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Migration represents opportunity, especially for youth, who make up the bulk of annual migration movements. Many young people risk their lives in search of a better life, better education, and more professional opportunities, despite knowing about the harrowing journey to reach a promised new life. Jamila’s journey, like so many others, is riddled with challenges. The challenges that come her way are there not to sadden us, but to remind us of the importance of freedom, dignity, equity and security for everyone crossing borders in hope of something better.


Copyright © 2020 The Iceberg book series was inspired by the Perception Change Project’s Iceberg Infographic, a visual demonstration of what media chooses to broadcast when reporting on the United Nations in light of global challenges, versus what the reality is. The production of this book has been made possible thanks to the financial support from Fondation pour Genève. A special thanks goes to the Division of Conference Management at UN Geneva for editing, translating and printing the books, and to Union University in Jackson Tennessee for illustrating the books. Printed at the United Nations Printing Section at UN Geneva, 2020. Author: Kirsten Deall Illustrator: Melinda Eckley Posey


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the Iceberg Collection Iceberg Education Poverty Youth Climate Change Gender Health Rights Peace

The series is created by the Perception Change Project team in the Office of the Director-General at UN Geneva.

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Youth Today, there are about 1.8 billion people between the ages of 10 and 24 – the largest youth population ever. Many of these young people live in developing countries and see their potential hindered by extreme poverty, violence, lack of food or lack of job opportunities. These are some of the reasons that force young people to leave their countries. According to Global Migration Indicators 2018 (a report prepared by the Global Migration Data Analysis Centre at the International Organization for Migration), there are over 36 million child migrants under the age of 19. Having to take dangerous routes across the sea or the desert in search of a better life is one of the hardest experiences a child can face. For children and young people, taking such a journey means abuse, trafficking and exploitation. The children who haven’t had an education, who travel alone, or who take a longer journey, face the most danger. Even though they know this, they are still prepared to risk their lives for the chance of a better life. They all have different reasons for leaving their home, but they all feel there is no other option. It is important to understand the challenges that these young migrants and refugees are confronted with. We need to welcome them into our countries and treat each individual with respect and sensitivity. If we can give these young people the skills and opportunities they need to reach their potential, they can be a driving force for mobilizing change and making a positive impact.

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ving a e l m ’ me. I r o f y a y r ia me. ig d D b o t r a r a s a e i i l i D Today s fam ’ . t a a l i h t m g a ere hin ,J t h e y t r m h e s g v ’ t u e o I Alth e and . m s o r h a y e y m ing ly, for t i t r m e a a g f w s ’ y t t m t like i been a l s e f a h e v y ’ r my we nt u g n o n e i c l h l r w e u t , O been e of hope v s ’ e I m . i g t en more, ioratin y r n e a t have be e e d r tually ive he l c a said o t s y e ’ e t v s i ’ h u y t , e r r t o h e u bett ly, b ough t safe f e h t t t a l o n n e e c s v ’ it e to ,e len s o t w i o o a v o h n h d t k c n y o y a l fami hting at the nes wh g h o fi w e e h e t h v t a t le o go ha all t t o f t d d o d e n i e d a a i s r , c u y beca s eas ’ve de i y’re af I e g ! h n i t e v v k a a n uch t le o le thi m t a I h s e i t . g n e e a f e r i m t s and l es cou y told e k e r h a won’t li e t T h t t . I e s ot tru gree. school n a d s s i ’ o t d o a g I h e roes. re ar that t e e h h t e s h y t a She s nd are i . h s e e b v i l y sta y aunt m e r e h a, w to Kerj rally. e n e g r bette

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ed me ride p l e h y r e v ia a h D Dear ople who e p t e m e v ’ r. I journey, a f e h d t e l g l e in v r a u r I have t rucks. D t f o k c a b e ing to nd th y a r t s y in l a t r n t a t f s o I was con on the top d n a , d o o f ater and arf. Now w c s e l y t m it l h y it r w e I had v sun, just g in t a e b e a boat m th o e r f k a e t c a n f a c y here, I protect m m o r F . y e L ’s enough he city of it t e in p o d h e I iv r o r s I’ve a ney left, o m f o it b a . I have a j r e K o t s s acro boat trip. e h t r o f y to pa 6


