Penn Nursing UPfront: Fall 2013

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fall 2013

LE A DI NG T H R O U G H IN N O VAT I ON Nursing as an Innovation: Innovating Nurses 4

Applying Mapping Technology to Track the Spread of Disease 14

Innovative Ways of Filling the Pipeline with New Nurses 16

Clinical Research in Pediatric Critical Care 24

THE WORLD. 速


H ealthy C ities : Healthy Women “A woman multiplies the impact of an investment made in her future by extending benefits to the world around her, creating a better life for her family and building a stronger community.” From USAID “Why Invest in Women”

More than half of the world’s population currently lives in cities, London September 17, 2013 9:30a.m. - 3:30p.m. Millennium Hotel London Mayfair

and the numbers are ever increasing. Women and girls make up half of that urban population and face unique challenges in living healthy lives in urban environments. They also have a unique and powerful role in positively influencing the health of their children, families, and communities. Penn Nursing, Penn Alumni, and the Trustees’ Council of Penn Women

Washington, D.C. October 30, 2013 8:30a.m. - 2p.m. JW Marriott Hotel

have partnered to bring visibility to these issues. In Miami, New York City, and Los Angeles, the Healthy Cities: Healthy Women conference series focused on understanding challenges and exploring solutions for and with women and girls that promise to improve health for urban populations everywhere.

“The Global Future” in Philadelphia May 15, 2014 Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts Board of Overseers Dean Kehler, W’79, Chair Rosemarie Greco, Immediate Past Chair Nancy Adelson, Nu’78 Phyllis W. Beck Carolyn Bennett, Nu’91 Carol Lefkowitz Boas, Nu’77 Cornelius Bond (emeritus) Lillian S. Brunner (emerita), HUP’40, Ed’45, HON’85 Gilbert F. Casellas, L’77 Eleanor L. Davis, Nu’82 Kim Dickstein, W’87 William Floyd Jr., C’67, WG’69 Seth Ginns, C’00 Terri Cox Glassen, Nu’91 (ex officio) Stephen J. Heyman, W’59 Daniel Hilferty

Join us for Healthy Cities: Healthy Women in London, Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia in 2013-14. For more information, visit www.nursing.upenn.edu/healthywomen

Ellen R. Kapito, Nu’79 Gail Kass Eunice King, Nu’71 Wendy Hurst Levine Patricia Martín, M’85 Barbara Nichols Melanie Nussdorf, CW’71 Vivian W. Piasecki (chair emerita) Krista Pinola, Nu’86 Marjorie O. Rendell, CW’69 Ralph F. Reynolds, W’84 Robert D. Roy, W’59 Sandy Samberg, Nu’94, GNu’95 Marie A. Savard, HUP’70, Nu’72, M’76 Martin J. Silverstein, GL’08 Patricia B. Silverstein, C’81 Susan Drossman Sokoloff, C’84 Carol Elizabeth Ware, Nu’73 Michael Wert

University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing Dean Afaf I. Meleis, PhD, DrPS (hon), FAAN, FRCN Director of Communications Joy McIntyre Vice Dean of Institutional Advancement Wylie A. Thomas Editor Joy McIntyre Online Editor Barbara McAleese Assistant Editors Becky Banks, Cathy Greenland, Monica Salvia, Victoria Smith Contributors Victoria Smith, Connie Ulrich, Jean Whelan, Robert Strauss Photography I. George Bilyk, Debbie Boardman, Wendy Grube, Demere Kasper, Marjorie Muecke, Helen Pun, Third Eye Productions Design Dale Parenti Design Printing Pearl Pressman Liberty Advisory Board Christina Costanzo Clark, Admissions and Academic Affairs; Janet Deatrick, Faculty; Patricia D’Antonio, Faculty; Carol Ladden, Graduate Enrollment Management; Yvonne Paterson, Faculty; Jennifer Pinto-Martin, Faculty; Wylie A. Thomas, Institutional Advancement; Lorraine Tulman, Faculty. www.nursing.upenn.edu Admissions 215.898.4271 | admissions@nursing.upenn.edu Institutional Advancement 215.898.4841 | nursalum@pobox.upenn.edu Communications 215.898.5074 | joymc@nursing.upenn.edu UPfront is a biannual publication of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. The magazine chronicles the research and leadership of Penn Nursing faculty, students, and alumni.


table

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Forging into the Future: Innovations and Transitions A Message from Dean Afaf I. Meleis

cover story 4

Nursing as an Innovation: Innovating Nurses The age of innovation in nursing will affect the whole of healthcare for a long time

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d e pa rt m e n t s 14 Technology

Bridgette M. Brawner, PhD, APRN, is using new mapping technology to track the spread of disease

16 Leadership

Innovative Ways of Creating a Pipeline

18 Global Impact

Faculty and Students Abroad: Learning Together

22 Voices from around the World

Afghanistan: Innovation in a War-Torn Land

24 The 11th Annual Fagin Lecture

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Martha A.Q. Curley, PhD, RN, FAAN, has focused on advancing knowledge in the care of critically ill pediatric patients

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Penn Nursing News

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Penn Nursing Science in Action

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Alumni Connections

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Faculty News

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14 www.nursing.upenn.edu

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Forging into the Future:

Innovations and Transitions

Transitions are well-known in nursing. As nurses, we care for people who move from illness to wellness or chronicity or from one stage of life to another. The healthcare system, too, will be going through a major transition as millions of Americans join the ranks of the newly insured and will be entitled to preventative and curative interventions. Increased reliance on technology in educational and healthcare systems will change the landscape. And, as millions of baby boomers age, necessitating a new emphasis on managing chronic conditions, nursing and healthcare will undergo more seismic shifts. In short, we are in the midst of many transitions.

Dean Meleis blogs at deanmeleis.blogspot.com

Anticipating and recognizing these transitions, we at the School embarked on instituting many innovative changes in our educational and research programs. First, we made substantive changes in our undergraduate curriculum (now in its third year of implementation). Next we launched a new simulation laboratory integrating creative simulating experiences throughout the undergraduate and graduate programs. Our state-of-the-art Helene Fuld Pavilion for Innovative Learning prepares students for real-life nursing experiences using the most advanced simulation equipment and instruction to provide challenging but safe opportunities to review and assess their critical thinking skills, diagnostic instincts, and effectiveness. In this issue of UPfront, we showcase many examples of innovations that advance research, practice, technology, and education – both nationally and globally – that have generated companies, patents, grants, awards, apps, and groundbreaking research under the partnership of Dr. Nancy Hanrahan and Dr. Yvonne Paterson. (See page 4.) To address the changing needs of populations, education in health professions is evolving and changing as well. It is nationally recognized that developing the pathways to quality healthcare,

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and more access to all those who need it, will require advancing innovations in interprofessional education. Our partnerships with the health science schools at Penn reflect this national trend and, in some instances, lead it as well. We have designed joint courses, developed partnered team projects for nursing and medical students, and our faculty are continuing to invent more contemporary pedagogic experiences across the University. Receiving one of only five national graduate nursing education demonstration projects from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, in partnership with the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, is allowing us to increase the number of advanced practice nurses (APNs) we are graduating. It is also giving us the means to experiment with innovative interprofessional experiences. In addition, we are very proud to have been selected, through a highly competitive process, to be the national program office for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Future of Nursing Scholars Program. This is a national initiative to support and increase the number of graduates with PhDs to better meet the growing demands for leaders and scholars in nursing. Yet another innovative program is The Hillman Scholars Program in Nursing Innovation at Penn, designed to streamline the time from admission to doctorate for top undergraduate students by integrating BSN to PhD education. (See page 16.) These programs are creating the pipeline to address shortages in APNs, researchers, and nursing faculty as well as manage the many health challenges we are facing globally. All create change and trigger a period of dynamic transition for our School. Indeed, very welcome transitions! One more anticipated transition is my own as I prepare to step “up” (not down) from the deanship to a new phase in my life at the end of


care to change the world

Chair of the Board of Overseers Dean Kehler with Dean Afaf Meleis and former First Lady Laura Bush

this academic year. However, in the meantime, and for the next many months, we have much unfinished business to complete as we all prepare the School for new leadership. Among this year’s vital projects are reaccreditation (with a site visit in September), redesignation as a WHO Collaborating Center (due in June 2014), redesigning our nurse anesthetist program (in process), and recruiting an associate dean for innovation and policy. And of course, continuing to vigorously seek funding for our dynamic, innovative, and trend-setting School.

I hope all of you, our readers, will join us in supporting our School as we forge into the future!

Afaf I. Meleis, PhD, DrPS (hon), FAAN, FRCN; the Margaret Bond Simon Dean of Nursing; Counsel General Emerita, International Council on Women’s Health Issues; and International Council of Nurses Global Ambassador for the Girl Child www.nursing.upenn.edu

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Nursing as an Innovation: Innovating Nurses

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care to change the world

The longtime research of Barbara Medoff-Cooper, PhD, RN, FAAN, into premature babies and their feeding patterns had clearly showed a big connection between the eventual health of those babies and getting their feeding to proper strength. “Feeding is a major reason why premature babies are kept in the hospital longer,” said Dr. Medoff-Cooper, the Ruth M. Colket Professor in Pediatric Nursing. “If they are not feeding well and gaining weight, you know there will be problems. I felt it was absolutely necessary to find ways to improve what seems like a simple task, but really isn’t.” While Dr. Medoff-Cooper did not specifically conjure up the rubric “innovation” in her research, her way of thinking was clearly that. “You need two pieces to have innovation – the want and the solution,” said Christian Terwiesch, the Andrew M. Heller Professor at the Wharton School and a Senior Fellow at the Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics, who studies how innovation works – not just in business, but in real-life scenarios. “A nurse is often in a situation where he or she recognizes a need that has gone unaddressed. It can run the gamut. A nurse who puts a white board in the waiting room to make sure people sign in properly is being innovative, and one who finds the road to a cure for cancer can be as well.”

Dr. Medoff-Cooper and colleagues now have two patents – and she has a new perspective on how to get her research into practice. “Technology is moving so quickly, and you realize, as a nursing researcher, that you can use it to help solve problems,” said Dr. MedoffCooper. “Once you open your thoughts to that, you cannot help but be innovative.” In fact, said Joseph Libonati, PhD, FAHA, the Director of Penn Nursing’s Laboratory of Innovative and Translational Nursing Research, this is just the mere dawn of the age of innovation in nursing, which will affect the whole of healthcare for a long time. “We at Penn Nursing have decided to approach clinical questions from a broad array of disciplines and viewpoints,” said Dr. Libonati, Associate Professor of Nursing. “If you are looking for grants, one of the first things you have to prove these days is that you are viewing things in innovative ways.” What Dr. Libonati likes is the approach to issues at Penn Nursing. Ideas, he said, get bounced back and forth between researchers and the clinics where basic nursing takes place. It is no Mom Kristen Keeler with Dr. Medoff-Cooper

Dr. Medoff-Cooper’s innovative instincts led her to consider that the problem of getting as many premature and otherwise stressed babies to feed properly was not to have just nurses weigh in, but electrical engineers, technology specialists, nutritionists, and cardiologists as well. The result has been a device that has a nipple with an embedded computer card that is able to record how strongly a baby’s sucking is progressing, how many sucks are taken during a certain time, and when there is a pause in sucking. The device known as the Neonur was developed in an interdisciplinary effort with Jay Zemel, PhD, Emeritus Professor of Engineering.

“You need two pieces to have innovation – the want and the solution…” Christian Terwiesch

(Left) Dr. Joseph Libonati in the Laboratory of Innovative and Translational Nursing Research

www.nursing.upenn.edu

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Left to right: Mrinal Bhasker, Chief Technology Officer, Dr. Bowles, Eric Heil, and Matt Tanzer, Chief Commercial Officer

longer a one-way process. A nurse may look at a new device or methodology, said Dr. Libonati, and say, “Well, it would work better if you just did this, or that.

from all parts of the system, but particularly nursing. In all, they got 1,700 submissions, which they whittled down to eventual prizewinners in a series of judged competitions.

“That sort of forward and backward flow does not often exist, and we at Penn Nursing think we are innovative just by doing that,” said Dr. Libonati. “We are attacking problems at many levels. No one is left out.”

“It brought new people into the innovation process, and nursing is a good constituency. Nurses are on the need side when viewing the patient experience. You really want to empower the people who see the needs,” said Wharton’s Professor Terwiesch. “We believe it has changed the culture of the place because it made people realize, ‘Look, everyone has a responsibility here and we will only succeed if we do it together.’”

“As I came into nursing from the outside,” noted Associate Dean for Research Yvonne Paterson, PhD, who is also a Professor of Microbiology in the Perelman School of Medicine, “one of the things that struck me is that nurses have a huge amount of know-how, which is an actual term for IP (intellectual property). “As caring people, nurses often give it away,” said Dr. Paterson. “But there can be a better way of providing information when it’s commercialized because there’s a wider distribution network.” That is what Wharton’s Professor Terwiesch, along with Patrick Brennan, MD, the Chief Medical Officer of the University of Pennsylvania Health System, used as a basis for their Penn Medicine Innovation Tournament from January to May 2012. They solicited ideas for improving medical care at the Penn hospitals and clinics 6

UPfront | Fall 2013

Kathryn Bowles, Gr’96, PhD, RN, FAAN, began researching hospital readmissions before it was thrust onto the center stage of healthcare providers and policy-makers, and like many great innovations, it began with a simple question: Why are so many older adults coming back to the hospital so soon after discharge?

Through a series of grants from the National Institutes of Health, she discovered a unique set of factors that drove readmissions, and developed a decision-support methodology that identified those high-risk patients at the outset of a hospitalization, ensuring that each patient receives a care transitions plan that meets individual needs.


care to change the world “Using electronic health records for decision-making is the wave of the future.” As Dr. Bowles, a Professor of Nursing, was working through her research, she realized that simply publishing her risk-scoring technique would not benefit patients immediately. “Translational research can take a decade or more to work its way from journals into clinical practice, and readmissions is a problem that we have to solve now,” said Dr. Bowles. “I needed a way to kick-start the adoption of this approach.” Eric Heil, who wrote his senior thesis at the Penn School of Engineering on this research, connected with her at a time when health systems around the country needed risk-

Dr. Kathryn Bowles

assessment solutions. The Affordable Care Act contains penalties for hospital readmission within 30 days following hospital discharge. Together, Dr. Bowles and Heil formed RightCare Solutions (www.Rightcaresolutions.com) to develop software products that help hospitals lower the number of readmissions and improve patient outcomes. Based on Dr. Bowles’ research and Heil’s commercial strategy, RightCare Solutions became the first nursing business seeded by UPstart, Penn’s two-year-old technology transfer host. And the timing could not have been better.

Nurses’ Long History of Innovation Innovation and nursing have a long and rich history of coexisting together. Indeed, the emergence of professional nursing represents the most novel and innovative change to healthcare delivery to occur in the mid-19th century. In an era when most individuals relied on family members when sick, the idea of using a corps of nurses educated to deliver the increasingly complex, technological care demanded by modern scientific medicine was nothing short of revolutionary. And, it was a revolution that created a fertile environment for further innovation to take place. Ensuring that the nursing profession was more than a passing trend required early generations of nurses to take on a number of critical jobs. Nurses needed to first establish an educational system to prepare new practitioners, which they accomplished with great zeal by opening up hospital-based nursing schools in every nook and cranny in the country. In 1890, a mere 15 schools of nursing existed; by 1920, there were almost 2,000. These schools were highly successful in creating a unique system which not only prepared a new type of healthcare practitioner, but also established educational venues in which women predominated. It was an innovative novelty at a time when debate raged over the inherent dangers of educating females.

In the early 20th century, nurses also needed to seize a firm hold on the nurse labor market – a market in which large numbers of non-educated nurse workers posed strong competition with professional nurses for jobs. In the absence of rigorous licensing laws, nurses had to convince the public to seek out professionals when illness struck. They did so through establishing a novel system of nurseowned and -operated private-duty nurse registries throughout the country which served as main distribution centers for nursing care. These registries continued to function until the mid-20th century providing steady nurse services to both private patients and hospitals. Other activities in which nurses innovated include the ways they forged a nursing presence where none existed, as when nurses became the first women to engage in military service through the Army and Navy Nurse Corps. One of the most practical and farreaching nurse-inspired innovations was the creation of a vast public health and visiting nurse system which is credited with providing, and continues to provide, necessary health services to marginalized populations. The immense technologically driven, modern hospital network, on which citizens depend for life-promoting care, could not exist without previous generations of nurses working within the system and constantly developing innovative methods of nursing and healthcare delivery, such as specialized nursing care roles, better patient care delivery systems, and magnet hospital status. Mid-20th century, about 100 years after professional nursing first appeared, nurses once more created a groundbreaking,

By Jean C. Whelan, PhD, RN, The Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing

Feeding devices, old and new

innovative method of healthcare delivery with the advanced practice nurse movement. As nurse practitioner pioneer, Joan E. Lynaugh, PhD, FAAN, Professor Emerita of Nursing, recounts, “The 1960s passage of Medicare and Medicaid created pressure to deliver more accessible healthcare to the elderly and poor. At the same time, nursing education programs, heavily supported through federal monies, were producing better educated nurses who were able to take on greater patient care responsibilities.” The result was a movement that echoed the revolutionary nature of professional nursing when it first emerged on the healthcare scene. Nurse practitioners, as well as nurses in general, promise to be the essential frontline providers of healthcare services as the Affordable Care Act goes into full implementation in 2014. Nursing’s historical experience with innovation, and as innovators, positions them well for this undertaking. For a profession with a strong history as developers of unique, novel, and creative ways to deliver the nation’s health, nursing’s ability to innovate will sustain them and the nation as it enters a new era of healthcare delivery. www.nursing.upenn.edu

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“The regulatory and economic landscape surrounding readmissions has shifted,” said Heil, who is now CEO. Between the Affordable Care Act and new payment models that see hospitals assuming more financial risk for patient outcomes, a greater emphasis than ever is being placed on not readmitting patients. “Using electronic health records for decisionmaking is the wave of the future,” Dr. Bowles said. “No one would have thought about this even a few years ago.” Currently, the University of Pennsylvania Health System is partnering with RightCare. Michael Poisel, the Director of UPstart, said there were too many research ideas in the past that just never got into real-time application. Now, UPstart, an offshoot of Penn’s Center for Technology Transfer that oversees much of the University-generated intellectual property, seeds or otherwise assists about two new Penn-based businesses a month in getting off the ground. Poisel said he sees nursing as a big contributor to technology transfer in the future. “Dr. Bowles had conducted 10 years of research, so this was really ready to get out there. All she

Dr. Teitelman (seated) with FNP student Kaitlyn Brokaw, Nu’11, GNu’13

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needed was an innovative way to move with it, and I am glad she found us,” said Poisel. Innovation at Penn Nursing, though, is not just in new products or services, but in the classroom itself. In the last three years, according to Deborah Becker, GNu’91, GNC’98, PhD, ACNP, BC, CCNS,

who has taught in the nursing school for two decades, the approach to undergraduate education has changed drastically. “The students learned biology or physiology by itself,” said Dr. Becker, Practice Associate Professor of Nursing, “but did not understand why or how this content related to nursing.” What often happened, she said, is that students would get to the patient care floor and know the science well, but would need help putting the pieces together and relate it to the care that patients require. The innovation, as Dr. Becker saw it, was in decompartmentalizing nursing education. Now students are taking courses in which the science and nursing practice are integrated. For example, students learn the musculoskeletal system and how to assess a patient’s gait, and how assistive


care to change the world

devices, such as canes, help patients ambulate when they have muscle weakness. Another example is in the pathopharmacology course, where instead of being taught pharmacology of drugs in isolation, students learn how the drug works in the body to correct, cure, or change the way patients manifest their diseases. Then, students come to the Helene Fuld Pavilion for Innovative Learning to participate in simulations that apply the classroom knowledge with how to properly and safely administer medications and how to evaluate patients for side effects. “Being able to practice this before doing this for the first time on real patients is an invaluable experience,” Dr. Becker said. “It does challenge the basic scientist and the nurse clinician in integrating what is being taught, so there can be some tension over whose territory is more important on any given day,” she said. “But it gets students seeing what nursing really is a lot earlier. It also allows students to see that there isn’t always a clear line between the science and nursing practice – that it is actually integrated in practice. “I don’t know why this didn’t happen before, but we were just tradition-bound,” said Dr. Becker. “We were producing well-educated nurses, but, really, our profession is about patient care, and the sooner we get them doing that, the better they will be.” It is no secret, too, that technology has not just crept into the profession, but has practically become an avalanche. Consequently, Penn Nursing has invested in more sophisticated simulation labs and equipment. “Resusci-Annie doesn’t just lie there anymore,” said Dr. Becker. “Now simulators speak to you and tell you how they are feeling and what they need,” noting that the generation going into nursing now is more comfortable with technology than previous ones. “Simulators, gaming and virtual reality are very attractive to students. They come in asking which electronic health record is available for them to work on. “They know that technology will be a part of their job,” she said.

Advanced Physiology and Pathophysiology, a master’s level course, “can be like drinking from a fire hose,” said Nancy Tkacs, Nu’75, GNu77, GNC’05, GNu’06, PhD, RN, Associate Professor of Nursing and Assistant Dean for Diversity and Cultural Affairs. The overload of content can be daunting so Dr. Tkacs employs a “clicker system,” allowing her and her students to “check in” with each other to make sure everyone is following the material. “It helps students stay engaged throughout the lecture,” she said. Penn Nursing researchers, too, see innovation in the computer application world.

Ethical Consequences and Questions of Innovation Nurses have a significant history of using innovative methods to care for the sick and to achieve positive outcomes. Indeed, one only needs to look to Florence Nightingale and her use of statistics to build better hospital sanitation systems of care – a novel, creative, and innovative use of numbers, figures, and graphs in the 18th and 19th centuries. Today, emerging technology has given us apps; in fact, there is an app for almost everything – weather, finance, business, and, yes, even ethics. Nurse researchers are part of this new wave of technology, by building and testing apps that help patients navigate their health-related issues in an innovative, yet effective and efficient manner. As is often the case, however, ethics usually lags behind technological developments. But are apps any different from other types of research that require ethical considerations and protection of human participants? Certainly ethical concerns related to informed consent, privacy, conflicts of interest, and data ownership and usage are significant and need much more thought. Apps and ethics can co-exist, but we need data on how this new technology meets the needs of consumers, how consumers use it, and importantly, our ethical responsibilities to develop reliable and valid apps that meet the goals of nursing care, ultimately advancing nursing science. By Connie M. Ulrich, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor of Nursing and Associate Professor of Bioethics, Department of Medical Ethics, Perelman School of Medicine

“Resusci-Annie doesn’t just lie there anymore. Now simulators speak to you and tell you how they are feeling and what they need.” Dr. Deborah Becker www.nursing.upenn.edu

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Anne Teitelman, PhD, FNP-BC, FAANP, FAAN, has been researching the access to healthcare in impoverished communities for more than 20 years. So when she was alerted to a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services challenge to create a viable computer app related to cancer prevention among minority women, she felt she could find an innovative approach to convey important health promotion messages.

Dr. Teitelman worked with a small team that included an app developer. In three weeks, they came up with a prototype, based in part on her prior research on cervical cancer prevention and many years of experience as a nurse practitioner. Dr.Teitelman and her team earned first place in the competition. The $85,000 award is currently being used for further development and implementation of the project. “In community health, you see people, from all different backgrounds, increasingly using mobile devices,” said Dr. Teitelman, noting the application is easy to use, offers tailored recommendations based on information provided by the user, reminders to support desired behavioral changes such as smoking cessation, and assists users in remembering when to schedule routine screening and other healthcare visits. “As more people use mobile devices, we have an opportunity to provide greater access to information for those who have been traditionally undeserved – such as poor and minority women – who may really benefit from using an app like this to help them fit prevention practices into their busy lives,” she said. Nancy Hanrahan, PhD, RN, CS, FAAN, the Dr. Lenore H. Kurlowicz Term Associate Professor of Nursing, has taken the application challenge one step further, by integrating it into the nursing curriculum. Over the last two years, nursing students in the interdisciplinary course – there are professors from Engineering, Computer Science, Law, and Business in the team teaching the course -- have been developing apps for practical use. The apps feature everything from HIV awareness in the minority community to ways nurses can communicate with each other about what they might have learned from particular patients so that they can pool their knowledge.

“I think there has been a tsunami of knowledge and data that has surged in the last three or four years. As a nurse, you have to know how to manage big data sets and use technology to simplify the process for patients. We know the healthcare system is terribly broken and we need innovative ways – particularly through technology – to reform it,” said Dr. Hanrahan. She was recently funded by the American Nurses Foundation to develop a website and an interactive game to assist nurses in helping those suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). In the end, though, explained Wharton’s Professor Terwiesch, innovation will mean not one big solution to the healthcare miasma, but a panoply of things. “The business press is full of prophets who claim to have found the solution to the healthcare crisis, but healthcare is not one problem, but thousands of problems, ones that the nursing community can really contribute to,” he said. “You need not a solution, but a problemsolving machine, full of innovations. “The leaders alone can’t do it, but if you reach out to the people on the front lines, like nurses, you will get to many goals,” he said. “It’s exhilarating to see what’s going on in the School now because people are turning to entrepreneurism to market their ideas and I think it’s going to happen more and more,” said Dr. Paterson, whose own research launched a company – Advaxis – which is conducting promising clinical trials for her cancer vaccine platform. “On a national level, the NIH has also recognized that entrepreneurism is a new way of providing paradigms for caring for people. All of the institutes are facing cuts because of sequestration,” said Dr. Paterson. “The National Institute of Nursing Research (of the NIH) is increasing the amount of money to give to innovative small business grants, and reducing the amounts they are giving to competing R01grants. This indicates that the NIH is very interested in the role entrepreneurism can play to improve public health.”

“I think there has been a tsunami of knowledge and data that has surged in the last three or four years. As a nurse, you have to know how to manage big data sets and use technology to simplify the process for patients.” Dr. Nancy Hanrahan (opposite)

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www.nursing.upenn.edu

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Ex amp le s o f N urs ing Innovations App Happy: Time Advantage

KnowMe

ICE Cube

Mental illness, depression, and stress are often common on college campuses, and although services are available, care is still underutilized. App Happy serves as a “therapist in your pocket” that students can access at any time of day and in a private way. The app consists of three programs: stress/anxiety, depression, and grief, for a month-long program in which it will send random tasks for the user to perform. Each task takes less than five minutes and comes with a description as to why the task is important. Users also have the option to connect with counselors so they can monitor how the user is doing throughout the process. The main goal of App Happy is to teach users self-management techniques that can be used for a lifetime, which will reduce the likelihood of acute mental health conditions.

