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AUTUMN 2013

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In tHis Issue

14

My Summer in China

by Jenna Martinello.....................................................................................

18

Making Book The story of Wind, Water, Barley and Wine by Lindi Pierce........................ Angelo Bean’s Oeno-Culinary Adventure Meat marries wine by Cynthia Peters.......................................................... The Webb HOme by Catherine Stutt........................................................................................ BLUE MOOSE AND BLACK MAGIC

22

by John Martinello...................................................................................... Temporary Foreign workers Augment local agriculture by Veronica Leonard......................................... The Allen-Robinson mill by Lindi Pierce............................................................................................

14 18 22 30 42 50 56 62

fine homes showcase........................................................................ Living in the ideal Artists turn home project into art exhibit by Cindy Duffy...........................

30

4

42

COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING AUTUMN 2013

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CQL Directory......................................................................................

71

saitarg’s gq Ruth Abernethy speaks with Alan Gratias....................................................

74

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: Phaitoon Commee is a member of the growing network of Thai workers helping area wineries. He is pictured in the vineyard at Casa-Dea Estates Winery. Photography by Daniel Vaughan.

64 Each issue available online at:

www.countyandquinteliving.ca


2014


Family Owned and Operated Since 1960

Group publisher Duncan Weir Duncan.weir@metroland.com publisher Ron Prins rprins@metroland.com editor Catherine Stutt editor@xplornet.com Photo editor Daniel Vaughan daniel@vaughangroup.ca Advertising Executive Laura Dawson 613.475.0255 x 208 ldawson@metroland.com design & production Kathern Bly and Monica McTaggart Susan K. Bailey Marketing & Design info@skbailey.com

rolfthejeweller.com 105 Dundas St. West, Trenton 613-392-3383

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Cindy Duffy Alan Gratias Veronica Leonard Cynthia Peters

Lindi Pierce Jenna Martinello John Martinello Catherine Stutt

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Laura Dawson Brad Denoon Lisa Farrell David Lawler

Colin Leonard Lindi Pierce Daniel Vaughan

ADMINISTRATION Benita Stansel bstansel@metroland.com Distribution Kathy Morgan kmorgan@metroland.com

Luxury baby alpaca and wool throws FRENCH COUNTRY 237 Main Street Picton, Ontario 613.476.7775 www.frenchcountry.ca 6

COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING AUTUMN 2013

County & Quinte Living is published quarterly and is available free of charge through strategic partners, wineries, golf courses, real estate, and chamber of commerce offices, retail outlets, and advertiser locations. County & Quinte Living may not be reproduced, in part or whole, in any form without prior written consent of the publisher. Views expressed by contributors are their own opinions and do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of County & Quinte Living. Subscription rate $25 a year. HST included. County & Quinte Living is a division of Metroland Media Group Ltd.

21 Meade St. P.O. Box 1030 Brighton, ON, K0K 1H0 Canada 613.475.0255 www.countyandquinteliving.ca Find us on Facebook Š2013 Metroland Media Group Ltd. Printed in Ontario Canada


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T

here seems to be something visceral, regardless of our age, about that genetically coded time around Labour Day when something shifts in our collective psyche. There is a sense of urgency, of preparing for the inevitable, whether that predestination is getting a backpack ready for Tuesday morning’s return to school, or for the winter we know is all too close.

While Orland writes about the geology of the County, hundreds of foreign workers contribute in a positive way to its economy, travelling from their homes in Thailand, the Caribbean, and Mexico to help local wineries, production facilities, and farms. Veronica Leonard met with the workers and their hosts and writes about the wealth of talent and sheer determination of these annual visitors.

Speaking with a friend, whose memories of the first day of the school year are as many decades in the past as my own, we laughed at the realization our subconscious was tweaking us to get our binders and pens together. Both in our 50s, both professionals, we realized this childhood memory will always be a benchmark in our adulthood.

Summer can’t be all about work, and John Martinello introduces readers to the the Blue Moose Café where he and our photo editor Daniel Vaughan claim they have found the best breakfast ever – including John’s favourite home fries – for only $7. The Blue Moose is part of a larger complex including the Waupoos Marina and Cannery Row – an outdoor museum chronicling the history of the County’s canning industry. It’s a good read, captured in John’s wonderful style.

Earlier in August I was speaking with another friend who recently returned from visiting her grandparents in Beijing. While there, nine-yearold Jenna Martinello learned from her friend of the highly competitive nature of high school in her mother’s native China. We’re fortunate to have Jenna’s back-to-school perspective in this issue and welcome her as a CQL writer. Keeping on an educational note, Cindy Duffy profiles internationally recognized artists Ian Carr-Harris and Yvonne Lammerich who recently made Prince Edward County their home, after relocating from Toronto. Ian and Yvonne made a study of their converted County barn as part of their ideal home project, calling on none other than Samuel de Champlain and imagery from textbooks. This is a bit of a learning issue, with the launch of Orland French’s Wind, Water, Barley and Wine, with guest writers, including our own Lindi Pierce. This geological take on Prince Edward County should be on every bookshelf and readers will never look at the County in the same light. 8

COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING AUTUMN 2013

We’re having a hard time running out of repurposed mills in the area, and once again Lindi Pierce delivers. This time, she visited with the owners of a private enclave to learn about a wonderful abandoned mill brought back to life by three best friends and now in the hands of the next generation of caretakers. Unlike many of Lindi’s mills, this one is not publicly accessible, so this is a very special glimpse of a treasured personal project. We extend our gratitude to Carey and Ann Webb for sharing their home with our readers. It was a multi-generation labour of love and enjoyed by the extended Webb family. As Ann showed us through her home, she lovingly explained their involvement in every detail. Although the home looks like it fell from the pages of a magazine (which I guess it does here), the warmth and love is evident in every room. Fall isn’t just about learning, it’s about harvest, and Angelo Bean has a treat for our

readers. Cynthia Peters visited with Angelo to learn about his wine and beer infused heritage pork sausages. Using County wine and cider, Angelo creates these revolutionary offerings in his private charcuterie, and then shares them through cooking classes at Cynthia’s From the Farm Cooking School and at gourmet establishments. From Tipsy Dogs to Tamworth heirloom pork, these are exceptional creations. They are incredible. Really really incredible. In my unbiased editorial opinion. Lastly, Alan Gratias speaks with Ruth Abernethy who shares her thoughts in Gravitas. A renowned sculptor, Ruth recently busted Sir John A. Macdonald in Picton. While the kids are back in school and the harvest continues, take some time to enjoy this most beautiful of seasons. Maybe all autumn babies grow up to love the warm days, cool nights, spectacular colours, memories of a summer well spent, and an approaching winter of content. This one did. May your heart’s cornucopia always be full. Thanks for turning the page.

from the

Editor’s Desk

Catherine Stutt, Editor, County and Quinte Living editor@xplornet.com


P13093DF_Sept_2013_DAA.indd 1

13-08-28 4:25 PM

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Advertiser Index

A cco m m o dat i o n s The Wexford House ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ Page 47 arts/e vents My Theatre ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Page 44 Savour ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ Page 61 Taste the County ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ Page 75 The Maker’s Hand ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Page 48 au t o Bay Subaru ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������Page 9 Belleville Toyota ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ Page 26 Lexus of Kingston ........................................................................................Page 5 Builders/De v elopers CTC Const. & Project Man. .................................................................................... Page 25 Elliott Sage Design .................................................................................... Page 38

Henderson Developments ..................................................................................... Page 53 Hickory Homes .................................................................................... Page 60 Honey Do Contractors .................................................................................... Page 62 Loyalist Contractors ..................................................................................... Page 45 Quinte Design ..................................................................................... Page 41 RayCon Building & Renovation .................................................................................... Page 46 Renovation Restoration .................................................................................... Page 28 Sandbanks Summer Village ..................................................................................... Page 49 COMMUNIT Y Belleville DBIA ..................................................................................... Page 59 Highland Shores CAS .................................................................................... Page 48 Kingston Accom. Partners ....................................................................................... Page 7 Picton BIA ..................................................................................... Page 52 Township of Stirling – Rawdon ..................................................................................... Page 55 Welcome Wagon ..................................................................................... Page 70 E d u c at i o n al I n s t i t u t i o n Albert College ����������������������������������������������������������������������Page 69 Fa s h i o n City Revival ��������������������������������������������������������������������� Page 52 H.D. Rolf The Jeweller ����������������������������������������������������������������������� Page 6 IDesign Optical ��������������������������������������������������������������������� Page 13 The Village Shoppe ��������������������������������������������������������������������� Page 59

Thomas Estevez Design ..................................................................................... Page 59 Quinte Mall ..................................................................................... Page 24 Vivacious ..................................................................................... Page 17 F o o d/ D i n i n g / W i n e Dinkle’s ..................................................................................... Page 59 Natural Sequence .................................................................................... Page 72 Old Stockdale Mill .................................................................................... Page 62 Paulos ..................................................................................... Page 59 H o m e D é co r /G i f t s Countrytime Furniture ..................................................................................... Page 17 Dustins Flower Shoppe ..................................................................................... Page 59 French Country ....................................................................................... Page 6 Ruttle Brothers Furniture .................................................................................... Page 54 Ten Thousand Villages ..................................................................................... Page 52 The Bird House ..................................................................................... Page 70 H om e Im prov em en t/D e sig n A & B Precast .................................................................................... Page 34 Anderson Equipment Sales ..................................................................................... Page 70 Fireplace Specialties ..................................................................................... Page 41 Inside Design .................................................................................... Page 40 Moira Glass & Mirror .................................................................................... Page 46 Nhance Wood Renewal .................................................................................... Page 46

