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Inside Canoeists paddling from Ottawa to D.C. community Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

The variety offered at country fairs continues to draw urban and rural visitors. – Page 7

news

A proposed waste recovery centre near Carlsbad Springs has prompted community members to organize opposition. – Page 5

sports

EMC news - A group of Ottawa-area paddlers are making the trek of a lifetime, paddling in a canoe from Ottawa’s Victoria Island to the capital of the U.S.A., Washington, D.C. as a part of the Capital to Capitol by Canoe trip. Covering about 50 kilometres a day, the group will paddle on rivers, lakes, canals, harbours and bays, They’ll cover the St. Lawrence Seaway, Lake Champlain, the Hudson River and Chesapeake Bay, and anticipate arriving in Washington in six weeks. It’s a diverse and varied group that ranges from Westboro canoe adventurer Max Finkelstein and his 13-yearold son Isaac, to American paddlers meeting with the crew along the way. Some of the paddlers have been friends for years, while others are just getting to know each other now as teammates. Their reasons for taking the trip are as diverse as the crew, but they primarily focus on respect for water as a resource and the protection of the waterways and history surrounding them. “What brought us together is, despite our backgrounds, we all recognize water as the most valuable resource,” said paddler Nicholas Tilgner, who has worked as a guide on the Yukon River.

Group members hope they can draw attention to the need to restore the rivers by making the trip, which is supported by the Canadian Wildlife Federation. This includes Canada and the United States working together to have ecologically healthy rivers running between the two countries. Dot Bonnenfant, one of the paddlers, said that there is a forgotten history along many of Canada’s waterways. The group incorporated this information into the official launch, made from Victoria Island on Aug. 5. As the trip is dedicated to Algonquin elder grandfather William Commanda, his daughter, Algonquin elder Evelyne Commanda was at Victoria Island to perform a blessing. Victoria Island was the launch site for the group because it has been the traditional spiritual meeting ground for the Algonquin people for centuries; many of whom travelled the Ottawa River. “This is pretty important history to us, and it’s lost. People take this for granted,” said Glebe resident and former city councillor Clive Doucet as he motioned to the Ottawa River. The first-day paddle saw them travel to Orléans, where they camped at Petrie Island, hosted by volunteer group Friends of Petrie Island. See TRIP, page 3

Brier dodge/metroland

Beacon Hill resident Norm Radford, a retired federal employee, will paddle from Ottawa to Washington, D.C. as a part of the Capital to Capitol project.

Car falls into sinkhole on highway 174 Crews were cleaning pipe before collapse A paralympian reaches a goal at the finish line in London. – Page 28

Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - The peak of rush hour came to a halt on Sept. 4 at 5 p.m. when a car fell into a sinkhole on highway 174. Mayor Jim Watson announced the city found a supplier for 18 sections of sewer pipe needed to fix the damage

caused by the sinkhole two days later, on Sept. 6. The city had difficulty finding a supplier for the 3.6-metre diameter pipe. “I completely understand the aggravation that people are experiencing as everyday life is disrupted by this failure of infrastructure,” Watson said at a press conference. “We fully understand the need to get this fixed as quickly as humanly possible.” The section of pipe under the eastbound lanes of highway 174 was slated for a $1.5-million renewal and crews were on site for the first time cleaning the pipe hours before the sinkhole

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formed. Alain Gonthier, the city’s manager of asset management said there is no indication the crew’s work contributed to the pipe’s collapse. The storm sewer pipe under the westbound lanes is newer, dating to about 1975, and is not at risk of a similar collapse, Gonthier said. The pipe that failed was 50 years old. The sinkhole is located on the eastbound Jeanne d’Arc off-ramp off the highway. One car went into the sinkhole, with the only a portion of the rear bumper left above ground. The sole occupant of the car, a 48-

year-old man, was able to exit the car on his own, and was able to exit the sinkhole with help from bystanders. Fire department spokesperson Marc Messier said the driver told firefighters he noticed a dark spot on the road, but was unsure of what is was, thinking it could be fresh asphalt. “He had started slowing down due to traffic on the on-ramp,” Messier said. “When he got up close to it, he realized it was collapsing and couldn’t stop.” After being treated by paramedics for a minor leg injury, he was released. See REPAIRS, page 3

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012


news

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Trip between capitals Sex assault could be first of its kind reported on

Repairs to highway 174 a priority: Watson

It wasn’t far from home for Beacon Hill’s Norm Radford, who is ready for the entire journey from one capital city to another. Now retired, Radford has participated in long distance cycling trips and is a former marathon runner. He said he’s looking forward “to an adventure of a lifetime (for) such a worthy and important cause.” Group members will change as the trip goes on, with some members joining for certain legs, and other guest paddlers joining in for several days at times. The 11-metre canoe will hold eight to 12 paddlers at a time, and will occasionally leave the water when needed to drive to the next river or passageway on the group’s route. Tourists may be in for a shock they see the canoe approach the New York harbour, which will likely be the most challenging part of the route, said Tilgner, with a sharp contrast to the remote northern routes he is used to navigating. “No one makes this kind of trip, ever. This will be the first time as far as we know, that anyone has ever done this,” Doucet said. “It’s a way of keeping our rivers healthy.”

Continued from front

He declined transportation to hospital. Fire crews and police then off the portion of the highway, as it came to a standstill from the 417-174 split to Montreal Road. After firefighters cleared the area and secured the perimeter, they turned the site over to city crews to determine the source of the problem. City crews were on location into the night to assess the cause of the collapse and begin making repairs. The car moved a few metres down the pipe and was soon settled under the eastbound lanes near the highway median, Gonthier said. The city encourages commuters to take OC Transpo, which will be given priority use of the remaining highway lanes, and stagger commute times to reduce the amount of traffic congestion. The first two sections of pipe were scheduled to arrive in Ottawa on Sept. 7, with the remaining sections shipped throughout this week. The city’s infrastructure manager, Alain Gonthier, said the city does not know how

Jeanne d’Arc

Continued from front

EMC news - Ottawa police are investigating the report of a suspicious incident on Aug. 30 At approximately 8:30 p.m., a 19-year-old woman was walking on Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard towards highway 174 when she was inappropriately touched by a man who walked by her in the opposite direction. The suspect is described as a white male in his mid-30s, 5-foot-6 inches and 180 pounds with medium to dark blonde hair, heavy build and wearing a red short sleeve shirt and blue jeans. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Ottawa police sexual assault/child abuse section at 613236-1222, ext. 5944 or Crime Stoppers at 613-233-8477 (TIPS).

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

3


news

Your Community Newspaper

St. Joseph Boulevard to be closed for 75 days Road construction top issue at business association meeting Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC - The Cardinal Creek Business Association held their second meeting at the Portabello Manor, and heard an update on plans for Trim Road construction and from Invest Ottawa. Joe Mojsej, senior project

manager with the city, gave a presentation on the Trim Road construction. He said it will be a twoyear project, but because only two lanes will be worked on a time, allowing Trim Road to stay open for the duration of the project. In contrast, construction

to St. Joseph Boulevard will cause a 75-day closure to the road from the eastbound highway 174 on-ramp to Taylor Creek Drive. The exact timeline for the road closure is still unknown at the time in that two-year window, he said. Business owners expressed concern that there wouldn’t be enough notice of traffic rerouting, and that they would be surprised by road closures. Mojsej said that some of the past Orléans road closures businesses referred to were

developer-based, while this is a city-run project. He talked about the city’s methods of communication with affected residents and said that there would be specified block captains, or delegates, who would be receiving regular updates. “We’ve been planning this for a year and a half,” Mojsej said of the Trim Road realignment project. He said that the city would take measures to ensure that businesses are still as accessible as possible during the

HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF

time. Projects are fluid, and some timelines and traffic patterns are due to change, Mojsej said. During Ottawa’s Bank Street reconstruction, there were more challenges because the street was much more narrow than Trim Road, and entire sections had to be closed. Biggest risks to delays are unplanned events and realty acquisitions not completed in time, he said. He also answered questions concerning power outages, and explained that occasionally, lines are severed during road construction. He was scheduled to meet with the Cardinal Creek Community Association on Sept. 12 to discuss impact to homeowners. Some homes may have driveways slightly relocated and may experience water disruptions. The Trim Road construction will likely start at the end of September or early October, if contracts can be finalized. The group also heard from Peter Stewart from Invest Ot-

tawa, who is the former executive director of the Orléans Chamber of Commerce. INVEST OTTAWA

Stewart said that since restructuring and renaming the former Ottawa Centre for Research and Innovation (OCRI), the group has become more east-end friendly. Invest Ottawa’s mandate does not exclusively focus on high-tech companies, as OCRI did. Stewart talked about the importance of communication with customers during the Trim Road construction. “What’s really important is that you get it out to customers,” he said. “It’s for your customers, it’s for your business. If they get there and you’re complaining, it’s easier for them to go the other way.” He also talked about different resources that businesses can use, including frequent presentations geared towards small business owners. A full schedule can be found at www.investottawa. ca.

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Orléans man named to Canada’s Senate Jennifer McIntosh

jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

nevil.hunt@metroland.com

EMC news - The pilot of a single-engine plane was able to walk away from an emergency landing in a dirt field on the afternoon of Sept. 5, crediting his training for the safe end of his solo trip. The plane remained upright during the landing, skimming over the hard dirt and the remaining stumps of hundreds of corn stalks that appeared to have been harvested recently. The 1997-model Katana two-seater lost power shortly after takeoff from Ottawa airport, said Ottawa fire department acting district Chief Donald Smith. “He took off on a test flight and had engine trouble and lost power,” Smith said. “He tried to get back to the airport.” The pilot avoided nearby power lines before landing in a plowed section of field northeast of the intersection of Fallowfield and Merivale roads. “He did a great job,” Smith said of the landing, adding there was little damage to the plane and the pilot was feeling fine despite the challenging landing. The male pilot, who did not identify himself, was wearing a shirt with an Ottawa Aviation Services logo when he walked out of the field.

The pilot of a small, singleengine plane, in red, walks away after an emergency landing in a Nepean corn field on Sept. 5. The pilot was the sole occupant and was uninjured. Nevil Hunt/metroland

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EMC news - Thanh Hai Ngo was one of five people recently appointed to the Canadian Senate. Ngo was one of two appointees from Ontario and is the first Vietnamese-Canadian senator in Canadian history. The Orleans man is a former teacher and was chair of the Employment Insurance Board of Referees and a citizenship judge. Ngo immigrated to Canada after fleeing the communist takeover in Vietnam. He remains active in various Vietnamese communities across the country. He founded the Ottawa Vietnamese Non-Profit Residence Corporation which provides housing with rents geared to income for seniors and low-income families. Ngo is also co-founder of the International Committee

for a Free Vietnam – Canada chapter. He served as the president of the Vietnamese Community Association of Ottawa and as a board member and vice-president of the Canadian Assessment and Placement Centre, Employment Centre for New Immigrants. Since being elected to government five years ago, Prime Minister Stephen Harper has appointed 50 senators. Tobias Enverga Jr. was the other senator appointed from Ontario. Thomas Johnson McInnis was appointed in Nova Scotia, Diane Bellemare in Quebec and Paul McIntyre in New Brunswick. “It is a pleasure to announce the appointment of these five distinguished Canadians to the Senate of Canada,” Prime Minister Harper said in a press release. “Their broad range of experience and dedication to community will further strengthen the institution and benefit the entire country.”

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

5


news

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Kiwanis Idol hosts competition at Place d’Orléans Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - One Orléans singer made the top 11 performers at the Kiwanis Idol competition held at Place d’Orléans on Sept. 1 and 2. Michelle Treacy, 16, qualified for the top 11 singers in the competition after the round of 22, held on Sept. 1. The top 22 singers were chosen after earlier auditions held at the Merivale Mall in July and August.

It wasn’t the first year for Treacy to take part in the annual talent competition; she performed in the Kiwanis Idol Red Carpet Concert that took place on June 30 at Scotiabank Place with the top singers from the 2011 competition. She placed in the top five in the 2011 competition, and qualified for the top 22 in 2010. Treacy said she enjoys performing a wide range of songs, but her idol is Lady Gaga. “I like her messages that

she sends out,” she said. “She taught me that even if there are five people watching, always perform like you’re in front of 30,000.” She hopes to one day be performing for 30,000 people, with a dream of one day selling out Madison Square Garden in New York City. She’s already crossed over the border to expand her music career, just returning from a month in Los Angeles to network and work with different producers.

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Using Skype, she’s been able to co-write her own songs with writers as far away as Australia. “Now I’m trying to really write my own music by myself and see how that goes,” she said, adding that she’d love to sing one of her own songs at a future showcase at Scotiabank Place. “I’m working very hard, I’m going to get that dream one day,” Treacy said. “It’s going to happen, no doubt in my mind.” Orléans’ Meaghan LaGrandeur, 21, had also qualified for the top 22 singers who performed on Sept. 1. The competition was won by Ally Maheral, 16, of Munster Hamlet.