Working at a long-term care facility, Kerry McLaughlin, Nu’13, would be assigned eight

Ninety-one percent of emergency medical services do not have the correct medical information that technicians need to provide the right care in emergency situations. ICE Cube, created by Penn Nursing graduate David Robert Bendell, GNu’13, is an app that securely delivers this information via QR codes.

App Happy’s team consisted of: Nancy Hanrahan, PhD, RN, CS, FAAN, principal investigator; Christine Skovira (recent graduate from Vagelos Life Sciences and Management Program); Helen Pun, Nu’15, W’15 (nursing-healthcare management dual degree); Linda Kang, Nu’12, Gr’17 (Hillman Scholars Program in Nursing Innovation); Mathew Lee, Nu’14, Gr’17 (Hillman Scholars Program in Nursing Innovation); and John Pettengill (Wharton). The team has submitted a grant application to The Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics at the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics.

T1DES

In July, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health awarded

elderly patients when she came in for her shift without knowing anything about them, except for how each patient was transferred. This realization of a gap in information turned into KnowMe, an app that will revolutionize the way healthcare is provided to elders in nursing homes.

KnowMe operates by taking personalized categories such as food preferences, past occupations, likes and dislikes, and creates a feed for those preferences to be viewed by the patient’s clinical team. On a separate feed, the clinical team can monitor nutrition, fall risk/occurrences, and moods. “KnowMe is a vector for bringing culture change to nursing homes and will change the way we provide care,” said McLaughlin, founder of the app. “We also believe that by using our feed function we can better monitor and predict adverse events in our elders’ lives such as falls, nutritional deficits, and weight loss.” In addition to Kerry McGlaughlin, the KnowMe team consisted of Jennifer Abraczinskas, MD, Seth Archambault, and Logan MacLean, Nu’14, W’14.

The team is in the process of finalizing the pilot app and applying for funding. A Medstartr crowdsourcing campaign has been launched to raise initial seed money.

Terri Lipman, GNu’83, GRN’91, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, a Small Business Technology Transfer

(STTR) grant for $242,171 for a system known as T1DES, providing a web-based tool to help manage diabetes. For more information, see page 33.

“We want to boil information down to a simple set of tasks tailored to the woman using the app…” Dr. Anne Teitelman (right)

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ICE Cube is a system that securely delivers essential medical information to first responders who can scan the QR code and then receive critical information such as allergies, medications, next of kin details, and blood type. By registering online, users provide specific medical information and then receive a sheet of QR code stickers that can be placed on cell phones, insurance cards, around the house, or if registering children, on their lunch boxes.


re:Mind

In Philadelphia, hospitals discharge more than 11,000 patients every year from inpatient acute psychiatric care. Before discharge, patients are scheduled for follow-up appointments with an outpatient provider to ensure continued care. However, many of these follow-up appointments are missed, primarily due to forgetfulness. The rehospitalization for these patients costs Philadelphia more than $9 million per year. Molly Viscardi, Nu’06, Gr’15, doctoral student at Penn Nursing, was part of an interdisciplinary team that won the National Invitational Public Policy Challenge for its tool re:Mind, a text message-based appointment reminder service for patients recently discharged from inpatient psychiatric care.

“Nearly half of patients discharged from inpatient psychiatric services miss their first appointment, most often because they forget,” said Ms. Viscardi. “Research shows that text messages can significantly

decrease no-shows in this vulnerable population.” The tool, re:Mind, will be available to hospital discharge planners as a simple, passwordprotected website that will take planners less than five minutes to enter necessary contact and appointment information. re:Mind will then automate a series of text messages leading up to the patient’s follow-up appointment. Optional voicemail and email alerts are also available. The team, including students from Penn’s Schools of Medicine, Social Policy and Practice, and Arts and Sciences, based their research on a pilot study in England that utilized text-based appointment reminders in a similar patient population and has projected an annual cost savings of $245 million USD. As the winner of the Public Policy Challenge, re:Mind was the recipient of $10,000 to further the proposal. The team has already shared the tool with Community Behavioral

The team behind re:Mind accepts first prize in the fourth Annual Penn Public Policy Challenge. (Image courtesy of Fels Institute of Government)

Health (CBH), which is a not-for-profit organization contracted by Philadelphia’s Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual Disability Services. CBH has authorized re:Mind for implementation and will cover start-up costs from its own administrative budget. re:Mind projects that if three patients continue with treatment, the tool will have recouped its costs. If the city of Philadelphia can reduce no-shows at appointments at a rate similar to the pilot study in England, the estimated annual savings would be more than $2 million. To read more about the tool and team, visit: www.reMindPhilly.org

Everhealthier Women Anne Teitelman, PhD, FNP-BC, FAANP, FAAN, Patricia Bleznak Silverstein and Howard

A. Silverstein Endowed Term Chair in Global Women’s Health and Associate Professor of Nursing, and colleagues have been awarded 1st place in the Reducing Cancer Among Women of Color Challenge from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) in partnership with the Office of Minority Health, both part of U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), for their app Everhealthier Women, http://everhealthier.org. As the first-place winner, the team received $85,000. “Cancer prevention and cancer treatment are already painful enough, we don’t need the information to be complicated and annoying,” said Dr. Teitelman. “We want to boil information down to a simple set of tasks tailored to the woman using the app. For women who are unable – or not motivated – their family members can use the app on their behalf, and then send them reminders for appointments or behaviors they can do to stay healthier.” Everhealthier Women is a mobile web app that helps women track cancer prevention

tasks for themselves and other women in their “healthy circle” through the web and SMS text messaging. The tasks are the screenings and prevention behaviors that match users’ ages and profiles according to national guidelines and can be shared with the users’ loved ones. The app provides up-to-date information on numerous health issues and links to online resources, including various organizations’ cancer care and prevention Facebook and Twitter feeds. The app currently uses both English and Spanish. “The app is all about fitting these health behaviors into each woman’s lifestyle,” noted Dr. Teitelman. “It’s mobile, it’s multilingual, it can send reminders by email or phone, and it can even keep track of follow-up tasks.” Dr. Teitelman collaborated with Damien Leri, MSEd, who runs Big Yellow Star, an information technology company that designs public health systems to improve health communications; Marilyn Stringer, GNu’91, Gr’95, GNC’97, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, Women’s Health Nursing-Clinician Educator Professor Emerita at Penn Nursing, who provided additional content expertise; and Ben Koditschek, an interface designer in Chicago.

Dr. Teitelman is an expert in health promotion intervention research to address women’s health disparities, especially among adolescent girls and young women. She is currently principal investigator of two NIH-funded studies, one in which she and her research team developed an HIV and partner abuse prevention program for adolescent girls. The other explores the role of the brain in safer sex decision-making among young adult women. The challenge was administered by Health 2.0, which promotes new technologies in healthcare. It has introduced over 500 technology companies, hosted more than 11,000 attendees at conferences and code-athons, and awarded over $4,078,000 in prizes. The currently available version of Everhealthier Women is a trial version of a web-based application tool. Users can try the app by logging in with Facebook, Twitter, or they can create a new user ID. By logging in through Facebook, users can easily add “friends” to their healthy circle. www.nursing.upenn.edu

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TECHNOLOGY

A PPLYIN G MAPP I NG TECHNOLOGY T O T R AC K T H E SP READ OF DISEASE In healthcare, as in life, it’s not always easy to make decisions. Books are written on decisionmaking, Benjamin Franklin urged us to make a list of pros and cons, and gurus tell us to follow our gut. But how easy would it be to just follow the dots, like a progression of ants to honey? And we can. Innovative new technology can plot the factors that influence the spread of HIV/ AIDS neighborhood by neighborhood, census tract by census tract. As the factors accumulate, so do the dots that represent them, until researchers – and the policymakers who allocate funds to the epidemic – literally have a roadmap to potential eradication of the disease. “I love the maps because, for me, they make my data live,” said Assistant Professor of Nursing Bridgette M. Brawner, GNu’05, Gr’09, PhD, APRN. “Being able to visualize an epidemic, or social and structural conditions that affect the work we do, strengthens our ability to do something about it.”

Mapping is an emerging discipline that neatly conjoins the holistic nature of nursing care; for example, it can merge factors to show not just how many cases of HIV/AIDS there are, but where they are and potentially why they are there. For example, different factors can be distilled into dots representing the incidence, and dots are overlaid until a clear pattern emerges. The researchers investigate how many HIVprevention resources there might be in a neighborhood, how many people are diagnosed with HIV/AIDS, and how many of those may – or may not – be virally suppressed on their medications (all of which can affect the likelihood of HIV being transmitted in a neighborhood). Even the incidence of mental illnesses can be taken into account because altered judgment or impulsivity can affect negotiations around behaviors such as condom use. Environmental factors which can be mapped include numbers of vacant properties, neighborhood disorder (which can be defined by factors such as police presence, physical assault, and drug use), the concentration of abandoned homes, the amount of green space, and how many residents are living below the poverty line. From the convergence of these factors, researchers can infer how high the population density is – less green space usually translates to more people – and matching that with the current incidence of HIV/AIDS can forecast a likelihood of the epidemic spreading.

“…maps make my data live. Being able to visualize an epidemic, or social and structural conditions that affect the work we do, strengthens our ability to do something about it.” Dr. Bridgette Brawner

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care to change the world

Putting health and environmental factors together then shows where the risk of spreading the disease is highest. “It gives us a strategy on where to partner and mobilize the community. We can tease out where the real problems are and allocate resources accordingly,” Dr. Brawner said. Dr. Brawner has launched her work in the community with the help of a dozen team members, some of whom are high school students, who help with data collection and increasing community involvement. “We are

looking at different factors such as how where you live can increase your likelihood of contracting HIV/AIDS,” she said. “Nurses, in our holistic care, also consider the social and structural conditions that affect our patients and communities – how do they get to us for treatment? If they have emphysema, can they walk six blocks, and is the walk safe?” she asked. But now, the care and the science of nursing have merged, as these factors can also be used to plot strategies for improved health.

www.nursing.upenn.edu

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LEADERSHIP

Creating a Pipeline for Innovative Scholars and Advanced Practice Nurses Strong leadership is critical if the vision of a transformed healthcare system is to be realized. To play an active role in achieving this vision, the nursing profession must produce leaders throughout the system, from the bedside to the boardroom. “The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health” by the Committee on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing at the Institute of Medicine

As the nation approaches the full implementation of the Affordable Care Act in 2014, no one is sure exactly how many new patients will enter the healthcare system – nor, more importantly, who will be available to take care of them. Estimates range from 28 to 33 million potential newly insured patients. Couple that with a current shortage of primary care, and there is little doubt that something needs to be done to provide the nation with the healthcare professionals its residents will need. Further adding to this problematic situation, The American Association of Colleges of Nursing has found, in a recent white paper, that 75,000 qualified applicants are turned away by nursing schools every year because there is a paucity of faculty available to teach them. Nurses, predominantly women with family responsibilities, tend to get a PhD later in life than other disciplines – at 46, more than 13 years older than in other fields. This leaves fewer years to teach, and thus fewer nurses to replace the retiring baby-boom nurses. At a time when the nation is in critical need of nurses, and the profession is in critical need of faculty to teach the next generation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has focused its

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attention on Recommendation 5 of the Institute of Medicine’s landmark report: double the number of nurses earning a doctorate by 2020. “Schools of nursing with support from private and public funders, academic administrators and university trustees, and accrediting bodies, should double the number of nurses with a doctorate by 2020 to add to the cadre of nurse faculty and researchers with attention to increasing diversity,” wrote the authors. Penn Nursing Professor Julie Fairman, GNu’80, GRN’92, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Nightingale Professor of Nursing and Director of the Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing, provided scientific support to the IOM committee. On June 3, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation announced a $20 million gift to launch The Future of Nursing Scholars Program to help more nurses get their PhDs by reducing the time to completion from four years to three. Dr. Fairman serves as co-director, with Susan B. Hassmiller, PhD, RN, FAAN, RWJF’s Senior Advisor for nursing at the national program office, of the program housed at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. “By next spring we will be issuing our first Call for Proposals to bring the nursing schools themselves into the program. The hallmarks of the program include diversity, scholarship, policy,


care to change the world Dr. Fairman (opposite)

innovation, critical thinking, leadership, and research. The program will produce Future of Nursing Scholars who will advance the science, create innovative models of care, and shape health policy for the future,” said Dr. Fairman.

under the Affordable Care Act. While the RWJF grant produces the teachers to teach, this grant offers support to the schools that were already at the maximum capacity, but need to expand to meet future need.

In Spring 2014, other schools of nursing will apply to join the Future of Nursing Scholars program, which will support up to 100 PhD nursing candidates over its first two years. The first scholars will begin their PhD studies in 2015. They will receive scholarships, stipends, mentoring, leadership development, and dedicated post-doctoral research support. To expand the new program’s reach, RWJF has also developed a strategic philanthropic collaborative to engage other donors.

Unlike educating residents at medical schools, Medicare did not pay for graduate clinical education for nurses, thus limiting what nursing schools can afford. “The question became: If Medicare would pay for this clinical education, as it does for medical residents, would this help schools expand enrollments and production of APNs?” asked Linda H. Aiken, PhD, FAAN, FRCN, RN, the Claire M. Fagin Leadership Professor in Nursing, Professor of Sociology, and Director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at Penn Nursing who led the grantwriting effort.

“This is a new and innovative initiative to solve a serious and entrenched problem of not enough nurses here and abroad,” said Dr. Fairman. “If we can attack the problem at its source by creating the professors to teach the next generation of nurses and nurse practitioners, we can provide immeasurable good to the world.” Also at Penn Nursing, The Hillman Scholars Program in Nursing Innovation, led by Therese Richmond, GRN’95, GNC’97, PhD, FAAN, CRNP, the Andrea B. Laporte Professor of Nursing, attracts talented students for an integrated BSN-PhD, educating a new cadre of nurse scientists and leaders to develop innovative solutions. This program is supported by the Rita and Alex Hillman Foundation. If selected for this highly competitive program, Hillman Scholars receive financial support and research mentoring during their final two years of undergraduate and three years of doctoral training. Scholars are able to complete their PhD in five years from selection. Hillman Scholars are selected prior to their junior year or, if a second degree student upon admission, they are concurrently BSN and PhD students. They begin taking graduate courses earlier than the traditional route and are embedded in research centers mentored by funded nurse researchers, allowing a more rapid, but equally rigorous process to their PhD. With more PhD-trained nurses to become faculty, there will be a new opportunity to educate more advanced practice nurses (APNs). Another signature demonstration grant, launched in fall of 2012, the CMS-GNE demonstration project, providing an estimated $36 million over four years through the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, seeks to increase the numbers of APNs to deliver care to those newly insured

“Our vision was to create a network of all the nursing schools in the greater Philadelphia area that trained nurse practitioners (NPs) and other APNs. A large urban network of schools represents an excellent potential model for Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to use to roll out a new graduate nurse education benefit after successful completion of the demonstration. All nine nursing schools in the CMS Graduate Nurse Demonstration Project have brought tremendous leadership and vision,” said Dr. Aiken. Philadelphia, a major hub for medical education, is fast becoming a similar hub for nursing education. “We want to meet the needs of the uninsured, and also improve the quality of education for APNs so they can assume broader roles to improve the quality of care,” said Dr. Aiken, noting the program will enable nursing students to be educated with physician residents and additional reimbursements for preceptors will provide nursing students more time in the clinical setting. “By 2016, we expect to have graduated 1,200 more APNs, with the largest increase expected in the growth of NPs. Medicare is interested in NPs because they tend to be in primary care, which is the highest priority as we near the implementation of the Affordable Care Act,” said Dr. Aiken. Looking at the nurse shortage from start to finish, Penn Nursing is helping to create new ways to change the educational mission to put more faculty in the classroom and more nurses into practice.

www.nursing.upenn.edu

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GLOBAL IMPACT “When it comes to global health, there is no ‘them’... only ‘us.’” Global Health Council

INDIA Aparna Kumar, Nu’10, GNu’13, PhD’18 (left) and Wendy Miner, Nu’07, GNu’10 (right)

Faculty and Students Abroad: Learning Together Numbers often tell the story of healthcare. Births and deaths, fevers of 100º or 104º, infection rates, viral loads of HIV – all are expressed as numbers used for treatment of the individual patient and for policymakers to allocate funds and make decisions in the aggregate. But, often in nursing, the most important number is the number one. In the case of undergraduate nursing course N535: Comparing Health Care Systems in an Intercultural Context, the relationship is between one student and one healthcare system in one culture – one country at a time. “These courses provide students the opportunity to explore international healthcare systems,” said Linda J. Hollenback, MSEd, Associate Director of Undergraduate Academic Affairs. Currently, students are observing healthcare delivery in countries as diverse as Hong Kong, India, and Thailand. There are plans to add the first European country – Spain – to the list in the near future.

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“We’re looking at a larger picture of health, not just patient care. Our question is how do you evaluate the health of a country?” asked Practice Assistant Professor Wendy D. Grube, GNu’82, Gr’10, PhD, CRNP. “We look at the social determinants, at financing, policy, and how the healthcare systems are constructed. We want to know who are the contributors and who are the providers and who do they reach and who do they not reach.” Another important part of the course for burgeoning nurses is how nursing is employed in the healthcare system. “We look at the roles of nursing and how nursing has evolved to fill in the gaps. If we can evaluate the approaches to some of their gaps, perhaps they can be useful approaches to managing ours,” Dr. Grube said. During the semester, the students undertake 15 hours of required classwork at Penn Nursing, except in the case of Hong Kong; there the course is taught jointly with the University of Hong Kong, which gives credit to both its School of Nursing and its School of Public Health. The students receive the entire course content in just one-and-a-half weeks by going to class intensively for three hours each day.


care to change the world

“There’s nothing like being in a classroom with students from another university and certainly even more so from another country. That student-to-student exchange and relationships are incredibly valuable. When you bring the faculty together, then you’ve really challenged a different mix of pedagogies and disciplinespecific perspectives,” said Sarah Kagan, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Lucy Walker Honorary Term Professor of Gerontological Nursing. “It allows people to see there is no one right way.” As a result, a Penn alumna is now working on a PhD at Hong Kong University. “These sorts of things only come about when you co-teach, not just a visit, but an actual shared enterprise,” said Dr. Kagan. After receiving classroom instruction, the students go into the field not as hands-on caregivers but as observers of a unique healthcare system. “Our role is observational. We want to observe how nurses interact, but we do nothing hands-on. We can learn a lot when we see nurses in context, but we don’t know enough about the situation or mores or even the language to do anything hands-on,” noted Marjorie A. Muecke, PhD, RN, FAAN, Assistant Dean for Global Health Affairs who takes students to India. “Our students emerge with important insights into healthcare in India, Thailand, and Hong Kong. They are learning to provide care that can change the world,” said Associate Dean for Academic Programs Kathleen M. McCauley, Nu’74, GNu’77, GRN’90, GNC’96, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, FAAN, FAHA.

India In eternal India, where it is said the Buddha sat under a tree for so long he almost died of hunger before finding enlightenment, patience is a signature characteristic of how the healthcare system handles mental illness. Rather than a mental health evaluation in a matter of 72 hours as in the U.S., nurses at the Christian Medical College in Vellore take part with patients’ families in a treatment program that usually lasts three months. “They require two family members to stay with the patient at the hospital for three months. The care team does a complete interdisciplinary workup on the patients – by the recreational staff, physicians, social workers, everyone,” said Dr. Muecke. As time goes on, the healthcare staff models appropriate behavior with the ill family member

and then begins to teach family members to take over, with staff available for advice and counseling. “The family takes on more and more of a role until it’s time to go home,” said Dr. Muecke. “The family learns to recognize the triggers and they learn to step in and mitigate the effects of those triggers for serious mental illness such as psychoses and depression.” While psychological disorders often seem Western in nature, serious psychoses are seen around the world. “The purpose of this intensive family-oriented workup is to enable them to live with this challenging disorder in the least disruptive way possible,” Dr. Muecke said, noting students discuss why the U.S. doesn’t attempt the same level of care. The students also accompany Christian Medical College nursing faculty and students into the countryside to observe nurse-managed community care. “It is very hard to limit the scope of practice when these nurses are the only available medical source for much of the rural population,” noted one student. “Once we went into our first home it was clear to me the strengths these nurses have in their bedside manner – every person we ran into was overjoyed to see the nurses coming, and even welcoming to me, an obvious foreigner.” The students spent a week seeing the innovative teamwork of IKP Centre for Technologies in Public Health (ICTPH), which has partnered with Penn Nursing to increase access to healthcare services and improve health outcomes for rural populations as well as to pilot the functionality and viability of nurse-managed rural micro health centers. “This past week has been very eye-opening. We journeyed from lavish Pondicherry to the more modest city of Thanjavur, where we were shown an ICTPH clinic. They delivered primary care to patients in the community, taking into account such extensive assessments such as oral hygiene, eye care, and PAP smears. “We had a particularly eye-opening experience visiting government hospitals and seeing the conditions of the facilities, realizing ICTPH would effectively provide primary care to residents of rural villages, preventing them from having to seek tertiary care at the overcrowded, less than hygienic, government hospitals,” wrote Katie Horn, GNu’13 of her experience.

www.nursing.upenn.edu

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THAILAND

Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. World Health Organization, 1948 Thailand “Even the fact that most patients are Buddhist affects the healthcare system and all decisionmaking,” said Dr. Grube, who takes students to both the urban and rural areas of Thailand. There, students found an interesting mix of modern and traditional healthcare. With some of the best hospitals in the world, Thailand has the accoutrements of western healthcare. Yet, the country also recognizes its traditional roots. In Krabi Province, “the nurses at Krabi Hospital shared with us their mission to provide a holistic and integrated quality of care… and teach the proper administration of traditional medicine. A common treatment includes Anapanasati meditation, which is a deep breathing exercise used to control anxiety and facilitate the transition to acceptance in living with a disease,” wrote Bianca Cutler, Nu’14, in her end-of-course journal. Rural health in Thailand has poorer outcomes, noted Grube, often because of the difficulties inherent in having fewer resources than in the U.S. The village health workers extend the 20

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outreach of the community healthcare system into the most isolated regions. “Thailand uses village health workers, they know everybody, and they will be that sociocultural bridge to get the community to the healthcare system,” she said.

Hong Kong The bustle of an urban society and population greets students in Hong Kong with its seven million inhabitants. But 13 percent of the population is over 65, notes Dr. Kagan, and they have a longer life expectancy than in the U.S. The focus of N535 in Hong Kong is on elder health and social care. “I learned the most about the similarities of aging societies in both Hong Kong and the U.S.,” wrote Lufei Tu, Nu’15, W’15, in the Nursing and Healthcare Management Program at The Wharton School and the School of Nursing. “It was interesting to compare and contrast U.S. hospital characteristics with Hong Kong hospital characteristics in terms of size, functionality, management, and funding. We mostly focused on how the U.S. took care of their elders in terms of financing, place to stay, community


More Opportunities Abroad

programs, and how Hong Kong organized and assisted their elders in the same areas.” The students visit elders in various locations – from a Kai Fong, a senior social care center, to Fung Yiu King Hospital, where there are many 90- and 100-year-old patients. “For the students, it’s an opportunity to see a largely public system in action. It gives them a glimpse into the future and what it will be like in the U.S. when our life expectancy begins to approximate that of Hong Kong,” said Dr. Kagan.

Penn Nursing has a number of different opportunities for students to study abroad in Israel, the UK, and Australia. Unlike the courses described here, they are not under the tutelage of Penn professors while abroad, yet, unlike other schools of nursing, they fully participate in a clinical experience in the host country. Master’s students participate in delivering care abroad. And there are shorter experiences available to interested students. For more information, go to the website: www.nursing. upenn.edu/students/advising/Pages/Study_Abroad.aspx

Hands-On Education in Guatemala As with N535, N545 Maternal Infant Health in the Americas teaches coursework for a semester on Penn’s campus, and students and professors then continue the educational experience in Guatemala and potentially Haiti. The key difference is that in Guatemala students deliver hands-on care. “I tried to describe what it was like being with the comadronas today. I told about how 30 midwives of all ages dressed in full traditional clothing climbed down from a pickup truck and walked single file towards our group. The small, generally indigenous women kissed each of us on the cheek as they passed and sat in a circle in the garden. How humbled I felt watching these strong, beautiful women walk proudly towards us, a symbol of the tradition as well as intelligence and wisdom,” wrote Kasey Benchimol, Nu’14, GNu’17, of her experiences in Guatemala with Maternal Infant Health in the Americas. “The aim of the course is for students to be able to have the opportunity to see and participate in not only clinical care in the inpatient setting and in ambulatory care in clinics, but also to be involved in community organizations that provide health education. It’s real true community health,” said Advanced Senior Lecturer Dawn Durain, CNM, MPH, who has taken students to Central America since 2007.

HONG KONG Left to right: Helen Pun, Nu’15, W’15; Kathryn Gruber, GNu’13; Lufei Tu, Nu’15, W’15; Andrea Valovcin, Nu’14; Daniel Zhou, ENG’13, GEng’13

GUATEMALA While studying comparative health systems during the semester, in this case, students deliver hands-on care to women who need it. “It helps students to be able to be inside a healthcare system in a developing country in order to bring it to life,” said Ms. Durain, who teaches the course with Mamie Guidera, MSN, CNM. “It’s interesting to think about what’s more, what’s less, what’s better – is it technology? Is it something else? Is it human contact?”

Nikki Marshall, GNu’12 (left), Rachel Schneider, Nu’12, GNu’14 (right), and Lauren Danella, Nu’12, GNu’15 (bottom)

“In Concepcion, Honduras, on a typical day, we were up very early and by 7a.m. we went to field clinics, or the Centro de Salud to help with immunizations. Even the dogs are well vaccinated here and the immunization rates would put any U.S. community to shame. Students also travel to a local school to set up a field ‘clinic,’ teach sex education, or do cervical cancer screening. We managed to convert a text book storeroom at the local school into a ‘clinic’ for women. The students learned that with a little clothesline, sheets and flashlights, you can do just about anything,” said Ms. Guidera. The lecturers and students literally go door-todoor to make sure women are registered for prenatal care, engaged in post-natal care, or to visit the infant. Students, partnering with middle schools, provide health education, teaching the younger students about dental care, nutrition, even contraception. With these interventions, the students speak Spanish. “All the students participate,” said Ms. Durain. www.nursing.upenn.edu

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VOICES FROM AROUND THE WORLD

I N N O VAT IO N IN A WAR- TORN LAND Capt. Demere Kasper, a 2010 graduate of the second-degree BSN program, has been serving as a military intelligence officer in the U.S. Army since 2004. This role has taken her to Iraq, Qatar, and currently to Afghanistan, where she is teaching local people the basics of healthcare.

