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2013 │ 2014

Annual Report

PENNSYLVANIA HIGHLANDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE


Table of Contents Message from the President ..................................................................................................................... 4    Mission, Vision, and Core Values  ............................................................................................................. 6    The College’s Strategic Plan .................................................................................................................. 8‐17   The Strategic Plan, 2011‐2015 ................................................................................................... 8‐12   Perpetual Improvement Model  ................................................................................................... 13   Strategic Priori es ‐ Goals and Accomplishments FY2014 ...................................................... 14‐17    Departmental Accomplishments ........................................................................................................ 19‐29   Academic Affairs and Student Services Accomplishments 2013‐2014 ................................... 19‐23   Finance and Administra on Accomplishments 2013‐2014 ..................................................... 24‐26   External Rela ons Accomplishments  2013‐2014 ................................................................... 27‐29      College Data ........................................................................................................................................ 31‐40   Student Enrollment and Demographics .................................................................................. 31‐37   Annual Enrollment .................................................................................................................. 31   Credit Enrollment by Semester .............................................................................................. 31   Enrollment Type ................................................................................................................ 31‐32   ACE Students .................................................................................................................. 31   Core Students ................................................................................................................ 31   Non‐Core Students ........................................................................................................ 32   Core Student Demographics .............................................................................................. 32‐33   Degree Seeking Status ................................................................................................... 32   Full‐ me/Part‐ me Status ............................................................................................. 32   Gender ........................................................................................................................... 32   Ethnicity ......................................................................................................................... 32   Age ................................................................................................................................. 33   County of Residence ...................................................................................................... 33   Program Enrollment .......................................................................................................... 34‐35   Program Headcount and FTE Informa on ................................................................ 34‐35   Program Type and FTE Informa on ............................................................................... 35   Graduates .......................................................................................................................... 36‐37   Degrees/Awards by Program ......................................................................................... 36   Degrees/Awards by Program Type ................................................................................ 37     Ins tu onal Resources ............................................................................................................ 38‐40   Employee Data ........................................................................................................................ 38   Category and Employment Status ................................................................................. 38   Gender and Ethnicity ..................................................................................................... 38   Facili es Data .......................................................................................................................... 38   Finance Data ...................................................................................................................... 39‐40   College Revenues and Expenses .................................................................................... 39   Founda on Revenue and Expenses ............................................................................... 40   Opera ng Fund Sources ................................................................................................ 40   Tui on ..................................................................................................................................... 40  2 


2013 │ 2014

Message from the President


Message from the President Dear College Community: Once again, we have completed another successful year as the community college for the Southern Alleghenies, and our growth has been significant. We are rapidly approaching the 2,000 full-time-equivalent (FTE) enrollment mark for credit students, and our continuing education department is now a multi-dimensional and entrepreneurial enterprise that’s destined to be a significant source of revenue. Our Somerset and Huntingdon Centers have grown better than our plans projected, and the Ebensburg Center has been transformed from ‘money pit’ to moneymaker. The Blair County Center has tripled its enrollment from last Fall to this Fall. Our focus is shifting from growing our service area to growing our campuses. I would like to see us reach 2,500 FTE before my retirement some two to four years from now. We have become a prime economic development engine for Cambria County, bringing more than $13 million through our own operations. The overall economic impact we have on the region is in excess of $50 million due to the increased level of employment and financial stability of our graduates, most of whom remain in our area after graduation. We have done a lot to build a strong college over the past seven years. Our Foundation has nearly tripled its assets over the past three years and should reach the million dollar mark a year earlier than we planned. We have strong cash reserves to protect the college from unanticipated shortfalls in our usual revenue streams. And we have established systems that work well for our endeavors and that should hold up even when there is a major change in our administration. For the next few years, our focus will be on getting ready for our next Middle States visit when we are evaluated for accreditation renewal. We must ensure that our assessment plans are in place, working, and producing data that is producing improvements in the way we deliver services to our students. We must be certain that our governance system—from the Board of Trustees to our employee Senates—are free from any conflicts of interest that could compromise our Middle States review. Simply speaking, we must show excellence and integrity in everything we do here. My priority goal over the next few years is to build our financial resources to the levels needed to provide the highly-skilled faculty and staff that are essential to being a high-quality community college. The residents of our region deserve the best service possible. I know we can get there together. Our administration, faculty, and staff are one of the best teams working together in Pennsylvania. Let’s do this. Sincerely,

Walter J. Asonevich, President

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2013 │ 2014

Mission, Vision, and Core Values


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Mission, Vision, and Core Values

MISSION Pennsylvania Highlands Community College provides quality, affordable opportuni es for learning that meet  regional needs in a suppor ve, student‐oriented environment.      VISION  Pennsylvania Highlands Community College will be a nurturing, dynamic center for teaching and learning.   We will be a model for individual development and a catalyst for regional renewal.     

CORE VALUES  Pennsylvania Highlands Community College strives to be a community of learners where every student, em‐ ployee and community member is respected and supported.  As such, the College is deeply commi ed to the  following values:    Student Success  Crea ng a student‐centered environment where individuals are challenged, encouraged, and supported to  achieve their educa onal, professional and personal goals while developing a spirit of intellectual curiosity  and a commitment to lifelong learning.    Quality and Accountability  Establishing performance standards throughout the ins tu on, developing measures to document effec ve‐ ness and commi ng to con nuous improvement in pursuit of excellence.    Integrity and Ethics  Holding each member of the organiza on to high professional and personal standards.  These principles are  also embodied in the Statement on Professional Ethics adopted by the College’s Faculty.    Collabora on and Collegiality  Informing and involving members of the College community in discussion and problem solving at all levels in  an atmosphere marked by civility and cordiality conducted with respect for personal and professional differ‐ ences as well as the value of humor and humility.    Responsiveness to Diverse and Changing Community Needs  Developing innova ve and crea ve responses to the region’s dynamic, economic workforce and social needs  based on interac ons with all segments of the community. 

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Strategic Plan

2013 │ 2014


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College The Strategic Plan – 2011-2015 The Pennsylvania Highlands Community College has been using various strategic planning processes since its  incep on in 1994. Each strategic planning process has involved various levels of interac vity on behalf of the  Board of Trustees, administra on and staff. Over the years several key elements have been difficult to incorporate into the planning process; the use of measurable ins tu onal data to gauge results and tying the planning process to the ins tu on’s budget.  In 2009-2010, a five-year strategic plan was developed by the President’s Cabinet with input from each of the  Board Commi ees. The five-year plan serves as the basis for the development of the annual ac on items  which support the goals and objec ves of the plan.  The following are the Priori es, Goals, and Objec ve for FY2011 to FY2015:  

Priority: Assess Ins tu onal Effec veness  











Goal: To improve the overall ins tu onal effec veness assessment plan and implement the    plan based on assessment data  

Assessment plan ready for college review July 2010 



Assessment plan ready for board approval Dec 2010 



Program advisory commi ees trained in using data for assessment (Title III) in FY2013 

Goal: To determine student sa sfac on  

Establish a schedule to survey students once every three years beginning in FY2012 



Run 2nd student survey; Include Climate Survey for Civil Rights Compliance in FY2015 

Goal: To determine employee sa sfac on  

Establish a schedule to survey employees every three years beginning in FY2012 



Run 2nd employee survey; Include Climate Survey for Civil Rights Compliance in FY2015 

