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THE LOCAL MAGAZINE FOR PET LOVERS

Complimentary Please Take A Copy!

Summer 2016

Anxiety & Your Pets Grief in Cats Loss of a Companion Can Trigger Grief

Tips for Pool Safety TNR

Keeping cat colony populations safe & healthy

IDYLLWILD SPECIAL SECTION p. 62 - 70 GROOMING, DAYCARE & BOARDING SERVICES: p. 24–35

RESOURCE GUIDE: p. 84–93

MEET

MAYOR MAX Idyllwild’s Public Servant


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t reques ation, er m r o f n d I s, or more! VPAH in tment appo ations, and medic erican by Amemergency id A t s l Pet Firross. Usefu Red Cmation. infor t to art Tesspiratory e H ’s g e o Your Dure resting r meas rate. ing Pet My Talk

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inside Features 8: Anxiety in Pets

24: Venus de Fido

By Lillian Roberts, DVM

The ultimate pampering spot

18: Grief in Cats

42: Ted’s Bed

By Rebecca Diaz, DVM

A TNR cat finds protection at the PSPD

Health 28: Summer Grooming Tips 5 quick tips for summer care

36: Pool Safety

Pool safety tips to keep pets from harm

39: Water Safety Products Pet escape ramps to pet sunscreen

48: Neighborhood Ticks

By Robert Reed, DVM, MSES, MPA


www.petcompanionmag.com facebook/desertpetcompanion

Lifestyle 45: Trap. Neuter. Return.

74: Have You Seen ...

Update from the PS Animal Shelter

Interesting pet-related products

66: ‘Island in the Sky’

76: Seniors’ Pet Wellness Fund

Idyllwild is a cool paradise for pets

Care 15: Saving Your Dog from Anxiety By Valerie Masi

31: Vacations & Pets

Looking for boarding or daycare?

56: Building a Lifelong Relationship By Lori Carmen, VSPDT

62: Cover Story: Mayor Max 79: Events!


bones-n-scones Your Pet’s Nutrition Center Great, Knowledgeable Service Since 1999. We Guarantee it! What’s the Special this Month?

Check our Facebook Page for Monthly & Sunday Specials and our ad on the Pet’s Page of the Saturday Desert Sun

Published quarterly. Fall (Sept.-Nov.) Winter (Dec.-Feb.) Spring (Mar.-May) Summer (June-Aug.) Publisher: Miriam Wiegel mwiegel@DesertPetCompanion.com Editor: Geoff Winstead editor@DesertPetCompanion.com Advertising Sales: sales@desertpetcompanion.com Distribution: Magazines are available at our advertisers’ locations or please visit our website or call the editorial office for a list of other locations. The magazine is also online as a complimentary digital download.

Cover photo courtesy Phyllis Mueller Please see article on page 62.

FOLLOW US ON Editorial photos © fotolia.com unless otherwise noted.

www.bonesnscones.com PALM SPRINGS: 577 E. Sunny Dunes Road 760.864.1133 PALM DESERT: 73-910 Hwy 111, Ste. C 760.340.2663

Desert Pet Companion (DPC) and its publisher assume no responsibility for changes, omissions or errors contained in this publication. Advertising in Desert Pet Companion does not indicate an endorsement by Desert Pet Companion or its publisher. DPC assumes no responsibility for opinions of contributors nor do the opinions expressed by contributors necessarily reflect the views or opinions of the publisher. DPC is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photos, which must be accompanied by return postage and envelope. No part of Desert Pet Companion may be reprinted or copied without express, written permission. ©2015 www.DesertPetCompanion.com Desert Pet Companion is published by Desert Pet Companion Editorial Office: 760-835-0369

Desert Pet Companion, P.O. Box 378 Palm Springs, CA 92263

For Advertising Information call: 760-835-0369


bones-n-scones Your Pet’s Nutrition Center

How do you find your way through all the information out there about foods for our beloved dogs and cats?

Where do you check for up-to-date information about recalls and other safety alerts?

Who do you trust, since there is so much conflicting information available?

We’ve been answering questions like these since 1999. Stop by one of our stores and we’ll be happy to answer some of yours and work with you to identify the best diet, treats and toys for your furry friends.

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Understanding

Anxiety in Pets by Lillian Roberts, DVM Country Club Animal Clinic

A

ccording to Wikipedia, Anxiety is defined as follows: “… an emotion characterized by an unpleasant state of inner turmoil… It is the subjectively unpleasant feelings of dread over anticipated events, such as the feeling of imminent death… Anxiety can be appropriate, but when experienced regularly, the individual may suffer from an anxiety disorder.” In humans, anxiety is a leading cause of stress – and humans can theoretically rationalize, recognizing, at least consciously, that no true danger exists; our lives are not being threatened, and most of what we fear is imaginary. Our pets don’t have that ability. For anxious pets, the threat of death is a very real and sometimes constant feeling! And we have no way of explaining to them that everything will be fine. Of course, some situations would normally be expected to cause some anxiety in pets – any new situation, or any situation the pet associates with a previous unpleasant experience. Unfortunately, 8 Desert Pet Companion

this can include visiting the veterinary clinic, but there are ways to reduce this stress, as we’ll discuss later. Fortunately, great strides have been made in understanding anxiety in both humans and our pets in recent years. Alleviating this condition in pets typically takes one or more of the following approaches: behavioral modification, medication, hormones or supplements and physical or environmental comforts. This article will deal mainly with the use of chemical agents – drugs, supplements, and natural remedies – but in most cases we try to incorporate a multi-modal approach to reducing anxiety, especially in dogs. Obvious symptoms of anxiety in dogs include cringing, hiding, running away, trembling, rolling onto the back

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and urinating, and even snapping/biting. More subtle, earlier clues might involve yawning, lip-licking, whimpering, tail-tucking, and clinging to the owner or another familiar person. In addition to the unpleasant emotional state caused by stress and anxiety, physical symptoms can result. Many cases of chronic diarrhea, house / litter box training failure, urinary tract disorders, finicky appetite and skin disease can be partially or entirely secondary to underlying chronic emotional distress. Anxiety may be situational – separation from the owner, noise-related (fireworks, thunderstorms), strangers or infrequent visitors such as guests or workers, and the infamous postal

worker. But some dogs and cats suffer from continual, unrelenting anxiety every day. Obviously, the way these are addressed will vary depending on the circumstances, severity of the problem and owners’ willingness to pursue options. Typically, veterinarians will recommend some combination of environmental enhancement, drug or supplement administration, and behavioral conditioning (training).

Environmental Enhancements / OTC Remedies:

n Pheromones are scents detectable only to target species – the equivalent of aromatherapy for dogs (or cats). The best-known product is DAP, or Dog-Appeasing Pheromone. It is available in a collar, a plug-in diffuser, and a spray. This is a compound produced by female dogs beginning shortly before they give birth, and has been shown to have a calming effect on dogs of all ages and genders. It’s a drug-free option that can help with transitioning into new situations such as the introduction of a new pet or human into a household, moving to a new home, etc.

n Music aimed at dogs, cats, and horses has been much in the news recently. This is typically classical or jazz style music that helps humans relax, but research has shown that dogs, cats, and even horses respond to different rhythms and instruments that humans also find soothing. CD’s and other modalities are available from various sources on the Internet. 10 Desert Pet Companion

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Thundershirt™ is available locally at Cold Nose Warm Heart, Pet Oasis, and other retail locations.

n The Thundershirt™ and various similar products provide strong tactile reassurance that has a significant calming effect on many dogs and occasionally cats respond well to it, too.

n Increasingly, natural, nonprescription remedies have been available to help alleviate anxiety in dogs. “Rescue Remedy” is a safe, very mild product that is readily available at pet supply venues and on the Internet. It contains Bach flower essences, which are believed to help calm humans and pets faced with various stressful situations. While some people feel it helps, in many cases it’s not successful in overcoming severe anxiety by itself.

From the Vet:

More recently, two non-drug products have been introduced. 12 Desert Pet Companion

Virbac’s Anxitane, is a palatable form of L-theonine, an extract from green tea leaves that soothes mildly anxious dogs or cats during times of turmoil, such as moving, introducing a new pet, going to the vet, etc. Anxitane is intended for intermittent use; its effectiveness tends to wane with frequent or continual use. Zylkene, from Vetoquinol, is a derivative of cassein, from hydrolyzed cow’s milk. From the website: “Zylkene helps balance reactions in some situations (travel, moving, adoption, grooming, meeting new people, loud noises, etc.) and helps animals maintain normal and relaxed dispositions. Zylkene may also open pets’ receptivity to behavior-modification training.” Zylkene may be used on an “as-needed” basis, or daily. Both these products are extremely safe, with no known side effects and no known interactions with other products, medications, etc. Both are safe for cats as well as dogs. But like most supplements, their effects may be subtle, and probably not enough to soothe a truly phobic or terrified pet. Special Diets. Royal Canin’s CALM line of dog food and Hills’ “Stress” formulas for dogs and cats make a lot of sense to those of us treating anxious pets that need ongoing support. Each contains a proprietary combination of additives that combine to address anxiety and usually another medical issue such as intestinal distress or urinary tract problems. Ask your vet for more information. Medications. It’s important to distinguish prescription medications

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“... litter box training failure, urinary tract disorders, finicky appetite and skin disease can be partially or entirely secondary to underlying chronic emotional distress.”

from the supplements listed above. The primary difference (other than the obvious need for a prescription) is the potential for side effects and/or interactions with other medications or products. Medications prescribed for anxiety and other behavioral issues in pets are typically prescribed to be used only for specific situations such as travel, grooming, etc., or for no more than a few months to support a behavioral modification (i.e., training) program. Basic categories are as follows: Sedatives and tranquilizers such as Acepromazine and Phenobarbitol have been used for decades to “take the edge off” for pets faced with frightening situations or where we require them to remain quiet – most commonly for long trips or when a frightening situation is anticipated, such as impending storms, fireworks, major grooming, etc. In recent years, studies have shown that these drugs may not Summer 2016

actually relieve anxiety and don’t produce amnesia either, but only dampen the pet’s reactions. Anxiolytics / Benzodiazapines such as alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), and others in this category are also helpful in many situations. They tend to reduce anxiety without causing drastic sedation, allowing the pet to interact with its surroundings in a subdued manner. The main drawback for some is that the effect typically lasts only a few hours, requiring frequent dosing. However, in some cases, that may be an advantage. Mood Stabilizers are basically human anti-depressants. Most work by increasing the amount of serotonin in the brain, a chemical that helps reduce anxiety. Since few studies have been done regarding use of these products in animals, almost all recommendations are based on anecdotal reports. Essentially, veterinary behaviorists or

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other specialists noted similarities in the behaviors of certain pets to those of humans with self-destructive tendencies and decided to try similar medications. For this reason, the drugs we are most comfortable prescribing tend to be older drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil), fluoxetine (Prozac), etc. It’s believed that the main advantage of using mood stabilizers is to help the pet develop a “habit” of experiencing stressful situations without reacting badly. Without providing that experience, simply medicating the pet will have limited impact. Most vets have one or two medications they are more familiar with but there is no firm evidence that one is safer or more effective than another. Side effects are far more common,

and it’s important to monitor closely. These drugs must be used on an ongoing basis to be effective, and if one is not effective, it’s essential to allow a “wash-out” period before switching to another. For these and other reasons, we tend to reserve such medications for fairly extreme situations, and strive for short term use only, in conjunction with environmental enrichment and behavioral reinforcement. Therefore, most anxious pets will respond best to a multi-tiered approach. Talk to your vet (and a great trainer / behaviorist) about a strategy to help your pet deal with its anxiety. Dr. Lillian Roberts, DVM, is the owner of Country Club Animal Clinic which is located at 36869 Cook Street, in Palm Desert. 760-776-7555 www.countryclubdvm.com.

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Saving Your Dog from Anxiety

You can help your dog calm down By Valerie Masi Best Paw Forward

O

ne of the toughest dog training problems to solve is anxiety. As a trainer, I can’t sit down and discuss a dog’s anxiety with it—for anxious dogs, both owners and trainers have to tune in for clues to discover what’s really going on. Anxious dogs may exhibit such symptoms as barking, howling, heavy panting, pacing, trembling or hiding. Severe cases can also exhibit obsessive licking to the point that it causes hot spots and destructive behavior like eating walls, tearing up furniture, etc. Summer 2016

The reason a dog becomes destructive is because it has pent-up anxiety it needs to release and that is usually in a destructive way. There are three main types of anxiety: separation, noise and social. When dealing with anxiety, you need to know which type of anxiety you are dealing with, if any at all. Sometimes a lack of training, exercise or mental stimulation can sometimes make a bored dog look like they going through separation anxiety. The biggest problem in dealing with this behavior is that dogs do not

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understand how to be different unless they experience a different way of being in the same situation. That means we need to create the positive experience and we can do that with medications or essential oils and supplements.