Kasper is stationed 90 miles northeast of Kandahar City, in the Mya Neshin district, as a member of a program called the Cultural Support Team, or CST. CSTs are female helpers for Special Operation Forces (SOF), who are often deployed in remote locations assisting with village stability and security. In this role, Kasper provides access to the other half of the population that male SOF members cannot engage with due to Afghan cultural norms. Until recently, healthcare in Mya Neshin revolved around a privately owned, Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan (GIRoA) run, clinic in a valley nearby. The clinic was staffed by

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a doctor from Jalalabad, a nurse from the Uruzgon province, and two pharmacists. Because of multiple complaints from villagers and the lack of time spent at the clinic, the doctor was fired. Throughout her tenure in Mya Neshin, Kasper and her CST partner had been working to build an official GIRoA clinic adjacent to the Mya Neshin District Center to provide healthcare access to more of the district population. On June 1, their perseverance paid off as the Mya Neshin Comprehensive Health Center opened, with provincial officials attending the ceremony. The Comprehensive Health Center now sees approximately 25 patients a day, and continues to grow. Since the start of her deployment, Kasper has been endorsing and lobbying for a program called Community Health Workers (CHW) which trains local men and women to act as health educators, first responders, and perform limited checkups within their villages.


care to change the world

Outreach to villagers in Mya Neshin has been done through radio messages created by Kasper and her partner… 15 episodes focus on common maladies and infectious diseases in Afghanistan as well as basic nutrition, hydration, and hygiene. Since the Taliban movement started in Kandahar province, there is still a strong adherence to the standards exacted under the name of Islam during its rule in many districts, including the Mya Neshin district. Many of the Afghans in the district believe it is wrong for a male doctor to perform any exam on a female patient, other than blood pressure, and believe women cannot fully disclose the nature of their problems to male doctors, or even to their husbands. “Community health workers are important for several reasons – they are given emergency birth training, and prenatal and infant training, which increases the local capacity for maternal and infant health as most women give birth in their home with the aid of their mother,” said Capt. Kasper. “They are supposed to provide education and limited checkups within their villages and it’s important that couples volunteer for CHW training, so at least a partially trained woman can provide some sort of healthcare and education to other women.” During her time in Mya Neshin, Capt. Kasper has worked in what is known as the “medshed,” treating Afghans who seek medical care. Supplies are limited, there is virtually no lab work capability, and instruments that are disposable in the United States must be re-used because resupplies don’t happen often. One of her main tasks is educating locals on medication compliance and acceptable treatments.

“You cannot write down instructions either, as the majority of the population in this district is illiterate. If you find nothing wrong with the patient, they are often very disappointed. For example, Afghans want high blood pressure, because then they receive medication,” said Kasper. “They also believe that IVs cure almost everything. So do injections – we have one recurrent patient who received an injection of Tordol and told us that the medicine is so good that it lasts a whole month, so now he comes monthly for his injection.” Outreach to villagers in Mya Neshin has been done through radio messages, since it is the only form of entertainment in the district. Along with her partner, Capt. Kasper has created 15 episodes that focus on common maladies and infectious diseases in Afghanistan as well as basic nutrition, hydration, and hygiene. The radio spots also provide an opportunity to advertise to sign up for the Community Health Workers program. The series has been requested by teams in other districts, and the Provincial Minister of Public Health has requested copies to air in Kandahar City. After returning from deployment, Capt. Kasper plans to take some time off before returning to Penn Nursing in the Fall of 2014 to complete her MSN in Family Health. U.S. Army Capt. Demere Kasper, GNu’10, treats patients in Afghanistan

www.nursing.upenn.edu

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THE FAGIN LECTURE

Clinical Research in Pediatric Critical Care: Not for the Faint of Heart For more than 20 years, Martha A.Q. Curley, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Ellen and Robert Kapito Professor in Nursing Science, has focused her research on advancing knowledge of the care of critically ill pediatric patients. On April 4, 2013, Dr. Curley delivered the 11th annual Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Lecture and chronicled her journey from staff nurse to internationally renowned pediatric researcher. In introducing Dr. Curley, Michael Mathay, MD, a friend and mentor, noted that while her work answers the questions posed by parents and patients, it has led to major innovations over time: the establishment of a Center for Clinical Innovations and Scholarship at Boston Children’s Hospital; a textbook that was named “book of the year” by the American Journal of Nursing; the development of several rating scales to understand pain, withdrawal, sedation assessment, and risk for skin injury; and finally, bringing together various investigators from around the nation and the world to inform the science in ongoing clinical trials. Dr. Curley said that her journey began as the night charge nurse in the pediatric intensive care unit at Baystate Medical Center (BMC) in Springfield, Mass., now the only Level 1 trauma center in western Massachusetts, treating the most critical and urgent cases in the region. BMC is home to the second-busiest emergency department in Massachusetts. At that time, in the early 1970s, pediatric critical care was a new and emerging field; most of the available equipment was built for adult patients, and Dr. Curley was challenged with finding a way to make the technology work for infants and children. The program of research Dr. Curley built over time was always driven by the needs of patients and their families. “When I saw that something needed to be fixed, I would fix it, following what my patients needed and what my families

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needed as I was taking care of them,” she told a full auditorium. In pediatric critical care there is the opportunity to not only work with babies and children, but also with families. In caring for children and their families, the families experience tremendous challenges, explained Dr. Curley, adding, “I became interested in trying to figure out how best nursing could help parents get through these best of times and worst of times. I believe nursing is about caring relationships that facilitate healing. It’s about nursing being lived through what you do with patients and families every day, how nurses work with and touch those patients and families.” In her remarks, Dr. Curley discussed the development of the Nursing Mutual Participation Model of Care, which included examining stress-point philosophy and incorporating those concepts. The model’s intervention engaged the family, sitting at the child’s bedside, helped them find their role, and then attach and live that role, which decreased their stress. “When I began as a clinical nurse specialist at Boston Children’s Hospital, I replicated the intervention, but instead of doing it myself, I taught the intervention to staff nurses. The staff learned how to consistently interact with families in a different way to decrease the family’s stress. And in fact it did work,” said Dr. Curley. Dr. Curley explained that after completing her dissertation on patterns of weaning pediatric patients from mechanical ventilation and receiving her PhD, she wanted to conduct clinical trials in order to find the answers to many questions she identified in pediatric critical


care to change the world

care: “I began with a smaller study on prone positioning. I knew that putting patients in the prone position, while intubated for acute respiratory failure, would have better matching of oxygen and ventilation. But what I really wanted to know was whether it was worth doing it, did these children get off the ventilator sooner? Was there less mortality?” Through a grant funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research, Dr. Curley identified how to safely put patients in a prone position, but she encountered the challenge of controlling the many additional variables that impacted the primary outcome: how the children were ventilated, sedated, and weaned from mechanical ventilation. During the trial, more than 8,000 children were screened. From that group, 102 were randomized. Dr. Curley noted that the study was stopped after 100 patients were enrolled because it was a negative trial. “But I had an answer to the larger question of ‘Does prone positioning, in a fuller scale, impact outcomes?’” Dr. Curley became a founding member of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Sepsis Investigator (PALISI) Network as a result of her ongoing quest to answer key questions for those who provide care for critically ill infants and children. “We formed the PALISI network with 80 participating centers who meet twice a year.” With support from this network, “We wrote an R-21 grant proposal for a two-center pilot of the RESTORE (Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure) protocol, to test whether or not pediatric patients with acute respiratory failure would be taken off the ventilator sooner if they were managed by nurse-led therapy,” she said. The study also looked at the cost and qualityof-life outcomes after a pediatric intensive care unit discharge. Based on positive findings from the R-21 grant, the study was expanded. The current trial has three coordinating centers for clinical management, data management, and follow-up, as well as 10 core investigators, 31 steering committee members, and 31 participating centers.

parameters; we will also know what these kids look like after they are discharged from the pediatric intensive care unit.” Dr. Curley noted that in addition to the nurse-led protocol there are two physician-led ancillary trials. “One is a study with the acronym BALI (Genetic Variation and Biomarkers in Children with Acute Lung Injury), looking at genetic variations and biomarkers of children with acute lung injury. The second has the acronym PISA (Pharmacologic Impact on Sedation Assessments), examining pharmacogenetics, genomics and kinetics, specifically of morphine and midazolam, two powerful drugs. To do so, the BALI study will be the largest repository of biomarkers that we’ve ever collected in this patient population. “This is also feeding into a new initiative called PALIC (Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus conference), because although in pediatrics we initially work off the adult definitions, for the first time we’re starting to look at our own definition within our cohort group. The databases of the prone study and sedation study will be feeding into modeling work so that we can really look at data from these children and identify what we might impact upon collectively using a multidisciplinary perspective.” Dr. Curley reflected in closing, “When I look through the nursing lens, patients and families want their questions answered. Parents sign on the dotted line to allow their children to participate in clinical trials during the worst of times for their family, when their child is extremely sick. With caring and compassion, these families have hope.”

Dr. Curley discussed the importance of the follow-up component of the RESTORE clinical trial: “There has never been a large-scale follow-up study in pediatric critical care before, and we are enrolling 2,400 patients and will collect data from the moment they get their breathing tubes until they get their last dose of opioids. At the end of this trial we are going to know whether nurse-implemented therapy impacts outcomes on numerous different Left to right, Claire Fagin, Dr. Curley, and Dean Meleis www.nursing.upenn.edu

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PENN NURSING NEWS 700 Attend LIFE Community Wellness Day Despite the cooler weather, the third annual Sounds of West Philadelphia at LIFE Community Wellness Day attracted the largest crowd in the event’s history, with 700 community members attending on April 6. Hosted by Penn Nursing’s Healthy in Philadelphia initiative, Living Independently For Elders, and Councilwoman Jannie L. Blackwell, the event was opened by the Honorable Chaka Fattah of the United States House of Representatives. The aim of this year’s event was to reach all age groups in the community with health information and screenings, integrate music and performance groups representing the diversity of West Philadelphia, promote fitness, movement and dance, and include vendors to provide resource information targeted to the health of West Philadelphians. “For the first time families, organizations, and legislators were calling us asking about the event, even before a date was selected and publicly released,” said Rebecca Phillips, Nu’70, GNu’75, Steering Committee Chair and Director, Healthy in Philadelphia. “You could sense the tremendous excitement building from the outside. This doesn’t happen unless you are making a difference!” There were more than 100 volunteers from five Penn schools (Nursing, Dental Medicine, Medicine, Engineering, and Social Policy and Practice) as well as St. Joseph’s Preparatory School and West Philadelphia Catholic High School, and numerous community and health organizations such as the Please Touch Museum. Glenn Bryan of Penn’s Office of Government Affairs, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center’s Nursing Magnet Program, and the Hospital of University of Pennsylvania’s Nursing Community Outreach Program played key roles in engaging the community about being U.S. Representative Chaka Fattah, top. Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell with proactive about health. LIFE member, bottom.

Glenn Bryan and Rebecca Phillips

“You could sense the tremendous excitement building from the outside. This doesn’t happen unless you are making a difference!” Rebecca Phillips

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care to change the world

Historic Images Added to The Bates Center’s Collection The Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing, in collaboration with the University Library’s Schoenberg Center for Electronic Text and Image, has created a new website that will feature more than 1,330 photo images donated by the Alumnae Association of the Philadelphia General Hospital School of Nursing. The Philadelphia General Hospital Collection is one of the first collections acquired by the Bates Center. The images feature the school, hospital, and campus of Philadelphia General Hospital, which was one of the major healthcare institutions in the country at its founding in 1729, supporting a large number of Philadelphians until its closure in 1977. Once the nation’s longest operating public healthcare institution, Philadelphia General Hospital opened as an almshouse. It eventually implemented innovative medical care and education under Dr. William Osler and Florence Nightingale’s protégé, Alice Fisher, who advanced nursing as a profession at the hospital. To view the Collection, visit the Center’s website at: www.nursing.upenn.edu/pgh

Faculty Accolades Two Penn Nursing faculty have been named fellows in the American Academy of Nursing (AAN). They are Pamela Cacchione, PhD, APRN, GNP, BC, and Kathy Burke, Gr’01, PhD, RN. They will be inducted and acknowledged at the AAN’s annual meeting on October 19, 2013, in Washington, D.C. Dr. Cacchione, Associate Professor of Geropsychiatric Nursing, has been a geriatric nurse practitioner for more than 20 years. She is completing an R01 that investigates the efficacy of a nursing intervention, Individualized-Sensory Enhancement of the Elderly, in improving vision and hearing in long-term care residents. Dr. Cacchione

Dr. Burke

Dr. Burke, Assistant Dean for Clinical Nurse Learning and Innovation at Penn Nursing and Director of Nursing Professional Development and Innovation at the University of Pennsylvania Healthcare System, provides oversight of nursing education and innovation to all Penn healthcare partners. At Penn Nursing, Dr. Burke forges new pathways to develop and implement nursing student and faculty interprofessional education, research, and practice innovations. The AAN is the discipline’s premier national organization whose 1,500 fellows are expected to enhance the quality of health and nursing care, promote healthy aging and human development, reduce health disparities, shape healthy behaviors and environments, and strengthen nursing and healthcare delivery. There are currently 40 other Penn Nursing faculty in the Academy, more than any other school of nursing. Penn Nursing’s Diane Spatz, Nu’86, GNu’89, Gr’95, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN, has been selected as the second recipient of the Norma M. Lang Distinguished Award for Scholarly Practice and Policy. Dr. Spatz will present the awards lecture on Tuesday, October 15 from 3:00-5:00p.m. in the Ann L. Roy Auditorium. Dr. Spatz, the Helen M. Shearer Term Professor of Nutrition and Professor of Perinatal Nursing, is world-renowned for her research and clinical scholarship and practice that reflect a commitment to improving the lives of women and their vulnerable children, especially teaching women the importance of breastfeeding.

Dr. Spatz

The Norma M. Lang Distinguished Award for Scholarly Practice and Policy was established to honor Dr. Lang, Dean of Penn Nursing from 1992 to 2000, for her international contributions to practice and policy. Terri Lipman, GNu’83, GRN’91, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, was the inaugural recipient in 2012.

www.nursing.upenn.edu

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PENN NURSING NEWS

Former First Lady Speaks at Commencement “Nurses matter. The future of healthcare around the globe can change with help from dedicated professionals like you. Through your skills, your advocacy, your care, your research, and your compassion, you can give the gift of health, whether here at home or abroad,” noted former First Lady Laura Bush as she gave the address at Penn Nursing’s 126th commencement. Mrs. Bush, now active with the Women’s Initiative and other areas of engagement at the George W. Bush Institute, exhorted the graduates to lead a productive life that involves helping others. “Any definition of a successful life must include service to others... There are so many needs to be met and so many ways you can help,” she told the overflow crowd, “that one friendly smile, that hand you hold for a geriatric patient in distress, or that one extra consoling touch for a premature baby – these are the things that quite literally make all the difference in the world.” “Mrs. Bush, a former librarian, launched the largest early reading initiative in American history and has been an outspoken supporter of the women of Afghanistan,” said Penn Nursing Dean Afaf I. Meleis, PhD, DrPS (hon), FAAN, FRCN. “She has spoken out against the Taliban’s oppression of women and children, and has supported women’s health initiatives against breast cancer and heart disease.” Dean Meleis has been a member of the George W. Bush Institute’s Women’s Initiative Policy Advisory Council since 2011. “Taking care of women is taking care of the family and when the family is cared for, so is the community and so is the community across the globe,” said Dr. Meleis. Because the U.S. Department of Labor predicts a shortage of 750,000 nurses by the year 2020, Mrs. Bush emphasized the importance of nurses in today’s society. “We may face a nursing shortage, but imagine being a patient in Zambia, a nation of more than 13 million, which has just over 12,000 nurses and midwifes and about 900 doctors… In Zambia and many other African nations, treatable illnesses are too often a death sentence. Cervical and breast cancer are epidemic. Zambia’s life-saving cervical cancer screening program is led by nurses… Two nurses have performed over 22,000 cervical cancer screenings. George and I were in Zambia last year, painting and refurbishing a health clinic and installing new medical equipment. In the yard, dozens of women gathered, waiting for us to finish the construction so that they could be screened for cancer. Every one of them was seen on the first day.” “I promised I would not bombard you with advice today,” Mrs. Bush concluded, “but I can’t resist issuing a challenge. And that challenge is to seek out people like this in your lives – people who are enterprising, energetic, indefatigable, and compassionate; people who care, people who dare. Attach yourself to them, learn from them, and look for the qualities inside yourself that will help you become one of them. …Your caring doesn’t stop at our borders.” 28

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care to change the world

Richmond Elected to the Hall of Fame Therese Richmond, GRN’95, GNC’97, PhD, FAAN, CRNP, the Andrea B. Laporte Endowed Chair,

received the Sigma Theta Tau International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame Award.

Dr. Richmond holds a secondary appointment as Professor of Nursing in Surgery at the Perelman School of Medicine; is the Research Core Co-Director for the Philadelphia Collaborative Violence Prevention Center; is a Senior Fellow at the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics; is a Fellow at the Jerry Lee Center for Criminology and the Center for Public Health Interest at Penn; and is the Director of the Hillman Scholars Program in Nursing Innovation, an integrated BSN-PhD program.

Photo provided by STTI

Dr. Richmond is nationally and internationally recognized for her research in post-injury disability and firearm violence and for addressing the interaction between physical injury, age, and the psychological aftermath of the injury to improve recovery after traumatic injury. She is the co-founder, and served as Research Director for more than 10 years, of the Firearm & Injury Center at Penn.

Dr. Richmond

Dr. Richmond was presented with the award at the 24th International Nursing Research Congress on July 22-26, 2013, in Prague, Czech Republic.

Doctoral Students Launch New Journal The inaugural issue of the Journal of Nursing Doctoral Students Scholarship (JNDSS), was published in the spring of 2013 by co-editors Justine S. Sefcik, Gr’15, and Maxim Topaz, Gr’16.

The JNDSS is a scholarly publication dedicated to the development of doctoral student scholarship and the advancement of nursing science. JNDSS is peerreviewed and edited by Penn Nursing doctoral students. The idea of developing the journal was borne out of discussions among doctoral students who were reflecting on their experience as students during their first and second years of being in the doctoral program. Conversations focused on the fact that the learning curve associated with beginning a doctoral program can be very stressful to students. At the same time, no platform currently exists for students to share their research at an early stage in their doctoral studies. From both of these concerns emerged the innovative idea of developing a journal run by doctoral students.

Topaz and Sefcik

The purpose of the JNDSS is to serve as a venue for doctoral students to share their thoughts and opinions, to publish beginning student work such as concept or theoretical analyses, and to highlight student work through research briefs on pilot work. In the call for manuscripts, papers that were prepared during the doctoral program (and not published elsewhere) were used as exemplars of doctoral student work. In addition, this journal provides an opportunity to socialize doctoral students to the editorial and administrative tasks associated with producing a professional publication.

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SCIENCE IN ACTION Penn Nursing Science and Sayre High School Student Research Receives Award The Penn Nursing Science and Sayre High School partnership garnered a first-place award for the research poster “Dance for Health: Increasing Fitness and Fun in the Community” at the 29th Annual Pediatric Nursing Conference in Philadelphia on July 12. Penn Nursing Practitioner Students Mariesa Buhl, Nu’07, GNu’13; Vivian Wu, GNu’14; and Julia Golden, GNu’13, in conjunction with Sayre and Urban Nutrition Initiative Student Daniel Sultan created the winning poster.

partnership, once again, culminate in collaborative presentations at a national conference.” For the past two years, Penn Nursing Pediatric Acute Care students provided the Dance for Health curriculum to Sayre students and then turned it into a community project. The program’s study measured height, weight, physical exertion, and body mass index. Since the program began, 228 people including 93 children have participated.

Along with two Sayre students, 14 Penn Nursing students presented 10 posters, two pertaining to the partnership with Sayre, and eight about a variety of findings related to pediatric acute nursing care. “I thought the students were professional, prepared, and engaging,” said Professor of Nursing of Childen Terri Lipman, GNu’83, GRN’91, PhD, CRNP, FAAN. “It was a wonderful event. It was also enormously gratifying to see our University and community Left to right: Sultan, Golden, and Buhl

Lower Readmissions for Hospitals with a Good Work Environment Medicare patients treated in hospitals with a good work environment for nurses had up to 10 percent lower odds of readmission than those treated in hospitals with a poor work environment.

Dr. McHugh

After examining data from more than 200,000 nurses and 412 hospitals in California, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey, researchers determined the likelihood of readmission within 30 days among Medicare patients over age 65 with heart failure, heart attack, and pneumonia was seven percent, six percent and ten percent lower, respectively, when treated in hospitals with good work environments. “Our results suggest that improving nurses’ work environment and reducing nurses’ workload are organization-wide reforms that could result in fewer readmissions for Medicare beneficiaries with common medical conditions,” said lead author Matthew D. McHugh, GNC’94, GNu’98, Gr’04, PhD, JD, MPH, CRNP, a health policy expert at Penn Nursing, in the January 2013

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issue of Medical Care. “This is consistent with the evidence showing significant associations between the nurse work environment, staffing, and other patient outcomes.” The researchers suggest that system-based interventions to improve care begin within the nursing care environment. All hospitalized patients are exposed to bedside nursing throughout their stay, and the combination of targeted transitional care, the coordination of healthcare during the transition from hospital to home, and high-quality inpatient nursing care will produce more positive outcomes for all patients. “To work effectively, nurses must practice in an environment that reinforces their professional role and autonomy, provides adequate resources, demonstrates consistent and high-quality managerial support and leadership, and includes nursing in institutional decisionmaking,” said Dr. McHugh. “The challenge of readmissions will require a range of interventions. One potentially effective means of reducing overall readmissions may come through improving the organization and delivery of hospital nursing services.”


care to change the world

Can Breakfast Make Kids Smarter? New research has found that children who regularly have breakfast on a near-daily basis had significantly higher full-scale, verbal, and performance IQ test scores. In one of the first studies to examine IQ and breakfast consumption, researchers examined data from 1,269 six-year-olds in China, where breakfast is highly valued, and concluded that children who did not eat breakfast regularly had 5.58 points lower verbal, 2.50 points lower performance, and 4.6 points lower total IQ scores than children who often or always ate breakfast, after adjusting for seven sociodemographic confounders. “Childhood is a critical period in which dietary and lifestyle patterns are initiated, and these habits can have important immediate and long-term implications,” said lead author Jianghong Liu, PhD, RN, FAAN. “Breakfast habits appear to be no exception, and irregular breakfast eating has already been associated

with a number of unhealthy behaviors, such as smoking, frequent alcohol use, and infrequent exercise.” At age 6, a child’s cognitive ability at both the verbal and performance levels is rapidly developing. Both the nutritional and social aspects of breakfast play a role. After a whole night of fasting, breakfast serves as a means to supply “fuel” to the brain. Meanwhile, social interaction at breakfast time with parents may promote brain development. Mealtime discussions may facilitate cognitive development by offering children the opportunity to expand their vocabulary, practice synthesizing and comprehending stories, and acquire general knowledge, noted the authors.

Dr. Liu

BSN-Prepared Nurses Connected to Fewer Patient Deaths When hospitals hire more nurses with four-year degrees, patient deaths following common surgeries decrease. Less than half the nation’s nurses (45%) have baccalaureate degrees, according to the most recent data available (2008). If all 134 Pennsylvania hospitals involved in the study had increased the percentage of their nurses with four-year degrees by 10 percentage points, the lives of about 500 patients who had undergone general, vascular, or orthopedic surgery might have been saved, the researchers found. The researchers surveyed 42,000 RNs in Pennsylvania in 1999 and 25,000 in 2006.

Specifically, a 10 percentage point increase (from 30 to 40 percent) in the overall percentage of BSN-prepared nurses in the hospitals studied between 1999 and 2006 saved about two lives for each 1,000 patients treated on average, noted lead author Ann Kutney-Lee, GNu’04, Gr’07, PhD, RN, in the March issue of the prestigious policy journal Health Affairs. “This adds to the importance of public policies to help direct a substantial shift toward the production of nurses with baccalaureates in nursing,” said Dr. Kutney-Lee, noting that a recent report from the Institute of Medicine recommends that 80 percent of nurses hold at least a baccalaureate degree by 2020. “Nursing is both high-touch and high-tech, requiring honed critical thinking skills in our complicated healthcare system.”

Dr. Kutney-Lee www.nursing.upenn.edu

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SCIENCE IN ACTION Emergency Rooms Provide a Place for Intervention Adults between the ages of 20 to 50 years old use the emergency room more frequently than any other age group and account for more than 30 percent of all visits in a given year. New research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing has found that emergency department visits provide a window of opportunity for interventions meant to reduce both risky driving and hazardous drinking. Researchers examined data from 834 young adults, defined as ages 18-44, that were admitted to the emergency room and determined that after interventions, patients’ risky behavior significantly decreased for at least nine months. “The risky driving behaviors that were significantly decreased at nine months in the intervention group included such lifesaving behaviors such as increased safety belt use, increased adherence to traffic signals, reduced speeding, and reduced driving after drinking,” said lead author Marilyn Sommers, Nu’72, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Lillian S. Brunner Professor of MedicalSurgical Nursing at Penn Nursing. “The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that safety belts prevent more than 11,000 traffic deaths a year and conversely, running red lights causes up to 900 fatal crashes a year. Changing these behaviors has the potential for significant health benefits.” Researchers considered hazardous drinking as alcohol consumption exceeding dietary guidelines for males up to 14 drinks per week and no more than four on drinking days, and for non-pregnant females up to seven drinks per week and no more than three on drinking days. Risky driving behaviors, which account for nearly $40 billion (or 17 percent) of all economic costs from crashes, were considered driving 20 miles per hour over the speed limit, driving through a yellow light as it changed to red, and wearing a seat belt only some of the time or never. Emergency room patients were randomized into three groups, brief interventions (BIG), contactcontrol (CCG), or no-contact-control groups (NCG). The BIG received a 20-minute

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assessment and two, 20-minute interventions, the CCG received a 20-minute assessment and no intervention, and the NCG had no assessment or intervention. Participants self-reported driving behaviors and alcohol consumption at three, six, nine, and 12 months. “Our results support the efficacy of an emergency room intervention for risky driving up to nine months and for hazardous drinking up to six months in a population of non-alcoholdependent young adults who screen positive for both health-compromising behaviors,” said Dr. Sommers. “The recent decision by the Joint Commission to include screening and brief interventions related to alcohol use as one of its national hospital inpatient quality measures reflects the growing evidence that such interventions have a valuable role to play at the intersection of public health and clinical care.” This research was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. The findings were published in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research and Clinical Nursing Research.