Michelle Treacy, 16, qualified for the top 11 at the Kiwanis Idol competition held Sept. 1 and 2 at Place d’Orléans. Submitted

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

ottawa.ca


NEWS

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Agricultural fairs still ticket to fun in rural Ottawa Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

C VI

R TO

, IA

BC

FILE PHOTO

Ottawa’s rural fairs provide urban visitors an opportunity to see and do things they otherwise might never experience in the city. Metcalfe Fair spokesperson Cheryl Cooper said that as more children grow up in apartment buildings and high-density areas, its important to expose them to rural and agricultural traditions. In Ottawa’s rural areas, involvement in the 4-H clubs that give kids hands-on agricultural experiences have remained steady. Cooper said the Metcalfe area’s participation rates, particularly in the dairy sector, are as high as they’ve ever been, if not higher. She said part of the fair’s strength comes from its adaptability. The Metcalfe Fair will celebrate 156 years this September – an anniversary that predates both the city of Ottawa and the formation of Canada. While it has stuck to its rural roots with horse, cattle and sheep shows every day, a fiddle and step-dance competition and popular competitions for best pie, biggest pumpkin and best quilt (among many other categories), it has also embraced what modern audiences want, said Osgoode Coun. Doug Thompson. “I find the executives are very progressive minded, they’re always looking to the

future. New attractions, they’re always looking for new ideas,� he said. The fair has added a popular demolition derby that draws crowds on the fair’s opening night, and over the years has added attractions like a fashion show, tractor pulls and lawnmower races. This year it will add a classic car show and a truck pull, and has adopted the marketing motto, ‘Make it your fair.’ The Arnprior Fair, which took place August 9 to 12, also features a demolition derby and truck and tractor pulls alongside the traditional livestock and exhibit halls. The Navan Fair, which ran the same weekend, added a ladies’ minivan class to their demolition derby this year. The Richmond Fair, which takes place Sept. 13 to 16, even has a BMX bike show in their lineup, as well as a youth talent show. Cooper said this flexibility attracts new audiences and

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maintains interest with returning patrons. However some fairs have a different strategy. Carp Fair general manager

Joyce Trafford said the west end agricultural fair has opted not to add modern attractions like a demolition derby or tractor pull, although it does

NOCO Fuels Canada awarded Esso branded Fuels and Lubricants reseller business for Eastern Ontario by Imperial Oil A recent investment by a family owned company is making business news in Eastern Ontario. NOCO Canada, a family owned and locally operated company has been serving Canada’s energy needs for decades. The company is leveraging their rich heritage in the business with an expansion of their fuel and lubricant operations into the Trenton and Ottawa areas. As a proud Esso and Mobil branded reseller, NOCO supplies heating oil, gasoline, diesel, and lubricants to serve residential, farm, commercial, and industrial customers. “With almost eighty years of experience in the energy business, we are honoured to have the opportunity to serve the hard working consumers of this region,â€? noted Mark Yeatman, General Manager of NOCO Fuels Canada, a wholly owned subsidiary of NOCO Canada. With this expansion, NOCO has established more local ofďŹ ces to efďŹ ciently and safely deliver high-quality products at competitive prices. With ofďŹ ce locations in Toronto, Trenton, Ottawa and Pembroke, NOCO simpliďŹ es access for their customers by allowing them to get all of their products from one place. One major change customers will see is the elimination of a national call center. By establishing local ofďŹ ces and working with local personnel, NOCO is keeping business local and investing in communities. Other improved operations include online ordering and automatic payments, with online billpay coming soon. NOCO’s customers can expect the prompt, courteous, and dependable service they deserve. As the second largest Mobil distributor in North America, NOCO’s expansion has created a stronger product mix to more completely serve their customers. The company provides a full line of Mobil lubricants for automotive, eet, industrial, metalworking, and specialty needs. NOCO also offers a used oil recycling program in some areas to make sure that businesses never need to worry about the proper collection, transportation, and processing of the waste they generate. “We believe the addition of the new products and new geography allows NOCO to address unmet consumer needs in the territory. Along with our key product brands, Mobil and Esso, we offer excellent service and local personnel. Our distribution model is strong and this new venture will provide strong value to the consumers throughout the region,â€? said James D. Newman, President of NOCO Canada. For more information, visit noco.ca or call 1-888-284-7777.

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OrlĂŠans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

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EMC news – We may be living in an increasingly urban world, but the rural fair isn’t going anywhere – at least not in Ottawa. Indeed, the educational opportunities at agricultural fairs are even more important than ever, according to Metcalfe Fair spokesperson Cheryl Cooper. She said that as more kids grow up in the city, rural agricultural fairs play an important role in showing the next generation where their food comes from. “Fifty or 75 years ago most people came from a farm. Now we need to actively teach that (farm knowledge),� she said. “Not everybody has the opportunity...to grow vegetables or to see a giant pumpkin.� The Metcalfe Fair offers an annual ‘Barn Door Exhibit’ that welcomes schoolchildren to see and touch the produce that ends up on their dinner tables. Livestock farmers bring their cows, sheep, pigs, rabbits and chickens and other producers showcase their grains, wool and other items that most kids would rarely see. And it’s not just rural families coming to the fair. Cooper said that as the idea of eating locally takes hold, more and more urban families are bringing their kids to the weekly farmers’ market and to the annual fair to see first hand what farmers do. “Certainly they’re bringing their families and they want their children to learn where their food is coming from. It’s not just for the rides and the midway,� she said. The city’s environmental movement is leading this charge to embrace local produce. Savour Ottawa is a collaboration of area farmers that provides a resource for consumers looking to buy local, sustainable food. The theme for Ecology Ottawa’s 2012 Eco Gala in October is ‘Celebrate Local Harvests’ and will include a four-course meal sourced from local producers. A new farmers’ market popped up in Manotick this summer to promote local and sustainable produce.

have a midway and evening entertainment. She said maintaining the focus on the fair’s rural traditions is more important than ever. “The exhibitors of livestock are getting less and less, but there’s more and more people who need to know where their food is coming from. So we’re educating people that way,� she said. She said the fair’s biggest challenge is the encroachment of subdivisions and development. “At one time we were sitting pretty in the town of Carp, and we weren’t totally surrounded by houses,� she said. “There are subdivisions around every agricultural ground now. So we, the organizers of agricultural fairs, are growing (but) we have to work within our boundaries of being landlocked.� The Carp fair, for the time being, has solved this problem by limiting on-site parking and shuttling visitors to the fair from off-site parking instead. Cooper said no matter the challenges, area fairs are still going strong – and Metcalfe’s especially. “We’re the oldest and certainly the last fair of the year,� she said. “As other agricultural events have seen their end, we took on the regional shows ... and that gives us some added strength.�

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OPINION

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EDITORIAL

Get electoral boundary changes right

U

ndertaking the task of re-drawing federal electoral boundaries is surely daunting, but it serves to ensure all Canadians are as equitably represented in the House of Commons as possible. While the recent announcement of a proposed federal electoral map makes several positive moves for voters in the city of Ottawa, it also fails to address an issue that many residents of this city can relate

to: the urban-suburban-rural divides. The total number of electoral districts required in Ontario has grown by 15 to 121, triggered by 2011 census data showing this province’s population has grown by more than 1.4 million since 2001. According to the proposal created by a federal electoral boundaries commission, a number of new ridings have been created in areas of dramatic population growth across the province. Some ex-

isting riding boundaries have likewise been adjusted. Among them are the proposed new riding of Nepean and the renamed riding of Carleton-Kanata, formerly Carleton-Mississippi Mills. There are positive aspects to both of these moves, but they were easy decisions to make. Move the western border of the renamed Carleton-Kanata riding to the city limits, break off the well-populated suburban chunk of the massive Nepean-Carleton riding and

name it Nepean. Job done. But there are missed opportunities here. Residents in rural places like Carp, Fitzroy Harbour and Dunrobin are still at the mercy of the suburban voters in Kanata. The voices of voters in Dwyer Hill, North Gower and Metcalfe are still drowned out by residents of Stittsville, Riverside South and Greely – larger, denser suburban nooks in what is mainly a rural riding. The situation is slightly dif-

ferent in the east end, where pockets of voters in places like Cumberland, Carlsbad Springs, Vars and Sarsfield remain in the sprawling Glengarry-Prescott-Russell riding, despite the fact they pay city property taxes. These examples stand out as missed opportunities for the commission, opportunities to ensure voters receive fair, balanced representation in the House of Commons. Presently, it must be difficult for an MP, such as

Nepean-Carleton’s Pierre Poilievre or Carleton-Mississippi Mills’ Gordon O’Connor to balance the way they represent their constituents. They are beholden to two different viewpoints, but one of those viewpoints gets them elected, the other – owing to their smaller numbers – doesn’t. The federal electoral boundaries commission should be doing its utmost to make this balancing act easier for our elected officials, so they can serve an electorate with common concerns. If it involves redrawing the entire Ottawa electoral map to ensure the population is balanced, so be it.

COLUMN

Giving a nod to the wave CHARLES GORDON Funny Town

W

aving is important. We don’t do it enough either. The other day, in one of those inevitable construction lineups on Highway 7, I watched the guy in front of me wave to the flagman as we started moving after a long delay. The flagman waved back. I waved too. He waved back at me. It was nice. Now, what did it mean? What were we all saying to each other? The guy in front, was he saying “thanks for waving me on, for changing the STOP sing to the SLOW sign�? Or was he saying: “No hard feelings: it’s not your fault I had to sit here for five minutes.� Or was he saying: “Thanks for standing out in the hot sun all day so that all of us don’t go crunching into some construction machinery?� What about the flag guy? Was he saying “thanks for being so patient� or was he saying “thanks for waving?� It could have been any or all of that, or none of it. Probably what mattered most of all was that we were human beings acknowledging that we’re all in this together, which, when you think about it, we don’t do often enough. On our lakes there is an old tradition that people in boats wave at people in other boats as they pass. Who knows what that means, perhaps something about members of the community of boaters saluting each other. The funny thing is you notice it when it doesn’t happen. And if it does happen, it can change the way you think about the other boater. Say he’s driving some great big noisy overpowered ocean liner of a boat that you think

has no business being on a lake this size. And as you’re thinking that, he gives you a friendly wave. Oh well, you think, at least he waved. Waving is a connection. Sometimes it’s an unpleasant connection, such as the well-known one-finger wave which usually occurs in traffic. Other times the connection is fleeting and distant. Children wave at a passing train. Passengers wave back. What does it mean for either of them? Yet they couldn’t not do it. The wave as “thank you� figures prominently in our daily lives. You know the situation: You’re coming out of a gas station or a side street into a heavy stream of traffic and somebody slows to let you in. When you are safely into the traffic, you wave your thanks. With your whole hand. And you mean it. Without people like that, willing to give up a few seconds of their busy lives, we’d be living in chaos, gridlock interrupted by some people barging into traffic and others slamming on their brakes. There would be a lot more one-finger waving then. The funny thing is that, even though the sacrifice we make in letting someone in is tiny, we still expect to be thanked for it. We want to see that wave. When we don’t, we are annoyed. “Wave, dammit,� we mutter from behind the steering wheel. The same thing goes for when we hold open a door for someone. It’s certainly no trouble, but we expect thanks for it. It may be sheer vanity but it may also be that we like people to acknowledge that we exist. Such acknowledgement is all the more important in an age when so many of our dealings are with computers, robots and other gizmos that know us only as a number, if at all. So we wave our thanks and feel thankful for waves. Mind you, for some of us, no thanks are required. Simply doing the good deed is reward enough. Those would be the saints among us. Too bad more of us are not like that, but then we’d all be saints and who would we look up to? And who would we look down at?

Editorial Policy The OrlĂŠans EMC welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at www.yourottawaregion.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to patricia.lonergan@metroland.com , fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to The OrlĂŠans EMC, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa ON, K2E 7L2.

ORLÉANS

Published weekly by:

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57 Auriga Drive, Suite 103 Ottawa, ON, K2E 8B2 613-723-5970 Vice President & Regional Publisher: Mike Mount Group Publisher: Duncan Weir Regional General Manager: Peter Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary Regional Managing Editor: Ryland Coyne 0UBLISHER-IKE4RACYMTRACY PERFPRINTCA

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Web Poll THIS WEEKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S POLL QUESTION

PREVIOUS POLL SUMMARY

Following the highway 174 sinkhole, are you worried about the state of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infrastructure?

Do you agree with the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision to cut most of its advisory committees?

A) Yes. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be wary of Ottawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roads and bridges from now on.

B) No. This was an isolated incident, not necessarily a sign of bigger problems. C) Perhaps. If the city fails to take appropriate action, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be very worried. D) I think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a better chance of being struck by lightning than I do of falling in a sinkhole.

A) Yes. With more ways available for residents to interact with the city, they arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as relevant now.

33%

B) I agree there were too many committees, but the cuts went too far.

12%

C) No. The committees are a valuable way for the public to interact with the city.

22%

D) I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even know they existed.

