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sUMMER 2013

A Spiritual Oasis

and much more inside!of ThesoWicket World

Croquet

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In tHis Issue

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The voice of the young In search of Al Purdy by Lindi Pierce..........................................................

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12 Don Oakley’s wicket world of croquet by Veronica Leonard.................................................................................... 17 TURNING TABLES by Gerry Fraiberg........................................................................................ 24 Lil Crow Native Arts Centre A Spiritual Oasis by Cynthia Peters............................................................ 28 INVISIBLE RIBBON GALA...................................................................... 34 The magic of manly macDONALD by Charles Beale.......................................................................................... 36 The Wexford house by Catherine Stutt........................................................................................ 40 Landscaping creates a welcoming arrival space by Catherine Stutt........................................................................................ 48 Quinte Hospice Gala............................................................................54 The road less travelled along waters that roared The legacy of Miss Supertest by John Martinello..........................................56 Burrell’s Axe factory & clapp-scott mills......................... 61 Albert college gala....................................................................... 66 fine homes showcase....................................................................... 68 Beach read.............................................................................................72 SUMMER events....................................................................................77 CQL Directory......................................................................................78 saitarg’s gq Danny ‘Count’ Koker.................................................................................. 80 COVER PHOTO: David R. Maracle embraces traditional music with a didgeridoo at his Lil Crow Native Arts Centre. Photo by Daniel Vaughan.

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COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

Each issue available online at:

www.countyandquinteliving.ca


COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

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YOUR FAVOURITE THINGS Group publisher Duncan Weir Duncan.weir@metroland.com PICTON, ONTARIO

publisher Ron Prins rprins@metroland.com editor Catherine Stutt editor@xplornet.com Photo editor Daniel Vaughan daniel@vaughangroup.ca Advertising Executive Laura Dawson 613.475.0255 x 208 ldawson@metroland.com design & production Kathern Bly and Monica McTaggart Susan K. Bailey Marketing & Design info@skbailey.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS 237 Main Street Picton, ON K0K 2T0 • 613-476-7775 • www.frenchcountry.ca

Join us for the 2013 BGH Foundation Gala

Charles Beale Gerry Fraiberg Marianne Gallagher Alan Gratias Veronica Leonard

John Martinello Cynthia Peters Lindi Pierce Catherine Stutt

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Lindi Pierce Mike Boers Daniel Vaughan Laura Dawson David Vaughan Gerry Fraiberg David Lawler ADMINISTRATION Benita Stansel bstansel@metroland.com Distribution Kathy Morgan kmorgan@metroland.com

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County & Quinte Living is published quarterly and is available free of charge through strategic partners, wineries, golf courses, real estate, and chamber of commerce offices, retail outlets, and advertiser locations. County & Quinte Living may not be reproduced, in part or whole, in any form without prior written consent of the publisher. Views expressed by contributors are their own opinions and do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of County & Quinte Living. Subscription rate $25 a year. HST included. County & Quinte Living is a division of Metroland Media Group Ltd.

COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

©2013 Metroland Media Group Ltd. Printed in Ontario Canada


A

s the latest storm slaps fat raindrops against the window, there is still optimism summer is only a cloud away. Sunlight is waiting for its chance to shine upon the Bay of Quinte region, beaming south to the reaches of Lake Ontario and north to fabled cottage country. The spring left us with an ice storm, flooding in Muskoka and Calgary, and a late planting season throughout the province. Regionally, our communities are renowned for their agricultural bounties, from early canning and wheat days of the 19th century to vast fields of traditional crops, to the dozens of vineyards geometrically assembled. Inclusive of all is a rapidly growing agritourism industry, representing diverse personalities and products, from the historic roadside stands selling heirloom vegetables to wineries and an equally coveted beverage with deeper roots – milk from multi-generation dairy farms. Determined to work around the vagaries of Mother Nature’s moods, farmers read the winds, plot the moon phases, maybe occasionally rub a crystal ball, and with a decent amount of luck and a lot of faith, sow their hearts into the soil one more time. Every turn of the road offers a chance to explore new territory, all while winding through historical agricultural domains. Regardless of the destination, it would be a challenge to get anywhere without seeing the bounty of this great land. We’re pleased to offer some suggestions for easy summer daytrips, drives to take you through some of the most beautiful landscapes on your way some of our favourite places.

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With a well-established and continuously growing arts community, we give a nod to those renaissance men who blazed the trail. In this issue, Lindi Pierce introduces a new generation to her beloved Al Purdy, and Charles Beale shares his memories and research on Point Anne painter Manly MacDonald. Charles Beale writes of his personal experience with the Interpreter of Old Ontario, who coincidentally summered on Long Reach, perhaps watching the famous Miss Supertest bring the Harmsworth trophy home to Canada, as John Martinello writes in his piece on Rick Frailick’s lifetime love of boat racing. We also meet two local craftsmen whose work is finding markets far from home. Don Oakley’s croquet sets (and talents) are known throughout North America. Colm MacCool’s rugged old maple trees were transformed into sleek modern tables now sitting at the Rotman School of Business in Toronto, where perhaps the next great economist will toil into the night with papers spread on county wood. No issue of County and Quinte Living would be complete without a celebration of home and heritage. Lindi Pierce tracked down two more historic mills, both continuing to serve their communities. We introduce readers to the circa 1880s Wexford House in Picton which recently opened its magnificent doors for private gatherings. We also stopped by David and Kim Maracle’s Lil Crow Native Arts Centre in Tyendinaga where far older traditions are celebrated and preserved, where culture is shared over food and storytelling and music. Summer is for reconnecting, and in this military community of ours, we are always

saying goodbye and Godspeed as our soldiers deploy around the world. This month, a huge thank you goes to Major Leighton James who spent the last six months away from his family, serving in the Persian Gulf area, and to Lieutenant Colonel Sean Lewis who frequently graces our pages and is returning from a year in Kabul as the Senior Canadian Advisor to the Afghan Border Police. They would be the first to say they are just doing their jobs, and remind us of all of the soldiers making this sacrifice. They would be right and may their summer be filled with the sounds of families and friends. Summer is for fun, for heading out to the water, so we even threw in a Lindi Pierce primer on three great area beaches. Take her advice. Don’t be a hot child in the city. Get your Gidget on and hit the beach and avoid those summertime blues. Take along County and Quinte Living, live it up, and thanks for turning the page. from the

Editor’s Desk

Catherine Stutt, Editor, County and Quinte Living editor@xplornet.com


COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

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A cco m m o dat i o n s The Wexford House ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ Page 65 arts/e vents Applefest ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Page 22 Kingston Writersfest ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ Page 71 My Theatre ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ Page 75 PEC Music Festival ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ Page 14 Rotary Loves Kids ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ Page 55 Scottish Irish Festival ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Page 23 The Glanmore House ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ Page 76 au t o Belleville Toyota �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������Page 18 Lexus of Kingston ........................................................................................Page 3 Builders/De v elopers CTC Const. & Project Man. .................................................................................... Page 23 Elliott Sage Design ..................................................................................... Page 51 Henderson Developments ..................................................................................... Page 16 Hickory Homes .................................................................................... Page 44 Honey Do Contractors ..................................................................................... Page 32

Loyalist Contractors ..................................................................................... Page 53 Quinte Design ..................................................................................... Page 47 Renovation Restoration ..................................................................................... Page 45 Sandbanks Summer Village ....................................................................................... Page 7 COMMUNIT Y Belleville DBIA .................................................................................... Belleville Hospital Foundation .................................................................................... Highland Shores CAS .................................................................................... Picton BIA .................................................................................... Welcome Wagon ....................................................................................

Page 54 Page 38 Page 77 Page 38

E d u c at i o n al I n s t i t u t i o n Albert College ........................................................................................Page 5 Fa s h i o n City Revival .................................................................................... Page 77 G Boyd Boutique .................................................................................... Page 73 Quinte Mall ..................................................................................... Page 53 Thomas Estevez Design .................................................................................... Page 22 Vivacious ..................................................................................... Page 55

Blooms & Events .................................................................................... Page 77 Countrytime Furniture .................................................................................... Page 27 French Country ....................................................................................... Page 4 Ruttle Brothers Furniture .................................................................................... Page 35 Ten Thousand Villages .................................................................................... Page 77 The Bird House .................................................................................... Page 38 H om e Improv em en t/D e si g n A & B Precast .................................................................................... Page 46 Anderson Equipment Sales .................................................................................... Page 58 Cataraqui Granite .................................................................................... Page 45

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County Arborists ............................................................................................ Page 19 Fireplace Specialties ............................................................................................ Page 52 Moira Glass & Mirror ............................................................................................ Page 38 Nhance Wood Renewal ............................................................................................ Page 23 PCI Consultants ............................................................................................ Page 26 Plumbing Plus ............................................................................................ Page 33 Rona ............................................................................................ Page 63 Sidney Inn Carpet One ............................................................................................ Page 26 Sines Flooring ............................................................................................ Page 73 St. Lawrence Pools .............................................................................................. Page 1 Tablecraft ............................................................................................ Page 77 The County Fireplace ............................................................................................ Page 47 Vanderlaan Building Products ............................................................................................ Page 35 VanVark Electric ............................................................................................ Page 59 William Design Company ������������������������������������������������������������������������ Inside Back Cover L a n d s c ap e /G a r d e n W.R. Bonter Landscaping ............................................................................................ Page 64 Earthwoods .............................................................................................Page 77 Farmgate Gardens ............................................................................................. Page 31 Hollandale Landscaping & Garden ............................................................................................. Page 21 Lockyers Country Gardens .............................................................................................Page 46 Scott Wentworth Landscape Group .............................................................................................Page 50 Terra Vista Landscape .............................................................................................Page 53

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Geoff Church ............................................................................................ Page 68 Elizabeth Crombie, Royal LePage ............................................................................................ Page 68 Gail Forcht, Chestnut Park Real Estate ............................................................................................ Page 69 Laurie Gruer, Chestnut Park Real Estate ............................................................................................ Page 70 Randy Kerr, Exit Realty Group ............................................................................................ Page 71 Monica Klingenberg, Chestnut Park Real Estate ............................................................................................ Page 70 Quinte Homes ............................................................................................ Page 71 Sam Simone, Chestnut Park Real Estate ............................................................................................ Page 70 Sarah Scott, Chestnut Park Real Estate ............................................................................................ Page 69 R e c r e at i o n Stephen Licence ............................................................................................ Page 22 Clearwater Design ............................................................................................ Page 60 W e ll n e s s / F i t n e s s / B e au t y

Professional Services General Mayeski Law ............................................................................................ Page 15 Ontario Coachways ............................................................................................ Page 79 Out in the County ............................................................................................ Page 76 PEC Travel ............................................................................................ Page 74 Vaughan Group ............................................................................................ Page 39 Vision & Voice Fraiberg Comm. ............................................................................................ Page 22 Welcome Wagon ............................................................................................ Page 38

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Corporate Health – Callanetics ............................................................................................ Page 78 The County Salon ............................................................................................ Page 73 Prince Edward County Wineries Casa Dea Closson Chase County Cider Co. Devil’s Wishbone Hillier Creek Estates Huff Estates Keint-he Sandbanks Estates The Grange of PEC Waupoos Winery .......................................................................................... Page 8-9

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In Search of Al Purdy

B y L i n di P ierce P hoto S b y L i n di P ierce & D a n iel Va u g ha n

12

So

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much has been written about the poet that the next few pages could be blank – with perhaps a line drawing of the famous A-frame, or a silhouette of that head of unruly white hair to conjure the man and his literary life. Those who know his quintessentially Canadian poetry, and those who knew him personally, from skeptical locals to emerging and established writers, could fill these pages many times over. The story is familiar, isn’t it? Hometown boy makes good? A Trenton lad, born in 1918, is suffocated by small-town life, hates school, drops out in Grade 10. He rides the rails, joins the Air Force, marries his girl, works at unskilled jobs – and writes poetry. Bad at first. Builds a

house in Prince Edward County, an A-frame from recycled material. Almost starves, but keeps on writing. Suddenly, a breakthrough. In 1962, his sixth book of poems is critically acclaimed. His reputation grows. He writes an astonishing 44 books of poetry and prose over 56 years. He inspires a new generation of Canadian writers, wins prestigious literary awards. He is recognized as the first, the last, the best Canadian poet – capturing stories and telling them in a familiar voice. He died in 2000. He is buried in Ameliasburgh cemetery. He is Al Purdy. Al’s legacy lives on in a massive body of work written by and about him, and through the gravestone pilgrims who visit the Grove


