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University of Pennsylvania School of Design Department of Architecture 212 Meyerson Hall 210 S. 34th Street Philadelphia, PA 19104-6311 215.898.5728 www.design.upenn.edu/architecture


INTRODUCTION FOUNDATION

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125 YEARS INTRODUCTION by Winka Dubbeldam, Chair NEWS 1/2

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501 Introduction by Andrew Saunders 502 Introduction by Annette Fierro LECTURES FOUNDATION PAVILION GALLERY

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601 Introduction by Hina Jamelle 602 Introduction by Simon Kim LECTURES GALLERY

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701 Introduction by Winka Dubbeldam 704 Introduction by Ferda kolatan LECTURES GALLERY NEWS 2/2

703 Introduction by Ali Rahim 706 Introduction by Annette Fierro HATCH 708 MEBD Introduction by William Braham IPD Introduction by Sarah Rottenberg Doctoral Degree Program Introduction by David Leatherbarrow CITY FUTURES

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PPD Thesis PhD MS & MSE PhD

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STUDIO TRAVEL SUMMER PROGRAMS

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COURSE DESCRIPTION COMPLETE ROSTER

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CREDITS

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125 YEARS INTRODUCTION by Winka Dubbeldam, Chair NEWS 1/2

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INTRODUCTION

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WINKA DUBBELDAM

WINKA DUBBELDAM

GLOBAL & LOCAL INITIATIVES Penndesign connects. Our third year Studios travel to destinations all over the world. Last year’s travel included the AA Studio in London under the leadership of Homa Farjadi, the Seoul Studio under the guidance of Simon Kim collaborated with students from Seoul National University, and the Cairo Studio was initiated, starting a three year research collaboration with the Government of Egypt, overseen by Ferda Kolatan. This new collaboration immediately resulted in an amazing exhibit at the Venice Biennale where the students showed their work on Cairo’s informal settlements in the Egyptian Pavilion. Thom Mayne, in his new role as the Cret Chair Professor of Practice, kept his students closer to home with a complete redesign of Penn Station and its surrounding area, provoking innovative urban and architectural design ideas in deeply researched proposals for the station and its role in the city. Visiting studio critics this past year included renowned architects such as: Paul Preisner, Jason Payne, Tom Wiscombe , Dan Wood, Florencia Pita, Matthijs Bouw and Kai Uwe Bergmann [BIG] and Nanako Umemoto, many of whom are slowly are becoming part of our team of returning guest critics, always adding great discourse and enticing studio subjects.

INTRODUCTION

CITY FUTURES The symposium presented a wide range of possible city futures; starting with Panel 1, Infrastructure + City Fabric, that explored the role of infrastructures (hard and soft) and urban fabrics in redefining how cities function, whether the aging metropolises in the Global North or the burgeoning megacities in the Global South. Panel 2, The Unplanned City, examined the sometimes striking commonalities and the very stark differences between informal urbanisms, and how the new potential of bottom-up systems [planned and unplanned] will shape future cities. Panel 3, The Imaginary/ Speculative City intentionally, even provocatively, played at a double meaning of “speculation”: as an act of gambling on the real estate market or as an act of visionary or utopian scheming. While the two types of speculation would seem to have little in common, or even to be fundamentally at odds with one another, both similarly envision alternatives to the city as it exists. Our list included great visiting speakers such as James Lima, Thom Mayne, Tom Verebes, Interboro,

Superpool, Istanbul, Andrew Herscher, Shohei Shigematsu [OMA] Paul Preissner, Vyjayanthi Rao, Alfonso Vergara, and Liam Young, all of whom opened up an amazing variety of views on the potential for the city that will influence us for years to come. City Futures was organized by Chair Winka Dubbeldam, with co-organizers Daniela Fabricius and Joseph Michael Watson. This symposium was one of the many organized at PennDesign.

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INTRODUCTION I am happy to introduce to you this year’s Pressing Matters, already in it’s fifth edition. It is a moment to look back, especially at last year’s celebration of the 125th anniversary of the Architecture Department at the University of Pennsylvania [2015-16]. In 1749 Benjamin Franklin published his famous essay, Proposals Relating to the Education of Youth, circulated it among Philadelphia’s leading citizens, and organized 24 trustees to form an institution of higher education based on his proposals. After 125 years of architectural education at the University of Pennsylvania, our City Futures symposium celebrated Franklin’s visionary initiative.