33%

To vote in our web polls, visit us at www.yourottawaregion.com/community/cityofottawa

Dave Pennett - Ottawa West - 221-6209 Dave Badham - Orleans - 688-1652 Cindy Manor - Ottawa South - 688-1478 Geoff Hamilton - Ottawa East - 688-1488 Valerie Rochon - Barrhaven - 688-1669 Jill Martin - Nepean - 688-1665 Mike Stoodley - Stittsville - 688-1675 Stephanie Jamieson - Renfrew - 432-3655 Dave Gallagher - Renfrew - 432-3655 ,ESLIE/SBORNE !RNPRIOR7#   Emily Warren - Ottawa West - 688-1659 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SALES: Sharon Russell - 613-688-1483 Kevin Cameron - 613-221-6224 Adrienne Barr - 613-623-6571

EDITORIAL: Managing Editor: Patricia Lonergan 613-221-6261 patricia.lonergan@metroland.com NEWS EDITOR Nevil Hunt nevil.hunt@metroland.com 613-221-6235 REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER: Brier Dodge brier.dodge@metroland.com 613-221-6235 POLITICAL REPORTER: Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com 613-221-6162

Member of: Ontario Community Newspapers Association, Canadian Community, Newspapers Association, Ontario Press Council, Association of Free Community Papers

OrlĂŠans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

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OPINION

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Be our guest for a week!

Let the kids fail

From September 17 to 23 you are invited to participate in our aquaďŹ tness, cycling/ spinningÂŽ and group ďŹ tness classes or workout in our ďŹ tness centres FREE of charge! Come give us a try and see how Ottawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services can become a part of your daily, active living routine.

Capital Muse

Not sure where to start? Take a look at what each of our participating recreation complexes has to offer by visiting www.ottawa.ca/tryit . Select the facility you wish to visit and see the impressive list of options available to you. Need more of a personal touch to navigate through all this? Drop into a recreation complex in your neighbourhood and ďŹ nd out how we can meet your ďŹ tness needs and preferences. Our knowledgeable staff will gladly take the time to introduce you to all the exciting programs and ďŹ tness options available to you. Our certiďŹ ed ďŹ tness instructors are focused on customer service and work hard to meet the needs of their community. Joining our ďŹ tness programs is the ďŹ rst important step to managing your health. The beneďŹ ts associated with exercising on a regular basis are undeniable; from lowering blood pressure and cholesterol, keeping chronic diseases at bay to boosting vitality. Make ďŹ tness an essential part of your healthy lifestyle. Through the City of Ottawa, ďŹ tness is affordable and available to all age groups and mobility levels. The City offers a wide range of programs to ďŹ t everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lifestyle and our Hand in Hand program offers ďŹ nancial support to ensure all residents can participate in our programs. Our ďŹ&#x201A;exible membership options do not require a year-long contract nor do we charge a registration fee. Looking for something different? Prefer to take a specialty program? We also offer a wide range of registration-based classes that will suit your fancy. We invite you to try before you buy and discover a new and healthy you! www.ottawa.ca/tryit

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adults -- as measured by their ability to hold down jobs or acquire post-secondary degrees -- while others seem stuck in the endless cycle of generational poverty. Tough cites a number of sociological experiments that suggest that emphasizing things like problem-solving, empathy and morals early on can make all the difference. To put my own spin on his findings, it would seem that kids who face adversity, but are taught ways to deal with it, emerge with a lot more â&#x20AC;&#x153;grit,â&#x20AC;? to use Toughâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s word, which is essentially the resilience to deal with lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sometimes harsh realities. On the other hand, those who face daily adversity in an unsupportive environment and those sheltered from failure â&#x20AC;&#x201C; such as the majority of kids in middle-class families â&#x20AC;&#x201C; donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to have what it takes to eventually become well-functioning adults. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s difficult to say how much impact parents can have on their childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s character development. Given the number of external influences that contribute to the shaping of personality, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s likely minimal. But at the very least, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth thinking about how to provide opportunities for our kids to botch something completely once in a while. Flat cupcakes may just be a good place to start.

Be our guest From September 17 to 23 youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re invited to participate in our aquafitness, cycling and group fitness classes or workout in our fitness centre FREE of charge! Try before you buy and discover the way to a new and healthy you! Visit a participating facility near you:   

   Complex - OrlĂŠans 613-824-0819      613-830-2747      613-742-6767  " 613-748-4222

For the complete list, visit PRCS 201205-301

between our ability to sink or swim as adults. In How Children Succeed, Tough provides an overview of neurological and psychological research studies that seem to suggest how well we eventually cope â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in school, work and society -- comes down to certain personality traits we acquire as children â&#x20AC;&#x201C; notably, curiosity, persistence, grit, self-control, delayed gratification and conscientiousness. Unlike cognitive skills that can typically be taught through rote learning and measured by IQ and standardized tests, these non-cognitive functions are harder to assess and perhaps even more difficult to teach. As the above cupcake example demonstrates, fostering these personality traits can take time. And it can be difficult, if not impossible, to acquire these skills in our middle-class world where there seems to be no room for failure. The paradox â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and the subject of Toughâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book, which is essentially about education reform in the United States -- is that a lot of kids face adversity every day. Poverty, violence and substance-abuse are the norm for many children. What Tough sought to figure out is why some kids in these environments emerge to become highly functional

BRYNNA LESLIE

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A

friend recently posted on Facebook that her four-year-old son botched a batch of cupcakes for his playgroup. To ward off disappointment, she baked another batch on the sly and allowed her son to pass them off as his own. He proudly marched into the playgroup party the following afternoon, bragging about his newly-acquired baking skills, none-the-wiser about his momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stealth cooking exercise. Reactions from our mutual friends ranged from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so sweet!â&#x20AC;? to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the best mom ever!â&#x20AC;? But I think she missed a golden opportunity. What if, instead of protecting him from his failure, she had told him overtly that he had failed? What if they had spent the next half hour discussing the reasons why the cupcakes didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rise in the oven? What if they had tried to find ways to make the failed batch into something successful â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a little icing to hide the flat tops, perhaps? What if they had baked the second batch together to see if they could correct their mistakes from the first round? The takeaways from this innocent little baking exercise could have been far more rewarding. Like science experiments, cooking offers a chance to learn how to deal with failure in a relatively safe space. And according to a new book by author and Canadian-born journalist Paul Tough, learning to handle adversity when weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re young may mark the difference

An active population makes for a healthy community so twice a year the City of Ottawa opens the doors to our ďŹ tness facilities! All residents are invited to enjoy a group exercise class and our ďŹ tness conditioning centres free of charge. Discover all the great programs and ďŹ tness amenities available in your own community.

ottawa.ca/tryit

OrlĂŠans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

9


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Students hold benefit concert for former music teacher Fundraiser to help pay for music therapy Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - After undergoing major brain surgery, friends and family of an Old Ottawa South music teacher want to use music to help her on the road to recovery. The benefit concert is in honour of former Hopewell Avenue Public School music teacher Allison Woyiwada and will look to raise money to help with medical expenses and post-surgery therapy costs. The concert will take place at the Southminster United Church on Sept. 22 and the money raised will help to pay for therapy and accommodation costs at the restorative program at Saint-Vincent Hospital. Woyiwada’s daughter, Marya Woyiwada, has rallied her mother’s friends, family, former students and colleagues to help. “I sent everybody an email and didn’t have a single person say no,” Marya said. “I have no real monetary goal set for the concert, I am just hoping lots of people would open their hearts and wallets and help provide her the best rehabilitation possible.” Marya said that without fundraising, her mother has few options available for therapy. “Nothing is really covered, aside from her hospital stay, everything

SUBMITTED

When Allison Wayiwada retired from Hopewell Avenue Public School in 2008 her students awarded her with an Oscar. A benefit concert on Sept. 22 will be held in honour of the former music teacher to aid in the costs associated with post-aneurysm surgery. has to be paid out of pocket,” she said. Woyiwada taught for 28 years at Hopewell before retiring in 2008. The passionate music teacher continued to pursue her love for music

with performances and directing for the Savoy Society of Ottawa. She was diagnosed with a brain aneurysm in December 2011 and underwent surgery in May. Since the surgery, Marya said the road to

FUTSAL (INDOOR SOCCER) FIFA ONLY INDOOR RULES

REGISTRATION BOYS-GIRLS-WOMEN-MEN-COED ALL AGES CALL (613) 692-1235 or visit www.futsalottawa.com Playing Futsal will enable coaches and the players to raise the level of their game. Futsal is the fundamental training in most Brazilian leagues and throughout South America. The focus on footwork, speed with the ball and quick feet, qualities that lack in most North American soccer players. Playing Futsal will enable the players to get more touches on the ball, which in turn will improve their long term development. The majority of possessions in Futsal are quick 1 or 2 touch combinations with teammates. The game rewards players who keep their head up, who control the ball, who support their team mates and who use one and two touch combination play to work with team mates. Come out and learn why futsal is recognized as the best way to teach the proper fundamentals of soccer and is the only type of indoor soccer endorsed by FIFA.

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

recovery has been tough and watching her mother’s ordeal, Woyiwada wants to ensure once she is released from the hospital the best type of care is waiting for her. “It has been like two steps for-

ward and then two steps back,” she said. “It has felt a little bit like a rollercoaster ride.” Former student and trumpeter Nick Cochrane will be among those performing at the concert. “I immediately wanted to help,” he said. “I know with the years of teaching she has been involved with so many students, I can’t imagine it will be a problem to get people to the concert, or contribute to the cause.” It was when he was in Woyiwada’s class that he first picked up the trumpet. Now more than 12 years later as a graduate of the University of Ottawa’s music program, Cochrane said he credits his former teacher for the inspiration to pursue a career in music. “Studying with her has given me a really solid foundation and encouragement to keep playing,” Cochrane said. “The amount of benefit I got, from the work she did when I was a student, defied expectation.” Cochrane will not be the only former student performing. The Hopewell school jazz band will perform the opening number at the concert. Tickets for the concert can be purchased at the Ottawa Folklore Centre or online at woyiwada.blogspot.ca, where a full list of the performers is available. The concert begins at 7 p.m. A trust account has also been established for Allison and donations can be made payable to Robert McMechan, marked “in trust for Allison”, 28 Glengarry Rd., Ottawa, K1S 0L5.


news

Your Community Newspaper

Orléans man named to Canada’s Senate Jennifer McIntosh

jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

nevil.hunt@metroland.com

EMC news - The pilot of a single-engine plane was able to walk away from an emergency landing in a dirt field on the afternoon of Sept. 5, crediting his training for the safe end of his solo trip. The plane remained upright during the landing, skimming over the hard dirt and the remaining stumps of hundreds of corn stalks that appeared to have been harvested recently. The 1997-model Katana two-seater lost power shortly after takeoff from Ottawa airport, said Ottawa fire department acting district Chief Donald Smith. “He took off on a test flight and had engine trouble and lost power,” Smith said. “He tried to get back to the airport.” The pilot avoided nearby power lines before landing in a plowed section of field northeast of the intersection of Fallowfield and Merivale roads. “He did a great job,” Smith said of the landing, adding there was little damage to the plane and the pilot was feeling fine despite the challenging landing. The male pilot, who did not identify himself, was wearing a shirt with an Ottawa Aviation Services logo when he walked out of the field.

The pilot of a small, singleengine plane, in red, walks away after an emergency landing in a Nepean corn field on Sept. 5. The pilot was the sole occupant and was uninjured. Nevil Hunt/metroland

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“If you’re trained well, you can land it well,” is all the pilot would say before departing. Smith said the Transportation Safety Board has been informed of the emergency landing and will investigate.

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Nevil Hunt

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EMC news - Thanh Hai Ngo was one of five people recently appointed to the Canadian Senate. Ngo was one of two appointees from Ontario and is the first Vietnamese-Canadian senator in Canadian history. The Orleans man is a former teacher and was chair of the Employment Insurance Board of Referees and a citizenship judge. Ngo immigrated to Canada after fleeing the communist takeover in Vietnam. He remains active in various Vietnamese communities across the country. He founded the Ottawa Vietnamese Non-Profit Residence Corporation which provides housing with rents geared to income for seniors and low-income families. Ngo is also co-founder of the International Committee

for a Free Vietnam – Canada chapter. He served as the president of the Vietnamese Community Association of Ottawa and as a board member and vice-president of the Canadian Assessment and Placement Centre, Employment Centre for New Immigrants. Since being elected to government five years ago, Prime Minister Stephen Harper has appointed 50 senators. Tobias Enverga Jr. was the other senator appointed from Ontario. Thomas Johnson McInnis was appointed in Nova Scotia, Diane Bellemare in Quebec and Paul McIntyre in New Brunswick. “It is a pleasure to announce the appointment of these five distinguished Canadians to the Senate of Canada,” Prime Minister Harper said in a press release. “Their broad range of experience and dedication to community will further strengthen the institution and benefit the entire country.”