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all our work!!! r fo id a p n e e b ’t n ve Dear Diary – We ha we don’t work fast if g in h yt n a s u y a p ave to They said they don’t h asked for. The ve y’ e th g in th ry ve e we’ve done enough, even though ’t do anything. on d y e th t u b , is th police know about

ths. I really on m 10 r fo e c la p le en in this terrib e b e ’v I – ry ia D r a e D before I left. I sh lfi se d e ll a c I o h w my sister, miss my family, even ’t let us. on w y e th ow n k I t ily, bu want to call my fam

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ntre e c n o i t deten e h t y r o t a i omame C c l t a Dear D s n i o r i t t terna sychia n p I r e e h e t t s: why rom n f o i t s A volun s a e w u id she d me q a e s k e s h a S e e fed, . Sh r s a today. s o e r w C Red often e h w t o h f o , g ecially oin g p s mittee e m ’ , I s e thoriti , where u e a m e o h h t hing. t t y y b r e d v I lef e e t much e trea r y t a t e e r w p as a old her and how e t v a I h . I n woma ights r g n e u h o t y and f o d e e t as a a m o e s r ioned e mist t b n e t o m n o o s ent m ght t t i a r She al e r e t h t like gnified , i g d n i d e n b a mane human u h e v i e to rec t h g i r e th tion. n e t e d while in lace. p s i h t e – I hat y r a i D r Dea re!!! It’s tortu

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DearDi ary - I ’m in K feel. M erja! So aybe ju rry I d s t gratefu on’t sou were re l to be nd so e ally big alive. W xcited. and roc a lot. I I don’t e k w i n e g r was clo e pack the boa know ho s ed so t ing my e t wI Other p i ght in t yes and eople w he boat trying t ere fain ; there o t h t i i n n k about g becau was no Omar, somethi se they room to who wa ng othe h sit. The s a d s n i t ’ t t was afr ing nex r h t a h waves d a n w ater or the rou t to me aid. Bu g , said, t I told food. h sea. S me abo “If you ome pe him I w ut his j ’re afra ople go a s o u fi r n ney, wh e. He a i t seasic d to the , y o u ether I won’t m sked m k. scorchin e a few ake it. was list g deser waves a ” Of co ening o t heat. questio round m urse I r n H s n , e o t b . c u e alled it t I ign My ear . It da in the s ored him was afraid. Ev s prick the “se wned on ame bo ed up w a of sa eryone . He th me that at – no nd”. Om hen he e n I wasn pun int s t a rted te ar help said he ’t the o ended. lling ed me h a nly one d We just l o st his b take m sufferin didn’t t y mind rother g, we w alk abo off the ere all ut it.


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only just ’s it , r e v o ’t n “Our journey is , e m o t id a s ing a job is not r d a in m F O . , e r ja e r h e e K g in now the langua k As we arrived ’t n o ers will be d t e in W w . e t h h t ig d r n s A a d he w be welcoming. l il w le beginning.” An p o e p l a e survived the c lo W . e h it t t ll u o a b t a o N e y. ing to be positiv y going to be eas r t ’m y rights as I m t d u n b a , t t s r a e h t d n in u e truth he way helped m t g harsh. There’s n lo a t e m d to ask to be I e le w o p o ll e a p ’m e I m o t S a y. mar told me th O horrible journe , le p ests to be m r a e t x e in r t o s F e b . y 18 m r e und rities that it’s in o h t u a migrant aged a e h t ll e t aunt’s house. n y a m c o I t . o y g il o m t a f le y b at and I was a reunited with m h t id d I . ja r e y aunt in K reunited with m ing to me. The m o lc e w d n a d has been so kin e h s , e she heard s u n o e h h w ’s t d n u ie r a c y r m e at mily. My moth a f y Since I arrived m ll a c o t s talked to my a w I o . d r e e h t m o e m d d a n m a r first thing she e. So had my g m r o f amily said f id y a r M f . a t f n e le e b I e d ha r arguing befor o f my voice. She r e h t o h c a e am their little o t I d d e n a iz g e v lo o a r p b a sister and we r leaving. I am o f d r in Kerja a d w o e c iv r a r t a o n I y m a a d I t g: brave one. Tha they were wron ly n o e h t t o n heroines who ’m d I n e a s s u e a o c r e e b h , e d hero. I smile of strong, brav l u f t a o b a d e erja gain was the day K to offer. have so much who left a e n o e m o s , r a ew friend, Om n a e v a h I , s me a fighter w a e c n e d b o , o g ja r is e h t K o ll On top of a n his journey t o , d n a est hero g g n in u t o h y g e fi h t h c , s u e m y country with so or, and, in my e iv v r u s a , t n a r young mig long time. a r o f s d n himself. He is a ie r f eling we’ll be e f a e v a h I ! I know 25


