great with kids and would love to find a home of my own soon. I have become a favorite amongst the staff and volunteers here. Come on down and visit me - maybe I can show you some of my tricks for some treats! The Oshkosh Humane Society is located at 1925 Shelter Ct in Oshkosh. Visit www.oahs.org for hours and directions.

Help Sponsor the Pet Journal Adoption Section! To find out how to have your business listed here call our office at: (920) 393-4818


10

PET JOURNAL

October 2011

www.petjournalmidwest.com

Uromastyx from page 9. And as always, if you have any questions regarding reptiles as pets, please feel free to contact me at The Eastern Wisconsin Herpetological Society & Rescue, home of the All Animal Rescue Center Project. Email: deb@easternwiherps. com or info@allanimalrescuecenter.com Happy Herping! Deb Enockson President – EWHSR/All Animal Rescue Center Project Photo Credits: Page 9 and 10: Various Uromastyx Goggle Search

Eastern Wisconsin Herpetological Society and Rescue Care Sheet Species: Uromastyx Binomial Name:

Approximately 13 species

Introduction: These lizards have only become popular over the last decade or so. There are approximately 13 species in the genus Uromastyx. They are adapted to arid regions and are found from northwestern India throughout southwestern Asia, the Arabian Peninsula and the Sahara of Africa (Moody 1987). Often called spiny tailed lizards or dab lizards. Seven species (U. aegypticus, U. or-

natus, U. maliensis, U. ocellatus, U. acanthinurus, U. hardwicki, and U. benti) that are occasionally available

in the United States. The other six are hardly ever imported. The largest member of the species is U. aegypticus, which can weigh in at several pounds and be 30” or more in length. Other varieties are generally less than 14” in length.

Distinguishing Characteristics: Color varies dramatically between varieties and gender. Behavior also differs between varieties and individual lizards. Adaption to captivity is variable. Uromastyx ornatus is rumored to have a death rate of as high as 80% during the first couple of months of captivity. Uromastyx aegypticus seems to be hardier and with proper treatment adapts to captivity. The Uromastyx is quite territorial and will defend their territory from other Uromastyx, other lizard species and other animals. Two males will fight and can have adverse effects on the loser’s health. Feeding may diminish and growth rates can be shunted. A male and a female may live comfortably together, although most keepers only introduce the two during mating season. Housing: Cages can consist of a glass aquarium or a wooden box.

Husbandry Cage décor and misc. items: The setup should represent a desert. Sand, dirt and newspaper are often used as a substrate. Make sure that you include rocks and a hide. Uromastyx is a burrower, so make sure that your rocks will not collapse on top of your lizard should they burrow under them. Temps: The Uromastyx are a deep desert lizard, so they are used to hot, arid desert conditions. Daytime you should offer a hot side at 110-120°F and the cool side at 90°F. Nighttime temperatures should be 80-90°F. Do not let the temperature drop below 65°F. These lizards live in the arid desert therefore they need NO humidity. Do not put a water bowl in with your Uromastyx Lighting: Ultraviolet B (UVB) Lighting is imperative. UVB is important to these lizards and direct sunlight (not through glass) is recommended. If you can’t give them direct sunlight a florescent UVB bulb should be used 10-12 hours a day. These bulbs should be replaced routinely every six months. Substrate: Substrate can vary greatly depending on personal preference. Newspaper and butcher paper, as well other papers that can be purchased in large quantity, on rolls are very effective. It is generally very inexpensive and easy to clean, bottom line; it is very functional but not necessarily aesthetically appealing. Another option is a more natural substrate, such as dirt or sand. Natural substrates have a couple advantages, as well as some very serious disadvantages. All of these should be taken into consideration when deciding on a substrate. Nat-

ural substrate looks very nice; it is often used in zoos, or amongst collectors who display their animals. In addition Uromastyx are natural burrowers, and sometimes the ability to do so will make them more comfortable.

Maintenance: It is important to provide all reptiles with a clean environment to live in. Always remove your animal from their habitat before cleaning with a disinfecting solution. Allow the habitat to air out after using a solution before returning them to it. Spot cleaning should be done as often as needed, whenever the animal defecates or urinates. In additional a heavily diluted bleach or Listerine solution should be used to scrub the inside of the cage weekly. If using a natural substrate it should be completely changed every 2-4 weeks as needed, frequency should really be based on frequency of defecation and urination. It is imperative to prevent mold growth. Inhalation of mold spores can result in serious respiratory illness.