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Cemetery. It persists in a bronze statue at Queen’s Park and endures in the Al Purdy A-frame Association’s energetic campaign to preserve his quixotic house for a writer-inresidence program. This is a good legacy, and more than Al may have expected. Of immortality, he wrote: “Some writers…yearn to have their work live on into the future. That kind of immortality, which probably amounts to fifty or a hundred years at most, is not attractive to me. I shall not be around then to enjoy such possible fame. Now is my time, today and not tomorrow. I suppose it is theoretically possible to write for all time; but now is when the blood runs quick, the heart beats and your feet touch the earth. And those things are what I want to write about”. (‘Reaching for the Beaufort Sea’, p.281). Al’s writing has special appeal for readers in the Quinte region - his youth in Trenton, his Roblin Lake life and landscape, local history and current events, UEL genealogy, family, friends, and neighbours – everything became a poem. Al’s voice has the forthrightness of the guy at the gas bar or the farmers’ market, and the depth and passion of the philosopher. If terroir - that unique flavor coming from the land - could be said to apply to poetry, then Ameliasburgh permeates and flavours much of his work. It’s not difficult to spot the resonance of the poems of ‘Wild Grape Wine’

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in this growing winery region. It’s accessible, appealing, challenging – and it’s ours. Al and Eurithe Purdy’s dilapidated A-frame is the crucible in which a new Canadian literature, and a proud clear sense of Canadian self was forged. The A-frame is not only the home of the great Canadian poet (which in itself would render it a worthy place of pilgrimage), but the spiritual home of a generation of poets and writers who were welcomed, fed, challenged, and nurtured in their craft (which explains the palpable energy in the tired old structure). Will anyone read Al Purdy’s poetry in another 30 years? Will anyone care if the A-frame still stands? How to keep the legacy of Al Purdy alive and evolving, creative not commemorative? Fortunately, new readers of Al Purdy’s work are produced every year. Young people identify with Al’s adolescent anomie, his boredom with small town life, his desire for adventure. They recognize self-doubt, questioning, rebellion and they connect. They respond to poetry about their rural life, their towns, and their history. At Trenton High School and Belleville’s Centennial Secondary School, visionary teachers challenge students to make these connections – and in so doing they create a new generation of readers of Al Purdy every year. It would be difficult to graduate from THS without knowing something about Al Purdy. For starters, the former THS building was Al’s school

from 1933 to 1936. His first poem was published in Spotlight, the school’s yearbook, which is displayed along with his unimpressive Grade 10 report card and other Purdy memorabilia in a prominent display case. The exhibit features a dramatic relief sculpture of Purdy created by art teacher Anne Macdonald, who was also the creative mind behind the décor of the school’s welcoming Purdy library. Physics teacher Eric Lorenzen, who admits to having taught his first 10 years in Trenton before becoming aware of Al’s story, spearheaded a project to have the school’s new library dedicated as the Al Purdy library; Eurithe Purdy unveiled the plaque in 2011. Not surprisingly, Al Purdy infuses the curriculum at THS. Mary Anne Ricard presides over the inviting Al Purdy library, with its worthy collection of signed Purdy works, and a quote from his poem What it Was. “I searched out chinks of reality in the high walls around me and found perilous escape in books.” Industrial education teachers Jay Noack and Ron Furlan engaged their classes in restoring the famous Al Purdy literary loo a few years ago, and Geography teacher Greg Fellows uses Purdy’s autobiographical novel A Splinter in the Heart to get students involved in exploring their town’s geography and history. In Brent Jewell’s senior Writer’s Craft class, students research the art of adaptation (novel to


screenplay, play to film), and adapt a piece of Al’s work to a new written form. The students’ work reveals their sensitivity, intelligence, and skill, their strong response to Al’s work, and the enduring value of the assignment in making Purdy fans. “He writes like a normal citizen of this town would,” comments Nolan. “It’s amazing what inspired him; he saw the world very differently than we would; he could take any ordinary situation and see it differently.” The students responded to local references in the work, glad to be proud of a boy from here. Matt, a self-confessed history geek, developed a three-part short story in response to Purdy’s poems Hombre and Fidel Castro in Revolutionary Square, about Cold War figures. “There’s a sappy-emotional, then a gritty-raw ‘I don’t care’ quality in his work I like,” he observes. Hockey-player Anthony produced a short story based on Al’s poem Hockey Players. “Who else would write a poem about hockey?” Bound with a skate lace, printed on facsimile hockey score-sheets and a beer list, the story is a flashback over a lifetime of hockey experiences. Hannah responded to the spare poignant lines of Poem with an original eight-page short story bound in a photo album, accompanied by a battered box full of inscribed photos, “Stories of every moment that had happened in her life, because that way they were safe, written on the

back of each photo, forever, in that shoebox.” Hannah inhabited the poem, creating a character Jane Smith and the back-story for the illness Purdy recounts, in her compelling original and mature work. This, despite her admission up to that point she had not heard of Al Purdy. Nolan’s story cycle Spring to Summer, Fall and Winter, mounted in antique photo frames, draws on several of Al’s poems – Spring Song, Indian Summer, Pause, and At the Evergreen Cemetery. He creates a character and explores her changing moods and emotions, through seasons and through a life. Logan channels Purdy’s anger in a prose adaptation of the poem a, filling in the blanks between Purdy’s spare lines with a hand-illustrated 10-page narrative filled with imagined events. Mackenzie developed a screenplay from the poems Al wrote about his mother’s death. His plan led him to Trenton’s Evergreen Cemetery, to connect more fully with Al’s story of his mother, and to shoot his first film. What are their thoughts on keeping people reading Purdy? “Keep it on the school curriculum. It’s relatable poetry.” Integrate the poetry in other subjects, but don’t overplay it, they caution. “Like, not a Purdy poem at announcements every morning or anything,” said Nolan. Centennial Secondary School drama teacher Michele Lintern-Mole has been the A-frame’s

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steward for five years. Each spring, in preparation for Purdy Day April 21, Michele brings students to tidy the house and property. Students spend time where a great poet lived and wrote - his bookshelves and writing room, Eurithe’s welcoming kitchen, and the lakeside point of land which the couple built by wheelbarrow-load, places that live in Al’s poetry. They respond to the place. Many of the young people comment on the tranquility, others feel a creative energy. They draw, write, photograph, wander, and enjoy the house and the lake. “There’s something about this place that brings out people’s creativity - Al Purdy energy,” Steven says, touching the A-frame’s worn barnboard reverently. Brandon C. reclines on the Purdy’s deck with Kenya, teacher Candace Stewart’s comfortable dog, before trying his hand at sketching on Steven’s invitation. “I never drew anything but graffiti before today.” One group of students applies itself to raking leaves and branches, another to pruning back the sumac which is attempting to take over the yard. Harley discovers an artifact, a piece of broken metal, and hams for the camera with teacher Michele Lintern-Mole. “They make a personal connection with Purdy here,” she observed. The students like the outdoor work and the freedom, and they develop a sense of ownership for the A-frame. Brandon S. signs up to volunteer. He’s so enthusiastic: “This is a really nice place.” By the A-frame’s stone fireplace, which Al immortalized in his poem Place of Fire, Noah (“my dad knew Al”) sits with his laptop, channeling Purdy’s labours at his cantankerous Underwood. Poetry? Maybe not, but that connection won’t be dropped, nevertheless. Here students can see a link between their daily lives, this cottage, and the country’s best poetry. As they do each year, the students follow Purdy’s route along Gibson and Whitney roads, into the village. They stop at Ameliasburgh’s Purdy Library with its collection of Purdy artifacts, and wander down Purdy Lane to the cemetery where Al was buried in 2000. Not long ago, when the annual visit coincided with Purdy Day, students gathered at Al’s distinctive Voice of the Land grave marker, beside the brooding millpond the poet immortalized in In Search of Owen Roblin, and read his poems in tribute. Inside the A-frame, a guest-book occupies the table where Eurithe Purdy served so many dinners to the country’s great and aspiring - writers. Over many visits, students have left their comments. Some are poets. Some will be. Some will read Al Purdy to their own adolescent children because Al Purdy spoke in their voice – the voice of the young. CQL


Don Oakley’s wicket world of croquet


B y Vero n ica L eo n ard P hotos D a n iel Va u g ha n

Don Oakley grasps the Gryphon firmly with both hands and sighting the ball, swings the mallet between his legs. The ball can travel up to 75 feet or go exactly where Don wants it to land, much to the dismay of his competitors.

D

on Oakley takes croquet very seriously. It’s a game of strategy, skill, and the right equipment. He reaches for a croquet mallet to demonstrate –not the battered bargain mallet with a chipped head and wobbly shaft everyone has in their garden shed. No, this is his mallet, made by him. This is the Gryphon, a tournament mallet built to take out all comers. Its rectangular black walnut head with an inlaid sightline is peripherally weighted with stainless steel striking faces coated with carbon fibre plates. The mallet head varies from 10 to 12 inches long depending on the player’s game style. The carbon fibre shaft comes in rigid or mid flex movement, encased in a dense foam grip in a range of colours and height options. It sells for $357.50.

Don is vice president of the American Croquet Association, and a director of the Canadian Croquet Association. In 2011, he won the US Croquet Nationals in his handicap division. His company - Oakley Woods - is the top manufacturer and distributor of croquet equipment in North America and it is run from the barn beside his home in Brighton, Ontario. After moving to Brighton in 1987, Don opened a specialty carpentry shop supplying cabinetry and custom staircases and business was building nicely. His life changed completely in 1991 when opportunity knocked on his door in the form of a friend with a croquet mallet held together by wire and duct tape. He was asked to custom design a stronger set. Fortunately, Don had kept an article on making croquet sets as possible a Christmas gift for his kids, so he was happy to give it a try.

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Like most kids, Don had played backyard croquet where chasing his brother with a mallet was half the fun, but he had never thought of it as a serious sport until after he made his first set, and then someone told him about tournament croquet.

Word got around about Don’s backyard sets and interest grew when he developed the Brighton mallet - a tournament mallet with a durable rectangular polyethylene head, inset sightline, and optional ash or aluminum shaft. It remains a popular seller.

“I realized there was a totally different level of the sport out there. Unlike backyard croquet which can be played on any terrain including cross-country, tournament croquet is played on flat manicured lawns within set boundaries using much more sophisticated equipment.”

“In 1993, the founding president of Croquet Canada invited me to attend a major croquet tournament in Florida where he introduced me and my products to the American players. At the beginning, I thought it was all right. A couple of mallets here and there will help supplement the revenue stream. Suddenly, it was so big I had to tell my contractors I was closing my carpentry business. They couldn’t believe manufacturing croquet mallets could be this big.” Along with the mallets he had to source balls for sets, and develop precision wickets, followed by other accessories. s

The games are very different. Backyard croquet is generally played with a cylindrical mallet using a modified golf swing. Wild shots, beer, and laughter are common. Tournament croquet uses a rectangular mallet, swung between the legs, and is a game of cutthroat strategies not unlike billiards.

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In 1997, he launched a one-page website as an inexpensive marketing tool. Today www.oakleywoods.com has more than 100 pages of products and information with links to associations, resorts, and croquet clubs. It supplies a range of croquet equipment from $150 backyard sets to resort equipment costing upwards of $2,000.

Woods had scored as best overall. The reporter warned them these stories often precipitated a sharp increase in sales and the edition was due out in two weeks.

Business took another leap forward in 1999 when the leading US manufacturer of tournament croquet equipment died and his business closed. Frantic customers looking for a new source of equipment flocked to Don’s website.

Jay remembered, “We were immediately overwhelmed. It was over six months before we could breathe again.”

Don modestly claims it was a case of being in the right place at the right time, but his innovative approach certainly helped. His lead hand, Jay Parnall says, “Don’s strength is his participation in the sport itself. He started playing tournament croquet in the ’90s. He’s always talking with the customers on the court getting direct feedback on things that are needed and it often leads to the development of new and better products.” In 2002, Don sold his backyard sport set to an American customer who called looking for croquet equipment. Several months later, the buyer called back and revealed he was a reporter on assignment from the Wall Street Journal. They had run a market test of croquet sets from the leading international suppliers and had given them to champion croquet players to rate. Oakley

Don had to hire additional employees and put on a big push to build inventory. As the reporter predicted, the phone started ringing at 7:30 a.m. the day the newspaper hit the stands.

With the Wall Street Journal’s article, Don Oakley’s reputation as the leading supplier of croquet equipment in North America was secured. He supplemented his line with lower priced backyard sets from North Meadow Croquet of Maine and he secured the North American distributorship for CQ16 tournament croquet balls. With the help of Jay and summer students, Don concentrates on the manufacture of mallets, hoops, and accessories for tournament and serious recreational players. While many Canadian manufacturers have outsourced their production to the cheaper labour pool offshore, that only happens at Oakley Woods as a last resort. “I think it’s the wrong thing to do. We are shooting ourselves in the foot when we send our manufacturing jobs offshore. My

“ There is a blurry line here between work and play. ” 20

COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013


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The exception has been the CQ16 polyethylene double milled croquet balls which are made offshore and are the best in the world. His Chinese-made equipment bags are also a better quality than he was able to find in North America.

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There are now more than 4.5 million people playing croquet in the US and its popularity is on the rise. Many of the 10,000 tournament level players in North America relocate to Florida for the winter. Although the average age is about 60, a growing number of youth are looking for a game of strategy away from the computer.