Goal: To provide professional development opportuni es to non-faculty employees  

Complete customer service training for all full- me employees of the College by June 2011 



Develop and implement a new employee orienta on program by Fall 2012 



Iden fy needs, develop, and implement an annual training program for faculty and staff in  areas as customer service, compliance, safety, and educa onal best prac ces in FY2015 

Goal: To determine the effec veness of College regionaliza on  

Create budget/audit capabili es for each addi onal loca on by FY2011 



Conduct first five-year comprehensive review of all addi onal loca ons in FY2015 

Goal: To assure the quality of academic programs  

Full implementa on of comprehensive academic assessment plan by FY2013 



Implement Academic Master Plan as part of Title III first-year goal in FY2013 



Achieve Na onal Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP) accredita on by  FY2014 

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Pennsylvania Highlands Community College The Strategic Plan – 2011-2015 

Priority: Achieve Regionaliza on  





Goal: To build and pursue the mul ‐campus map for regionaliza on  

Build systema c approach to establishing regional poli cal support for regional expansion  by FY2011 



Locate and lease a facility for the Hun ngdon loca on in FY2011 



Hire full‐ me director for Hun ngdon addi onal loca on by FY2012 



Full implementa on of regional poli cal support plan by FY2012 



Lease facility and hire staff for Blair County addi onal loca on by FY2013 



Decide on addi on of State College into service area in FY2014 



To develop and implement a plan to increase use of video communica on between sites  for student services in FY2015 



Market online credit and non‐credit programs to regions without a physical campus in  FY2015 



Online Services for Con nuing Educa on in FY2015 



Create formal Regionaliza on Plan for Middle States in FY2015 



Create Good Neighbor Policy in FY2015 

Goal: To leverage diverse workforce needs in program development in the College’s service area  

Develop marke ng plan to disseminate informa on on workforce training op ons across  the 6‐county region by FY2012 



Loca ng training sites in all loca ons of our service area by FY2013 



Implement workforce training marke ng plan by FY2013 



Implement Healthcare IT Specialist Program (TAACCCT) by FY2013 



Realignment of courses to employment needs of community (Title III) in FY2015 



Create a comprehensive list of approved trainers and training facili es that can deliver  content across the 6‐county region in FY2015 

Goal: To establish community rela onships throughout College service area  

Develop a systema c approach to Pennsylvania Highlands’ engagement with community  leaders throughout the 6‐county region by FY2011 



Increasing involvement with municipal leadership in all loca ons by FY2012 



Have 100% involvement of cabinet‐level staff on external boards in our service areas by  FY2013 



Outreach to businesses to establish career placement and internship opportuni es per   Title III by FY2014 

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Pennsylvania Highlands Community College The Strategic Plan – 2011-2015 

Priority: Improve Academic Services  



Goal: To improve academic programs  

Revise all current programs to adhere with new core curriculum and ready for Board approval by Feb. 2011 



Implement new programs in radiography by Fall 2011 



Create two single-semester cer ficate programs each year for five-years in FY2011 



Create Associate of Science (A.S.) or Associate of Arts (A.A) versions of three programs by  fall 2012 



Create two single-semester cer ficate programs each year for five-years in FY2012 



Create Associate of Science (A.S.) or Associate of Arts (A.A) versions of three addi onal  programs by fall 2012 



Create two single-semester cer ficate programs each year for five-years in FY2013 



Develop new program in Computer Science by FY2013, ready for implementa on for Fall  2013 



Implement new program in Engineering Technology by FY2013 (*moved from FY2012) 



Create two single-semester cer ficate programs each year for five-years in FY2014 



Create Associate of Science (A.S.) or Associate of Arts (A.A) versions of three addi onal  programs in FY2014 



Revise and implement new FYE and SYE program in FY2014 



Realign 100 and 200 level courses in accord with the Academic Master Plan (Title III) in  FY2014 



Achieve 52% of enrollment taught by full- me faculty in FY2015 



Review Program Review Process to add elements of visioning in FY2015   

Goal: To increase first- me/full- me reten on fall-to-fall and spring-to-spring  

Ensure all faculty teaching FYE are trained in a FYE curriculum by FY2011 



Hire a full- me professional advising coordinator by FY2011 



Add two new 200-level general educa on courses each year for five years in FY2011 



Revamp current FYE curriculum to adhere to na onally-recognized FYE programs by  FY2012 



Add two new 200-level general educa on courses each year for five years in FY2012 



Add two new 200-level general educa on courses each year for five years in FY2013 



Develop a career development office by FY2013 



Implement new orienta on strategies to increase reten on (Title III) in FY2013 



Modify Gen Ed requirements to include 200 level courses in FY2014 



Add two new 200-level general educa on courses each year for five years in FY2014 



Purchase and implement a reten on so ware system in FY2015  10 


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College The Strategic Plan – 2011-2015 

Goal: To increase the matriculation rate of part-time to full-time students 

Eliminate incentives that allow part-time students to remain in part-time non-matriculated status by FY2012

Redesign catalog to optimize transfer options within General Studies and Liberal Arts areas by 2012

Provide training to all academic advisors on transfer flexibility of College’s programs by FY2013

Redesign catalog to optimize searchability through online content by FY2013

Goal: To improve course/program transferability 

Produce a partnership catalog by FY2012

Goal: To increase number of specialized accreditations of College programs 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) accreditation by FY2014

National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP) accreditation by 2014

Continue efforts to achieve Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) accreditation; Identify additional accreditation opportunities in FY2015

Goal: To improve developmental education 

Implement new developmental courses by FY2011

Create a developmental department by FY2012

Develop and implement course alignment between developmental courses and 100-level courses by FY2013

Goal: To increase and improve continuing education offerings and associated revenues 

Establish a cost-recovery model for continuing education by FY2011

Increase continuing education offerings at additional locations by 3% each year for five years in FY2011

Increase continuing education offerings at additional locations by 3% each year for five years in FY2012

Hire an AVP of Continuing Education by FY2013

Increase continuing education offerings at additional locations by 3% each year for five years in FY2013

Increase continuing education offerings at additional locations by 3% each year for five years in FY2014

Ensure Continuing Education offerings are proportional at all sites in FY2015

Establish and implement cost recovery model for Continuing Education in FY2015

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Pennsylvania Highlands Community College The Strategic Plan – 2011-2015 

Priority: Strengthen Fiscal Stability and Remain Affordable 

Goal: To develop and implement the five-year financial plan for expansion 

Identify all additional locations and potential enrollments to be served by the College over five years by FY2011

Identify all key data elements that will contribute to the financial plan FY2011

Project state and local revenue trends over the next five years by FY2011

Identify staffing needs for each additional location over the next five years by FY2012

Work towards building 15% Cash Reserve, Regional Reserve, and Capital Reserve & Emergency Fund in FY2015

Redesign tuition and fee structure to remain affordable in FY2015

Allocate indirect revenue and indirect costs to the regional sites in FY2015

Goal: To develop and implement a comprehensive facilities master plan 

Identify and hire a firm to produce the facilities master plan by FY2015

Goal: To develop and implement a five-year staffing plan 

Complete staffing projections for all locations by FY2011

Conduct analysis of staffing plan and its impact on Governance in FY2015

Goal: To achieve permanent ownership of a main campus facility

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Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Perpetual Improvement Model (PIM) The Pennsylvania Highlands Community College model for continuous, data-driven, strategic planning and improvement:

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Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Strategic Priorities - Goals and Accomplishments FY2014 Objec ve 

Status

Priority: Assess Ins tu onal Effec veness   Goal: To assure the quality of academic programs   Achieve Na onal Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment  NACEP accredita on awarded in May 2014.  AccreditaPartnerships (NACEP) accredita on  on is effec ve through 2021.  Priority: Achieve Regionaliza on   Goal: To build and pursue the mul -campus map for regionaliza on   Decide on addi on of State College into service area. 