However, one should keep in mind when using these that feeding can be very dangerous. Ingestion of substrate can often lead to an impaction, often resulting in expensive vet bills, or worse death. In addition natural substrate has been known to cause infected hemipenes as well as infected cloacal tissue. Infection of hemipenes often occurs because males will randomly evert their hemipenes and bedding will stick to them. Both sexes may evert their cloacal tissue slightly when defecating; when organs are drawn back in References: any stuck on bedding may cause an “Basic care for Uromastyx Lizinfection. I have had good success and no problems with using calcium ards” by Audrey Vanderlinden Edited sand that is commercially available by Susan Horton, DVM www.exoticpetvet.com at most pet stores that carry reptile “The Lizard Lounge” supplies. www.the-lizard-lounge.com ”Herp Care Collection” Feeding Melissa Kaplan www.anapsid.org Types of food: “Basic care for Uromastyx” The Uromastyx is an omnivore. www.angelfire/super/urozone/ They should be offered a mixture info/care.html of feeder insects and a salad. Wax worms, mealworms, crickets and Editors Note: For more inforsuper worms will suffice for the meat. The salad should consist of mation on the Eastern Wisconsin a wide variety of vegetables and Herpetological Society and Rescue fruit: greens (kale, collard, mus- please visit their website at: www. tard greens, dandelion greens and easternwiherps.com flowers, turnip greens), sweet potatoes, carrots, apples, strawberries, corn, split peas, green beans and a bird seed mix. You can use frozen/ thawed mixed vegetables to provide a variety of good veggies. Most of their water comes from their food. Frequency: They should be offered a fresh salad daily and meat 2-3 times a week.


Green Bay/Fox Cities Region

PET JOURNAL

Fox River Valley Cat Club

October 2011 11

41st Annual Cat Show

Selected Pictures from entry on Sunday September 11th, from the 2 day event at the Tri-county Ice Arena in Neenah, WI

Lookin to Score, a Bengal, Janice & Chris B., Plymouth, MN

Daniel of the Lions Den (right) a Ruddy Somali & Little Red Daydream (left) a Red Somali Annette D., Wrightstown, WI

Enzo Ferrie (right) & Lamborgani Gallardo, 1/2 Siamise & 1/2 Sphynx, Karly C., Portage, IN

Jacob, a Main Coon, Dean F., St. Joseph, MO

Snnuggle Purrs JUK Sunshine, a Raga Muffin, Penny B., Ripon, WI

Sunset Tail Charmin’ Merlin, a Siamese Seal Point, Bonnie F., Columbus, IN

Left:

y

“Connor” Conchobar, an Oriental Short, Bob G., Lakeville, IL Right: Sapphire, a Longhair Blue Solid, Janelle La V., Appleton, WI

Safety from page 5. Wrappers can cause vomiting, choking and intestinal blockage. Lighted decorations requiring either electricity or candles pose potential risks. Chewing on the power cords or the small bulbs can result in damage to their mouth and gums from broken glass and dangerous shocks from power cords. Candles have the potential of burning little faces that get too close or tails that swish over open flames. None of these hazards should prevent you from having a fun filled Halloween with your four legged buddy, as long as you keep potential hazards out of their reach. As part of this article, I am re-running below Tamara Pool’s “Ask The Alpha Dog” from October 2010. I believe it covers many important points dealing with behavior of your dog and his reactions to the many sights and sounds of this particular holiday. As we near the season of ghouls and goblins, I want to give you all a few tips on how to help your dog through this “All Hallows Eve” without incident. This could be a very frightening, and potentially harmful time. Remember that

your dog has no idea what is going on. They don’t understand the concept of dressing up, obviously. You, as the pet owner/parent, need to do everything in your power to make sure that they are not only well-behaved, but also safe. First things first. Don’t expect your pooch to know that it’s you or your kids behind that mask. Allow your dog to sniff you kids’ mask or anything else that might obstruct their identity before they put it on. This will give them a better idea of who’s in there. Dog’s work off scent. That is how they greet each other and that is how they know who their people are. If the mask already has your little one’s scent on it before the dog sniffs it…all the better. Put the mask on in front of the dog a couple times to show that it’s not something attempting to hurt the kids. Dogs can get protective over the children of the house. This will help limit the emotional issues that may arise from your fourlegged friend. If you are staying home with your dog to hand out candy, be aware that a kid that comes to your door may frighten your dog. Think of it this way… there is a freaky-looking thing standing at my door. This could cause your dog to lash out. Although it is unintentional, be alert to the signs of a fearful dog. Ears down, tail tucked and low-

My Dream Catcher, a Himalayan, Kitten-Briches, Menasha, WI

Phenex & Moxy, Balinese pair, Shirley F., Crete, IL

Iris, a Lilac Birman, Harriet S., Des Moines, IA

Desmo, a Siamse, Karly C., Portage, IN Left:

Bam, a Main Coon, Chellsa, Marshfield, WI Right: Lovintonks Midnight Rider, a Tonkinese, Leanne F., Wausaw, WI

ered head are all signs of a fearful dog. Watch for these signs and, if need be, move your dog to another room where they won’t be affected. Lastly, make sure that any candy that comes into the house stays out of pooches reach. It’s not just chocolate that is bad for dogs, but any candy is potentially harmful. They love to get into things that they shouldn’t have. The kids will be upset, the parents will be upset and the dogs could get very sick. So take a preventative measure and keep it out of reach from the start. Of course you need to inspect the candy before it can be enjoyed. This would be a good time to work on a “Leave It” command. Encourage your dog to completely ignore the candy that is laid out for inspection and they can receive a treat for their good behavior. While problems are inevitable for some, if you follow these simple guidelines you can look forward to a happy and fun Halloween full of great memories with your canine companion. Happy Trick or Treating!!