Adolescent Obesity Epidemic Numbers Underreported The obesity epidemic in minors might be worse than previously believed, as Alison Buttenheim, PhD, MBA, found in her recent paper “Underestimation of Adolescent Obesity.” Co-authored with Noreen Goldman, DSc, and Anne R. Pebley, PhD, this study discovered that minors often do not report their height and weight in population surveys, which can impact national data. This lack of information may lead to an underestimation of how widespread the child

and adolescent obesity epidemic is by as much as 31 percent. The study also found that younger and heavier children generally comprise the group that does not report the information. Among the non-reporters, obesity rates were 40 percent, contrasting to the 30 percent rate of reporters. Using data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey, the study focused on more than 600 youths between the ages of 12 and 17 who are white, black and Hispanic. The researchers then proceeded to find out information pertaining to youth who did not answer or provided a “don’t know” response. From there, information was collected about these responders – height and weight – as well as additional characteristics. “Underestimation of Adolescent Obesity” was published in the May/June 2013 edition of Nursing Research.

Grant for Adolescent Diabetes Management Technology Managing adolescent diabetes just got another boost from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In July, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the NIH awarded Terri Lipman, GNu’83, GRN’91, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, a Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant for $242,171. This grant is for the Technology-enabled Type 1 Diabetes Education and Support system, also known as T1DES. The T1DES system provides the web-based management assessment tools along with tailored educational information. This comprehensive program also generates onepage clinician reports. Along with an appointment reminder, the program has the

capability to be integrated into electronic health records and automated referrals (mental health providers, social workers, and diabetes specialists). Its mission is to use technology to overcome barriers such as educational, psychosocial, and support issues. Dr. Lipman is developing the T1DES system with Kathy Murphy, PhD, BSN, RN, the Director of the

Diabetes Center for Children at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Nursing Science Adjunct Associate Professor. This is in partnership with Polaris Health Directions, a small business. The relationship with Polaris made it possible to obtain the STTR grant.

Dr. Lipman

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ALUMNI CONNECTIONS From the Penn Nursing Alumni Board President Dear Penn Nursing Alumni, In my role as alumni president, I have been privileged to meet many of you at events, conferences, and virtually. Repeatedly, I find myself in awe of how you use your Penn Nursing education and experience to create a professional role that is unique to you. Whether you work as a hospital floor nurse, connect talent with job openings at an executive search firm, or are taking a break from your professional career to focus on your family, you are constantly changing and evolving – finding new ways to meet today’s challenges. This is what nursing is all about. We sit at the frontline of healthcare delivery, where yesterday’s solutions will not be enough for tomorrow’s demands. And we know that each person, each situation is unique and must be cared for in a unique way. The health of our patients, our families – and yes, our alumni body – requires change. As Penn Nurses, we have been uniquely prepared to see where change is needed and provide new solutions.

We want to hear from you. We welcome your input and encourage your participation at nursalum@pobox.upenn.edu or 215.898.9773.

This issue’s theme of innovation is incredibly timely for the Penn Nursing Alumni Board and for the School’s alumni outreach goals. In addition to the innovation I hear about from each of you, we have been doing work to assess our current programs. Over the last year, we have been looking at ways to align ourselves more closely with the School’s mission, update our activities with today’s technology, and leverage the University’s existing alumni relations programs to serve the needs of our alumni. This past year, we initiated Brainstorming Summits which brought together experts from around the University and enabled us to focus on specific areas of alumni outreach – including our nominations/recruitment process, alumni awards, and global alumni engagement. Upcoming areas of focus include graduate alumni outreach and events realignment. One significant outcome from our Alumni Awards Brainstorming Summit was a change to one of our long-standing alumni awards, the Lillian Sholtis Brunner Award for Innovation. Recognizing the importance of cooperation, this award is now open to ALL Penn graduates and recognizes innovation in interprofessional, collaborative practice impacting the nursing profession and/or healthcare delivery system. I invite you to consider nominating a colleague, mentor, or client who meets these criteria. Your voice is critical and I invite you to be part of the conversation and share your thoughts and ideas, and your stories of innovation, as we seek to serve you better. Join us! Terri Cox Glassen, Nu’91 President, Penn Nursing Alumni

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From the HUP Nursing Alumni Association President A Warm Hello to All Nursing Alumni! I write this letter – my first – with fond memories from the HUP Annual Spring Luncheon, when I was installed as President of our venerable Alumni Association. That was followed a few weeks later by Penn Nursing Alumni Weekend, when, with Terri Cox Glassen, Nu’91, Penn Nursing Alumni President, we marched proudly together with OUR beloved Dean Meleis. With these two wonderful events in mind, I couldn’t help but feel that the School of Nursing is most fortunate to have the continuing distinction of two active Alumni Associations! As I begin my presidency, my goal is to strengthen close ties and forge new ones. As the theme of this magazine illustrates, innovation will be critical to meeting our goals. Our alumni and board have always embraced innovation and together we will continue this tradition. A smart and dedicated group of HUP Alumni Board members and I are working to improve the way our Board conducts business to better utilize the valuable time and contribution of Board members and to improve the way we communicate with our alumni to increase active participation and stimulate friendships old and new. Our Board will be using more technology to support our Board meetings and to add new features on the HUP Alumni website (with thanks to support from the Penn Nursing Alumni Office for both). Through the addition of a story-collecting feature, alumni will be able to share their experiences, to inspire and benefit current and future nurses. A coming photo gallery of old and new alumni will instigate further interaction. Visually, alumni will be enabled to cherish old friends as they have been and as they are now. For example, my roommate, Johann Shea, and I are still buddies after 45 years…and I am looking forward to sharing our shared vacation photos! When I was diagnosed with celiac disease, I did what nurses do: I innovated. I thought, “How could I help the other nearly 3,000,000 Americans estimated to have undiagnosed celiac disease?” To do this, I leveraged technology to produce a unique encyclopedia and a website. So far, we have reached at least 1,000,000 people in 23 countries to help them get well and stay healthy. Indeed, Penn Nurses Care to Change the World. You each have your own personal and professional experiences of innovation, and I hope you will share your stories with me – in person at our next luncheon, or by email or mail. Looking forward to the future at Penn! Cleo Wolfe Libonati, HUP’68, Nu’72 President, HUP School of Nursing Alumni Association

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Alumni Weekend 2013 From a story-filled Legacy Breakfast to interactive demonstrations of the new Helene Fuld Pavilion for Innovative Learning to our cool sunglasses in the parade, Alumni Weekend 2013 was our best yet as we welcomed the MSN Health Care Administration and Health Leadership program alumni to join our traditional pool of HUP and Penn Nursing graduates. For more information on future Penn Nursing events, see the calendar on page 42 or email nursalum@pobox.upenn.edu to learn how you can get involved.

Save the date for next year! May 15-18, 2014, featuring a series of events celebrating Dean Meleis and her Deanship. See Events Calendar on page 42 for details.

2013 Alumni Award Winners Congratulations to the following alumni award winners who were honored on Friday, May 10, along with faculty award winners, during Alumni Weekend 2013. Anthony Shamoun flew in from Lebanon to be at the ceremony! See page 40, Alumni Notes, to read more about Anthony. Outstanding Alumni Award for Leadership in Nursing

Alumni Legacy Award

Ginette G. Ferszt, GNu’78

Jean C. Whelan, GR’00, GR’02

Expert Alumni Award for Clinical Excellence

Student Alumni Award

Kathryn E. Roberts, Nu’91, GNu’98

Irina Pekareva-Kochergina, Nu’10, GNu’13

Lillian Sholtis Brunner Alumni Award for Innovative Practice

Recent Alumni Award for Clinical Excellence

Anthony Shamoun, GNu’06

Sarah Collins, Nu’03 Honorary Nursing Alumni Award

Ann and Mark Baiada, Berton Korman

2013 Alumni Award winners with Dean Meleis, PNA President Terri Cox Glassen, Nu’91 (far left) and Awards Committee Chair, Mary Walton, Nu’86, GNu’81, GR’10, GR’12 (far right)

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Anthony Shamoun and Dean Meleis (center) with Penn Students from Lebanon


care to change the world Penn Nursing Alumni Board The Penn Nursing Alumni Board represents you in planning activities, programs, and professional opportunities. We are always looking for alumni who are interested in giving back and advancing their professional network by involvement on the board. For information on joining the Board or a project-focused committee, please email nursalum@pobox.upenn.edu or call 215.898.9773. Meet the current members of the 2013-2014 Penn Nursing Alumni Board: President

Board of Directors

Terri Cox Glassen, Nu’91

Katelin Hoskins, Nu’07, GNu’08, GNu’12 Lisa Hilmi, Nu’97, GNu’14

President-Elect

Ashley Zampini, Nu’07, GNu’10 Secretary

Open Vice President for Alumni Support

Ellen McCabe, Nu’88, GNu‘91 Vice President for Student & School Support

Maya Clark-Cutaia, Nu’03, GNu’06 Board of Directors, Nominating Committee

Kate Bowles, Nu’07 Suzanne Conaboy, Nu’07 Sarah Emily Farkash, Nu‘06, GNu’10 Pamela Mack-Brooks, GNu’96 Kathryn Sugerman, Nu’91, GNu’93

Board of Directors, Young Alumni Rep

Amelia Cataldo, Nu’11 Stephanie Chu, Nu’05, GNu’08 Meredith Mooney-Levin, Nu’11 Amanda Webb, Nu’11, GNu’14 Recent Graduate Representatives

Katelin Hoskins, Nu’07, GNu’08, GNu’12 Angela Nguyen, Nu’12 Sharon “Ainsley” Sutton, Nu’12 Lorelei Phillips, Nu’12 Debbie Yiu, Nu’13, GNu’15 Amber Stark, Nu’13, GNu’14 Ex-Officio Member, HUP Alumni President

Cleo Wolfe Libonati, HUP’68, Nu’72

YOUR SUPPORT MAKES A DIFFERENCE! This past summer I worked in Penn Nursing’s Office of Institutional Advancement before leaving for a study abroad experience in Spain. What I thought would be an opportunity to make extra money turned into a learning experience. I learned about the alumni, parents, faculty, and friends who have supported the School through the Penn Nursing Annual Fund and how the collective support of our donors has a direct impact on my Penn Nursing education through the financial support that I have received. The Annual Fund supports all students, whether or not they receive financial aid. It funds innovative programming, cutting-edge technology, and enhancements to facilities. This fall, the School will enroll its largest entering class, which means that there are more of us to support than ever. Thank you to all of you who have supported the Annual Fund in the past. Please know that your support makes a difference. I hope all alumni will support the Annual Fund in the future. I know I plan to! Cindy Wee, Nu’15

For more information on how you can support students, contact Desirée Carr at 215.898.1665 or carrd@nursing.upenn.edu www.nursing.upenn.edu

37


ALU M NI NOT ES If you are a HUP or Penn Nursing alum, we want to hear about your life! Send us a personal or professional update at nursalum@pobox.upenn.edu or call us at 215.746.8812.

1960s Roberta Pichini, HUP’68, was recently inducted as a Fellow in the International Society of Barristers, an invitation-only, limited-membership society dedicated to preserving trial by jury, the adversary system, and an independent judiciary. Pichini currently works at the firm Feldman Shepherd in Philadelphia, and also is a Fellow in the American College of Trial Lawyers and the International Academy of Trial Lawyers. She served as the Academy’s first female President during 2011-2012. Throughout her career, Pichini has represented seriously injured infants, children, and adults in all areas of catastrophic injury cases and, in particular, medical malpractice and product liability matters. She is a graduate of Neumann College and Villanova University School of Law, where she earned the Order of the Coif honors.

1970s Elizabeth Nissley, Nu’70, GNu’89, celebrated

her 70th birthday and retired after 101/2 years as Associate Pastor at James Street Mennonite Church on June 30. She was the first woman to be ordained in the Lancaster District of the Lancaster Mennonite Conference of the Mennonite Church USA. Ruth Wagner Pilote, Nu’72, is now a specialty case manager with Tufts Health in Boston. Mary Elizabeth Tully Brown, Nu’72, is now

a school nurse with the Catholic Diocese of San Jose, Calif. Mary Mishler, Nu’73, GNu’77, a nursing instructor at Gloucester County College in Sewell, N.J., has been selected as a writer for the national registered-nurse licensure examination in Portland, Ore. Michele Mittelman, HUP’74, now writes for the Global Advances of Health and Medicine Journal. Patricia Kuroski Vuolo, Nu’77, has accepted a position on the full-time faculty at SUNYOrange Nursing in Middletown, N.Y.

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UPfront | Fall 2013

Wendy Grube, GNu’82, GR’10,

1980s Ann L. Cupp Curley, GNu’81, the nurse

research specialist for Capital Health in Trenton, N.J., is co-editor of Population-Based Nursing: Concepts and Competencies for Advanced Practice, which was published by Springer Publishing this year. Elizabeth L. Bringsjord, GNu’82, has been

appointed by the State University of New York as Interim Provost of System Administration. In her previous position as Vice Chancellor for Academic Programs and Assessment, she oversaw the review of the University’s academic developments. Dr. Bringsjord has more than 20 years of experience in higher education and has led many efforts to enhance academic quality while promoting access and success. She attained her BS in Nursing from Boston University, her master’s from Penn and a PhD and MS in Educational Psychology and Statistics from the University of Albany. Terri Lipman, GNu’83, GRN’91, has received a CTSA

Community Engagement and Research Core grant to fund her project: MyDiaText: Feasibility of a Text Messaging System for Youth with Type 1 Diabetes. The program will help young people struggling with Type 1 diabetes to better manage their illness, and, in some cases, achieve behavioral changes. The study will determine the functionality of receiving educational and motivational texts. MyDiaText is a collaborative initiative between the School of Nursing, the College of Engineering, and The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Susan Bakewell-Sachs, GNu’82, GR’92, GNC’95, was

recently appointed the Dean of the School of Nursing at Oregon Health & Science University. Previously, she was Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at the College of New Jersey. She also served as the Carol Kuser Loser Dean and Professor of Nursing at the College. Earlier in her career, she played an active role in healthcare administration, serving as Program Director for the New Jersey Nursing Initiatives, which worked to address nursing shortage concerns. She has published several books and articles in medical journals on the care of preterm infants.

has been honored with the Provost’s Award as an exemplary member of the Penn faculty. As a professor she has embraced interdisciplinary teaching and inter-school collaboration to develop an innovative curriculum. She has also introduced complementary and alternative therapies as effective treatment options, and played an important role in the development of facultystudent women’s healthcare clinical immersion experience in Thailand. Currently, Dr. Grube is Director of the new Bridge Training Program curriculum for the ICTPH program in India where she is teaching primary healthcare physicians. Mary M. Knapp, GNu’84,

received The Distinguished Service Award for 2012 from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) for providing significant “time and effort over many years in support of the mission and goals of the National Birth Defects Prevention Network, Inc.” on February 27, 2013. Mary is the Chair of the Education and Outreach Committee of the NBDPN. Her Penn classmate and colleague of 24 years, Linda Biando, GNu’87, shared, “she has worked tirelessly for the Birth Defects Registry and the families that we serve here in New Jersey.” Mary received a master’s in perinatology from Penn and volunteered for many years on the Penn Nursing Alumni Board, ultimately serving as Vice President for School and Student Support. Cynthia Kline O’Sullivan, GNu’86, has

recently started a new position at Southern Connecticut State University as an Associate Professor in New Haven, Conn. Diane Spatz, Nu’86, GNu’89, GR’95, has been named the

recipient of the 2013 Norma M. Lang Distinguished Award for Scholarly Practice and Policy. See page 27 for details. Dr. Spatz invites her fellow alumni to the Lang Lecture on October 15 at Fagin Hall. In addition to being Professor of Perinatal Nursing and the Helen M. Shearer Term Professor of Nutrition at Penn, Dr. Spatz also works at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia as Director of the Lactation Program.


care to change the world

Carolee Polek, GNu’86, is the recipient of two recent awards. She was honored as the recipient of the 2013 ONS Excellence in Cancer Prevention & Early Detection Award, and also received the Pennsylvania State University Shirley Novosel Award for Outstanding Nursing Alumni. She is currently an Associate Professor in the School of Nursing at the University of Delaware in Newark. Barbara Romig, GNu’88, is now Senior

Director at Reading Hospital & Medical Center. Margaret O’Keef Slusser, GNu’88, GR’94,

is now a Chair and Associate Professor at Stockton University in Galloway, N.J.

1990s Laurel Edinburgh, Nu’92, has been named

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP) of the Year for 2013 by the Minnesota Chapter of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP). The award is bestowed to a Minnesota PNP who best exemplifies the mission of NAPNAP, which is to promote optimal health for children through leadership, practice, advocacy, education, and research. Among other accomplishments, Edinburgh developed the Runaway Intervention Program to help young girls who have run away from home. Cathy Carol Fortenbaugh, GNu’92, GNu’04, is

now a clinical nurse specialist with Amgen in Thousand Oaks, Calif. Tammara Jenkins, GNu’92, has recently

started a new position with the National Institutes of Health as a nurse consultant. Deborah Christopher, Nu’94, GNu’12, is now Director, Nursing Quality at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Deborah Lee Sutera, GNu’95, is now a nurse

practitioner with Hampton Gynecology in Southampton, N.Y. Susan Stabler-Haas, Nu’95, an adjunct

instructor in nursing at Villanova University, wrote Fast Facts for the Student Nurse: Nursing Student Success in a Nutshell, which was published by Springer earlier this year. Sigrid Ladores, Nu’97, GNu’02, has been

awarded the Nurse of the Year award in the Graduate Student Category by the March of Dimes. She was also nominated in the Clinical and Academic Education Category. Presently, she is working toward her PhD in Nursing at the University of Central Florida.

Amanda Sparks Abbott, Nu’98, and her husband, Daniel, announced the arrival of their son, Griffin Davis Abbott, born on March 16 at 7:55a.m. He joined big sisters Caroline, 4 and Lila, 2. Amanda is a healthcare attorney and a counsel for Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego. Hui Son Choe, Nu’98, is now a nurse case manager at Choc Children’s Hospital in Orange, Calif. Christina Ochmanowicz, Nu’98, is now

a staff nurse at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Angela Toles, GNu’99, is now a nurse

practitioner at St. Jude’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn.

Grant Martsolf, Nu’02, W’02,

has accepted a new position as an associate policy researcher at the Rand Corporation in Pittsburgh, Pa. Martsolf is working on a nursing-workforce project, a unique study examining the relationship between healthcare staffing and patient outcomes. Martsolf, who has experience as a registered nurse in both clinical and industrial settings, received a PhD in health policy and administration at Pennsylvania State University. His research interests have focused on quality of care, and address issues such as quality measurement, payment reform, and public reporting. Courtney Cassidy, Nu’03, WEV’11, GNu’11,

2000s

has recently started a new position at Pennsylvania Hospital as a Quality Manager.

Karen Lenar Winn, Nu’00, and Gilbert Winn, C’00, celebrated the birth of their baby, Rand

Kristin Tuozzo, Nu’03, is now a nurse

Frank, on May 25 in Boston. Allison Marchesi-Rooks, GNu’01, GNC’09,

has recently started a new position at Famcare Inc. as a nurse practitioner in Bridgeton, N.J. Kathy Burke, GR’01, was

recently inducted as a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing. Samantha S. Desai, Nu’01,

and her husband Nehal Desai, announced the arrival of their second son, Noah Michael on November 29. He is 8 lbs., 4 oz., and 21 inches. He joined his big brother Benjamin Andrew. Nehal is the finance director of field operations for product supply for Coca-Cola Refreshments in Atlanta, and Samantha stays home with their two boys. Abby Kra Friedman, Nu’01, and Dov Friedman welcomed their first daughter, Menucha Zahava, into the world on January 14 at Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem, where Abby works as a certified nurse midwife. Katrina Dela Torre, GNu’01, has recently accepted a position as a nurse clinician at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, N.Y. Denise Santiago, GNu’01, GNC’02, has

recently started a new position at the Children’s National Medical Center as a nursing director in Washington.

coordinator at New York Presbyterian Hospital. Sarah Alden, Nu’03, GNu’05, is now a

registered nurse at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Joshua Miller, Nu’03, W’03, is now a director at Bayada Home Health Care in Philadelphia, Pa. Joyce Y. Minakami, C’04, Nu’04, GNu’07, has recently started a new position at University of California-San Francisco as an administrative director. Katherine A. Stuhlemmer, Nu’05, GNu’11,

married James D. Dunning III, C’05, on June 2 at St. Patrick’s Church in Philadelphia. A reception followed at The Water Works. Marianne Baernholdt, GR’05,

will be inducted as a fellow into the American Academy of Nursing. She oversees the University of Virginia School of Nursing’s new Rural and Global Health Care Center and directs the School’s global initiatives and study abroad programs. In addition to her teaching appointments, she has also practiced as a critical care nurse in Pennsylvania, New York, and Arizona. Danielle Stewart, Nu’05, GNu’08, is now a women’s health nurse practitioner at North Shore Long Island Jewish Hospital. Allison Caulfield, GNu’06, married Brian

Garfinkel in Rose Valley, Pa., on November 2.

www.nursing.upenn.edu

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ALU M NI NOT ES

( continued )

Catherine Doty, GNu’06, GNu’07, is now a psychiatric nurse practitioner with First State Family Counseling in Wilmington, Del. Vicki Krohn, GNu’06, has recently started a

new position at Franklin Square as a professional development coordinator in Baltimore, Md. Anthony Shamoun, GNu’06, recently received

Penn Nursing’s Lillian Sholtis Brunner Alumni Award for Innovative Practice in Nursing. Only 10 days away from the due date for his first child, Anthony flew to Philadelphia to receive the award from Penn Nursing Alumni. He and his wife have since had a baby boy, “Charbel.” Anthony is Chief Clinical Nurse Specialist and Neuroscience Clinical Nurse Specialist at the American University of Beirut Medical Center-Lebanon and an Academic Associate at AUB-School of Nursing. He earned a BSN from AUB in 2001 and an MSN from Penn in 2006 and is a Certified Adult ACNP and CNS. He is a Member of the Sigma Theta Tau International XI Chapter and a guest speaker at national and international conferences. Keisha Walker, GNu’06, has recently started a

new position at Planned Parenthood of America as a nursing supervisor in New York, N.Y. Erica McMillan, Nu’07, GNu’10, is now a

registered nurse with United Healthcare. Jessica Leet, GNu’07, is now a pediatric critical care nurse practitioner at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. Kimberly Magrann, Nu’07, GNu’11, has recently started a new position at Pennsylvania Hospital as a quality coordinator. Clare Ryan, GNu’07, is now a pediatric nurse

practitioner with St. Louis Children’s Hospital. Regan Trappler, Nu’08, GNu’11, has recently

started a new position at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington, Va., as an infection prevention coordinator. Anne Shoemaker, Nu’08, GNu’11, taught a

course on aging and life in an aging society with Sarah Kagan, the Lucy Walker Honorary

Term Professor of Gerontological Nursing. The course, “Growing Old Around the Globe,” which was free of charge and presented weekly on Coursera, addressed the critical issues surrounding age and the world’s aging societies. The course was supplemented by an online discussion forum, live webcast discussions, and social media discussions on Facebook and Twitter. Lauren Gebrian, GNu’09, is now a nurse practitioner with Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Systems in Philadelphia, Pa. Jessica Plantulli, Nu’09, is now a registered

nurse with the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Jay Roth, Nu’06, GNu’09, is now a nurse practitioner at Meta Options in Jersey City, N.J. Megan Cronin Pambianco, Nu’09, GNu’12,

has recently started a new position at Lehigh Valley Health Network as a children’s float pool nurse in Allentown, Pa. Yana Sigal, Nu’09, GNu’12, married Archita

Banerjee, C’08, W’08, WG’13, in Philadelphia on Friday, April 13. The couple met during Spring Fling on Friday, April 13, 2007. Archita is currently pursuing an MBA at Wharton, and Yana completed her graduate program at the School of Nursing last year. Meredith Boehm Palusci, C’09, Nu’10, and John Palusci, C’09, are thrilled to announce their marriage on June 30 at the Lyman Estate in Waltham, Mass. They first met in the Penn Band their freshman year, where his parents, Roslyn Scheiber Palusci, C’80, and Vincent Palusci, C’80, also met as freshmen in 1976.

2010s Erin Shaver, GNu’10, is now a nurse

practitioner in the medical ICU at Columbia University. Faith Crozier, GNu’10, has recently started a

new position at Children’s National Medical Center as a nurse practitioner in neurooncology in Washington, D.C. Kathleen Ann Kirkpatrick, GNu’10, is now a

nurse practitioner at Crystal Clinic Orthopedic Center in Akron, Ohio. Donna Sabella Monheit, GR’10, GNu’12, is

now the Director of Global Studies and an Assistant Clinical Professor at Drexel University. Shoemaker (left) and Kagan

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UPfront | Fall 2013

Catherine Domanska, Nu’10, GNu’12, is now

a nurse practitioner at Doctors May Grant Associates in Lancaster, Pa.

Jill Smith, GNu’10, is now a critical care

nurse practitioner at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C. Meaghan Reich, Nu’10, GNu’13, is now an emergency nurse at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Katherine Anne Snyder, GNu’10, is now a nurse midwife at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Vivian Huang, Nu’10, W’10, has recently

started a new position at the University of California-San Francisco as a clinical nurse. Laura Marcellino, GNu’11, has recently

started a new position at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia as a nurse educator. Ashley McCarthy, Nu’11, is now a registered

nurse with WellStar Paulding Hospital in Dallas, Ga. Jay Dawson Piccini, WEV’11, GNu’11, has

recently started a new position at Dell Healthcare Services as a senior principal solutions consultant in Plano, Texas. Kathryn Travers, GNu’11, is now a coordinator at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Dina Bammer, GNu’11, has recently started a new position at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania as a professional development specialist. Katherine Daily, Nu’11, has recently started a new position as a staff nurse at Medstar Georgetown University Hospital. Melisa Leighton, GNu’11, is now a professional development specialist at the University of Pennsylvania Health System. Meghan Mcgowan Dwyer, GNu’11, has

recently started a new position at Sivley Memorial Hospital as a nurse practitioner in Washington, D.C. Margaret Haviland, Nu’12, is now a clinical

nurse at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Elizabeth Grun, Nu’12, GNu’13, is now a

registered nurse at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena, Calif. Michelle Lu, Nu’12, W’12, has recently

started a new position with Booz & Company as a consultant in New York, N.Y. Sarah Carey, GNu’12, is now an educator at

Temple University. Karly Kassay, Nu’12, is now a critical care

registered nurse with the University of Pennsylvania Health System.


care to change the world

I n Me m oria m 1930s

1960s

Maureen Hreha, Nu’70, GNu’83, Edison, N.J.