In consulta on with Board's execu ve commi ee, we  will build a strategy for expansion into State College into  the next strategic plan. 

Goal: To establish community rela onships throughout College service area   Outreach to businesses to establish career place “College Central Network” –  Registra ons since   June 2013: 82 Employers, 136 students, 96 job and  ment and internship opportuni es per Title III  16 internship pos ngs. To date, (March 21,2014),  107 employers, 169 students/alumni, 141 jobs and  18 internships have been registered on College Central Network.   Professional Memberships –WestPACS 45 college  consor um membership raise student awareness,  prepara on and a endance at WestPACS fairs.    Con nuing Educa on Office/Faculty Partnership  –  met with 10 employers to discuss student job/ internship and volunteer opportuni es, as well as  curriculum and employee training programs. Employers to date include: Problem Solu ons, UCP, FCILore o, Cresson Secure, NHS Human Services, Goodwill, Altoona, Somerset Conemaugh, and Windber  Hospitals.   Established Employer Advisory Board    Employer Database – u lized as engine to drive  office employer rela onship building and student  service. Database doubled to 774 employers.   Internships – Employer directory available in hard  copy and online provides contact and posi on descrip ons for job and internship opportuni es.  Directory lis ngs increased from 79 to 107 employers  who have hired or are interested in hiring students.   Internship lis ngs increased from 62 to 85 and the  new job shadow category lists 48 opportuni es.   Job/Internship Fairs: WestPACS Fall 2013 - 8 students  a ended, WestPACS Spring-12 students a ended.  Upcoming Penn Highlands fair employer registra on  almost doubled from last year's 30 to 58.  14 


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Strategic Priorities - Goals and Accomplishments FY2014 Objective

Status

Priority: Improve Academic Services Goal: To improve academic programs Create two single-semester certificate programs each year for five-years

Delayed due to Gainful Employment and other requirements. Recommend move to two-semester programs. The Enrollment Management workgroup is looking to develop Customer Service as a certificate for tripledevelopmental students. Accounting faculty working on Bookkeeping as a two-semester program.

Create Associate of Science (A.S.) or Associate of Arts (A.A) versions of three additional programs.

Environmental Science AS, Computer Science AS, PreEngineering AS, Pre-Health Professions AS, Psychology AA

Revise and implement new FYE and SYE program.

FYE completed and undergoing assessment; SYE remains to be revised. Full-time faculty coordinator being considered to provide leadership and continuity.

Realign 100 and 200 level courses in accord with the Academic Master Plan (Title III)

Curriculum Committee proposed guidelines for 100 and 200 level courses. Faculty Senate approved in December

Goal: To increase first-time/full-time retention fall-to-fall and spring-to-spring Modify Gen Ed requirements to include 200 level courses Add two new 200-level general education courses each year for five years.

To be deferred to 2014-15. Fall 2012 ENG 260 Monsters in Literature. Spring 2013 ENG 271 World Literature and BIO 207 and 217 Ecology lecture and lab. Fall 2013 Added REL 200 Understanding the Bible and BIO 208/218 Genetics. Spring 2014 added SOC 205 Race, Class, and Gender in Society and MAT 230 Calculus III

Goal: To increase number of specialized accreditations of College programs. Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) accreditation

On hold pending needed faculty certification.

National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP) accreditation

As of May 2014, the College has received NACEP Accreditation.

Goal To increase and improve continuing education offerings and associated revenues Increase continuing education offerings at additional locations by 3% each year for five years

In process. Focus this year has been on supporting continuing education offerings at the sites, covering costs, and filling the vacant Dean's position.

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Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Strategic Priorities - Goals and Accomplishments FY2014 Objective

Status

PRESIDENT’S OBJECTIVES PRIORITY GOAL A: Work with senior staff to eliminate $153,000 deficit in the FY2014 budget and begin building strategies for reducing impact on students of full $150,000 reduction in County funding as we build a budget for FY2015.

We are approaching sufficient cost savings in expenditures for supplies and in unfilled positions that we should be able to get the budget balanced by end of fiscal year. We may need to adjust tuition and fees for sponsored students going forward to get revenue up to costs.

PRIORITY GOAL B: Continue working with state legislators and state administrators to build into the community college budget additional funding to cover the needs of community colleges that have seen dramatic enrollment growth over the past six years. While Penn Highlands is at the top of list for growth rate among the state’s community colleges, others have also seen their dollars/FTE student eroded due to flat funding and reduced funding since FY2008.

Have started conversations with the PA Commission for Community Colleges on the need for changes in the Community College Act to address funding and the role of sponsors in the funding formula. Senator Mensch legislation is still pending to create a task force to study the funding issues for community colleges.

PRIORITY GOAL C: Negotiate contracts with both faculty and staff unions that can keep salaries competitive for faculty on a national level and for support staff on a regional level while recognizing the severe limitations placed upon us by reduced county and state funding.

The College President has discussed the process with both support staff and faculty union presidents and agreed to exchange lists of desired contract changes ahead of negotiations. Also, all MOA's created since the current contracts were installed have been incorporated into a draft of the CBA's and shared with union and college leadership. Negotiations are on-going with faculty. Staff union contract has been negotiated and approved by the union and will be brought to the Trustees in June 2014.

16


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Strategic Priorities - Goals and Accomplishments FY2014 Objective

Status

PRESIDENT’S OBJECTIVES (con’t.) Goal One: Have Blair County site running “in the black” as we enter its second year of operation.

Blair did not reach revenue targets for Fall 2013.

Goal Two: Depending on Funding, establish expansion site in Mifflin County and, perhaps, additional site in Moshannon Valley.

Mifflin County funding did not come through and the project has been back burnered indefinitely. The Moshannon Valley site has been determined to be unnecessary if we proceed with plans to move into State College a few years down the road.

Goal Three: Find match money for the Title III grant ($20,000) for 3rd year endowment building project and get the Foundation over the $700,000 mark.

Have a $5000 donation from Conemaugh Hospital as a lead donor toward the match. The remainder of the $20,000 in unrestricted funds was raised by December 2013. Our assets for the Foundation are approximately $796,000.

Goal Four: Continue to build on EITC donations to fund ACE Program.

Received $33,347.25 in EITC Donations.

Goal Five: Achieve NACEP Accreditation for ACE Program.

As of May 2014, the College has received NACEP Accreditation.

Goal Six: Reduce deficit spending in Continuing Education Department to less than $50,000.

In process. Mr. Larry Coco began as Dean of Workforce Development and Continuing Education in February 2014 and is making good progress on this goal.

Goal Seven: Replace the roof and the hot water system.

Contracts have been awarded for construction on the roof which started in April 2014 and will be completed in July 2014. Water heater system is currently being designed by an engineering firm.

Goal Eight: End of year enrollment goal is to be at 85% the size of the Community College of Beaver County.

We appear to be on track to break the 2000 FTE mark in our annual enrollment. Beaver is a 2400 FTE and shrinking based on most recent enrollment reports. 2000/2400 puts us at 83%, but Beaver could be down 8% by year's end.