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Winka Dubbeldam, Assoc. AIA Professor and Chair Department of Architecture winka@design.upenn.edu

Winka Dubbeldam PROFESSOR & CHAIR - Founded Archi-Tectonics (1994) - Received Master's degrees from the Academy of Architecture in Rotterdam (1990) and Columbia GSAPP, NYC (1992) - Lectured & taught in the masters programs at Columbia GSAPP, Harvard, and Cornell. - External examiner for the AA's annual RIBA review & on the board of Directors for the Institute for Urban Design, NYC; & for BOFFO, NYC.

WINKA DUBBELDAM

WINKA DUBBELDAM

We hope to host you very soon at PennDesign!

INTRODUCTION

PENNDESIGN This year we are adding a brand new Robotics Lab to our school in collaboration with ABB. This adds to the large pool of 3D printers, which are not only installed in the school’s FabLab, but also directly in our student’s studio space. This exemplifies the Department’s ongoing interest in Digital Design and manufacturing, and its ongoing dedication developing ties to outside experts and to a vast terrain of innovations. A great example is the Annual Pavilion designed by a team of first year students, and built the semester after, by a group of first, second and third year students. Always sponsored, this pavilion finds a home outside of PennDesign the summer after graduation. The Department of Architecture offers an undergraduate major, a professionally accredited Master’s degree, two post-professional Master’s programs [MSS-AAD and the MEBD], and a research-based Master of Science and Doctoral program. The Department is situated within a multi-disciplinary School of Design and a strong research University. This allows for many kinds of connections and specialized studies, including undergraduate minors, certificate studies at

the Master’s level, and dual degrees in a host of disciplines. You can find more on our website: http://www.design.upenn.edu/architecture/graduate/work

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Of course the new Summer Programs are also going strong. Our Paris Program (spearheaded by professor Annette Fierro), the Greece program (under leadership of Danielle Willems and Ezio Blasetti), as well as the Colombia Program (run by Eduardo Rega Calvo and Juan Ricardo Rincon from Bogota), have inspired students over the last few years and strengthened PennDesign’s collaborations in Europe and Latin America. Workshops with local students add a strong intellectual discourse to the summer, and allow the students to experience the local culture, while making new friends.


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MAY 2015 WINKA DUBBELDAM PUBLISHED IN “CONVERSATIONS WITH ARCHITECTS” Vladimir Belogolovsky's book "Conversations with Architects- In the Age of Celebrity" was published by Dom Publishers. Winka is featured alongside other luminaries of the industry such as Liz Diller, Zaha Hadid, and Peter Eisenman. Belogolovsky follows in the great footsteps of Cook/Klotz with this new book; the author provides a detailed picture of contemporary architects in the form of documented conversations. The publication features interviews with thirty architects, which Belogolovsky conducted in the framework of his long-term, international activities as a curator and author.

MOOOI’S NEW YORK SHOWROOM OPENING IN NOMAD

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Moooi’s first US showroom and Headquarters located on 36 East 31st Street in Manhattan were recently designed by Archi-Tectonics and opened during Design Week in May 2015. Aesthetically a marriage made in heaven, Archi-tectonics trademark approach was a perfect fit for the famed Dutch company’s “narrative design” furniture and accessories. A grand steel winding stair, skylights, custom display units and imposing metal entrance doors contributed to completely transform this vast space.

ALUM CLARK THENHAUS WINS PennDesign alum Clark Thenhaus (M.Arch 2007), of Endemic, won the Architectural League of New York Prize. The Architectural League Prize is one of North America’s most prestigious awards for young architects and designers. The Prize, established in 1981, recognizes exemplary and provocative work by young practitioners and provides a public forum for the exchange of their ideas.


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SEPTEMBER 2015

WINKA DUBBELDAM, CHAIR ARCHI-TECTONICS FEATURED IN “30 YEARS OF EMERGING VOICES”

4TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION SUMMIT, SINGAPORE

Archi-Tectonics was featured as "One of the forty most inventive and exciting design practices working in the city today" in the newly launched 30 Years of Emerging Voices, published by The Architectural League of New York. Understanding the importance of fostering young designers, the firm also participated to “Open Studios on Open House” for New York City design students.

Winka Dubbeldam moderated the “Technology” Panel at this Summit that took place in Singapore last September. The panel discussed technology as a theme, tool and platform for creating networks and enhancing collaborations. The “technology panel” consisted of Tom Kovac, Jeffrey Huang, Prof Xu Weiguo and Dietmar Leyk. The three-day conference focused on emerging networks in architectural education.