Margaret Mooney, HUP’34, York, Pa., a

Jane L. Hart, Nu’60, Bryn Mawr, Pa.

Lois Ward, Nu’70, Chestertown, Md.

Valene Komorowski, HUP’60, Lewes, Del.,

Denise A. Rotko, Nu’73, GNu’76, Unionville,

retired nurse. a retired teacher.

retired school nurse for the Shenandoah Valley (Pa.) School District.

Helen Austin, HUP’38, Mesa, Ariz.

Loanne Adams, Nu’61, HUP’58, Hatboro, Pa.

Mrs. June Kaplan Perles, NEd’39,

Dorothy H. Poppert, Nu’62, Glen Mills, Pa.

Florence Fagan Boyd, NEd’37, Easton, Conn.,

Huntington, N.Y.

Ethella H. Cressman, GNu’62, Lake Alfred,

Pa. She was a nursing professor at Widener University. At Penn, she was a member of the Pennguinettes synchronized swimming team, and later taught at the School of Nursing. Her husband is Michael J. Rotko, L’63, and her stepson is Thomas C. Rotko, L’94.

1940s

Fla.

1980s

Marion Oyer, HUP’44, Stroudsburg, Pa.

Nancy Tigar, Nu’62, Mount Holly, N.J.

Janice W. Leach, GNu’80, Grant, Fla.

Reba Hewitt Thompson, HUP’45, former administrator of the public health nurse service in Hamilton County, Iowa. During World War II, she served in the Cadet Nurse Corps.

Elva J. Tate, Nu’64, GNu’76, Philadelphia, Pa., a retired nurse who had taught pediatric nursing at Einstein Hospital.

Helen Papan, GNu’80, Reading, Pa.

Marion Louise Seidel Angle, HUP’46,

was a former nurse who had served as president of the Kidney Foundation of Central Pennsylvania. She set up and ran Program Planning Associates, a conference-planning firm. Her husband is Dr. William S. Peirce, M’62, GM’69.

Chambersburg, Pa., a retired nurse. Jean Culberson, HUP’46, Bethelem, Pa. Laura Johnson, ED’47, Bedford, Pa. Marguerite R. Waters, NEd’48, Oneonta,

N.Y., a retired school nurse teacher.

1950s Martha Babyar White, Nu’51, Whittier, N.C.,

a Professor Emeritus of Nursing at Western Carolina University. Audri Reed Bukeavich, Nu’51, Morristown,

Tenn. During World War II, she served in the U.S. Navy before going on to a career as a clinical instructor in public health nursing. Blanche Lange, GEd’52, Albuquerque, N.M. Vivian Middleman, Nu’53, Haverford, Pa. Leona Strike Baksi, Nu’54, Woodlyn, Pa. She

was a retired nurse. Elizabeth Ann McCreary Nager, HUP’55,

Daphne, Ala., a retired nurse. Josepha Karr, HUP’57, Grand Blanc, Mich. Gabrielle M. Torok, Nu’58, Harrisburg, Pa. She was a retired registered nurse at the old Haverford State Hospital.

Peggy Jayne Stone Pierce, HUP’65, Harrisburg, Pa. She

Debra L. Hein, GNu’81, West Hartford, Conn. She was head of the certified nurse midwife program at Hartford Hospital, and had been a certified nurse midwife at Pennsylvania Hospital for many years. Dorothy Moyer Black, GNu’82, Warren, Pa. Mary Doherty, GNu’85, Old Bridge, N.J.

2010s Dulcy Sacan, GNu’11, Philadelphia, Pa.

Ida Ellis, Nu’67, Pittston, Pa. Martha Taylor, Nu’68, Havertown, Pa. J. Castrina-Hanula, Nu’69, GNu’75, Peoria,

Ariz. She was a retired hospital administrator and consultant.

1970s Lois Pearce Ward, Nu’70, Centreville, Md., a nursing professor at the Nursing School of Wilmington. Col. Vera Nolfe Anderson, Nu’70, Augusta, Ga. She was an obstetrical nurse at Lying In Hospital and a surgical nurse at Veteran’s Research Hospital, both in Chicago. She later worked as a staff nurse at Germantown Hospital and a Red Cross blood mobile nurse, both in Philadelphia. She was a U.S. Army Nurse from 1960-1984 and served in 15 assignments all over the world, including the VIP suite at Walter Reed Hospital, where she tended to President Dwight Eisenhower. Her highest award received was the Legion of Merit. She is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

www.nursing.upenn.edu

41


Events Calendar September 11 - October 2 and October 16 - November 6, 2013

November 2, 8:30a.m. - 2:00p.m.

Online: Transitional Care Model program, four self-paced units supported by live webinars held each Wednesday 3:00-4:00p.m. (EST). Nurses with varied backgrounds along with social workers and pharmacists have successfully completed the program. For more information on opportunities to join us, contact bixbymb@nursing.upenn. edu, or visit www.transitionalcare.info/ to register.

November 9-10

Fall – Pharmacology & Pharmacotherapeutics for Advanced Practice Nursing

March 31-April 4

See www.nursing.upenn.edu/ce for dates and information

April 10

September 17, 9:30a.m. - 3:30p.m. Millennium Hotel London Mayfair

Save the Date for the annual Claire M. Fagin Lecture.

HEALTHY CITIES: HEALTHY WOMEN London See www.nursing.upenn.edu/healthywomen October 3, 3:30 - 5:00p.m.

Dean’s annual State of the School Address, Ann L. Roy Auditorium, Claire M. Fagin Hall

Graduate Programs Open House, Fagin Hall Homecoming featuring Arts & Culture Weekend. Join us for a Penn Nursing alumni-student networking event on Saturday morning during QuakerFest. February 17-22

Global Health Reflections Week at Penn Nursing Penn Nursing Spirit Week

May 15-18, Alumni Weekend 2014

Alumni Weekend 2014 with a special preview day of events on Thursday, May 15 celebrating Dean Meleis and her impact. Traditional events will include the Legacy Breakfast, Parade through campus and Picnic at the Nursing Tent. Save the Date!

October 4, 9:00a.m. - 2:00p.m.

May 15

PhD Open House, Fagin Hall

HEALTHY CITIES: HEALTHY WOMEN The Global Future The Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, Philadelphia See www.nursing.upenn.edu/healthywomen

October 15, 3:00 - 5:00p.m.

Norma M. Lang Distinguished Lecture Award for Scholarly Practice featuring award recipient, Dr. Diane Spatz, Nu’86, GNu’89, GR’95. See the inside back cover for more details.

Inaugural Presentation of the Penn Nursing Renfield Foundation Award in Global Women’s Health

October 30, 8:30a.m. - 2:00p.m. JW Marriott Hotel

HEALTHY CITIES: HEALTHY WOMEN Washington, D.C. See www.nursing.upenn.edu/healthywomen

Gala in honor of Dean Afaf I. Meleis See below for more details!

May 15, 2014 Educate. Engage. Advocate. Honor.

Celebrating Care to Change the World Mark your calendars for Thursday, May 15, 2014, when we have planned a series of events to celebrate the extraordinary tenure of Dean Afaf I. Meleis, the many milestones in Penn Nursing’s path to global eminence, and our ongoing commitment to advancing care delivery around the world. The day will feature HEALTHY CITIES: HEALTHY WOMEN The Global Future, a culminating event in a series of discussions focused on better understanding challenges and exploring solutions for and with women and girls that promise to improve health for all urban populations. The event will be held at The Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts on Penn’s campus. This important dialogue will continue during the inaugural presentation of the Penn Nursing Renfield Foundation Award in Global Women’s Health, which will be bestowed upon an individual who has made a demonstrative impact on improving the health and lives of women around the world. The day will conclude with Honoring a Legacy: Dean Afaf I. Meleis, Celebrating Inspirational Leadership and Passionate Enthusiasm, a fun evening to honor a visionary who has helped transform our School, the field of nursing, and women’s healthcare globally. Under her leadership, Penn Nursing has established itself as one of the world’s preeminent schools of nursing, and she continues to advocate for the profession, our School, and our mission to deliver care to change the world. For more information on these events, contact the Office of Institutional Advancement at 215.898.4841. 42

UPfront | Fall 2013


care to change the world

FAC ULT Y N EW S Faculty Honors Linda H. Aiken Anvar and Pari Velji Global Health Project of the Year Award, Consortium of Universities for Global Health; 2012 – Twenty People Who Make a Difference in Healthcare, Health Leaders Media Kathryn H. Bowles Fellow, American College of Medical Informatics Margo Brooks Carthon RWJ Nurse Faculty Scholar Kathleen Burke Fellow, American Academy of Nursing Marianne Buzby Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Advocate Award, Pediatric Nursing Certification Board; 2013 Department of Family and Community Health Service Award, School of Nursing

Jeane Ann Grisso Elizabeth Kirk Rose Women in Medicine Award, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Wendy D. Grube Inspiration Award, National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health; Provost’s Award for Excellence in Teaching by Non-Standing Faculty, University of Pennsylvania; 2013 Dean’s Award for MS/MSN Scholarly Mentorship, School of Nursing Mary Guidera Fellow, American College of Nurse Midwives, ACNM Excellence in Teaching Award Linda A. Hatfield 2013 Department of Family and Community Health Marilyn Stringer Academic Practice Award, School of Nursing

Christopher L. Coleman 2013 Joan Lynaugh Faculty Mentorship Award, Department of Family and Community Health, School of Nursing

Sharon Y. Irving Distinguished Alumna in Service to Nursing Award, The Marquette University College of Nursing; 2013 Dean’s Award for Exemplary Professional Practice, School of Nursing; Fellow, American College of Critical Care Medicine

Charlene W. Compher Fellow, American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

Tanja Kral 2013 Dean’s Award for Undergraduate Scholarly Mentorship, School of Nursing

Cynthia A. Connolly Adelaide Nutting Award, American Association of the History of Nursing; Exemplary Teaching Award

Mary Ann Lafferty-Della Valle 2013 Salve Regina University Alumni Achievement Award

Martha A.Q. Curley 2013 Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award, School of Nursing; Named one of 90 Nurses in 90 Years, Yale School of Nursing

Lisa M. Lewis Clinical Article of the Year Award, American Heart Association Council on Cardiovascular Nursing; 2013 Department of Family and Community Health Scholarship Award, School of Nursing; Award for Emerging Women Leaders, Forum of Executive Women

Patricia D’Antonio President’s Award, American Association of the History of Nursing Janet A. Deatrick Editorial Reviewer Appreciation Award, Health Psychology –The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia; 2013 Barbara J. Lowery Faculty Award, Doctoral Student Organization, School of Nursing Mary Kay Dollard Pennsylvania Award for Excellence-Nurse Practitioner Award, American Association of Nurse Practitioners Dawn Durain 2013 Lois Evans Non-Standing Faculty Mentoring Award, Department of Family and Community Health, School of Nursing Claire M. Fagin Guggenheim Honor Cup, The Penn Club of New York, University of Pennsylvania Maureen George 2013 Dean’s Award for Exemplary Teaching, School of Nursing; 2013 Department of Family and Community Health Exemplary Teaching Award, School of Nursing

Terri H. Lipman 2012 Norma M. Lang Distinguished Award for Scholarly Practice and Policy, School of Nursing Jianghong Liu Department of Family and Community Health Research Award, School of Nursing Matthew McHugh Fellow, American Academy of Nursing Barbara Medoff-Cooper Outstanding Nurse Scientist Award, Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science Salimah H. Meghani Fellow, American Academy of Nursing Afaf I. Meleis Phyllis N. Stern Award, International Council on Women’s Health Issues; President’s Award, National League for Nursing; Doctor Honoris Causa, University of Alicante, Spain; Honorary Citizen of Oporto, Portugal-City of Knowledge, Nursing School of Coimbra, Portugal Marjorie Muecke Alumni Award, Mount Holyoke College

Christine Mulligan 2013 Award for Teaching Excellence by Non-Standing Faculty, School of Nursing Jamille Nagtalon-Ramos 2013 Department of Family and Community Health Award for Teaching Excellence by Non-Standing Faculty, School of Nursing Mary D. Naylor Maxwell A. Pollack Award for Productive Aging, Gerontological Society of America; President’s Award, Friends of the National Institute of Nursing Research Kelly L. Wiltse Nicely 2013 Dean’s Award for Exemplary Professional Practice, School of Nursing Ann L. O’Sullivan 2013 Dean’s Award for Exemplary Citizenship, School of Nursing Yvonne Paterson One Health Award, University of Pennsylvania Patricia Pawlow 2013 Outstanding Nurse Educator Award, Graduate Student Organization, School of Nursing Beth Hogan Quigley 2013 Undergraduate Award for Teaching, Student Nurses at Penn Barbara Reale Fellow, American College of Nurse Midwives Victoria L. Rich Prism Diversity Award, American Organization of Nurse Executives Therese Richmond International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame Award, Sigma Theta Tau International; University of Pennsylvania Trustees Council of Penn Women’s Award for Excellence in Advising Barbara Riegel Sigma Theta Tau International 2013 International Award, recipient Elizabeth McWilliams Miller Award for Excellence in Research Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers President’s Award, Friends of the National Institute of Nursing Research Diane L. Spatz 2013 Norma M. Lang Distinguished Award for Scholarly Practice and Policy Samantha Thomas Nurse of the Year Award; National Program of All-Inclusive Care of the Elderly Barbra Mann Wall Mary M. Roberts Award, American Association of the History of Nursing; Christian R. & Mary F. Lindback Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching, University of Pennsylvania Jean C. Whelan 2013 Legacy Award, Penn Nursing Alumni Association

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Conference Grants Cynthia A. Connolly The Future of Health Care’s Past: A Conference in honor of Joan E. Lynaugh University of Pennsylvania University Research Foundation 3/1/2012 - 2/28/2013 Principal Investigator: Cynthia A. Connolly

Fellowship Grants Kamila Alexander Narratives of sexuality and sexual safety among black emerging adult women National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR013121) 9/1/2011 - 8/31/2013 Mentor: Loretta Sweet Jemmott Fellow: Kamila Alexander Joan Carpenter Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) American Academy of Nursing 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2013 Mentor: Mary Ersek Fellow: Joan Carpenter Janine Everett Skin elasticity and skin color: Understanding health disparity in sexual assault National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR011106) 1/1/2009 - 12/31/2012 Mentor: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Fellow: Janine Everett Sara Jacoby Experiences of Black trauma patients: Why are there disparate racial outcomes? National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR013599) 6/1/2012 - 5/31/2015 Mentor: Therese Richmond Mentor: Loretta Sweet Jemmott Fellow: Sara Jacoby Matthew Lucas Caregiver functional expectations for survivors of childhood brain tumors National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR013091) 9/1/2011 - 8/31/2014 Mentor: Lamia Barakat Mentor: Janet A. Deatrick Fellow: Matthew Lucas M. Melanie Lyons A novel treatment, TAT-HSP70, in attenuating lung injury in sepsis induced ARDS National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR02100) 5/1/2010 - 4/30/2013 Mentor: Nancy Tkacs Fellow: M. Melanie Lyons Susan Lysaght Prospective exploration of transitions in settings of care within hospice National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR013103) 8/1/2011 - 12/31/2012 Mentor: Mary Ersek Fellow: Susan Lysaght

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Lauren Massimo The Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) predoctoral scholarship American Academy of Nursing 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2013 Mentor: Lois Evans Fellow: Lauren Massimo The cognitive and neural basis of apathy in frontotemporal degeneration National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR013306) 1/1/2012 - 6/30/2014 Mentor: Lois Evans Mentor: Murray Grossman Fellow: Lauren Massimo Ruth Masterson Creber John A. Hartford Foundation BAGNC predoctoral scholarship American Academy of Nursing 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2014 Mentor: Barbara Riegel Fellow: Ruth Masterson Creber Profiling the heterogeneous response of exercise therapy in heart failure patients National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR014086) 1/1/2013 - 12/31/2015 Mentor: Barbara Riegel Fellow: Ruth Masterson Creber Kim Mooney-Doyle Exploring family decision-making in pediatric palliative care National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR011533) 1/1/2011 - 12/31/2013 Mentor: Connie Ulrich Mentor: Janet Deatrick Fellow: Kim Mooney-Doyle Aditi Rao The Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) predoctoral scholarship American Academy of Nursing 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Lois Evans Fellow: Aditi Rao Justine Sefcik The Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) predoctoral scholarship American Academy of Nursing 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2014 Mentor: Pamela Cacchione Fellow: Justine Sefcik The Jonas/Hartford predoctoral scholarship Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence 9/1/2010 - 8/31/2012 Mentor: Pamela Cacchione Fellow: Justine Sefcik Terease Waite Real-time data capture of the experiences of Blacks in cancer clinical trials National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR013847) 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2015 Mentor: Connie Ulrich Fellow: Terease Waite

Other Student-Related Grants Eeeseung Byun The effects of early uncertainty on caregiver stress and psychological outcomes Neuroscience Nursing Foundation 10/1/2011 - 9/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Eeeseung Byun Elizabeth Froh Breastfeeding the infant with congenital diaphragmatic hernia School of Nursing Doctoral Student Research Award 6/1/2013 - 5/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Elizabeth Froh Sunny Hallowell Influence of the nurse work environment on human milk provision and breastfeeding support in the NICU School of Nursing PhD Mentored Research Award 5/1/2012 - 4/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Sunny Hallowell Youjeong Kang Predictors of re-hospitalization in older adults with heart failure receiving telehomecare School of Nursing Doctoral Student Research Award 6/1/2013 - 5/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Youjeong Kang Lisa Marie Kohr Promoting physiologic stability in high risk infants with complex congenital heart disease: Evaluation of an intensive care unit evnironmental care bundle Society of Critical Care Nursing 6/1/2012 - 5/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Lisa Marie Kohr Matthew Lucas Caregiver functional expectations for survivors of childhood brain tumors American Cancer Society 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2014 Principal Investigator: Matthew Lucas Meredith MacKenzie Hospice care outcomes in the heart failure population School of Nursing Doctoral Student Research Award 6/1/2013 - 5/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Meredith MacKenzie Linda Maldonado Midwives’ collaborative activism in two U.S. cities, 1970-1990 School of Nursing PhD Mentored Research Award 5/1/2012 - 4/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Linda Maldonado


care to change the world

Ruth Masterson Creber Tailoring self-care interventions for heart failure patients Edna G. Kynett Memorial Foundation, Inc. 7/1/2011 - 10/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Ruth Masterson Creber Afaf Meleis Penn Nursing/Helene Fuld Health Trust Partnership for the Future of Nursing Helene Fuld Health Trust 3/1/2011 - 5/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Afaf Meleis Maxim Topaz Translation of Heart Failure clinical practice guidelines for home care electronic health record using standardized nursing terminology School of Nursing PhD Mentored Research Award 5/1/2012 - 4/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Maxim Topaz Jill Vanak Association of transplant center and nursing workforce factors on patient outcomes after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in a four-state sample School of Nursing PhD Mentored Research Award 5/1/2012 - 4/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Jill Vanak

Research Grants Linda Aiken Nursing impact on care outcomes for chronically ill and minority patients National Institute of Nursing Research (R01-NR004513) 6/1/2010 - 6/29/2014 Principal Investigator: Linda Aiken Co-Investigator: Jeannie Cimiotti Co-Investigator: Douglas Sloane Policy-relevant evidence to advance the future of nursing Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 4/15/2012 - 4/14/2014 Principal Investigator: Linda Aiken Pediatric outcomes research The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 9/1/2011 - 6/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Linda Aiken Joseph Boullata A long term, open label study with Teduglutide for subjects with parenteral nutrition dependent short bowel syndrome who completed study Cl0600-020 NPS Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 7/1/2009 - 12/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Joseph Boullata Drug compatibility and stability in enteral nutrition A.S.P.E.N. Rhoads Research Foundation 1/1/2011 - 12/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Joseph Boullata Co-Investigator: Juan Muniz

Kathryn Bowles Decision support: optimizing post acute referrals and effect on patient outcomes National Institute of Nursing Research (R01-NR007674) 9/29/2010 - 6/30/2015 Principal Investigator: Kathryn Bowles Co-Investigator: Mary Naylor Co-Investigator: John Holmes Co-Investigator: Sarah Ratcliffe Barriers and facilitators to implementation and adoption of EHR in home care AHRQ/Drexel University (R21-HS021008) 9/30/2011 - 9/29/2012 Principal Investigator: Paulina Sockolow Co-Investigator: Kathryn Bowles Visiting Nurses Society of New York Scholars Program Visiting Nurse Service of New York 9/01/2012 - 8/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Kathryn Bowles Technology application to enhance discharge decision support National Institute of Nursing (R43-NR013609) 12/1/2012 - 5/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Kathryn Bowles Patient and provider perspectives on reasons for hospital readmission Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute 5/1/2012 - 6/1/2014 Principal Investigator: Stephen Kimmel Co-Investigator: Kathryn Bowles Comparative effectiveness of intensive home health and MD visits in health failure AHRQ/Visiting Nurse Service of New York (R01HS020257) 9/01/2012 - 8/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Christopher Murtaugh Co-Investigator: Kathryn Bowles Christine Bradway The transition of care of morbidly obese patients: What are the challenges? School of Nursing Faculty Research Award 5/1/2012 - 4/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Christine Bradway Geriatric Education Center of Greater Philadelphia consortium grant Health Resources and Services Administration 7/1/2010 - 6/30/2015 Principal Investigator: Mary Ann Forciea Co-Investigator: Christine Bradway Bridgette Brawner HIV/STI prevention among Black adolescents with mental illnesses Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U01-PS0033004) 1/1/2012 - 12/31/2015 Principal Investigator: Bridgette Brawner Co-Investigator: Loretta Sweet Jemmott

Alison Buttenheim Pilot studies to improve participation in Chagas disease vector control programs University of Pennsylvania Center for Undergraduate Research & Fellowships 3/1/2012 - 2/28/2013 Principal Investigator: Alison Buttenheim Pilot studies to improve participation in Chagas disease vector control programs University of Pennsylvania Global Engagement Grant 12/1/2011 - 11/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Alison Buttenheim Can policies change norms? Measuring school vaccine exemption norms in the context of regulatory change School of Nursing Faculty Research Award 6/1/2013 - 5/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Alison Buttenheim Retail pharmacy vouchers to promote Tdap vaccination for adults living with infants Leonard Davis Institute Pilot Fund Program 1/1/2013 - 12/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Kristen Feemster Co-Investigator: Alison Buttenheim Pamela Z. Cacchione Exploration of safe transporting on vans for older adults to and from the LIFE center Frank Morgan Jones Fund 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Pamela Cacchione Co-Investigator: Christine Bradway J. Margo Brooks Carthon Nurse practice environment influences in reducing disparities in hospital outcome National Institute of Nursing Research (K01-NR012006) 7/1/2010 - 5/31/2013 Principal Investigator: J. Margo Brooks Carthon The diversity imperative: Assessing the impact of recruitment and retention pipeline initiatives to increase minority representation in nursing Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 11/15/2011 - 11/14/2013 Principal Investigator: J. Margo Brooks Carthon Defining a set of nursing performance measures to reduce hospital readmissions among older adults School of Nursing Faculty Research Award 5/1/2012 - 4/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Ann Kutney-Lee Principal Investigator: J. Margo Brooks Carthon Expanding access to health care by removing aprn practice barriers: lessons from pennsylvania Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 5/1/2013 - 4/30/2015 Principal Investigator: J. Margo Brooks Carthon Principal Investigator: Kelly Wiltse Nicely Charlene Compher A one-year, open-label study with teduglutide for subjects with parenteral nutrition-dependent short bowel syndrome who completed study cl0600-021 NPS Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 7/25/2012 - 11/1/2013 Principal Investigator: Charlene Compher

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Cynthia Connolly A prescription for a healthy childhood: A history of children and pharmaceuticals in the United States Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 6/1/2010 - 8/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Cynthia Connolly State(s) of health: The Commonwealth Fund, child development and preventive care program, 1999-2011 The Commonwealth Fund 6/1/2011 - 5/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Cynthia Connolly Martha A.Q. Curley Sedation management in pediatric patients with acute respiratory failure study (RESTORE) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U01HL086622) 4/1/2008 - 3/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Martha Curley Impact of pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics on the duration of mechanical ventilation in pediatric patients with acute respiratory failure The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (R01-HL098087) 5/31/2010 - 5/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Athena Zuppa Co-Investigator: Martha Curley HALF-PINT: Heart and lung failure-pediatric insulin titration trial National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (R01HL108028) 2011 - 2016 Principal Investigator: Michael Agus Principal Investigator: Darshana Nadkarni Co-Investigator: Martha Curley Predicting immobility-related and medical devicerelated pressure ulcer risk in pediatric patients American Association of Critical Care Nurses 1/1/2013 - 12/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Martha Curley Patricia D’Antonio A history of health demonstration projects in the United States,1920 -1940: The perspective of the New York City Department of Health American Association of the History of Nursing 11/19/2012 - 11/18/2013 Principal Investigator: Patricia D’Antonio Bart De Jonghe Neural mechanism of Glucagon-Like-Peptide-1 Receptor-mediated nausea/malaise National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (R03-DK093874) 3/5/2012 - 2/28/2014 Principal Investigator: Matthew Hayes Co-Investigator: Bart De Jonghe The role of obesity in chemotherapy-induced malaise University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing Behavioral Research Center 2/1/2012 - 1/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Bart De Jonghe