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Professional Services Dental Dr. Brett’s Family Dentistry .......................................................................... Page 21 Dr. Younes Dental Care Wexford House - Picton ­—Photography by Daniel Vaughan ..................................................... Inside Front Cover Riverside Dental .......................................................................... Page 35 Steinberg Dental Centres PCI Consultants .................................................................................... Page 58 ............................................................. Outside Back Cover Plumbing Plus .................................................................................... Page 25 Professional Services General Rona ..................................................................................... Page 67 County Arborists ..................................................................................... Page 32 Sidney Inn Carpet One ..................................................................................... Page 17 H & R Block ..................................................................................... Page 27 Sines Flooring .................................................................................... Page 68 HelpLegal ..................................................................................... Page 16 St. Lawrence Pools ....................................................................................... Page 3 IDesign Optical ..................................................................................... Page 13 Tablecraft ..................................................................................... Page 71 Mayeski Law ..................................................................................... Page 33 The County Fireplace ..................................................................................... Page28 Ontario Coachways .................................................................................... Page 73 The Window Centre .................................................................................... Page 48 Out in the County ..................................................................................... Page 70 Vanderlaan Building Products .................................................................................... Page 54 PEC Travel .................................................................................... Page 20 VanVark Electric .................................................................................... Page 66 Vaughan Group ..................................................................................... Page 53 William Design Company ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Page 58 R e al E s tat e L a n d s c a p e /Ga r d e n County Arborists ..................................................................................... Page 32 Earthwoods ..................................................................................... Page 72 Hollandale Landscaping & Garden ......................................................................................Page 37 Lockyers Country Gardens ......................................................................................Page 12 Scott Wentworth Landscape Group ......................................................................................Page 39 Terra Vista Landscape ......................................................................................Page 45

W e ll n e s s / F i t n e s s / B e au t y Corporate Health – Callanetics .................................................................................... Page 72 Polish Day Spa ..................................................................................... Page 21 The Country Salon .................................................................................... Page 68 Prince Edward County Wineries Casa Dea Closson Chase County Cider Co. Devil’s Wishbone Hillier Creek Estates Huff Estates Keint-he Sandbanks Estates The Grange of PEC Waupoos Winery ............................................................................... Page 10-11

Elizabeth Crombie, Royal LePage .................................................................................... Page 62 Gail Forcht, Chestnut Park Real Estate ..................................................................................... Page 63 Sarah Scott, Chestnut Park Real Estate ..................................................................................... Page 63

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In June of this year, nine-year-old Jenna Martinello made her annual trip to China with her mother to visit her maternal grandparents. With each year, Jenna’s perspective on her mother’s home country evolves as she is exposed to cultural differences. This year, Jenna visited with her mother’s school friend Xia and her daughter Mung Mung, who was facing an important milestone for Chinese students. In Jenna’s words, with some background from Xia, here is a trip to China through the eyes of a perceptive young lady.

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COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING AUTUMN 2013


us mmer B Y J enna M a r tinello

I went to China on June 23, 2013. On the way there, there was a lot of turbulence and bumpiness. My mother and I arrived in China on June 24 at Beijing. At the airport we had to go through some scanners and stuff, but not many of them. My mother’s friend Simon picked us up and he drove us to my grandparents’ apartment. In Ontario, quite a few people live in real houses, but in Beijing most people live in apartment buildings. My mother only knows one person who lives in a real house in China. There are a lot of differences about China and Canada. The major ones are population and pollution. Pollution in Canada is way less than in China. There are some days in China when the air is foggy and a bit green. In China you can also see some beggars - some just because they are poor, but also some who are disabled. In Canada you don’t see many beggars. A very big difference is the food. In Canada’s McDonald’s there are burritos for breakfast, but in China they have hotdogs for breakfast. Clothing is also different in China. In China they wear baggy and bubbly pants, shorts, and even dresses. I used to have a bubble dress from China but I outgrew it. Another cool difference is in China there are so many people. When I first went to China I was absolutely stunned at how many people there were. In China there are about one billion people and in Canada there are only 30 million and that is a pretty big difference. China has sometimes five lanes for one way that makes 10 lanes for both ways!

After I spent awhile in China with my grandparents, I went to see some of my mother’s friends. The first person I met was Mung Mung and her parents. My mom and Mung Mung’s mom were friends since Grade 7. After we settled at Mung Mung’s condo we went grocery shopping, to the mall, and on a lot of walks. While I was there I tried some yummy foods, too. I tried some amazing fried noodles, delicious dumplings, and some awesome cabbage! During our visit it was sunny and hot; that was because there was less pollution there so the sky was not clogged. Then, there was David, Mung Mung’s dog. He is so cute! I really enjoyed giving him his meals of leftovers. I was at Mung Mung’s home when a pretty big thing happened. This was the time of year when every junior high student in China takes exams so they can get into the high school they wanted. Mung Mung took her exam and she didn’t get the mark she hoped for - she only got 90 per cent. You might 90 is a really high mark but in China it isn’t good enough. When Mung Mung found out about her mark she had a lot to do. That day she made about 50 calls back and forth with her father and she started taking another test for a different school. In the end Mung Mung got into the school she wanted. I realized I’m very fortunate because I can go to a really good high school in Canada just because of where I live.

COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING AUTUMN 2013

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H IGH SCHOOL I N CH I NA BY T H E N U M B E RS Mung Mung’s mother, Xia, explained the education system, translated by Jenna’s mom, Yan. “Why do our children need to go to a good high school? Why do they have to eat?” she shrugged while answering a question with an answer painfully obvious to her. “You will be with other students are equally keen to learn and teachers eager to teach. With good students and teachers, you’ll do better on the university entrance exams.” In Beijing, with a population of 20.7 million, this year there are 96,000 junior high school graduates and 92,500 write the high school entrance exams, attempting to secure one of the 86,000 placements. Of those, 52,800 apply to regular high school while 33,200 hope to enter a trade high school. The entrance exams are the only way to get into high school – nothing else matters – not junior high transcripts, not community achievement, not residence – simply the 580 points from the exams. They are the sole criteria and students must excel during the 2.5 days of exams at language (Chinese), math, and English, which are each worth a maximum of 120 points, physics (100 points), and chemistry (80 points). Another 40 points are awarded for physical education. The higher the marks, the more school choices a student has, and the better the high school, the more university options. “Chinese culture values white collar jobs,” continued Xia. “If you don’t have one, then your job is not considered good, and to get a white collar job, you need, at minimum, a degree from a good university. There is a very low percentage of students able to get into the best schools; it is very competitive, beyond competitive.” “Population dictates opportunities and scholastic achievement is the earliest and most significant benchmark for students.” 16

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Book Making

The story of Wind, Water, Barley & Wine BY Lin di Pie rce pHOTO gr a phy BY Daniel Vaughan

Wind, Water, Barley & Wine, the newly released offering from Wallbridge House Publishing about Prince Edward County, begins with the geology of the county, and works up. Why rocks? By way of explanation writer and publisher Orland French shared an anecdote from his past as provincial affairs correspondent for the Globe and Mail. One pressure-filled day, 45 minutes from deadline, his column idea was scuttled by newly emerging information. Orland scanned the horizon for a new topic and came up with – a tree. A government press release just proclaimed the white pine Canada’s official tree. Orland threw together a quick response, written from the perspective of the tree so honoured. “We got more response from that column…,” Orland shook his head with the unpredictable nature of readers. Indeed, why rocks? Orland’s journalistic background inclines him to come at a story from a different angle, to present information in an unusual way, to present serious topics in a whimsical fashion. Orland’s ironic dry wit keeps readers reading. Wind, Water, Barley and Wine tells the story of Prince Edward County through the lens of geology and it is rocking this part of the world. Visitors grab the book because it captures everything about the county they’ve fallen in love with - its stunning beauty, its history and architecture, its nature, farms, beaches, and wineries. Locals respond with, “I had no idea there was so much I didn’t know about this county; the only issue I have with the book is that it’s too short!” Wind, Water, Barley & Wine began over two years ago. Orland already had two county atlases to his writing and editorial credit - Heritage Atlas of Hastings County and Lennox and Addington. Both are engaging reference works packed with geology, natural history, the human story, and statistics.