Separation Anxiety

If your dog gets anxious when you leave, your dog should be put in a crate or a small area to stay while you’re gone. Exercising the dog before you leave will help, and giving your dog a special treat in its crate or room—something of high value, like a frozen raw bone—will help keep its mind focused elsewhere. You should also practice putting your dog in its crate or room when you are home; this will help get the dog comfortable with the situation, you periodically looking in on the dog but ignoring any barking or whining. Reinforce the quiet behavior with a reward. Dogs with bad anxiety may need the help of medications or essentials oils and supplements. I’ve seen good results with acepromazine, a tranquilizer that has been used for years for traveling. Frequently, the dog starts on 16 Desert Pet Companion

the highest dose and transitions to zero doses over a month or so, depending on how long it takes to condition the behavior.

Noise and Social Anxiety

For both noise and social anxiety, I will use a calm, well-balanced dog to help the anxious dog. The balanced dog can help relax and set the example for the anxious dog. If your dog is fearful of people, places, noises or dogs, the dog should be introduced to what the fears are in small doses to desensitize to whatever is causing the fear. When you are dealing with noises, you want to start desensitizing the dog

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to noises at very low level (remember, your dog has better hearing than you) while playing or engaging in something the dog enjoys. If your dog is super-sensitive to noise, you will need the help of a supplement or medication. In social situations, you can also help desensitize your dog in small doses. For example, if a dog is fearful of people, it is important to tell people to ignore the dog, and if the dog approaches to smell the person, they should not look at, talk to, or touch or the dog. The dog needs to feel the freedom to investigate a person without the pressure of interaction—this will help the dog to trust. If you are working on fear of dogs, then your dog should only be introduced to calm dogs who aren’t that in-

Summer 2016

terested in getting to know your dog. Again, the dog needs to learn to trust dogs, and if you introduce your fearful pup to an excited young dog that is trying to play, that will reinforce its fear of dogs. Difficult cases of anxiety need the help of essential oils, supplements, or even medication. In order to help your dog, you, your vet and your trainer may need to work together to get the right combination to help your dog. Consistency with love and understanding are the keys to success. Valerie Masi, owner of Best Paw Forward, can be reached at 760-885-9450 or visit www. bestpawforwarddogtraining.com.

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Grief in Cats By Rebecca Diaz, DVM The Cat Clinic

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rief is not an emotion that is often ascribed to cats. However, after the loss of a companion cat or dog, behaviors may be noted that indicate mourning in your cat. This is especially possible if there was only one other companion in the household. Behaviors that may be noted are vocalization (the most common), insistent rubbing on persons or objects, neediness, hiding, lethargy and/or decreased appetite. One, several or none of these signs may be present with your cat. If you note the presence of any of these behaviors, we recommend you have your kitty examined by your veterinarian to be sure there is no illness. When one pet in the household has been severely ill, a more subtle illness in another pet may be overlooked. This is especially the case with

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conditions such as high blood pressure, which can cause some of these behaviors while often having no other obvious indications that a disease is present in your pet. If the check-up shows kitty is otherwise healthy, then grieving may explain the behavior. If so, how might your veterinarian help? We will explain different steps that can be taken at home to potentially decrease the grieving. One possibility is the use of a Feliway diffuser, which release a scent. The scent is a pheromone that decreases stress and may decrease grieving. It comes as spray or wipes as well as in the diffuser form.  These products are available on line or can be ordered from your veterinarian. Another idea is to leave your TV or

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radio on when not at home, as the sound of voices might provide a sense of companionship. You should also schedule more play time and lap/petting time. Play (i.e., exercise) is good for kitty’s mood, and the extra lap/petting times can make kitty feel more in touch and secure. Be careful to actually schedule time, rather than responding to crying, to avoid finding that kitty has trained you to respond to the cries. Lastly, although this is somewhat controversial, sometimes a new pet in the household may help. However, your kitty had a bond to the original companion and may not feel comforted with a new one. This is especially true of older pets. If none of these changes at home

relieve your cat’s sadness, speak to your veterinarian. In particular, do not allow kitty to skip meals, which can lead to severe liver disease. Your veterinarian can provide prescription stress relief which may include herbs, antidepressants or appetite stimulants, as deemed appropriate. All in all, there is no reliable way to predict how long your kitty might grieve or which of the remedies will work, but you should be prepared to respond to your cat’s grief along with your own. We hope this information will help you with the difficult process. Rebecca Diaz, DVM is the owner of The Cat Clinic, a feline-only veterinary clinic located at 67870 Vista Chino, Cathedral City, CA, www.catcitycat.com, 760-325-3400

760-325-3400 20 Desert Pet Companion

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Venus de Fido

The ultimate pampering spot for you —and your dog! By Geoff Winstead

T

here’s something coming to Palm Desert that will actually be unique—certainly for the Coachella Valley, but quite possibly the entire country. From the ashes of the old Athletic Club rises what looks a modern Italian villa or a mini Bellagio plucked from Las Vegas. It is the soon to be finished Venus de Fido, located at 73600 Alessandro Drive. This brainchild of Lorie 24 Desert Pet Companion

Loftis, along with her mother, Loving All Animals founder Lindi Biggi and her husband Geno, will be the ultimate pampering spot for you—and your dog! I was given a tour by Lorie as she took a break from promoting her new venture during the recent walkabout on San Pablo in Palm Desert. The first thing you notice as you walk in (other than all of the construction scaffolding

right now) is the ceilings with Italian frescos much like those at the Venetian in Las Vegas, which is the intention. According to Lorie, in some of the larger rooms, “…the weather will ‘change’ in a similar way to the ceilings at Caesar’s Palace.” The extremely large building is clearly divided into areas for pets and areas for humans. “Due to obvious health restrictions, we can’t have

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the dogs in the human spa areas. However, we can have interaction in the pet areas, particularly in the large indoor dog park (that looks like a small Italian village) where we will have a K-9 Fit program, which is a fitness program for you and your dog to take together.� Venus de Fido has a licensed K9 Fit club with certified trainers who are dedicated to creating good health, fitness and wellness of dogs and their people offering the timesaving aspect of working out with your dog in a fun, safe and controlled environment. If you’d like more information about K9 Fit programs, check out http://k9fitclub.com. There will be so much more going on here that Summer 2016

Lorie Loftis and Lindi Biggi

it is a bit mind boggling. You can take individual or group exercise classes, including yoga, thai chi, kick boxing, Zumba, TRX www.PetCompanionMag.com

and Pilates, use state of the art gym equipment (so new that no place else in the valley has it), get skin and facial treatments, Desert Pet Companion 25


play squash on the only international regulation squash court in the valley (you can also take lessons and join a league), detox in the valley’s only salt cave, or visit with an acupuncturist. While you are pampering yourself, your dog can enjoy playgroup sessions in the dog park, visit their world class grooming salon, get one on one training, or just run around and explore the 3-acre, leash free dog park under trained supervision. This area is separated into large and small dog areas so no accidents will happen. Outside activities for pet owners include a large whirlpool and fresh food and juice bar with a patio. After your workout, play and detox session, you can shower in the large men’s and women’s locker/ shower rooms, then order fresh soup or salad and a “doggy bag” from the café and join up with your pooch for a nice meal in The Beastro seating area, which is located in the Loving All Animals retail store. “We are bringing several local petrelated businesses into this with us,” says Lorie. “While we will have a retail pet boutique that benefits ‘Loving All Animals’, with many things, such as food, we will only be selling sample items and will direct you to the retailers that sell those

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items. We will have trainers from places like Dream Dogs available for classes and one-on-one sessions, and volunteers from Loving All Animals will be hosting playgroups assisting with socialization activities in Fido Park. If you need to board your dog, we are not a boarding kennel, but will set you up with Barkingham Palace to make sure your dog is sheltered and pampered.” Venus de Fido will have concierge services, guiding you through all of their available health, fitness and beauty programs, setting up appointments, reserving rooms for parties, special events, or private one-on-one visits with a specialist. Membership is encouraged but walk-ins are accepted. The official scheduled opening for Venus de Fido is in November. However, they will have a “soft opening” on July 10th from 11 am to 2 pm. You really have to come and take a tour to see and believe how much is offered here. For more information (and there’s a lot more information!), go to http://venusdefido. com. Keep returning to this website as they are frequently adding more information as the opening gets closer.

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Pet Grooming, Boarding, Sitting & Spas

5 Summer Grooming Tips

1

Brush your pet daily

Brushing your pet not only eliminates loose fur and keeps mats from forming, it also gives you an opportunity to check your pet for parasites (fleas, ticks and mites), and bond with your furry companion.

4

Dry wet ears

Wet ears are the perfect breeding place for infections. Take a soft cloth and gently wipe the inside of ears. Even if your pet isn’t a swimmer, keep those ears clean and dry.

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2

Keep nails trimmed

3

5

After hiking, look for ...

Provide cool water and shade

Active dogs generally spend more time outdoors and you may not hear that telltale taptapping reminding you to trim their nails. Long nails are uncomfortable for pets’ toes. Can’t trim them yourself? It’s time to visit the groomer.

If you’ve been hiking in the local mountains, check your dog for ticks (see article, page 48). If you’ve been walking local trails, check between toes for stickers, rocks and other irritations. On longhaired pets, check fur, too, for tangled stickers.

Rinse pet after a swim

Chlorine and salt water pools may irritate a pet’s skin and dry out its fur. A quick rinse after pool water exposure washes off the pool chemicals. Also, rinsing a pet will keep them from licking (and ingesting) the chemicals.

Outdoor potty breaks for dogs mean your dog needs a cool path to get to his favorite relief spot. Check the temperature of the walk way, if your hand cannot rest on it comfortably, it is probably too hot for your pet’s feet.

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Summer Vacations and Pets

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re you getting away for the day or possibly an overnight trip? Who will watch your pets while you are away? Summer boarding and daycare services fill up quickly during the summer months. Make your reservations as soon as you know your schedule. Choosing between overnight boarding and in-home pet sitting depends upon your personal preferences and the personalities of you furry friends, but whichever solution you choose, prescreen the facility or pet sitter prior to your vacation. If possible, schedule a short daycare session to familiarize your pet with the pet care business. Many facilities and in-home providers require a meet and greet to

Summer 2016

check for compatibility. For pets with special needs, confirm that the care provider is able to accommodate your pet’s medical needs. A short checklist to consider: ƒƒ Will the schedule match what your pet is used to – walks, feeding, potty breaks? ƒƒ How much play time or visitation time will your pet get? How frequently does someone check on your pet to determine your pet’s well-being? ƒƒ How are emergencies handled? ƒƒ How will your pet be cared for in case of a power outage? ƒƒ Are daily reports available? ƒƒ Check references.

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Pet Grooming, Boarding, Sitting & Spas

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Boarding Too! Our hospitals offer boarding you can trust. It is sometimes difficult to find a boarding facility that will tend to the needs of your pet and give them the attention they deserve. Boarding at our facility is ideal, especially if your pet has certain medical conditions that require medication. VCA Rancho Mirage Animal Hospital

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752 Vella Rd. S Palm Springs, CA 92264

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Located just 1.2 miles from the Palm Springs International Airport!

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Summer 2016

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Desert Pet Companion 33


Looking for Summer Activities for Your Dog? Here are some cool ideas for summer FUN!

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arkingham & Hyde Park have great activities available for your dog this summer including an indoor agility course, a swimming pool and dog gym. Keeping your dogs fit while keeping them cool has never been easier. Less active dogs can enjoy the cool comfort of the climate controlled facility too. Drop your furry companion off for a day or for overnight boarding (Palm Desert only). Lori Weiner is now a certified Clinical Pet Nutritionist (CPN), and will be available to consult with clients on proper nutrition for their pet, in particular, pets with health issues. Call to schedule an appointment.

Indoor Agility

Swimming Be sure to visit the website for California Paws Rescue (www.CaliforniaPawsRescue. org). CPR is a 501c3 nonprofit rescue for dogs and cats. You may just see a photo of a furry friend you want to take home.