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The role of inflammation in chemotherapy-induced malaise and neuronal activation in the rat University of Pennsylvania McCabe Fund 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Bart De Jonghe The role of NTS POMC Neurons in Energy Balance University of Pennsylvania Diabetes and Endocrinology Research Center 04/01/13 - 3/31/14 Principal Investigator: Bart De Jonghe The role of Hindbrain POMC Neurons in Energy Balance and Obesity Development University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Behavioral Research Center 02/01/13 - 1/31/14 Principal Investigator: Bart De Jonghe Janet Deatrick Mothers and fathers perspectives: Family management of young adult survivors of childhood brain tumors Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation 1/3/2011 - 1/2/2014 Principal Investigator: Janet Deatrick Co-Investigator: Wendy Hobbie Transition readiness of adolescent/young adult survivors of childhood cancer The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 1/1/2011 - 12/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Lisa Schwartz Co-Investigator: Janet Deatrick Mary Ersek Development of a multidimensional pain measure for persons with dementia Veteran’s Health Administration HSR&D Merit Review Award (HX-000507) 10/1/2012 - 12/31/2015 Principal Investigator: Mary Ersek Principal Investigator: Lynn Snow Can concurrent hospice care and cancer treatment achieve superior outcomes? Veterans Health Administration HSR&D Merit Review Award (HX-000956) 4/1/2013 - 3/31/2016 Principal Investigator: Vincent Mor Co-Investigator: Mary Ersek The OPTIMISTIC Project - Optimizing patient transfers, impacting medical quality, and improving symptoms: Transforming institutional care Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation 11/1/2012 - 10/31/2016 Principal Investigator: Greg Sachs Co-Investigator: Mary Ersek Co-Investigator: Kathleen Unroe Co-Investigator: Susan Hichman National PROMISE (Performance Reporting and Outcomes Measurement to Improve the Standard of care at End-of-life) Center Veterans Health Administration 9/1/2012 - 8/31/2015 Principal Investigator: Mary Ersek

Exploring End-of-Life care in VA Community Living Centers Veterans Health Administration HSR&D Merit Review Award 5/1/2013 - 11/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Mary Ersek Julie Fairman Campaign for Action Research Manager Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 4/15/2012 - 4/14/2014 Principal Investigator: Julie Fairman Preservation Planning Track Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts 11/1/2012 - 12/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Julie Fairman Anesthesia delivery models and best practices American Association of Nurse Anesthetists 5/1/2013 - 5/1/2014 Principal Investigator: Julie Fairman Principal Investigator: Kelly Wiltse Nicely Maureen George Patient-provider communication: CAM beliefs, attitudes and practices National Institutes of Health (K23-AT003907) 5/1/2008 - 4/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Maureen George Beliefs associated with adherence to antiretroviral medications post prison release among HIV-positive individuals University of Pennsylvania CTSA CEAR Core Grant Award 6/1/2012 – 10/31/13 Principal Investigator: Roberta Herceg-Baron Principal Investigator: Kathie Nixon Principal Investigator: Lisa Lewis Co-Investigator: Maureen George Karen Glanz Social goals and individual incentives to promote walking in older adults Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 4/1/2012 - 3/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Karen Glanz Principal Investigator: Jason Karlawish Advancing measurement and modeling of healthy food and activity U.S. Department of Agriculture (2010-85215-20659) 4/1/2010 - 3/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Karen Glanz Penn Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer Centers National Cancer Institute (U54-CA155850) 6/24/2011 - 5/31/2016 Principal Investigator: Kathryn Schmitz Co-Investigator: Karen Glanz Institutional Clinical and Translational Science Award National Center for Research Resources (UL1-RR024134) 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2016 Principal Investigator: Garret FitzGerald Co-Investigator: Karen Glanz


care to change the world

Comprehensive Center of Excellence National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities (P60-MD006900) 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2017 Principal Investigator: Timothy Rebbeck Co-Investigator: Karen Glanz

Tanja Kral Eating behaviors among weight-discordant siblings National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (K01-DK078601) 4/1/2008 - 3/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Tanja Kral

Impact of the NYC sugar sweetened beverage policy on calories purchased and consumed National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (R01-DK099241) 2/8/2013 - 1/14/2017 Principal Investigator: Brian Elbel Co-Investigator: Karen Glanz

Individual differences in children’s susceptibility to overeating National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (R03-DK091492) 4/1/2011 - 3/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Tanja Kral

Karen Hirschman Palliative needs of cognitively impaired patients during health care transitions National Institute on Aging (R03-AG040320) 9/1/2011 - 8/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Karen B. Hirschman Co-Investigator: Alexandra L. Hanlon Olga Jarrin Understanding the role of nursing factors in home care patient outcomes American Academy of Nursing 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2014 Principal Investigator: Olga Jarrin Evidence for a pathway to excellence in home health care American Nurse Foundation 9/1/2011 - 8/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Olga Jarrin Loretta Sweet Jemmott Barbershop-based HIV/STD risk reduction for African American young men National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (R01-HD061061) 8/1/2009 - 5/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Loretta Sweet Jemmott Co-Investigator: John Jemmott Co-Investigator: Christopher Lance Coleman Health promotion for positives: A randomized trial with HIV positive Black men National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (R01-MD006232) 03/21/2012 - 12/13/2016 Principal Investigator: John Jemmott Co-Investigator: Loretta Sweet Jemmott Reducing risk of HIV/STD infection among African American men National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities (R01 MD004075) 12/19/2009 - 11/30/2014 Principal Investigator: John Jemmott Co-Investigator: Loretta Sweet Jemmott Jinyoung Kim An objective snoring index and its association with carotid atherosclerosis National Institute of Nursing Research (K99NR-013177) 9/28/2011 - 7/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Jinyoung Kim

Comparison of the satiating properties of egg versus cereal grain-based breakfasts for appetite and energy control in 8- to 10-year-old children American Egg Board 12/5/2011 - 12/4/2013 Principal Investigator: Tanja Kral Dietary intake, child feeding practices, and weight status in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Typically Developing Children and their caregypically Developing Children and their caregivers School of Nursing Biobehavioral Research Center 2/1/2012 - 1/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Tanja Kral Principal Investigator: Margaret Souders Co-Investigator: Jennifer Pinto-Martin Buy 1 Get 1: Role of grocery coupons in promoting obesogenic home food environments and eating behaviors University of Pennsylvania Leonard Davis Institute 9/1/2012 - 8/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Tanja Kral Ann Kutney-Lee Change in hospital care organization and outcomes Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (K08-HS018534) 9/30/2009 - 7/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Ann Kutney-Lee Defining a set of nursing performance measures to reduce hospital readmissions among older adults School of Nursing Faculty Research Award 5/1/2012 - 4/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Ann Kutney-Lee Principal Investigator: J. Margo Brooks Carthon Lisa Lewis A longitudinal study of adherence to medication in black men with hypertension National Institute of Nursing Research (R01-NR013491) 9/1/2012 - 6/30/2016 Principal Investigator: Lisa Lewis Co-Investigator: Barbara Riegel Joseph Libonati Exercise and stem cell engraftment in the heart following myocardial infarction National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (R21HL113777) 2/15/2013 - 1/31/2015 Principal Investigator: Joseph Libonati

Biomarker measurements Emory University 3/1/2013 - 12/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Joseph Libonati Can exercise and bone marrow infusions improve cardiac function in doxorubicin cardiotoxicity? Transdisciplinary Research in Energetics and Cancer (TREC) pilot grant National Cancer Institute (U54-CA155850) 6/1/2012 - 5/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Joseph Libonati Co-Investigator: Kathryn Schmitz Research Facilities Development Fund, Human cardio-metabolic research capacity in the School of Nursing University of Pennsylvania, Office of the Vice Provost for Research 1/1/2013 - 12/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Joseph Libonati Can acute exercise increase myocardial retention of exogenously-infused Mesenchymal Stem Cells School of Nursing Biobehavioral Research Center 3/1/2013 - 2/28/2014 Principal Investigator: Joseph Libonati Terri H. Lipman Treatment options for Type 2 Diabetes in adolescents and youth: Post intervention protocol Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (NIH-NIDDK-U01DK061239) 3/1/2011 - 2/28/2013 Principal Investigator: Lorraine Katz Co-Investigator: Terri Lipman Increasing activity in community: Dance for health University of Pennsylvania Center for Public Health Initiatives 7/1/11 - 6/30/13 Principal Investigator: Terri Lipman Overcoming disparities in growth evaluations National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (RO1- HD57037-01A2) 9/15/09 - 6/30/13 Principal Investigator: Adda Grimberg Co-Investigator: Terri Lipman Jianghong Liu Mechanisms that mediate the link between lead exposure and child behavior problems National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (K02-ES019878) 9/1/2011 - 5/31/2016 Principal Investigator: Jianghong Liu Lead exposure, externalizing behavior, and neurobiological mediating factors National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (R01-ES018858) 9/8/2010 - 4/30/2015 Principal Investigator: Jianghong Liu Co-Investigator: Adrian Raine Co-Investigator: Alexandra Hanlon

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Lea Ann Matura Proinflammatory cytokines and symptoms in pulmonary arterial hypertension American Nurse Foundation 9/1/2012 - 8/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Lea Ann Matura Co-Investigator: Steven Kawut Proinflammatory cytokines, symptoms and symptom clusters in pulmonary arterial hypertension University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing Biobehavioral Research Center 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Lea Ann Matura Co-Investigator: Steven Kawut Feasibility of slow-paced respiration therapy for treatment of a symptom cluster in pulmonary arterial hypertension School of Nursing Faculty Research Award 6/1/2013 - 5/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Lea Ann Matura Co-Investigator: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Co-Investigator: Steven Kawut Co-Investigator: Barbara Riegel Kathleen McCauley Implementation of practice standards for ECG monitoring Yale University (R01-HL081642) 5/15/2008 - 3/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Marjorie Funk Co-Investigator: Kathleen McCauley Jonas Veterans Healthcare Program Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence 8/1/2012 - 7/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Kathleen McCauley Catherine McDonald Serious teen crashes: identification of the most common scenarios and factors The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 5/1/2012 - 4/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Catherine McDonald Principal Investigator: Allison Curry PA Department of Health tobacco cure formulary grant for 2010 2013 The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 8/1/2012 - 12/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Flaura Winston Co-Investigator: Catherine McDonald Promoting teen health: A web-based intervention to prevent risky driving National Institute of Nursing Research (K99-NR-013548) 8/1/2012 - 7/31/2014 Mentor: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Mentor: Flaura Winston Fellow: Catherine McDonald Understanding and predicting human driving behaviors via machine learning models The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 5/1/2013 - 4/30/2014 Principal Investigator: Yi-Ching Lee Co-Investigator: Catherine McDonald

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Matthew McHugh Hospital care environment, neighborhood, and racial disparities in elder outcomes National Institute on Aging (R01-AG041099) 9/15/2011 - 8/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Matthew McHugh Co-Investigator: Charles Branas Co-Investigator: Douglas Sloane Co-Investigator: Herbert Smith Co-Investigator: Rachel Werner Co-Investigator: Linda Aiken

New care delivery model for older adults with multiple chronic conditions Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence 8/1/2011 - 7/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Mary Naylor

Nursing care environment, neighborhood, and racial and ethnic disparities Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 9/1/2011 - 8/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Matthew McHugh

Newcourtland Center for Transitions and Health pilot projects Newcourtland Elder Services 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2015 Principal Investigator: Mary Naylor Co-Investigator: Helene Moriarty Co-Investigator: Melissa O’Connor Co-Investigator: Mark Toles Co-Investigator: Connie Ulrich

The impact of nursing on in-hospital cardiac arrest outcomes School of Nursing Faculty Research Award 6/1/2013 - 5/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Matthew McHugh Barbara Medoff-Cooper Transitional telehealth home care: REACH The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 9/1/2011 - 6/30/2016 Principal Investigator: Barbara Medoff-Cooper Co-Investigator: Kathryn Bowles Co-Investigator: Martha Curley Salimah Meghani A novel approach to elucidate mechanisms for disparity in cancer pain outcomes National Institute of Nursing Research (RC1NR011591) 9/25/2009 - 7/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Salimah Meghani Co-Investigator: Deborah Watkins Bruner Co-Investigator: Alexandra Hanlon Co-Investigator: Barbara Riegel A tailored pain risk sssessment clinical tool (PRACT) towards ameliorating cancer pain disparities Institute of Aging/Penn Minority Aging Research for Community Health Center (Penn-MARCH) 6/24/2011 - 6/23/2013 Principal Investigator: Salimah Meghani Mary Naylor Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative (INQRI) Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 10/1/2005 - 9/30/2013 National Program Director: Mary Naylor Co-Program Director: Mark Pauly Effects of patient centered medical home plus transitional care for complex older adults Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Mary Naylor Co-Investigator: Ronald Barg Co-Investigator: Kathryn Bowles Co-Investigator: Alexandra Hanlon Co-Investigator: Karen Hirschman Co-Investigator: Kathleen McCauley Co-Investigator: Mark Pauly

New care delivery model for older adults with multiple chronic conditions Rita and Alex Hillman Foundation 8/4/2011 - 7/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Mary Naylor

Jennifer Pinto-Martin Early autism risk: Longitudinal investigation (EARLI) network Drexel University (R01-ES016443) 4/1/2008 - 3/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Craig Newschaffer Co-Investigator: Jennifer Pinto-Martin Centers for Autism and Developmental Disabilities Research & Epidemiology (CADDRE): Study to explore early development (SEED) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U10-DD000182) 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2016 Principal Investigator: Jennifer Pinto-Martin Co-Investigator: Ellen Giarelli Therese Richmond Alcohol and injury in adolescents, their families and their neighborhoods National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (R01-AA016187) 4/15/2008 - 3/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Charles Branas Co-Investigator: Therese Richmond Psychological effects of injuries in urban Black men: A disparate health issue National Institute of Nursing Research (R01-NR013503) 9/21/2012 - 7/31/2016 Principal Investigator: Therese Richmond CCHIPS supplement global ventures 1 and 2 The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 8/28/2012 - 5/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Flaura Winston Supplement Principal Investigator: Therese Richmond Injury and trauma research training for Guatemala NIH Fogarty International Center (D43-TW008972) 4/1/2011 - 3/31/2016 Principal Investigator: Charles Branas Co-Principal Investigator: Therese Richmond


care to change the world

Biosocial prediction and intervention on childhood aggression Pennsylvania Department of Health/ Commonwealth Universal Research Enhancement (C.U.R.E.) Program 6/1/2008 - 5/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Ruben Gur Principal Investigator: Rose Cheney Principal Investigator: Adrian Raine Principal Investigator: Therese Richmond Co-Investigator: Jianghong Liu Micro-environments and daily routines of housingunstable children and parents Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholars Program Research and Education Fund 4/1/2013 - 8/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Therese Richmond Barbara Riegel CBT by technology to reduce stress in family caregivers of Heart Failure patients: Pilot study School of Nursing Faculty Research Award 5/1/2012 - 4/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Barbara Riegel Implementation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for at-risk families National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (R18HL107217) 8/18/11 - 7/31/15 Principal Investigator: Benjamin Abella Co-Investigator: Barbara Riegel Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Injury in Latina women after sexual assault: Moving toward health care equity National Institute of Nursing Research (R01-NR011589) 9/30/2009 - 6/30/2014 Principal Investigator: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Principal Investigator: Yadira Regueira Co-Investigator: Jamison Fargo Co-Investigator: David Margolis Co-Investigator: Konstantinos Daniilidis Co-Investigator: Kathleen Brown An RCT of brief intervention for problem drinking and partner violence National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (R01-AA018705) 9/1/2010 - 5/31/2015 Principal Investigator: Karin Rhodes Co-Investigator: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Margaret Souders Dietary intake, child feeding practices, and weight status in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and their caregivers University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Behavioral Research Center 2/1/2012 - 1/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Margaret Souders Principal Investigator: Tanja Kral Co-Investigator: Jennifer Pinto-Martin

Jennifer Stewart Adaptation of an evidence-based sexual risk taking intervention for young African American women in church settings University of Miami 6/1/2012 - 5/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Jennifer Stewart Community-based HIV education research program for diverse scholars Yale University 10/1/2012 - 5/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Jennifer Stewart Anne Teitelman HIV prevention and partner abuse: Developing an intervention for adolescent girls National Institute of Mental Health (K01-MH080649) 1/5/2008 - 12/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Anne Teitelman Do brain differences influence HIV risk behavior? A study of young urban women National Institute of Mental Health (R21-MH097583) 7/18/2012 - 4/30/2014 Principal Investigator: Anne Teitelman Principal Investigator: Anna Childress Step up to prevention: A nurse-practitioner guided health promotion intervention American Academy of Nurse Practitioners Foundation 12/31/2011 - 12/30/2014 Principal Investigator: Anne Teitelman Connie Ulrich Africa Regional Group University of Pennsylvania Office of Global Affairs 1/15/2013 - 1/14/2014 Principal Investigator: Connie Ulrich Principal Investigator: Barbra Mann Wall Dartmouth/UPENN research ethics training and program development for Tanzania NIH Fogarty International Center (R25-TW007693) 6/1/2011 - 5/31/2016 Principal Investigator: Jon Merz Principal Investigator: Richard Waddell Co-Investigator: Connie Ulrich Cross-national comparisons at end-of-life Commonwealth Fund 5/1/2013 - 4/30/2014 Principal Investigator: Ezekiel Emanuel Co-Investigator: Connie Ulrich Co-Investigator: Scott Halpern Co-Investigator: Justin Bekelman End of life healthcare utilization patterns and costs of care in chronically ill aging adults NewCourtland Center for Health and Transitions Principal Investigator: Connie Ulrich Barbra Mann Wall Africa regional group University of Pennsylvania Office of Global Affairs 1/15/2013 - 1/14/2014 Principal Investigator: Barbra Mann Wall Principal Investigator: Connie Ulrich

Kelly Wiltse Nicely Anesthesia delivery models and best practices American Association of Nurse Anesthetists 5/1/2013 - 5/1/2014 Principal Investigator: Kelly Wiltse Nicely Principal Investigator: Julie Fairman Expanding access to health care by removing APRN practice barriers: Lessons from Pennsylvania Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 5/1/2013 - 4/30/2015 Principal Investigator: Kelly Wiltse Nicely Principal Investigator: J. Margo Brooks Carthon Co-Investigator: Linda Aiken Co-Investigator: Julie Fairman Amy Witkoski Stimpfel Magnet hospitals: more satisfied patients and nurses? American Nurses Foundation 9/1/2012 - 8/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Amy Witkoski Stimpfel

Training Grants Linda H. Aiken Advanced training in nursing outcomes research National Institute of Nursing Research (T32-NR007104) 6/1/1999 - 3/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Linda H. Aiken Margaret Griffiths Nurse Anesthetist Traineeship Program (NAT) Health Resources and Services Administration 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Margaret Griffiths Robert Wood Johnson Foundation new careers in nursing: Enhancing accelerated student enrollment and diversity Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 9/1/2012 - 8/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Margaret Griffiths Graduate nursing scholarships Independence Blue Cross Foundation 1/1/2012 - 6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Margaret Griffiths Undergraduate nursing scholarships Independence Blue Cross Foundation 1/1/2012 - 6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Margaret Griffiths Kathleen McCauley Jonas nursing scholars Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence 4/1/2012 - 3/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Kathleen McCauley Expanding enrollment in NP and NMW programs Health Resources & Services Administration 9/30/2010 - 9/29/2015 Principal Investigator: Kathleen McCauley Co-Investigator: Margaret J. Griffiths

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Jennifer Pinto-Martin Summer mentorship in environmental health sciences for high school and undergraduate students National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (R25-ES016146) 1/1/2008 - 11/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Jennifer A. Pinto-Martin Therese Richmond The Hillman Scholars Program in Nursing Innovation Rita and Alex Hillman Foundation 7/1/2011 - 6/30/2015 Principal Investigator: Therese Richmond Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Research on vulnerable women, children and families National Institute of Nursing Research (T32-NR007100) 7/1/2009 - 6/30/2014 Principal Investigator: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Co-Director: Janet Deatrick Co-Director: Loretta Sweet Jemmott Research training to promote health in vulnerable women, children, and families: Scholars Training in Interdisciplinary Methods, Analytic Techniques and Technologies (STIMULATE) National Institute of Nursing Research (T32-NR007100-14S1) 2012 - 2014 Principal Investigator: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Co-Director: Barbara Medoff-Cooper Co-Director: Eun-Ok Im Co-Director: Therese Richmond

Faculty, Staff, and Student Publications Aiken, Linda Aiken, L.H., Sermeus, W., Van den Heede, K., Sloane, D.M., et al. (2012). Patient safety, satisfaction, and quality of hospital care: Cross-sectional surveys of nurses and patients in 12 countries in Europe and the United States. British Medical Journal, 2012, 344. doi:10.1136/bmj.e1717 Brooks Carthon, J.M., Kutney-Lee, A., Jarrin, O., Sloane, D.M., Aiken, L.H. (2012). Nurse staffing and postsurgical outcomes in Black adults. Journal of American Geriatrics Society, 60, 1078-1084. Cimiotti, J., Barton, S.J., Gorman, K., Sloane, D., Aiken, L.H. (IN PRESS). Nurse reports on resource adequacy in hospitals that care for acutely ill children. Journal for Healthcare Quality. McHugh, M., Witkoski Stimpfel, A. (2012). Nurse reported quality of care: a measure of hospital quality. Research in Nursing & Health, 35, 566-575. doi:10.1002/nur.21503 McHugh, M.D., Brooks Carthon, M., Sloane, D.M., Wu, E.S., Kelly, L., Aiken, L.H. (2012). Impact of nurse staffing mandates on safety-net hospitals: Lessons from California. The Milbank Quarterly, 90, 160-186. Witkoski Stimpfel, A., Sloane, D.M., Aiken, L.H. (2012). The longer the shifts for hospital nurses, the higher the levels of burnout and patient dissatisfaction. Health Affairs, 31, 2501-2509. Aiken, L.H., Sloane, D.M., Bruyneel, L., Van den Heede, K., Sermeus, W. (2013). Nurses’ reports of working conditions and hospital quality of care in 12 countries in Europe. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 50, 143-153. Coetzee, S.K., Klopper, H.C., Ellis, S.M, Aiken, L.H. (2013). A tale of two systems – Nurse practice environment, wellbeing, perceived quality of care and patient safety in private and public hospitals in South Africa – A questionnaire survey. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 50, 162-173. Kutney-Lee, A., Sloane, D.M., Aiken, L.H. (2013). Increases in nurses with baccalaureate degrees associated with lower rates of post-surgery mortality. Health Affairs, 32, 579-586. Kutney-Lee, A., Wu, E., Sloane, D.M, Aiken, L.H. (2013). Changes in hospital nurse work environments and nurse job outcomes. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 50, 195-201. Li, B., Bruyeel, L, Sermeus, W, Van den Heede, K., Matawie, K., Aiken, L.H., Lesaffre, E. (2013). Group-level impact of work environment dimensions on burnout experiences among nurses: A multivariate multilevel probit model. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 50, 281-291. McHugh, M.D., Kelly, L.A., Smith, H.L., Wu, E.S., Vanak, J., Aiken, L.H. (2013). Lower mortality in Magnet hospitals. Medical Care, 51, 382-388.

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Neff, D., Cimiotti, J., Sloane, D., Aiken, L.H. (IN PRESS). Utilization of non-U.S. educated nurses in U.S. hospitals: Implications for hospital mortality. International Journal for Quality in Health Care. doi:10.1093/intqhc/mzt042 Stimpfel, A.W., Lake, E.T., Barton, S., Gorman, K.C., Aiken, L.H. (2013). How differing shift lengths relate to quality outcomes in pediatrics. Journal of Nursing Administration (JONA), 43, 95-11. Tubbs Cooley, H., Cimiotti, J., Silber, J.H., Sloane, D.M., Aiken, L.H. (2013). An observational study of nurse staffing ratios and hospital readmissions among children admitted for common conditions. BMJ Quality and Safety. doi:10.1136/bmjqs-2012-001610 Van den Heede, K., Aiken, L.H. (2013). Nursing workforce a global priority area for health policy and health services research. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 50, 141-142. Witkoski Stimpfel, A., Aiken, L.H. (2013). Hospital staff nurses’ shift length associated with safety and quality of care. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 28, 122-129. doi:10.1097/NCQ.0b013e3182725f09 Witkoski Stimpfel, A., Lake, E.T., Barton, S., Gorman, K., Aiken, L.H. (2013). How differing shift lengths relate to quality outcomes in pediatrics. Journal of Nursing Administration (JONA), 43, 95-100. Becker, Deborah Becker, D. & Doherty, C. (2012). Emerging Roles of the Advanced Practice Nurse. In L. Joel (Eds.), Advanced Practice Nursing:Essentials for Role Development (3rd Ed.). (19-39). Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company. Boullata, Joseph Boullata, J.I. (2012). A rational approach to vitamin D supplementation. Nutrition Journal, (11-12), 1204-5. Boullata, J.I., Guenter P, Miratllo JM (2012). A Parenteral Nutrition Use Survey with Gap Analysis. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, [Epub], ahead of print. Druyan, M.E., Compher, C., Boullata, J.I., Braunschweig, C.L., George, D.E., Simpser, E., et al. (2012). Clinical guidelines for the use of parenteral and enteral nutrition in adult and pediatric patients: Applying the GRADE system to development of A.S.P.E.N. clinical guidelines. Journal of Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition, 36(1), 77-80. Seidner, D.L., Schwartz, L.K., Winkler, M.F., Jeejeebhoy, K., Boullata, J.I., & Tappenden, K.A. (2013). Increased intestinal absorption in the era of teduglutide and its impact on management strategies in patients with short bowel syndrome-assoicated intestinal failure. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Jan 23, Epub ahead of print. Boullata, J., Nicolo M., & Stratton, K.W. (IN PRESS). Dietary Supplements. In C. Mueller, et al (Eds.), The A.P.S.E.N. Adult Nutrition Support Core Curriculum (2 Ed.). (313-327). Silver Spring, MD: Aspen Society for Parental and Enteral Nutrition.


care to change the world

Boullata, J.I. (IN PRESS). Pharmaceutical and Medical Agents- Monographs: Nutrients and assosciated substances. In Allen LV (Eds.), Remington: The Science and Practice of Pharmacy (22 Ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Pharmaceutical Press.

Holland, D.E., Rhudy, L.M., Vanderboom, C.E., Bowles, K.H. (2012) Feasibility of Discharge Planning in Intensive Care Units: A Pilot Study. American Journal of Critical Care Jul;21(4):e94-e101. PMID 22751377

Boullata, J.I. (IN PRESS). Nutrients and assosciated substances. In L.V. Allen (Eds.), Remington: The Science and Practice of Pharmacy (22 Ed.). (2273-2299). Philadelphia, PA: Pharmaceutical Press.