Editors Note: Please join us next month when we talk about the dangers involving Thanksgiving.

Flighing High, an Abyssinians, Sue & Jim V., Neenah, WI

Tiger Lily, a Raga Muffin, Blue Star Raga Muffins, Fond Du Lac, WI


12

PET JOURNAL

October 2011

PHOTO GALLERY

Cubbie, a German Shepherd/Pitbull mix, an aspiring Therapy Dog, Michelle H., De Pere, Wisconsin

OF

www.petjournalmidwest.com

READERS PETS

Pogo, and American Eskimo/Pomeranian mix, a very friendly and caring companion, Diane V., Cedarburg, Wisconsin

If you would like to see your pet(s) on this page, please email them to us at petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com with a short description including: your pets name, your name, city, and a little statement about what they are doing in the photo. If you do not have email and would like to mail a glossy photo, please mail it to our mailing address: Pet Journal, attn: Pet Photos, 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270, Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 (all photos received by mail will be returned after they have been scanned for print.) All photos received will also be posted in our online photo gallery at http://images.petjournalmidwest.com/gallery.html, due to space limitation’s some submissions may not be printed in Pet Journal the same month they are received.

PHOTOS OF OUR FRIENDS WHO ARE GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN

Midnight, Faithful friend, Steve B., Sheboygan, WI


PET JOURNAL

Green Bay/Fox Cities Region

Family Pet or Family Member from Cats International.org A national survey of 1,049 pet owners conducted by the American Animal Hospital Association indicates that the pet/human bond is stronger than most individuals would openly admit. Of the survey respondents: •

75% of dog owners and 69% of cat owners spend at least 45 minutes to more than one hour each day engaged in activities with their pets.

October 2011

13

Who are the Free Roamers? by Kathy Beer, Free Roaming Felines

76% of pet owners surveyed They could be brown. They could said they feel guilty occasionally be black. They could be red. They could or frequently for not spending be white. They could be a mixture of all enough time with their pets of these, or a combination of a couple of these. They could be little. They could • 54% of survey respondents said be big. They could be friendly. They they felt an emotional depen- could be not so friendly. They are fedence on their pets. lines who have found their way onto city streets, vacant lots, or other types of • 55% and 46% of dog and cat shelters. Most of them are castaways. owners, respectively, said they Most of them were one time house pets chose a human name for their who grew up, went into heat, started to pets. spray, and for these reasons were left to roam freely throughout their area. According to Dr. Clayton Mackay, These felines mate and have kittens AAHA board member, “Companion ani- that are born without a trust of people mals...are like permanent children. They resulting from negative experiences of make a place for themselves in the fam- street life. The gestation period of a feily by the very nature of their codepen- male cat is 9 weeks. She could have dence. The fact that really strengthens almost 4 litters per year and litters can the pet/human bond is the animal never range in size from 2-6 kittens. Studies moves beyond their dependence--and have shown that roaming city cats are they’re never critical of us for anything either first or second generation house we do.” cats.

69% of dog owners and 60% of cat owners said that they give their pets as much attention as they would to their children. 57% said feline family members sleep with them, while 59% said their canine family members either sleep on, under, or next to, the bed.

Editors Note: Cats International was founded by Betsy Libscomb, a cat behavioral expert. If you would like more information on Cats International or for cat behavioral assistance, please visit the Cats International website, www.catsinternational.org. Reprinted with permission.

If a city or, for that matter, county feline is lucky, they step into a livetrap that’s been baited with some feline enticing delicacy. They are picked up in the livetrap and taken to one of the participating Roamer veterinarian clinics where they become an official Free Roamer. After their 7 day wait, they are sterilized and vaccinated. They receive a name and a new identity and go into “witness protection.” They are then relocated indoors or outdoors, depending on the cat’s wishes. Some of the potential indoor Roamers may go into foster care until a forever home is found. Butterscotch is one of our first program Free Roamers. He came in from the City of Manitowoc in 2009. He’s a feral guy who likes his space. He lives at a horse barn and I was recently told he’s still there, hunting the mice in the barn and doing well. Mercy is an indoor Roamer who came from the streets of Manitowoc. She’s now with an indoor foster mom and was obviously an indoor cat

until she was abandoned on the city streets. She will only be adopted to an indoor situation. We’ve sterilized, vaccinated, and re-homed/relocated 600 felines since the program started in 2008. The people who do the program are as diversified as the cats served. We don’t have the variety of colors the cats have, but we are from different walks of life. I’m a retired educator. I work with an insurance sales person, an engineer, an X-ray technician, and a housewife. Our backgrounds and our experiences are what allow us to do this program. Along with the immediate Roamer crew, we have a circle of citizens that help with the program. The police departments, the township constables, the veterinary technicians, and the veterinarians all help to keep this program up and running. Local businesses help with Roamer fundraisers. This is a business of the heart, but it is, nevertheless, a business. Thanks for your support. You’ve made a difference. Kathy Beer for the Free Roamers

Editors Note: For more information on the Free Roaming Felines program please visit their website: www.freeroamingfelineprogram.com. Also, don’t miss Rocky, a Free Roamer with his own story on page 4.