PENNDESIGN TEAM WINS FIRST PRIZE On July 9, Team A from PennDesign was announced as the 1st Prize Winner for Vertical Cities Asia 2015 with their project”The Third Reserve". Teammates Joseph Rosenberg, Daniel Lau, and Lindsay L Rule were then invited to present their scheme to the guest of honor, Singapore's Minister of State for National Development, Dr. Mohamad Maliki, who shared their enthusiasm for innovative farming technology and productive landscapes within Singapore.

BUILDING TOMORROW: TRENDS DRIVING THE FUTURE OF DESIGN PSFK, a trend research company, and Architizer invited Winka to provide her expertise to the PSFK+ Architizer's report, Building Tomorrow: Trends Driving the Future of Design.

OCTOBER 2015

NEW! — MSD-AAD Our former 2 semester Master of Architecture II post-professional degree, referred to as the PPD, is now the 3 semester Master of Science in Design with a concentration in Advanced Architectural Design (MSD-AAD). There will be no significant change to the program, though our faculty are always working to improve content and coursework for all of the programs at PennDesign.

AUGUST 2015 WINKA DUBBELDAM, CHAIR

KEYNOTE LECTURE – ROTTERDAM’ ACADEMY OF ARCHITECTURE 50 YEAR JUBILEE The Rotterdam Academie van Bouwkunst [Academy of Architecture] celebrated their 50th Anniversary with a symposium, and Winka Dubbeldam was chosen among 700 fellow alumni to give the Jubilee Keynote Lecture. The Academy is located in a spectacular harbor building in Rotterdam’ Heijplaatstraat.

SEPTEMBER 2015 LECTURE IN AUSTIN TX The University of Texas-Austin School of Architecture hosted a lecture by Winka Dubbeldam as part of their Fall lecture series. Her lecture “INTRINSIC” which explained Winka’s firm’s conceptual underpinning, was followed by a reception hosted by the AIA Austin Chapter.

MICHAEL LOVERICH’S FIRM IS SHORT-LISTED FINALIST FOR THE PS1 WARM-UP SERIES 2015 In ‘Gels’ water informs the creation of a new landscape where water is captured in various features across the site to produce a collection of living beings. Throughout the course of the summer the installation will grow and wither as one of its primary materials is bundled and mounded hay which will sprout wheatgrass and wildflowers across its conical surfaces. In addition to nourishing these architectural volumes water becomes a playful architectural element within the courtyard and its presence can be felt, heard and seen in a large glowing and \ bellowing sac of liquid and its numerous jelly-like offspring. The largest sac becomes an interactive feature helping to motivate the party much like a disco ball would and the smaller water sacs are sprinkled throughout the site becoming furniture and structural elements. Water also can be found oozing from elevated and interactive heads that sway in the wind creating a cooling drip garden. As the summer comes to an end the bodies of these elements which have been held together with thin membranes of plastic and netting will be drained of their water and their hay composted leaving barely a trace of their former beings.

BLTA 2015 STUDENT DESIGN COMPETITION; PENNDESIGN STUDENTS WIN 1ST AND 3RD PLACE! The mission of the competition is to provide maximum freedom to the participants in proposing imaginative and sustainable building design ideas. - During years of disinvestment following World War II, the once vibrant neighborhoods of North Philadelphia around Temple University became economically depressed. Beginning in the early 1960s a local Baptist clergyman, Reverend Leon H. Sullivan (1922-2001), spearheaded programs of community investment that achieved significant success.

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DECEMBER 2015

‘MATERIAL PERFORMANCES’ OPENS; AN ARCHITECTURE FACULTY SHOW

FACULTY MEMBERS ALI RAHIM AND HINA JAMELLE SELECTED FOR ’50 UNDER 50’

Material Performances – Architecture Faculty Show ( Nov 2nd to 20th ) with work from faculty members, Ben Krone, Jonathan Scelsa and Brian Phillips. Materials are the inspiration of many a design project. In this exhibit four architects and faculty members from the Architecture department at Penn Design demonstrate their inventiveness in re-conceptualizing the architectural possibilities of common and at times ubiquitous materials – canvas, polypropylene, felt and fiber cement. In a chance encounter with rain, light, sound and surface inscriptions, what was once common has now been transformed into a material with significantly enhanced performative characteristics. This exhibit introduces us to the form finding promise of planar sheet polymers (Scelsa’s Plastic Flowers); the environmental capacity of high performance canvas (Krone’s Canopy); the ornamental aptitude of cementitious panels (Phillips’ Tattoo/ Skinny House ) and the sound absorptive potential of wool felt ( Krone’s RMDH Music Experience ). Each of the four projects captured in Material Performances ask us to look anew at the infinite possibilities for design that existing materials afford when we actively interrogate their performative dimensions.