Dog Gym Pet Hotel at Barkingham Palace 34-550 Spyder Circle / Dinah Shore Dr. Palm Desert, CA 92260 760-537-1172 www.PetHotelCalifornia.com Hyde Park @ Barkingham Palm Springs 555 S. Palm Canyon Drive Palm Springs, CA 92264 760-327-5700 hydepark@pethotelcalifornia.com

Summer Hours: Open Monday to Friday 7:30 am to 6:00 pm Open for Grooming on Saturday (by appointment only)


s


Pool Safety

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or some dogs (and cats) the pool is a refreshing way to cool down during the hot summer months. It can also be great exercise and an enjoyable way of staying active when the sidewalks are too hot for a run. Keeping the pool as a safe and enjoyable environment requires a little planning and attention to 36 Desert Pet Companion

possible hazards. When you open your pool for the season, it’s a good time to review the pet safety of your pool area. ƒƒ Pets should not have access to the pool unless supervised. A pet proof fence can be installed to limit access to the pool. Is

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Keep pets away from the pool unless they are supervised. If the pool is accessible, install pet-proof fencing around it for times when you cannot supervise your furry friends. Add a pool alarm that sounds when the pool is entered. Many pool surface alarms are for disturbances weighing 18 pounds or more, so small dogs or cats may not trigger the alarm.

Use a pet collar alarm. Collar alarms are worn on your pet’s collar and trigger a remote alarm when submerged.

Teach your dog to swim. If you aren’t comfortable teaching it, hire a professional trainer. Most local trainers can come to your pool or offer training at doggie daycare facilities.

Reinforce where the steps, pet ladders or pet ramps are for easy egress. Pet ramps also help little critters (lizards, mice, etc.) escape from your pool. Some dogs love the water but aren’t good swimmers. Flotation vests and flotation collars provide an extra layer of safety. Always use a flotation aid when allowing your dog to swim in large bodies of water, like lakes or the ocean.

Summer 2016

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the fence pet-proof and gate in working order? ƒƒ If a fence is not an option, consider using a pool alarm system. If you have one installed, confirm that the batteries are fresh and you can hear/see the alarm no matter where you are in your house or yard. ƒƒ Check the pet ramps or pet ladders installed in your pool to make sure they are in good working order. Does your pet know where they are and how to use them? Add a visual marker to help your pet recognize where the steps, pet ladder or pet ramp is located. ƒƒ Is your pool cover pet-safe? Floating covers can trap pets if they accidentally fall in a pool and are normally not recommended for use in house-

holds with pets or children. ƒƒ Keep pool chemicals safely stored and out of pets’ reach. Undiluted pool chemicals can be toxic for your pet. ƒƒ Check your pool chemistry before letting your dog go for a swim. ƒƒ Pool decks can be extremely hot. If the deck is too hot for you to walk on, it is too hot for your pet. Wet the deck down before you allow your pet to walk on it. ƒƒ Remind gardeners, pool cleaners and anyone who works in your home that pets live in your home and gates must be securely latched. It is estimated that several thousand pets die annually by drowning. Don’t let your pet be a statistic. Practice water and pool safety.

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Developed by police officers, based on experience in the field. Six in ten people with dementia will wander.

The kit contains step-by-step instructions for collecting and preserving a scent.

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ORDER TODAY: www.findemscentkit.com (855) 346-3368 38 Desert Pet Companion

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2016


Water Safety Product Spotlights

PHOTOS CREDIT: WWW.GAMMA2.NET

Skamper Ramp by Gamma2 Inc.

This white, hi-tech plastic ramp attaches to the deck of the pool. It is UV and chemical resistant and doesn’t yellow in the sun. You can simply flip it out of the pool when you don’t need it and flip it back in to safeguard your pet when you leave the pool area. Made from recyclable materials, the Skamper Ramp snaps together for easy assembly. Visit www.gamma2.net Favorite of Pet Oasis.

We provide veterinary services for every stage in your pet’s life, from her first shots to a lifetime of preventive care to keep her happy and healthy.

• Primary & Advanced Care • Preventive Care • Alternative Medicine We provide comprehensive veterinary care for your: Cats • Dogs • Pocket Pets Exotics • Rabbits • Reptiles

Pet Boarding & Grooming Available! 78-267 Highway 111, La Quinta (The Building In Front of Vons)

www.vcahospitals.com/all-creatures-ca Summer 2016

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Water Safety Product Spotlights

H

AKC Flotation Vest

Kurgo Surf N Turf Dog Life Jacket • both a dog lifevest and a three-season shell in one • Intended to comfortably fit your active dog in the water, the flotation layer can be removed and the coat can be used as a waterproof shell that doubles as a dog raincoat. • two metal d-rings for leash connections • two transverse handles to help you easily control or extract your pup from the water • high contrast color with reflective trim • machine washable 40 Desert Pet Companion

PHOTOS COURTESY BH PET GEAR

PHOTO CREDIT WWW.KURGO.COM

ere are a few flotation products that are available for pets. As with any product for your pet, make sure that the device fits your pet correctly and your pet is comfortable wearing it. A pet struggling in water shouldn’t also be struggling with their flotation device. Look for: • easy to put on and adjust for your specific dog’s shape • allows dog to move comfortably when wearing it • buckles and straps don’t rub • bright color for easy visibility • handle on back to lift dog out of water, if necessary

• quick release buckles • a large nylon handle on the top of the vest to make it easier to snatch your dog out of the water • available in two vibrant colors, orange and yellow for easy visibility. Available online.

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Unlike dog life jackets that hold dogs in a swimming position, the hexagonalshaped Watercollar™ hangs comfortably on the dog’s collar and helps prevent drowning by keeping a dog’s nose above water even if unconscious. The Watercollar™ hangs loosely away from the neck for long wearing comfort and ease of movement when not in the water. When a dog swims or falls in the water the straps position the Watercollar™ under the dogs chin allowing for easy treading and ensuring a panic-free swim to safety. In the case of an accident or a fall into a pool with no one around to help him out, the dog will simply be “suspended” in the water until help arrives. As with all swimming devices, monitor pets when around the pool. www.hedzuppets.com or savedogsfromdrowning.com. Summer 2016

Protect your dogs from the sun’s harmful rays but be aware that if ingested, zinc oxide can be toxic to your pet. Use only pet-approved sunscreen. Don’t forget your pet’s nose - My Dog Nose It! is sun protection for noses! Carried at most independent retail stores. Suggested by The Grand Paw. PHOTO:S RC PET PRODUCTS

PHOTOS COURTESY BH PET GEAR

Hedz UP Pets Watercollar

Don’t forget the sunscreen!

Sport PAWks™

Sport PAWks will keep dog’s feet dry and also adds an extra barrier (silicon covering) that protects from the hot pavement. Regular PAWks can still be used outside if you’re concerned about the breathability factor and want a little more air circulation, but Sport PAWks have a silicon covering for extra protection. Just a note, never use PAWks on frozen surfaces as the silicon turns very dangerous and slippery. Visit www.rcpets.com/Paw-Protection/ Department.aspx Suggested by Pet Oasis.

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Ted’s Bed A TNR cat finds an unusual home

Photos & article by Geoff Winstead

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D

Summer 2016

PC was told by one of our sources that there is a cat living at the Palm Springs Police Department that is more than likely a catch and release feral cat due to its having a clipped ear. That’s all we had to go on but it sounded like there might be a story there. After a couple of inquiries, I received a reply from Sgt. Hutchinson from their public relations department that indeed, they have an “adopted” cat. So the time was set for a meeting and interview. Upon my arrival, I noticed a stocky

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black cat outside the building, preening himself, and wondered whether this was the guy I was there about. Sgt. Hutchinson greeted me and brought me into his office where he called in another officer, Jo Herlihy, who knew the whole story … because she’s the one who first paid attention to the cat. Officer Jo Herlihy recounted “I first saw him at the window on a day that was over 100 degrees, so I decided to take a bowl of water out to him. He started ‘talking’ to me and just kept going on and on. I had just seen the movie ‘Ted’ (about the bear that always keeps talking), so I named him Ted. “It took awhile to get him to come to you. He didn’t want to be touched, but we decided to feed him and he stuck around. He seemed pretty healthy, and we were pretty sure he had been fixed as a catch and release animal due to the ear being clipped. Another person caught him and took him to the vet to make sure he was healthy and got his shots. I didn’t want to leave him at a shelter. Black cats are usually the last to be adopted and everybody here had grown pretty fond of him. So we got him a basket and put it under the surveillance camera in front of the jail door, and that’s been his home for over three years now.” And that’s how Ted got his bed. 44 Desert Pet Companion

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Photography by Alicia Bailey

Trap Neuter Return (TNR)

Update from Palm Springs Animal Shelter

F

riends of the Palm Springs Animal Shelter continue to lead the way in compassionate sheltering here in the Coachella Valley. As the only public shelter operating under a no-kill philosophy, progressive programming and community outreach is critical to saving lives. One program that is essential to life saving is TNR or “Trap. Neuter. Return.” TNR is the humane solution to managing the community cat population. A managed TNR program is the method where all the cats in a colo-

Summer 2016

ny are trapped, neutered and then returned to their territory where caretakers provide them with regular food and shelter. At the Palm Spring Animal Shelter, cats in the TNR program are vaccinated for rabies, receive a health check, are treated for internal and external parasites, and any wounds are treated. While the cats are under anesthesia, the left ear is “tipped” or surgically removed to make it easy to identify them as fixed, even from a distance. The Palm Springs Animal Shelter

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relies on volunteers and resident cat colony caretakers to monitor colonies to ensure the colony is both safe and healthy, and to quickly trap and fix any new unaltered cats who may appear in or around the colony. Over the last three and half years, Palm Springs has worked diligently to educate the community and debunk myths about how to deal with community

46 Desert Pet Companion

cat populations. Unfortunately, the common practice by many animal control departments is to “catch and kill” colonies of community cats. The thought is that eradicating them will make them go away. Catch and kill is not sustainable. More importantly, it is a cruel and ineffective practice. Feral cats are the same species as pet cats and are protected under animal cruelty laws in many states, California included. Some benefits of an effective TNR program are: ƒƒ TNR reduces the number of animals admitted to shelters. ƒƒ Feral cats that are trapped, neutered/spayed and returned can no longer reproduce. ƒƒ Spaying and neutering reduces

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noise and other nuisance behaviors. ƒƒ When a colony is managed by a caretaker, new cats are quickly TNR’d and the population stabilizes and declines over time. ƒƒ The quality of life for existing colonies is improved.

What you can do to help: ƒƒ If you see cats in your neighborhood, call our Cat Action Hotline: 760-820-CAT1 ƒƒ Look for a “tipped” ear before feeding. Feeding unfixed cats increases reproduction. ƒƒ Become a TNR Volunteer! We need help trapping cats, educating the public, administering clinic days and fostering litters of kittens.

Summer 2016

The positive impact of the Palm Springs TNR program can already be seen. Shelter Director, Dr. Shayda Ahkami states, “As the community becomes increasingly educated and aware of how to effectively manage free-roaming cats, the number of kittens entering the shelter will decline. This year, we hope to cast an even wider net and expand throughout the Coachella Valley to save more lives.” For more information on the Palm Springs Animal Shelter, their many life saving programs, or to make a donation, visit their website at psanimalshelter.org. The shelter is located at 4575 East Mesquite Ave. Palm Springs, CA 92264 / phone: 760-416-5718.

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Getting to Know Your Neighborhood Ticks By Robert Reed DVM, MSES, MPA VCA Rancho Mirage Animal Hospital

I

suppose beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but for most of us, ticks are not the most lovable creatures on earth. They crawl around on our dogs’ bodies (and our own); they dig into their skin and feed on their blood, sometimes swelling to grotesque proportions. And, perhaps most disturbingly, they transmit diseases. These characteristics put them right up there with leeches and mosquitoes in

48 Desert Pet Companion

the category of things we don’t want touching us. Yet, although it is with grudging admiration, I have to acknowledge that they are pretty successful at what they do. The world has over 850 species of ticks. Mammals, birds, reptiles, even amphibians can be targets of their malice, and usually more than one animal is impacted by a single tick during its lifetime. Their ability to parasitize multiple animals is part of a

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PHOTOS COURTESY THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH

The enlarged photo above shows a close-up of a tick from larvae to adult. Inset photo shows ticks at actual size.

complex and fascinating life cycle that is worth understanding, as it explains a lot about how and where dogs (and other animals) come into contact with ticks, as well as what the consequences of that contact might be.