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PET JOURNAL

October 2011

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Evie by Linda Ledbeter, Animal Connections I have been in the process of writing a book on how my pets have taught me about the art of living authentically. Unlike the natural writers who seem to have a pen in hand and the words flow onto the paper like fresh glaze on a cake, I struggle. I struggle picking up the pen, I struggle writing the first word; I was told writing with the computer would be easier.... A natural writer I am not. What I do have is an endless stream of true to life stories. My life with the animals has proven to be an investment in my mental health. Some would say cheaper than a therapist, like many pet owners, this is a statement to laugh at. It was not my intent to discover how inept I was when I began this journey, yet it is the end result. Last week I came face to face with the realization that I’m getting old. In my mind, I feel young even though the past few months my memory hasn’t been anything to brag about. I muddle through, blaming it on the heat, age, stress, lack of sleep, overly commited and anything else that sounds plausible. It took one small dog to blow my excuses sky high. Evie, a Jack Russell terrier mix, came into my life as a foster through Furry Bottoms Rescue. I was to evaluate her behavior and why she just didn’t seem to understand the concept of toileting outside. This didn’t appear to be a difficult case, and since I have a difficult time saying “no”, I said “Sure no problem.” I understand Jack Russell’s very well, they are high energy little dogs, something I have failed to except within my current lifestyle. The first week, Evie was quiet, unsure of herself and finding any corner available for her bathroom breaks. No matter how much time we spent outside, it never failed within fifteen minutes back in the house, I found a prize. This is when I realized that maybe she needed to be alone, no other dogs, no humans... just her and nature. The next several days proved my theory was correct. Into the third week, the real Evie comes prancing to the forefront. She decides she is comfortable enough with Royal, Bo and Angel to play. Royal, a three year old cock-a-poo foster, Bo, my newly adopted collie mix and Angel, my

pit bull mix were more than happy to oblige. This is when I realize Evie had a strong will and desire to satisfy her basic needs; running and toileting in the basement. She ran from room to room, sailing through the air with her little feet barely making contact with the back of the sofa giving her just enough boost to sail another 5 feet landing in the middle of the room. Circle around the dining room and kitchen down the hall and back into the living room. I have fostered other Jack Russells and they are smart and ready to learn. Teach them a few tricks such as fetch and we have it made for the time they are with me. I don’t roller blade, I tried and thought better to save my body instead. Walking Evie is not enough, she needs to run, to feel the wind in her wiry fur, and to feel the muscles stretch with each stride. Last time I ran was from the car to the house in a down pour. Since she was learning fetch in the house, I decided we needed to take it outside. With safety as number one priority, I attached a long line to her harness. If she decided she wasn’t listening I could easily get to the line. The first three minutes all four dogs are doing the dog sniffing routine. Evie was enjoying that she was no longer attached to a post. Sniffing another area of the yard was intriguing. Her line was a short three foot distance from me. Within a nano second, her head came up and she was off and running. Across the yard, under the trees through the ditch line and down the country road she ran. My frantic screaming of her name fell on deft ears as I took off running after her. With each step I took she easily picked up distance between us and all I could see was the line bouncing behind her white hind quarters. Running full speed down the blacktop road barefoot, jeans rolled up to my calves, my mind racing between turning around and getting the car to catch up to her or to continue on. If I went back to get the car, chances were she would dart into the woods and I would be none the wiser or keep running and hope the line eventually gets caught before I have a heart attack. I keep running full speed ahead forgetting about the other 3 dogs until I notice Royal running on my left and Bo on my right.

see

Evie on page 18.

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Fish Unlimited 1259 S Military Ave Green Bay, WI 920 491-9220

Family Pet Food Center 1228 S Military Ave Green Bay, WI 920 490-9711

Waggin Tails 3246 Bowling Green Ln Suamico, WI 920 434-3337

Pulaski Warehouse 5665 Quarry Dr Pulaski, WI 920 822-3536

Liberty K9 Lodge 1550 Cornell Rd Green Bay, WI 920 661-0867

Furry Divas Pet Grooming 406 S Military Ave Green Bay, WI 920 593-3993

GB Pets and Supplies 2315 University Ave Green Bay, WI 920 465-7387

Tammy’s Tack & Feed 14500 Velp Ave Suamico, WI 920 661-4066

PJ’s Collectables 817 S Military Ave Green Bay, WI 920 321-1030

Clever K-9 2000 Crooks Ave Kaukauna, WI 920 766-9597

Circle Kennel Club 1050 Circle Dr Suite A Green Bay, WI 920 429-2300

Saving Paws Pet Rescue, Inc. N3130 Meade St Appleton, WI

For the Birds 1040 N Broadway De Pere, WI 920 336-9525

Pink Shears Pet Grooming Salon 135 W Pulaski St Pulaski, WI 920 621-9149

Walgreen’s Drugstores Appleton, De Pere, Green Bay, Fox Cities, Oshkosh, & Sturgeon Bay

Starbucks Coffee Appleton, Ashwaubenon, De Pere, Green Bay, Neenah, & Oshkosh WI

For more locations please visit our website at: www.petjournalmidwest.com and click on the link “Where can I find Pet Journal..”