Plane lands in cornfield

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

11


news

Your Community Newspaper

Kiwanis Idol hosts competition at Place d’Orléans Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - One Orléans singer made the top 11 performers at the Kiwanis Idol competition held at Place d’Orléans on Sept. 1 and 2. Michelle Treacy, 16, qualified for the top 11 singers in the competition after the round of 22, held on Sept. 1. The top 22 singers were chosen after earlier auditions held at the Merivale Mall in July and August.

It wasn’t the first year for Treacy to take part in the annual talent competition; she performed in the Kiwanis Idol Red Carpet Concert that took place on June 30 at Scotiabank Place with the top singers from the 2011 competition. She placed in the top five in the 2011 competition, and qualified for the top 22 in 2010. Treacy said she enjoys performing a wide range of songs, but her idol is Lady Gaga. “I like her messages that

she sends out,” she said. “She taught me that even if there are five people watching, always perform like you’re in front of 30,000.” She hopes to one day be performing for 30,000 people, with a dream of one day selling out Madison Square Garden in New York City. She’s already crossed over the border to expand her music career, just returning from a month in Los Angeles to network and work with different producers.

The Children’s Aid Society Ottawa recruiting volunteer volunteer drivers for longThe Children’s Aid of Society ofisOttawa is recruiting term assignments. be 18 yearsCandidates of age and must be available drivers forCandidates long–termmust assignments. be 18 to commit years for a minimum of one year. of age and be available to commit for a minimum of

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Using Skype, she’s been able to co-write her own songs with writers as far away as Australia. “Now I’m trying to really write my own music by myself and see how that goes,” she said, adding that she’d love to sing one of her own songs at a future showcase at Scotiabank Place. “I’m working very hard, I’m going to get that dream one day,” Treacy said. “It’s going to happen, no doubt in my mind.” Orléans’ Meaghan LaGrandeur, 21, had also qualified for the top 22 singers who performed on Sept. 1. The competition was won by Ally Maheral, 16, of Munster Hamlet.

Michelle Treacy, 16, qualified for the top 11 at the Kiwanis Idol competition held Sept. 1 and 2 at Place d’Orléans. Submitted

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For more information please contact André Fontaine at (613) 747‐7800 ext 2516 or andre.fontaine@casott.on.ca.

2012026014

The Order of Ottawa

City Council has created the Order of Ottawa as a way of recognizing excellence in our community. Nominate a deserving resident by October 10, 2012. Visit ottawa.ca/orderofottawa 0906_R0011596208

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

ottawa.ca


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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

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news

Your Community Newspaper

Police chief tours Beacon Hill-Cyrville Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

Ottawa’s #1 Ranked Soccer Club

Pictured with OSU President, Bill Michalopulos are the winners of the annual OSU Graduate Bursary Award. Pictured from left to right are: Heather Ogilvie (Carleton University), Shannon Magee (Carleton University), Edson Lai (Queens University), Megan Lawson (Trent University). Missing Gord Goodkey (Carleton University).

EMC news - Ottawa police Chief Charles Bordeleau got a tour of the Beacon Hill-Cyrville ward from Coun. Tim Tierney on Aug. 31. The tour took two-and-a-half hours and covered a range of issues in the ward. “We basically went around the ward and I collected feedback from residents on where they figured some of the hot spots were,” Tierney said. Overall, Tierney said the top concern in the ward is speeding. On Sept. 4, he said he noticed an increased police presence in several residential areas that complained of speeding, most of which were also school zones. They also discussed fast traffic on Blair Road, specifically between Ogilvie and Montreal roads. “Obviously number one on the list is speeding,” Tierney said. “I highlighted a few.” They also visited the NCC-owned boat launch on Blair Road, where late-night noise has been an issue. Tierney said it’s just usual teenage shenanigans on Friday and Saturday evenings, but they discussed the idea of patrol cars doing checks on a more regular

Submitted

Beacon Hill-Cyrville Coun. Tim Tierney, right, and Ottawa police Chief Charles Bordeleau complete a ridealong through the ward on Aug. 31 to highlight some minor issues. basis. Along Cyrville Road, several businesses have dealt with recent break and enters. They went to one of the businesses that had suffered a break-in, M&T Glass. They discussed options to make break and enters more avoidable, such as put-

ting up extra lighting in outdoor areas – something M&T Glass has since done. Tierney said the ride long was productive and he’s confident the chief is up to date on issues in the Beacon Hill-Cyrville area. “He’s very concerned and he does follow up,” Tierney said.

s cket i t 2 for rom w F a r ! a D hin to C

The $500 individual bursary is given annually to long time OSU players who over time have demonstrated outstanding community service, an academic orientation, excellent team participation qualities and who will be attending a higher academic institution in the year of their high school graduation. OSU is very proud of this year’s recipients and wished them the club’s best wishes for their future.

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Sugar bowl was sometimes lacking Take a Veteran to Dinner MARY COOK T here was no doubt about it, Father needed a new suit. The only one he owned was threadbare, and even though he hadn’t grown an inch, the cuffs on the legs were above his ankles. No doubt because Mother had tried to wash it one Monday and now even the sleeves were too short. There was no getting around it. He needed a new suit, and the ad in the weekly Renfrew Mercury was just what the doctor ordered – three pieces for $14. Father said there was no money for such frivolity. Mother said going to the Lutheran Church on Sunday dressed like a tramp, raised the purchase well above frivolity. I knew Mother had waited until the big wood box of hand-me-downs had come from Aunt Lizzie in Regina to make sure there wouldn’t be something suitable from Uncle Jack. But as always, whatever Uncle Jack once wore had to be severely altered before it would fit Father. Uncle Jack was about Father’s height, but there the similarity ended. My sister Audrey said he looked like a pineapple. I have no idea how she knew what a pineapple looked like, because I never knew one to come into the house, but I did know Uncle Jack was more round than long. His arms were huge and hung well below his hips, and it always looked like he was carrying a bag of grain under his jacket. Without altering the suit, you could put at least two of Father in it. Now Mother, when she moved to the farm out in Northcote, tried her best to master the old pedal Singer sewing machine and she did

Mary Cook’s Memories well on simple things like clothes for Audrey and me, making aprons and even simple house dresses out of Dan River cotton, but when it came to trying to make Father fit into one of Uncle Jack’s suits, she failed miserably.

barns and Mother made sure my sister Audrey and I kept up with what was expected of us in the house too. But you’d think we were all getting a new outfit, not just Father, as the day of this major purchase drew closer.

It would be a long time before the blue sugar bowl had in it enough for what Father called a frivolity like a new suit. Sunday morning saw him at the Lutheran Church in the same old suit he had worn for years. It always ended up that the suits, after being taken apart, became jumpers or skirts for my sister and me. The Mercury had come in the middle of the week and Mother said there was just about enough money in the blue sugar bowl in the back-to-the-wall cupboard to buy the suit. What was lacking would be made up when Mother peddled her eggs, butter and chickens on Saturday in Renfrew. So it was decided Saturday was the day Father would be getting his new $14 suit. The excitement ran high that week in our old log house in Northcote. That didn’t mean we could ease off on the workload. Chores were done as usual morning and night in the

Mother took the blue sugar bowl out of the cupboard a few days before we were to head into Renfrew. She dumped the coins out on the kitchen table with a couple crumpled $1 bills. Then she moved the money over to the top of the ice box and stacked the coins in little piles on top of the bills. The blue sugar bowl went back into the cupboard. She figured she’d have to sell at least four chickens, five or six pounds of butter, and six dozen eggs to make up the difference between what was sitting on the ice-box and what the suit would cost. The day before we were to head into Renfrew, just before we were to sit down to eat at noon, Father came

into the kitchen with a long piece of harness in his hands. He stood silently at the back door, never taking his eyes off it. “Broke. Just as I was putting it on Queenie. This is the piece I have fixed at least a dozen times. I’m afraid it won’t take another fixing. Can’t use the team without it.” He didn’t have to say any more. Mother went to the ice box and slid the coins into her hand with the bills. She looked at it for a minute and walked over to the door and handed it to Father. It would take just about all of it to replace the worn-out harness that should have been replaced long before. Horses and their harness meant survival back in the 1930s. A farmer couldn’t farm without either. Nothing more was said about the $14 suit. We went into Renfrew as usual on Saturday for our few supplies, bought only after Mother made her house calls along the back streets of the town with the cleaned chickens, butter and eggs. That day she had sticky buns as well. It would be a long time before the blue sugar bowl had in it enough for what Father called a frivolity like a new suit. Sunday morning saw him at the Lutheran Church in the same old suit he had worn for years.

Mary Cook will be speaking on the “Joy of Memories” at the Friends of the Experimental Farm annual general meeting on Sept. 19. All are welcome to attend this free event at the Neatby Building, located at Carling Avenue and Maple Drive. Call 613-2303276 or visit friendsofthefarm. ca for more information.

Thank You for Choosing Health. Y

our contributions to Healthpartners, through the GCWCC campaign, help to save lives, fund groundbreaking research, and provide support to Canadians in every community who are dealing with life-changing illnesses.

of the previous dinners, this year’s event in Ottawa will occur on Sunday, Oct. 21, at Tudor Hall in Ottawa. Cocktails will be available starting at 5 p.m., with dinner following at 6 p.m. Tickets are $50 per person, but there is no cost for veterans and their spouses. The evening will include an introduction of veterans in attendance, a dinner, a guest speaker and much reminiscing. For more information about this event, please visit www.veteransdinner.ca. Hosts and honourees may call 613-239-4035 to order tickets.

EMC news - The idea for Take a Veteran to Dinner Night was born of a strong desire to show appreciation of the efforts and sacrifices of Canadian veterans in past and current conflicts. This non-partisan event is simply an opportunity for community members to personally thank area veterans and their spouses by treating them to dinner. That is, a host buys a veteran’s ticket as well as their own and both host and veteran attend the dinner together. Hosts often invite veteran and spouse couples when appropriate. Building on the successes

Ottawa police warn of necklace thefts late morning or during the afternoon. The male driver is described as about 55 years of age, of South Asian or Middle Eastern decent, with tanned skin. One female suspect, approximately 25 to 30 years of age was described as South Asian, Middle Eastern or Hispanic, with tanned skin. The second female suspect, approximately 50 to 60 years old, was described as South Asian, Middle Eastern or Hispanic, with tanned skin. All three spoke English with an accent.  The male driver has used different vehicles which are either a dark colour four-door sedan or a white, gold or dark colour minivan. If you are approached on the street by anyone wanting to sell you a gold necklace or any other jewelry, please refuse and report it to the Ottawa police at 613-230-6211. Anyone with any information regarding these incidents is asked to contact the district investigation section at 613236-1222, ext.3566 or Crime Stoppers at 613-233-8477 (TIPS).

EMC news - Since Aug. 10, there have been 20 reported thefts by scam artists on the streets of Ottawa. Police say the scam sees two female suspects approach a woman and ask for directions or attempt to sell a gold necklace. The female suspects place the gold necklace over the victim’s neck, in some instances stating the necklace is a gift. When the suspects remove the necklace they had placed on the victim’s neck, they also remove the victim’s own gold necklace without their knowledge. Only after the suspects have left the scene does the victim realized what just occurred. In some cases, a vehicle was involved whereby a male driver was seen picking up and dropping off two female suspects. The theft of necklaces have occurred in different parts of the city, specifically in store parking lots and neighbourhood streets including the Villa Marconi Retirement Residence, Herongate Mall, Montfort Hospital and an Esso gas station on Prince of Wales Drive. These thefts have taken place predominantly either

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Easy-to-make ‘mother sauce’ has unlimited possibilities

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PAT TREW Food ‘n’ Stuff this basic sauce recipe for any other dish that calls for it. The microwave technique for cooking it is explained stepby-step. Creamed Salmon on Toast

• 2 tbsp. butter or margarine • 2 tbsp. flour • 2 cups milk • 1/2 tsp. butter or margarine • 1/2 cup frozen peas • 1/2 medium onion, chopped • 2 cans (213 gram) salmon, drained • salt, pepper to taste Use a microwave-safe bowl or a measuring cup that holds four cups. In the bowl, melt two tbsp. butter or margarine on high for 40 to 50 seconds. Stir in the flour until it forms a smooth paste. There’s no need to cook this mixture. Add the milk all at once and stir well. Microwave on

high, uncovered, for four to five minutes. During this time, stir the sauce once every minute, scraping around the bottom of the bowl to mix in all the flour paste. When the sauce is slightly thickened, cook it one to two minutes longer on high. This time, stir the sauce every 30 seconds to prevent lumps from forming and the sauce from boiling over. The sauce is done when it’s thickened and bubbly. If you’re making creamed salmon on toast, place the 1/2 tsp. butter, frozen peas and onion in a small microwavesafe dish. Cover and cook on high for two minutes. Stir the onion mixture and the salmon into the white sauce. Cook on high for one to two minutes longer, stirring every 30 seconds, to heat the salmon. To serve, spoon over toast. Use one or two pieces of toast per person. Serves four.