Although “Jamila” is a fictional story, there are many real-life stories like hers of children and adults migrating to another country to find a better life.

HANAN Hanan is a 32-year-old refugee from Yemen who did vocational training in Addis Ababa with many other women from different countries. She was very nervous about going back to school after so many years. She worried about fitting in as a mature student and a refugee, but her concerns evaporated once she got to know her classmates, including her best friend in Ethiopia, Yanchinew. The women became friends while attending the course, the first of its kind in Ethiopia where refugees and Ethiopians can study subjects together ranging from cooking and woodworking to mechanics. “We are very close and we help each other with our studies,” says Hanan. “Whenever something isn’t clear, someone else in the group always explains.” Spending time with her Ethiopian peers has also helped Hanan forge a deeper understanding and appreciation of her new home. “We learn about the language, culture and way of life from our classmates. It has changed our way of thinking about life,” she adds. Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

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YOUNES My name is Younes, I’m 10 years old and I come from Iraq. I live here, at the open accommodation center of Drama, with my mom, my sister and my brother. Our dad is not with us. I recently started going to the Greek primary school every day. The Greek language course is my favorite, and I don’t find it difficult to learn. I have Greek friends and classmates at school. When the bell rings and we go outside for a break, we play with the ball in the school yard all together. I like going to school so much! I dream of becoming a doctor when I grow up. *IOM Greece is ensuring the safe transportation of pupils from the Accommodation Centers to schools and has equipped them with school kits including notebooks, pens, pencils and other necessary school material, with support from the European Commission’s Civil Protection & Humanitarian Aid Operations Office. I am a Migrant (International Organization for Migration campaign)

KATHERINE My name is Katherine. I’m Peruvian and I’ve been living in the United Kingdom for two years. Having left my country and my loved ones, nostalgia is part of my every day. I needed to fill that void with activities to do with my beloved Peru.

Dancing has always been my passion. I’ve done it since I was a child. As my father always tells us: “It’s in the blood, and what is inherited cannot be stolen.” I took part in different folk dancing events at school and university. I was even in dance

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events of the Brisas del Titicaca Cultural Association. There, I developed many of

my

dance

skills

and

complemented

them

with

the

typical

dances

of

Peru.

I wanted to share this experience and passion with other people. So I set up the ArtPerUK initiative in May 2019. By teaching other Peruvian migrants our rich heritage of music and dance, we learn and have fun at the same time.

My vision for the future is to make this initiative a basis for a dance group that can participate in different events in London and help to spread Peruvian culture more widely. I hope the initiative continues and grows, so that we can leave a legacy for our families in the United Kingdom and know that we did something for people to learn more about our wonderful country of Peru. I am a Migrant (International Organization for Migration campaign)

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These are a few examples of the positive statistics that should be making headlines. As the numbers are changing daily, please see the websites of the relevant organizations for the most up-to-date information.

• In 2016, a dramatic increase in the

• The Office of the United Nations High

amount of money - over $445 billion - that

Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has

migrants send home to their families in

data on 3.9 million stateless people..

developing countries helps lift millions out of poverty. • The small amounts of $200 or $300 that each migrant sends home make up about 60% of the family’s household income. • About 40% of remittances (about $200 billion) are sent to rural areas where the majority of poor people live. • Over the past decade, remittances have risen by 51%– far greater than the 28% increase in migration from developing

• Over 92,000 refugees have been resettled. • In 2015, EU countries offered asylum to 292,540 refugees. • In 2018, over 2,400 migrants have been evacuated from Libya, up from just under 400 in 2017. • The number of deaths of migrants at sea reduced by almost half from 2015 to 2018.

countries. • Currently, about 200 million migrant workers support some 800 million family members globally. • 85% of total migrant earnings remains in the host countries, which is estimated at $3 trillion annually.