The Life Cycle of Ticks

Most ticks (including all the ones in our area) go through four life stages:

Stage 1: Eggs

After mating a female tick will lay thousands of eggs on the ground, where they hatch after anywhere from a few weeks to a few months, depending on environmental conditions, to become… 50 Desert Pet Companion

Stage 2: Larvae Larvae are sometimes referred to as “seed ticks”. They are very small, like the head of a pin, and may be difficult to see. Like all subsequent stages, larvae have to find a blood source to feed on before they can move to the next stage. They accomplish this feat by moving as high as they can onto vegetation or plant debris, extending their legs, and waiting for an animal to brush by, so they can grab on to it. The process is called “questing”, and during questing, ticks may respond to several environmental cues, such as light, shadow, color, carbon dioxide levels, and maybe even smells to help them find the ideal location to reach out and

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PHOTOS COURTESY THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH

touch someone. Because larvae are so small, they usually don’t make it very far from the ground, so their host (host number 1) is typically something small, like a mouse or a lizard. After attaching to the host and feeding for a few days, larvae drop to the ground, and then after a few weeks molt and develop into…

Stage 3: Nymphs

Nymphs look like smaller versions of adult ticks. Like larvae, they have to feed on blood before they can really accomplish anything, so they must repeat the questing process. Since they are bigger than larvae, they tend to climb further from the ground and can usually latch on to slightly larger animals, like rabbits, birds, or raccoons, although nymphs can certainly end up on dogs, or even people. Again, after feeding for several days, nymphs drop off their host (host number 2) and, following a few weeks to a few months on the ground, molt and become…

Stage 4: Adults

Adults are the version we usually envision when we think of ticks. They are the only ones capable of reproducing and the ones (primarily the females) that become noticeably engorged during feeding. Adult ticks go through the same questing process, but generally from an even higher position, usually tall grass or low shrubs, to reach larger animals, like deer, dogs and humans. After finding a host (host number 3) the adults may wander around for a while looking for the ideal location to attach. This is the time we sometimes Summer 2016

spot them on dogs. Once they become attached they are a little harder to see, and their saliva acts as an anesthetic, so the host is unaware of their presence. If left undisturbed they may stay attached for up to two weeks, and it may be a little disconcerting to know that they breed while on the host, but only after they have fed. After breed-

Removing a Tick When a tick attaches to a dog it inserts a feeding tube that is anchored with barbs, and held by a cement-like secretion that helps the tick stay attached. It is very difficult to remove a tick with fingers alone without smashing the tick or leaving part of it in the skin. Because squashing an attached tick increases the risk of disease transmission to both the dog and the person touching the tick, it is never recommended. The best way is to carefully grasp the tick with tweezers as close to the skin as possible and pull it straight out. If possible, save the tick in alcohol. Identifying its species will help predict the level of risk it carries.

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ing, the male dies, the female drops to the ground, deposits her eggs, and also dies, completing the cycle. Because ticks in each stage can survive months on the ground without feeding, the length of the total process can be hard to predict, but it would take a minimum of two months, and maybe as much as three years. However, since environmental factors, like temperature, humidity, and rainfall can influence tick development, we see a strong seasonality in the number of ticks reaching the point of questing, which correlates directly with the risk of tick exposure to our dogs. In our area we tend to see the greatest tick activity in April, May and June, then again in October and November. It seems sensible, therefore, that during those months dog owners should be especially vigilant and remember to check carefully for ticks anytime a dog has visited an area with low vegetation or plant litter on the ground. An area frequently vis-

ited can be checked for ticks by brushing a rough, light-colored cloth over the vegetation to see if it picks up any hitchhikers. In addition to helping us predict tick population variances, knowing the life cycle also allows us to see why ticks are so effective at transmitting diseases. Each host has the potential to pass an infection through the blood to any stage tick, which is subsequently carried to the next host and transmitted from the tick in its saliva. At least one disease organism is even known to pass through the eggs from one generation of ticks to the next. The Table presented illustrates some possible disease risks from ticks found in our area.

Local Tick Species

As alarming as this information may seem, it could be worse. We are lucky that the environment of the Coachella Valley doesn’t favor a lot of ticks. As far

Coachella Valley Ticks and the Canine Diseases They Can Transmit Tick Species

Habitat

Diseases

Western Black-Legged Tick (Ixodes pacificus)

Wooded and grassy areas in the mountains surrounding the Coachella Valley.

Lyme disease, Anaplasmosis

American Dog Tick (Dermacentor variabilis)

Isolated areas in the Valley, where watering supports tall grass and other low vegetation.

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Tularemia

Brown Dog Tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus)

Walls and crevices of indoor areas where dogs are regularly housed.

Anaplasosis, Babesiosis, Ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

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American dog tick (female), not to scale

PHOTO COURTESY THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH

PHOTO COURTESY THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Western Black-legged tick (female), not to scale

as we know, there are only three species we might encounter here.

1

The Western Black-Legged Tick (Ixodes pacificus) is not known to inhabit the lower elevations of the Valley, but is present in the San Bernardino and San Jacinto Mountains around us. These ticks are known carriers of Lyme disease and Anaplasmosis, but fortunately, no ticks in our area have ever tested positive for either disease.

2

The American Dog Tick (Dermacentor variabilis) is not native to the Desert, but apparently in some specific, localized areas where moisture, vegetation, and wildlife conditions are just right, it is able to survive. This is the tick a dog in the lower Valley is most likely to encounter outdoors, but only if it stumbles upon one of those isolated pockets. This species has the potential to carry Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) and Tularemia, but neither disSummer 2016

Brown Dog Tick (female), not to scale

ease has been confirmed in ticks from our area.

3

The Brown Dog Tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) can be found anywhere dogs live. Its life cycle is very closely associated with dogs, and while it may feed on other mammals, dogs are the preferred host for every stage in its life. Most of the time each host is a different dog with the tick dropping

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off between stages, so the potential for disease transmission between dogs is high. It can also transmit RMSF, as well as Ehrlichiosis and Babesiosis. None of these diseases has been associated with ticks from the Coachella Valley, but the agents of both Babesiosis and RMSF have been reported in ticks from other California desert areas. Unlike the other two species, this

tick does not survive well in outdoor environments, but is extremely successful in indoor environments, such as kennels, where dogs are regularly housed. All of its life stages thrive in crevices and wall spaces of buildings. It is the only species likely to infest a home, and although brown dog ticks always prefer dogs, they will readily attach to people in such situations.

Sun & Bug Blocker Suit

There is now a way to protect your pooches from possible cancercausing UV radiation, dangerous insect bites and grass burs. Hurtta’s new Sun & Bug Blocker suit covers a dog’s legs, body and neck with a thin but strong breathable material that is impregnated with Clariant Sanitized® finishing. This breakthrough finishing repels and helps protect dogs from harmful UV rays, mosquito, horsefly and tick bites. The Sun & Bug Blocker suit is constructed from a lightweight and flexible material that makes it easy to put on and allows the dog unrestricted freedom of movement. www.hurtta.com

Ticked Off™

An alternative to tweezers, the Ticked Off™ tick remover is a clever tool to remove ticks from pets (and their people). The device may be used in any direction to remove ticks, from front, back or side. Once the tick has been isolated, is clearly visible and free from obstruction, you place the wide part of the notch on the skin near the tick (holding skin taut if necessary). Applying slight pressure downward on the skin, slide the remover forward so the small part of the notch is framing the tick. Continuous forward sliding motion detaches the tick. tickedoff.com

Products shown are not necessarily endorsed by author. 54 Desert Pet Companion

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Summary While there is not much to love about ticks, they are formidable adversaries and worthy of our respect. But the danger they present is manageable for dog owners who understand them, know how to avoid them, and who exercise common sense, a little caution, and some communication with their veterinarian. There are some great

new products available that make tick prevention easier than it has ever been before. They can’t make ticks any less disgusting, but they make sharing the world with them a little less challenging. VCA Rancho Mirage Animal Hospital located at 71-075 Highway 111, Rancho Mirage, CA. 760-346-6103. Visit www.vcahospitals.com/rancho-mirage

Insect Shield® for Pets Insect Shield® for Pets puts insect repellency near your dog’s skin, instead of directly on it, and the protection is invisible. Insect Shield does not have to enter into your dog’s system for it to be effective. Nor, do the insects have to bite in order for the protection to work. You simply have to put Insect Shield dog apparel on your pet or have them use the products and it helps ward off a variety of insects. Insect Shield protection is bonded to the textile so Summer 2016

it cannot be rubbed off. The Insect Shield process binds a proprietary permethrin formula tightly to fabric fibers, resulting

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in effective, odorless insect protection that lasts the expected lifetime of apparel. insectshieldforpets.com

Desert Pet Companion 55


Building A Lifelong Relationship

by Lori Carman, VSPDT Dream Dogs

T

he American Veterinary Medical Association defines the humananimal bond as “a mutually beneficial and dynamic relationship between people and animals that is influenced by behaviors that are essential to the health and well-being of both.” So, what are the behaviors in ques56 Desert Pet Companion

tion? Being a responsible caretaker is at the foundation, of course, and includes providing food, water, shelter, and safety, as well as medical care when needed. But aside from that, what influences a person’s relationship with her dog? What takes it from good to great? In the human world,

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Classes red at also offe d Paw’s The Gran ings Palm Spr location.

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psychologist John Gottman spent four decades studying couples to find out what makes marriages happy and lasting. His major takeaway was that a deep sense of connection and trust is built between couples that make many “bids”—verbal or nonverbal requests for attention and connection—and offer positive responses to those bids. Positive reinforcement training shows us that the same principles apply to dog-human relationship building. If you like something and reward it, not only will it be more likely to happen again, but everyone involved in the interaction feels better about each other. More connected, more trusting. The one caveat is that it’s important not to reinforce behavior we don’t like (with any kind of attention, positive or negative) and that we should therefore ignore whining, jumping up, nudging, and so on. Beyond that, though, any time spent with dogs offers opportunities to extend and respond to bids. For example, just looking at a dog with a happy or playful expression qualifies as positive attention and therefore a bid for connection. Ditto saying “what a good dog you are…” in a soft voice for no particular reason. The same goes for reaching over to a dog lying quietly on or beside the couch to scratch a belly or neck, depending on the dog’s preference. Have three minutes to spare? Play a quick game. Get out a treat and practice a fun trick. What’s the lesson? Never think you’re spoiling your dog with these kindness58 Desert Pet Companion

es. They are tiny investments in a lifelong, loving relationship. Every time we remember to stop to give our dogs affection and attention, we are making deposits on a richer and ever-deepening bond.

Yoga for Dogs Like cats, dogs seem to have a built-in understanding of the healing and wellness-boosting properties of stretching. It is a priority to them and most stretch thoroughly several times a day. Yoga for dogs can be a natural extension of this stretching habit—a fun, healthful, and relaxing activity you can share with your dog, whether at a neighborhood yoga studio (some offer doga classes), with a group of friends, or in your own living room. For dogs that get into the practice, yoga can promote flexibility, increased blood circulation, and quicker recovery from strenuous walks or play sessions. And for dogs that don’t quite catch on, yoga sessions mean spending enjoyable time with you. To explore yoga with your dog,

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Did You Know?

Number of dogs worldwide?

Around 525 million. At 75.8 million, the U.S. has the highest dog population in the world. France has the second highest with 8.8 million.

Reproduction rate?

One female dog and her offspring could produce 67,000 puppies in 6 years.

Number of words dogs can remember? check out some of the many videos on YouTube on the topic, or invest in a DVD or book. And if you are a yoga enthusiast already, do a little research online for inspiration on how to include your dog in your favorite workout and then get stretching. Lori Wainio-Carman, VSPDT, professional dog trainer and owner of Dream Dogs, has been successfully training for over 20 years. 760-899-7272, www.dreamdogs.com, www.Positively.com

Summer 2016

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Somewhere between 150 and 200. A few dogs have supercanine abilities in this area, though. One collie is known to have learned over 1,000 words.

Size differential? Dogs can vary in size from a 150 lb. Great Dane to a 2 lb. Chihuahua.

Sources: MSPCA Angell, Dr. Stanley Coren, The World Health Organization.

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Why You May Benefit from Having an Emotional Support Animal (ESA) By Joanne S. Williams, LCSW

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speak to people daily while doing evaluations for people who want to have their pet become an Emotional Support Animal (ESA). For most of these people, even picking up the phone and making the call for an appointment is a very difficult task. The thought of talking about emotional issues creates great anxiety. We understand how anxiety-producing the ESA process can be, so we make the process as easy and painless as possible. Many people with anxiety, whether PTSD, generalized anxiety, fear of flying, social anxiety or fear of crowds, express that having an ESA has “changed their lives.” Folks that have social anxiety tell me that their ESA helps to “break the ice” in conversations. They feel more comfortable talking with new people when their animal is with them. Most clients with Agoraphobia, which is a fear of crowds and enclosed places, report they have fewer panic attacks, can go to more places and visit family and friends more often if they have their ESA with them. Flying can be a completely different experience when you can have your animal on your lap or at your feet to calm 60 Desert Pet Companion

and comfort you. You will be relieved to know there are no weight or size limits and no fees. Others say having an ESA can help with those long TSA lines as you are entertained, distracted and calmed as you focus on your traveling buddy instead of the crowds and chaos. Airlines have learned how to use dogs in the airport to calm us, too. 15 airline terminals now have dogs with handlers walking around the terminal because they know the benefits of how dogs can calm the entire environment that they are in. So, taking your ESA on the plane can actually help the other anxious passengers as well. Our love for animals is having a positive impact on airline travel.