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Sales increase every year as country clubs, resorts, and golf clubs are adding croquet as an optional sport for their members and are turning to Oakley Woods for their range of durable equipment. “It’s become popular to turn the 19th hole into a croquet green as an alternative to bridge.”

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OTS GAP S O Factory Store en za American Eagle Outfitters Danier Leather

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“Like golf, serious croquet players upgrade their equipment. My first tournament mallet was a polyethylene head with an ash shaft, and then someone asked for a square head. We needed to relocate weight so we developed an aluminum shaft. We upgraded our ash heads to purple heart wood with phenolic striking plates. Currently, our top of the line mallet is the Gryphon. “

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Keeping the manufacturing in-house has allowed him to stay in control of the quality of their product and make continual improvements.

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philosophy is first to see if I can make it inhouse. If not, I ask if there is someone within a 50 km radius who can do it, then extend the search to North America.”

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Don points to a group in Muskoka who play Extreme Croquet annually on a three kilometre cross-country course which includes getting the ball across a dry creek bed on a two by eight board with a hoop nailed to the middle.

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A highlight of Don’s year is February when he and his partner Diana travel to Florida with a van full of equipment. “We’ve been doing this for 10 years. We’ll visit about 25 clubs and resorts. They look forward to the Oakley Woods travelling road show with all the toys. The rewarding thing about croquet is it is such a social game. We visit a lot of people I’ve played with in tournaments and I’ll play in at least one tournament while we’re on the road.” In his mid-50s, Don has no thoughts of retirement. “I could keep doing this for years. I love working with my hands. I’ve been tinkering with stuff since I was a knee high to a grasshopper. There is a blurry line here between work and play. I work in a play environment. When we go to the Cottage Life Shows, people come to our booth in play mode with big smiles. We’ve had wonderful relationships with our clients and formed lifelong friendships. Why would I ever want to retire from this?” CQL

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Turning


P hotos a n d article B y Gerry Frai b er g Colm MacCool says he may be the only person in Ontario who benefited from the hot dry summer of 2012. The Westlake wood sculptor left it to nature to dry the silver maple tables he made for his biggest project to date. He was commissioned to make 38 tables for the new Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto – with exacting specifications. Each table was to be 36 inches in diameter, 18 inches high, perfectly circular, and made out of one log. The finished tables weighed in between 300 and 400 pounds. This was not a job for the faint of heart. Colm and his wife Cindy, originally from Belleville, run the eclectic MacCool’s Reuse furniture store on Westlake Road. A customer - John Roberts who has a place in Prince Edward County - is a sales rep for the award winning contemporary furniture company Herman Miller in Toronto. He was having a drink with U of T furniture procurement officer Steven Bourguignon who told Roberts he couldn’t find anyone to execute plans for the tables. John remembered a table Colm made and mentioned him as a possibility. In January 2012 Colm received an email inquiring about his interest in building the tables. He went to Toronto to meet with

his prospective clients and got the job. Colm said he thinks when the tables were designed, the architects envisioned Douglas fir or western cedar, but Colm pitched the job in silver maple, which is an eastern tree, with the largest growing in urban areas in southern Ontario. It saved transportation costs for the raw material. Having had lots experience working with salvaged tree trunks as a sculptor, Colm had a head start in sourcing the trees from arborists or municipal tree dumps. When he found a large enough tree trunk, a backhoe, crane, and dump truck were needed to move them to his yard. Many of the logs turned out to be useless once he cut them close to the finished size. Some were rotten; others cracked beyond repair or just didn’t make the proper circle. “Cutting these trees required a massive chain saw, and since they were urban trees they often had nails or bits of fence in the wood,” said Colm. “Every time the chainsaw hit debris it stopped cutting properly. The 36-inch chains are expensive and had to be custom ordered.”

tables

COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

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The logs were cut into rough shape and levelled. This required heavy equipment and a fair bit of ingenuity. A compact front-end loader was used to carry the logs into the workshop and an engine hoist moved the logs around. The first stop was the levelling station where a jury-rigged sliding router was used to level the wood. A vertical plunge router did the turning, while the slab spun on a turntable made from a truck wheel that could hold more than 500 pounds. Sanding was next, and then the tables were finished with polyurethane. Colm’s background in the film industry honed his MacGyver skills in preparation for this massive wood turning job. He was a prop master at The Partners Film Company, a Toronto television commercial production company, where he met Cindy. Among his credits - adding blue food colouring to liquid poured on a diaper, pulling a pizza slice out of the oven so the cheese would melt just right, and sliding puppies into a wall of toilet paper. One day 10 years ago, Cindy went to her class reunion at Centennial Secondary School in Belleville. By then, they were finding Toronto a hard place to live and were thinking of finding a place outside the GTA. Within five hours of Cindy getting back from the reunion they decided to move and landed in Prince Edward County. Colm commuted

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to his job in Toronto for two years. He noted, “Once you live out here it’s very difficult to go back in.” They quit their jobs, struggled at first, and settled into to their thriving store MacCool’s Reuse. Aside from the sheer mass of the logs, sourcing the wood was harder than first anticipated. Colm has a lot of logs in his yard destined for sculpture plinths (base) because they had rot or weren’t the right size. He did some tables with green wood, which cracked due to the low moisture content in the building and the interior of the tree drying at a different rate than the exterior, which he shared with his client. Colm thinks it’s aesthetically interesting, adding a whole element of graphic power. With the job done, the tables are sitting in the main lobby and downstairs at the new Rotman School of Management on St. George Street in downtown Toronto. Colm is thrilled with the project. “It’s great to have your work where it is going to stay for a long time. An art show is only up for a month.” He adds in spite of how challenging and physically demanding the job was, it was a fantastic opportunity to attempt something unique. “While the incoherence of the giant pieces of wood was frustrating as a craftsman, the sculptor in me was blown away by the look of the finished product,” he said. CQL

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COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013


A Spiritual Oasis! BY C y n thia P eters p H O T O S BY D a n iel Va u g ha n

s

On the shores of Bay of Quinte stands a spiritual oasis rich in history, music, art, and the culinary roots of the First Nations people. Creators and owners, David R. Maracle and his wife Kimberly built this special place in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory, just east of County Road 49. Their oasis offers a multifaceted authentic experience to visitors to the small café and retail shop with David’s music and art, and outdoor stage venue for local and guest musicians. This place inspires exploration. There’s a magical flow beginning at the doorstep of the Lil Crow Native Arts Centre and Gallery. Opened in 2009, this cozy wood building is graced with beautiful open vistas and colourful murals depicting the life and stories of the Maracles’ heritage. From the first step through the front door, visitors enter a world of First Nations culture. Kimberly is usually the first person to greet visitors. Warm and engaging she makes them feel right at home. The café is not only for visitors; it is a local gathering spot for many to grab a lunch or a quick snack. The majority of breakfast and lunch menus are built on heritage ingredients including moose, elk, rabbit, and duck.

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The People of Flint -Kanien’keha:ka Long ago, It must have been a sight to see, as Mohawks paddled along the bay of Quinte. Curious about the land, They pulled their canoes ashore, Filled with skins, furs, tools, and more While setting their feet upon this land The Mohawks, people of flint, With fire, food, and dance, Will call this home on where they stand. Gathering, building, planting and shaping, A village, a settlement, was in the making. Years went by population grew The old ways becoming new. Continuing to be thankful for this sacred place Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory The birthplace, of The Great Peacemaker... We will protect and preserve And welcome all who come From far and wide to share our ancestral heritage That we respect and share with great pride

David’s Mohawk name is

Tehaneniakwè:tarons

It was given to him by his father, who was fluent in all six dialects. It means, “he slices the stones,” and is a fitting name for a sculptor.

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Items could include Three Sister vegetable soup, their signature elk and cranberry chutney panini, or traditional bannock. Offerings change daily and generally consist of sandwiches, soups, and stews. All-day breakfast wraps include farm fresh eggs and a host of other local ingredients. David is the head cook and enjoys prepping the dishes. In the summer months the backyard patio is a perfect venue to steal a quiet moment for a relaxing lunch overlooking Mohawk Bay, enjoying the warm breezes, beautiful outdoor art, and the teepee. David’s talents are more widely known outside the kitchen. He has gained a large following and success with his music and art. A strong advocate of aboriginal rights, language, and education, he expresses his messages and emotions through his award-winning stone sculptures and songs. David’s sculptures have received numerous global awards and owners of his work include Nelson Mandela and the Emperor of Japan. His music is lauded with two gold records and many national awards. David has produced more than a dozen records, and performed in concert worldwide. His love of unique wind and percussion instruments and distinct sound garners him much coverage in the music industry, all without formal training in either art form. He offers his works for viewing and purchase at his retail shop and gallery as well as online. Over the years David has galvanized his creativity and together he and Kimberly have grown their company into a distinct cultural brand. In addition to the store and café, in warm weather they offer outdoor concerts every other Friday on their waterfront property under the banner Stage Red. Visiting musicians gravitate to the creative and tranquil setting under the stars. Customers enjoy some of David’s culinary delights - from smoked fish to Waupoos Cider - while taking in a concert. Family and youth focused, this couple is also passionate about reaching out to children to share their First Nations stories. Visiting school groups are common and the Maracles go on the road with workshops and concerts. David and Kimberly hope to expand their outdoor stage area so more youth can explore their aspiring talents. Other ideas for expansion include Friday afternoon folk singers, birch bark canoe building, and a corn heritage pounding ceremony. They offer private guided day tour packages - a new First Nations Destination. For groups of six or more, they conduct tours of the heritage sites in Tyendinaga, and provide a traditional lunch with a backdrop of David’s storytelling and music. Whether it is a short visit for a cup of coffee and a slice of bannock or a longer stay with a day tour, the experience is memorable. Most importantly, it will bring visitors closer in knowledge and spirit to the First Nations people who founded and preserved this area. CQL

Lil Crow Native Arts Centre & Gallery is at 216 Bayshore Road, Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory


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COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

Seated L-R Heather Williams, Honorary Colonel Glenn Rainbird, Jennifer Rainbird, Anne-Lucie Bouchard, and Liz Gyuk Standing L-R - John Williams, Chief Warrant Officer Sandor Gyuk, and Colonel Sean Friday


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The magic of

P hotos a n d article b y C harles Beale

Manly MacDonald

Manly Edward MacDonald (1889 - 1971) is sometimes referred to as the forgotten painter of the Group of Seven era. Unlike other artists, MacDonald was first and foremost a family man. He was known to be honest, humorous, and dedicated to both his craft and kin. It was a wellknown fact belonging to the Toronto Arts & Letters Club - MacDonald did not - could further your career. MacDonald was also a non-drinker, which didn’t gain him many new friends in the Toronto establishment where he and his family lived. In spite of being overshadowed by his contemporaries, Manly MacDonald was every bit as versatile. His interpretations of horses plowing, sheep crossing a bridge, sailboats on the bay, or the iconic mills of eastern Ontario are truly unique, warm, and full of life. In addition to his landscapes, MacDonald was a first-rate portrait artist and etcher, experimenting with different mediums throughout his long life. Manly MacDonald was born a twin of Manson in the village of Point Anne, east of Belleville. The MacDonald clan were many and almost as famous then as the Hull brothers later - Bobby and Dennis who became National Hockey league legends. Like the Hulls, MacDonald was typical of great things happening in unlikely places. He showed an unusual talent for sketching and painting while in school at Point Anne

and at 13 walked to Belleville to try the grade nine art exam. He sailed through it; his life in art was set. MacDonald enrolled in the Ontario College of Art in Toronto in 1908, with further studies at the Albright School of Art in Buffalo in 1911. In 1912, he attended the prestigious School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts before returning to OCA from 1914 to 1918. In 1917 and then again in 1920, MacDonald traveled to Europe on Royal Canadian Academy of Arts scholarships. In the interim, he was commissioned by the Canadian War Memorials Fund and the National Gallery of Canada to paint scenes of women working in the fields. MacDonald chose the Quinte region and the 23 pieces in the series are now part of the Beaverbrook Collection at the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa. One of his most famous scenes was Fishermen on Lake Ontario, 1920, now at the National Gallery of Canada. This was known to be painted of his family’s fishing enterprise on the Bay of Quinte and MacDonald was actually sitting in the back of the boat when creating this striking image. The cover of Interpreter of Old Ontario depicts a farmer Tilling the Land in what is undoubtedly Prince Edward County. The farmer coaches three workhorses, two white and one roan up a hillside in spring. COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

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COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

Many notables in Belleville sat for formal portraits by MacDonald, including Nathaniel Vermilyea, former Reeve of Thurlow Township, and then Warden of Hastings County. The portrait was presented to Vermilyea in 1923, a year before he died. Family also featured in many formal and impressionistic portraits and MacDonald had begun a selfportrait in 1970 that was never completed. MacDonald always painted landscapes en plein air, and in all seasons. Many well-worn anecdotes from his painting locations, recounted by art students, schoolchildren, and farmers shape a portion of his well-loved personal charm. Art critic and author Albert Henry Robson first dubbed MacDonald ‘Interpreter of Old Ontario’ for capturing unique impressions of towns, villages, and hamlets from a bygone era. His travels took him to Europe twice on Royal Canadian Academy scholarships, to Ontario’s north, and to the east coast of both Canada and the United States. In 1920, he was elevated to an Associate of RCA. He also became a controversial figure in Canadian art circles when he and a few contemporaries resigned from the Ontario Society of Artists (OSA) in 1951, in protest over the “creeping modernism” in Canadian art. Further controversy was created when the City of Toronto chose him to paint the Toronto waterfront as a gift to Queen Elizabeth II. His painting was presented to Her Majesty on her visit to Toronto in June 1959. MacDonald’s painting style also became the subject of debate over time, not because he wasn’t a great Canadian painter, but because he always saw himself as an academic traditional painter, whereas others saw him more as a semiimpressionistic one. Regardless of the contentions, his talent is now being recognized. Collectors and supporters, on hearing a book on Manly E. MacDonald was being produced after 40 years of endeavour, said, “His time has finally come.”