WWB&W is Wallbridge House born and raised, from concept right through to marketing and distribution. Financing the venture was step one and Orland thanked several local friends who believed in the project, including a well-known entrepreneur whom he said is, “Known for having backed a lot of losing ventures…lots of winning ones too,” Orland smiled at the book’s June launch at Picton’s independent bookseller Books & Company. Book publishing is a gamble these days, but Orland is optimistic. “The area has a halfmillion visitors each year, if only one per cent of them purchased WWB&W it would be a Canadian bestseller,” he quipped. By all indications the book should be a smash success. Orland French has a history of making local histories; he has an eye for the local tale. There’s the story of the down on his luck sled racer who teamed up a dog and a calf, or the one about the two guys in a boat who teased a swimming bear with a paddle – that ended badly. Their dubious motivation was summed up by the title of the popular 2003 work about rural life in northern Hastings County, North of Seven…and Proud of It. Histories of South Crosby, Northumberland County, the Rideau, West Gwillimbury, Olmstead-Jeffrey Lake, and individual works like Baden Vance’s tender tale of the old character Henigan Rush, Orland’s biography of Maurice Rollins, and dozens of others followed - all this after a career teaching journalism students at Loyalist College to follow in his footsteps. Orland describes himself as the prime instigator on the WWB&W project, and is quick to credit contributors and editorial staff - as he introduced them in the pre-publication Rock Solid Newsletter updates. Orland choose his writers using a simple theory. “We chose local writers with a proven track record, writers who passionate about their areas of interest.” The concept guiding the book is unique, exploring, “How geology determines the lives of the 25,000 or so inhabitants of a peninsula COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING AUTUMN 2013

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known as Prince Edward County,” Orland explained in the introduction. WWB&W is a visually stunning page-turner thanks to Joe VanVeenen’s photos and graphic design including the draw of double page panoramic shots, and journeys above and below the county via intriguing maps. Darko Zeljkovik’s breathtaking aerial photography provides a perspective available to very few. There’s always the Orland French trademark - that different perspective on things; among his many contributions to the book is a magical submersible tour of the perilous waters around the fabled county. Terry Sprague’s 16 pages on Prince Edward’s natural history, from wolves to warblers, capture the richness of the county. In true birder fashion, he includes a list of the 351 species identified locally. Sylvia calls Terry the nature evangelist – and indeed he is a well-known and loved local naturalist with his business Nature Stuff. Orland continued, noting Terry “Retired from farming to make more money watching birds,” said Orland with irony many county farmers can appreciate. Dugald Carmichael, retired professor emeritus of geology at Queens and McGill universities, “Can explain a very complex idea in a simple and elegant way.” said Orland. Orland caught the rock fever from Dugald, who balances impeccable scholarship and childlike curiosity and he brings both to WWB&W. Orland shared a story of Dugald falling on his knees outside a church on a rock-hunting trip. Orland delicately inquired as to the

nature of Dugald’s religious experience, only to hear, “Look at these great new fossils!” Sailor Peter C. Newman, described by Orland as “a Prince Edward County groupie,” has a few books of his own to his credit. Although the men moved in the same journalistic circles, they hadn’t met until a breakfast invitation when Peter and wife Alvy took up residence in Belleville. Peter is writing a history of the United Empire Loyalists. Not surprisingly he is overwhelmed with stories in this proudly UEL enclave. Peter contributed the introduction to WWB&W. Then there is Sylvia, Orland’s partner in publishing and in life. Without Sylvia’s dedication to fact-checking and proofreading Orland could be at risk of dangling participles, spell-checker malapropisms, questionable data, or worse. Sylvia recalled the time she was browsing the acknowledgement pages of a beautifully produced publication, to discover some poor soul listed as ‘poofreader.’ She bemoans the inevitable last minute changes that can result in oversights: “painter turtle almost got past me. If I find myself asking ‘this doesn’t seem right to me, can this be true?’ I check.” WWB&W is a mighty book from a small publishing house, a true cottage industry. Wallbridge House Publishing resides in the French’s century-old red brick house on a leafy street in Belleville’s charming Old East Hill. “The roughest street in town,” Orland observed with characteristic irony. The home is

Prince Edward County Travel

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associated with a member of the storied pioneer Wallbridge family; many of whom lie in the old farm’s cemetery on Massassauga Point Road. In fact, farmer and teetotaller Wallbridge once changed the fortunes of the fabled Massassauga Hotel by cancelling road access when he objected to strong drink being served. The Wallbridge family story is Belleville’s own - an early inn was operated by the family from 1825 at the city’s principle intersection and several gracious old homes in the historic East Hill neighbourhood have links. The historic Wallbridge House seems just the right spot for a historian and publisher of history books. In case Orland’s history cred was still shaky, he has to his credit ten years of visionary leadership of the Hastings County Historical Society, and has been a major force behind the drive for a new archives for the city and county. Wallbridge Publishing’s offices are on the second floor. Orland’s airy book-strewn office provides a squirrel’s-eye view of neighbouring roofs and treetops from windows along three walls. Sylvia’s neat workstation houses a collection of reference books; a third workspace on the elegant brightly lit landing serves as a clutter-free proofreading centre. After months of word-by-word vigilance at the card table, Sylvia is looking forward to turning the space back into a sitting room at the top of the gracious main staircase. In the week following the launch of the book, Orland made the rounds of county wineries, B&Bs, and gift shops distributing books and delivering a second shipment to Picton’s Books & Co. The doorbell was ringing regularly by people coming to pick up their pre-ordered copies as gifts for young and old. Sylvia was beginning to pack for the couple’s annual week as resident interpreters/custodians at the historic Hay Bay Church – a week that was beginning to look very appealing. Perhaps the trees along that historic reach will whisper another idea and a new Wallbridge House publication will take shape. “I’d love to do another on Northumberland County,” Orland mused. Of his column-writing days, Orland reflected, “I was always fairly good at taking an idea and making it interesting to read.” Those words are a safe description of Wallbridge House’s summer 2013 offering, Wind Water Barley & Wine. CQL

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angelo bean’s oeno - culinary adventure Meat Marries Wine

By C ynthia Pete r s p H O T O g r a p hy B Y Daniel Vaughan

It all began on the mountainside in Naples, Italy. The life of artisan sausage maker Angelo Bean is an interesting journey. From his roots in the countryside of Italy to his new home in Prince Edward County, Angelo always believed simple quality ingredients are the key to good food and wine choices. For his first 20 years, Angelo learned and appreciated the traditions and tastes of his Italian heritage. Today, he excites his customers’ taste buds with his stories before they have even taken a bite of his remarkable sausages. His mother, Marcella Bean was a professional cook in her earlier years and Angelo’s first inspiration. One of his favorite childhood memories is making small meatballs loaded with parsley. He also recalls stuffing pure pork sausages made from pigs raised on their small farm. Marcella’s cooking philosophy was to keep the ingredients simple and as few as possible, letting the quality speak for itself. If the recipe called for more than three or four ingredients, it was too busy. This remains a cooking practice core to Angelo’s sausage and charcuterie creations. At 19, Angelo moved to Toronto and brought a slice of Italy with him. Like many Italian immigrants, creating a vegetable


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garden in a small backyard plot was crucial. This was the renaissance of urban agriculture in Toronto, nearly 50 years ago. Today, it is popular again, practiced by numerous cultures and ages and found in many unique locations including schoolyards and commercial rooftops. When Angelo started duplicating his mother’s recipes, he also started experimenting - creating new world versions from the old. His love of food and wine only became a profession recently. Angelo started as a cabinetmaker in the 1970s when he arrived in Canada. For the next 28 years he continued to work in the furniture business, but in his spare time his passion for all things culinary - especially wine - took over. His first foray in that direction was as a product consultant for the Liquor Control Board of Ontario, a position he held for many years. One of Angelo’s favorite duties was sampling 4,000-plus wines each year.

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His love of meats never stopped and one day he thought combining his two passions - food and wine - might be a winning formula. As a commercial venture, Angelo started the Ontalia Company - Italian Roots in Local Soil - specializing in wineinfused sausages using local ingredients. First, he started with Niagara wines and now many of Angelo’s sausages feature local wine and cider.

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Products range from his signature Tipsy Dogs to Sandbanks’ Baco Noir sausages to lighter versions using Huff Estates Riesling or County Apple Cider. For Norman Hardie, Angelo creates specialty sausages for the winery’s famed pizza using the lees (solids) from the estate’s wines. The sourcing of the local heritage pork (Tamworth is his favorite) has expanded to the County.

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Angelo is keen to share his knowledge through local cooking classes at From the Farm Cooking School, sampling, and demos at local food events and establishments. He is very particular on how sausages should be cooked and offers these tips: • Heat the BBQ – start medium low and then finish the sausages at medium heat • Monitor the sausages throughout the entire cooking period. • Treat them with as much care as an expensive piece of meat • Start with the crescent side down of the sausage (if they are curved). Turn a quarter every few minutes to cook evenly. • Cooking time should be about 12 to 15 minutes. • Most importantly, enjoy a glass of local wine, cider, or beer at the barbeque. For recipes, tips, availability, and more about Angelo, visit www.angelobean.com

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Angelo’s process is the secret to making his sausages so tasty. He keeps it simple with only a few ingredients, just like his mother taught him. The reduction process of the wine elevates the flavour, combined with the right amount of fat and proper grind of meat. Angelo reduces the wine (not on the stove) and then adds organic grape skin powder to the formula. The winning recipe is the result of superior craftsmanship combined with great pork and some salt and pepper. His sausages have been getting rave reviews for many years in Toronto and now word is spreading throughout Prince Edward County. Angelo is always inventing with both his commercial line of sausages and his personal love of charcuterie. He has a fully


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equipped test kitchen and climate controlled storage rooms custom built into his County home. Stainless steel counters and equipment line his beloved cucina. Rooms for air drying and preserving his prosciutto and salami are filled with new inspirations. Angeloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sausages can be purchased at Barley Days Brewery on Highway 33 between Bloomfield and Picton and at select fine food vendors in Toronto. Angelo relishes every day he can share his love of food and wine from his roots, especially with those in Prince Edward County. His new home has become a sense of place for both his past and his future. CQL

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Webb Home

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By C athe r ine Stutt p H O T O g r a p hy B Y Daniel Vaughan

In very few circles would a 5,000 square foot house be considered cozy, but there is something immediately inviting and warm about Carey and Ann Webbâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home on the shore of Lake Consecon. From the first turn off of a busy country road, the shift in ambience is immediate. Gone is the busyness of crops and commerce and tourists and traffic, replaced instead with a short journey down a winding trail leading through forests and vines to the waterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s edge. 30

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While the seclusion could be daunting, it is instead intriguing, inviting exploration and relaxation. There is nothing rushed about the Webb home, nothing urgent, but the story of its creation certainly belies this aura. In 2000, Carey and Ann were living in Trenton in their family home. Ann laughed as she remembered the tiny 700 square foot insulbrick house the couple purchased early in their marriage. When they sold it a few years ago, it was well over 3,000 square feet. “Carey’s uncle, Norman Wilkie, who most people knew as Carson, came over every day and told Carey what to do next with the project,” recalled Ann. “Carey loves working with his hands and learned from his uncle while doing the work himself.”