17


2013 │ 2014

Departmental Accomplishments


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Academic Affairs and Student Services Accomplishments , 2013-2014 ACADEMIC AFFAIRS AND STUDENT SERVICES (DR. TED NICHOLS, VP) 

Convened faculty and staff search committees leading to successful hiring of new faculty and staff: 

Associate Dean of Curriculum – Ms. Cynthia McCabe

Associate Dean of Institutional Research and Assessment – Mr. Gary Boast

Assistant Professor of Social Sciences/ACE Faculty Coordinator – Dr. Tim Konhaus

Assistant Professor of English – Dr. Russell Newman

Instructor of Medical Assisting/Practicum Coordinator – Ms. Tammy Calpin

Instructor of Biological Sciences – Ms. Michelle Myers-Claypole

Assistant to the Vice President of Academic Affairs and Student Services – Ms. Mary Ann Lee

Assistant Professor of Mathematics – Ms. Robin Hughes

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences – Dr. Matthew Sisak

Dean of Workforce Dev. and Continuing Education – Mr. Larry Coco

Coordinator, Office of Instruction - Ms. Daun Boyle

Part Time Campus Receptionist – Ms. Lisa Wirfel

Part Time Reference Services Assistant – Ms. Ashlee Kiel

Assigned responsibility for Workforce Development and Continuing Education following restructuring of that area.

Convened Faculty Promotion and Tenure Committee, provided for faculty Promotion and Tenure orientation, reviewed applications, and submitted recommendations to the President.

Supported the development of a “virtual campus” concept and a vital training program for faculty to ensure quality delivery of on-line courses.

Provided testimony to House Policy Committee on College Affordability.

Supported partnership programming including Conemaugh Health System, JWFI, Statewide Transfer and Articulation (TAOC), MTT Aviation Services, OVR, Career and Technology Centers.

Supported other College-wide initiatives such as Budgeting, Human Resources, Strategic Planning, External Relations, State and Federal Compliance.

Represented the College at a wide range of college, community, and regional events.

FACULTY AND CURRICULUM (MS. ERICA REIGHARD, DEAN) Priority: Improve Academic Services - 2014 Goal, Add two new 200-level general education courses each year for five years. 

Developed MAT 240 Differential Equations; SOC 205 Race, Class and Gender; PHI 245 Symbolic Logic; REL 200 Understanding the Bible; CRJ 212 Special Topics.

19


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Academic Affairs and Student Services Accomplishments , 2013-2014 Priority: Improve Academic Services - 2014 Goal, Realign 100 and 200 level courses in accord with the Academic Master Plan (Title III). 

Developed definitions for 100 and 200 level courses.

Terminated Administrative Office Assistant A.A.S. and related diploma offerings.

Terminated WAN, A.A.S. program (to be converted to a certificate program).

Revised Computer Science and Early Childhood Education degree programs.

Note: Although we made progress in preparing for CAAHEP accreditation for Medical Assisting Technology thanks to the outstanding work of Assistant Professor, Gaynelle Schmieder, we were unable to apply due to the long-term absence of another key faculty member. We have a new FT faculty member on board and expect to apply during the 14-15 academic year. ENROLLMENT SERVICES AND REGISTRAR (MS. MICHELLE STUMPF, DEAN) 

Met Institutional Enrollment Goals for 2013/14: 

The full time head-count goal for 2013/14 was 1814. 1806 full time students were enrolled by the end of the academic year which was 8 full time students shy of goal or 99.5%.

The part time credit goal for 2013/14 was 10,733. 11,707 part time credits were enrolled during the academic year which is 968 credits over goal or 109%.

Conferred Degrees and Certificates (2013/14): 

Fall 2013 Graduates totaled 91 students.

Spring 2014 graduates totaled 179 students.

12.5% increase in the number of graduates over the previous year.

Recognized Achievement: 

331 students were honored on the Dean’s List in Fall 2013.

344 students were honored on the Dean’s List in Spring 2014.

Created and implemented a Pre-Advising survey to provide vital data regarding student goal and goal attainment and match services and programs to student interests.

Reviewed the enrollment procedures and student service delivery across sites to ensure that practices support healthy enrollment and student success.

Established an Enrollment Management Group for the purpose of implementing the Enrollment Management Plan and to assist in the management of the College's overall enrollment potential.

STUDENT SUCCESS CENTER 

Began internal review process to become a Jed Foundation Campus. The Jed Foundation is “the nation’s leading organization working to promote emotional health and prevent suicide among college students.” The assessment is being funded by UPMC Altoona Foundation.

COMPASS placement testing has been implemented in 28 high schools. 20


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Academic Affairs and Student Services Accomplishments , 2013-2014 FINANCIAL AID OFFICE   Streamlined the FAFSA verifica on process from two‐week turn‐around to 2‐3 day turn‐around.   Developed process of daily outreach to students not comple ng the FAFSA through email no fica on,  le ers, OneCall, FATV – resources on FAFSA comple on.   Successfully implemented Pennsylvania Highlands Financial Aid TV (FATV) – Financial Aid Video Tutorial  Library available 24/7.   Named Military Friendly School for the second year in a row.  ADMISSIONS OFFICE   Re‐designed ACE enrollment procedures to accommodate the NACEP accredita on requirements across  52 high schools.   Increased access to high school students through onsite classroom presenta ons and field trips to the  Richland campus. 40 classroom presenta ons were conducted touching over 1,000 students across  southern Cambria County.  An addi onal 280 students were brought to campus for on‐site experiences.     Implemented new Board Scholarship requirements to include a higher GPA requirement (3.5 minimum),  tes ng into college level classes, and required service hours in Admissions.   SCHOOL PARTNERSHIPS (DR. MELISSA MURRAY, DEAN)  Priority: Assess Ins tu onal Effec veness ‐ 2014 Goal, Achieve Na onal Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment  Partnerships (NACEP) accredita on by FY 2014.   Submi ed NACEP Applica on for Accredita on Review (June, 2013).   Completed Peer Review Interview, Jacksonville, FL (October, 2013).   Awarded NACEP Accredita on effec ve 2014 through 2021 (April, 2014).  LEARNING RESOURCES/LIBRARY (DR. BARBARA ZABOROWSKI, DEAN)    Developed a training program in conjunc on with an Instruc onal Designer for faculty teaching in an  online environment.   Successfully hosted the 9th annual One Book, One Community Middle School Reading Program.   Hired a Reference Services Assistant to provide more comprehensive service to students in the evening.  WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT AND CONTINUING EDUCATION (MR. LARRY COCO, DEAN)   Priority: Achieve Regionaliza on:  2013 Goal, Implement workforce training and marke ng plan by FY2013.   Implemented Marke ng plan significantly increasing reliance on electronic media.     Developed new strategies to increase revenue.   Created new course offerings in both Workforce Development and Con nuing Educa on.   Developed new partnerships with reputable training/consul ng firms.   21 