Is your cat driving you crazy?

Helping you understand why your Cat behaves the way it does and how to change problem behaviors ... call or email for an appointment Vonnie Keebaugh, CVT (920) 720-0678 catsense2me@aol.com www.catsense2me.com

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PET JOURNAL

Green Bay/Fox Cities Region Grooming your Pet

October 2011

15

Coming in November

by Diana Schmidt, Happy Tails Pet Grooming and Boarding groomingyourpet@petjournalmidwest.com A lot of my customers ask me what they can do for their pets between grooming appointments. Two things that owners can do on their own is take care of their dogs ears and nails. Most dogs need their nails trimmed monthly, but you can trim just the tips or grind or file weekly at home. Most dogs adjust quickly with consistent weekly trims. If one person holds, calms, and praises the dog, the other can clip or grind. Hold them gently with reassurance and praise. Keep the sessions short and fun, even if you only do one nail per day, reserving the very best treats for rewarding the manicure sessions. Keep styptic powder handy in case you make a mistake. It’s available in pet supply stores.

With fall is in its full pageantry of color and Thanksgiving is just ahead. Look for the November issue of Pet Journal at one of our When it comes to your dogs ears, many distribution locations. Coming in the November issue we will regular cleaning will keep them smell- be bringing to you the following:

ing fresh. Using a cotton ball moistened with ear cleanser, swab out dirt and wax. For dirtier ears, flood the ear with ear cleanser, let your dog shake, then clean out visible areas with a cotton ball. If your dog behaves as if ear cleaning hurts or if the inner ear looks red or inflamed, there’s a possibility of infection, call your veterinarian.

Editors note:

Diana welcomes your questions on grooming; please email her at groomingyourpet@petjournalmidwest.com or by mail at: Pet Journal Attn: Grooming your Pet 3120 S Business Dr Ste 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

Keeping your Pets Safe During the Holidays Thanksgiving Edition Eco News: Wisconsin’s Unknown Animals & more articles of Pet/Animal interest. More from our columnists: Ask the Alpha Dog, Alpha Dog Ask Scrappy!, Scrappy Grooming your Pet, Diana Holistic & Natural Options for your Pets, Cheryl Ask the Vet, Dr. Strickfaden Pet Journal Word Search Pictures of your Pets and more!

Your Cats Social Life from Catsinternational.org Friendly, relaxed, confident cats are not necessarily born that way, to a large degree they can be made. Genetics may have some influence on a cat’s unique individuality, but we also know that nurturing can often overcome some of nature’s flaws. Everyone wants a cat that can be petted by friends, that can be a part of the family life, that likes to play, but not every cat owner knows that there is much that can be done to encourage the development of an outgoing, confident personality. Cats that are talked to, cuddled, and played with, are going to be affectionate, lap-sitting companions. Cats that are ignored and seldom handled become aloof and independent. The notion that cats are loners has persisted throughout the centuries. Perhaps this is due to the fact that cats are solitary predators, unlike dogs who are pack hunters. In the wild the dog’s survival depends on his ability and willingness to work as a member of a team to run down prey. The cat, on the other hand, doesn’t have to associate with others to obtain a meal. In fact, the cat’s method of hunting which involves stalk, hide-and-wait, and pounce can not be successfully practiced in a group. How-

ever, when cats are provided with ample food and shelter and there is no need to compete with other cats for the basic necessities of life, they have proven to be highly social animals. Their sociability is often overlooked by humans because the cat’s greetings and displays of affection are so subtle. A nose touch, a slow eye blink, a tilt of the tail, is not nearly as obvious as the well understood facelick of the dog, but it is just as sincere and deliberate.

Editors Note: Cats International was founded by Betsy Libscomb, a cat behavioral expert. If you would like more information on Cats International or for cat behavioral assistance, please visit the Cats International website, www. catsinternational.org. Reprinted with permission.

S e p t e m b e r Wo r d S e a r c h A n s w e r s


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PET JOURNAL

October 2011

www.petjournalmidwest.com

PET JOURNAL CLASSIFIED’S Pet Journal classifieds are a free service for our readers. Classifieds are for free or paid services offered by individuals or families, such as a teenager looking for a dog walking job over the summer. Classifieds are also available for our Local Humane Societies/Shelters and Animal Rescues to post their needs lists. Please contact the respective Humane Society/ Shelter/Rescue if you have questions or would like to donate an item or two. Events from our advertisers and readers will also be printed as space allows. To place your classified ad please email Pet Journal at: petjournal@petjournalmidwest. com. Please include the following when submitting your classified: Name, Phone, email, best time to call (in case there is a problem with your classified ad), what text you would like in your ad. Please limit to 25 words and keep your wording clean. Remember this is a family paper. How many months you would like the listing to be available for, and list in the subject of your email “PJ Classified”. If you would prefer to mail it to us, you may do so, with the same items as requested above. Mail it to: Pet Journal attn: PJ Classified’s 3120 S. Business Dr. STE 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 Please submit your classified no later than the 20th of the month to make the next edition.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Formula Purina Dog Chow (green bag) Purina Beneful Dog Toys Rawhide bones Cat Litter (scoopable, any brand) Office Supplies Copy Paper Postage Stamps HP Ink Cartridge #60 for HP printer model# F4280 Cleaning Supplies Bleach Paper Towels Towels Blankets Toilet Tissue High Efficiency Laundry Detergent