As the house expanded, so too did the family, and the Webbs raised their four children – Kim, Pete, Lindsay, and Curtis – in the ever-changing Trenton home. When not working on the house project in Trenton, Carey was learning another trade – he is a second generation State Farm agent, learning from his father, and now passing along the combined knowledge to his son Peter, who joined the family business in Trenton. In 2000, Carey and Ann decided it was time to find a place to relax away from the office. They purchased the modest cottage on Lake Consecon, feeling the property leant itself well to thoughts of a larger more permanent home, if and when Carey decided to spend a little less time at the business. For the next eight years, Carey and Ann spent time at the cottage, enjoying it with their children and the next generation, always keeping in mind the goal of moving to the lake.

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In 2008, the decision was final and in October of that year, the cottage came down and a new custom home began to take shape. With considerable guidance from Greg McIlmoyle, the couple incorporated their own wish list along with input from the family. “Kim’s husband Dave is 6’7” and runs an Internet business in Pittsburgh. His only requests were taller ceilings and broadband rather than dial-up,” Anne smiled, remembering her son-in-law trying to shower in a bathroom made for elves. The shower was tucked under the roofline and the tub was too short for him to stretch out. Kim and Dave’s new suite features vaulted ceilings in their bathroom, following the majestic roofline of the new home. The rest of the family had equally simple requests – bigger beds. “It was a cottage and we had twin beds for the kids. They’re married now and wanted room, wanted a place where they could all come home to stay for a while,” explained Ann, who is more than happy to surround herself with family. “Even though the kids weren’t raised in this house, it’s still where they come home.” Since buying the small cottage, the family has grown and moved around, with Mom and Dad’s home always the anchor. Kim and Dave are in Pittsburgh, Pete and Jodi are nearby on Rednersville

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Road, Lindsay is in Toronto, and Curtis and Charly are in Stittsville. There are now five grandchildren aged seven to almost two, plus three granddogs, so designing a new home for three very active generations was a challenge and a pleasure. The couple started with a basic Linden Homes’ design and changed it to fit their ideas and then handed it off to Greg for execution. “When we saw his first set of plans we were blown away,” said Ann. “It was totally custom, and configured just as we wanted. We were so excited we came out in the middle of winter and drew the footprint in the snow of the kitchen and pretended to make dinner, just to make sure everything worked.” The floor plan is intricate yet simple – an open concept throughout the main floor with the ceiling reaching for the stars. The strength of the fir posts and beams is evident

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as it solidifies – much like the family – at a central gathering point. While the ceiling is a web of angles, they add character and constantly draw the eye to new corners while reinforcing the sense of interconnectivity. The upper floor has bedrooms and a playroom for the kids, the main floor boasts the kitchen and dining areas, the sunroom, a large livingroom looking over the lake, and the master suite. The bottom floor is an entertainment area, home to a pool table surrounded by Carey’s extensive Coca-Cola collection and a stunning bar with all of the amenities. There is a bedroom wing on this floor as well, with a walkout leading to the patio stretching across the front of the house and down to the water. “We still call it the cottage,” admitted Ann. “The house is back in Trenton and we don’t own it anymore. Carey calls the upper floors the house, but the basement is always his cottage.” When Carey and Ann were considering the materials, they consulted with Greg and decided to use Douglas fir from British Columbia. Greg ordered the wood and had it milled locally. Ann liked the trim pattern on the windows so she and Greg replicated the design which was custom-made in Hamilton, along with the doors. The couple was a little uncertain of the ceiling treatment in the sunroom. The support structure matched the Douglas fir throughout the house but the ceiling was a point of discussion. “Greg talked us into an inlay of western red cedar between the fir,” remembered Ann. “We were a little leery, but Carey mentioned if we didn’t like it we could always put drywall over it. The look on Greg’s face was priceless.”

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There is a natural feel to the entire home, including earth tones in the wall and floor tile and natural wood throughout. The Webbs worked with another family – the Hilwerdas of B&H Carpet in Brighton, who were pleased to be part of this new home. “We’ve done a lot of work with Carey and Ann over the years and this was a beautiful project,” said Dave Hilwerda. “They are perfect customers – they have their own ideas, they understand the products, and they accept advice and input when necessary.” Dave’s brother Kevin concurred. “There is an immense amount of hickory flooring in the home and it had to be installed at the right stage to ensure it wouldn’t expand or contract beyond expectations, so humidity had to be controlled. We explained to Carey and Ann even a little movement with those spans wouldn’t be ideal. Their knowledge of the product and process and their trust ensured the results were exactly as we all wanted. They’re just good people to work with.” Carey and Ann were intimately involved in every single aspect of the project, including completing much of the work with their own hands. From the small but important details – a built-in dishwasher raised off the floor to accommodate Ann’s tricky back, an alarm/ intercom/music system throughout the house, and the compass rose inlaid into the entrance - there is an unmistakable touch of the owners. It is there in the design of the staircases connecting the three storeys, evident in the landscaping features leading from the road entrance to the waterfront, and in the dock with swivel chairs where a grandfather can teach a grandson to fish. The waterfront is as much a part of the home as the house. There is a modest boathouse awaiting Carey’s renovations, and a boat perfectly sized for Lake Consecon, which the family both enjoys and respects. “It’s a busy day on the lake when we see five boats,” noted Ann. The family is active, enjoying the opportunity to boat, water ski, kayak, tube, and wakeboard from the dock, or simply watch from one of the large decks. As the grandchildren grow into these pursuits – at seven, Beckham is already on the water with six-year-old Tate following closely – they already love the lake. Harlow is five, Avery is four, and Arynne is almost two, and all are frequent visitors to their grandparents’ lakeside retreat. Just a few doors down are Carey’s Uncle Ross and Aunt Nancy, and their son Andrew and his wife Sandra, who just purchased their own property nearby. Ann loves to entertain and always hosts Christmas and Thanksgiving dinners. In fact, the Webbs moved in on a Wednesday, four days before Thanksgiving in 2009, and on the following weekend hosted her typical sit-down dinner for 24 to 28 guests without a hitch, thanks in part to a winter walk in the snow to ensure the kitchen was perfect for her family. CQL

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By J ohn M a r tinello p H O T O g r a p hy B Y Daniel Vaughan

W

hen James H. Carter and Herbert W. Bedell built the Waupoos Canning Company in 1912, it is safe to assume they were focused on maximizing the pack of tomatoes, peas, and corn and they would never have imagined the grounds of their factory would be inhabited by two blue moose and Black Magic. It is probably even safer to assume in 1984, when she was busy cofounding Bellwood Health Services in Toronto, Mary Linda Bell could never have guessed she would own the canning factory built by Misters Carter and Bedell.

Linda was involved with the establishment of addiction treatment facilities across Canada through her father, Dr. Gordon Bell. In 1946, Dr. Bell was a Captain in the Canadian Army and his last assignment was to establish a clinic in Sussex, New Brunswick for the treatment of Canadian Second World War veterans suffering from shell shock, known today as posttraumatic stress disorder. Through his work with veterans, Dr. Bell developed an interest in the treatment of addiction and he became known as a pioneer who revolutionized addiction treatment, eventually founding Willowdale Hospital for Women, the Donwood Institute, and Bellwood Health Services.


Linda adopted her father’s passion for helping others. How does the Chief Executive Officer of Bellwood Health Services become the owner of the Waupoos Marina? It started in 1983 when Linda met her husband, Ian Cameron Kennedy who was a veteran of the Canadian Navy and a sailor looking for a place to dock his 20 foot sailboat, Jade. In 1986, through business associates, Ian learned the Waupoos Canning Company had closed and was coming up for sale. In his book County Canners, Douglas A. Crawford writes 1985 was a bad year for all canning companies, particularly small independents such as Waupoos Canning Company. As part of a price war, Green Giant (itself started in 1903 as the Minnesota

Valley Canning Company in Le Sueur, Minnesota) dumped lowpriced product into Canada and market prices plummeted by 23 percent. This, combined with the fact Maritimes and Quebec farmers were respectively paid 16 and 23 percent less for peas, sealed the fate of Waupoos Canning Company. In 1986, Jay Hepburn announced its closure. One year later, in 1987, Linda Bell and Ian Kennedy purchased the Waupoos Canning Company site on Prince Edward Bay and began building Waupoos Marina. Tragedy struck 13 years later when Linda’s husband died. It was from this tragedy the first of the blue moose, phoenix-like, rises.