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f all the millions of recipes that exist in cookbooks, there’s one which is found more often than any other. It appears in cookbooks published around the world – from Eastern Ontario to France to Australia. You probably have it in at least one of the cookbooks in your kitchen right now. The recipe is for a “basic white sauce,” and it’s made with three ingredients – butter, flour and milk. In France, they call it “one of the great sauces,” but they also have another name for it – the “sauce mere” or “mother sauce.” And that’s probably the best name for this sauce because it’s the starting point for so many different recipes. It can be flavoured with cheese, herbs, mustard or wine, and served over vegetables, meat, poultry or fish. Although the basic white sauce has been used in both home and professional kitchens for years, it became a lot simpler to make with the introduction of the microwave oven. The recipe that follows is for creamed salmon on toast, a convenient and quick supper dish. It starts with a medium white sauce and you can use

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Sometimes you just have to get your hands dirty

Your Community Newspaper

Everyone knows the creative process can be rewarding and fulfilling for adults without being messy. But, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face it: sometime getting your hands dirty is half the fun. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just for kids anymore. Whether you want your creativity to be mucky and yucky, or clean and pristine, there is bound to be something interesting near you listed in the City of Ottawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Recreation eGuide available at ottawa.ca/recreationguide. There is probably no better way to make a mess than through pottery. Artists at the Nepean Visual Arts Centre produce more than 50,000 pieces of art each year. This year, some of them can be yours. Think about Discovering Your Voice in Clay, Sculptural Handbuilding or maybe a Wheel and Hanbuilding Combo. For a splash of colour in your work area there are painting classes of various media offered across the city. Whether you are a beginner or an expert, you can work with oil, acrylic, watercolour or mixed media, explore abstract expression or classic portraiture. Does Canvas and Cocktails sound appealing? For something artistic and practical, learn to make a table, tray or mirror frame mosaic. Using stained glass tailored to suit the individual (beginner or improver), learn about techniques and materials and take home the completed project of your choice.

If you would like to eat your art, there are cooking classes available for young and old alike. Classes involving sushi, phyllo pastry and wine are on the menu, with cake decorating for dessert. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry, if you really want to keep your hands clean while being creative, there are several classes available across the city and in your neighbourhood that involve drawing, sketching, calligraphy and creative writing. The art of photography, which used to be messy, may have gone digital in recent years, but there are still plenty of opportunities to explore this medium in City classes. Get an introduction to the medium, sharpen your skills or simply learn how to Take Your Camera for a Walk. Fall Classes are starting now! Browse online at ottawa.ca/recreation to discover affordable fall and winter programs. Visit your favourite facility where knowledgeable and friendly staff will help you discover your next adventure. You can also call 3-1-1 for more details.

Submitted

The sign for Cairine Wilson Secondary School briefly displayed the wrong spelling, showing the name Carnie Wilson instead. Carnie Wilson is the lead singer for the band Wilson Phillips. Cairine Wilson, in comparison, was the first female Canadian senator.

Sign switch-up causes a laugh Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - Cairine Wilson Secondary School is named after the first female Canadian senator. But due to a mix-up before back-to-school, the sign at the front of the school instead paid tribute to 1990s Wilson Phillips singer Carnie Wilson. The school isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t being renamed after the pop singer and it was just a humorous misstep, said trustee John Shea. Shea spent several years lobbying to have the previous sign updated; it was installed in 1975. When the new sign went up on Aug. 31, it only took a day for the emails and calls to start

coming in. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What can you think but just laugh?â&#x20AC;? Shea said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was hilarious; it was obviously an honest mistake.â&#x20AC;? He said that the sign change was an easy fix and there was no additional cost to make the correction. The quick fix was made on Sept. 1, so students and teachers returning to school on Sept. 4 were greeted by the proper name â&#x20AC;&#x201C; though photos of the original sign had already made their way around via social media. And it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take long for the tweets to make their way to Carnie Wilson herself. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Hold On to the pretend honor forever !! Much love.... Carnie,â&#x20AC;? the singer tweeted in response to the photo.

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Brighter tomorrows for our community Giving back to the community has always been a core part of Hydro Ottawa’s mandate

For the past 11 years, Hydro Ottawa and its employees have generously contributed more than $1 million in support of United Way Ottawa’s Community Campaign. The corporate matching dollars from Hydro Ottawa’s campaign are directed to its Brighter Tomorrows Fund. Brighter Tomorrows Fund grants help agencies who serve people who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless invest in energy-efficient technologies and products. As a community company, contributing to the well-being of Ottawa has always been a part of Hydro Ottawa’s core mandate. By working with the United Way, we can ensure that the dollars we donate are truly making the biggest difference in our community.

Bryce Conrad President and Chief Executive Officer

2012 Hydro Ottawa Brighter Tomorrows Fund grant recipients and special guests.

Thanks to the success of our 2011 United Way campaign, this year Hydro Ottawa has awarded $85,696 in grants to the following agencies:

Daybreak Housing provides safe and rent-geared-to-income housing with support services for single adults who are homeless, at risk of becoming homeless or living in poverty, specifically those with mental illness, issues of substance abuse or people in abusive relationships.

BENEFITS OF GRANT: Installation of new ENERGY STAR fans in the common areas of five homes.

Multifaith Housing Initiative provides and promotes safe, affordable, well-maintained housing for people who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.

BENEFITS OF GRANT: Replacement of 15 old refrigerators with energy-efficient models. This will save low-income tenants about $60 per year in electricity costs.

National Capital Region YMCA-YWCA provides emergency shelter, youth transitional housing and a monthly supportive housing program for students, newcomers to Canada, individuals in transition due to separation and divorce, those living in unsafe or unstable housing, and individuals coping with issues related to physical/mental health, or substance abuse.

BENEFITS OF GRANT: Replacement and repair of window hardware.

Operation Come Home Logo Specs as of May 25, 2009

BENEFITS OF GRANT:

Font used is Helvetica Neue LT Std, an Open Typeface. Operation / Opération: 35 Thin Come Home / rentrer au foyer: 67 Medium Condensed

Reduction of energy costs by installing programmable thermostats, weather stripping and upgrading the insulation at its facility youth. 425 @ 80% PMS 425 @that 100% helps homeless PMS CMYK: 100% black RGB: 78 / 78 / 78

CMYK: 75% Black RGB: 120 / 120 /120

PMS 123 CMYK: 0 \ 25 \ 100 \ 0 RGB: 238 / 169 / 0

PMS 138 CMYK: 0 \ 50 \ 100 \ 0 RGB: 246 / 204 / 21

Options Bytown provides community-based, affordable housing and support services for people who need to live independently due to a history of homelessness, mental illness, addictions, concurrent disorder and lack of life skills.

BENEFITS OF GRANT: Installation of energy-efficient windows at an apartment complex for people at risk of homelessness.

Ottawa Salus offers affordable, supportive housing and community support services to people with mental illness who are homeless or at risk of being homeless.

BENEFITS OF GRANT: Installation of one new boiler ensuring comfort for tenants in these supportive housing apartment buildings.

Shepherds of Good Hope serves the needs of the homelessness, including temporary shelter services, supportive and transitional housing, and support services such as the Soup Kitchen, grocery and clothing programs, evening drop-in and the Christmas Hamper program.

BENEFITS OF GRANT: Modifications to stoves to improve the safety and efficiency of the appliances.

Thank you Hydro Ottawa employees for being engaged in our community and for making our community stronger!

Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Operation Come Home provides programs to homeless youth to help prevent them from becoming homeless adults by assisting them to reach their goals, through school and work opportunities, housing, outreach and clinical supports.

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news

Your Community Newspaper

New rules for wood-burning heaters Existing hydronic heaters exempt from proposal Laura Mueller

laura.mueller@metroland.com

New rules to regulate hydronic heaters in the city’s rural areas were tweaked in response to concerns expressed earlier this summer. The rules, which are new to Ottawa but common in smaller rural Ontario municipalities, are meant to govern where property owners can place the wood-burning boilers on their lots, and on which properties they are allowed. The changes followed comments voiced by both owners of the heat-producing boilers, neighbours bothered by the smoke the devices spew onto their properties and representatives from the industry. The standalone devices are common means of heating homes – and sometimes pools – in rural areas. The issue was first brought to the attention of the city’s agriculture and rural affairs committee on Jan. 13 by Carlsbad Springs resident Dan Renaud and Glen Roberts of Cumberland. The committee approved revised rules on Sept. 6. Renaud and Roberts detailed their frustration as neighbours’ wood-burning boilers sat di-

rectly adjacent to their properties. If the smokestack isn’t tall enough and the boiler is close to a neighbouring home, heavy smoke can drift across a neighbours’ property. With that in mind, the city drafted new rules that would prevent people from putting a boiler on their property if it’s a small lot. The proposed rules also include provisions for how far away the unit must be from a neighbouring home and how tall the smokestack must be. After a public consultation in May, the proposed mini-

“What about the right to breathe fresh air?” Carlsbad Springs resident Dan Renaud

mum setback for a heater’s distance from a neighbour was reduced, and agriculture zones were excluded from the 8,000metre square lot minimum. The height requirement for smokestacks was also reduced, as was the distance between neighbours that would trigger a height increase for the smokestack. The finalized rules also exclude automatically fed pellet boilers and controlled combustion. But the city couldn’t find a way to avoid “grandfather-

ing” existing hydronic heaters in Ottawa, which displeased Renaud and Roberts. Since the most logical and effective way to regulate the devices is to use zoning provisions, said city staffer Geraldine Wildman, any hydronic heaters that are already in place are allowed to remain. In Renaud’s case, he says smoke from his neighbour’s wood boiler has prevented him from working at his carpentry shop in the spring. For Roberts, the concern is health. His wife has a chronic cough and must use an inhaler, which the couple attributes to the smoke coming from their neighbour’s wood-burning boiler. City lawyer Tim Marc said it’s an “awful situation” that likely results from improper use and maintenance of the devices. The boilers smoke more if green materials are used instead of dry wood or pellets, and some people even burn garbage and other materials, which produces dangerous toxic smoke. “What about the right to breathe fresh air?” Renaud said. “What is my option? To walk around with a fresh air tank?” For people dealing with a problem hydronic heater on a neighbour’s property, their only recourse will be taking their neighbours to court, Marc said. The rules still need city council’s final approval.

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On Saturday, October 13th 2012 WALK with us at Marion Dewar Plaza (City Hall) as we Light The Night in support of finding a cure.

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Submitted

Ottawa police are seeking the two men shown above after a July 26 robbery at a gas station on Prince of Wales Drive

Join us for Amica at Bearbrook’s Upcoming Events

Police seek public’s help to identify robbery suspects

Fall Centrepiece 2 Day Workshop ~ Wednesday, September 26th and October 3rd, 2012 - 2:30 pm Local Artist Ann Copeland will be teaching you how to create a decorative Fall Centrepiece. Cost: $10.00 per person (for 2-day workshop)

EMC news - Two suspects wanted in relation to a retail robbery on Prince of Wales Drive were captured by cameras and Ottawa police have made those photos public in the hope that someone will identify the two men. On July 26, at about 7:50 p.m., the two men entered a gas station situated along the 1300 block of Prince of Wales,

Home Staging & Downsizing Seminar ~ Friday, September 28th, 2012 - 1:30 pm Join us for a home staging & downsizing seminar featuring Kathryn Wilson, a Certified Staging Professional. Ask about our move in specials with suites starting at $2,695.00/month.

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

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There were no injuries. The suspects were described as both being black males, of average build, in their 20s. Anyone with information with respect to this robbery, or any other robbery, is asked to contact the robbery unit at 613-236-1222, ext. 5116 or Crime Stoppers at 613-2338477 (TIPS).

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between Baseline Road and Meadowlands Drive. As one of the suspects was making a purchase he displayed a handgun and demanded money.  The suspects fled with an undisclosed amount of cash to a waiting white four-door sedan, possibly a Honda or Hyundai.  The licence plate may contain the numbers 443.


news

Your Community Newspaper

South Ottawa Race Day hopes to end brain cancer forever Emma Jackson

emma.jackson@metroland.com

EMC news – The brain cancer battles of two Steve MacLean Public School members – one a 38-yearold mother who lost her battle last summer, the other a Grade 2 student currently fighting for her life – have inspired an entire community to find a cure. Greely resident Heather Geddie was diagnosed with a cancerous brain tumour in 2009, and fought for two years until she passed away in July 2011. Two of her three children, then aged 9 and 15, had attended Steve MacLean Public School in Riverside South. A group of parents from the school were so inspired by Geddie’s positive attitude that after her death they decided to host the South Ottawa Race Day, which will fundraise for brain cancer research at the Rideau Carleton Raceway on Sat. Sept. 29. But well into planning for the big event, the community received a second blow this spring when another Steve MacLean family discovered their daughter Sofia has an inoperable brain tumour. She would have been going into Grade 2 this year, but is instead fighting her disease at CHEO. The race day will include a twokilometre family walk/run, a fivekm walk/run, a 10-km route and a half marathon or half marathon relay through rural Ottawa South. A free barbecue, a children’s corner provided by the Manotick co-operative nursery school and speeches from Geddie’s family will take place after the races are all finished.