MacDonald was also eastern Ontario’s painter, for in 1956 he and his wife Beverley bought a summer home south of Napanee on the Long Reach of the Bay of Quinte. From here he roamed the countryside, painting quaint villages like Newburg and scenes along the Napanee River, the stone mills at Glenora and Ameliasburgh, Prince Edward County, farms, and city scenes in Belleville and Hastings County and a rare winter scene of the Kingston Farmer’s market behind City Hall. He was one of a select group of Canadian painters who had an agreement with Coutts, then Coutts-Hallmark and then Hallmark companies to reproduce some of his winter scenes for their Christmas card series each year. MacDonald also produced series of cards sets depicting the Quinte region. My interest began when, as a boy of 12 I watched MacDonald painting on the Napanee River. He was always good with children - a gentle soul, like his surviving son Duncan. He explained why he was painting where he was and what his line of vision showed him. I was impressed and this affection stayed with me over the years. As a teacher I trained in art and my courses renewed my interest in Canadian painters and Manly MacDonald. One of MacDonald’s students, Clark Cunningham at OCA first started chronicling the painter’s endeavours from 1910 forward. In Cunningham’s archival material there are many accounts of MacDonald’s generous nature where he would donate a painting to a good cause. Many a Quinte area teacher received a painting on retirement. Cunningham died in 2001 before beginning a landscape book, but he did amass news articles and some 300 photographs of MacDonald’s paintings. Hollis Arnold of Port Hope took up the challenge from Cunningham’s estate. His wife, Patricia had bought him a MacDonald painting in 1970 entitled Repairing the Dory as a reminder of Arnold’s maritime youth. He was hooked. Arnold continued to collect articles and take photos of MacDonald’s work whenever he could, enlarging the archives to over 900 images. Sadly, Arnold died in 2006 before anything but an outline of a proposed work could be completed. The Arnold family and dear friends in Port Hope transferred the archival material to me in 2006. On returning to my hometown of Napanee, the serious work began and in 2010, Interpreter of Old Ontario was launched at the new John M. Parrott Gallery in Belleville. Two of my favourites in my collection are of Napanee. The first one was given to me by Duncan MacDonald on a visit to our cottage on the Long Reach, a stone’s throw from his parents’ cottage. He and his wife Barbara presented Spring on the Napanee River. The second is also of Napanee; a painting in town for many years until the family retired to Victoria, British Columbia. An executor of the couple’s estate contacted me for information on value and insurance. I let him know that I would

be interested in buying this painting, Winter on the Napanee River. MacDonald painted the very location where I first met him as a boy of 12. The painting hangs proudly in my home. Locally, The John M. Parrott Art Gallery has a Manly MacDonald Hall on the third floor of the new Belleville library and rotates its collection of over 100 donated paintings. Loyalist College, also in Belleville has a further 60 pieces. Many more works remain in private collections, handed down through families. CQL

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The

exford B y C atheri n e S t u tt P hotos D a n iel Va u g ha n

Certain houses seem destined to write their own relationships with those who dwell within – some fleeting, some fermenting for decades – and yet the connection remains in the hearts of those woven through the threads of the stories. Paul Elliott’s first exposure to the Wexford House was during a trip to Picton to visit his childhood friend Peter Sage. This was far from Paul’s first visit to the area. Paul’s wife Tamara and her family visited Sandbanks every summer and eventually developed strong family routes in the County. Eventually Peter and Paul partnered in the iconic Elliott Sage, and although Paul was very much the silent partner, pursuing his destiny in the auto industry, the families maintained close personal ties. It was during one of these summer visits when Peter asked Paul to come with him while he looked at an interesting proposal. It seemed the owners of the Wexford were considering constructing an underground tunnel to the Merrill Inn next door. Apparently the tunnel idea was abandoned, and the Elliotts continued to enjoy their trips to Picton, visiting friends and family when not at their home near Detroit, Michigan or at their Skeleton Lake cottage in Muskoka. Fast-forward 30 years from the great tunnel caper, and Paul and Tamara decided a more permanent destination in Prince Edward County was a logical next step. The couple made the rounds of properties for sale and came across the Wexford. At first, Paul didn’t remember the visit three decades earlier, but it all came back. “It was an amazing sense of déjà vu,” he laughed. “I knew every


room before I entered it, where every hall would lead, what was waiting around every corner. I was once again amazed with the house, the grand staircase, the dining room, the wood panelling, but this time, Tamara fell in love with it, too.” The sensible acquisition plan fell by the wayside and suddenly the Elliotts had a personal project in one of their favourite places. “We originally were simply looking for a Canadian investment to appreciate over the years,” insisted Paul. “Instead, we fell in love and knew we had to protect and preserve this wonderful home.” The Wexford’s history is well-documented, chronicled by renowned heritage architect Peter John Stokes and author Tom Cruickshank in The Settler’s Dream. Originally constructed in 1883 by Dr. W.W. Colton, Peter Stokes writes of its architecture. “It is unusual for a house of the 1880s to display a symmetrical front and even more remarkable is the design of the doorcase, whose glazing echoes (perhaps in later imitation) the pattern of the transoms and sidelights of the 1830s. As a whole, the house has a conservative, solid look which suggests an earlier date than the whimsical gables of the Merrill House next door, but it is in fact about five years later. Despite its conventional form, the house abounds in details at their peak in the eighties. The panelled cornice, for instance, can be found on dozens of houses of the period, but here it is given added emphasis by using pairs of oversized brackets.” “The porch itself is a replacement, possibly constructed about the turn of the century when the interior underwent extensive renovations. It has characteristic stout pillars here twinned on tall brick pedestals.”


“I was once again amazed with the house, the grand staircase, e the dining room, the Wexford. wood panelling, but w this time, Tamara fell in love with it, too.”

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The house was far more than a collection of well-matched architectural elements. It was also home to Dr. Colton and his wife Diantha., and their live-in servants who worked and occupied the less luxurious back of the home. “The front of the house is very grand with large rooms and high ceilings,” explained Paul. “The back – the servants’ quarters - was cobbled together and very different from the front. The floors were uneven, the insulation insufficient, and the rooms small with low ceilings.” The house, the social strata, the two worlds were divided by a triple brick wall with a small doorway, and it was the first to go after the Elliotts purchased the house and decided – with considerable persuasion from their old friend Peter – to undertake a substantial renovation and make it their own. “We travel a lot,” said Paul. “We have four children and they are all over the world. Tamara and I wanted a place where our children and grandchildren can gather in an area very meaningful to us. When we aren’t using it, we wanted it suitable for others to make their own memories. We loved how this home reflects more than 100 years of love and care.” In keeping with traditions and connections, Paul and Tamara put the project firmly in the hands of Peter Sage, realizing managing this from afar would have been next to impossible. “He’s a great friend and someone we trust totally,” stated Paul. “We wouldn’t have bought the home if Peter wasn’t going to do the renovations. He’s very particular and dedicated to keeping details appropriate to its history. He has an incredible talent and is invaluable. Without him on the scene, I would have run away. Now we have somewhere to run to.” The first step was to tear down the brick wall dividing the glamorous living space and the rabbit’s warren of tiny bedrooms and the back kitchen. “We tore it apart from the joists to the rafters,” said Paul with glee. It was replaced – on the main floor – by a large airy modern kitchen with historical character retained. The kitchen is warm, open, inviting, with the latest in modern conveniences tucked subtlety beneath the striking granite top on the centre island the quartz countertops adorning the new cabinetry. “The kitchen is important to us. We do a lot of entertaining and it is a gathering place for our family. Tamara really wanted to make it a focal point,” shared Paul. Integrating the two starkly contrasting sections took some ingenuity. The grand parlour and dining room and staircase are filled with light; the back kitchen was gloomy workspace with little light. After dismantling what was essentially a demising wall, Peter designed a broad arched entry complimentary to the style of the grander sections of the home. He raised the ceiling and removed interior walls, added lots of windows and flooded the room with natural light. The kitchen is large and yet intimate, with doors leading off of the west side to an inviting veranda. Upstairs above the new kitchen, the little rooms are gone and in their place are bedrooms and luxury bathrooms and wide hallways. The redesigned treacherous backstairs is now inviting with the original black cherry newel post matched with a railing and balusters. The massive undertaking at the back of the house was eased somewhat by the character and preservation of the front. The large graceful rooms needed little work on the main floor. Perhaps the most important change is the addition of a beautiful antique Chickering grand piano now sitting in the parlour. The grand staircase – with a secret hiding spot – leads to an equally spacious upper floor. In all, the home can easily sleep a dozen people, and entertain many more. Until the Elliotts claim it on a full time basis, they are offering it for rent on a weekend or weekly basis.

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“We had a family with branches in Ottawa and Toronto meet in the middle for a 50th anniversary weekend, and the bride and groom renewed their vows there,” smiled Paul. “There is a lovely backyard shaded with black walnut trees and it is perfect for weddings.” To introduce the Wexford to the public, the Elliotts hosted an open house shortly after renovations were complete in the spring, and the family learned how connected their new home is to the town. “It is iconic,” said Paul. “It is so meaningful to so many people and we can’t ignore the history. An 85-year old gentleman stopped by – he had a cane and wore a bowtie. He remembers playing with his friends who lived in this house when they were kids. It was wonderful of people to share their stories of our house.” The Wexford’s wonder, though, exists not in the details of the renovation – it starts with the view from the street, where the broad and inviting front veranda beckons to visitors. Its sturdy pillars have witnessed the rise of Picton over the past 140 years; its carved balusters, graceful railing, and wicker seating offer a respite from the hectic pace on the street just steps across the sweeping lawn, but somehow much more distant from the aura of the Wexford. CQL

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Landscaping creates a welcoming


“…create a sense of arrival, a lingering space…”

B y C atheri n e S t u tt P hotos Mi k e Boers Backyard birding, backyard cooking, and backyard projects tend to indicate the front of a home is an afterthought, but what about that all-important curb appeal, and a home’s first chance to make a good impression? One award winning landscape architect knows the key to successful landscaping starts early and starts at the front door. “The entrance is important space, it’s a focal point,” stressed Mike Boers of Hollandale Landscaping and Garden Centre. “Plan your landscaping by starting at the entrance. If you don’t do anything else, you have covered the welcoming area.” This logical approach is the key to Mike’s designs, which tend to incorporate a perfect marriage of consistent textures, materials, colour, and plant varieties whether it involves one component or a blueprint for the an entire property. “Simple and direct lines don’t work when applied to a front entrance,” he insisted. “Going straight from the driveway to the front door doesn’t work aesthetically. We want to create a sense of arrival, a lingering space where the doorway is anticipated, not exposed.” An expanded entry creating a pleasant welcoming point is Mike’s trademark and his work is easily recognized from the street – on both existing landscapes he has renovated and those he has designed in conjunction with a new home project, something he feels is integral to early success for exterior decorating. “Involve the landscape architect as soon as possible,” he insisted and with typical charming honesty continued. “Driveways are often the biggest mistake. They don’t work, they are shaped wrong, and the asphalt is too close to the front door. Spend the time to get the alignment right before it’s paved.” This is only one of the practical reasons to make landscape design part of the initial homebuilding project. A builder’s focus is on excavation, construction, and completion and the wrong backfill can make a landscaping project more time consuming and expensive.