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About one week after her husband’s death, Linda attended the Special Olympics Auction in Toronto where two of the 326 fibreglass moose from Toronto Mayor Lastman’s Moose in the City program were to be auctioned. Custom Homes • Additions • Renovations Concrete & Concrete Restorations • Decks • Garages • FULLY INSURED

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The last item on auction was Heavenly Moose. Linda’s husband, along with American astronomer and author Carl Sagan, was a founding member of The Planetary Society, and had their names on the 1976 Viking 1 Lander to Mars. With her husband’s death weighing on her mind, Heavenly Moose, with its stars and cosmic blue stars was a must-have. After an intense bidding war, Heavenly Moose went home with Linda. Heavenly Moose jumped into the back of a pick-up truck, watched the 401 whiz by, and then jumped out at Waupoos Marina. This moose who once gazed over the racket of tens of thousands of people and buses and cars in Commerce Court in Toronto now gazes east over the calm and clear waters of Prince Edward Bay, east towards the Rose Cemetery where Ian Cameron Kennedy now rests. Heavenly Moose stands just metres away from the second moose of this story – The Blue Moose Café. Opened in 2004 and located in the 19th century apple storage building, the café seats about 30 people. With its spectacular view of Prince Edward Bay and simple and warm wood finish, it is a place to relax – to let out a deep breath. The food, ranging from a breakfast buffet to a balsamic mushroom and quinoa salad to a traditional bacon, lettuce, and tomato sandwich is, simply put, delicious. When the sun is shining, diners can enjoy a meal on the grass patio under the cool protection of mature maple and fir trees; trees there so long they have heard the rattle and hum of canning factory operations and given cool comfort to canning factory workers. Conversation, if desired, is very easy to come by. The café is inhabited by sailors from as far away as Annapolis, Maryland, Montreal, and Chicago and as close as Brighton and Ottawa sailors with the time to talk about their latest voyages, politics, or any other matter under the sun. Amid the chatter, French is a language commonly spoken in the café; not only can diners talk about any matter under the sun, they can practice their French language skills. After ten in the morning, visitors to the café may notice a steady stream of people going in and out the back door - the entrance to The Cannery Row Cheese Shop. Specializing in sheep milk


cheeses produced by Le Moutonnière in Ste-Hélène-de-Chester, Quebec, the shop resounds with chatter of French and English voices sampling and dickering over a wide variety of delicious cheeses with exotic names like Le Fleur des Monts, Le Soupçon de Bleu, le Neige de Brebis. About 30 meters from the cheese shop, Cannery Row begins and the story of Waupoos Marina’s previous life as Waupoos Canning Company is laid out. The exterior walls of what was the canning building tells its history in posters and photographs chronicling the canning process and hard labour of a bygone era; a time when Prince Edward County was known as the “Garden County of Canada” and almost every County family was somehow connected to the canning business. Throughout the grounds of Waupoos Marina there is an easygoing magic. Whether it is the relaxed atmosphere created by the easy chatter of vacationing sailors, the helpfulness of the friendly staff or just the magic of walking among the ghosts of a former industrial facility is hard to know. There is, though, a Black Magic that, although hidden from sight, is very real and once very visible, inside a former warehouse.

Walking into the warehouse and first seeing Black Magic makes it easy to imagine how Mr Kennedy felt when he first saw it - the thrill of a great find in an unexpected place. Other than it is a 23-foot long, red and black wooden hydroplane with a very large inboard motor, not much is known about Black Magic. The records were lost in a 2005 fire, destroying the marina offices, the Chandlery Café, the clubhouse, and event area. By one person’s estimate Black Magic is a Lauterbach hydroplane. There is also conjecture Black Magic was owned by famous Canadian bandleader and hydroplane racer Guy Lombardo and once raced on the Detroit River. It only conjecture - the mystery of Black Magic lies quiet - and mostly - unseen. At the heart of the two blue moose, Black Magic and Cannery Row is a marina. From its humble beginnings as a simple, blue,

The reasons for the purchase of Black Magic were lost to history the day Ian Kennedy died, but he was known to purchase things on a whim. The story goes that one day in 1993 he was driving along Hayward Long Reach and happened to spot Black Magic from the road. Being a lover of things nautical, he bought it. Today, Black Magic lies, dust-covered and mostly forgotten, on a boat trailer in one of the former warehouses at the marina.

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AsFostering we observe Child Abuse Prevention Month and National Foster is a rewarding experience. Family Week during the Aid month of October, we recognize the invaluable Highland Shores Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is currently contribution that foster make in our community. in need of foster homes for parents adolescents. Highland Shores Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aid wishes to offer our Learn more about how you many can open your heart sincere gratitude to the families who have and yourtheir homehearts to a child need. to our children and youth. opened andinhomes

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steel, shore-side dock in 1988, the marina has grown into a full service facility with 140 deepwater slips. Sheltered by a floating tire breakwater and Waupoos Island, the marina is protected from even the strongest winds. With 50 years experience, marina manager and trained shipwright Rick Verschoor has seen and can fix almost any problems arriving at the dock. The Blue Moose at Waupoos is much more than a cafĂŠ and marina. This summer marked the premier of the three-show Cannery Row Summer Theatre Series by the Lake. The County Show, starring Suzanne Pasternak, and the County Rum Runners Show, starring the County`s own Emily Fennell, both played to sellout audiences. The theatre season ends on September 21 with Studio Tour Rock and Roll Night, starring The Fade Kings. The shows play in a former Waupoos Canning Company warehouse repurposed after the 2005 fire.

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Under the arc of a cloudless blue sky, on August 3, Waupoos Marina hosted the 19a Annual Shirley Memorial Cup Race. With 20-knot southwest winds filling their sails, 24 sailboats, tacked, jibed, pointed, and ran through waters running from Waupoos Marina, past Little Bluff, around Waupoos Island back to Waupoos Marina. With eyes closed tight enough, it is easy to imagine the white sails of the racing sailboats were the white sails of Prince Edward County schooners carrying barrels of County apples to near and distant shores. The namesake of the Shirley Memorial Cup provides an interesting connection between the Quinte region and The County. Shirley and Gerry Homer, of Trenton, were among the first boaters to dock at Waupoos Marina and owned two of the first six boats (one of them called Down Homer) moored there. Every summer, Shirley Homer spent as much time as she could at Waupoos Marina, until she died of cancer in 1994.

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COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING AUTUMN 2013

Under the guidance of Linda Bell and her new husband, Louis St. Laurent, the Waupoos Canning Company has risen, phoenixlike, to become much more than the thriving Waupoos Marina. With The Blue Moose CafĂŠ and the Cannery Row exhibit and now the Cannery Row Summer Theatre Series By the Lake, it has become a place where sailors, tourists, and County residents can walk a part of the history of Prince Edward County and enjoy great conversation and food surrounded by the natural beauty of Prince Edward County and Prince Edward Bay. What was once the derelict canning factory at the end of County Road 38 has become another jewel in Prince Edward Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crown. CQL


Temporary foreign workers augment local agriculture By V e r onica L eona r d p H O T O g r a p hy B Y Daniel Vaughan

Over the run of a year, the County and Quinte area hosts workers from around the world to work with its agricultural-related businesses. Some are WWOOFers, (World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms), some are student interns, but most are seasonal agricultural workers or temporary foreign workers. In early April, several hundred families in Thailand, the Caribbean, and Central and South American say farewell to the family breadwinners who leave for eight to 24 months to work on farms, vineyards, and agricultural production facilities in this area. With little English and a determination to work hard, they leave with the intention to better the lives of their families and in doing so they help grow the local economy. Edgar Ramirez, a Mexican immigrant who operates Ramirez Property Services, said the program is a win win for both employers and workers. Ramirezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business supplies trained workers for specific project work on local vineyards. He has four local workers and three seasonal foreign workers from Mexico. Like most local employers, he said although he advertises for Canadian workers, it is extremely hard to find people who are able and willing to work seasonally in agriculture for $10.25 to $13 per hour. Bryan Rogers at Keint-he Winery said he has several local workers who have been with the winery for years and others who are invaluable at harvest time but has to rely on foreign workers to complete the team for the full length of the season. Local workers still have to maintain a work life balance with their family obligations and expectations and are often slowed by heat waves and humidity. In comparison, the foreign workers have no family distractions and are acclimatized to heavy farm labour in extreme heat in the rice paddies, coffee plantations, and fruit farms of their native lands. They are eager to put in extra hours because the $10.25 they make per hour translates to a good wage and they earn as much in 12 hours in Canada as they would in a week back home - if they can find work. Working in Canada means there is money to send home to feed, clothe, and educate their children. Most have no desire to move to Canada, finding even spring and fall uncomfortably cold and they know the money would not go as far.


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Rick and Jane Robinson, owners of Quinte Global Foods in Belleville, cater to the needs of about 80 foreign workers who drop in every week or so for specialty foods and long distance phone cards to stay in touch with their families. They are also a money transfer agent helping workers send money home. They occasionally invite some of their long-term customers for supper. One of the workers showed Rick a photograph of a house he built for his family from the money he earned in two years working at a County vineyard.