Emma Jackson/Metroland

Riverside South resident Karen Sinclair holds a photo of her friend Heather Geddie, who died from a brain tumour last summer. Sinclair and three other parents from Steve MacLean Public School will host a fundraising race day in her memory on Sept. 29. But it’s not just the small organizing group that has come together, said co-organizer Karen Sinclair. Businesses, dance studios, students and parents who never met Geddie or Sofia have jumped on board. Dance Roots studio choreographed an awareness flash mob at the school last June, and a ladies’ night fundraiser in February sold out more than 400 tickets in just a few days. On Sat. Sept. 15 the Broadways on Earl Armstrong

Road will host a live band fundraiser for Sofia, which will contribute to the race day’s totals. “It’s amazing how interwoven this has become,” Sinclair said. Geddie was an enthusiastic athlete, and Sinclair, who was close to Geddie, said it made sense to pair their fundraising efforts with something active. Adding Sofia’s cause to the banner has only served as a poignant reminder that brain cancer is preva-

lent everywhere, she said. Sinclair said the group hopes to raise $40,000, which the Ottawa Regional Cancer Foundation’s board of directors will help direct to a worthy brain cancer research project. Fellow organizer and Steve MacLean parent Chris Hill, who didn’t know Geddie, said he was motivated by her positive attitude and the community’s response during her illness. He said the event will help people

grieve her loss and celebrate her life while helping to end cancer. “I think people wanted an outlet to express their grief and express their inspiration,” he said. Geddie was born in Nova Scotia but grew up in Kanata, where she graduated from the Earl of March Secondary School. She studied Recreational Marine Management at St. Lawrence College in Kingston and then worked for two years at a small shipyard before moving back to Kanata in 1997. A great lover of sports, Geddie spent the last eight years of her life in Greely where she focused on family activities including playing tennis, spending time at the cottage in Calabogie and skiing at the Peaks, according to her biography on southottawaraceday.ca. She and her family also developed strong ties to the church community in Manotick, and her husband Kevin will perform with the Manotick Village Singers on the race day. Her children Breanna, Ryan, and Colin will all take part in the event, and her parents will talk to the crowds about their daughter’s fight. Sinclair said Geddie remained positive throughout her entire illness, and was always thinking of others before herself. “She honestly never said a bad word about anybody, she was always looking on the bright side and thinking of how to help people,” Sinclair said. “She was quite a humanitarian in that sense and we wanted to keep that positive outlook going.” For more information, sponsor a participant or to register for the event visit www.southottawaraceday.ca.

R0011614112-0913

Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

23


Local events and happenings over the coming weeks — free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: orleans@metroland.com

Sept. 14 to 16

Friends of Library and Archives Canada hosts an annual giant used book sale at St. Laurent Centre, 1200 St. Laurent Blvd, Centre Court. Vinyl LPs, CDs, children’s books, and specially priced gems. More info: 613-9431544   Email: friends.amis@ lac-bac.gc.ca.

Sept. 15

Cruise Don’t Bruise Bikers Against Violence, a fundraiser motorcycle ride to raise money for Eastern Ottawa Resource Centre’s programs against violence. Starts at Beacon Hill Shopping Centre, 2339 Ogilvie Rd., at 9 a.m. Information at 613-741-6025. Join Ottawa’s hilarious and sensational Afro-Caribbean Group, Ni Wewe Tu on Saturday, Sept. 15, for an evening of entertainment in celebration of Jamaica’s 50th year of independence. Jamaica Mi Soon Come is a skit about an unruly group of people travelling to Jamaica on Soon Come Airlines to celebrate Jamaica’s 50th. They get increasingly frustrated with the flight delays and heated arguments, Jamaican style, ensue. When they finally arrive, their friends and relatives welcome them back to Jamaica. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children age’s six to 12. To purchase tickets and for more information, please call 613834-1718 or visit the web site,

niwewetuchoralgroup.org.

follow the links to the Walk2Hear webpage.

Sept. 16

St. Pat’s Walk the Block 2012 registration at 8 a.m. and start at 9:30 a.m. Participant lunch at 11:30 a.m. Departing St. Patrick’s Home, 2865 Riverside Dr. Prizes for top fundraising walkers, and giveaways for all participants. Donations of $20 or more will be issued a charitable tax receipt. Pick up your walker registration form at reception or at www.stpats.ca/foundation/walk%20the%20block. html. For more information, to donate prizes, or to volunteer, please email foundation@ stpats.ca or call 613.260.2738. The event is free and all are welcome.

The Ottawa Voyageurs Walking Club hosts a six- and 11kilometre walk to benefit the Orleans-Cumberland Community Resource Centre. Start time 10 to 11 a.m. from the Shenkman Arts Centre, 245 Centrum Blvd. Participation is free. Donations to the centre appreciated. Info: Kathy Luten, 613-830-7437 or www. ottawavoyageurs.ca.

Sept. 17

Calling all golfers for Habitat for Humanity National Capital Region’s annual Chipping In Golf Tournament at Cedarhill Golf and Country Club. Come out for a fun day of networking, prizes and friendly competition while raising much-needed funds for Habitat NCR to build homes. For more information, call Gail at 613-749-9950 ext. 223, email fundraising@habitatncr.com or go to www.habitatncr.com.

Sept. 22

Walk2Hear, the signature fundraising event of the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association will be held on Sept. 22 at Vincent Massey Park. Registration from 8:30 to 9 a.m. and a barbecue lunch provided at 11:30 a.m. For more information on registering for the Walk2Hear, or to pledge financial support, please visit www.chha.ca and

Yard sale, rain or shine, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at South Gloucester United Church at Rideau and Albion, just west of the Rideau Carleton Raceway. Reusable treasures, books, crafts, baking, new and nearly new items. Donations of clean, working items (No TVs, electronics or clothing please) can be dropped off on Thursday evening, Sept. 20 between 6:30 and 9 p.m.

Sept 22 and 23

Glebe Fine Art Show from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Glebe Community Centre 175 Third Ave. featuring the work of 29 local artists including the work of Canterbury visual arts students.

Sept. 28

Discovery Café presents Let’s Do Business! given by Jerry Tomberlin, dean of the Sprott School of Business, Carleton University. Discovery Café is a series of public lectures on the last Friday of the month at Blackburn Hamlet Community Church, 2598 Innes Rd (between the TD Bank and the Blackburn Arms). Coffee/tea/desserts are provided. Visit www. blackburnhamletcommunitychurch.ca for more.

Oct. 20

Harvest Gold Dinner and Dance fundraiser for the extension of St.Helen’s Anglican Church, Orléans. Buffet dinner, museum tours, silent auction, live auction, and dancing at the Canada Aviation Museum, 11 Aviation Pkwy. Tickets are available by calling St.Helen’s at 613-824-2010 or email: harvestgoldtickets@gmail. com.

Mondays

The Ottawa Pub Dart League plays from October to April at various venues in the city. If you are interested in joining or venue sponsorship, please visit www.theopdl.ca.

Fridays

Fivepin bowling league is to encouraging senior citizens over the age of 50 to

IS YOUR MORTGAGE TAX DEDUCTIBLE? Karl Ruban and Fraser Smith first introduced the principles of The Smith Manoeuvre to their clients in Ontario in 2003. Since that time, thousands of Canadian taxpayers have used this innovative strategy to convert interest that is non deductable to deductable for tax purposes. A typical homeowner will pay interest of $12,000 per year on a $300,000 mortgage at 4%. If they employ The Smith Manoeuvre, that $12,000 will be a tax deduction, using a 40% average tax bracket, converting interest to be deductable for tax purposes will reduce taxes otherwise payable by $4,800. Karl Ruban, Senior Financial Planner with Assante Capital Management Ltd. is conducting a free seminar Thursday, September 20th at 7:00 pm at Blackburn Community Centre, 190 Glen Park Drive, for those interested in learning how to implement The Smith Manoeuvre. To register, please phone Jeanne at 1-877-494-7744. There will be complimentary coffee and dessert. You will have an opportunity to win an iPad, call for details!

participate in an activity that provides regular moderate exercise. There is no registration fee. The league is a fun, non-competitive league, experience not required. Bowling takes place each Friday afternoon between 1 and 3 p.m. at Walkley Bowling Centre, 2092 Walkley Rd. Participants are placed on mixed four-person teams. To register, please call Roy or Jean Hoban at 613-731-6526.

Saturdays

The Cumberland Farmers’ Market 2012 season is open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., rain or shine, until Oct. 13 at the RJ Kennedy Community Centre, 1115 Dunning Rd. For information visit cumberlandfarmersmarket.ca or call 613-833-2635.

Ongoing

Ottawa Newcomers’ Club invites women new to Ottawa to join activities and meet some new friends. Please check the our website at: www.ottawanewcomersclub. ca For more information call 613-860-0548 or ottawanewcomers@hotmail.ca. The Gloucester South Seniors’ Chess Club, 4550 Bank St. meets every Monday and Thursday at 7 p.m. Immediate openings. Please contact Robert MacDougal, 613-8211930 for more information.

There is a Mom and Me Playgroup meeting at East Gate Alliance Church. It takes place the second and fourth Wednesdays of the month from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. More information can be found at www.eastgatealliance.ca or by contacting debbie@eastgatealliance.ca or 613-744-0682. Women’s competitive volleyball league looking for individual players. League runs end of September to end of April. Cost is $170. Located in Blackburn Hamlet on Wednesday evenings from 8 to 10 p.m. Contact Marg Walters at mewalters@rogers. com. Girl Guides of Canada offers programs locally for girls from five to 17 years of age. Meetings, camps, leadership and skills are all part of the opportunities provided. Go to www.girlguides.ca to find the unit closest to you and complete the online registration. The Active Living Club invites active seniors and adults 50-plus to join us in the outdoor activities of hiking, cycling, canoeing, cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. All outings start at 10 a.m., from different locations in Ottawa-Gatineau, and range from one-and-a-half to three hours. Call City Wide Sports at 613-580-2854 and press 1 for administration or email cws-psm@ottawa.ca.

WAtCh for your

y r a s r Annive r e y l f e l Sa Arriving in this EMC publication on Sept. 20th, 2012.

For information, go to www.kruban.ca www.smithman.net/home.html. The opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of Assante Capital Management Ltd. or Assante Financial Management Ltd. Assante does not endorse the Smith Manoeuvre and does not guarantee any tax advantages in the use of this strategy. Using borrowed money to finance the purchase of securities involves greater risk than using cash resources only. If you borrow money to purchase securities, your responsibility to repay the loan and pay interest as required by its terms remains the same even if the value of the securities purchased declines. Please speak to your legal, tax and banking professionals for advice before embarking on this strategy. Assante Capital Management Ltd. is a member of the Canadian Investor Protection Fund. Assante does not promote “Is Your Mortgage Tax Deductible?” by Fraser Smith and its views shall not be used for product endorsement purposes. R0011606900

24

Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

Kanata Vacuum & Sewing Centre 471 Hazeldean Rd., Kanata 613-831-2326

Cardy Vacuum 210 Colonnade Rd., S. Nepean 613-727-0307 2451 St. Joseph Blvd., Orleans 613-830-2360

BF Vacuum Cleaner Centre Ltd. 298 Richmond Rd., Ottawa 613-722-3434 R0011603507-0913


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FINANCIAL / INCOME TAX Consolidate your Debts. 1 monthly pmt, including credit cards, taxes, collection agencies, garnishments, etc. GMC Consulting 24 hrs, Toll Free 1-877-977-0304. Services Bilingues. gmyre@debtzero.ca

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Up to $1500 CASH Weekly NEW Direct Sales Position NO Door to Door Sales Apply Online Today

PropertyStarsJobs.com Apples, cider and apple products. Smyths Apple Orchard, 613-652-2477. Updates, specials and coupons at www.smythsapples.com. Open daily til April 1st.

News EMC Classifieds Get Results!

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Need a helping hand? Our dedicated and mature caregivers (50 years+), thoroughly screened and insured, provide light housekeeping, companion care, dementia care, respite care, child care, shopping, transportation, handy work and other services. Call Seniors on Site at 613-422-7676 or visit www.sosonsite.com

Sailboat 16ft Wayfarer. Excellent cond. cover, dolly, trailer. $2800. Excellent cond. A fun, safe sail 1-4 people. Brighton 613-475-9121

Winter boat storage- Winterizing, shrink wrapping, indoor and outdoor, $335-$425. Mobile shrink wrapping available. 613-267-3470. relax@christie lakecottages.com

MORTGAGES $$MONEY$$ Consolidate Debts Mortgages to 90% No income, Bad credit OK! Better Option Mortgage #10969 1-800-282-1169 www.mortgageontario.com

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VEHICLES

DOG SITTING Experienced retired breeder providing lots of TLC. My home. Smaller dogs only. References available. $17-$20 daily Marg 613-721-1530

TRAILERS / RV’S Quiet adult campground, large fully serviced lots, fishing, tennis, horseshoes and volleyball, near Merrickville on Rideau River. $1200/season. 613-269-4664.