DANIEL BARBER LECTURE Daniel Barber gives keynote lecture entitled “The World Solar Energy Project, continued” at the symposium “Ignis Mutat Res: Thinking Architecture and Urbanism through Energy.” This was symposium held at the Ecole Nationale Superieure d’Architecture Paris - Belleville. It was sponsored by the French Ministry of Culture as a lead in to the COP 21 climate change discussions in Paris in December.

FACULTY MEMBER J.D. ALBERT NAMED TO NATIONAL INVENTORS HALL OF FAME PennDesign Lecturer J.D. Albert has been named a 2016 inductee for the National Inventors' Hall of Fame (NIHF). Working in the lab of MIT professor Joe Jacobson, Albert helped develop the concept of a book with content that could be changed and renewed at the push of a button—what ultimately became electronic ink used in e-readers like the Kindle and Nook.

DECEMBER 2015 Daniel Barber gives a presentation as part of the conference “Climate Change and the Scales of Environment” at the Columbia University GSAPP.

FORMER FACULTY MEMBERS DENISE SCOTT BROWN AND ROBERT VENTURI RECEIVE 2016 AIA GOLD MEDAL According to the AIA's announcement, Scott Brown and Venturi "have long enhanced the popular appreciation of architecture, with their whimsical forms that play off historical precedents and their writing in support of everyday building types that might otherwise be disregarded." The announcement continues, "Scott Brown’s 1972 book Learning from Las Vegas (with Steven Izenour) remain more than required reading for every architecture student. They are touchstones for three generations of architects in thinking critically and designing thoughtfully."

New Book Spotlights Architecture and Design Innovators of the 21st Century Professor of Architecture Ali Rahim and Senior Lecturer in Architecture Hina Jamelle are among the contemporary architects, designers, artists and others profiled in a new book, Fifty Under Fifty: Innovators of the 21st Century (Images Publishing, 2015). The work of Rahim and Jamelle's firm, Contemporary Architecture Practice, was included by the editors to represent a forward-thinking generation of creative people who are aware of global issues that urgently need solutions through imaginative design. The projects presented here show how these practitioners bridge disciplines, respect cultural norms, respond to human needs regardless of costs, and how they adopt team transparency in their passion to create and solve problems with a clear mission. Featured projects are sited in Bangladesh, Belgium, Brazil, China, Germany, India, Ireland, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Thailand, Turkey, and the United States.

JANUARY 2016 MICHAEL LOVERICH’S FIRM’S PINATA WAS DISPLAYED AT THE GRAHAM FOUNDATION AS PART OF THE ‘WHY WRITE ALONE’ PUBLICATION. The Graham Foundation is pleased to present Treatise: Why Write Alone?—an exhibition and publication project that brings together fourteen young design offices to consider the architectural treatise as a site for theoretical inquiry, experimentation, and debate. Organized by Chicago and Los Angeles-based designer Jimenez Lai, the project grows out of a recent Graham Foundation grant to Lai, whose interest in discursive practices and nonconformist approaches to architecture led him to ask his peers working in the realm of conceptual architecture: Why write? And, why write alone? In response to these questions, Treatise presents an exhibition of works by this core group of designers as well as an individual treatise from each office. Together, the exhibition and publications provide a platform to investigate the collective and individual stakes that emerge from this temporary alliance of designers as they explore architecture’s representational limits and possibilities.

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DANIEL BARBER PRESENTATION

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MARCH 2016

FIVE WOMEN TO WATCH IN BUILDING AND DESIGN 2016

"CLOSE-UP", OUR FACULTY INCLUDED IN A SCI-Arc EXHIBITION

Winka Dubbeldam was named as one of “Five Women to Watch in Building and Design” by Elegran, a New York City-based real estate and development company. Gretchen Chapman’s article features two Archi-Tectonics projects, the Greenwich Street Project (80,000 sf, completed in 2004) and the Grand Salon in the Tribeca Grand Hotel (1,200 sf, completed in 2010). “Archi-tectonics’ choice of an intimate color scheme, metallic curtains and a deep red lighting scheme perfectly complement the Salvador Dali–inspired furniture”, says Chapman.