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Door County Humane Society at: 920.746.1111, by email at: nail@dooranimals.com or you may visit their website: www.doorcountyhumanesociety.org. Eastshore Humane Association of Chilton, WI is looking for: • Non-scoopable Cat Litter • Purina Cat Chow -or• Purina Complete • Purina Dog Chow • Laundry Detergent

Section 1: Individual/Family Classifieds Section 1.1: Puppies for Sale HavaMalt Pups non shed darlings ready for forever homes. Vet checked, shots, both parents on site, $600. Call 262.424.3238 AKC Gordon Setter Pups Ready for forever home. Champion show blood lines. Vet checked, shots, wormed, dew claws removed. Both parents on site. 920-757-5699/920-213-7440

Section 2: Humane Societies & Animal Rescues/Shelters Needs Lists Section 2.1: Humane Societies Bay is • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Area Humane Society of Green Bay, WI looking for: Bleach Paper Towels Clay Cat Litter (non-clumping) Rawhides Kongs Dog Toys Canned Cat Food Small Litter Boxes Cat Toys Chew Blocks & Treats for Small Animals Carefresh Bedding (no pine or cedar) Liquid Laundry Detergent Powder-free Exam Gloves Scratching Posts, Towers or Cat Trees or consider these as a way to recycle: Blankets Bath Towels Leashes

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Bay Area Humane Society at: 920.469.3110 or visit their website: www.bayareahumanesociety.com. Door County Humane Society of Sturgeon Bay, WI is looking for: • Animal Supplies • Purina Pro Plan Adult Chicken and Rice Formula • Purina Pro Plan Kitten Chicken and Rice

EASTSHORE HUMANE ASSOCIATION COLLECTS WEIGHT CIRCLES FROM PURINA CAT AND DOG FOOD PRODUCTS Please help out by sending us the weight circles. The Purina products include: Purina dog and cat food products such as Pro Plan, Purina One, Purina Cat Chow & Kitten Chow, Kit ‘N Kaboodle, Happy Cat, Purina Veterinary Diets. These weight circles enable Eastshore to earn points toward the purchase of Purina products for the shelter animals. As an added bonus, the weight circles from Purina dog food products can also be used to help Eastshore Humane pay the veterinarian bills!

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Eastshore Humane Association at: 920.849.2390, by email at: ehashelter@gmail.com or you may visit their website: www.eastshoreha.org. Fox Valley Humane Association of Appleton, WI is looking for: • Pet Supplies • Purina or Iams cat food and dog food • Purina Kitten Chow • Purina Puppy Chow • Canned cat, kitten and dog food • Pine or aspen shavings • Timothy hay • Cleaning Supplies • Lemon Pine-sol • Dish Soap • Tall Kitchen Garbage bags • Febreeze air freshener • Bleach • Liquid laundry detergent • Garbage bags (33-gallon) • Miscellaneous • Gas gift cards to local gas stations • X-large wire and plastic crates • Cash sponsorships • One months’s supply of pain medication for cats and kittens after surgery - $40/ per mo. • One month’s supply of pain medication for dog s and puppies after surgery - $75/per mo. • Surgical packs, 12 needed - $850 each

• •

Sponsorship to spay or neuter a cat, 800 needed - $18.50 each Sponsorship to spay or neuter a dog, 650 needed - $30.50 each

To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Fox Valley Humane Association at: 920.733.1717, by email at: shelter@foxvalleypets.org or visit their website: www.foxvalleypets.org. Oshkosh Area Humane Society of Oshkosh, WI is looking for: • Purina Kitten Chow • Purina Cat Chow • Purina Puppy Chow - regular flavor • Purina Dog Chow • Caned Cat Food - pate type only (please no shredded or sliced in gravy) • Canned dog food • Canned kitten food • Romaine Lettuce (for rabbits) • Rolled Raw Hide Chews - Larger sizes only, please • Soft Dog Treats • Scoopable cat litter • Bleach • Tall Kitchen garbage bags • Dryer Sheets • Paper Toweling • Swiffer Dry Mops • Small paper plates • Degreaser - like Jungle Jake • Micro Fiber Cloths • Cotton Swabs & Cotton Balls • Copy Paper To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Oshkosh Area Humane Society at: 920.424.2128 or visit their website: www.oahs.org.