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Many veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome (PTSD) have consistently said that having their ESA reminds them of the brotherhood they experienced in the military. They know that their ESA has their back and can help the transition back into their non-military life. As a mental health professional for over 20 years, and specializing in ESA evaluations in the last three years, I have a deep compassion and understanding of how an ESA can connect us to our compassionate side. It can calm and comfort us like no person can. From my professional experience, I haven’t seen anxiety going down since the financial crisis, or from the ever-increasing terrorism that we hear about

daily. We deserve some help from whatever source we can get it from. Get an Emotional Support Evaluation today to increase your enjoyment of life. Go to our website www. NextGenPsychology.com and look at the common questions tab to see if you qualify to have an ESA, or call us at 760-485-6784. We know it’s not easy living without a companion. Editor’s note: An ESA is not classified as a Therapy or Service animal. ESA designation does not allow a person to bring a pet into a store or institution that clearly states “no pets allowed,” for example. It only gives the owner rights for air travel and also applies to no-pet housing situations.

Emotional Support Animal Joanne S. Williams, LCSW

CA Lic. # 22409

760-485-6784

SUMMER SPECIAL

Save $40* off EVALUATION Call for details

Summer 2016

Federal Laws Protect You For Air Travel And “No Pet” Housing

Get a simple 20 minute phone evaluation FEEL THE COMFORT OF HAVING YOUR ESA WITH YOU TO CALM AND SOOTH YOU

www.NextGenPsychology.com EMAIL: ESA@ESAevaluation.com www.PetCompanionMag.com

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Idyllwild

Mayor Max Idyllwild’s Public Servant

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ou’ll see him at every event, on every holiday, and pretty much every afternoon, somewhere in Idyllwild. He’s the esteemed mayor, the guy who’s always looking out for his citizenry, willing to clear his schedule to lend a hand when needed, and devotes his life to being a public servant. 62 Desert Pet Companion

He’ll greet you warmly, no matter how many times he’s seen you that day, and he wears a perpetual grin, which he’ll flash for everyone he meets. He’s even been known to offer a kiss or two, if you let him. Yes, the mayor of Idyllwild is a dog—a hard-working, civic-minded,

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Meet the mayor and his deputies, Mitzi and Mikey Deputy Mayors Mikey (L) and Mitzi (R).

and very well-dressed dog. And yes, Idyllwild, since it’s unincorporated, does not officially elect a mayor. But, in fact, this mayor was elected and won in a landslide victory. Let’s back up to the beginning of Idyllwild’s mayoral history. Idyllwild has always been full of animal lovers. Summer 2016

In 2012, a local pet rescue, Animal Rescue Foundation (ARF), had a great idea for a fundraiser: they’d hold an election—a mayoral election—and the candidates running for office would all be pets! They charged residents $10 to apply to enter their cat or dog, and voters paid $1 to cast a vote. With 14

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Idyllwild dogs and 2 cats in the race, a golden retriever named Max won 21,132 of the 31,000 votes. Max (Maximus Mighty-Dog Mueller) was voted into office during an election held on June 11, 12, and 13, 2012 in Idyllwild, Max I and was inaugurated to a one-year term on July 1, 2012. Sure, it was rigged … sort of. Political campaign staffs were encouraged to vote as many times as they wanted, to help their candidate win. And so it was with a generous $20,000 donation to ARF from Max’s owner, Phyllis Mueller, that Max blew the competition out of the water. There were no hard feelings, though, and the event raised over $31,000 to help save animals. It was a fun event that got the town excited about donating to pet rescue efforts and gave everyone a few good laughs. But 11-year-old Max—Max the first, as he is now known—took his office seriously and so did his chiefs of staff, Mueller and Glenn Warren. The first thing he did as he began his two-year term was to dress for the job—he began to wear a tie to work every day. His office? The streets of Idyllwild, where he brought a smile and a tail wag to everyone he met, residents and 64 Desert Pet Companion

visitors alike. He spent his days acting as official mascot for the town, attending fundraisers, encouraging generosity to the local pet rescues, and just generally making people happy. Max’s popularity moved the people of Idyllwild to appeal to ARF for his continuation in office. On February 9, 2013, ARF announced the extension of his one-year term to a second and final year, ending on June 30, 2014. On April 2, 2013, Mayor Max passed away. The successor for the remainder of Max’s term, Maximus Mighty-Dog Mueller II, born of the same bloodline as Max the first, arrived in Idyllwild on July 21, 2013. Idyllwild Animal Rescue Friends approved his mayoral transition plan. Upon his arrival to Idyllwild, 11-week-old Max was accompanied by two deputy mayors, also of Max the first’s bloodline and both just 8 weeks old: Mikey and Mitzi (Mikey MightyDog Mueller and Mitzi Marie Mueller). The trio is often referred to as “the Mayor and the spares” or simply “the Mayors of Idyllwild.” In March of 2014, as the June 30 end of Max’s term approached, ARF solicited the town’s interest in holding another election. Once again, the

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people overwhelmingly pled for Mayor Max’s continuation in perpetuity. So today, Mayor Max and his two deputies, Mikey and Mitzi, all three years old, continue to serve the town of Idyllwild. Max has worn his tie to the more than 500 events and thousands of in-person “visits with visitors” he has attended since taking office. He and his deputies work tirelessly to not only promote tourism to Idyllwild—Max is a public figure on Facebook, with more than 5,000 Facebook friends— but also to touch the children of Idyllwild through an outreach effort with the schools. Sometimes, Max will “deputize” some of those children, in an effort to help them spread his Summer 2016

platform to others. And what is that platform? “The goal and purpose of the Office of Mayor Max is to convey unconditional love and to do as many good deeds for others as possible.” It’s as simple as that, and that is what Max and his mayors—and his chiefs of staff, of course—devote their lives to. “We believe we can make the world a better place by bringing joy, happiness, and fun communication to as many people as possible. We believe that positive energy leads towards life, and no matter what happens, we always do our very best to remain positive and flow as much loving energy into the world as possible. It is our intention to help and to increase the well-being and longevity of every person we reach.” Max, Mitzi and Mikey and their chiefs of staff have received thousands of responses from people thanking them for the joy they brought to their lives and for everything they’ve done for Idyllwild. All the mayors’ activities are funded solely by their chiefs of staff, as a public service to town they love so much. The Mayors of Idyllwild and the chiefs of staff each work long hours to provide joy to people, and they are committed to continuing that effort for years to come. A noble endeavor, carried out by the three cutest politicians you’re ever likely to meet. Don’t miss a chance to say hello to Max and his deputies whenever you’re in town!

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Idyllwild

The ‘Island in the Sky’ Is a Paradise for Pets Drive up ‘the hill’ to Idyllwild for a pet-friendly escape

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re you tired of imposing on your friends or spending a fortune on pet care when you go away, only to miss your pet the whole trip? Looking for a place to relax without having to leave your pet at home? Just 45 minutes above the desert floor is a pet lover’s getaway known as the “island in the sky.” Perched in the San Jacinto Mountains, Idyllwild is consistently 25 degrees cooler than the desert, making it a perfect place for hiking and rock climbing—and a perfect place to escape with your pet. Strolling through the artsy community, you’ll see dogs on every corner, dining on the patios of most restaurants, and welcomed in just about every store and gallery. Bowls of cool water stay filled outside most businesses, and dog treats are offered all over town to four-legged visitors.

Idyllwild’s heart for pets begins with its animal rescues. Living Free 66 Desert Pet Companion

Animal Sanctuary is a beautiful, 150-acre rescue, where dogs and cats enjoy roaming free in large, protected outdoor spaces. Dogs are walked daily and go out to play in the central area, protected from snakes by an in-ground barrier fence. The cattery is exceptional—cats can be indoors or out as they wish, with a large screened-in outdoor space. Each fall, Living Free holds its annual “Howl and Yowl Benefit for the Animals,” a full day of music, demonstrations, dog training, and adoptable cats and dogs.

Also in town is the Animal Rescue Foundation (ARF), “the little rescue with the big heart,” which recently held its annual fundraiser, ARF’s “Paws for Rhythm and Brews” beer festival, on June 4th. With music, craft beers, and a silent auction, the event is ARF’s biggest of the year. Idyllwild is also home to Natural

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Idyllwild

Monarch Raw Pet Food, founded by Ben Davis, who is passionate about educating pet owners about the effect their pet food has on their dogs. Davis owns and operates a professional grooming shop, a 24-hour pet daycare and a retail pet supply store in town.

When you visit Idyllwild, you’ll find a variety of bed and breakfasts and numerous campgrounds to provide a comfortable stay for you and your pet, as well as the Quiet Creek Inn, which offers pet-friendly studios and onebedroom suites. Almost every shop in town will welcome both you and your pet, and some offer treats for your

dog, like Let It Shine Gallery, a gift shop that boasts an art gallery specializing in pet portraits painted on stone, 68 Desert Pet Companion

and sells other unique items you’ve never seen before. In Let It Shine, you can enjoy the art, pick up a souvenir or find an unusual gift. You might even catch a glimpse of owner and artist Terri French painting portraits in her studio. Hubert Halkin is the “accidental owner” of Café Aroma, the hot spot in town for dining with your dog. Dogs dine with their humans on the wifiequipped patio, and it’s rare to see an outdoor table occupied by someone without a dog at their feet. The culinary masters at Café Aroma create beautiful dishes with French, Nuevo Latino, Asian and SoCal flair, and serve them with fine wine, microbrews and spirits. Inside, there is a gallery of changing art collections displayed on the walls. At night, the patio becomes an outdoor stage, home to local, regional and national musicians— it’s known as the “Madison Square Garden” of Idyllwild and is one of the main reasons Café Aroma has such a large clientele of loyal locals and visiting guests. With cooler temperatures in the summer, snow in the winter, and— most importantly—a warm welcome for your pet, Idyllwild is the ideal vacation spot if you just can’t leave your pet behind!

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A Unique Twist on Pet Portraits

Let It Shine’s Terri French captures souls of pets on stone ‘canvas’

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dyllwild’s Let It Shine Gallery specializes in pet painted portraits on stone—unique works of art that have been heralded for capturing the heart and soul of dogs and other animals. Award-winning artist Terri French owns the extraordinary gift shop and gallery, which also offers other locally produced art, textiles, and unique cre-

ations, as well as books, antiques and consignment items. As you’ll find throughout all of Idyllwild, dogs are always welcome at Let It Shine, with treats on hand and water always available, for humans and pets alike. When you visit her gallery, located in Oakwood Village, you’ll be warmly greeted by Terri, along with

CUSTOM PET PORTRAITS by Terri French at

“Let it Shine” in Idyllwild, CA

Email for more information: mycrazyfrench@yahoo.com or call, 619-933-2306 or... www.letitshineshop.com Also on Facebook, Google and Yelp!

$85 and up Summer 2016

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Idyllwild her rescue dog, Sweetie. Her portrait painting started with one thoughtful gesture. “I’ve always loved animals, and when a friend lost a cat that she loved dearly, I painted her cat’s portrait on a stone as a keepsake. She treasured that gift,” says French. “I was drawn by the beauty of Idyllwild and impressed with the passion for animals there, and it has turned out to be the perfect place to pursue my passion.” Portraits start at just $85, and photos can be texted or emailed to French. She uses acrylic paint and varnish, so finished pieces can be displayed inside or outside. French says she also loves meeting people from all over the world who visit Let It Shine. Another gallery, Oh My Dog, is adjacent to and accessible

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from her gallery. Oakwood Village also sports bike shop, Hub Cyclery, the IdyllCreations gift shop, and another art gallery, JerryArt. So when you visit Idyllwild, don’t miss a stop at Oakwood Village and Let It Shine Gallery, located at 54425 North Circle Drive, Suite 4, Idyllwild CA 92549, (619) 933-2306. Open Thursdays through Mondays.