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Even with a plan in hand as the house is under construction, Mike insisted there is no great rush to completely finalize the landscaping. “Sometimes it’s better to live in a new home for a year and get to know the property and its quirks; learn the hot spots, the natural character, and the rhythm of the neighbourhood. Do the minimum to get in the front door and perfect the plan over the next months.” It is solid advice based on extensive experience. “We’ve done a lot of corrective work for people who weren’t patient, who didn’t take the time to put it all in context,” said the expert who believes in selecting the perfect materials and accenting them with mass plantings and feature shrubs to achieve a simple elegance. Whether a landscape plan is incorporated with new construction or reworking an existing layout, Mike considers each project on its individual merits. “Inviting input from

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the owners and understanding their personality and lifestyle is vital,” he insists. Some people entertain constantly; some want a lot of privacy. Others enjoy spending all day gardening, while others want to simply relax and enjoy the results. Some want curves, some want a linear look, and balancing it all into proportion - to scale - is critical, all while materials and style to the architecture.

To achieve the desired look, Mike often borrows from the driveway to create more of a transition between parking and living space. “By removing some of the asphalt and replacing it with brick, it enhances and extends the entry area, and makes it more of an excursion,” he shared. “A direct line is the least expensive, and also the least interesting. Ideally, the transition should include part of the

driveway and continue seamlessly to the front door, using textures and materials to create a natural flow.” Mike enjoys the challenge this region presents – from the steep shorelines of Lake Ontario to large rural lots with varied elevations to urban lots. “We are fortunate to have unique subdivisions in this area, compared to the narrow lots in large cities,” he explained. “We

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have a bit more freedom and we have a mixture of new to historic construction and urban to lakefront. There is always a way to make a project unique because we have so many scenarios.” In one area subdivision, the garages are all accessed from the rear of the property, leaving the front entrance only steps from the public sidewalk. The small space challenged Mike’s designs, but the result pleased both the architect and the homeowner. “In a situation like that, it is all about material and texture choices. We have about 10 feet to develop and it turned out very cool,” he smiled. One of the greatest compliments came from a customer with a definite plan. “The client told me she had a photo from our website and she wanted the exact same design, right down to the plants. When I saw the picture, it was my front yard. That was serious praise.” There is one final element Mike likes to incorporate into his designs, and often it doubles the pleasure for his clients. “Lighting brings it all together when the sun goes down. It is just as important to consider lighting outside as inside. It sets a mood and enhances the space,” he said. “Lights under benches, recessed into stone, shining up through a tree, or mounted high and filtering through the branches all turn a daytime garden into a totally different experience at night. I can’t imagine not lighting a landscape.” At high noon or for an evening visit, a walk to a front door can be a journey of its own, with the atmosphere created by the perfect landscape. CQL

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The road less travelled

T

here are three roads of spectacular beauty in Canada – all along water, all dangerous – not only because of the twists and turns and traffic, but because it is hard to concentrate on the road, hard to ignore the surrounding beauty. The first of these roads is Highway 4 starting at the Cathedral Grove of MacMillan Provincial Park in British Columbia and twisting and turning and diving to what feels like the end of Canada – the T-junction north to Tofino or south to Ucluelet. This is no relaxing drive. The traffic and narrow roads are nerve-racking, the scenery breathtaking. 56

COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

The second is the Highway 138 from BaieSaint-Paul to Baie Comeau, Quebec. Twisting and turning through small riverside villages, the mighty Saint Lawrence River is almost always in view. The third of these roads is right here in Prince Edward County. Highway 49 overlooking Hayward Long Reach has a serene and unforgettable beauty. The sparkling waters of the Bay of Quinte and lush, green red cedar forests of Prince Edward County stretch ahead. It may be a road less travelled, but it is no less spectacular. Off Highway 49 is County Road 35, and then

Quick Short Road leads to the waters of Hayward Long Reach. These waters, now quiet, once roared with the sound of thunder. This story begins on none of these roads. It starts at a neat, white, Cape Cod-style house built by George Fralick on Dundas Street West in Belleville in April 1944 when his son Rick was born. At the time, it was known as the Trent Road and shaded by a cathedral of elms. Cows answered a 4 o’clock bell and trundled through the fields just north of Rick Fralick’s home, on their way to Mrs. Ponton’s barn for milking. Rick remembers


along waters that roared The legacy of Miss Supertest

B y J oh n Marti n ello P hoto S D av id va u g ha n

taking the shortcut home from his Grade 7 classes at Queen Mary Public School and riding the cows in Mrs. Ponton’s fields. Rick’s interests were more nautical than agricultural. His house was on the Bay of Quinte side of the road and Rick and his brother Paul were born water rats - building rafts and swimming. In 1959 at the age of 15, Rick’s lifelong association with fast boats began. His brother Paul gave him $15 to design and build a Seaflea - an

eight-foot long, flat-bottomed boat driven by a 7.5 horsepower outboard motor. Rick built the Seaflea using the thin wood panels from a six-quart basket and strips of waxed paper to cover the deck. The design perfected, Rick bought two sheets of fir plywood and some pine boards. Two weeks later he delivered the completed racer to his brother. Shortly after, friend and neighbour Bud Pringle asked Rick to build him a boat. Not all was smooth sailing; sticky throttles were a problem. Rick

remembers colliding with Bud and the force almost sinking Bud’s boat and ripping the helmet off his head. In another incident, Rick’s brother Paul drove his Seaflea into the shore at speed. The back end was sinking as Paul scrambled to safety over the front deck. About the time he completed Bud’s boat, another friend - Larry Morrison - built a simple hydroplane which was the first in the neighbourhood. Rick remembers a summer Saturday morning skimming COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

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down the warm and glassy waters of the Bay of Quinte on the deck of Larry Morrison’s boat. About 300 feet offshore of the Belleville Cemetery, the nose of the boat dug into the water, flipped at top speed, and flung Rick and Larry into the water. They swam the overturned and broken boat to the near-vertical shore, drained it, and paddled home. Rick remembers arriving at the Toronto Star office and pulling the wet newspaper collection money out of his pocket and giving it to the clerk. Rick’s paper route was only one means of funding his boat building and racing program. He

hundred feet from the Fralick home. Rick and Paul were awestruck by Miss Supertest III’s mass and beauty. There, right before their eyes, was all 30 feet, eight inches of shiny, varnished, cherry wood deck. At midships, sat the power plant that made Miss Supertest III roar - a 37-litre, V12, 2,000 horsepower Rolls-Royce Griffon 65 airplane engine, one of the engines powering the legendary Supermarine Spitfire through the Second World War. Meeting Miss Supertest III was no small event. Since 1952, Colonel Gordon Thompson, owner

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worked in the radio and electronics business, first at his father’s store - Fralick Radio - where at the age of five or six he was paid one cent for each radio tube he tested. By the age of 16, Rick was working for his uncle Howard Booth at Booth’s Radio and TV across from the current Belleville City Hall. About the time he was launched from the nose of Larry Morrison’s boat, Rick saw something about which he had only read and dreamt. The legendary Miss Supertest III unlimited hydroplane stopped along the side of the road a couple of

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of the Supertest Petroleum Company, of London, Ontario, his son Jim, and the Miss Supertest hydroplanes battled American boats for supremacy in the world of unlimited hydroplane racing. These battles had names like the Detroit Memorial Race, the Gold Cup, and the Windsor Maple Leaf Regatta, and were fought on the Detroit and St. Clair Rivers against legendary boats like Miss Bardahl, Miss Wahoo, Miss Thriftway, and Hawaii Kai. Finally on August 28, 1959, on the Detroit River, Jim Thompson accomplished what he had told his father he would do when he was seven years old in 1934. He took the Harmsworth Trophy back from the Americans. This victory was a source of great pride for all Canadians, and young Rick Fralick, a paperboy and voracious reader, followed the progress and struggles of the Miss Supertest boats. Miss Supertest III’s defence of the Harmsworth Trophy began on August 19, 1960 on Long Reach in Picton. Picton was abuzz with activity and tens of thousands of visitors. Picton’s proud Mayor, Harvey McFarland, presided over opening ceremonies attended by Prime Minister John Diefenbaker, his wife Olive, Ontario Premier Leslie Frost, Toronto Mayor Nathan Philips, and hundreds of other dignitaries. Rick, Paul, and a friend drove to Long Reach to watch Miss Supertest III’s first defence of the Harmsworth Trophy. Rick remembers pulling into a field used as a parking lot and upon hearing the roar of engines he ran as fast as he could across a field to the launch area at the end of Quick Short Road.

There they were - the legendary unlimited American hydroplanes Gale V, Nitrogen, Nitrogen Too, and the sole Canadian entry, Miss Supertest III - in all their splendour, roaring. Rick clearly recalls being enthralled by the launching of the boats into the water and the massive engines, and how the earth shook when the boats tore up the waters of Long Reach. By the end of the two-day race series, Miss Supertest III, with the legendary Bob Hayward at the wheel, reigned supreme. The Harmsworth Trophy stayed in Canada. In 1961, the Harmsworth Trophy races returned to Long Reach. Rick and Paul made it to a test day prior to the races, climbed a fence into the pit area (which they had to do several times as they were frequently escorted out of the pits), and took shelter from the rain under Miss Supertest III. The two brothers stared up in awe at the strut, propeller, shaft, and perfect workmanship of Miss Supertest III. With Bob Hayward at the wheel, Miss Supertest III once again successfully defended the Harmsworth Trophy against the sole American boat, Miss Detroit, in a two-race series on August 5 and 7, 1961. The races were a wash. After the first lap, Miss Supertest III blew Miss Detroit out of the water. For Rick, the race was, “A disappointment, it was not much of a race.” Many of the estimated crowd of 20,000 to 30,000 people left early. One month after roaring to victory on Long Reach, tragedy struck the Miss Supertest team. On a rough Detroit River on September 10, 1961,

in the third heat of the Detroit Silver Cup Race, at an estimated speed of 160 miles per hour, Bob Hayward swung Miss Supertest II hard right to avoid a collision with Miss U.S. I. According to Jack Dulmage of the Windsor Daily Star (as quoted in John Joseph Kelly’s Roostertail: The Miss Supertest Story), “His left sponson dug in hard … and I mean hard. He was killed right there. The impact of a sponson going in at his speed is like driving into a concrete wall at 50 miles an hour.” Bob Hayward, a humble farm-boy from Embro, Ontario and a Canadian hero was dead. Never again would the Miss Supertest boats race. Never again would the thunder of unlimited hydroplanes and their Second World War airplane engines shake the gentle slopes and calm waters of Long Reach. Rick remembers the day Bob Hayward was killed and even with his limited experience in fast boats, the 17-year-old knew, as Bob Hayward must

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have known, driving unlimited hydroplanes was a risky and deadly business. Still, he never lost interest in building and racing hydroplanes. He will be running one of his boats, Green Slime, at the Antique and Classic Boat Show in Gravenhurst on July 6. By his own estimate he has raced in thousands of races on waters from Schenectady, New York to Dayton, Ohio to Gravenhurst and Deseronto, Ontario to Verdun and Sorel-Tracy, Quebec, mostly in the rough and bone-rattling world of B Stock hydroplanes. Nine and one-half foot long mini Miss Supertests, driven by 25 horsepower stock outboard motors to speeds of 70 mph. Crouched over in the cockpit of his boat, with his eyes 12 inches above the water’s surface, Rick knows 70 mph on water looks and feels like 100 mph. It is said all roads lead home. In December 2004, Rick and his wife Christine purchased their current home on County Road 35, just north of Picton. Their back deck overlooks the calm waters of Hayward Long Reach. Their backyard was once the field 16-year-old Rick flew across to get to the boat launching area at the end of Quick Short Road. A quarter mile south of the small dock at the end of their yard sits an old stone foundation, where, during the time of the Harmsworth Trophy races sat a barn. The barn was the judges’ stand and on its end wall the large timing clock would have been the focus of unlimited

      

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hydroplane drivers such as Bob Hayward. About 200 feet north of the same small dock is where Quick Short Road goes into Hayward Long Reach. It is the very place where young Rick stood awestruck as Miss Supertest III and other unlimited hydroplanes were lifted into the water, where their engines coughed, sputtered, and then roared to life. On a warm and sunny May day, the first day of the 33rd Annual Kiwanis Walleye World Fishing Derby, small fishing boats trolled the glassy waters of Hayward Long Reach. It is probably safe to guess most of those fishermen had very little idea the waters they trolled once shook with the roar of unlimited hydroplanes. Except for a roadside plaque on the east side of County Road 35, there is no evidence of the legacy of Miss Supertest III and the Harmsworth Trophy races, but that legacy is alive and well. On that same May day, a group of about 50 hydroplane racers and builders gathered on Rick’s front lawn for the annual hydroplane swap meet. Enthusiasts gathered there from as far away as Buffalo, NY and from as close as Picton - people who race and build small hydroplanes, all carrying forward the legacy of Bob Hayward and Miss Supertest III. All on a Prince Edward County road quiet and less travelled, along waters that once roared with the thunder of unlimited hydroplanes. CQL


Burrell’s Axe Factory and Clapp-Scott Mills P hotos a n d article B y L i n di P ierce

Few structures tell the story of settlement better than old grist and sawmills. Their very presence speaks to the tenacity and industry of ancestors. The mills’ existence also celebrates the knowledge, determination, and dedication of subsequent owners who have preserved these structures, and put them to good use.