From Sciarc.edu: "Close-up examines the impact of digital technologies on the architectural detail and the traditions of tectonic expression associated with it. An often overlooked condition of digital design technologies is the ability to design objects through continuous degrees of magnification. The consequences of this very basic fact are more significant than we may realize. The traditional premise that some architectural ideas only reside at standardized scales of magnification at this point is nostalgic. This exhibition proposes that technological advancements have resulted in a transformation of how architectural ideas unfold at different degrees of resolution and that tectonics might mean something very different in the 21st century. Related to this new power of computer assisted observation for both the author and the audience of architecture is the blurring of the boundaries between the virtual and the real and the mutual imbrications of concepts with materials. Ranging from the cinematic to the clinical, the transition from the architectural detail to the architectural close-up implies new formal logics and new modes of reception. This exhibition will survey some of the pioneers of this way of thinking about architecture after the digital and examine recent work by emerging architects that are continuing this important investigation.

ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM RECEIVES ACCREDITATION “This past February we set up the Upper Gallery in Meyerson Hall for accreditation. While the room remained closed off to the public during evaluation, we did take some photos to show off all the hard work that went into the accreditation preparation. We are very proud of our 2016 Visiting Team Report. ‘The interdisciplinary nature of the architecture program—with other departments within the School of Design (PennDesign) and within the university—is exemplary. The extensive integration of advanced technology as a teaching, learning, and research tool is very unique and a signature of the program.’ ”

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FEBRUARY 2016

MARCH 2016 The GW Townhouse is a seven floors, single family private residence located in Downtown Manhattan. This “double-skin” building comprising a renovated 4-story brick townhouse with a 3floor extension, reflects a new way to interpret New York’ urban fabric while offering a new concept of city-dwelling. The boundary between privacy and openness here is blurred by an innovative, foldable solar shading system, with a loose fit, allowing its inhabitant to choose between privacy or interaction with the surrounding urban life on the terraces located between the 2 skins.

DANIEL BARBER Daniel Barber gives the keynote lecture at a symposium commemorating the 40th anniversary of the School of Architecture at Victoria University in Wellington, New Zealand.

LOS ANGELES CHAPTER OF THE PENNDESIGN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Thom Mayne and PennDesign Overseer William Witte (C'73, MCP'75) host the Los Angeles Chapter of the PennDesign Alumni Association for a cocktail reception and talk by Winka Dubbeldam and Dean Marilyn Taylor.

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GW TOWNHOUSE UNDER CONSTRUCTION - NYC


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APRIL 2016

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MARCH 2016

UNDER EGYPTIAN PARTNERSHIP, ARCHITECTURE STUDIO LOOKS BEYOND TOURIST'S CAIRO The Department of Architecture at PennDesign recently kicked off a new collaboration with the Ministry of Heritage and Culture in Cairo, Egypt. The partnership began this semester with the 704 Research Design Studio Real Fictions led by Senior Lecturer Ferda Kolatan, which took students to Cairo for a week in March. The studio will culminate in an exhibition at the Egyptian Pavilion in this year’s Architecture Biennale in Venice, Italy, on view May 28 – November 27, 2016.

DANIEL BARBER LECTURE

PENNDESIGN'S ARCHITECTURE RANKS THIRD

Daniel Barber gives a lecture at the Yale School of Architecture as part of the conference commemorating its 100th anniversary.

Most Admired Programs From Deans and Chairs. Design Intelligence polled 90 deans and chairs for their ranking of architecture schools. We're happy to announce that PennDesign's Architecture program has ranked third!

MAY 2016 OSLO ARCHITECTURE TRIENNALE 2016

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THOM MAYNE JOINS US AS THE 2016 COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER!

PENNDESIGN STUDENTS REACH NEW HEIGHTS IN EVOLO SKYSCRAPER COMPETITION Two PennDesign student teams have placed in eVolo Magazine's 2016 Skyscraper Competition. The Hive, designed by Hadeel Ayed Mohammad, Yifeng Zhao, and Chengda Zhu, received second place. The project imagines a vertical control terminal for advanced flying drones that will provide personal and commercial services to residents of New York City. Biomorph, designed by Jayong Shim, Dailong Ma, and Tai Feng, received an Honorable Mention. The project imagines atmospheres as a re-invention of typology for new ways of monetizing space. The students are all enrolled in PennDesign's Advanced Architectural Design program, directed by Professor of Architecture Ali Rahim.