Section 2.2: Animal Rescues & Shelters K&R • • • • • • • • • • • •

Small Animal Sanctuary is looking for: Baby Blankets Fleece Blankets Stuffed Animals Hard Plastic Baby Toys or Rattles Bunny/Guinea Pig Toys Natural Small & Large Wicker Baskets Natural Wicker Craft Wreaths PLAIN Rabbit Pellets (no seeds or treats mixed in!) Bagged Hay 16oz or 32oz Water Bottles Ceramic Dishes Treats

To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the K&R Animal Sanctuary by email: kr_small_animal_sanctuary@yahoo.com or visit their website at: www.krsmallanimalsanctuary.vpweb.com. Happily Ever After Animal Sanctuary, Inc. of Marion and Green Bay is looking for: • Liquid Laundry Detergent • Anti-bacterial Liquid Dish Soap • Garbage Bags • Bleach • Anti-bacterial Hand Soap • Blankets (new or used) • Sheets (used) • Bath Towels (new or used) • White Multipurpose Printer Paper (8.5 x 11) • Purina Kitten Chow • Caned Cat Food (Friskie’s Plate) • Purina Cat Chow Original • Rubbermaid Pets High Sided Litter Pan (can be found at PetSmart) • Metal Litter Scoops (Durascoop Large Cat Litter Scoop, found at PetSmart) • Large Ceramic Dog Food Dishes • The Loops 2 Leashes (can be found at Fleetfarm or PetSmart)

• • • •

• • • •

Canned Dog Food (Lamb and Rice, cans with pop tops only, please) Dog Treats (Snausages, Liver Treats, Beggiin’ Strips, T’ Bonz, ect.) Dog Chewies (Rawhides, Dingo Bones, Pressed Bones, ect.) Dog Toys • Tuffies Ultimate Dog Toys • The Almost Indestructible Ball • Air Kong Squeeker Dog Toys • Jolly Pets Tug and Toss Ball • JW Pet Good Cuz/Bad Cuz Dog Toys • Kong Wubba Dog Toys • Kong Rubber Balls • Kongs Gift Cards to PetSmart, PetCo, Fleet Farm, Menards Energy Star Washer and Dryer Large Van Cash Donation

To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Happily Ever After Animal Sanctuary, Inc. at: 920-634-9701 or visit their website: www.happilyeverafterinfo.org. Saving Paws Animal Rescue, Inc. of Appleton is looking for: • Cat Litter • Dry Cat Food (Please no Ol’Roy) • Dry Kitten Food (Please no Ol’Roy) • Canned Cat and Kitten Food • Dog Toys • Dog Rawhides/Chews/Bones • Bleach • Laundry Detergent • Paper Towels • Fly Traps • Any Cleaning Supplies • Bug Spay • Metal or Ceramic Bowls • Styrofoam Bowls • Folders (Red and Blue) • Any Pet Supplies To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Saving Paws Animal Rescue, Inc. at: (920) 209-PAWS (7297) or visit their website at: www.savingpaws. com. All Animal Rescue Center project of the Eastern Wisconsin Herpetological Society & Rescue of Plymouth, WI is looking for: • Reptile Cage Thermostats • Storage Space • Cargo Tailers • Livestock Trailers • Tow behind RV • Mini Van or Full Size Van • Kennel Fencing • Commercial/Large Capacity Washers/Dryers • Chest Freezers/Walk-in Coolers • Animal Control Equipment • Office Furniture • Gift Cards for Hardware or Home Improvment Stores • Lumber and 3/4” Plywood • Cash Donations To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the EWHSR at: 920.207.5642, by email at: info@allanimalresourcecenter.com or visit their website: www. allanimalrescuecenter.com. Furry Bottoms Rescue of Plymouth, WI is looking for: • 4 - 4-shelve storage units on wheels To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Furry Bottoms Rescue at: 920.449.5084, by email at: info@furrybottomsrescue.com or visit their website: www.furrybottomsrescue.com.


Green Bay/Fox Cities Region

PET JOURNAL

PET JOURNAL CLASSIFIED’S Section 3: Event Posters

October 2011

17


18

PET JOURNAL

October 2011

www.petjournalmidwest.com

Evie from page 14. The smiles on their faces told me they were loving this game. Before I had a chance to linger on the thought of what to do next, I round the bend in the road to see several cars coming up the hill and Evie is now in the middle of the road, still running. As I pick up my pace I let out one more scream E-V-I-EEEEE! At this point I wasn’t sure if I picked up speed because I was running down hill or pure adrenalin. The first car stopped, the second car stopped and there was Evie wagging her tail at the driver’s door thinking she was the cutest little dog on the planet. Evie sees me coming and decides she just might be in trouble and begins to dance around the road. I step on her line to pick it up at the same time I am mouthing THANK YOU to the driver. She did not look pleased or even humored at the sight of a gasping 55 year old woman running bare foot with rolled up jeans screaming down the middle of the road with two dogs at her side and ahead of her the smallest dog creating the scene. Barely breathing, I then notice the other two are meandering around holding up traffic and attempted to call them to my side. The second car was my neighbor who stopped making a comment on the style of dogs I had. It was a far cry from huskies to this mixed pack. He smiled when I said between breaths, “Fosters.” As he began to drive away, I noticed he had stopped at the top of the hill; there in the middle of the road was Angel. Oh Lord, will this ever end? I said to myself. A-N-G-EEEELLLLL get out of the road!!!! She sees me, her tail wags and trots to me.