Few places recall Belleville’s 19th century industrial past like the old limestone building housing the Quinte Construction Association on the bank of the Moira River along Station Street in Belleville. There has always been some debate as to the building’s origin. An Ontario Heritage Plaque at the site, honouring the pioneer industrialist John Walden Meyers whose mill complex extended along the riverbank may have contributed to the confusion. While writing the Heritage Belleville publication Heritage Buildings East of the Moira, researchers Lois Foster and Beth Green studied old maps of the area and determined the original Meyers’ mill buildings stood just upstream from the surviving stone building. They established its construction date as after 1878, and identified its owner as Ellis Burrell, owner of an axe factory, who may have

built on foundations of an earlier forge building. No matter the original owner of the building, the area’s early importance is indisputable, and the structure’s heritage significance unassailable. Today’s Station Street, formerly Mill Street, was once the site of a vast industrial complex including grist and sawmills, stone storehouses, a brewery and a dam, established here by the legendary Captain John Walden Meyers, United Empire Loyalist, about 1790. For power, Meyers dammed the Sagonaska (Moira) River and the community became known as Meyer’s Creek. On the escarpment above the mills (today’s Mount Pleasant Road) Meyers built one of the province’s first brick houses with bricks from his own kiln in Sidney Township, in 1794. From this handsome Georgian home he surveyed his empire forged from cedar swamp. COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

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By 1990, the limestone building was in disrepair and slated for demolition. Fortunately, the Quinte Construction Association was looking for more office space, so agency directors approached the city and offered to rebuild the structure. Working from an old photograph, they made the exterior reconstruction as authentic as possible; the basement with the river running through it was filled in, the interior reworked into modern offices. Discovery of several old millstones stored in the basement doubtless contributed to the gristmill story. Reconstruction occurred during 1993 and 1994; the Quinte Construction Association moved into the premises in October 1996. Formed in 1948, the Quinte Construction Association is a non-profit membership organization which serves the needs of the area’s construction sector. The mill building is owned by Quinte Conservation Authority and leased to the city of Belleville, which leases it to Quinte Construction Association. The adaptive reuse of an important piece of Belleville history is a source of pride. At the office is a copy of Hans Waltimeyer, the John W. Meyers history written by eminent Meyers scholar Jane Bennett Goddard, U.E. The book’s inscription reads, “Presented to the Quinte Construction Association in grateful thanks for the restoration of the John Walden Meyers stone building, October 27, 1996.”

The Clapp-Scott Mill

The barnboard mill at the head of the Milford millpond has become a crusade by the Friends of the Clapp-Scott Mill. The hyphenated name itself speaks to their determination to preserve history – Joseph Clapp was the builder of the historic mill, Carson Scott the last private owner. A volunteer with the Friends organization recalled the beginning of the project in 2002, when plans to remove original milling equipment to another worthy mill project were trumped by one individual’s well-documented appeal to preserve the mill for the community. He waited on a frigid February morning, to speak to “Jack, in charge of Quinte Conservation,” who was arriving to supervise the removal of assets. By the end of the fellow’s persuasive appeal, Jack tossed the keys to him and the mill enthusiast became the steward of the mill. The representative of the QCA explained their role is not the preservation of old buildings, but the 62

COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013


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ASK OUR EXPERTS conservation of area watersheds. Each community must decide what to preserve, and find the means to do it. At this point, overshadowed as it is by the divisive debate over industrial wind turbines, the fate of the little mill is uncertain. The Clapp-Scott mill represents Prince Edward County’s last best opportunity to preserve and hand down its early milling history. Historians recall with sadness Napier Simpson’s 1963 dismantling and removal of the historic Roblin’s Mill of Ameliasburgh to Black Creek Pioneer Village in Toronto, “For which I never quite forgave him,” said built heritage crusader Peter John Stokes in his book, A Village Arising. In Milford, named and noted for the mills of its heyday, only the old Clapp-Scott mill remains to tell the story of its origins in the very early 1800s. Today the sleepy village is a tourism destination with an awardwinning bistro/gallery, a flourishing theatre, unique B&Bs, a well-stocked general store, and a tiny post office - and a dedicated handful of heritage enthusiasts. Milford gives no hint of the bustling logging days, when massive timbers were dragged down the mast roads from the East Lake forests, floated down the wide Black River, and transported to Europe. Schooners were built and launched in the marshy hollow, huge quantities of lumber were shipped out to Montreal, and wild loggers’ shenanigans shocked the righteous villagers. The Clapp-Scott mill is not the mill it once was. Murray Clapp’s invaluable publication The Mills of Milford tells the riches to rags story. Today’s Milford was put on the Marysburgh map by UEL entrepreneur Joseph Clapp (whose wife Nancy was a niece of miller John Roblin of Roblin’s Mills, Ameliasburgh) and his descendants. Joseph built an early sawmill in a ravine on Black River in 1808 (the ravine crossed by the village’s County Road 17 bridge). Milford’s bucolic millpond was formed by the dam at this location. A second mill complex was established by 1812 on the upper falls of the Black River; today’s Clapp-Scott mill is a remnant. After Joseph’s 1813 death in Kingston, from an illness contracted while serving with the militia preparing for an American invasion, his family carried on. Son Philip ran the lower mill, while wife Nancy and other sons operated the upper mill. This upper mill was sold in 1886 to Bethuel and Lewis Kirkpatrick and in 1888 to William B. Scott. William died in 1921 and son Lee struggled

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to continue a local mill service, reducing the deteriorating structure to its current size, finally closing down for good in the 1940s. In 1975 the mill and creek property were donated to the QCA by Carson Scott. The Clapp-Scott mill of today is the lone survivor of the extensive 19th century upper mill complex. To the north, a rubble escarpment offers hints of the old access road which led behind the mill, where teams of weary horses hauled logs for off-loading at the second storey level; sawdust was shoveled out the windows below. An 1888 photo shows the two-storey five-bay gristmill, the essential blacksmith shop across the road (at the edge of today’s millpond), a separate open structure housing the sawmill, and farm buildings at the bottom of the hill now climbed by a road. On private property above the mill, a massive cast iron

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conduit snakes downhill beneath dense cedars. The pipe was built in 1875 to replace earlier wooden flumes which conducted water from an upper pond, through a sluice gate which still exists, to power the mill wheel below. Today, a small museum of pioneer farming and milling artifacts sits abandoned in the dark dusty interior. The mill’s corroded Little Giant Water Wheel, manufactured at faraway Glenora, its web conveyor belts and millstones sit cheek by jowl with apple boxes and horseshoes, sickles and corn shellers. A wobbly handmade desk bearing the stenciled name W.B. Scott conjures the old mill office. It was a good pioneer display, but the group dreams of repurposing this mill into something new, a working demonstration mill for students, visitors, and residents. It will preserve Milford’s milling history for future generations


who no longer get their lumber and flour milled close to home. Several community clean-up parties have been held with locals and summer visitors, old-timers and new resident enthusiasts uniting around the vision for this fragile piece of history. Volunteer John Lyons recently devoted scores of hours to repair drainage issues along the mill’s back wall. The Friends of Scott-Clapp Mill have an ambitious vision restoration of barnboards and masonry, creation of a working demonstration mill, development of interpretive panels. A dream shared, and realized, by neighbouring Hastings County’s O’Hara Mill. Historic Prince Edward County warrants no less? Volunteers are welcome, donations are sought. History can be made here. CQL

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The Albert College Phantom of the Opera Gala on April 27, 2013 raised almost $72,000 to support scholarships and bursaries, upgrade the senior school gym, and purchase a much-needed projection screen for the Parrot Junior School. The event featured a performance by opera singer Robert Martin. Albert College provides an enriched education experience for 300 students from 24 countries around the world. P hotos B y Gerry Frai b er g

Albert College Head of School Keith Stansfield and Katherine Stansfield.

Tess & Michael Moffatt

Dr. John Marinovich and Dr. Sue Marinovich Michele Hughes, Bob Stokes, Niki Holmes, David & Susan Smart

James & Meredith Lortie

Sean McIlreath, Jennifer McIlreath, Francesco Barnabi & Lynn Barnabi


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Thank You!

The Albert College Phantom of the Opera Gala on April 27, 2013 was a huge success! Thanks to our sponsors, guests and many volunteers, we raised a record amount: almost $72,000. These funds will be used to support scholarships and bursaries, make upgrades to the Senior School gym and purchase a muchneeded projection screen for the Parrot Junior School. It is only through the support of our loyal community that Albert College can continue to provide an enriched education experience for all students. Thank-you to all those who made this incredible evening possible.

Mark & Cynthia Russell

Reenu Sandhu, Kulldeep Sandhu, Raed Younes, Abbey Younes, Mostafa Beshir & Mona Ghander

A-1 Limousine Service Albert College Parent Guild Bella Ever After Belleville Bulls Brennan Electric Bryden Optical Laboratory Cambridge Beaches Resort & Spa Camp Tamakwa Canadian Tire Belleville College Sports Deerhurst Resort Devil’s Elbow Dewe’s Your Independent Grocer The Dressing Room East Side Mario’s Endras BMW Fairmont Hamilton Princess Fitzgibbon Construction/ Loyalist Asphalt Hinterland Wine Company Hosers Car Care Julia’s Women’s Wear Jumbo Video Karing Kards Karlo Estates Winery Katrina’s Cakes & Treats Komosis Hair Studio L’Auberge de France Bistro Loyalist Veterinary Hospital Marsh Insurance Merrill Inn Mill Creek Spa Mix 97 Nestle’s Canada Norman Hardie Winery Ontario Coachway Patrick Maher Photography Pure Honey Quinte Ballet School of Canada Reefs Resort & Club

Richard Davis Men’s Wear Rosehall Run Winery Rosehips Wedding & Events Studio Runway Bridal Salon You Sam The Record Man Scalliwag Toys Sigma Promotions Stirling General Mercantile Timber Ridge Golf Course Tipper Financial Topper’s Pizza Trent Valley Distributors Trenton Integrative Health Centre Van Soelen Landscaping Wallack’s Art Supplies Williams Hotels Ziebart Glass Michael Anscombe ’65 Aulthouse Family Craig Bridgewater ’87 Busscher Family Pat Busscher Campbell Family Larry Christie ’63 Chut Family Arthur Clark ’66 Correia Family Brian Crowder ’64 Davis Family Dede Family Dan Dickinson & Jennifer Kimball Judith & David Doidge Joanne Dullard Melanie Eddy ’98 Ted Fennell ’65 Paul Ferguson Foster Family Fredericks Family Dave Gendron

Gibson Family Paolo Giuliani Grigoriou Family Hale-Sanders Family Hall Family Karen Halliday ’85 Robert Hamilton ’65 Jeanette Hepburn ’85 & Mark Schneider ’86 Nikki Holmes Michele Hughes Eben James Family Jennifer Barritt Johnson ’64 Karen Kehler Kesenci Family Daryl Kramp MP Tanya Rawluk Lawson ’98 Mic McCullough ’47 Jim Nelson Newman/Samaras Family Pazotto Family Phillips Family Don Price ’90 Pritchett Family Profit Family Brian Prudhomme ’64 Quinn Family Jennifer & Glenn Rainbird Rawlins Family Schmidt Family Sherratt Family Shubert Family David Smith ’59 Colin & Michele Smith Katita Stark ’66 Stevens Family Bernie & Joanne Uhlmann Simon Warren ’03 Wegener Family Robert Wright ’67 Xu Family Mac Young ’67 Zhiyenkulov Family


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P hotos a n d article B y L i n di P ierce

July afternoon. Sun and heat. A day at the Outlet beach, in a favourite Provincial Park along the sublime Lake Ontario shoreline stretching from Presqu’ile and around Prince Edward County. You are one happy parent. Smart move, to bring along that teenager the kids love. They’re so happy in the waves; they’ll sleep well tonight. Now where’s that paperback? A friend at work recommended it as a great beach read. The piping voices of children, the argumentative screams of gulls, the white noise of the waves and the wind in the poplars. Inevitably, you drift off. The lake glitters in the sun ~ goes on forever. Suddenly you’ve time-travelled 400 million years backwards and a shallow sea covers today’s Lake Ontario region. This warm sea teems with miniscule creatures living, dying, settling to the sandy bottom. Millennia pass. Water compresses countless tiny shells into the limestone shelves of today’s shoreline. What was that? Oh, the rattle of pebbles in a passing toddler’s sand-pail. Where were you? Oh, limestone - now it makes sense. Must take the kids to looks at fossils at Presqu’ile and West Point – those curiosities with their beginnings under that prehistoric sea.