ON PROOF

Lynn Sullivan of Rosehall Run said one of their workers was buying a house in Mexico recently and asked for two weeks pay in advance to finish the deal. At CasaDea Estates Winery, lead hand Suwit Burasit, who has been working at the winery for the last six years, says he uses his money to buy land for his own rice farm back in Thailand. Keint-he’s Miguel Vargas Flores was able to pay for medical care for his asthmatic wife. “Many of the workers now have small farm lots back home which their families work and their wages pay for extra livestock, equipment, and seed,” said Edgar Ramirez. It’s also a win for the employers. Most agricultural operations have a tight budget with their profitability dependent on wildly fluctuating weather and market conditions and stiff competition from cheaper foreign produce shipped from countries with lax labour standards and much lower wages. Local employers say they cannot offer higher wages and remain competitive. The Foreign Agricultural Resource Management Service (FARMS.ca) oversees the contracts of seasonal agricultural worker program agreements between Canada, Mexico, Barbados, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, and the eastern Caribbean which allows workers to stay up to eight months between January 1 and December 15. Most come April to November.

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Strict guidelines are in place for housing, medical insurance, transportation, and working conditions. Employers must provide suitable accommodations which are regularly inspected. Pay is based on the greater of minimum wage or the prevailing


wage rate in an area. Workers who take on leadership roles or who have several years experience with the same employer receive annual raises. Canadian Income Tax, CPP, and EI are deducted. Workers from Thailand and other countries come under the equally strict Temporary Foreign Worker program which allows work visas up to 24 months and formalized transfers to a second employer during that period. Casa-Dea’s workers will put in eight months in the vineyard, go to Leamington to work in the greenhouses over the winter, and return to Casa-Dea for another season before returning to their home country and re-applying for the program. With the time and money invested in training the workers to do the specialized farm or vineyard work, employers are anxious to see them return for repeat work terms. Shirley Curtis at Closson Chase says that it’s like old home week in the spring when the workers return from Mexico and everyone is together again. “There are always happy smiles for the people who meet them at the airport.” Most employers make a point of providing occasional outings for their workers on their days off including barbecues, shopping, and a trip to the beach. Dan Sullivan of Rosehall Run has taken his workers to a baseball game in Toronto before they fly home. At Closson Chase, the workers put together an appreciation dinner for their employers before leaving. Although they try hard to tone down the Mexican spices, Shirley Curtis reports even their mild salsa sizzles. Although many workers speak little or no English when they first arrive, everyone pitches in to get the conversation going, through sign language, demonstrations, and pictures. At CasaDea, Vineyard Manager Lou Della Civita worked diligently to

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learn Thai at the same time as his 12 Thai workers are improving their English. Casa-Dea has been the base for recruiting Thai workers in the County, many of whom are related, and he is occasionally called upon by other wineries to interpret.

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COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING AUTUMN 2013

Lou’s colleague Paul Marconi added, “When all else fails, out come the BlackBerrys and they use the translator.” It’s easier for employers who hire Mexicans as many Canadians speak a little Spanish and occasionally they call Edgar Ramirez to help when there are more complicated issues, but even those who are unilingual still find ways to communicate on day-to-day courtesies. Edgar Ramirez often drops by farms where there are Mexican workers to see if his former countrymen have any issues needing advanced interpretation. Many of the workers are people he recommended as possible employees. At Highline Mushrooms in Wellington, close to a third of their workers come from China, Thailand, Honduras, Guatemala, and Jamaica under the 24-month Temporary Foreign Worker program. Company management is anxious about proposed rule changes limiting workers to only two consecutive 24-month terms and then a four-year break. The changes would inflict severe hardship on both the employers who have to train new employees to a level of work and language competency and on the workers who have to revert to a subsistence living at home. The employers have a strong sense of community with their workers and respect for their work ethic. Margaret Korman at Half Moon Bay Winery echoed the concerns of Highline Mushrooms. “Our Thai workers are kind, gentle people who work very hard so their families can have a better life. We understand the government has now put a 48-month limit on TFWs which we hope will be rescinded. Our guys know our vineyard practices and need little direction from us. They want to return and we want them back.” CQL


WWOOFing and Internships The World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms (WWOOF) program annually provides Vicki’s Veggies with volunteers from overseas to experience life on an organic farm in exchange for food and lodging. The organic tomato grower also has 10 full-time local staff. In July, Austrian students Klara Schmeissl and Katrin Schmidthaler were WWOOFing as part of their agricultural school curriculum requirement to work on foreign farms for two summers. The July heat wave was a little more than they had bargained for but they enjoyed the experience and even learned a little Japanese from fellow WWOOFer Mayuka Onishi - a student who had come to improve her English. Mayuka said people are usually very serious in Japanese workplaces and she enjoyed the fun of working with the other staff at Vicki’s Veggies. She hoped the experience would allow her to find work at a travel agency or an airport when she returns to Japan. At Keint-he Winery, Alexandre Thil from France was also doing a summer internship for his agricultural program and learning winemaking techniques from winemaker Ross Wise. Two more French interns are expected this fall.

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The Allen

A r ticle an d p hotog r a p hy b y L in d i Pie r ce

On a secluded cove along Prince Edward County’s south shore, a weathered mill bears witness to the industry of the 18th century United Empire Loyalist pioneers, to the labours of successive generations of milling families, and to the vision and resourcefulness of 20th and 21st century individuals who have created a very private family enclave on the hillside property. Captain Joseph Allen’s mill, generally believed to be the county’s oldest, was a contemporary of Major Peter Van Alstine’s stone mill at Glenora. The Allen mill was converted to a family home in the 1950s, and promises to endure for many generations to come. Local historian Carolyn Love and genealogist Bill Morris describe the turn in the fortunes of the fifth generation of the Quaker Allen family of New Jersey. Joseph Allen (1742-1815) led a British

regiment during the American Revolution, and was rewarded for his loyalty to King George by the loss of his considerable property, imprisonment and torture, and banishment from the new republic. The family barely escaped by refugee ship out of New York to the Maritimes, endured a bitter winter in tents in Sorel, Quebec, and struggled in primitive open boats up the St. Lawrence to the Bay of Quinte. Left with nothing but loyalty, UEL Allen re-established his fortunes on his Crown grant in Adolphustown, and later in Marysburgh. Old account books record an Allen sawmill in operation by 1790 and a grist mill running by 1796, producing flour and lumber for shipment via schooner to Montreal. The lower mill’s grindingstones were operated by water which flowed down a flume from a pond controlled by a sluice gate, and poured over a wooden water wheel on the building’s west side. The wheel was eight to 10 feet across and 16 to 20 feet in diameter; its rotation turned gears which activated the millstones. Later the mill adopted the famous Little


Robinson Mill

Giant Water Wheel water turbine manufactured at Glenora (see Spring CQL) which operated with much less waterpower, and in the early 1900s it changed once again to a gasoline engine. The Allen Mill was sold out of the family by 1885, and owned and operated by members of the Clarke, Wright, and Bongard families until it ceased operation in 1932. The Allen Mill story of adapting and renewal took a decidedly modern turn in the 1950s when it was purchased and gradually transformed into a summer home by three indomitable women whose story links politics and publishing, arts and literature, city and country, Toronto society, and rural Prince Edward County. John R. ‘Black Jack’ Robinson was the outspoken and fiercely independent editor of the Toronto Telegram from 1888 to 1928. The family’s rambling Wellesley Street home entertained Canada’s cultural, journalistic, and political elite. John’s lawyer son Bill and his wife Betty Boothby Robinson purchased a lakeside farm

in Prince Edward County for a healthful country retreat. Bill’s sisters Judith, a political columnist in her father’s image, writer, and amateur architectural designer, and Joy, whose name belies her widowhood after a three-month marriage to her young soldier husband in the Second World War, and their friend Peggy Blackstock, Judith’s editor and at one time, a partner in Shirley Leishman Books of Ottawa, visited often. The three friends soon acquired their own sanctuary, a rustic fisherman’s cottage further along the shore, where they spent idyllic summers. Their imaginations were stirred by the old mill on the hill above, its roof collapsed but otherwise sturdy with its massive hand-hewn beams and stonework. With very little money, but great resourcefulness, the trio set about transforming the abandoned mill into a summer home and filled it with cast-offs and memorabilia from their work, family, and travels.


Judith, Joy, and Peg were early adopters of the principle of adaptive reuse. They represented the first wave of heritage awareness in Ontario, the appreciation of primitive pine furniture and early domestic buildings at a time when most locals were happily transitioning to chrome and Formica. The women enlisted local stonemason Gary Harrison to repair the stonework and build a chimney and massive fireplace. This fireplace exemplifies the reuse/recycle ethic. Built of stones from the creek running beside the mill, its mantel was formed from curved and notched sections of the broken mill wheel. The brick facing was sourced in Kingston. Driving past an old garrison building being demolished one day in the late 1950s, the Robinson sisters discovered piles of early clay bricks destined for landfill. Driven to “save these bricks” they began loading up their tiny Morris Minor, a small auto which features in Judith’s 1951 book As We Came By. When the foreman learned of their determination to return for enough tiny loads to amass 600 bricks, he saved the little car’s life by offering to deliver to the property. The partners sourced and restored old wood-framed windows of all sizes, fitting them into existing gaps in the stone walls and between massive timbers. Broken pieces of the old mill wheel were crafted into windowsills, pieces of the stone grinding wheels patchworked into a doorstep. The trio rescued abandoned old doors and furniture from barns, repurposed weathered planks into shelves and panelling, built a bed frame from hand-hewn beams and a floor from tongue and groove oak planks milled from trees cut on the Robinson property and cured for several years in the rafters. In the stone basement level, the women created a bright rustic kitchen heated by a woodstove. Limestone slabs were used for a wood box; foot thick oak beams blackened with engine oil form a room divider. Beneath a trap door in the floor is a primitive refrigerator; in the early days the women stored perishables in