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Lake Arrowhead area

Lake Arrowhead area resources Boarding Double Dog Ranch, Crestline, CA www.DoubleDogRanch.com (909) 338-8383 Groomers Doggie Styles, Lake Dr, Crestline, CA 92325 (909) 338-5329 Head To Tail Pet Grooming, 23966 Springwater Rd., Crestline, CA 92325 (909) 338-5407 Lauren’s Grooming, 27219 Highway 189, Blue Jay, CA 92137 (909) 337-5077 Jeani’s Mobile Grooming (909) 522-0111 72 Desert Pet Companion

Retail & Pet Stores Three Dog Bakery, 28200 Highway 189, Suite T240, Lake Arrowhead, CA www.threedog.com/three-dog-bakerylake-arrowhead (909) 337-3157 Open 7 days Tommy’s Pet Studio, 27177 Highway 189, Blue Jay, CA 92317 www.tommyspetstudio.com (909) 336-1061 Open 7 days Pet Shelters & Adoptions Mountains’ Humane Society, PO Box 452, Lake Arrowhead, CA 92352 mountainshumanesociety@hotmail.com (909) 337-6422 Pet Sitters Rachel’s Pet/House Sitting Services, PO Box 2513, Blue Jay, CA 92317 (909) 362-2468

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Veterinarians Rimforest Animal Hospital, 1299 Bear Springs Road, Rimforest, CA 92378 www.rimforestanimalhospital.com (909) 337-8589 Hours: M-Sat 8 am-5 pm Arrowhead Animal Hospital, 27244 Highway 189, Blue Jay, CA 92317 www.arrowheadanimalhospital.com (909) 336-6800 Hours: M-F 7:30 am-5 pm Sat 8 am-3 pm

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he San Bernardino Mountain Resorts offer another cool and pet-friendly get-away location. The altitude of the resorts is 4500 feet plus and temperatures are generally 10-15 degrees cooler than the nearby lower elevations. Crestline/Lake Gregory (pictured here) has a mostly shaded walkway around the lake and leashed dogs are welcome to walk. It also boasts a fenced dog park with separate areas for large and small dogs. Lake Arrowhead Village is a lovely place to walk your leashed dog while window shopping.

Hiking http://lakearrowheadchamber. com/leads/hiking-guide/ Presents information on area hiking trails and rules and regulations.

Dog Parks Cedar Glen Dog Park, 512 SR 173, Lake Arrowhead, CA 92352 Fully fenced off-leash dog area with dog poop bags, surrounded by hiking trails.

Lake Gregory Regional Park/Dog Park, South Shore, Crestline, CA (909) 338-2233 2.7 mile fitness trail. Dogs must be on a leash.

Lake Gregory Regional Park/Dog Park, South Shore, Crestline, CA (909) 3382233 Half acre fenced off-leash area split for large and small dogs.

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Have You Seen... For Dog’s Sake!

A Simple Guide to Protecting Your Pup from Unsafe Foods, Everyday Dangers, and Bad Situations Amy Luwis’ cleverly written and illustrated book. It’s a great quick resource and fun read. Available online.

Pompooch Bowtie

Handsome addition to your pet’s collar – lightweight, washable and fun! Several color choices available. pomchies.com

Shelter Dogs in a Photo Booth

Talented photographer Guinnevere Shuster, features the photos and brief stories of 100 dogs. The adorable photos keep you turning the pages to see more. Available online.

PupSTEP HitchSTEP

Solvit Products’ PupSTEP HitchSTEP slides into vehicle hitch receiver creating a two-step stair that makes it easy for pets to climb into and out of SUVs and pickup trucks. www.solvitproducts.com

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Nature’s Variety SweetSpots These frozen treats for your dog are 98% lactose free, fortified with whey protein, and enriched with live active yogurt cultures. Suggested by Pet Oasis.

Dr. Catsby’s Cat Bowl Bear & The Rat’s Cool Treats

The frozen treats are made with probiotic yogurt with live & active cultures, pumpkin & bananas. Human-grade ingredients are sourced in the U.S.A (except for bananas). Made in Boulder, Colorado. Suggested by Bones-n-Scones.

SureFeed Sealed Pet Bowl

Dr. Catsby’s is an ergonomically designed feeding bowl that helps alleviate whisker fatigue by using a low and shallow configuration which provides easy access to food without pulling back the cat’s whiskers and causing discomfort. The stainless steel finish is resilient to bacteria, easy to clean, and raised high enough off the floor to make eating healthier for your cat. drcatsby.com

The SureFeed Sealed Pet Bowl opens and closes automatically sealing tight to prevent wet food from drying out. The airtight seal also helps prevent odors and keeps bugs out. www.sureflap.com/en-us Summer 2016

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Animal Samaritans’

Seniors’ Pet Wellness Fund

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Summer 2016

here is no better example of the sheer joy of pet companionship than the relationship between pet owners and their much beloved four-legged family members. According to a study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, caring for a cat or dog helps elderly people overcome depression or loneliness. Whether that be from the loss of a loved one, not having family or friends nearby to interact with, or not being able to get out much, having a fluffy friend gives older single citizens a sense of purpose in caring for their pets. Pets benefit seniors by being companions, increasing levels of activity and acting as a social catalyst. In addition, pets help the elderly maintain self-care routines and can provide valuable support during the early stages of bereavement, by establishing daily routines and by providing a comforting presence at a time when people feel a great sense of loneliness. Finally, as people live longer the question of how to maintain a dignified, sustained quality of life becomes more vital. Taking care of a pet can serve as an alarm clock, reminding pet owners to take care of themselves too. Living longer also presents financial hardships for some of our aging population. The reality is that some animals are relinquished to a county shelter because of an individual’s inability to pay for their

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pet’s medical care. Animal Samaritans knows that some pet owners are not able to pay for the veterinary care their pets need. In keeping with their mission to “Improve the Lives of Animals and People” and their desire to be a focal point within the Coachella Valley for animal welfare, Animal Samaritans offers a Seniors’ Pet Wellness Fund to assist people in caring for their pets. This program is offered to income and age qualifying senior pet owners who meet certain requirements: ƒƒ Age 60 or older (proof of age required such as copy of Driver’s License, etc.) ƒƒ A permanent Coachella Valley or Morongo Basin resident (proof of residency required such as copy of Driver’s License, utility bill, etc.) ƒƒ Maximum income not exceeding $1,500 a month for one person (proof required such as copy of bank statement, Social Security statement, etc.) ƒƒ Proof of ownership of animal (such as vaccination records or license) This fund is available thanks to the generosity of foundation grants and individual donations. Animal Samari78 Desert Pet Companion

tans is grateful for the support of several foundation grants over the years: The Albert & Anna Herdina Memorial Fund for Animals, made possible in part by a grant from The Community Foundation - Strengthening Inland Southern California through Philanthropy; The Banfield Foundation; The Frank M. and Gertrude R. Doyle Foundation; Newman’s Own Foundation; and a variety of donations from private individuals. However, because so many low-income senior pet owners request financial assistance to care for their pets, the fund is often depleted part way through the year, and not every lowincome senior pet owner who qualifies for assistance can receive it. Your support allows families and individuals to keep their animals healthy and in the warmth of their loving home; your support keeps families together! If you are interested in more information about this program, or need an application, please contact Michelle Fiorda at 760-601-3989. For any other information, please contact Kim Laidlaw at 760-601-3754. Please visit Animal Samaritans on the web at animalsamaritans.org or on Facebook or Instagram.

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Events! Throughout the Summer:

Agility, Obedience, Rally Romper Room and more! Climate controlled training facilities in Indio, Palm Springs and soon in Palm Desert. Visit Dream Dogs’ website for class schedules or to schedule one-on-one training. 760-8997272 or www.dreamdogs.com Mondays at Lunch visit Vue Bar & Grille in Indian Wells. LaDiDa Jewelers shows their exquisite jewelry and donates 20% of their sale proceeds to Animal Samaritans.  animalsamaritans.org

JUNE

Celebrate! Felines & Exhibitors, Hosted by: Victor Valley Cat Club & AmericansWest Cat Clubs, Saturday June 11, 2016, at Oaks Middle School, 1221 Oaks Ave, Ontario, CA, ENTRY CLERK: Lisa Marie Kuta, Email: Lisa@Kuta.net CatCon LA, June 25-26, Part expo, part symposium, CatConLA showcases some of the world’s top cat-centric merchandise including furniture, art, toys and clothing for those of us who possess a great love of the feline, as well as conversations with some of the top cat experts in the world. The Reef, 1933 S. Broadway, LA for tickets and information, visit catconla.com

TNR Surgery Days, second and last Saturday of the month. Palm Springs Animal Shelter, 4575 E Mesquite Ave, Palm Springs. Call for details (760) 4165718. www.psanimalshelter.org Public vaccine clinic every Thursday 4-6 pm, Palm Springs Animal Shelter, 4575 E Mesquite Ave, Palm Springs. Call for details (760) 416-5718. www.psanimalshelter.org PSAS Volunteer orientations: June 15. July/Aug TBA, Palm Springs Animal Shelter, 4575 E Mesquite Ave, Palm Springs. Call for details (760) 416-5718. www.psanimalshelter.org

JULY

July Adoption Special: $17.76 for all pets one year and over, Palm Springs Animal Shelter, 4575 E Mesquite Ave, Palm Springs. Call for details (760) 4165718. www.psanimalshelter.org Pets On Parade (POP 2016) Luncheon & Awards Ceremony, July 9th, 11 am- 2 pm, Renaissance Indian Wells Resort & Spa, benefits Pegasus Therapeutic Riding and Loving All Animals. Purchase tickets at www.pegasusridingacademy.org or call 760-834-7000 Venus de Fido Soft Opening, July 10th from 11 am to 2 pm, 73600 Alessandro Drive. Call for details 760-834-7050 or visit venusdefido.com

Visit us on Facebook to see photos from events and event updates or additions. www.facebook.com/desertpetcompanion Summer 2016

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Clear the Shelters, July 23, Palm Springs Animal Shelter, 4575 E Mesquite Ave, Palm Springs. Call for details (760) 416-5718. www.psanimalshelter.org

PS Dog Training

Public vaccine clinic every Thursday 4-6 pm, Palm Springs Animal Shelter. Call for details (760) 416-5718.

AUGUST

Public vaccine clinic every Thursday 4-6 pm, Palm Springs Animal Shelter. Call for details (760) 416-5718. Training programs to meet the needs of your dog and satisfy your training goals, including: house breaking, obedience training (on or off leash), rally obedience, agility, and conformation training.

Save the date:

Howl and Yowl Benefit for the Animals, Fall 2016, benefits Living Free Animal Sanctuary, (951) 659-4687, living-free.org Faux Fur Ball III: The Art of Love, Oct. 22, Palm Springs Animal Shelter, 4575 E Mesquite Ave, Palm Springs. Call for details (760) 416-5718. www.psanimalshelter.org Venus de Fido Grand Opening, November 2016, 73600 Alessandro Drive. Call for details 760-834-7050 or visit venusdefido.com

Ellen Wade uses a combination of positive reinforcement, clicker training, and food/toy rewards to create an enjoyable learning atmosphere that works for your dog. Private Lessons Group Lessons Sleep Away School 30 + years experience

Puppy Pre-school

For more information please call us at

(760) 365-2628

Paws & Hearts 16th Annual Dog Walk, Saturday, November 26th, 2016, Westin Mission Hills Resort and Spa, Rancho Mirage. Registration begins at 9am, Walk kicks off at 10am, Registration forms and information on our website, www. pawsandhearts.org, or call (760)836-1406. Men of the Desert Fashion Show and Charity Luncheon – December 4, 2016 at the Agua Caliente Casino Resort & Spa. Ticket prices are $125.00 per person.  11am – 2pm. Benefits Animal Samaritans, 760.343.3477, animalsamaritans.org

psdogtraining.com

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Join Us for the 18th Annual Pets on Parade Luncheon & Awards Ceremony

Saturday, July 9, 2016, 11 am - 2 pm Renaissance Indian Wells Resort & Spa Tickets: $65 per person including Valet Parking Live & Silent Auctions, Raffle, Pet Adoptions, and bring your well-behaved dogs to the event! Purchase tickets at www.PegasusRidingAcademy.org or call LOVING ALL ANIMALS AT 760-834-7000. Presenting Sponsor

Hosted by

2016 POP Honoree

Dan McGrath of Sunny 103.1 FM, Bianca Rae & Haley Clawson of the Desert’s KESQ News Channel 3.

Exclusive Invitation! POP Attendees will be invited to Venus de Fido’s Private Opening Party to celebrate Lindi Biggi’s 75th Birthday on July 10 from 3 - 5 pm.