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International Geneva The city of Geneva lies in the southwestern tip of Switzerland and boasts some of the country’s most recognized qualities. The spectacular views of the surrounding mountains capture firsttime visitors and long-standing residents alike, its competitive financial centre attracts business persons from around the world, its quality of life is second to none and, above all else, Geneva hosts a high number of international organizations. This led to the term “International Geneva” being coined. It all started in 1863, when the Red Cross was founded in Geneva to protect victims of armed conflicts. Today, people come together in this city to address not only humanitarian needs but also challenges related to peace, health, science, human rights, migration, climate change and more. International Geneva unites international organizations, academic institutions, an international business community, many non-governmental organizations and the permanent representatives of 178 Member States of the United Nations. The lives being affected by International Geneva extend well beyond Geneva itself and the leitmotif that runs through its work is the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals are the way that International Geneva, together with its many partners across the world, fights against poverty, prevents violence, protects the planet and does so much more. Geneva may be small in size, its reach is global. It is the venue where the world crafts solutions.

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Sustainable Development Goals In an era when we are bombarded with negative news, it is easy to feel discouraged and unequipped to improve the world we live in. Thankfully, to address the many problems, world leaders have adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: a set of 17 goals that are humanity’s road map for transforming our planet into a better place. The goals reach everyone, they leave no one behind, they are all interconnected and they are everyone’s responsibility. We have everything we need to help everyone thrive and reach their potential. Together, let’s create a world where peace, rights and well-being become a reality.

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The Perception Change Project Time and again, when people hear about the United Nations for the first time, their eyes light up. Especially children. The comfort and reassurance we feel knowing that there is an organization that brings the entire world together, for peace, rights and well-being, are unparalleled. We don’t need to explain why there is a need for such an organization. We all get it. It’s there, for all of us. And it’s in International Geneva. At the same time, this feeling of awe and security fades away quickly because we live in tumultuous times and, of course, the reality is different. We have ups and downs, and we are also constantly adapting to address new challenges. News stories often focus on the negative, while we all take the positive for granted. We have a natural tendency to put the spotlight on issues that need to be fixed rather than celebrate what we are good at. But the mission and underlying impact of the work of the United Nations and its partners remain the same, and we don’t always realize it in our daily lives. The good news is that this constellation of organizations that make up International Geneva is still there, carrying out its noble mission. And it belongs to all of us. For it to thrive, we all need to recognize its value, its impact and make sure it can do what it was designed to do. This is what the Perception Change Project has set out to do and it succeeds every time eyes light up when people hear about the United Nations, just like they did the first time.

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Copyright © 2020 The Iceberg book series was inspired by the Perception Change Project’s Iceberg Infographic, a visual demonstration of what media chooses to broadcast when reporting on the United Nations in light of global challenges, versus what the reality is. The production of this book has been made possible thanks to the financial support from Fondation pour Genève. A special thanks goes to the Division of Conference Management at UN Geneva for editing, translating and printing the books, and to Union University in Jackson Tennessee for illustrating the books. Printed at the United Nations Printing Section at UN Geneva, 2020. Author: Kirsten Deall Illustrator: Melinda Eckley Posey


Migration represents opportunity, especially for youth, who make up the bulk of annual migration movements. Many young people risk their lives in search of a better life, better education, and more professional opportunities, despite knowing about the harrowing journey to reach a promised new life. Jamila’s journey, like so many others, is riddled with challenges. The challenges that come her way are there not to sadden us, but to remind us of the importance of freedom, dignity, equity and security for everyone crossing borders in hope of something better.

Profile for Perception Change Project (PCP)

ICEBERG SERIES #5 - Jamila (English)  

ICEBERG SERIES #5 - Jamila (English)  

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