Despite the heat, a passing cloud brings a hint of coolness. You doze. Over infinite time, great ice sheets descend, then retreat northwards, scouring the limestone land with their grinding weight, leaving behind gravel and sand ~ and the occasional out-ofplace granite boulder, like careless glacial litter ~ as they melt. Finally, this little shelf of limestone is left to the creative power of wind and waves. Near Brighton, the even Lake Ontario shoreline breaks up into a series of irregular bays. Over millennia, wind and waves have worked on the limestone and sandy shores to create unique landforms. Longshore drift, the movement of water and sediment along the shore by the endless approach and retreat of the waves moves sand inexorably eastward along the shore until it reaches obstacles, where it builds up. At Presqu’ile, offshore islands are gradually joined to the shore by ribbons of sand, a formation called a tombolo. West of the sandbar lie long sand beaches; beyond it, limestone shelves are scoured, bluffs undercut, beaches formed from water-smoothed pebbles washed ashore. Over time successive lines of sand dunes form, creating a complex environment of mysterious cedar-forested dunes, unique seasonal panne ecosystems with rare plants, and newer foredunes closer to shore, colonized by poplars and grapevines. Further along the shoreline, wind and waves meet Prince Edward County’s irregular

limestone borders. Longshore drift moves sand into west-facing Weller’s Bay, Huyck’s Bay, and Pleasant Bay. The areas now known as the county’s two provincial parks - North Beach and Sandbanks - are formed by sand blocking the entrances to bays, creating sheltered inland lakes linked by a single outflow to the parent lake. At North Beach day-use park, three kilometers of pristine baymouth barrier beach face westward, offering spectacular sunsets, swimming, and fishing. On the far side of the sandbar, warm North Bay provides shady picnic grounds in the shelter of the dunes. Sandbanks Provincial Park is the freshwater baymouth barrier dune system writ large. A glance at a map reveals the characteristic formation. The timeless complicity between wind, water, and sand produces the wide beaches and towering sand dunes beyond. West Lake’s baymouth barrier, its outflow the channel at Wellington harbour, creates the world-famous Dunes and Sandbanks beaches. Further along, East Lake is blocked by another baymouth sandbar,

the sun-baked expanse of Outlet Beach; the Outlet River provides outflow in high seasons. Sand washes ashore, dries in the sun, and travels inland on the wind. Mountains of sand form, hardy plants arrive to anchor the sand, soils develop from their remains. Over time the dunes are upholstered in pioneering native plants – grapevine, wormwood, marram grass, poison ivy. Today, a succession of dunes parallels the shore. Closest to the beach, new foredunes rustle with their crowns of poplars.

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Across the park road behind these first dunes, older dunes along the river cloak themselves in cedars. In the early days of settlement, the Sandbanks dunes were covered in grass interspersed with pines and cedars. Geez, what’s that itch? Oh yeah, poison ivy. That’s the end of it though; we’re staying on the trails from now on to give those hardworking pioneer plants a chance to take hold. Man there are a lot of people on this beach today…” First peoples visit the shoreline to fish, living lightly on the land, leaving net sinkers and spear points behind for the archeologists. United Empire Loyalists settle the area, husbanding the fine land inshore, leaving the green dunes unexploited until the mid-19th century, when the urge for barley fields and the wealth they brought drive cattle from pastures and onto the dunes. Cattle, logging, and fire; it isn’t long before the protective work of the pioneer plants is destroyed and history is turned back tens of thousands of years – and the sand begins to move. Wind and water reassert themselves. All along this ribbon of vacation shoreline from Presqu’ile, past Wellington, across the mouths of Weller’s Bay, Pleasant Bay, Huyck’s Bay, West Lake and East Lake, the wind and waves have always held dominion. Maybe it’s time to start packing up. The kids will be famished once they hit land. Gather the beach toys, shake sand out of their clothes, towels, the snacks – sand gets everywhere! Find dry towels to bundle the teeth-chattering little people. Sand. Moving over hard flat beaches. Towering into shifting dunes. Sand is one of the parks’ largest management challenges. After the 1890s deforestation of the West Lake dunes the sand begins to move. Inexorably, it drifts across farms and roadways and piles up against obstacles - trees, fences, buildings. County Road 12 is rerouted three times, producing today’s picturesque dog’s-leg. Buildings are moved or they are buried. Farmers call for help to preserve good land; they plant rows of white willows, whose descendants survive today. A provincial forestry unit is set up in 1921; over the next 40 years three million pines are planted to stabilize sand. Some of those pines still stand, themselves

threatened by an insect pest. The parks are living places, always changing. Few traces remain, but the commercial potential of the Sandbanks area was once aggressively tapped. The lake with its sheltering inlets and safe harbours supported a valuable commercial fishery; the shallows off the beaches were once filled with seine nets. The West Lake Brick Company manufactured white silica bricks near today’s Dunes day-use beach in the years around the First World War; in later decades tons of sand were trucked out for the manufacture of cement. Only public opposition and the formation of the Provincial Park stopped that particular movement of the sand. Whoops, there goes the beach umbrella! Wind’s coming up. Those waves are really rolling in, kids leaping like porpoises. Hate to drag them away. The wind and waves have not always been friendly. The bare limestone shelves at Presqu’ile, West Point, and Salmon Point - beauty spots today - once broke ships and sailors’ hearts. The story of the wreck of the Speedy, told at Presqu’ile lighthouse, is one such tale. One stormy night changed the fortunes of the proposed seat of Newcastle forever. The site of the planned district town is marked only by an interpretive panel in Presqu’ile Provincial Park. What was that? Dance band music? Oh, portable sound system. Guy Lombardo? Don’t hear that much anymore. Summer is so simple now. Load up the trailer with swimsuits and s’mores….Wasn’t always like that. Late 1800’s ladies in long skirts, prim white blouses and big hats recline on the wide verandahs of old lodges. The more daring venture out on a carriage-ride to perch in their finery on a sand dune, then write post-card descriptions later before changing for formal dinner in the dining room. People stayed put on holiday then – enjoying sedate strolls, ‘improving’ reading, wellchaperoned entertainments at summer hotels like Lakeshore Lodge. The automobile changes things. By the 1920s people are day tripping to the dunes and beaches of Presqu’ile and Sandbanks, driving and parking at water’s edge; some even go swimming! The 1920s to 1950s see the rise and decline of the

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summer dance pavilions with resident orchestras and (non-alcoholic) refreshment stands. Lads in jackets and ties escort gals in flowered summer frocks to hot spots like the Pleasure Palace at Presqu’ile’s resort hotel and the Palace of the Moon on the Outlet dunes. Cottage colonies grow, like those at the Presqu’ile peninsula’s Atkins farm and the Cedars along the Outlet River. Tourist resorts like the long-lived Martin’s on the Outlet River cater to cottagers, picnickers, dancers, swimmers, and tower-divers, changing with the times. By the 1950s cottagers and campers have forever changed the way to enjoy the beaches. The Provincial Park at the Outlet opens in 1957, the Sandbanks in 1962; the two are amalgamated and expanded in 1984. The longprotected Presqu’ile Park Commission lands are folded into the Provincial Park system in 1954. Wow. There is so much cultural history in these parks. Must take the kids to visit that old Lakeshore Lodge site before you leave for the city – there are ruins, and a 1960’s dance pavilion terrazzo floor among the trees. And check out the interpretive panels at Presqu’ile instead of just driving by. Likely a good idea to pick up a local history or two, also. Drifting again. Terns squawk as they kamikaze dive for fish. Gulls scream, fighting over something on the beach. So much life all around us here… A whirling kaleidoscope of interconnected plant and animal life enters your dreams. Micro-organisms in the algae attract delicate shorebirds as intriguing as their names: whimbrel, dunlin, sanderling, and dowitcher. Migrating waterfowl rest and feed, attracting thousands of naturalists. Vast nesting colonies of herons, egrets, terns, gulls, and the unlovely cormorant turn Presqu’ile’s protected Gull and High Bluff islands and beach nesting sites into a waterfowl incubator, ducks and geese take to the beaches. In the Presqu’ile marshes swans, herons, egrets, bittern, elusive sorbas, and rails live their lives unmolested. Frogs and turtles, some species gravely endangered, hide in Presqu’ile’s seicherefreshed marsh; the prehistoric snapping turtle emerging to lay hundreds of eggs on the roadsides, hoping for a few lucky escapes from predators – and passing traffic. In the forest canopy, songbirds and bats thrive, unaware of city pressures, and in rejuvenating farm fields of wildflowers

and tree seedlings at Sandbanks and Presqu’ile butterflies live their lifecycles and prepare for long migrations. Wild turkeys, deer, skunks, raccoons, foxes, and coyotes make the occasional furtive appearance – squirrels and chipmunks visit more confidently, as campers can attest. Marshes and rivers shelter homes of beaver, muskrat and otter, and the waters harbour a rich variety of fish species. A teeming biodiversity of plant, insect, fish, bird, and animal species finds refuge in these parks. Parks management works to maintain and enhance the area’s biodiversity, and balance the needs of its human and non-human visitors. Our understanding and co-operation is critical to the success of these resources. A cacophony of sound – wing beats and splashes, chirps and rustles, screeches and howls… WAAAAH! What creature makes that sound? It’s only your youngest, tired and cranky, complaining of some grievance at the hands of his older siblings. Time to pack up. Have to make some plans to take the kids on some of the park trails, read the interpretive plaques, and attend some natural heritage education programs. No nature deficit disorder for your kids! A day at the beach. A lifetime in the memory of a child. But it’s only an instant in the ongoing geological, natural and human tale that is the Lake Ontario shoreline story. CQL

My Theatre performs in the Historic Trenton Town Hall at 55 King St. Trenton

Drama. Comedy. Musical Theatre info@my-theatre.ca tickets@my-theatre.ca www.my-theatre.ca

Tickets available at Quinte Chamber of Commerce • 613.392.7635 or 800.930.3255 COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

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Celebrating 130 Years

Visit Belleville’s Treasure GL ANMORE

NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE OF CANADA

COUNTRY CUISINE SUPPER CLUB

LICENCED • ENTERTAINMENT

CALL TO BOOK YOUR GROUP EVENTS!

257 Bridge Street East, Belleville, Ontario • (613) 962-2329 www.glanmore.ca Open Tuesday to Sunday, Year-Round September to May 1 pm to 4:30 pm, June, July, & August 10 am to 4:30 pm

1914 Stockdale Road, Stockdale, ON 613-398-1700 613-398 1700 • 416 416-699-2001 699 -2001 WWW.STOCKDALEMILL.COM

www.outinthecounty.com

Out in the County provides positive LGBT lifestyle travel to one of the most beautiful places in Canada:

Prince Edward Count y, Ont ario www.copperkettlechocolate.ca www.shopfad.com

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www.sugarbushvineyards.com

COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

www.indulgencedayspa-ourspa2u.com

www.harwoodestatevineyards.com www.milfordbistro.com

www.keint-he.ca


SUMMER 2013 E v e n t

L i s t i n g s

Please list your events on our Facebook page.

Events are subject to change, please confirm event details with the organizer. Events may be submitted to editor@xplornet.com

July

West Ben Theatre July to early August Bringing culture and nature together in perfect harmony, the stage hosts an incredible array of renowned Canadian and international artists, from full symphony orchestras and choruses to chamber music and soloists. The best in class in a relaxed country setting. Campbellford. www.westben.ca Until July 14 20th Annual Art in the County Juried exhibition and sale. Highest quality work by renowned County artists and artisans. One of the best juried art shows in eastern Ontario; a highlight of the summer season in Prince Edward County. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday to Saturday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays. Upstairs, Books & Co., 289 Main Street, Picton www.pecartscouncil.org/art-in-the-county-s18.php July 11 to 14 Belleville Waterfront Festival Ethnic food village, midway, large vendor exposition, and entertainment on main stage, shuttle buses to Dragon Festival. Supports youth organizations in the Belleville area. Free admission. www.bellevillewaterfrontfestival.com July 13 Town & Country Garden Tour Canadian Federation of University Women sponsored tour featuring eight beautiful gardens and box lunch. Supporting scholarships for local students. Belleville www.cfuwbelleville.ca/ July 19 Rotary Loves Kids Annual Golf Tournament and Party in the Square. Help the kids of Quinte. Belleville’s best summer party. Food and drink, dancing under the stars. www.rotaryloveskids.com and www.partyinthesquare.ca

July 19 to August 9 Music at Port Milford Chamber music school and festival bringing together 12 to18 year olds with internationally renowned faculty. Featuring four Friday night performances with students and faculty at St. Mary Magdalene Church, Picton, and Saturday student matinees. www.mpmcamp.org July 25 to August 10 CLIC Eastern Ontario’s largest photography show and sale. Dedicated to enhancing photography’s stature among the arts, CLIC presents eastern Ontario’s photographers in an annual, juried show, offering viewers a first-rate exhibition setting. Upstairs, Books & Co., 289 Main Street, Picton clicphotoshow.ca/

AUGUST

innovative new artists. An outstanding festival with a variety of events and venues, centred on three major performances at the Regent Theatre, Main St, Picton. www.pecjazz.org August 22 to 23 Hastings County 25th Plowing Match & Farm Show Eastern Ontario’s Premiere Agricultural event. Plowing competitions, machinery demonstrations, antique tractor parade, and more. Stirling www.hastingsfarmshow.com August 31 to September 2 Rednersville Road Art Tour Labour Day weekend outing. Purchase original artwork from more than 30 artists. www.rednersvilleroadarttour.com g a r d e n / l a n d s c a p i n g

August 1 Art and Craft Sale The Prince Edward County Women’s Institute presents its 30th annual arts and crafts sale with more than 200 vendors in four buildings and outdoor booths. $3 admission includes parking. Picton Fairgrounds, Main Street East, Picton. www.countywomen.ca August 3 to 4 Bancroft Art & Craft Guild Summer show and sale. More than 50 artists and artisans. Enjoy live music, food. Millennium Park, Bancroft. www.bancroftontario.com August 9 to 11 Quinte Ribfest. Support Big Brothers, Big Sisters at Quinte’s biggest little BBQ. Live bands, vendors, kid zone. West Zwick’s Park, Belleville www.quinteribfest.ca August 13 to 18 Prince Edward County Jazz Festival This year’s festival combines both a look back upon jazz’s greatest achievements and the chance to hear from

Blooms

Stephen Petrasek

613-476-8955

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture

• fine garden design and consultation • native plant expertise earthwoodsl@gmail.com

h o m e

i m p r o v e m e n t

Table~Craft Unique Hand Crafted Tables 15796 County Rd. 2 – (Hwy #2) Brighton, ON 613.439.9768

cszumilas@gmail.com www.table-craft.com

&

Events

by Thompson Tents

Cool Clothes

Jewelry

Gift Certificates

Your Event Specialist YourBoutique & Flower the heart of EventinSpecialist ...perfectly arranged! the County!