Marilyn Jordan Taylor, Dean and Paley Professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design, announced last month that Thom Mayne - one of the world’s most prominent living architects, and Practice Professor of Architecture and Paul Philippe Cret Professor - had accepted her invitation to speak at PennDesign’s Commencement Exercises on Monday, May 16, 2016!

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Eduardo Rega and his partners Nora Akawi, Nina Kolowratnik and Johannes Pointl were selected for the exhibition In Residence and publication of the Oslo Architecture Triennale 2016, After Belonging Agency with the project Movement as Civilian Disobedience: Mapping Migration and Solidarity on Lesvos Island.


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501 Introduction by Andrew Saunders 502 Introduction by Annette Fierro LECTURES FOUNDATION PAVILIONS GALLERY

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FOUNDATION 501

Andrew Saunders, Coordinator

[4]

Ezio Blasetti LECTURER

Abigail Coover Hume LECTURER

Lasha Brown LECTURER

- Principal of Andrew Saunders Architecture + Design (2004) - Received an M.Arch from Harvard GSD with Distinction for work of clearly exceptional merit. (2004) - B.Arch from Fay Jones School of Architecture, University of Arkansas (1998) - Winner of The Robert S. Brown ‘52 Fellows Program (2013)

- Founding Partner of ahylo, Athens, GR (2009) - Received an MSAAD from Columbia University GSAPP after having previously studied in Athens and Paris. (2006) - Founder of algorithmicdesign.net - Taught at Pratt Institute, the Architectural Association, and Columbia University

- Partner at Hume Coover Studio (2008) - Editor & Founder of suckerPUNCH (2008) - Graduated with a MArch from Yale University (2006) - Earned a Bachelor of Science in Architecture from University of Virginia (2001)

- Co-founded design studio Akte_01, PA & NY (2009) - Received an MArch from Yale University (2008) and a BArch from Syracuse University (2002) - A teaching fellow at Yale School of Architecture

[5]

[6]

[7]

Danielle Willems LECTURER

Eduardo Rega LECTURER

Michael Loverich LECTURER

-C  o-Founder of Mæta Design (2008) - Visiting Professor at Pratt University, Brooklyn NY - Earned a MArch from Columbia University, GSAPP (2007)

- Editor, & Art Director of the Editorial Project and Investigation system “From Spam to Maps” - Master of Science in Advanced Architectural Design at Columbia University - MArch from Polytechnic University of Madrid, ETSAM - BArch, University of Las Palmas, Spain

- Co-founded Bittertang (2008) - Master of Architecture (MArch I) from the University of California Los Angeles; Dept. of Architecture and Urban Design (2007) - Received the Architectural League Prize for Young Designers: Resource (2010) - AIA New Practices New York Award (2014)

FOUNDATION 501

PROJECT 02 For the second project, students are challenged to evolve concepts from their pavilion in the design of a larger architectural intervention within an architecturally and culturally significant context. The project utilizes skills and analytical concepts from Project 01 to fully engage architectural criteria including, enclosure, program, circulation, lighting, materiality, space and form.

[3]

Andrew Saunders ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

DESCRIPTIONS OF THE STUDIO PROJECTS: There are two projects that successively build upon one another. PROJECT01 / PAVILION During the first stage, students engage descriptive geometry and generative analysis of a cultural artifact, working through disciplined and explicit modeling and fabrication. Once documented, a container is designed and fabricated for the partial display of that object. The container curates by hiding and revealing precise traits as well as negotiating prescribed normative boundary conditions. Based on the concepts developed in the container project, generative drawing and modeling techniques are introduced to interrogate the artifact and amplify its effects. The generative exercise motivates the construction of aggregations and part-to-whole relationships by developing new objects through a series of transformations. For the second stage, students are divided into three groups per section based on common tactics from the initial exercise. The groups proceed to design and develop full-scale (non representational) pavilions demonstrating the architectural consequences of part-to-whole relationships. Pavilions accomplishing structural span, component variation, durable construction and reaffirmation of prescribed normative boundaries for the formation of differentiated and habitable space.