This is what I learned, I can still run but I need to work on my lung capacity AND Evie does not deserve me. She needs someone who will roller blade or run with her. Her sharp mind and energetic body needs a human to match her’s. My assessment, the toilet training is a result of an inactive mind and body and I am not the person for the job. Fostering is an amazing and rewarding aspect of my life. I love each and every dog that comes through my doors. This experience is a lesson for all of us who foster or for those questioning if they could; you are not every dog’s perfect family. Helping them to find their perfect family is what this work is all about. Evie is still waiting for her forever home through Furry Bottoms Rescue and remains with me. Royal however has found his forever home. If anybody is wondering, we have not attempted fetch outside again. I will be co-teaching with Dr. Dan Huber and therapist Pam Kachelmeier at the UW Sheboygan, Wednesday evenings in October 2011. Fee is $65.00 For more information please contact me at 920 892-6180 or by email at thehealingtouchconnection@yahoo.com.

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Words to Find: ADOPTION CATSHOW COSTUMES DIGITALIMAGING FREEROAMING GHOSTS HALLOWEEN HEALTHY HOLISTIC HUSBANDRY OBESITY RESCUE SAFETY TOYS UROMASTYX

ALLERGY COMPANION CUBBIE FOSTER FRIEND GROOMING HAUNTED HERPETOLOGY HUMANE NATURAL OCTOBER ROCKY SCRAPPY TRICKORTREAT VETERINARIAN

Words to find, they can go across, up or down, diagonally. Answers will appear in next months issue on page 15 or on the Pet Journal website about the 20th of the month, on the Green Bay/Fox Cities Region page.


Green Bay/Fox Cities Region

PET JOURNAL

October 2011 19

Litterbox Problem Solutions What Every Cat Owner Should know About the Solution of Literbox Problems from Catsinternational.org Have your cat examined by a veterinarian for a physical problem even if there are no obvious symptoms. (Some problems can only be diagnosed through testing). Be sure to mention Kitty’s urination and defecation habits. If a cat’s elimination is painful, it may associate the litterbox with pain and choose to eliminate elsewhere. When the cat is healthy again, a careful reintroduction to the box will be necessary. 1. Carefully check the 10 steps for preventing litterbox problems mentioned previously. Perhaps the solution is as easy as adding more litterboxes, cleaning more frequently, or changing the brand of litter. Try to accommodate Kitty’s preferences for litterbox location (by placing litterboxes where the “accidents” occurred) and litterbox substrate whenever possible. Special consideration should be given to declawed cats as paw sensitivity may be the cause for litterbox avoidance and kitty may require a box or tray without litter. 2. Never punish the cat for eliminating outside of its litterbox. Housesoiling occurs when the litterbox, its contents, or its location is offensive to the cat or when the cat is stressed by the environment. Punishment

finement period may be necessary in order to clean the soiled areas, place deterrents in these spots, and to purchase more litterboxes or new litter. The confinement room should be comfortable and equipped with two litterboxes, fresh food and water(not near the litterboxes!) and a bed and toys. Visit Kitty regularly, but don’t let him out until the home environment has been cleaned and the litterbox situation has been improved. (Please note that extended periods of confinement may be detrimental to the retraining process.)

only increases the cat’s stress. HOUSESOILING IS NEVER DONE TO SPITE THE OWNER. 3. If a health issue or aversion to the litterbox can be ruled out, consider that the problem could be anxietyrelated. Has there been a change in the household? Any intrusion on the cat’s territory, whether human, animal, or even a new piece of furniture, can cause a cat to feel threatened, insecure, and stressed. This may result in his need to mark his territory. This is usually accomplished by spraying urine on vertical surfaces, or less frequently, by squatting and urinating or defecating on horizontal surfaces. The more cats in the household, the more likely that one or more of them will spray. 4. Try to relieve or eliminate the source of the cat’s anxiety. (For example, pull the drapes so that Kitty cannot view the antics of the tom cat next door.) If the environmental cause that triggers the territorial behavior cannot be identified or eliminated, consult with an experienced feline behavior counselor. 5. Whatever the cause for the inappropriate elimination, a brief con-

6. In order to thoroughly clean the urine-soaked areas, an ultraviolet light may be used to identify the problem spots and a strong enzymatic cleaner should be used to saturate and neutralize the affected areas. The Equalizer is highly effective and is available at many veterinary clinics. (It can also be ordered directly from Revival Animal Health via their web site or by calling them at 1-800-786-4751 - Item # 29210) 7.

To repel kitty from previously soiled areas, cover them with solid air fresheners (preferably a citrus scent) or a mini-motion detector (available from Radio Shack--Cat.

No.49-425). When the carpet is dry, a vinyl carpet runner (spike side up!) can be placed over the problem areas. Cats are very location-oriented so deterrents should be left in place for at least six weeks after kitty has been using the litterbox regularly to make sure that old habits have been broken. Solving housesoiling problems is possible--with patience, persistence, and a systematic plan for retraining. If you would like help determining the cause or treatment for an inappropriate elimination problem, call Cats International at 262-375-8852.

Editors Note: Cats International was founded by Betsy Libscomb, a cat behavioral expert. If you would like more information on Cats International or for cat behavioral assistance, please visit the Cats International website, www.catsinternational.org. Reprinted with permission.


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