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Academic Affairs and Student Services Accomplishments , 2013-2014 Priority:  Improve Academic Services ‐ 2014 Goal, Increase con nuing educa on offerings at addi onal lo‐ ca ons by 3% each year for five years; 2015 Goal, Ensure Con nuing Educa on offerings are propor onal  at all sites.   Increased Workforce Development and Community Educa on classes on books for Fall 2014 by 25 to 50%  or more at all campus loca ons.      Priority:  Improve Academic Services ‐ 2015 Goal, Establish and implement cost recovery model for Con n‐ uing Educa on.   Model implemented ‐ Running classes only at “break‐even or at‐profit” depending on the circumstances  and commitments made.     Planning, adver sing, and revenue‐genera ng partnerships expected to show increasing returns over the  current fiscal year.  KEYS PROGRAM (MS. KATHLEEN BANKS, COORDINATOR)   Priority: Achieve Regionaliza on ‐ Goal, To establish community rela onships throughout College service  area.   A ended Local Management Commi ee (LMC) mee ngs to promote KEYS and network with the other  DPW contractors in the WIA (Workforce Investment Agency).   Met with Cambria County Assistance Office and other County Assistance Offices in the region to reconcile  KEYS par cipant academic progress, inform the case managers of any changes in KEYS guidelines and to  brainstorm ideas to boost the number of TANF recipients that par cipate in the KEYS program.   Achieved an Ac vity Compliance Rate (ACR) of 85% (above KEYS state average).  STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND ATHLETICS (MS. SUZANNE BRUGH, DIRECTOR)   Developed and delivered effec ve orienta on programming for students and proud supporters at all lo‐ ca ons through a combina on of in‐person and on‐line processes.  Orienta on focused on dynamics of  student success and reten on to gradua on and included an academic convoca on.        Worked with student clubs and organiza ons to plan and host several large College‐wide and community  events including:   

Presenta ons by Holocaust Survivor, Eva Olsson ‐ Es mated a endance ‐ 1,500 members of the  college and community.   



Philosophy debate on “Origins of Life” organized by faculty member, Wes McMichael and the Phi‐ losophy Club which a racted philosophy and religion faculty from neighboring ins tu ons, stu‐ dents, and members of the general public from around the region.  Es mated a endance ‐ 400‐ 500. 

 Men’s Basketball second place finish in the Western Pennsylvania Collegiate Conference was a great ac‐ complishment for any team but for a team in just its fourth season was even more special.     Eleven student athletes graduated during the 2013‐2014 academic year.   Combined Phi Theta Kappa and Student Recogni on ceremonies was very well received.  With over 80%  of the students honored being Phi Theta Kappa members themselves made the event a truly worthwhile  experience for all involved including administra on, faculty, staff, students, and proud supporters.  22 


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Academic Affairs and Student Services Accomplishments , 2013-2014 CAREER PLANNING AND EMPLOYER SERVICES (MR. LARRY BRUGH, DIRECTOR)  Priority: Achieve Regionaliza on ‐ Goal, To establish community rela onships throughout College service  area.   Implemented online job/internship pos ng board, “College Central Network.” To date, 165 employers  have posted 254 jobs/internships.   Organized the annual College Job/Internship Fair increasing employer par cipa on and relevance by major from 27 in 2013 to 59 in 2014.   Penn Highlands Employer database – Expanded overall database contact list from approximately 400 in  2013 to approximately 750 with the addi on of newly appointed director’s established employer rela onships.   Penn Highlands Employer Directory – Created and published an annual directory to include 100 employers who have either hired or are interested in hiring PHCC students. The directory was also expanded to  include regional wage informa on and recommended job/internship search websites. The publica on is  available in hard copy and online free of charge to students, faculty, and employers.   Developed partnership with Workforce Development and Con nuing Educa on to host employer outreach luncheons/site visits. Conducted 10 outreach mee ngs which resulted in agreements with  Conemaugh, UPMC Altoona, Somerset, and Windber to expand health and non-health related internships  for Penn Highlands’ students. 

23


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Finance and Administration Accomplishments, 2013-2014 BUSINESS OFFICE 

Implemented the online purchasing module along with making updates to the purchasing procedures to align them with the module. This included training sessions with necessary employees and users of the system as well as the development of a process manual.

Implemented direct deposits for both student financial aid refund checks as well as for reimbursing employee business expenses. This eliminated the need to cut thousands of checks throughout the year and saved us time with cash reconciliations.

Improved our credit card purchasing processes by recording the actual vendor in the G/L and by paying our credit card invoice electronically.

Produced an Unqualified Audit Opinion on the 2012-2013 financial audit (7th consecutive year). We also made numerous changes and updates to the financial statement format and financial information as requested by the Finance Committee.

BURSAR’S OFFICE 

Implemented One Call Now for the College. This automated messaging system is used by the Bursar’s Office to remind students of tuition due date and payment plan due dates.

In working with other departments, implemented ACH refunds for students.

Created total withdrawal payment plan for students who withdraw; financial aid is reduced or eliminated, and need to make monthly payments until the balance on account is paid in full.

Took on responsibility for receipting Continuing Education payments.

Recommended Reliant Capital Solutions as new collection agency.

Implemented meal plan process for students – students paying out of pocket deal with Metz directly – students using financial aid to cover cost of plan complete form and submit to Bursar’s office.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 

The core IT infrastructure for Blair County was installed in early July 2013 at the Logan Valley Mall location. An Atlantic Broadband 100 Mbps point to point link provides connectivity to the Richland Campus. All services are functional at this time including Wi-Fi for students and staff, print/copy/fax, and access to all other back end student services modules via the Internet and the Jenzabar EX student information system.

All telephone connectivity at the Main Campus in Richland has been moved to Atlantic Broadband. This change resulted in a savings of $900 per month.

The Network Redesign project was completed in early January 2014 with the implementation of the multi -homed Internet connection using both Atlantic Broadband and PennREN (Pennsylvania Research and Education Network). The project involved working with service providers to configure BGP and the conversion to the College-owned IP address block. The aim of this project was to increase uptime of the Internet connection by introducing load balancing via BGP and provide increased bandwidth available to all College resources and constituents.

24


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Finance and Administration Accomplishments, 2013-2014 

The IT Department worked closely with the Finance Department to implement the on-line purchasing system. Beginning in January the paperless process for procurement requests and approvals was implemented using a phased approach with the IT Department first followed by other Business Office personnel and then the college as a whole. The goal was met for this project as the College-wide roll out was completed in May 2014.

The College’s video surveillance was expanded to include the Ebensburg, Blair, and Huntingdon Centers. This system allows the security and facilities department to access real-time and recorded video of activities at the centers. There are 9 cameras installed at the Ebensburg Center and 3 each at the Blair and Huntingdon Centers.

Network-based loud speakers are installed at the Richland Campus for use by the security department. There are 5 speakers that also function as digital clocks. During an emergency the digital display can provide directions to building occupants. The speakers are integrated with the IP telephony system so each phone can be taken over and used as a loud speaker in the event of an emergency. This system is capable of using phones at all sites and implementing additional speakers as necessary.

The IT Department facilitated the installation, development, and support for the new www.pennhighlands.edu website. Extensive collaboration with the 3rd party development organization regarding technical issues was coordinated by IT Staff members. The new site utilizes Joomla, a content management system, so College departments can control updates to content.

HUMAN RESOURCES 

Negotiated Support Staff and Faculty contracts.

Facilitated supervisory trainings, sexual harassment, and Title IX trainings.

119 new full-time and part-time hires including support staff, faculty, administrators, work study staff, and adjuncts during 07/01/2013 – 06/30/2014.

Managed RFP process for benefits broker. Successfully transitioned from previous benefit broker to new benefit broker in April 2014.