Pets on Parade & the POP Magazine benefit two 501(c)(3) Nonprofit Organizations: Pegasus Therapeutic Riding - Tax ID:95-3774003 & Loving All Animals - Tax ID: 26-3841119


Save the Date For

The “Paws & Hearts” 16th Annual Dog Walk Saturday, November 26th, 2016 At The Westin Mission Hills Resort and Spa, Rancho Mirage Registration begins at 9am, Walk kicks off at 10am

All proceeds benefit the amazing therapy visits that our group of 40 + 2-legged and 4-legged volunteers provide to Coachella Valley hospitals, long-term care facilities, Cancer and Alzheimer facilities. __________ Please plan on attending our Thanksgiving Saturday walk and raise funds in your dog’s name.

Registration forms and information can be found on our website, www.pawsandhearts.org, or call our office at (760)836-1406.


palm springs Hiking

Retail & Pet Stores

Grooming

City Parks

Bones-n-Scones 577 E. Sunny Dunes Rd., Palm Springs, 760-864-1133 www.bonesnscones.com Yes, we’ll answer any questions about your pet’s diet! Raw, dehydrated, grain-free & fresh foods, also an on-site bakery offering treats & specialty cakes. Please see ad on p 6/7.

Bath & Brush 4771 E. Palm Canyon Dr. Ste. A, Palm Springs 760-202-4494 Please see ad on p 30.

desertmountains.org

Baristo Park Located at Calle El Segundo DeMuth Park 4365 Mesquite Avenue Frances Stevens Park 555 N. Palm Canyon Drive Ruth Hardy Park 700 Tamarisk Sunrise Park Located at Sunrise Way between Ramon Road and E. Baristo Road Victoria Park 2744 N. Via Miraleste

Ongoing Activities Market Night Thursdays, year-round downtown Palm Springs

Cold Nose Warm Heart 189 S. Palm Canyon, Palm Springs, 760-327-7747 www.coldnosewarmheart. com Cold Nose Warm Heart is an upscale pet boutique in the heart of Palm Springs Village. We carry gifts, pet supplies, treats and food. Please see ad on p 94/95.

Where Locals Go The Corridor 515 N. Palm Canyon Dr. Palm Springs, CA palmspringscorridor.com

Visit our website for additional information about the businesses listed in the directory and other local pet businesses. To be included in this list, please contact sales@ desertpetcompanion.com.

84 Desert Pet Companion

Treat Buddy 4751 E. Palm Canyon, South Palm Springs, 760-202-3600, TreatBuddy.com Treat Buddy specializes in high quality food, gourmet treats, beautiful and functional toys and accessories, all chosen to make every moment of your pet’s life perfect. Please see ad on p 3. PetSmart Palm Springs (760) 325-9711 Petco Pet Store (760) 864-1393 www.DesertPetCompanion.com

Hyde Park, Barkingham Pet Hotel California, 555 S. Palm Canyon Dr., Palm Springs 760-327-5700 www.pethotelcalifornia.com Please see ad on p 34/35. Alex’s Pet Grooming (760) 327-5186 Dogs World (760) 832-7736 Petco Pet Store (760) 864-1393 PetSmart Palm Springs (760) 325-9711 Puppy Luv Pet Salon (760) 322-7336

VCA - Desert Animal Hospital 4299 E. Ramon Road, Palm Springs, 760-778-9999 www.vcahospitals.com/ desert Please see ad on p 49.

Winter 2016


Veterinarians

VCA - Desert Animal Hospital 4299 E. Ramon Road, Palm Springs, 760-778-9999 www.vcahospitals.com/ desert Please see ad on p 49. Palm Springs Animal Hospital (760) 324-0450 Banfield Pet Hospital (760) 778-2714

Doggie Daycare

Doggie’s Day Out of Palm Springs, 752 Vella Rd. S., Palm Springs, CA 92264 760-422-6259 Please see ad on p 33.

Elite Pet Care Palm Springs Elite Pet Care is locally owned & operated by Joan Demiany and her team of professional pet sitters. Doggie Daycare is located in the Movie Colony area of Palm Springs. 760-320-4710 Please see ad on p 31.

Hyde Park, Barkingham Pet Hotel California 555 S. Palm Canyon Dr. Palm Springs 760-327-5700 Please see ad on p 34/35.

The Grand Paw 368 S. Palm Canyon Dr., Palm Springs, 760-327-8200 Please see ad on back cover. See page 92 for a listing of local pet sitters, trainers and other pet service providers who serve multiple cities.

PHOTO ©KARIANDCAREY.COM

Palm Springs Dog Park

3200 E. Tahquitz Canyon Way (behind City Hall) Contact Public Works, (760) 323-8117 www.ci.palm-springs.ca.us/city-services/dog-park

Located directly behind Palm Springs City Hall, the Palm Springs Dog Park is a 1.6 acre park where dogs can run free and their owners can socialize in a beautiful environment. Palm Springs Dog Park features grass, trees, awnings, a smaller fenced-off area for smaller dogs, recycled picnic benches & trash bins, pooper scoopers, 11 antique fire hydrants (canine bathroom facilities!) and dual-drinking fountains made to accommodate both the lowto-the-ground pooches and their taller owners! Everyone is expected to clean up after their pet and see that their dogs exhibit appropriate behavior. The park is open daily 6am–10pm & closed noon–3pm, Tuesdays and Fridays.

Resources

Palm Springs Animal Shelter 4575 E. Mesquite Ave. Palm Springs, CA 92264 (760) 416-5718 Programs Pet Adoption & Transfers placement@psanimalshelter.org Pet Food Bank, Autumn Corrow petfoodbank@psanimalshelter.org Fix-A-Friend Spay & Neuter Clinic, info@psanimalshelter.org Animal Control can be reached at 760-323-8151.

Summer 2016

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cathedral city - rancho mirage City Parks

Retail & Pet Stores

Cathedral City

Pet Oasis

Century Park 69908 Century Park Drive Panorama Park 28905 Avenida Maravilla Second Street Park 68-752 Buddy Rogers Avenue Town Square 68-701 Avenida Lalo Guerrero Rancho Mirage Blixseth Mountain Park Located east of the Magnesia Storm Channel and the Rancho Mirage Elementary School off Mirage Road Magnesia Falls MiniPark Located north of Rancho Mirage Elementary School Michael S. Wolfson Park DaVall and Frank Sinatra Dr. (adjacent to the Whitewater wash) Rancho Mirage Community Park 71-560 San Jacinto Drive Currently closed to the public for renovations through January 2016.

86 Desert Pet Companion

Pet Oasis 72877 Dinah Shore Dr. (across from Clark’s Nutrition), Rancho Mirage, 760-3240980. Our mission is to provide you with top-quality food and supplies for your pet companion. Please see ad on p 21.

Grooming

K9 Clipper & Catamaran 67-555 E. Palm Canyon Dr. (Hwy 111), Ste. F110, Cathedral City, 760-770-7676, www. k9clipperandcatamaran. com. Ensure your pet always looks good at K-9 Clipper & CATamaran. 40-plus years of experience. New facility. Dog and cat grooming. Please see ad on p 30. Grooming With Love 760-328-4523

The Canine Spa Pet Hotel & Grooming 760-328-0876 68766 Perez Rd, Cathedral City, CA 92234, www. TheCanineSpa.com Since 1976, we’ve provided the finest individual care experience for your pets while you are away. Open 7 days.

Desert Pet Grooming

VCA - Rancho Mirage Animal Hospital 71-075 Highway 111 Rancho Mirage, 760-346-6103 www.vcahospitals.com/ rancho-mirage Our hospital offers grooming services to keep your pets feeling and looking their best. Please see ad on p 49.

Veterinarians

PAWS DOWN, THE BEST AROUND!

67850 Vista Chino, Ste. 107

(in the Rio Vista/Stater Bros. Shopping Center) Cathedral City, 760-322-8508 www.DesertPetGrooming.net New owners. Renovated and great new groomers. Bring your furry friends.

The Cat Clinic 67870 Vista Chino, Cathedral City, 760-325-3400 www.catcitycat.com, A feline only veterinary clinic dedicated to keeping your cats and kittens healthy with quality care in a stress-free environment. Please see ad on p 20.

www.PetCompanionMag.com Summer

2016


Cathedral City Dog Park

68752 Buddy Rogers Ave., Cathedral City VCA - Rancho Mirage Animal Hospital 71-075 Highway 111 Rancho Mirage, 760-346-6103 www.vcahospitals.com/ rancho-mirage. Your pet’s health is our top priority. Please see ad on p 49. Carter Animal Hospital 760-324-8811

Southwest Veterinary Clinic 760-770-3380

Pet Boarding & Daycare

VCA - Rancho Mirage Animal Hospital 71-075 Highway 111 Rancho Mirage, 760-346-6103 www.vcahospitals.com/ rancho-mirage Our hospital offers dog boarding you can trust. Our doggy day care keeps your dog well cared for and supervised throughout the day, while engaging them in playful and meaningful activity. Please see ad on p 49.

The Cathedral City Dog Park has two sides, one for big dogs and the other for small dogs. Both sides are spacious with plenty of room for dogs to run, play ball or catch a Frisbee. Open everyday between dawn and dusk.

Resources

Animal Control for both Cathedral City and Rancho Mirage is a function of the Coachella Valley Animal Campus. Animal Control Riverside County Animal Services, 72-050 Petland Place, Thousand Palms, (760) 343-3644 Cathedral City dog license information only, please contact: (760) 770-0353

Car Dealerships

Palm Springs Subaru 67925 E/ Palm Canyon Dr., Cathedral City, 760-318-4700 www.palmspringssubaru. com.com, Subaru loves pets and pets love Subaru, stop by and see why!

Pet Friendly Resorts

The Westin Mission Hills Golf Resort & Spa 71333 Dinah Shore Dr. Rancho Mirage (760) 328-5955

The Canine Spa Pet Hotel & Grooming 760-328-0876 68766 Perez Rd, Cathedral City, CA 92234, www. TheCanineSpa.com Summer 2016

See page 92 for a listing of local pet sitters, trainers and other pet service providers who serve multiple cities. Visit our website for a listing of pet-friendly lodging and dining. Visit our website for additional information about the businesses listed in the directory and other local pet businesses. To be included in this list, please contact sales@ desertpetcompanion.com.

www.PetCompanionMag.com

Desert Pet Companion 87


palm desert Retail & Pet Stores

Ambrosia Pet Pantry 73121 Country Club Dr. #E2, Palm Desert, (760) 568-2055 www.palmdesertpetstore. com. We provide your companion with only the best alternatives in all natural pet foods, raw diets, and other supplies.

73-910 Hwy 111, Ste. C Palm Desert, 760-340-2663 www.bonesnscones.com Whether you are searching for dry or canned, raw, organic or freshly prepared items, we are your pet’s health food store! Please see ad on p 6/7.

Cold Nose Warm Heart 77920 Country Club Drive, Suite 6-8, Palm Desert, (760) 345-8494, www. coldnosewarmheartspa.com. In addition to grooming, we offer a wide array of supplies, including pet food, toys, treats, and more in a cozy boutique-like atmosphere. Please see ad on p 94/95.

Spoiled Dog Designs College of the Desert Street Fair, Lot 2 Space 222, Saturdays and Sundays, 7am–2pm, 760-482-1877 www.spoileddogdesigns.com, customerservice@spoileddogdesigns.com Function to Fashion For Dogs 2 to 200 Pounds. Regular and Custom 88 Desert Pet Companion

Sizing. Harnesses, Clothing, Carriers, Accessories, Travel Gear, Toys, Gifts and lots more.

Grooming

Barking Beauties 72216 Hwy. 111, Ste. F1, Palm Desert, 760-851-4679. Dog grooming and private DIY self-wash room. Please see ad on p 30.

Venus De Fido 73600 Alessandro Drive Palm Desert, California 92260 (760) 834-7050, venusdefido. com. A health and wellness luxury spa for pets and their people. Please see ad on p 24-27. Creative Dog Grooming 760-674-3337 Ritzi Rover Pet Grooming 760-341-4133

Barkingham Pet Hotel California 34-550 Spyder Circle, Palm Desert, 760-537-1172 www.pethotelcalifornia.com Please see ad on p 34/35.

Super Mutts 760-776-9201 Uptown Dog Grooming 760-779-9900 You Dirty Dog 760-779-5525

Veterinarians Cold Nose Warm Heart 77920 Country Club Drive, Suite 6-8, Palm Desert, (760) 345-8494, www.coldnosewarmheartspa.com Please see ad on p 94/95.