& Flower Boutique

613-476-0040 • 190 Main St www.tenthousandvillages.ca

in the heart of 613-476-0021 • 124 Main St the County! www.bloomsandevents.com

HISTORIC DOWNTOWN PICTON ...perfectly arranged!

124 Main Street, Unit 101 Picton, ON K0K 2T0

Phone: (613) 476-0021 Toll Free: (866) 886-2226 info@bloomsandevents.com www.bloomsandevents.com


a u t o

b u i l d e r

/

d e s i g n e r

b u i l d e r

/

d e s i g n e r

BUILDING QUALITY BUILDING TRUST SINCE 1989

Building Quality is Second Nature

13360 Loyalist Parkway, Picton, Ontario 613-476-6834 | www.elliottsage.com

b u i l d e r

/

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b u i l d e r

/

d e s i g n e r

613.922.9276 | www.hickoryhomes.ca

b u i l d e r

RR

THE

CQL Directory

Building with you for you

HOMES

BUILDING COMMUNITIES

in Brighton

/

d e s i g n e r

ENOVATION ESTORATION COMPANY

F i n d e v e ryo n e yo u n e e d r i g h t h e re

ANDREW WADFORTH TEL: 613.885.5477 2804 COUNTY ROAD 10 RR#3 PICTON ON KOK 2T0 WWW.HENDERSONDEVELOPMENTS.CA • 613-475-0197

L AWYER

p r i v a t e

s c h o o l

MAYESKI LAW P R O F E S S I O N A L

d e n t i s t CHOOSE WISELY.

C O R P O R AT I O N

advocacy | litigation

6 Talbot Street, Suite 8, P.O. Box 9, Picton, ON K0K 2T0 | 613.707.2944

Meet Dr. Gokhan Shevket.

First Canadian Place, 100 King Street West, Suite 5700, Toronto, ON M5X 1C7 | 416.907.1779

steinbergdental.com Madoc: 613.473.2142 Deseronto: 613.396.2974

Fax: 1.888.987.2944 alexandra@mayeskilaw.com | www.mayeskilaw.com

d e n t i s t

d e n t i s t

d e n t i s t

Dr. R. Younes

Dental Care Family, Cosmetic & Implant Dentistry

RIVERVIEW PLAZA 255 Glen Miller Rd. Unit #3, Trenton ‘Over 30 years in the Quinte Region’

613.208.0807 •

96 Division St. Trenton www.younescosmeticdentist.com

f a s h i o n

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME

69 Division St., Trenton, Ontario

613-392-2732

613-392-9586 www.drbretts.com

f i t n e ss

t h e a t r e

+ US V I VAC I O

tickets@my-theatre.ca www.my-theatre.ca

F O R T H E A B OV E AV E R A G E WO M A N

WE OFFER A STYLISH SELECTION OF

Improve Posture, Flexibility, Strength, Balance, Coordination

BUSINESS, CASUAL, EVENING WEAR AND ACCESSORIES

613.392.7635 or 800.930.3255

FOR THE ABOVE AVERAGE SIZE WOMAN.

COME VISIT OUR

g a r d e n / l a n d s cNEW a LOCATION p -

g a r d e n / l a n d s c a p i n g

JEWELLERY & ACCESSORIES SPECIAL ORDERING WARDROBE CONSULTATIONS

h o m e

f u r n i t u r e

Where Quality Grows

COUNTRY GARDENS Personalized service for both the novice and experienced gardener.

PICTON, ONTARIO

OPEN YEAR ROUND! Gift Certificates Available.

613.392.7806 • www.hollandale.ca 101 DUNDAS ST. WEST, TRENTON

78

613.394.2200

IAMVIVACIOUS.COM

COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

613.476.5757

info@lockyers.com • 332 Cty. Rd. 1, Picton

237 Main Street Picton, ON K0K 2T0 • 613-476-7775 • www.frenchcountry.ca


g a r d e n / l a n d s c a p i n g

g a r d e n / l a n d s c a p i n g

H o m e

D ĂŠ c o r

613.476.8872 1.877.874.4418 92 Talbot St. Picton terravista@kos.net Picton 613-476-1181 Belleville 613-969-7992 Kingston 613-547-3772 www.swlg.ca

h o m e BEDROOMS

d e c o r

T.V. STANDS

Architecture Construction Supplies

1245 Midland Ave Kingston ON

613.634.1400

1478 Unity Road Glenburnie ON

613.547.5445

h o m e

i m p r o v e m e n t

h o m e

i m p r o v e m e n t

COFFEE & ENDS

PICTON

613.476.6597

6648 Hwy 62 North

RUTTLE BROTHERS FURNITURE

BOOKCASES

SINCE 1974

www.ruttlebrothersfurniture.com

613-969-9263

i m p r o v e m e n t

613.969.6246

613.962.9111 1.800.267.2851

1 mile N. of WALMART on HWY 62, Belleville

h o m e

BELLEVILLE

R.R. #5, Belleville, ON

DESKS & ACCENTS

h o m e

i m p r o v e m e n t

h o m e

i m p r o v e m e n t

P LUMBING P LUS Belleville 613.968.3461

404 Maitland Dr. Belleville

613.969.6699

Kingston 613.389.5724

www.fireplacespecialties.ca

www.plumbingplus.com

2400 Hwy 38, Kingston ON • 1-866-728-3998 • cataraquigranite.com

h o m e

i m p r o v e m e n t

h o m e

i m p r o v e m e n t

h o m e

i m p r o v e m e n t

Family, Fun & Fitness We Install Flooring Kitchens, Bathrooms & Windows

260 Bell Blvd., Belleville • 613-967-8080 h o m e

i m p r o v e m e n t

www.stlawrencepools.ca

The ONE store for your perfect floor

285 Coleman Street, Belleville • 613.966.9988

h o m e

i m p r o v e m e n t

Kingston.Brockville.Cornwall.Belleville

H o m e

I m p r o v e m e n t

Large Selection of Lights, Lamps, Shades & Ceiling Fans

 

124 MAIN ST. PICTON 613.476.9259 www.countyfireplace.ca

r e n t a l

p r o p e r t y

    

613-392-5867 | 16477 Hwy 2 (Between Trenton & Brighton)

p r o f e ss i o n a l

s e r v i c e s

613.399.2344 • www.williamdesigncompany.com p r o f e ss i o n a l

s e r v i c e s

PROUDLY SERVING YOU SINCE 1996!

BUSINESS AWARD WINNERS!

Plan Your Business From the Ground Up web & graphic design

Spectacular, Historic 13-room Rental Getaway Property in Picton! 341 Main St. East, Picton, ON • 1-866-576-5993 • thewexfordhouse.com

Pearson Int. Airport - Door to Door - 24/7 Private Direct! Shared Ride! Special Events! Town Cars - Limousines - Mini & Full Size Vans - Buses

613-968-2058 • 1-888-677-4287 www.ontariocoachway.com

photography

business plans

& Show it to the World in the Best Light

613-966-9193 | vaughangroup.ca big city know-how... local prices COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

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Saitarg’s GQ Gravitas Quotient is a measure of one’s reserves of inner wisdom.

Discover your Gravitas Quotient at www.gravitasthegame.com

Danny ‘The Count’ Koker makes his first Canadian appearance at Brighton’s Applefest September 28 and answers 14 Gravitas Questions Danny ‘Count’ Koker, owner of Count’s Kustoms is a self-taught mechanic who grew up in Cleveland and Detroit. He is the creative force behind each project leaving the shop. His love for cars and motorcycles started at a very young age and was fueled on by his family who worked for Ford Motor Company. Count’s Kustoms opened 15 years ago and garnered international attention from the very beginning. Danny and his team’s work is frequently featured on television shows and in magazines, newspapers and more both nationally and internationally. With Danny’s reputation in the industry and expertise for all things automotive, he began making appearances in 2011 as an industry authority on the History Channel series Pawn Stars. A short time after, Danny had his own show on History Channel, launching August 2012 to an audience of 4.3 million viewers. The show takes an in-depth look at Danny’s obsession with hunting, buying, and flipping American muscle cars and motorcycles. With razor-sharp attention to detail, from the bodywork to the final paint fit and finish, every custom through the team embodies individuality, with a nod to the retro. Danny and his builders take great pride in every one of the custom bikes and hot rods fabricated in the shop, and nothing leaves without Danny’s scrutiny and approval. A long-time Las Vegas resident, Danny owns several thriving businesses including Count’s Tattoo at the Rio and Count’s Vamp’d Rock Bar & Grill. In addition to his business ventures, Danny and the team’s charitable efforts are well known. From holiday drives for children to veterans in need, the team is very involved with those in the community who are less fortunate. Danny is always bringing projects into the shop to help disabled veterans, military groups, and families. Outside of cars and motorcycles Danny is the lead singer of Count’s 77 - a compilation of long-time friends. He can often be found on stage performing when not working at the shop. Count’s 77 performs at events and fundraisers in addition to headlining at some of the top rock venues in the country.

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COUNTY & QUINTE LIVING SUMMER 2013

What car or motorcycle makes your heart stand still? Lamborghini Miura SV If it is never too late to be what you might have been, what might you have been? Doing what I love - there are no regrets If you were in charge of the world for one day, what would you change? I would eliminate Daylight Savings Time! Name one universal rule of friendship? Number one in my book is TRUST What recipe for a successful business can you share? Hard work and being responsible is the best recipe for being successful in business How do you let go of some of the cars that you love? So far I have only let go of one. It was PAINFUL!! May never happen again! What’s the hardest part about being the man in charge? The hardest part for me is trying to balance my creativity with the practical business side We all hope there will be one more time. One more time for what? The ’70s. That would be great to relive! Name one secret you do not want to discover before you die? I do NOT want to know what’s really in a hot dog!! If you were going to launch a new prohibition, what would you outlaw? I would ban scooters that can’t keep up with traffic How would you like to rewire your brain? I wouldn’t

Give one example of life’s absurdities? It’s absurd to me that California law requires you to drive 55 mph if you’re pulling a trailer Who would you like to have a conversation of a lifetime with? Former President Ronald Reagan How would you know what questions to ask? I consider myself pretty politically educated so I’d have a lot to ask


BECAUSE IT’S CUSTOM, YOUR OPTIONS ARE LIMITLESS

We design, build and install: kitchens bars offices vanities entertainment centres organizers fireplaces counter tops n

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1209 Wilson Rd. Hillier, Ontario K0K 2J0 613.399.2344 www.williamdesigncompany.com n

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Rebecca McNevin Office Manager Deseronto

Brittany Hawker

Registered Dental Hygienist - Deseronto

Dr. Gokhan Shevket Doctor of Dental Surgery

Team Effort. For the past six years, we’ve been striving tirelessly to raise your expectations of what a dental practice should be. The secret? It’s all in our “A”-Team of Dental Professionals. From the enthusiasm of our Office Manager Rebecca, to the thoroughness of hygienists like Brittany, and the serious passion of Dr. Gokhan Shevket - our Deseronto team will make sure that you and your family are in good hands. After all, you only have one set of teeth.

Isn’t it time you raised your expectations?

Choose Wisely.

Deseronto Madoc Web Twitter

613.396.2974 613.473.2142 steinbergdental.com @SDCDentalCentre

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County and Quinte Living Summer 2013

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