Improved new employee semi-annual orientation.

FACILITIES 

Replaced kitchen dishwasher and kitchen exterior entry doors. Changed wiring to allow the main walk-in cooler and freezer to be backed up off the emergency generator.

Replacement of the roof began in April of 2014. At this point, we are about 80 – 85% complete. The secondary contract over the East Hills recreation area has been completed at the bid price.

Completed design, bidding, construction and occupied new facility in Blair County.

SECURITY 

Director of Security & Safety enrolled the College in the Clery Center Pilot Collaboration Program. This program has an annual membership fee and allows for training opportunities, informational sessions, and conferences concerning Clery requirements and Title IX issues.

25


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Finance and Administration Accomplishments, 2013-2014 

Issued all employees a newly designed parking permit. The permit features our approved brand logo and allows for the Security department to better document vehicle ownership with permit number. Changes and updates were made to the old Parking Policy to enhance enforcement efforts at the Richland Campus. Proper signs were purchased and towing services will be utilized in the future to decrease the number of illegally parked vehicles.

In a joint effort with the Facilities and IT Departments five (5) emergency notification speakers were installed at Richland. These speakers are also tied into the phone system to allow for public announcement for emergency scenarios.

Security cameras were installed in the Blair, Ebensburg, and Huntingdon Campuses. Four (4) additional cameras were installed at the Richland Campus.

Composed a newly created job description for Assistant Director of Security & Safety and promoted full time Officer Cory Fairman to the position.

BOOKSTORE 

Cross trained employees in shipping and receiving, customer service, and cash control.

Restructured labor force in order to increase customer facing associates during back to school rush, rental check in and buyback events.

Adjusted course materials ordering strategy in an effort to avoid out of stock situations. Out of stocks decreased dramatically between Fall 2013 and Spring 2014 back to school periods.

26


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College External Relations Accomplishments, 2013-2014 GOVERNMENT AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS The College has long held the belief that our greatest assets are the residents of the communi es we serve  and those persons who give their  me to lead them.  From local legislators to the representa ves on our regional Advisory Councils these individuals provide Penn Highlands with the support and input necessary to  improve and enhance our services.  These councils have also helped our Founda on garner dona ons that  provide financial assistance to both the college and our students.  Penn Highlands is con nuously working with federal, state, and local government throughout the Southern  Alleghenies region to address issues surrounding educa on.  Our annual legisla ve recep on held in Harrisburg a racts state legislators from across the region who meet with our President, administra on, students,  and Trustees to share thoughts and concerns regarding community college funding, expansion, and growth.   This year we were privileged to have U.S. Congressman Keith Rothfus give the key note address at commencement.  The Congressman was very impressed with the College and has offered his ongoing support for  our efforts.  From a community rela ons perspec ve, Penn Highlands is pleased to work with each and every local Chamber of Commerce within the region.  Sponsoring and a ending events is one way that the College engages  with local business and community leaders.  Penn Highlands also hosts many other community groups by providing space for mee ngs and community  affairs.  These include high school commencement ceremonies, community job fairs, nonprofit fundraising  events and mee ngs.  The College provided a number of educa onal opportuni es for the community this  year including hos ng Holocaust survivor Eva Olson, a debate on the topic of evolu on, and a holiday fundraising event for a local radio sta on.  These events drew thousands of residents to our campus, providing us  with an opportunity to showcase the College.  Finally, our students, faculty and staff have always been very community oriented and as such are constantly  working with local not-for-profit organiza ons.  These individuals have annually donated well over $18,000  per year to the College Founda on and local United Ways.   They also collect items for needy veterans, the  elderly, children in need, and local animal shelters providing well over $30,000 annually to these chari es  and dona ng in excess of 1,000 man hours to their causes.  MARKETING AND MEDIA RELATIONS The highlight for this year’s marke ng department has been the redesign of our website.  This effort involved  collabora on between and among the various departments of the ins tu on.  The site was beta tested with  both students and staff and then launched in late February.  The feedback indicates a more user friendly site  and visitors are much happier with the naviga on.    Our annual State of the College Address was held in April with members of the regional media, Trustees, students, faculty, and staff in a endance.  This address is an opportunity for the College President to report on  what has happened during the past year and what ini a ves we will be working on in the coming year.  Our marke ng strategies con nue to incorporate the use of technology and social media.  We have a very  good presence on both Facebook and Twi er with larger followings than some four year ins tu ons.  We  have found that our students are willing to engage with us via social media and will con nue to incorporate it  into our strategies.  We also con nue to u lize a variety of op ons with regard to our adver sing including  radio, television, print, and billboards.   27 


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College External Relations Accomplishments, 2013-2014 FOUNDATION The Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Foundation continues to work on achieving its goal of having $1 million in assets by the end of the 2015-16 fiscal year. These assets are garnered through annual campaign donations, special fundraising events, and the development of scholarship funds for our students. The Foundation has completed its annual campaign for this fiscal year. We are happy to report that we have raised $71,246 this year which places us at approximately 21% over our goal of $59,000. This year’s donations and pledges were received from local businesses, residents, students, faculty, staff, and board members. Below is a chart of the results of our Annual Giving Campaign. Enhancing our campaigns for the past three years has been the inclusion of the Title III matching grant from the U.S. Department of Education. This year we were required to raise $20,000 in unrestricted donations which would then be matched with grant dollars. Our required match for the next two years is $40,000 and we have already begun to take pledges for these years. We added two additional scholarships during the year that will have long term effects for our students. One of these, the Dale W. Miller Scholarship, is an endowed gift that will provide financial assistance to students for years to come. We are finding that donors in our regional locations are beginning to recognize the benefits of having a community college in their area and have been very generous in providing donations to assist these centers. EMPLOYEE SUPPORT Full-Time Participation

Total Contributions COMMUNITY SUPPORT Board Members, Businesses, Individuals Total Contributions

79 of 105

$

14,096.00

$

38 57,150.00

Unrestricted

$

36,989.00

One Book

$

4,068.00

Asonevich Scholarship

$

2,800.00

Mangarella Scholarship

$

1,550.00

PTK

$

711.00

AAUW Scholarship

$

52.00

Weitz Scholarship

$

26.00

Break Barriers Scholarship

$

3,000.00

Dale W. Miller Scholarship

$

20,000.00

Blair Center

$

300.00

Huntingdon Center

$

2,000.00

Somerset Center

$

250.00

GRAND TOTAL

$

71,246.00

DESIGNATIONS

28


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College External Relations Accomplishments, 2013-2014 GRANTS We are pleased to have been awarded a number of local grants during this year. These grants provide the College with the best opportunity to enhance programs and enrollment and lead to improved relationships with funding organizations throughout the region. GRANT

AMOUNT

PURPOSE

Fend Foundation/ACE

$ 11,760.00

Scholarships for ACE students in the 5 Greater Johnstown Area School Districts

Fend Foundation

$ 7,000.00

Scholarships for incoming freshmen from the 5 Greater Johnstown Area School Districts

Lee Initiatives

$ 4,536.30

Equipment for CPR and Basic Life Support training

JED Foundation

$

Suicide Prevention Programming

Title III

$ 20,000.00

TOTAL GRANTS RECEIVED

$ 43,946.30

650.00

Endowment

EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENT TAX CREDIT PROGRAM

The College’s Educational Improvement Tax Credit (ETIC) Program raises funds that support our Accelerated College Education (ACE) Program. The College utilizes these donations to ensure that the tuition rate for this project remains affordable for everyone involved. The total amount donated for this year was $33,347.25. Total funds generated by the Foundation this year on behalf of the institution were $185,385.55.