Th Pet Spaw 73-911 Hwy 111, Palm Desert, 760-346-3461, www. thepetspawpalmdesert.com At the Pet Spaw, we love what we do and we’re passionate about dog grooming! Please see ad on p 29.

Country Club Animal Clinic 36869 Cook St., Palm Desert 760-776-7555 www.countryclubdvm.com Independently owned by Dr. Lillian Roberts, Country Club Animal Clinic sets the pace for exceptional care and service to our patients and their people. Please see ad on p 11. Animal Hospital Of Desert 760-568-5151 Palm Desert Pet Hospital 760-568-9377

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2016


Barkingham Pet Hotel California 34-550 Spyder Circle, Palm Desert, 760-537-1172 www.pethotelcalifornia.com “Your pets ultimate vacation spot!” Pet Taxi available from the Palm Springs area to our Palm Desert Facility. Please see ad on p 34/35.

PHOTO ©KARIANDCAREY.COM

Pet Boarding & Daycare

Palm Desert Dog Parks Civic Center Park Northeast corner of Fred Waring Drive and San Pablo Avenue Freedom Park 77400 Country Club Drive

Venus De Fido 73600 Alessandro Drive Palm Desert, California 92260 (760) 834-7050, venusdefido.com Please see ad on p 27.

Compounding Pharmacy

Town Center Compounding Pharmacy 72-624 El Paseo, Ste. 1A, Palm Desert, 760-341-3984 Can formulate your pet’s medicine into a paste, pill, capsule or liquid for easier dosing.

Joe Mann Park 77810 California Drive adjacent to the Palm Desert Country Club Homeowners Association University Dog Park 74802 University Park Drive Cahuilla Hills Park 45825 Edgehill Drive Cap Homme / Ralph Adams Park 72500 Thrush Road Visit Palm Desert’s website for information about each park: www.cityofpalmdesert. org/Index.aspx?page=543

Resources

Animal Control and licensing for Palm Desert is a function of the Coachella Valley Animal Campus. Animal Control Riverside County Animal Services, 72-050 Petland Place, Thousand Palms, (760) 343-3644

Summer 2016

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Desert Pet Companion 89


indian wells to indio Dog Training Facility Dream Dogs 45090 Golf Center Parkway Unit B, Indio, 760-899-7272, www.dreamdogs.com. Scheduled classes and by appointment only A Positive Approach to Training Your Pet. We offer the highest level of professionalism, equipment and products. Please see ad on p 57.

Retail & Pet Stores

Desert Feed Bag 83558 Avenue 45 # 1, Indio (760) 342-6602 desertfeedbag.com

Grooming Paws & Reflect (in Village Park Animal Hospital)

51-230 Eisenhower Dr., La Quinta, 760-564-3833 www.VillageParkAnimal Hospital.com Please see ad on p 2.

Pet Oasis Pet Oasis 42-220 Washington St., Bermuda Dunes (next to Home Goods), 760-345-3199 Our mission is to provide you with top-quality food and supplies for your pet companion. Please see ad on p 21.

Paws & Reflect

The Grand Paw 51750 Jackson St., Indio, 760-398-9900. www.thegrandpaw.com Please see ad on back cover.

51-230 Eisenhower Dr. La Quinta, 760-564-3833 www.VillageParkAnimal Hospital.com Please see ad on p 2.

VCA All Creatures Animal Hospital 78-267 Highway 111 La Quinta, 760-564-1154, www.vcahospitals.com/allcreatures-ca Please see ad on p 39.

The Grand Paw 51750 Jackson St., Indio, 760-398-9900. www.thegrandpaw.com Please see ad on back cover.

VCA - Valley Animal Medical Center 46920 Jefferson St., Indio, 760-342-4711, www. vcavalleyemergency.com

(in Village Park Animal Hospital)

90 Desert Pet Companion

Veterinarians

Village Park Animal Hospital 51-230 Eisenhower Dr., La Quinta, 760-564-3833 www.VillageParkAnimalHospital.com, A full-service, small animal veterinary hospital providing comprehensive medical, surgical and dental care for the life of your pet. Please see ad on p 2.

VCA All Creatures Animal Hospital 78-267 Highway 111 La Quinta, 760-564-1154, www.vcahospitals.com/ all-creatures-ca. We provide comprehensive veterinary care for all species of critter. Please see ad on p 39.

VCA - Valley Animal Medical Center 46920 Jefferson St., Indio, 760-342-4711, www. vcavalleyemergency.com, We are a 24-hour, full-service veterinary hospital and emergency animal medical center in Indio. Animal Samaritans 760-343-3477 Desert Dunes Animal Hospital 760-345-8227

www.PetCompanionMag.com Summer

2016


Pet Boarding & Daycare

desert hot springs Pet Boarding & Daycare

The Grand Paw 51750 Jackson St., Indio, 760-398-9900. www.thegrandpaw.com, Whether you’re looking for pet boarding or doggie day care, your precious pooch will receive the best in pet care at The Grand Paw. Please see ad on back cover.

VCA All Creatures Animal Hospital 78-267 Highway 111 La Quinta, 760-564-1154, www.vcahospitals.com/ all-creatures-ca. We provide comprehensive veterinary care for all species of critter. Please see ad on p 39.

VCA - Valley Animal Medical Center 46920 Jefferson St., Indio, 760-342-4711, www. vcavalleyemergency.com, We offer boarding and daycare, call for information or to make a reservation.

Furrst and Furrmost 68100 Louisan Rd. Desert Hot Springs, 760-409-9226, www.furrstandfurrmost.com, Treat your best friend to a doggone great vacation. By boarding your dog with us, you’ll be provided extraordinary service at great rates. Your dog comes home happy, healthy, and tired! Please see ad on page 32.

Veterinarian

Animal Hospital of Desert Hot Springs 13700 Palm Drive Desert Hot Springs 760-251-1400

Dog Parks Mulligan Dog Park - Indio 45355 Van Buren St., Indio Pioneer Dog Park - La Quinta 45-130 Seeley Dr., La Quinta Fritz Burns Park - La Quinta Corner of Calle Sinaloa (Ave. 52) and Avenida Bermudas near the tennis courts

Resources

Animal Control and licensing is a function of the Coachella Valley Animal Campus. Animal Control Riverside County Animal Services, 72-050 Petland Place, Thousand Palms, (760) 343-3644

Kats Hotel for Dogs & Cats www.dssbykat.com, 760-460-1047 Please see ad on p 33.

Pet Rescue Organizations

Summer 2016

www.PetCompanionMag.com

The Pet Rescue Center 83-496 Avenue 51, Coachella, (760) 398-7722, coachellapetrescuecenter.org. ”Celebrating 16 years of life saving love!” Desert Pet Companion 91


valleywide services

The list below includes businesses that do not necessarily have a brick & mortar location but provide services for the Coachella Valley.

Mobile Veterinarian Veterinarian on the Run Mobile veterinarian 760-898-2627 vetontherun.com

Pet Clubs

Kennel Club of Palm Springs kennelclubpalmsprings.org The Coachella Valley Dog Club www.cvdogclub.com Standard Poodle Club www.spoodles.org

Pet Sitters & Pet Waste Removal Service

Guardian Pet and Home Care, 760-238-1612 www.guardianpetandhomecare.com. Please see ad on p 32.

Retail

Find ‘em Scent Kit 855-346-3368 findemscentkit.com Please see ad on p 38. Let It Shine letitshineshop.com 619-933-2306 Please see ad on p 69. True Tails from the Dog Park www.kariandcarey.com

Grooming School Golden Paws Pet Styling Academy 760-289-8217 Please see ad on p 29.

Services

Emotional Support Animal 760-485-6784, Joanne Williams, LCSW Please see ad on p 61. Farmers Insurance 760-485-3320, Christina Gutierrez

Got Dooky? 866-229-9289, www.gotdooky. com. Founded in 2007, Got Dooky? provides homeowners and their communities with year round professional pet waste removal service. Browse our site to learn more. Please see ad on p 33.

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Paws & Hearts, 760-836-1406 www.pawsandhearts.org Please see ad on p 83. Pets at Rest, 818-388-8867 www.rabbisally.com Please see ad on p 22/23.

Trainers

Best Paw Forward Valerie Masi, 760-885-9450 www.BestPawForwardDogTraining.com Please see ad on p 17.

Dream Dogs Lori Wainio-Carman 45090 Golf Center Parkway Unit B, Indio, 760-899-7272 www.dreamdogs.com Please see ad on p 57. PS Dog Training Ellen Wade, 760-365-2628. www.psdogtraining.com Providing positive, individually tailored dog training services to California’s High and Low Desert areas. Please see ad on p 80.

Resources Living Free Animal Sanctuary 54250 Keen Camp Road, PO Box 5, Mountain Center, CA 92561 (951) 659-4687 living-free.org Please see ad on p 67.

www.PetCompanionMag.com Summer

2016


yucca valley Boarding

Training

Blue Barn Ranch (Horse Boarding Stable) 3070 Yucca Mesa Rd, Yucca Valley, 760-965-6019, bluebarnranch.com

Dog Park

Joshua Tree Pet Resort 63381 Quail Springs Rd, Joshua Tree, 760-9740218, www.joshuatreepetboarding.com

Grooming

The Posh Pooch 56734 Twentynine Palms Highway, Yucca Valley, 760-369-0528, theposhpoochsalon.com Dirty Dog-O-Mat 7305 Apache Trail, Yucca Valley, 760-365-7985, dirtydogomat.com Sandy Paws Pet Grooming 7324 Pioneertown Rd, Yucca Valley, 760-2281233, sandypawsgrooming.org Doggie Style Pet Grooming   55595 Twentynine Palms Highway, Yucca Valley, 760-820-1240, doggroomingyv.com Josie’s Dog Grooming   56881 Twentynine Palms Highway, Yucca Valley, 760-228-2127 Petco Pet Store   58713 Twentynine Palms Highway, Yucca Valley, 760-228-3264

Veterinarian

Companion Animal Clinic 7332 Pioneertown Rd, Yucca Valley 760-228-1474 www.companionanimalclinicca.com VCA Yucca Valley Animal Hospital 57185 Twentynine Palms Highway, Yucca Valley, 760-365-0641 www.vcahospitals.com/yucca-valley

Summer 2016

PS Dog Training, Ellen Wade, 760-365-2628, Providing positive, individually tailored dog training services to California’s High and Low Desert areas. Please see ad on page p 80.

8490 Warren Vista Ave, Yucca Valley

Resources

Morongo Basin Humane Society 4646 Sunview Ave (760) 366-3786 www.mbhumanesociety.com Animal Action League 62762 Twentynine Palms Hwy. Joshua Tree, CA 92252 (760) 366-1100 Provides low cost, quality spay/neuter services for cats and dogs. Our mobile clinic travels throughout the Coachella Valley and Morongo Basin bringing services directly to the communities where pets most desperately need help. Joshua Tree National Park Dogs in Parks Regulations: Although many national park visitors enjoy the companionship of their dog pets when on vacation, dogs are not a beneficial addition to natural ecosystems such as those found in Joshua Tree National Park. While dogs, when accompanied by their owners, are allowed in the park, their activities are restricted by the Code of Federal Regulations: Pets must be restrained on a leash that does not exceed six feet in length, or otherwise be physically confined at all times. 36CFR 2.15 (b)(2): Leaving a pet unattended and tied to an object is prohibited. 36CFR 2.15 (b)(3): Pets are prohibited on trails and beyond 100 feet from legally open roads and campgrounds. Excerpted from: www.us-parks.com/joshua-tree-nationalpark/dogs-in-parks.html

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Desert Pet Companion 93


Pet Boutique and Spa

77920 Country Club Dr., Palm Desert, CA (in the EoS Fitness Plaza) 760

345-8494

this Mentioneceive ad and r A Retail

10% off Pu Full A Groom f f o R O $5 re ee Sto

rchase

S ils* for deta

• Precision

Grooming Onsite

Including scissor cuts and cats!

• Certified Cat Groomer

• Expanded Nutrition Offerings

*Discount available only at Country Club location


A Gift Store for Pet Lovers

189 South Palm Canyon, Palm Springs, CA 760

327-7747

Visit o Palm S ur location prings f pet acc or gifts, essorie and fas s h your fa ion for v furry f orite riend!

Fine Art & Collectibles Authorized Dealer of Sandicast, Sojos, & Ruffwear

www.ColdNoseWarmHeart.com


Profile for PetCompanionMag

Desert Pet Companion, Summer 2016  

The local pet magazine for Southern California's Coachella Valley and surrounding areas.

Desert Pet Companion, Summer 2016  

The local pet magazine for Southern California's Coachella Valley and surrounding areas.