Holland, D.E., Knafl, G.J., Bowles, K.H. (2012). Targeting hospitalized patients for early discharge planning intervention. Journal of Clinical Nursing. 2012 Aug 21. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2012.04221.x. [Epub ahead of print] OMID: 22906077

Bowles, Kathryn Bowles, K.H., Hanlon, A.L., Holland, D.E., Potashnik, S., Topaz, M. (2013) Impact of Discharge Planning Decision Support on Time to Readmission among Older Adult Medical Patients. Professional Case Management [in press]

Bradway, Christine Bradway, C., Trotta, R., Bixby, M.B., McPartland, E., Wollman, M.C., Kapustka, H., McCauley, K., & Naylor, M.D. (2012). Qualitative analysis of an advanced practice nurse: Directed transitional care model intervention. Gerontologist, 52, 394-407.

Topaz, M., Golfenshtein, N., & Bowles, K.H. (2013). Omaha System: A systematic literature review of the recent literature. Journal of American Medical Informatics Association [epub ahead of print] PMID 23744786.

Hildebrand, C., Taylor, M. & Bradway, C. (epub ahead of print, June 2013). Elder self-neglect: The failure of coping because of cognitive and functional impairments. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/ doi/10.1002/2327-6924.12045/pdf

Fachko, M.J., Xiao, C., Bowles, K.H., Robinson, K.M., Libonati, J.R. (2013). Cardiovascular Effects and Enjoyment of Exer-Gaming in Older Adults. Journal of Gerontological Nursing 1-11. Doi8:10.3928/0098913420130628-01[epub ahead of print]. Radhakrishnan, K., Bowles, K.H., Hanlon, A., Topaz, M., Chittams, J. (2013). A Retrospective Study on Patient Characterisitcs and Telehealth Alerts Indicative of Key Medical Events for Heart Failure Patients at a Home Health Agency. Telmedicine Journal and E-Health, June 28, 2013 [epub ahead of print]. Bowles, K.H., Potashnik, S.L., Ratcliffe, S.J., Rosenberg, M., Shih, N.-W., Topaz, M., Holmes, JH, Naylor, M.D. (2013). Conducting Research Using the Electronic Health Record Across Multi-Hospital Systems: Semantic Harmonization Implications for Administrators. Journal of Nursing Administration. 43(6), 355-360. Vanderboom, CE, Vincent, A, Luedtke, CA, Lori M. Rhudy, LM, Bowles, KH. (2013). Feasibility of Interactive Technology for Symptom Monitoring in Patients with Fibromyalgia Pain Management. Nursing 1-8. Zubritsky, C., Abbott, K.M., Hirschman, K.B., Bowles, K.H., Foust, J.B., Naylor, M.D. (2013). Health-related Quality of Life: Expanding a Conceptual Framework to Include Older Adults Who Receive Long-term Services and Supports. Gerontologist, Apr;53(2):205-210. [Epub ahead of print, 2012 Aug 2] PMID 22859435. Radhakrishnan, K., Jacelon, C.S., Bigelow, C., Roche, J.P., Marquard, J.L. Bowles, K.H. 2013). Use of a homecare Electronic Health Record (EHR) to find associations between patient characteristics and hospitalizations for heart failure patients using telehealth services. Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare. 19, 107-112. PMID 23528787. Topaz, M, Shafran-Topaz, L., Bowles, K.H. (2013). ICD-9 to ICD-10: Evolution, Revolution and Current Debates in the US. Perspectives in Health Information Management. pp. 1-18. PMID 23805064.

Hensley, D., Driscoll, A., Bradway, C., Wyman, J.F., Sheldon, P., Hooper, G., & Joseph, A. (2013). Urologic Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice. (2nd Edition). Pitman, NJ: Jannetti Publications, Inc. Dowling-Castronovo, A. & Bradway, C. (2012). Urinary incontinence. In M. Boltz, E. Capezuti, T. Fulmer, & D. Zwicker (Eds.), Evidence Based Geriatric Nursing Protocols for Best Practice (4th Ed.). (363-387). New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company. Paniagua, M., Bradway, C., & Eskildsen, M.(2012). Hospital discharge to the nursing home. In S. McKean, J. Ross, D. Dressler, D. Brotman, & J. Ginsberg (Eds.), The Principles and Practice of Hospital Medicine. (1414-1420). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. Brawner, Bridgette Baker, J.L., Brawner, B.M., Cederbaum, J., Davis, Z., White, S., Brawner, W., & Jemmott, L.S. (2012). Barbershops as venues to assess and intervene in HIV/ STI risk among young, heterosexual African American men. American Journal of Men’s Health, 6(5), 368-382 (PMID: 22398991). doi:10.1177/1557988312437239 Baker, J.L., Brawner, B.M., Leader, A., Voytek, C., Jemmott, L.S., & Frank, I. (2012). Incorporating community-based participatory research principles for the development of a HPV prevention program for African American adolescent females and their parents/guardians. American Journal of Health Studies, 27(1), 1-7. Baker, J.L., Leader, A.,E., Voytek, C.D., Brawner, B.M., Fishman, J.M., Peter, N.G., Silverman, R.N., Jemmott, L.S., & Frank, I. (2012). Perspectives on Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among African American female adolescents. American Journal of Health Studies, 27(4), 204-213. Brawner, B.M., Gomes, M., Jemmott, L.S., Ratcliffe, S., & Deatrick, J. (2012). Clinical depression and HIV risk related sexual behaviors among African American adolescent females: Unmasking the number. AIDS Care, 24(5), 618-625 PMID 22292603. doi:10.1080/09540121.2011.630344

Brawner, B.M. (2012). Attitudes and beliefs regarding depression, HIV/AIDS and HIV risk related sexual behaviors among clinically depressed African American adolescent females. Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, 26(6), 464-476. doi:10.1016/j.apnu.2012.06.003 Brawner, B.M., Davis, Z.M., Fannin, E.F., & Alexander, K. A. (2012). Clinical depression and condom use attitudes and beliefs among African American adolescent females. Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, 23(3), 184-194 PMID: 21737313. doi:10.1016/j.jana.2011.03.005 Brawner, B.M., Baker, J. L., Stewart, J.M., Davis, Z.M., Cederbaum, J., & Jemmott, L.S. (2013). “The Black man’s country club”: Assessing the feasibility of an HIV risk-reduction program for young heterosexual African American men in barbershops. Family & Community Health, 36(2), 109-118. doi:10.1097/ FCH.0b013e318282b2b5 Brown, Kathleen Brown, K. (2012). From Nurse Ratched to modern forensic mental health nursing. Journal of Psychiatry and Law, 40(1), 93-105. Sommers, M. & Brown, K. (IN PRESS). Injuries from intimate partner and sexual violence: Significance and classification. Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine, 19(5). Buttenheim, Alison Buttenheim, A.M., Goldman, N., & Pebley, A.R. (2013). Underestimation of adolescent obesity. Nursing Research, 62(3), 195-202. Buttenheim, A.M., Pebley, A..R., Hsih, K., & Goldman, N. (2013). The shape of things to come? Obesity prevalence in foreign-born and US-born MexicanAmerican youth. Social Science and Medicine, 78, 1-8. Fang, M., Buttenheim, A.M., Havassy, J., & Gollust, S.E. (2013). It’s not a ‘if you build it they will come’ type of scenario: Stakeholder perspectives on farmers’ markets as a policy solution to food access in low-income neighborhoods. Journal of Health and Environmental Nutrition, 8(1), 39-60. Buzby, Marianne Buzby, M. (IN PRESS). Endocrine physiology. In K. Reuter-Rice and B.N. Bolick (Eds.). Pediatric Acute Care. Carthon, J. Margo Brooks Adanga, E., Avakame, E., Brooks Carthon, J.M., & Guevera, J.P. (2012). Underrepresented minority faculty recruitment programs in U.S. medical schools: An environmental scan. Academic Medicine, 87(11), 1540-1545. Brooks Carthon, J.M. (2012). Website review of Learning Historical Research. Nursing History Review, 20(1), 218-220. Brooks Carthon, J.M., Kutney Lee, A., Jarrin, O., Sloane, D., & Aiken, L. (2012). Nurse staffing and postsurgical outcomes in Black adults. Journal of American Geriatrics Society, 60(6), 1078-1084 NIHMSID 364087.

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McHugh, M.D., Brooks Carthon, M., Wu, E., Kelly, L., Sloane, D., & Aiken, L.H. (2012). Impact of nurse staffing mandate on safety net hospitals: Lessons from California. The Milbank Quarterly, 90(1), 160-186. Compher, Charlene Arsenault, D., Brenn, M., Kim, S., Gura, K., Compher, C., Simpser, E., et al. (2012). A.S.P.E.N. clinical guidelines: Hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia in the neonate receiving parenteral nutrition. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 36(1), 81-95. Beckman, LM, Earthman, CP, Thomas, W, Compher, CW, Muniz, J, Sibley, SD. Factors Predicting Change in Serum 25-OH Vitamin D Concentration After Gastric Bypass Surgery. Obesity, 2013 Mar 21. doi: 10.1002/ oby.20464. PMID: 23526677 Fallon, E.M., Nehra, D., Potemkin, A.K., Gura, K.M., Simpser, E., Compher, C., et al. (2012). A.S.P.E.N. clinical guidelines: Nutrition support of neonatal patients at risk for necrotizing enterocolitis. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 36(5), 506-523. Fallon, E.M., Nehra, D., Potemkin, A.K., Gura, K.M., Simpser, E., Puder, M., & Compher, C. (2012). Response to letter to the editor regarding nutrition support of neonatal patients at risk for necrotizing enterocolitis. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Sep 18, [Epub ahead of print]. Fallon, E.M., Nehra, D., Potekim, A.K., Gura, K.M., Puder, M., Compher, C. (2013). Response to Meyer and Gortner. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 37(1), 13-14. Holsten, J.E., Deatrick, J.A., Kumanyika S., Pinto-Martin, J., & Compher, C.W. (2012). Children’s food choice process in the home environment. A qualitative descriptive study. Appetite, 58(1), 64-73. Irving, S.Y., Medoff-Cooper, B., Stouffer, N.O., Schall, J.I., Ravishankar, C., Compher, C.W., Marino B.S., Stallings VA. Resting Energy Expenditure at 3 Months of Age Following Neonatal Surgery for Congenital Heart Disease. Congenital Heart Disease, 2013 Jan 30, doi: 10.1111/chd.12035. [Epub ahead of print].

Wrotniak BH, Malete L, Maruapula S, Jackson J, Shaibu S, Ratcliffe S, Stettler N, Compher C. Association between Socioeconomic Status Indicators and Obesity in Adolescent Students in Botswana, an African Country in Rapid Nutrition Transition. Pediatric Obesity, 2012 Apr;7(2):e9-e13. doi: 10.1111/j.2047-6310.2011.00023.x. Epub 2012 Feb 10.; Apr; 7(2)e9-e13 Connolly, Cynthia Connolly, C.A., Golden, J., & Schneider, B. (2012). “A startling new chemotherapeutic agent:” Pediatric infectious disease and the introduction of sulfonamides at Baltimore’s Sydenham Hospital. Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 86, 66-93. Curley, Martha A.Q. Curley, M.A.Q. (2012). Distinguished Research Lecture 2012: Together, stronger, bolder clinical research. American Journal of Critical Care, 21(4), 230-237. Curley, M.A.Q., Meyer, E.C., Scoppettuolo, L.A., McGann, E.A., Trainor, B.P., Rachwal, C., & Hickey, P.A. (2012). Parent presence during invasive procedures and/or resuscitation: Evaluating a clinical practice change. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 186(11), 1133-1139. Galvin, P.A. & Curley, M.A.Q. (2012). The Braden Q+P: A pediatric perioperative pressure ulcer risk assessment and intervention tool. AORN Journal, 96 (September), 261-270. Kohr, L.M., Hickey, P.A., & Curley, M.A.Q. (2012). Building a nursing productivity measure based on the synergy model - first steps. American Journal of Critical Care, 21(6), 420-430. Ng, L.S. & Curley, M.A.Q. (2012). “One more thing to think about...” the cognitive burden experienced by intensive care unit nurses when implementing a tight glucose control protocol. Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, 6(1), 58-64 (PMID: 22401323). Curley, M.A.Q., Hunsberger, M., & Harris, S.K. (2013). Psychometric Evaluation of the Family-Centered Care Scale (FCCS) for Pediatric Acute Care Nursing. Nursing Research, 62(3), 160-168.

Liu, J., Hwang, W.T., Dickerman, B., & Compher, C. Regular breakfast consumption is associated with increased IQ in kindergarten children. Early Human Development, 2013 Feb 5.

Lebet, R., Fineman, L.D., Faustino, E.V.S., Curley, M.A.Q. (IN PRESS). Asking parents’ permission to enroll their child into a clinical trial- Best practices. Invited Commentary. American Journal of Critical Care.

Malete, L, Motlhoiwa, K, Shaibu, S, Wrotniak, BH, Maruapula, SD, Jackson, J, Compher, CW. Body Image Dissatisfaction is Increased in Male and Overweight/Obese Adolescents in Botswana. The Journal of Pediatrics 2013, Article ID 763624, 7 pages. Epub.

Lincoln, P., Hamilton-Bruno, S., Manning, J., Labreque, M., Casey, D., Kennedy, H., Cook, K., & Curley, M.A.Q. (2013). A pediatric critical care practice group- the use of expertise and evidence-based practice in identifying and establishing. Critical Care Nurse, 33(2), 85-87. doi:10.4037/ccn2013740

McMahon, MM, Nystrom, E, Braunschweig, C, Miles, J, Compher, C; American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) Board of Directors. A.S.P.E.N. Clinical Guidelines: Nutrition Support of Adult Patients With Hyperglycemia. JPEN Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Jan;37(1):23-36. Epub 2012 Jun 29.

Green, M., Curley, M.A.Q., & Arnold, J.A.(2012). Chapter 24: Prone positioning in Acute Lung Injury. In P. Rimensberger (Eds.), Pediatric and Neonatal Mechanical Ventilation. (msp. 29). Heidelberg, Germany: Springer Publishing Company.

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Ersek, Mary Bakerjian, D., Prevost, S.S., Herr, K., Swafford, K., Ersek, M. (2012). Challenges in making a business case for effective pain management in nursing homes. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 20, 42-52. Ersek, M., Polissar, N., Pen, A. D., Jablonski, A., Herr, K., Neradilek, M. B (2012). Addressing methodological challenges in implementing the nursing home pain management algorithm randomized controlled trial.. Clinical Trials: Journal of the Society of Clinical Trials, 9(5), 634-44. Towsley, G., Neradilek, B., Snow, L., Ersek, M. (2012). Evaluating the Cornell scale for depression in dementia as a proxy measure in nursing home residents with and without dementia. Aging and Mental Health, 16(7), 892-901. Corcoran, A.M., Lysaght, S., LaMarra, D., Ersek, M. (2013). Pilot test of a three-station palliative care OSCE for multidisciplinary trainees. Journal of Nursing Education, 28, 1-5. doi:10.3928/01484834-20130328-02 Ersek, M., Sefcik, J.S., Lin, F.C., Lee, T. J., Gilliam, R, Hanson, L. C. (2013). Provider Staffing Effect on a Decision Aid Intervention. Clinical Nursing Research, [Epub, ahead of print]. Ersek, M., Smith, D., Cannuscio, C., Richardson, D., Moore, D. (2013). A nationwide study comparing end-of-life care for men and women veterans. Journal of Palliative Care, [Epub, ahead of print]. Lysaght, S., Ersek, M. (2013). Dying at home: Review of the literature and reconceptualization. Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, 15, 171-176. Sefcik, J. S, Rao, A, & Ersek, M. (2013). What models exist for delivering palliative care and hospice in nursing homes?. In Goldstein, N.E., & Morrison, R. S. (Eds.), Evidence-Based Practice of Palliative Medicine. (450-457). Philadelphia: Elsevier. Evans, Lois Kong, E-H., & Evans, L.K. (2012). Nursing staff views of barriers to physical restraint reduction in nursing homes. Asian Nursing Research, 6, 173-180. Fairman, Julie Antitrust and the Future of Nursing: Federal Competiton Policy and the Scope of Practice. Health Matrix: Journal of Law-Medicine, Vol. 24, Forthcoming Fairman, J., Okoye, S. , Vanak, J. A Broader Role for the Federal Trade Commission in Regulating APRN Nursing Scope of Practice. Human Capital Blog. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Accessed June 11, 2013. D’Antonio, P., In Fairman, J., & In Whelan, J.C. (2013). Routledge handbook on the global history of nursing. New York, NY: Taylor & Friends. George, Maureen George, M. (2012). A model for industry and certified asthma educator (AE-C) partnerships: An evaluation of a novel educational initiative. Journal of Asthma and Allergy Educators, 3(5), 229-230.

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Guidera, Mamie Guidera, M., McCool, W., Hanlon, A., Schuiling, K., & Smith, A. (2012). Midwives and liability: Results from the 2009 nationwide survey of certified nurse-midwives and certified midwives in the United States. Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health , 57(4), 345-352. Hanlon, Alexandra Abbott, K.M., Bettger, J.P., Hanlon, A., & Hirschman, K.B. (2012). Factors associated with health discussion network size and composition among elderly recipients of long-term services and supports. Health Communication, 27(8), 784-793 (PMID: 22292979.). Guidera, M., McCool, W., Hanlon, A., Schuiling, K., & Smith, A. (2012). Midwives and liability: Results from the 2009 nationwide survey of certified nurse-midwives and certified midwives in the United States. Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health , 57(4), 345-352. Mahmood, U., Hanlon, A.L., Koshy M., Buras, R., Chumsri, S., Tkaczuk, K.H., Cheston, S.B., Regine, W.F., & Feigenberg, S.J. (IN PRESS). Increasing national mastectomy rates for the treatment of early stage breast cancer. Annals of Surgical Oncology, Nov. 8, (PMID: 23135312). Maselko, J., Hayward, R.D., Hanlon, A., Buka, S., & Meador, K. (2012). Religious service attendance and major depression: A case of reverse causality. American Journal of Epidemiology, 175(6), 576-583. Patterson, F., Seravalli, L., Hanlon, A., & Nelson, D.B. (2012). Neighborhood safety as a correlate of tobacco use in a sample of urban pregnant women. Addictive Behavior, 37(10), 1132-7 (PMID: 22688344). Steis, M.R., Evans, L., Hirschman, K.B., Hanlon, A., Fick, D.M., Flanagan, N., & Inouye, S.K. (2012). Screening for delirium using family caregivers: Convergent validity of the family confusion assessment method and interviewer-rated confusion assessment method. Journal of American Geriatrics Society, 60(11), 2121-6 (PMID: 23039310). Vandergrift, J.L., Gold, J.E., Hanlon, A., & Punnett, L. (2012). Physical and psychosocial ergonomic risk factors for low back pain in automobile manufacturing workers. Occupational & Environmental Medicine, 69(1), 29-34. Xiao, C., Hanlon, A., Zhang, Q., Ang, K., Rosenthal, D.I., Nguyen-Tan, P.F., Kim, H., Movsas, B., & Bruner, D.W. (2012). Symptom clusters in patients with head and neck cancer receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Oral Oncology, Nov 2, (PMID: 23168337). doi:10.1016/j.oraloncology.2012.10.004 Hatfield, Linda Hatfield, L.A. & Lowenthal, M.M. (2012). Participation of healthy infants in pediatric pain genetic research. Journal of Pain, 13(4), S13. Hatfield, L.A. & Polomano, R.C. (2012). Infant distress: Moving towards concept clarity. Clinical Nursing Research, 21(2), 164-182 PMID: 21646548.

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Naylor, Mary Bradway, C., Trotta, R., Bixby, M.B., McPartland, E., Wollman, M.C., Kapustka, H., McCauley, K. & Naylor, M.D. (2012). A qualitative analysis of an advanced practice nurse-directed Transitional Care Model intervention. The Gerontologist, 52(3), 391-407. Buck, H. G., Meghani, S., Prvu Bettger, J. A., Byun, E., Fachko, M. J., O’Connor, M., Tocchi, C., & Naylor, M. (2012). The Use of Comorbidities Among Adults Experiencing Care Transitions: A Systematic Review and Evolutionary Analysis of Empirical Literature. Chronic Illness, 8(4), 278-95. doi:10.1177/1742395312444741 Foust, J.B., Naylor, M.D., Bixby, M.B. & Ratcliffe, S.J. (2012). Medication problems occurring at hospital discharge among older adults with heart failure. Research in Gerontological Nursing, 5(1), 25-33. Hirschman KB, Abbott KM, Hanlon AL, Prvu Bettger J, Naylor MD. 2012. What factors are associated with having an advance directive among older adults who are new to long term care services? Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. Jan;13(1):82.e7-11. doi: 10.1016/j. jamda.2010.12.010. Epub 2011 Feb 26. PMID: 21450235 Working Group on Health Outcomes for Older Persons with Multiple Chronic Conditions. (2012). Universal health outcome measures for older persons with multiple chronic conditions. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Dec;60(12): 2333-41. doi: 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2012.04240.x. Epub 2012 Nov 29. PMID: 23194184 Naylor, M.D., Karlawish, J. H., Arnold, S. E., Khachaturian, A. S., Khachaturian, Z. S., Lee, V. M., Baumgart, M, et al (2012). Advancing Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis, treatment, and care: recommendations from the Ware Invitational Summit. Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of Alzheimer’s Association, 8(5), 445-52. doi:10.1016/j. jalz.2012.08.001 Prvu Bettger, J. A., Sochalski, J., Foust, J., Zubritsky, C., Hirschman, K., Abbott, K., Naylor, M.D. (2012). Measuring nursing care in long-term care: One size does not fit all. The Journal of Nursing Research, 20(3), 159-68. doi:10.1097/ jnr.0b013e318263d977 Toles, M. P., Abbott, K. M., Hirschman, K. B., Naylor, M. D. (2012). Transitions in care among older adults receiving long-term services and supports. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 38(11), 40-7. doi:10.3928/00989134-20121003-04 Trojanowski, J.Q., Arnold, S.E., Karlawish, J.H., Naylor, M.D., Brunden, K.R., Lee, VM-Y. (2012). A model for improving the treatment and care of Alzheimer patients through interdisciplinary research. Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of Alzheimer’s Association, 8(6), 564-73. Zubritsky, C., Abbott, K. M., Hirschman, K.B., Bowles, K. H., Foust, J. B., Naylor, M.D. (2012). Health-Related Quality of Life: Expanding a Conceptual Framework to Include Older Adults Who Receive Long-term Services and Supports. Gerontologist, 53(2), 205-211. www.nursing.upenn.edu

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Bowles, K. H., Potashnik, S., Ratcliffe, S.J., Rosenberg, M., Shih, N-W., Topaz, M., Holmes, J.H., Naylor, M.D. (2013). Conducting Research Using the Electronic Health Record Across Multi-Hospital Systems: Semantic Harmonization Implications for Administrators. Journal of Nursing Administration (JONA), 43(6), 355-360. doi:10.1097/ NNA.0b013e3182942c3c Naylor, M.D., Lustig, A., Kelley, H.J., Volpe, E.M., Melichar, L., Pauly, M. V. (2013). Introduction: The Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative. Medical Care, 51, S1-S5. doi:10.1097/ MLR.0b013e31827dc3ab Naylor, M.D., Volpe, E.M., Lustig, A., Kelley, H.J., Melichar, L., Pauly, M.V. (2013). Linkages between Nursing and the Quality of Patient Care: A Two Year Comparison. Medical Care, 51, S6-S14. doi:10.1097/ MLR.0b013e3182894848 Van Cleave, J.H., Trotta, R. L., Lysaght, S., Steis, M.R., Lorenz, R.A., Naylor, M.D. (2013). Comorbidities in the Context of Care Transitions. Advances in Nursing Science, 36(2), E1-E13. doi:10.1097/ANS.0b013e318290207d O’Sullivan, Ann Schwarz, D., O’Sullivan, A., Guinn, J., Mautone, J., Carlson, E., Zhao, H., Zhang, H., Esposito, T., Askew, M., & Radcliffe, J. (2012). Promoting early intervention referral through a randomized controlled home-visiting program. Journal of Early Intervention, 34(1), 20-39. doi:10.1177/1053815112451849 Pinto-Martin, Jennifer Darcy Mahoney, A.E. & Pinto-Martin, J. (2012). State of the science: The association between perinatal brain injury and school performance in very-low-birthweight infants. Newborn and Infant Nursing Reviews, 12(1), 33-39. Holsten, J.E., Deatrick, J.A., Kumanyika, S., Pinto-Martin, J., & Compher, C.W. (2012). Children’s food choice process in the home environment. A qualitative descriptive study. Appetite, 58(1), 64-73. Liu, J., Ai, Y., McCauley, L., Pinto-Martin, J., Yan, C., Shen, X., & Needleman, H. (2012). Blood lead levels and associated socio-demographic factors among preschool children in the Southeastern region of China. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, 26, 61-69. Liu, J., Leung, P.W., McCauley, L., Ai, Y., & Pinto-Martin, J. (2012). Mother’s environmental tobacco smoke exposure during pregnancy and externalizing behavior problems in children. NeuroToxicology, 34, 167-174. Liu, J., McCauley, L., Yan, C., Shen, X., & PintoMartin, J. (2012). Low blood lead levels and hemoglobin concentrations in preschool children in China. Toxicological and Environmental Chemistry, 94(2), 423-426.