29


College Data

2013 │ 2014


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Student Enrollment and Demographic Information, 2013-2014

ANNUAL ENROLLMENT  Unduplicated Headcount CREDIT 

3,370

Non‐Credit

1,001

CREDIT ENROLLMENT BY SEMESTER   

FALL, 2013 

SPRING, 2014 

SUMMER, 2014 

Headcount

2,544

1,802

755

Credits

21,517

15,769

4,134

1,793.08

1,314.08

344.50

FTE’s

ENROLLMENT TYPE  Type of Student ‐ Accelerated College Educa on (ACE) (The Accelerated College EducaƟon (ACE) program (also known as Dual or Concurrent Enrollment) is a partnership between school districts and the College which allows high school students to earn Pennsylvania Highlands' credits while in high school.) 

ACE Dual Enrollment  Associates in High School  Total 

FALL, 2013 

SPRING, 2014 

1,747

236

252

69

1,999

305

Program Headcount and FTE Informa on 

FALL, 2013  HEADCOUNT  FTE 

ACE PROGRAM  BAHS 

Business Administra on, AA  in High School 

GNHS

General Studies, AA in High School 

SPRING, 2014  HEADCOUNT  FTE 

1

0.33

1

0.42

107

66.42

117

37.17

Type of Student ‐ CORE CORE 

FALL, 2013 

SPRING, 2014 

New

385

171

 

954

1,119

1,339

1,290

Returning Total Core 

31

 


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Student Enrollment and Demographic Information, 2013-2014 Type of Student ‐ Non‐CORE NON‐CORE 

FALL, 2013 

SPRING, 2014 

Conemaugh Nursing 

58

153

Conemaugh Radiology 

17

28

Conemaugh Histotechnology 

0

1

Conemaugh EMS 

0

2

First Energy 

0

0

JWF

0

0

FALL, 2013  1,272 

SPRING, 2014  1,185 

88

108

CORE STUDENT DEMOGRAPHICS   Degree‐Seeking Status of CORE students    Degree Seeking  Non‐Degree Seeking 

Full‐Time / Part‐Time Status ‐ % of CORE students   Full‐Time 

FALL, 2013  67.50% 

SPRING, 2014  60.40% 

Part‐Time

32.50%

39.60%

FALL, 2013  43.16% 

SPRING, 2014  42.46% 

56.84%

57.54%

FALL, 2013 

SPRING, 2014 

Caucasian

86.91%

87.47%

African American 

4.56%

4.18%

Hispanic

1.84%

1.86%

Asian or Pacific Islander 

0.29%

0.46%

American Indian or Alaska Na ve 

0.22%

0.23%

Two or More Races 

1.18%

1.39%

Unknown

5.00%

4.41%

Gender ‐ % of CORE students   Male  Female    Ethnicity ‐ % of CORE students   

32


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Student Enrollment and Demographic Information, 2013-2014 Age ‐ % of CORE students   Under 18 

FALL, 2013  1.84% 

SPRING, 2014  1.31% 

18‐24

67.79%

66.13%

25‐29

9.41%

10.67%

30‐34

5.44%

5.96%

35‐39

5.74%

4.87%

40‐49

6.47%

7.50%

50‐64

2.65%

3.17%

65+

0.15%

0.00%

Unknown

0.51%

0.39%

Non‐Tradi onal (25+) 

29.85%

32.17%

FALL, 2013 

SPRING, 2014 

Bedford

0.66%

0.62%

Blair

5.22%

6.57%

Cambria

70.30%

70.61%

Fulton

0.00%

0.00%

Hun ngdon

4.85%

4.18%

Somerset

16.25%

15.24%

All Other Coun es 

2.72%

2.78%

County of Residence ‐ % of CORE students  

                                 

33


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Student Enrollment and Demographic Information, 2013-2014 PROGRAM ENROLLMENT  Program Headcount and FTE Informa on PROGRAM 

FALL, 2013 

SPRING, 2014 

HEADCOUNT

FTE

HEADCOUNT

FTE

AC

Accoun ng, AAS 

16

14.75

20

16.25

ACAS

Accoun ng‐ Associate of Science 

21

19.25

20

18.83

ACDT

Architectural/Civil: CAD & Design, AAS 

34

32.42

32

30.33

AO

Administra ve Office Assistant 

11

10.33

8

6.75

BAAS

Business Administra on 

33

29.58

31

29.75

BIOT

Biotechnology

2

1.42

1

0.58

BM

Business Management, AAS 

88

72.50

92

74.83

BMO

Business Management Online, AAS 

29

21.33

28

19.75

CDA

Child Development, AA 

1

1.00

1

1.00

CDAS

Child Development, AAS 

11

9.50

14

12.00

CDC

Child Development, CERT 

1

0.50

CJ

Criminal Jus ce, AAS 

52

47.08

48

42.92

CJAS

Criminal Jus ce – AS Degree 

46

45.75

34

32.08

CMST

Communica on Studies 

4

3.75

4

4.00

CPSCI

Computer Science – AS Degree 

10

10.00

13

11.58

CTNA

CICT – Network Administra on, AAS 

51

44.75

46

43.00

CUL

Culinary Arts, AAS 

13

12.50

11

10.33

ECAA

Early Childhood Educa on, AA 

12

11.42

15

12.17

EE

Early Childhood Educa on, AAS 

5

3.67

3

1.67

ES

Environmental Science – AS Degree 

2

0.58

GN

General Studies, AGS 

468

421.25

401

345.42

HCTS

Healthcare Tech Specialist 

25

23.67

25

23.00

HIST

Health Professions:  Histotechnology 

7

4.33

10

7.50

HSGN

Human Services – Generalist, AAS 

29

26.83

23

20.17

HSGR

Human Services – Gerontology, AAS 

1

0.75

1

0.50

ISA

Informa on Security and Analysis 

1

0.83

MC

Medical Coding Specialist, DIP 

39

31.50

43

33.75

MDAT

Medical Assis ng Technology, AAS 

83

74.42

80

70.33

MPR

Media Produc on 

10

8.75

14

12.58

NM

Non‐Matricula ng

88

35.50

114

34.08

OA

Administra ve Office Assistant 

1

1.00

1

1.00

PARA

Health Professions: Paramedic 

1

0.50

34


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Student Enrollment and Demographic Information, 2013-2014 Program Headcount and FTE Informa on (cont.) PROGRAM

FALL, 2013 

SPRING, 2014 

HEADCOUNT

FTE

HEADCOUNT

FTE

PH

Pharmacy Technician, CERT 

18

16.42

13

9.58

PM

Pre‐Communica ons/Media, AA 

1

0.58

1

0.25

PREH

Pre‐Health Professions – AS Degree 

2

2.00

15

12.67

PREN

Pre‐Engineering

4

4.00

6

5.83

PRPI

Professional Pilot 

6

5.08

6

5.50

PSY

Psychology, AA 

35

32.92

38

35.50

RCM

Restaurant / Culinary Management 

8

8.00

10

9.08

TECH

Technology Studies, AAS 

2

2.00

2

2.00

TM

Technology Management 

6

5.25

3

2.25

TP

Teacher Educa on, AA 

28

25.08

25

24.17

WAN

WAN/CISCO Networking 

14

13.17

11

10.58

WELD

Welding Technology, AAS 

22

19.83

23

20.58

Note: Several programs have been discon nued, combined with other programs, or renamed in the 2013‐2014 academic year.