HELP WANTED

2006 Buick Allure CXL, 101,000 km. Leather, fully loaded,excellent condition. New brakes, new summers and winters all on rims. $8,900. 613-271-7513. Need a car or truck and can’t get financed? Whatever your credit issues we can help. Guaranteed financing is available to everyone regardless of credit history. Call today, drive tomorrow. Call Joseph 613-200-0100.

WEDDING Weddings, Baptisms & Funerals, location of your choice. Also available small weddings, my home, weekdays. The Rev. Alan Gallichan. 613-726-0400.

HUNT CLUB SQUARE

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934 Hunt Club, a sophisticated rental property in Ottawa South. 20 new elegantly finished one and two bedroom apts. Includes details such as: UÊ"«i˜ÊVœ˜Vi«ÌʎˆÌV…i˜Ê>˜`ʏˆÛˆ˜}Ê>Ài> UÊÀ>˜ˆÌiʎˆÌV…i˜ÊˆÃ>˜`à UÊ,ivÀˆ}iÀ>̜À]ÊÃ̜ÛiÊ>˜`Ê`ˆÃ…Ü>ÅiÀʈ˜V° UÊ iÀ>“ˆVÊyœœÀÃʈ˜ÊŽˆÌV…i˜Ã]ÊL>̅Àœœ“ÃÊ>˜`Êi˜ÌÀˆià UÊ>՘`ÀÞʅœœŽ‡Õ«Êˆ˜ÊiÛiÀÞÊ՘ˆÌ]Ê>ÃÊÜiÊ>Ãʜ˜ÊÈÌiÊ >՘`ÀÞÊv>VˆˆÌÞ UÊ``ˆÌˆœ˜>ÊÃ̜À>}iÊ՘ˆÌÃÊ>Û>ˆ>Li UÊ“«iÊ«>ÀŽˆ˜}Ê>Û>ˆ>Li www.vipconstruction.ca UÊ"ÛiÀÈâi`Ê܈˜`œÜà viphomes1@gmail.com UÊ"VÌÉ œÛʜVVÕ«>˜VÞ 613-731-2455

AUCTIONS

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012


BUSINESS DIRECTORY

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OrlĂŠans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

27


PARALYMPICS

Your Community Newspaper

Bittersweet B final win for Blair in London compared to Canada’s 3:28.82. “It was disappointing, especially because we were in contact,” said the Merivale High School grad who now studies humanities at Carleton University. “If we had our best race, I think we could have qualified.” Blair said it wasn’t so much a case of the Canadians racing poorly, it was just that their competition enjoyed standout races.

Dan Plouffe

EMC sports - If you’d told Ottawa’s David Blair prior to the Paralympic Games that his Canadian crew would win their race on the final day of rowing, you can bet he’d have been on top of the world. And that’s precisely what played out in London, but the big surprise was that Canada’s LTA4+ mixed coxed four adaptive rowing team was racing in the B final for seventh to 12th place. Canada won the race in three minutes, 31.17 seconds – close to one second ahead of France. But make no mistake – the Canadian team’s performance in London was a bitter disappointment on the heels of gold and silver medals at the 2010 and 2011 world championships, although they did get to end their Paralympic experience on positive note. “Obviously given our track record, we wanted to be in the A final,” Blair said on the dock at Eton Dorney. “But that wasn’t in the cards, so we all needed to reset and come here today focused with a new goal, and that’s what we did. “It was a good confident, relaxed feeling warming up. It feels good to come out in first in whatever race you’re in. That was nice.” A national team member for only two years and the youngest member of the Canadian crew, Blair’s teammates had warned him that the Paralympics would be unlike any other competition he’d previously participated in, and that turned out to be the case when he made his Paralympic debut

Your Community Newspaper G%%&&+%.,'."%.&(

UPPED THE BAR

DAN PLOUFFE

David Blair, right, and other members of the Canadian mixed coxed four adaptive rowing team got to finish their Paralympics with some smiles as they won the B final at Eton Dorney in London. Blair visited Trillium Elementary School in Orléans at the end of February to speak to students, who had been doing a Paralympics unit. on Friday, Aug. 31. “My first race going down, I knew I would get a surge of energy just by knowing where I am, hearing everything that’s going on,” recounted Blair, whose team was over

six seconds behind eventual gold medalist Great Britain in the heats to miss the lone automatic qualifying position in the final. “My focus was on being as technically clean as possi-

ble,” the Ottawa Rowing Club member added. “By the end of the race, I had so much energy still that I could give from absorbing everything that was coming from the crowd. It’s been pretty incredible.”

The repechage round on Sept. 1 was when the big letdown came for the Canadians. With two more places available in the final, Ukraine and China both beat Canada to the line in 3:23.53 and 3:25.03,

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“The level stepped up,” added the rower who is visually-impaired and wears a blinder so that he’s not able to see at all. “If you look at our times, they’ve been pretty consistently around there. It was more that other crews from other countries upped the bar in a big way and we weren’t capable of responding.” Despite the disappointment, Blair sounded somewhat at peace with the result. The 20-year-old was already thinking about the future and taking another crack at the Paralympics come 2016 in Rio de Janeiro. “I spent every day trying to get ready for these Games,” he said. “About a week ago I realized I never want to stop improving. I’m never going to be at that point where I can say, ‘Yes, OK, this is the best I’m ever going to be.’ I came in here knowing that I’m going to give it my all and when I come back next time I’m going to be even faster. “I’ll definitely do it again.”


news

Your Community Newspaper

South Ottawa Race Day hopes to end brain cancer forever Emma Jackson

emma.jackson@metroland.com

EMC news – The brain cancer battles of two Steve MacLean Public School members – one a 38-year-old mother who lost her battle last summer, the other a Grade 2 student currently fighting for her life – have inspired an entire community to find a cure. Greely resident Heather Geddie was diagnosed with a cancerous brain tumour in 2009, and fought for two years until she passed away in July 2011. Two of her three children, then aged 9 and 15, had attended Steve MacLean Public School in Riverside South. A group of parents from the school were so inspired by Geddie’s positive attitude that after her death they decided to host the South Ottawa Race Day, which will fundraise for brain cancer research at the Rideau Carleton Raceway on Sat. Sept. 29. But well into planning for the big event, the community received a second blow this spring when another Steve MacLean family discovered their daughter Sofia has an inoperable brain tumour. She would have been going into Grade 2 this year, but is instead fighting her disease at CHEO. The race day will include a twokilometre family walk/run, a fivekm walk/run, a 10-km route and a half marathon or half marathon relay through rural Ottawa South. A free barbecue, a children’s corner provided by the Manotick co-operative nursery school and speeches from Geddie’s family will take place after the races are all finished.

Emma Jackson/Metroland

Riverside South resident Karen Sinclair holds a photo of her friend Heather Geddie, who died from a brain tumour last summer. Sinclair and three other parents from Steve MacLean Public School will host a fundraising race day in her memory on Sept. 29. But it’s not just the small organizing group that has come together, said coorganizer Karen Sinclair. Businesses, dance studios, students and parents who never met Geddie or Sofia have jumped on board. Dance Roots studio choreographed an awareness flash mob at the school last June, and a ladies’ night fundraiser in February sold out more than 400 tickets in just a few days. On Sat. Sept. 15 the Broadways on Earl Armstrong

Road will host a live band fundraiser for Sofia, which will contribute to the race day’s totals. “It’s amazing how interwoven this has become,” Sinclair said. Geddie was an enthusiastic athlete, and Sinclair, who was close to Geddie, said it made sense to pair their fundraising efforts with something active. Adding Sofia’s cause to the banner has only served as a poignant reminder that brain cancer is prevalent

everywhere, she said. Sinclair said the group hopes to raise $40,000, which the Ottawa Regional Cancer Foundation’s board of directors will help direct to a worthy brain cancer research project. Fellow organizer and Steve MacLean parent Chris Hill, who didn’t know Geddie, said he was motivated by her positive attitude and the community’s response during her illness. He said the event will help people

grieve her loss and celebrate her life while helping to end cancer. “I think people wanted an outlet to express their grief and express their inspiration,” he said. Geddie was born in Nova Scotia but grew up in Kanata, where she graduated from the Earl of March Secondary School. She studied Recreational Marine Management at St. Lawrence College in Kingston and then worked for two years at a small shipyard before moving back to Kanata in 1997. A great lover of sports, Geddie spent the last eight years of her life in Greely where she focused on family activities including playing tennis, spending time at the cottage in Calabogie and skiing at the Peaks, according to her biography on southottawaraceday.ca. She and her family also developed strong ties to the church community in Manotick, and her husband Kevin will perform with the Manotick Village Singers on the race day. Her children Breanna, Ryan, and Colin will all take part in the event, and her parents will talk to the crowds about their daughter’s fight. Sinclair said Geddie remained positive throughout her entire illness, and was always thinking of others before herself. “She honestly never said a bad word about anybody, she was always looking on the bright side and thinking of how to help people,” Sinclair said. “She was quite a humanitarian in that sense and we wanted to keep that positive outlook going.” For more information, sponsor a participant or to register for the event visit www.southottawaraceday.ca.

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Local events and happenings over the coming weeks — free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: orleans@metroland.com

Sept. 14 to 16

Friends of Library and Archives Canada hosts an annual giant used book sale at St. Laurent Centre, 1200 St. Laurent Blvd, Centre Court. Vinyl LPs, CDs, children’s books, and specially priced gems. More info: 613-9431544   Email: friends.amis@ lac-bac.gc.ca.

Sept. 15

Cruise Don’t Bruise Bikers Against Violence, a fundraiser motorcycle ride to raise money for Eastern Ottawa Resource Centre’s programs against violence. Starts at Beacon Hill Shopping Centre, 2339 Ogilvie Rd., at 9 a.m. Information at 613-741-6025. Join Ottawa’s hilarious and sensational Afro-Caribbean Group, Ni Wewe Tu on Saturday, Sept. 15, for an evening of entertainment in celebration of Jamaica’s 50th year of independence. Jamaica Mi Soon Come is a skit about an unruly group of people travelling to Jamaica on Soon Come Airlines to celebrate Jamaica’s 50th. They get increasingly frustrated with the flight delays and heated arguments, Jamaican style, ensue. When they finally arrive, their friends and relatives welcome them back to Jamaica. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children age’s six to 12. To purchase tickets and for more information, please call 613834-1718 or visit the web site,

niwewetuchoralgroup.org.

follow the links to the Walk2Hear webpage.

Sept. 16

St. Pat’s Walk the Block 2012 registration at 8 a.m. and start at 9:30 a.m. Participant lunch at 11:30 a.m. Departing St. Patrick’s Home, 2865 Riverside Dr. Prizes for top fundraising walkers, and giveaways for all participants. Donations of $20 or more will be issued a charitable tax receipt. Pick up your walker registration form at reception or at www.stpats.ca/foundation/walk%20the%20block. html. For more information, to donate prizes, or to volunteer, please email foundation@ stpats.ca or call 613.260.2738. The event is free and all are welcome.

The Ottawa Voyageurs Walking Club hosts a six- and 11-kilometre walk to benefit the Orleans-Cumberland Community Resource Centre. Start time 10 to 11 a.m. from the Shenkman Arts Centre, 245 Centrum Blvd. Participation is free. Donations to the centre appreciated. Info: Kathy Luten, 613-830-7437 or www.ottawavoyageurs.ca.

Sept. 17

Calling all golfers for Habitat for Humanity National Capital Region’s annual Chipping In Golf Tournament at Cedarhill Golf and Country Club. Come out for a fun day of networking, prizes and friendly competition while raising much-needed funds for Habitat NCR to build homes. For more information, call Gail at 613-749-9950 ext. 223, email fundraising@habitatncr.com or go to www.habitatncr.com.

Sept. 22

Walk2Hear, the signature fundraising event of the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association will be held on Sept. 22 at Vincent Massey Park. Registration from 8:30 to 9 a.m. and a barbecue lunch provided at 11:30 a.m. For more information on registering for the Walk2Hear, or to pledge financial support, please visit www.chha.ca and

Yard sale, rain or shine, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at South Gloucester United Church at Rideau and Albion, just west of the Rideau Carleton Raceway. Reusable treasures, books, crafts, baking, new and nearly new items. Donations of clean, working items (No TVs, electronics or clothing please) can be dropped off on Thursday evening, Sept. 20 between 6:30 and 9 p.m.

Sept 22 and 23

Glebe Fine Art Show from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Glebe Community Centre 175 Third Ave. featuring the work of 29 local artists including the work of Canterbury visual arts students.

Sept. 28

Discovery Café presents Let’s Do Business! given by Jerry Tomberlin, dean of the Sprott School of Business, Carleton University. Discovery Café is a series of public lectures on the last Friday of the month at Blackburn Hamlet Community Church, 2598 Innes Rd (between the TD Bank and the Blackburn Arms). Coffee/tea/desserts are provided. Visit www. blackburnhamletcommunitychurch.ca for more.