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a bucket suspended in the cold creek water diverted under the foundation, and dipped water from a well built into the stream. “To me the story is this: people think they have to have a lot of money to do something lasting and significant. This house is their monument to the history of this province and this county. This building was put up 18 years before Abe Lincoln was born, think of that,” explained the owner. The recycling/green ethic sustained throughout the trio’s ownership; in later years Peggy moved a finely proportioned early clapboard house scheduled for demolition on a nearby farm onto the property for a guesthouse. On its wall is a tribute to the man who rebuilt the mill without power tools. The current owner has created an evocative display of antique hand tools used on the project to celebrate the old ways and the old craftsmen. The Allen-Robinson Mill (so named to honour Judith’s rescue of the structure) is a unique blend of the historic and artistic. There’s a story for everything. A relief above the fireplace was carved from a single piece of wood by Fred Hagan, who worked at the Mazinaw Lake camp once operated by the mill’s current owner. Sprinkled amidst comfy cottage furniture are treasured keepsakes: their father’s editorial desk from the Telegram, hundreds of books, r d osigning w n t otable w n .from c a Shirley Leishman Books, a crystal w w w . r e d i s c o v e r d o w n t o w n . c a w w w . r e d i s c o vane old chandelier rescued on a business trip to England, and the seat from an old local stagecoach.

B e l l e vBi e lll Ee v i l l E

Each steward of the Allen-Robinson Mill has continued its story. A decade ago the owner added a rustic deck on the hill near the mill. It is inscribed, “This deck was designed and built in the spring of 2001 by Murray Isenor and Gerry Wilkinson (the mill’s imposing watchman) to honour the life and continue the memory of Peggy Blackstock, one of the three original restorers of the mill – as she touched us so she taught us.”

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In the past year, artist Allan Bender (who recently created the panda habitat murals at Toronto Zoo) was commissioned to paint a mural depicting local history. On the towering walls above the open ceiling’s heavy beams are First Nations and UEL history, a Second World War Lancaster bomber tail gunner’s story, the massive wooden waterwheel at work, a horse-drawn wagonload of grain, and the three young women friends in the canoe from which they first glimpsed their mill home. The future sonin-law of the mill’s heir-apparent has crafted a beautiful Shaker-style hutch which houses old family china and completes the simple basement kitchen. The host summed up his feelings, “This isn’t my mill. Peggy saw it that way too. It was her mill to look after while she was alive; now it’s my turn to be its custodian.” He teases the long-time family friend who will one day assume the joys and responsibilities of the mill home. “Oh they’ll probably throw out all this old junk and put in orange shag carpeting.” He cites author Marjorie Kinnon Rawlings in her book The Sojourner, where she describes a farm family’s commitment to their land. “They had their turn to look after the farm, while they sojourned on the earth. We are this mill’s keepers, its custodians. Then we pass it on.”

The three women had agreed the surviving member of the group would inherit the mill. Peggy Blackstock became the mill’s custodian for a time, and then she handed it down to her nephew in the early 1990s. In his turn, he will pass it on to a dear friend whose family grew to love the mill, the woods, the stream, and the shore over years of childhood holidays. The mill’s many tiny bedrooms will fill with family love and life; the old Allen mill will live on. Thanks to dedicated heritage preservationists, creative entrepreneurs and visionary owners, so will all of the mills featured in this CQL series on repurposed mills. CQL

Building with you for you

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“In making art artists make a relationship between art and life. We don’t make art works solely for museums, or solely for mantle pieces. It is never a question of whether it is going to look good over the mantelpiece, but whether the work connects with experiences and memories that resonate with life. That is why people buy art.”

Ian Carr-Harris

Living in the ideal artists turn home project into art exhibit 64

COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING AUTUMN 2013


By C in d y Duffy p H O T O g r a p hy B Y Daniel Vaughan

The story of how the internationally exhibited artists Yvonne Lammerich and Ian Carr-Harris came to imagine settling and building a home in Prince Edward County is familiar. Tired of the hustle and bustle of the metropolis, they looked forward to a quieter life in the County. A couple of their artist friends had already made the move, joining a growing number of artists and artisans who have chosen to make this area home. What is unique about their story, though, is how they turned the process of building their new home into art, making it a story of life becoming art. Yvonne and Ian’s building project on Rednersville Road represents the coming together of life’s circumstances and notions of the ideal, in this case theoretical ideals of form, structure, and history. “In the process, questions are raised as to where one is going to live, the practicality of living, and how does one construct a structure that feels good to live in? The house on Rednersville Road is a work in process representing a fusion of art and architecture,” said Ian. For some time the two artists had been thinking they would someday move from their downtown Toronto home. The Victorian building is conveniently located on Ossington between Queen

and Dundas and has both living and studio space. Ossington was once an anonymous neighbourhood, but has changed since they bought the building, becoming an entertainment district with an increasing number of bars and restaurants, rising taxes, and a dramatic change in atmosphere. “The milieu is no longer conducive to having a studio practice; there’s a bar on one side and a gymnasium on the other side,” commented Yvonne. “The writing was on the wall, and we have been talking for some time about the notion of what constitutes for us an ideal house. Questions of how many square feet, how much studio space and storage space we would need were raised, but we were thinking way into the future.” In a rather whimsical turn of events ‘way into the future’ became the near future. Yvonne’s sister Angelika and her husband often let them use their cottage in Presqu’ile Provincial Park as a getaway, and two years ago, in repayment, they did a surprise renovation of the cottage kitchen. On the drive back to Toronto, Yvonne saw a real estate box in Brighton and decided to get a paper to look over the listings. Before they reached Highway 401 she spotted a listing for two acres, with a barn, in a price range they could afford. “There was no intention on our part to get involved in a building project at this point in our lives, but we thought, ‘Wow, we could do this,’ so we went and had a look.” Yvonne describes the setting when they went to see the property as “park-like.” Its rectangular shape includes a pond about half way back, and the remainder stretches to a stand of trees. The barn was at the front of the property. COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING AUTUMN 2013

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The property’s owner, Bill Bowerman, told them the two acres were once part of a larger farm owned by his family. The barn was at least 100 years old with architecture typical of the area. Over the years it was used to house various farm animals and at other times to store apples harvested from the orchards. Yvonne and Ian bought the property with the intention of renovating the barn and using it as a studio and County retreat, but once the purchase was finalized municipal officials in Picton notified them the barn was located too close to the municipal road and they would prefer it be moved farther up the property. Moving the barn would have been prohibitively expensive, costing over $60,000 just to dismantle and re-erect. By that time,

Yvonne said they had already fallen in love with the overall feel of the building. “It was a beautiful mathematical structure, 24 feet wide, 36 feet long, 12 feet high, and the stables were divided beautifully into 12 by 12 foot units.” After much thought and deliberation they came up with a plan to take the barn down, reproduce it, and then put some of the elements back into the interior. They worked with Bill Bronson who helped design the new structure in such a way the old barn, in its original dimensions, would fit into it. Bill says working with Ian and Yvonne was a collaborative process where he built the structure and they did the majority of the design. “It was a completely enjoyable process to work with two people willing to save a historic building and willing to think outside the box.”

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Bill was also impressed with their physical involvement in the project, “I’ve never met a couple who work as hard as they do. They were hands-on the entire time.” Yvonne attributes this approach to the many lofts they had renovated into live-work spaces as well as the art installations - both individual and collaborative – the couple completed together over many years. Although they didn’t know it at the time, they would soon turn their new house project into an art installation.

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Esther Shipman, curator for Design at Riverside (part of the Cambridge Galleries located at the University of Waterloo School of Architecture) was familiar with their artwork and became interested in doing an exhibition based on artists making architecture. “We knew the quality of Esther’s exhibitions was substantial so when she suggested this of course we said yes,” said Yvonne. The result was two exhibitions. The first was The Slit Barn - Ideal House Project, part of the Common Ground exhibition which included public art, landscape, environment, and architectural projects. The second was a stand-alone exhibition at Riverside bringing together The Ideal House Project in conjunction with one of their earlier collaborations, Abitation, which examines Samuel de Champlain’s 1608 fur trading fort at what is now Quebec City, through the lens of two different images - Champlain’s original cartographic drawing and C.W. Jeffries’ reconstruction for school textbooks. “It’s the concept of what constitutes the ideal that connects these projects,” says Ian. “We hadn’t originally looked at Champlain’s fort as an ideal but under the circumstances that is what brought these two projects together. Reflecting on Champlain’s Abitation foregrounded our contemporary circumstance,” he says. “Recording one’s own moment in history, thinking, doing, dreaming, and projecting, that’s the contribution the artist makes to society,” the two artists agreed. In addition to their role as artists, Ian and Yvonne are academics. Ian, who in 2009 received the Governor General’s Award in the Visual Arts, teaches studio and theory at the Ontario College of Art and Design in Toronto. Yvonne, while her studio practice is also her primary career, received a PhD in Art History from the University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM). Both have written for numerous art magazines and academic publications. Their new building on Rednersville Road is now 75 feet back from the road. It mirrors the shape and basic dimensions of the original century-old barn, but it is entirely clad in corrugated galvanized aluminum giving it a very modern look. The steel work was done by local contractor Lowell Fife, who along with Chris Philp also built a steel-clad workshop on the west side of the house.