Program Type and FTE Informa on PROGRAM

FALL, 2013 

SPRING, 2014 

HEADCOUNT

FTE

HEADCOUNT

FTE

AAS

Associate of Applied Science 

525

459.92

514

444.00

AS

Associate of Science 

125

117.75

135

122.50

AA

Associate of Arts 

561

507.25

473

405.75

CERT

Cer ficate

19

17.25

12

8.83

DIP

Diploma

42

34.00

51

41.25

   

     

35


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Student Enrollment and Demographic Information, 2013-2014

GRADUATES Degrees/Awards conferred by Program   PROGRAM 

AWARDS

AC

Accoun ng, AAS 

6

ACAS

Accoun ng – Associate of Science 

3

ACDT

Architectural/Civil: CAD & Design, AAS 

6

AO

Administra ve Office Assistant 

4

BAAS

Business Administra on 

4

BIOT

Biotechnology

1

BM

Business Management, AAS 

28

BMO

Business Management Online, AAS 

3

CDA

Child Development, AA 

1

CDAS

Child Development, AAS 

1

CJ

Criminal Jus ce, AAS 

13

CJAS

Criminal Jus ce – AS Degree 

6

CTNA

CICT – Network Administra on, AAS 

22

CUL

Culinary Arts, AAS 

8

ECAA

Early Childhood Educa on, AA 

1

ECML

Early Childhood Mgmt. Leadership, CERT 

5

EE

Early Childhood Educa on, AAS 

7

GN

General Studies, AA 

68

GNHS

General Studies – Assoc. in HS 

4

HCTS

Health Care Management, AAS 

5

HIST

Health Professions: Histotechnology 

2

HSGN

Human Services – Generalist, AAS 

10

ISA

Informa on Security and Analysis 

2

LA

Liberal Arts, AA 

1

MC

Medical Coding Specialist, DIP 

13

MDAT

Medical Assis ng Technology, AAS 

27

PARA

Health Professions: Paramedic 

1

PH

Pharmacy Technician, CERT 

7

RT

Radiologic Technology, AAS 

8

TECH

Technology Management,  AAS 

1

TM

Technology Management 

1

WAN

WAN/CISCO Networking 

4

WELD

Welding Technology, AAS 

1

36

                                                                             


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Student Enrollment and Demographic Information, 2013-2014 Program Type and Degrees/Awards Conferred PROGRAM TYPE  AA  AAS  AGS  AS  CERT  DIP 

AWARDS

Associate of Arts  Associate of Applied Science  Associate of General Studies  Associate of Science  Cer ficate  Diploma 

66 159  8  13  15  13  274 

Total

37


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Institutional Resources, 2013-2014 EMPLOYEE DATA, FALL OF 2013 Category and Employment Status FULL‐TIME

PART‐TIME

TOTAL

Instructors

26

108

134

Execu ve/Administra ve

38

0

38

Other Professionals, Support Services 

21

0

21

Technical & Paraprofessionals 

0

0

0

Clerical & Secretarial 

19

16

35

Service & Maintenance 

9

1

10

113

125

238

Total

Employment Status, Gender and Ethnicity FULL‐TIME 

 

PART‐TIME

TOTAL

MALE

FEMALE

MALE

FEMALE

MALE

FEMALE

Caucasian

48

65

56

68

104

133

African American 

0

1

0

0

0

1

Hispanic

0

0

0

0

0

0

Asian or Pacific Islander 

0

0

0

0

0

0

American Indian or Alaska Na ve 

0

0

0

0

0

0

Unknown

0

0

0

0

0

0

48

66

56

68

104

134

Total  

FACILITIES DATA SQUARE FEET

ASSIGNABLE SQUARE FEET

Richland

128,967

99,205

Ebensburg

24,651

19,248

Somerset‐West Main St 

3,759

2,959

Hun ngdon

3,258

1,638

Somerset‐Georgian Place 

3,868

1,994

Blair

4,343

2,490

168,846

127,534

Total

38

                   


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Institutional Resources, 2013-2014 FINANCE DATA Revenue and Expenses, 2012‐2013 COLLEGE REVENUE AND EXPENSES, 2012‐1013   REVENUES 

 

Student Tui on & Fees, net 

$6,977,885

Government Grants 

$777,926

Other Income 

$99,976

TOTAL OPERATING REVENUES

$7,855,786

EXPENSES

 

Instruc on

$3,720,403

Academic Support 

$1,667,419

Student Services 

$2,013,795

Ins tu onal Support 

$2,021,967

Facility/Maintenance

$1,631,325

Provision for Uncollec ble Accounts 

$74,946

Deprecia on

$934,600

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES

$12,064,455

NON‐OPERATING REVENUES/EXPENSES

 

State Appropria ons 

$3,500,852

County appropria ons 

$1,173,000

Financial Aid revenue 

$6,990,271

Financial Aid (expenses) 

($6,989,126)

Private Gi s 

$51,907

Interest

($121,498)

Other non‐opera ng revenue 

$78,106

TOTAL NON‐OPERATING REVENUE/(EXPENSES)

$4,733,512

OTHER REVENUES

 

Governments grants – Capital 

$49,727

TOTAL CHANGE IN NET POSITION

$574,570

NET POSITION – BEGINNING OF YEAR

$10,311,226

NET POSITION – END OF YEAR

$10,885,796

     

39


Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Institutional Resources, 2013-2014 Revenue and Expenses, 2012‐2013 (cont.) FOUNDATION REVENUE AND EXPENSES, 2012‐2013 REVENUES 

 

In‐kind Revenues 

$44,361

Contribu ons

$186,972

Fundraising

$21,809

TOTAL OPERATING REVENUES

$253,142   

EXPENSES Ins tu onal Support 

$51,528

Facility/Maintenance

$43,602

Provision for Uncollec ble Accounts 

$608

Scholarships and grants 

$24,470

Fundraising

$4,932

In‐kind Expenses 

$44,361

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES NON‐OPERATING REVENUES/EXPENSES 

$169,501   

Interest and dividends 

$26,714

Unrealized gains and losses 

$22,274

TOTAL NON‐OPERATING REVENUE/(EXPENSES)

$48,988

TOTAL CHANGE IN NET POSITION

$132,629

NET POSITION – BEGINNING OF YEAR

$519,678

NET POSITION – END OF YEAR

$652,307

Opera ng Fund Sources (as of June, 2013) SOURCE

AMOUNT

% OF OPERATING FUNDS

Tui on

$6,977,885

58.5%

State

$3,550,852

29.8%

Local (Cambria County) 

$1,173,000

9.8%

$229,989

1.9%

Total

$11,931,726

100%

IN‐COUNTY

REGIONAL

OUT OF COUNTY

OUT OF STATE

Full‐Time Tui on 

$1,485.00

$2,673.00

$2,970.00

$4,455.00

Per‐Credit Tui on 

$96.00

$173.00

$192.00

$288.00

Other

TUITION, 2013‐2014 Per‐Credit Tui on

Note: Does not include course fees.

40

Annual Report | 2013-2014  

The Annual Report for Pennsylvania Highlands Community College highlights many accomplishments pertaining to strategic goals for the institu...

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