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Liu, J., Zhou, G., Wang, Y., Ai, Y., Pinto-Martin, J., & Liu, X. (2012). Sleep problems, fatigue, and cognitive performance in Chinese kindergarten children. Journal of Pediatrics, 161(3), 520-525. Zhang, J., Mahoney, A.D., & Pinto-Martin, J. (IN PRESS). Perinatal brain injury, visual motor function and poor school outcome of regional low birthweight survivors at age nine. Journal of Clinical Nursing. Guevara, J., Gerdes, M., Localio, R., Huang, Y., Pinto-Martin, J., Minkovitz, C., Hsu, D., Kyriakou, L., Baglivo, S., Kavanagh, J. & Pati, S. (2013). Effectiveness of developmental screening in an urban setting.. Pediatrics, 131(1), 30-7. Korzeniewski, S., Whitaker, A., Paneth, N., Lorenz, J.M., Feldman, J., Pinto-Martin, J., Pappas, A. & Levy, S. (2013). Association between Transient Hypothyroxinemia of Prematurity and Adult Autism Spectrum Disorder in a Low Birthweight Cohort: An Exploratory Study. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, 27(2), 182-7. Kral, TVE, Eriksen, WT, Souders, MC, & Pinto-Martin, JA. (IN PRESS). Eating behaviors, diet quality, and gastrointestinal symptoms in children with autism spectrum disorders: A brief review. Journal of Pediatric Nursing. Polomano, Rosemary Hatfield, L.A., & Polomano, R.C. (2012). Infant distress: A developing concept for examining infant behavioral response. Clinical Nursing Research, 21(2), 164-182; PMID: 21646548. Masterson Creber, R., Polomano, R.C., Farrar, J.T., & Riegel, B. (2012). Psychometric properties of the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ). European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 11, 197-206. Meghani, S.H., Polomano, R.C., Tait, R., Vallerand, A., Anderson, K., & Gallagher, R.M. (2012). Advancing a national agenda to eliminate disparities in pain care: Directions for health policy, education, practice, and research. Pain Medicine, 13, 5-28. Buckenmaier, III, C., Galloway, K.T., Polomano, R.C., McDuffie, M., Kwon, N., & Gallagher, R.M. (2013). Preliminary validation of the Defense and Veterans Pain Rating Scale (DVPRS) with a military population. Pain Medicine, 14(1), 110-123. Willens, J.S., Junquist, C., Cohen, A., & Polomano, R.C. (2013). ASPMN survey-nurses’ practice patterns related to monitoring and preventing respiratory depression. Pain Management Nursing, 14(1), 60-65. Polomano, R.C. (2013). Intervention research. In S.K. grove & N. Burns (Eds.), The Practice of Nursing Research (7th Ed.). (323-350). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier. Pron, Ann Pron, A.L. (2013). Job satisfaction and perceived autonomy for nurse practitioners working in nurse-managed health centers. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 25, 213-221.

Puzantian, Houry Davidson, P., Meleis, A.I., McGrath, S.J., DiGiacomo, M., Dharmendra, T., Puzantian, H., Song M. & Riegel, B. (2012). Improving Women’s Cardiovascual Health: A position statement from the International Council on Women’s Health Issues. Health Care for Women International, 33, 943-955. doi:10.1080/07399332.2011 .646375 Prows, C. & Puzantian, H. (IN PRESS). Pharmacogenetics. In C. Kenner and J. Lewis (Eds.), Genetics and Genomics for Nursing. NJ, USA: Pearson Education, Inc. Reilly, Loretta Reilly, L., Byrne, A.H. & Ely, E. (2012). Does the use of an immobilizer provide a quality MR image of the brain? Journal of Radiology Nursing, 31(3), 91-96. Richmond, Therese McDonald, C.C., Richmond, T.S., Guerra, T., Thomas, N.A., Walker, A., Branas, C.C., et al. (2012). Methods for linking community views to measureable outcomes in a youth violence prevention program. Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action, 6(4), 499-506. Ulrich, C.M., Knafl, K.A., Ratcliffe, S., Richmond, T.S., Grady, C., Miller-Davis, C., et al. (2012). Developing a model of the benefits and burdens of research participation in cancer clinical trials. American Journal of Bioethics, 3(2), 10-23. Richmond, T.S., Cheney, R., Soyfer, L., Kimmel, R., & Raine, A. (2013). Recruitment of community-residing youth into studies on aggression. Journal of Community Psychology, 41, 425-434. doi:10.1002/ jcop.21546 Vaughn, N.A., Jacoby, S.F., Williams, T., Guerra T., Thomas, N.A., Richmond, T.S. (2013). Digital animation as a method to disseminate research findings to the community using a community-based participatory approach. American Journal of Community Psychology, 51, 30-42. doi:10.1007/ s10464-012-9498-6 Wiebe, D.J., Guo, W., Allison, P.D., Anderson, E., Richmond, T.S., & Branas, C.C. (2013). Fears of violence during morning travel to school. Journal of Adolescent Health. doi:10.1016/j. jadohealth.2013.01.023 Riegel, Barbara Masterson-Creber, R., Polomano, R., Farrar, J., & Riegel, B. (2012). Psychometric properties of the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ). European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 11(2), 197-206. Davidson, P.M., Riegel, B., McGrath, S.J., DiGiacomo, M., Dharmendra, T., Puzantian, H., et al. (IN PRESS). Improving women’s cardiovascular health: A position statement from the International Council on Women’s Health Issues. Health Care for Women International, 33(10), 943-955.


care to change the world

Dickson V.V., Buck, H.G., Riegel, B. (IN PRESS). Multiple Comorbid Conditions Challenge Heart Failure Self-Care by Decreasing Self Efficacy. Nursing Research. Johansson, P., Riegel, B., Svensson, E., Brostrom, A., Alehagen, U., Dahlstrom, U., & Jaarsma, T. (2012). The Contribution of Heart Failure to Sleep Disturbances and Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 25(3), 179-87. Johansson, P., Riegel, B., Svensson, E., Brostrom, A., Alehagen, U., Dahlstrom, U., et al. (IN PRESS). Sickness behavior in community dwelling elderly: Associations with impaired cardiac function and inflammation. Biological Research for Nursing.

Sherry, Victoria Sherry, V. (2012). Taste alterations. In M. Hickey & S. Newton (Eds.), Telephone triage for oncology nurses (2nd Ed.). (123-126). Pittsburgh, Pa.: Oncology Nursing Society Publication Division. Sommers, Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Everett, J.S., Budescu, M., & Sommers, M.S. (2012). Making sense of skin color in clinical care. Clinical Nursing Research, 21, 495-516. doi:10.1177/1054773812446510 Sommers, M.S., Everett, J.S., Tiller, D.A., & Fargo, J.D. (2012). Forensic examination following rape: Do skin colour and baseline injury matter?. Injury Prevention, 18(S1), A145-146.

Masterson-Creber, R., Allison, P.D., & Riegel, B. (IN PRESS). Overall Perceived Health Predicts Risks of Hospitalizations and Death in Adults with Heart Failure: a Prospective Longitudinal Study. International Journal of Nursing Studies.

Sommers, M.S., Lyons, M., Shope, J.T., Sommers, B.D., McDonald, C.C., & Fargo, J.D. (2012). Preventing risky driving and alcohol misuse among young adults: A randomized controlled trial in the emergency department. Injury Prevention, 18(S1), A38.

Moser, D.K., Dickson, V.V., Jaarsma, T., Lee, C., Stromberg, A., & Riegel, B. (2012). Role of self-care in the patient with heart failure. Current Cardiology Reports, 14(3), 265-275.

Everett, J.S. & Sommers, M.S. (2013). Skin viscoelasticity: Physiologic mechanisms, measurement issues, and application to nursing science. Biological Research for Nursing, 15, 338-346. doi:10.1177/1099800411434151

Reed, S.D., Li, Y., Kamble, S., Polsky, D., Graham, F.L., Bowers, M.T., Samsa, G.P., Paul, S., Schulman, K.A., Whellan, D.J., & Riegel, B.J. (2012). Introduction of the TEAM-HF Costing Tool: A User-Friendly Spreadsheet Program to Estimate Costs of Providing Patient-Centered Interventions. Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, 5(1), 113-119. Riegel, B., Dickson, V.V., Topaz, M. (IN PRESS). A Qualitative Analysis of Naturalistic Decision Making in Adults with Chronic Heart Failure. Nursing Research. Riegel, B., Jaarsma, T., & Stromberg, A. (2012). A middle-range theory of self-care of chronic illness. Advances in Nursing Science, 35(3), 194-204. Riegel, B., Lee, C.S., Ratcliffe, S.J., De Geest, S., Potashnik, S., Patey, M., et al. (2012). Predictors of objectivity measured medication nonadherence in adults with heart failure. Circulation, 5, 430-436. Roman, June Lipman, T.H. (2012). TODAY study group. Clinical trial to maintain glycemic control in youth with type 2 diabetes. The New England Journal of Medicine, epub 10,1056/, NEJMoa1109333. Ulrich, C.M., & Roman, J.M. (2012). Revisiting therapeutic relationship in psychiatric-mental health nursing: Toward a relational ethic (Chapter 13 Ed.). Indianapolis, Ind.: Sigma Theta Tau International. Scipio, B. Diane me, myself, and i (2013). testing 2013 information. Acta Paediatrica, 1, 34.

Fisher, B.S., Kaplan, A., Budescu, M., Fargo, J.D., Tiller, D.A., Everett, J.S., & Sommers, M.S. (IN PRESS). Influence of ano-genital injury on women’s willingness to engage with the criminal justice process after rape. Violence and Victims. Ho, N., & Sommers, M.S. (2013). Anhedonia: A concept analysis. Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, 27, 121-129. doi:10.1016/j.apnu.2013.02.001

Tang, S.X., Yi, J., Calkins, M., Whinna, D.A. Kohler, C.G., Souders, M.C., McDonald-McGinn, D., Zackai, E.H., Emanuel, B.S., Gur, R.C., Gur, R.E. (2013) Psychiatric Disorders in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome are Prevalent but Under-Treated, Psychological Medicine, (in press). Pak, V. & Souders, M.C. (2012) Advancing the Science of Environmental Exposures During pregnancy and the Gene-Environment through the National Children’s Study, Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing, 00, 1-9. Schendel, DE, Diguiseppi, C, Croen, LA, Fallin, MD, Reed, PL, Schieve, LA, Wiggins, LD, Daniels, J, Grether, J, Levy, SE, Miller, L, Newschaffer, C, Pinto-Martin, J, Robinson, C, Windham, GC, Alexander, A, Aylsworth, AS, Bernal, P, Bonner, JD, Blaskey, L, Bradley, C, Collins, J, Ferretti, CJ, Farzadegan, H, Giarelli, E, Harvey, M, Hepburn, S, Herr, M, Kaparich, K, Landa, R, Lee, LC, Levenseller, B, Meyerer, S, Rahbar, MH, Ratchford, A, Reynolds, A, Rosenberg, S, Rusyniak, J, Shapira, SK, Smith, K, Souders, M, Thompson, PA, Young, L, YearginAllsopp, M. (2012) The Study to Explore Early Development (SEED): A Multisite Epidemiologic Study of Autism by the Centers for Autism and Developmental Disabilities Research and Epidemiology (CADDRE) Network. Journal of Autism. Souders, M.C. & Sharp, K. (2012). A case of complex autism: Is it rare or a family affair? In E. Giarelli & M. Gardner (Eds.), Nursing of Autism Spectrum Disorder: Case Studies in Integrated Care Across the Lifespan, (pp. 131-150). New York, NY, Springer Publishing Company.

Sommers, M.S., Lyons, M.S., Bohn, C.M., Ribak, J., & Fargo, J.D. (IN PRESS). Health-compromising behaviors among young adults in the urban emergency department: Opportunity for a teachable moment. Clinical Nursing Research.

Souders, M.C. (2012, Fall). Insomnia and anxiety may be linked in Individuals with autism spectrum disorder, Mental Health News- Autism Spectrum, pages 6, 29. Retrieved from http://mhnews-autism.org/back_ issues/ASN-Fall2012.pdf Spatz, Diane Edwards, T.M. & Spatz, D.L. (2012). Making the case for using donor human milk in vulnerable infants. Advances in Neonatal Care: The Official Journal of The National Association of Neonatal Nurses, 12(5), 273-278.

Sommers, M.S., Lyons, M.S., Fargo, J.D., Sommers, B.D., McDonald, C.C., Shope, J.T., & Fleming, M.F. (IN PRESS). ED-based brief intervention to reduce risky driving and hazardous/harmful drinking in young adults: A randomized controlled trial. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Froh, E.B. & Spatz, D.L. (2012). Associated morbidities to congenital diaphragmatic hernia and a relationship to human milk. Advances in Neonatal Care: The Official Journal of The National Association of Neonatal Nurses, 12(4), 209-216. doi:10.1097/ ANC.0b013e31825eb07b

Stewart, J.M., Sommers, M.S., & Brawner, B. (IN PRESS). The Black church, sexual health and sexuality: A conceptual framework to promote health through faith-based organizations. Family & Community Health.

Spatz, D.L. & Schmidt, K.J. (2012). Breastfeeding success in infants with giant omphalocele. Advances in Neonatal Care: The Official Journal of The National Association of Neonatal Nurses, 12(6), 328-335.

Souders, Margaret Kral, T.V., Souders, M.C., Eriksen, W. PintoMartin, J. (2013) Eating Behaviors, Diet Quality, and Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Brief Review. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, (in press)

Teitelman, Anne Domanska, C. & Teitelman, A.M. (2012). Factors that affect acceptance of HIV microbicides among women. Collegian, 19, 23-32. doi:10.1016/j. colegn.2011.09.006

Sommers, M.S., Beacham, B.L., Baker, R.B., & Fargo, J.D. (IN PRESS). Intra-and inter-rater reliability of digital image analysis for skin color measurement. Skin Research and Technology.

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Tkacs, Nancy Song, M., Ratcliffe, S.J., Tkacs, N.C., & Riegel, B. (IN PRESS). Self-care and health outcomes of diabetes mellitus. Clinical Nursing Research, 21(3), 309-26. Verger, Judy Bolick, B., Haut, C., Reuter-Rice, K., McComiskey, C., Mikhailov, T., Cavender, J.D., Creaden, J., McLeod, R., Verger, J. (2012). The acute care pediatric nurse practitioner: Curriculum overview. Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 3, 231-237. Bolick, B., Bevacqua, J., Kline-Tilford, A., Reuter-Rice K., Haut, C., McComiskey, C., Cavender, J.D., & Verger, J. (2012). Recommendations for matching pediatric nurse practitioner education and certification to pediatric acute care populations. Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 27(1), 71-77. Fieldston, E., Li, J., Terwiesch, C., Helfaer, M., Verger, J., Pati, S., Surrey, D., Patel, K., Ebberson, J., & Metlay, J. (2012). Observation of bed utilization in the pediatric intensive care unit. Journal of Hospital Medicine, 7(4), 318-324. Verger, J., & Verger, E. (2012). Respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in children. Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America, 24(2), 555-572. Walker, Suzanne Berkowitz, A. & Walker S. (2012). Bortezomibinduced peripheral neuropathy in patients with multiple myeloma. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 16(1), 86-89. Stevenson, J.P., Langer, C.J., Somer, R.A., Evans, T.L., Rajagopalan, K., Krieger, K., Jacobs-Small, M., Dyanick, N., Milcarek, B., Coakley, S., Walker, S., Eaby-Sandy, B., & Hageboutros, A. (2012). Phase 2 trial of maintenance bevacizumab alone after bevacizumab plus pemetrexed and carboplatin in advanced, nonsquamous nonsmall cell lung cancer. Cancer, 118(22), 5580-5587. Wall, Barbra Mann Wall, B.M. (2012). American catholic nursing: A historical analysis. Medizinihistorishes Journal, 47, 160-175. Wall, B.M. (2012). Teaching students to read: Teaching students to think. Talk about teaching and learning series. University of Pennsylvania Almanac, 58(26), 8. Wall, B.M. (2013). Historical highlights in disaster nursing. In M. Truglio-Londrigan and S.B. Lewenson (Eds.), Health Nursing: Practicing Population-Based Care. (353-367). Boston, Massachusetts: Jones and Bartlett. Walsh Brennan, Ann Marie Walsh Brennan, A.M., Sullivan-Marx, E. (2012). The Paradigm Shift. Nursing Clinics of North America, 47(4), 455-462.

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Whelan, Jean Whelan, J.C. (2013). Florence Nightingale: The Crimean War. Nursing History Review, 21, 127-129. Wiltse Nicely, Kelly Wiltse Nicely, K.L., Sloane, D.M., & Aiken, L.H. (2012). Lower mortality for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in high volume hospitals is contingent upon nurse staffing. Health Services Research. doi:10.1111/1475-6773.12004


care to change the world

Keynotes, Invited Lectures, and Presentations Bridgette Brawner Fostering research collaboration with parents/ guardians of marginalized and vulnerable adolescent girls. 140th Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American Public Health Association. San Francisco, Calif. October 2012. “Geobehavioral vulnerability”: An exploration of HIV/ AIDS among Black Philadelphians. 140th Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American Public Health Association. San Francisco, Calif. October 2012. Cynthia Connolly New Drugs, Old Problems: The Sulfonamide Revolution and Pediatric Nurses, 1936-1949. Nursing History in a Global Perspective Conference. Kolding, Denmark. August 2012. New Challenges, Old Dilemmas: Sulfonamides and Children’s Health Care Delivery in the United States, 1936-1949. Agnes Dillon Randolf International Nursing History Conference, University of Virginia School of Nursing. Charlottesville, Va. March 2013. Janet Deatrick Families and their Impact on HRQOL: Perceptions of AYA Brain Tumor Survivors. National Podium Presentation. Minneapolis, Minn. June 2013. Stress, Families, and Chronic Disease. Conferencia USP sobre Estresse, Cooperacao Internacional. Bauru, Brazil. November 2012. Families and Chronic Illness: The Ties that Bind. University of Sao Paulo. Sao Paulo, Brazil. November 2012. Creating the Future of Advanced Practice Nursing Practice (APN). The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Philadelphia, Pa. September 2012. Families and Research: The Ties that Bind. Suzanne Brouse Lecture, Dean’s Research Day, University of Michigan School of Nursing. Ann Arbor, Mich. April 2013. Patricia D’Antonio Invited panelist. Broadening the Dialogue: What Makes a Global Conversation? International Academy of Nurse Editors. Montreal, Canada. August 2012. Keynote speaker. Historicizing Body Work in Nursing: Continuities and Discontinuities Across Time and Place. In the Spirit of Nightingale: The Care Work of Body Work, McGill University. Montreal, Canada. May 2013. Sophie and Alex Rosner Seminar. Columbia University School of Public Health. New York, N.Y. April 2013.

Terri Lipman Psychosocial and Cultural Aspects of Growth Hormone Deficiency and Growth-Related Disorders. Managed Care Review Board ™: Analysis of Therapies for Growth Hormone Deficiency and Growth-Related Disorders. Webinar. January 2013. Addressing Racial Disparities in Children through University/Hospital/Community Partnerships. New York University College of Nursing. New York, N.Y. February 2013. Writing for Publication. Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society Conference. Las Vegas, Nev. May 2013. Leadership in Nursing. Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society Conference. Las Vegas, Nev. May 2013. “Growth Analysis” and “Thyroid Issues” (With C. Alter). Fourth Annual Pediatric Endocrinology Clinical Pearls and Review for the Primary Care Practitioner. Philadelphia, Pa. February 2013. Afaf Meleis Reach Up: Passion, Persistence and Positive Thinking. National U.C. Diversity Pipeline Initiative Conference. Third Annual Distinguished Alumni Speaker Series, UCLA School of Nursing. Los Angeles, Calif. November 2012. Symbols of Power: Past and Present. National Women’s Committee Spring 2013 Event, University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Philadelphia, Pa. April 2013. Women’s Health and the World’s Cities. Proudly Penn in the UK. London, England. May 2013. A Journey into the Future: Urbanization and Women’s Health. Third Annual Distinguished Alumni Speaker Series, UCLA School of Nursing. Los Angeles, Calif. November 2012. Applying Transitions Theory in Nursing Care. Universidad Catolica Santo Toribio de Mogrovego. Chiclayo, Peru. October 2012. Current Recommendations for Reform in Education for Health Professionals. Universidad Catolica Santo Toribio de Mogrovego. Chiclayo, Peru. October 2012. Professionalizing Nursing in a Global Context: A Passion for Scholarship. VI Jornada Internactional de Investigacion en Ciencias de Enfermeria, Universidad Catolica Santo Toribio de Mogrovego. Chiclayo, Peru. October 2012. A Journey into the Future: Urbanization and Women’s Health. 19th International Congress on Women’s Health 2012: Partnering for a Brighter Global Future. Bangkok, Thailand. November 2012. The Leadership Journey and Developing your Personal Leadership Plan. 19th International Congress on Women’s Health 2012: Partnering for a Brighter Global Future. Bangkok, Thailand. November 2012.

Marilyn Sommers Policy Implications: Injury in Women after Sexual Assault. 19th International Congress on Women’s Health 2012: Partnering for a Brighter Global Future. Bangkok, Thailand. November 2012. Building a Funded Program of Research: Challenges, Supports, Barriers, Successes, and Changes of Direction. Penn State University. University Park, Pa. November 2012. Assessment Reactivity in an Emergency Department Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment Trial to Reduce Alcohol Misuse. American Public Health Association. San Francisco, Calif. October 2012. Effects of an ED Intervention to Reduce Risky Driving and Alcohol Misuse Among Young Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial. American Public Health Association. San Francisco, Calif. October 2012. Forensic Examination Following Rape: Do Skin Color and Baseline Injury Matter? Safety 2012 World Conference: 11th World Conference on Injury. Wellington, New Zealand. October 2012. Preventing Risky Driving and Alcohol Misuse Among Young Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial in the Emergency Department. Safety 2012 World Conference: 11th World Conference on Injury. Wellington, New Zealand. October 2012. Brief Intervention to Promote Health in the Community: Theories and Practice. Center for Social Advancement, Disease Prevention and Medical Research. Ormylia, Chalkidiki, Greece. September 2012. International PhD Education and Collaboration: Creating the Future of Doctoral Education in Nursing. American Association of Colleges of Nursing’s 2013 Doctoral Education conference. San Diego, Calif. January 2013. Judy Verger National Educational Competencies for Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioners. National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties. Washington, D.C. 2013. Advancing practice through changing times: Parkinson’s disease. Nurse Practitioner Association of New York annual conference. Saratoga Springs, N.Y. October 2012. The chronic care model in Parkinson’s disease. San Francisco Veterans Affairs. San Francisco, Calif. July 2012. The cognitive and psychiatric manifestations of Parkinson’s disease. Oregon Health Sciences University. Portland, Ore. September 2012. Barbra Mann Wall Keynote Speaker. How Our Past Shapes Our Future. Bon Secours Health Systems Advance. Richmond, Va. November 2012. Jean Whelan Digital Nurses: Digitizing the Quintessential Women’s Profession. Women’s History in the Digital World Conference. Bryn Mawr, Pa. March 2013.

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Faculty Appointments and Promotions

Successfully Defended Dissertations

Appointment of Bridgette Brawner to Assistant Professor of Nursing

August 2012 Julia Bohinksi Examining the Influence of Family Communication on Adolescent Girls’ Experiences with Dating Violence

Promotion of Kathleen Burke to Advanced Senior Lecturer in the Standing Faculty of the School of Nursing

Michael Fachko Cardiovascular Effects and Enjoyment of Exer-Gaming in Older Adults

Promotion of Cynthia Connolly to Associate Professor of Nursing with tenure in the Standing Faculty of the School of Nursing

Anne Mitchell The Relationship of Self-Reported Health Status and Perceived Neighborhood Built Environment with the Amount of Self-Reported Walking Among Urban Community Dwelling Older Adults

Promotion of Deborah Becker to Practice Associate Professor of Nursing

Appointment of Kathleen Dracup to Visiting Professor Promotion of Karen Hirschman to Research Associate Professor of Nursing in the Standing Faculty of the School of Nursing Appointment of Sharon Irving to Assistant Professor of Pediatric Nursing in the Standing Faculty of the School of Nursing Promotion of Lisa Lewis to Associate Professor of Nursing in the Standing Faculty of the School of Nursing Appointment of Mary Mancini to Visiting Professor Promotion of Matt McHugh to Associate Professor of Nursing as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar Promotion of Rosemary Polomano to Professor of Pain Practice Nursing in the Standing Faculty of the School of Nursing Appointment of Susan Renz to Senior Lecturer Appointment of Susan Reverby to Visiting Professor Promotion of Judy Verger to Advanced Senior Lecturer

Deena Kelly The Organization of Critical Care Nursing and Outcomes of Mechanically Ventilated Older Adults December 2012 Chenjuan Ma Organization of Hospital Nursing and Readmissions in Surgical Medicare Patients Carol Vincent Family and Self-Care Management of HIV Infected Women and Their HIV Infected Children Kamila Alexander Sexual Safety and Sexual Security: Broadening the Sexual Health Discourse May 2013 Susan Lysaght Prospective Exploration of Transitions in Settings Within Hospice Eeeseung Byun Effects of Uncertainty on Perceived and Physiological Stress and Psychological Outcomes in Stroke-Survivor Caregivers Sunny Hallowell The Associations Between the Nurse Work Environment, Breastfeeding Support and Human Milk Provision in the NICU Aditi Rao Retaining Nursing Home Directors of Nursing: The Importance of Professional Networks and High Quality Professional Support

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UPfront | Fall 2013


The Norma M. Lang Distinguished Award for Scholarly Practice and Policy honors the dean emerita of the School of Nursing for her eminent contributions to health and science. This award is given annually to a Penn Nursing faculty member or a graduate from the School of Nursing's doctoral program who has made a distinguished contribution to nursing through scholarly practice.

Diane L. Spatz, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN, the Professor of Perinatal Nursing and the Helen M. Shearer Professor of Nutrition at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, is also the Director of the Lactation Program and a nurse researcher at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. She received her BSN, MSN, and PhD from Penn Nursing. Dr. Spatz is an internationally renowned clinical nurse scientist who has translated the science of human milk and breastfeeding worldwide. Dr. Spatz co-authored the first position statement on human milk and breastfeeding for the National Association of Neonatal Nurses as well as the new position statement on the Risks of Not Breastfeeding for the International Lactation Consultant Association. She is an experienced teacher who has received the prestigious Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. Dr. Spatz is the recipient of numerous awards including the Research Utilization Award from Sigma Theta Tau International and serves as Faculty for the Sigma Theta Tau and Johnson & Johnson Maternal Child Leadership Academy.

2013 Award Recipient

Diane L. Spatz, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN 2nd Annual Lecture

The Power of Human Milk & Breastfeeding: Translating the Science to Clinical Practice and Policy Tuesday, October 15, 2013 – 3:00-5:00pm

School of Nursing – Claire M. Fagin Hall Ann L. Roy Auditorium Reception immediately following – Carol Elizabeth Ware Lobby RSVP: 215.746.8822 or http://lang-spatz-award.eventbrite.com


Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage P A I D Permit #2563 Phila., PA

Claire M. Fagin Hall 418 Curie Boulevard Philadelphia, PA 19104-4217 www.nursing.upenn.edu

Penn Nursing’s third annual Sounds of West Philadelphia at LIFE Community Wellness Day was held on April 6 at the Living Independently For Elders practice of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, 4508 Chestnut Street. Wellness Day featured health checks, massages, food, live music, children’s activities, and zumba. The well-attended event was hosted by LIFE, Penn Nursing’s Healthy in Philadelphia initiative, Councilwoman Jannie L. Blackwell, the community outreach nursing programs of Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and Penn’s Office of Government and Community Affairs. See page 26.


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