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Like most homes, the house reflects the tastes and lives of its inhabitants. The interior spaces are yet to be determined – temporarily the inside is an open concept kitchen, dining and living area. Centrally located, however, is a tiled Kachelofenstyle fireplace, quoting a type of masonry wood burning fireplace Yvonne says was typical in the houses in Germany where she grew up. There is a large dining table for gatherings of friends and family and temporary bookshelves with cultural theory and art history books. A simple wooden staircase leads upstairs to a bedroom, bathroom, and open loft area currently used as their workspace. Yvonne is a fourth-generation artist, and stored in a space above the loft are paintings by Yvonne’s father, Frederick Lammerich, COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING AUTUMN 2013

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also an accomplished visual artist, who passed away in June of this year at the age of 101. These paintings are there for safekeeping until they can find a more permanent place. The house reflects their shared interest in history in which Ian has an undergraduate degree from Queen’s University. “We study history to give life structure,” he said. “On a personal note I stopped studying history before I went to graduate school because I wanted to switch from simply studying the structure of things to making things as a study. This house is an example of that.” Yvonne continues, “I wanted to study certain strategies in the history of art that both informed my work and illuminated my studio practice, the simultaneous experience we have of real space and projected space, the domain of imaginary spaces.” The beautifully crafted south-facing door of the house dates to the 19th century, a handsome entry door found at Legacy Vintage Building Materials in Cobourg. From the road view the house in its simplicity is unassuming but for the north-facing front entry which features a double oak door salvaged from an old church and found at an antique show in Odessa. To the door’s left they placed a horseshoe salvaged from the original barn and nailed upright for good luck. Both artists describe the house as a work in progress with much left to do. The old barn is waiting for its moment to make a re-appearance. Yvonne laughed, “Under those tarpaulins are all the timbers of the original structure of the barn. We are waiting for the moment when we will be putting some of the original parts of the barn back into the new building, but we are not there yet.” They’ve gone as far as to give their building a name - Red Pond - in reference to its location and of course to the cherished pond on their property. Their place in Toronto is for sale and when it sells they intend to build two studios to continue their careers at their new home on Rednersville Road. CQL

COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING AUTUMN 2013

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Saitarg’s GQ Gravitas Quotient is a measure of one’s reserves of inner wisdom.

Discover your Gravitas Quotient at www.gravitasthegame.com

Sculptor Ruth Abernethy answers 28 Gravitas Questions Ruth Abernethy was born in Lindsay, Ontario to a musical farm family. Hired for professional summer theatre at age 17 she subsequently studied theatre arts in Nanaimo, British Columbia and then spent 20 years building props for major theatre and dance companies in Canada and the United States. Renovations at the Stratford Festival in 1996 brought about a carving project that served as introduction to the bronze foundry, and shortly after an invitation arrived to sculpt a figure portrait of Glenn Gould. Other commissions followed, and Ruth’s subject list now includes John Hirsch, Al Waxman, Mackenzie King, and Arnold Palmer. In 2004, Ruth was the first Canadian artist juried into Sculpture-by-theSea in Sydney, Australia. In 2007, she was the first Canadian artist to exhibit in Dublin, Ireland with Sculpture in Context at the National Botanical Gardens. In 2010, her figure portrait of jazz pianist Oscar Peterson was unveiled by Queen Elizabeth at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa. Only weeks later, a commission arrived to do a figure portrait installation of Canada’s first Prime Minister in Picton’s historic downtown. Sculpting began on the Macdonald head study in the autumn of 2012 and once bronzed, it was unveiled with great excitement at the Regent Theatre. A September unveiling of Vernon Smith in Wolfville, Nova Scotia closed a year of many projects. Mario Bernardi’s portrait graces the National Arts Centre foyer; an enormous bear commemorates Duke in Rossburn, Manitoba; and a lofty figure of Alex Mustakas strides on stilts near the St. Jacobs Playhouse of Drayton Entertainment. John A. takes centre stage. www.ruthabernethy.com

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Name one universal rule of friendship. I’m drawn to people who balance kindness with complexity, but the connection usually hinges on truth. What are you going to do about growing old? I shall contend, with as much grace as I can muster, and nurture friendships with people older and younger. What makes your heart stand still? The sound of bagpipes, the music of Beethoven and Edward Elgar, and the occasional glimpse of the immensity of my affection for my sons. What recipe for a successful home life do you want to share? My motto is, “The only thing worse than doing housework is NOT doing it! Also, TIMING is critical; exactly when to broach a topic so others seem ready to take on the challenge. If you knew the truth, how would you reveal it? My truths live in my sculptures and there are many I hope to realise as contemplative icons in public space. We all hope there will be one more time. One more time for what? My husband Mark and I are always hungry for time together, which is no small challenge, as both of us seem perpetually up to our ears in some project. Work precluded a honeymoon, so we joke that every time we have a date for coffee it’s another honeymoon. I will always want one more time for that! What was your last rapture? I’m reduced to tears while driving when some favorite piece of music arrives on radio. There should be a word for impaired driving behind tears and great emotion! If you were going to launch a new prohibition, what would you outlaw? I would outlaw emotional parsimony, and lack of courage. Lady Macbeth’s summary says it all, “Screw your courage to the sticking point, and we’ll not fail.” How would you like to rewire your brain? I have no wish to rewire my brain, despite struggling with the thinking demanded by technological devices. If you were to ask for divine intervention, what would it be for? The safety of my ‘Three Bears;’ my husband Mark and our two sons.

Where do you go in search of the fading light? To that magical strip on the seashore. Why should we hang onto our illusions? Illusions are opportunities to re-imagine what exists around us. What would your father make of you now? I am very lucky to have my Dad still a vigorous presence in my life. I think he is utterly chuffed at my making a life as an artist. How do you know what questions to ask? When I hold someone in my imagination, with their detailed personal context around them, the next question seems to logically appear. When do reality and fantasy merge? I think these two are much more interspersed than anyone realizes! What is the best way to get licensed as an adult? By having children, or dependants, for whom you must set your own needs in a secondary position How do we get to the authentic self? Keeping the incoming channels and the outgoing channels of our life experience wide open, and sustaining equal flow of thought and sensation. How is the world more interesting than our thoughts about it? Wonder moves me forward and I delight in the compelling challenge to figure out whether the truth, as I figure it, would apply to anyone else, and at any time other than my own.

What are you fatally attracted to? Fatally best describes being summoned by the needs of others, ‘Attracted to’ would have to be to the thinkers of the world!

How are all your riches interior riches? I’m well aware I can’t take it with me, but I delight in the exquisite items humans can make. I love the thought process, the engineering, methodology, and mastery of materials in the objects and buildings that furnish my world.

Give one example of life’s absurdities? Working by the hour! I cover a great deal of territory in an hour and see comedy in rewarding those who cover considerably less turf!

What is your favourite recipe for unhappiness? Exhaustion and doubt are the demons that loosen my hold on the big picture.

Why do we sometimes crave chaos? I have a generous dose of chaos on a daily basis and though I do not succumb to anxiety over it, I do try to keep it at a minimum for the sake of sanity.

How can you make your ideal a reality? By avoiding exhaustion and doubt, and by keeping company with people who ask intelligent questions. It helps me re-frame my own problem solving technique.

What is it that we need to understand about surrender? We are all swimmers of a sort, but from that vantage point it is impossible to get a clear look at the tide.

If it is never too late to be what you might have been, what might you have been? When I was 15 I spent a summer with family in Nova Scotia and I remember saying to my aunt that I wanted to make beautiful things. I feel I’ve spent many years doing exactly that.

How do you stay clear of the rocks and shoals? I make a conscious effort to speak truthfully in any situation. No matter how wide my eyes have flown open, or how great a grimace I might quell, there is always something truthful that can be said. A contrived answer always comes back to haunt and I avoid that like the plague!

COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING AUTUMN 2013

If you were in charge of the world for one day, what would you change? I need two tools. One is an aerosol spray that instills ‘Regard’. The second is an international celebration entitled, ‘Bury the Hatchet Day.’


Discover the magic of our island community. The regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier epicurean experience, TASTE community grown celebrates our culinary community, along with regional history, film, music and art. Join us this year as we expand our celebration to a weekend long event and meet some of the regions finest chefs, beer, sprits and cider masters, winemakers, artists and musicians. Come to Prince Edward County and see why TASTE community grown is Eastern Ontarioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most anticipated culinary event of 2013.

Friday Sept. 27 to Sunday Sept. 29, 2013 Visit www.tastecommunitygrown.com for more information

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Rebecca McNevin Office Manager Deseronto

Brittany Hawker

Registered Dental Hygienist - Deseronto

Dr. Gokhan Shevket Doctor of Dental Surgery

Team Effort. For the past six years, we’ve been striving tirelessly to raise your expectations of what a dental practice should be. The secret? It’s all in our “A”-Team of Dental Professionals. From the enthusiasm of our Office Manager Rebecca, to the thoroughness of hygienists like Brittany, and the serious passion of Dr. Gokhan Shevket - our Deseronto team will make sure that you and your family are in good hands. After all, you only have one set of teeth.

Isn’t it time you raised your expectations?

Choose Wisely.

Deseronto Madoc Web Twitter

613.396.2974 613.473.2142 steinbergdental.com @SDCDentalCentre


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