Oct. 20

Harvest Gold Dinner and Dance fundraiser for the extension of St.Helen’s Anglican Church, Orléans. Buffet dinner, museum tours, silent auction, live auction, and dancing at the Canada Aviation Museum, 11 Aviation Pkwy. Tickets are available by calling St.Helen’s at 613-824-2010 or email: harvestgoldtickets@gmail. com.

Mondays

The Ottawa Pub Dart League plays from October to April at various venues in the city. If you are interested in joining or venue sponsorship, please visit www.theopdl.ca.

Fridays

Fivepin bowling league is to encouraging senior citizens over the age of 50 to

IS YOUR MORTGAGE TAX DEDUCTIBLE? Karl Ruban and Fraser Smith first introduced the principles of The Smith Manoeuvre to their clients in Ontario in 2003. Since that time, thousands of Canadian taxpayers have used this innovative strategy to convert interest that is non deductable to deductable for tax purposes. A typical homeowner will pay interest of $12,000 per year on a $300,000 mortgage at 4%. If they employ The Smith Manoeuvre, that $12,000 will be a tax deduction, using a 40% average tax bracket, converting interest to be deductable for tax purposes will reduce taxes otherwise payable by $4,800. Karl Ruban, Senior Financial Planner with Assante Capital Management Ltd. is conducting a free seminar Thursday, September 20th at 7:00 pm at Blackburn Community Centre, 190 Glen Park Drive, for those interested in learning how to implement The Smith Manoeuvre. To register, please phone Jeanne at 1-877-494-7744. There will be complimentary coffee and dessert. You will have an opportunity to win an iPad, call for details!

participate in an activity that provides regular moderate exercise. There is no registration fee. The league is a fun, non-competitive league, experience not required. Bowling takes place each Friday afternoon between 1 and 3 p.m. at Walkley Bowling Centre, 2092 Walkley Rd. Participants are placed on mixed four-person teams. To register, please call Roy or Jean Hoban at 613-731-6526.

Saturdays

The Cumberland Farmers’ Market 2012 season is open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., rain or shine, until Oct. 13 at the RJ Kennedy Community Centre, 1115 Dunning Rd. For information visit cumberlandfarmersmarket.ca or call 613-833-2635.

Ongoing

Ottawa Newcomers’ Club invites women new to Ottawa to join activities and meet some new friends. Please check the our website at: www.ottawanewcomersclub. ca For more information call 613-860-0548 or ottawanewcomers@hotmail.ca. The Gloucester South Seniors’ Chess Club, 4550 Bank St. meets every Monday and Thursday at 7 p.m. Immediate openings. Please contact Robert MacDougal, 613-8211930 for more information.

There is a Mom and Me Playgroup meeting at East Gate Alliance Church. It takes place the second and fourth Wednesdays of the month from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. More information can be found at www.eastgatealliance.ca or by contacting debbie@eastgatealliance.ca or 613-744-0682. Women’s competitive volleyball league looking for individual players. League runs end of September to end of April. Cost is $170. Located in Blackburn Hamlet on Wednesday evenings from 8 to 10 p.m. Contact Marg Walters at mewalters@rogers. com. Girl Guides of Canada offers programs locally for girls from five to 17 years of age. Meetings, camps, leadership and skills are all part of the opportunities provided. Go to www.girlguides.ca to find the unit closest to you and complete the online registration. The Active Living Club invites active seniors and adults 50-plus to join us in the outdoor activities of hiking, cycling, canoeing, cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. All outings start at 10 a.m., from different locations in Ottawa-Gatineau, and range from one-and-a-half to three hours. Call City Wide Sports at 613-580-2854 and press 1 for administration or email cws-psm@ottawa.ca.

WAtCh for your

y r a s r Annive r e y l f e l Sa Arriving in this EMC publication on Sept. 20th, 2012.

For information, go to www.kruban.ca www.smithman.net/home.html. The opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of Assante Capital Management Ltd. or Assante Financial Management Ltd. Assante does not endorse the Smith Manoeuvre and does not guarantee any tax advantages in the use of this strategy. Using borrowed money to finance the purchase of securities involves greater risk than using cash resources only. If you borrow money to purchase securities, your responsibility to repay the loan and pay interest as required by its terms remains the same even if the value of the securities purchased declines. Please speak to your legal, tax and banking professionals for advice before embarking on this strategy. Assante Capital Management Ltd. is a member of the Canadian Investor Protection Fund. Assante does not promote “Is Your Mortgage Tax Deductible?” by Fraser Smith and its views shall not be used for product endorsement purposes. R0011606900

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

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0913

Last week’s answers

38. Radioactivity units 40. Star Wars’ Solo 41. Water filled volcanic crater

career decisions that will work for you. That new venture you have been pondering takes a big step forward.

Last week’s answers Interactions with coworkers could feel a little strained, SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21

municating your t 23/Oct 23and ew meetings Sagittarius. Make a few adjustments to remedy any onal activities ways for you to keep Take stock of your working uss things withare idealuncomfortable situations. educe stress over the relationships. course of the week. your troubles melt away.

ct ant24/Nov to handle22 your

3. Surrounding radiant light 4. Open land where livestock graze 5. Quench 6. Strays 7. Chickens’ cold 8. Heart chamber 9. Timid 10. Oil cartel 11. Statute heading 12. Severely correct 16. An amount not specified 21. It never sleeps 22. Indian frock 25. Soak flax 27. Mariner 28. Arabian outer garment 29. Binary coded decimal 32. European Common Market 35. 17th Greek letter 36. Norse sea goddess

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20

weeks GEMINIThis - May 22/Jun 21

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

Three LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18

Aries, you will bring creativity and originality to a project at work this week. Working with people comes easy to you, so put your ingenuity to good use.

Capricorn, your drive for independence is very obvious to ave a greatwith interest business making oo. Consult a in others thisand week. However, your determination could also ns thatchanges. will work for you. new major put That you in an venture unpredictable mood. n pondering takes a big step forward.

S - Nov 21 This is a good time to take a deep breath and lighten up ple makes23/Dec you ithyour coworkers a little to lifestylecould for feel your load strained, and your feelings, Aquarius. Tell some jokes or go ake a few adjustments to remedy anyoccasion. You’ll be thankful you did. onsibilities at work. out for a social e situations. Take stock of your working

er present People often sense that you can have your head on - Dec 22/Jan re ready for a 20 straight, Pisces. So don’t be surprised when you are asked r drive for independence very obvious to eagues. for is advice. ek. However, your determination could also unpredictable mood.

Jan 21/Feb 18

Taurus, you are entering a creative phase and others will admire and appreciate your work. But don’t allow the extra attention to go to your head. Be humble at every turn. There are plenty of opportunities for communicating your puzzle answers in ideas this week, Gemini. Expect quite a few meetings and other social weeks occasions where you can discuss things with next issue others. Cancer, you have a basic idea of how you want to handle your finances, but you are open to suggestions, too. Consult with a professional if you are considering making major changes.

time to take a deep breath and lighten up your feelings, Aquarius. Tell some jokes or go l occasion. You’ll be thankful you did.

This weeks puzzle answers in Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down intoissue nine next weeks

19/Mar 20

ense that you can have your head on s. So don’t be surprised you are asked Here’s How Itwhen Works:

Month Your ability to supervise and organize people makes you Special: unique, Leo. This role Ageswill 3-6become years central to your lifestyle for the next few days as you tackle new responsibilities at work.

and Recreational Classes offered in:

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Scorpio, you have a great interest in business and making career decisions that will work for you. That new venture you have been pondering takes a big step forward. Interactions with coworkers could feel a little strained, Sagittarius. Make a few adjustments to remedy any uncomfortable situations. Take stock of your working relationships. Capricorn, your drive for independence is very obvious to others this week. However, your determination could also put you in an unpredictable mood. This is a good time to take a deep breath and lighten up your load and your feelings, Aquarius. Tell some jokes or go out for a social occasion. You’ll be thankful you did.

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20

People often sense that you can have your head on straight, Pisces. So don’t be surprised when you are asked for advice.

Thursday, September 20 at 6 p.m.

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For more information call 613-580-2424 ext. 19042 or e-mail the volunteer coordinator at daniele.hamonic@ottawa.ca. Cumberland Heritage Village Museum 2940 Old Montreal Road, Cumberland

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family

Libra, recreational activities are ideal ways for you to keep in shape and reduce stress over the course of the week. You could feel your troubles melt away.

Ottawa’s only living history museum is looking for volunteers to unsettle the past and venture into the shadows. Join the cast of the Haunted Historic Village and sign up on

• Ballet • Pointe • Jazz • Tap • Hip Hop • Lyrical

Ongoing Registration

Last week’s answers

Walk the darknessThis weeks puzzle answers in and haunt the night… next weeks issue

3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers Virgo, opportunities to advance your career present will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. Competitive themselves, but you are not sure if you are ready for a bigger role. Seek advice from trusted colleagues. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

Ages 3 and up Welcome

37. All without specification 39. Diego or Francisco 42. Products of creativity 43. Yes vote 44. Radioactivity unit 46. Credit, post or greeting 47. Computer memory 48. Land or sea troops 50. A way to travel on skis 51. Tenure of abbot 53. Fiddler crabs 55. Rainbow shapes 57. Bird genus of Platalea 58. Having winglike extensions 59. Squash bug genus 61. Islamic leader 63. Former Soviet Union 64. Small sleeps 65. Iranian carpet city 67. Auto speed measurement 69. Ambulance providers

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n’t allow the extra at every turn.

45. Initialism 49. A shag rug made in Sweden 50. Yemen capital 52. Atomic #79 54. CNN’s Turner 55. A priest’s linen vestment 56. Returned material authorization (abbr.) 58. Blood clam genus 60. Raging & uncontrollable 62. Actress Margulies 66. Burrowing marine mollusk 67. Port in SE S. Korea 68. Swiss river 70. Mix of soul and calypso 71. Area for fencing bouts 72. Canned meat 73. Myriameter 74. Long ear rabbits 75. Requests CLUES DOWN 1. Tell on 2. Medieval alphabet

0913

0913

authorization (abbr.) 46. Credit, post or greeting 7. Chickens’ cold 58. Blood clam genus 47. Computer memory 8. Heart chamber 60. Raging & uncontrollable 48. Land or sea troops 9. Timid 62. Actress Margulies 50. A way to travel on skis 10. Oil cartel 66. Burrowing marine mollusk 51. Tenure of abbot 11. Statute heading 67. Port in SE S. Korea 53. CLUES Fiddler ACROSS crabs 12. Severely correct 37. All without specification 3. Surrounding radiant light 1. Lion sound 68. Swiss river 55. Rainbow shapes 16. An amount not specified 39. Diego or Francisco 4. Open land where livestock 5. Pictural 70. Mixgraze of soul and calypso 57. Bird genustapestry of Platalea 21. It42. never sleepsof creativity Products 71. Area for fencing bouts 10. Manywinglike not ands extensions 58. Having 22. Indian 43. Yesfrock vote 5. Quench 72. Canned meat 59. Squash bugknown genustoad species 25. Soak flax 13. Largest 44. Radioactivity unit 6. Strays 73. Myriameter 61. Islamic leader 27. Mariner 14. Truth 46. Credit, post or greeting 7. Chickens’ cold 74. Long ear rabbits 63. Former Union 28. Arabian outer garment 15. PlacesSoviet an object 47. Computer memory 8. Heart chamber 75. Requests 64. Small sleeps 29. Binary coded decimal 48. Land or sea troops 9. Timid 17. Small mountain lake LUES 65. Iranian carpet city fish 32. European Market 50. A wayCommon to travel on skis 10. DOWN Oil cartel 18. Scomberesocidae 1. Tell on 67. Auto speed measurement 35. 17th Greek letter 51. Tenure of abbot 11. Statute heading 19. A N.E. Spanish river 2. Medieval alphabet 69. Ambulance providers 36. Norse sea goddess 53. Fiddler crabs 12. Severely correct 20. Selleck TV series 55. Rainbow shapes 16. An amount not specified 22. Strong, coarse fabric 57. Bird genus of Platalea 21. It never sleeps 23. Nestling hawk 58. Having winglike extensions 22. Indian frock 24. Macaws 59. Squash bug genus 25. Soak flax 26. Decorate with frosting LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23 61. Islamic leader 27. Mariner lity to a project at Libra, recreational activities are ideal ways for you to keep 27. The bill in a restaurant 63. Former Soviet Union 28. Arabian outeringarment mes easy to you, shape and reduce stress over the course of the week. 30. Sea patrol (abbr.) 64. Small 29. Binary codedYou decimal could feel your troubles melt sleeps away. 31. Used of posture 65. Iranian carpet city 32. European Common Market 33. Basics 67. Auto 35. 17th Greek letter SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 speed measurement 34. Having no fixed course and36. others willsea goddess Scorpio, you have a great in business and making 69.interest Ambulance providers Norse

Orthotics Home & Office Visits Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012

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OrlĂŠans EMC - Thursday, September 13, 2012


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