[2]

M ARCH

M ARCH

FOUNDATION 501 FACULTY

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The 501 Studio is the introductory course in the Master of Architecture Design Studio sequence. In contemporary pedagogy, design studio is the primary course in the preparation of the professional architect. Exercises and projects are designed to train the student so that the methodology gained will sustain the practitioner through the challenges of practice. More importantly, this methodology provides a framework of values and criticality to elevate the output of this practice to its highest expression. The studio sequence involves carefully developed projects to introduce students to the first principles of material and its properties, shaped and formed in particular geometries, to produce space and enclosure that imparts meaning. Furthermore, the studio imparts the irreducible basics of architectural design media, its notations of communication, and their spaces of design. Production requires learning of both techniques and strategies introduced through a series of design procedures. The design processes, in turn, requires the fluent use of both analog and computational tools -including those of digital modeling and fabrication. These techniques and strategies are gained through the studio’s progression of projects and the lectures and readings that accompany each project. Each project’s requirements include the appropriate 2D and 3D documents, a short writing requirement and physical models. In addition, assignments of the Visual Studies (ARCH 521) course reinforce essential skill sets integral to the objectives and deliverables of the 501 studio.


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[1]

MANITOGA SANCTUM SPECULATIVE WHOLES IN PARTS

[2]

CRITIC: Ezio Blasetti TA: Jung Jae Suh This is a speculative design studio that attempts to redefine the contemporary architectural discourse within a larger scale of time. Each project aspires to reposition contemporary architectural techniques for the definition of space in dialogue with a disciplinary canon and within a broader ontological morphogenetic framework. Architecture is a singularity in the confluence of matter with time. Through a Socratic questioning on the emergence of architectural language, the studio is in search of a new fundamental logos at once analytical and generative, immersed within and emerging from an environment through interference. Our speculative condition is that computation is not solely digital but omnipresent. As such, beyond the correlation of simulation, this studio positions different mediums onto a flat

PARTIAL PARTS/ UNIQUE WHOLES

[3]

CRITIC: Abigail Coover Hume This studio seeks to challenge the relationships between two dimensional drawings and three dimension space and form. We looked at drawings as a critical tool throughout the design process and not just as a final output. The relationship of part to whole was a focus of the entire 501 class. The particular spin on this in our studio was to use fork, material and color not the differentiate individual parts within the whole, but to create both continuity and difference across the whole that was not in specific relationship to the individual parts. This technique allows for both the part and the whole to be expressed in the final architectural manifestation.

This studio explored the design of a pavilion and exhibition gallery on the grounds of the Russel Wright design center of Manitoga in Garrison, NY by developing organizational, formal, and material vocabularies discovered through analysis of Russel Wright’s ceramic vessels and self-organizing systems.

Self-organization is a process where some form of overall order or coordination arises out of the local interactions between smaller component parts of an initially disordered system. The process of selforganization can be spontaneous, and not necessarily controlled by any auxiliary agent outside of the system - often triggered by random fluctuations amplified by positive feedback. Students are asked to design their own self-organizing system based on material behaviors and logics in order to generate a set of spatial, material, and tectonic principles resulting in a full-scale inhabitable pavilion. Criteria for the system include the ability to accommodate opposing states within a selfsimilar assembly logic. Certain flexible parameters of the system are to be identified and calibrated to achieve gradient conditions between these opposing states. For this studio, the study of self-organizing systems are by no means intended to absolve the author of responsibility nor as an abstract exercise in sculptural expression, but a means through which students engage architecture’s fundamental principles of part-to-whole relationships, structure, form, and representation, without resorting to architectural clichés. Systems generated for the pavilion and their implications with regard to the external pressures of site, and threshold were further explored for project 2. Edge conditions identified on the site become territories of negotiation for these tectonic systems as well as a testing ground for their capacity of adaptation. Scalar shifts and geometric variation become devices used to negotiate these conditions in plan, section, and volumetric expression. The ambition of the project is to expand upon the formal principles established in the pavilion exercise - evolving into a full engagement of architectural criteria including, site, circulation, enclosure, program, lighting, and space.

CRITIC: Danielle Willems Protomorphs’ perceives the architectural production as part of a larger, self-organizing, material process. While engaging in the production of protomorphic-architectural environments through the generative capacities of algorithmic /diagrammatic logics, our primary focus will be the relationship between city and architecture. Finding the constitutive difference between the two in time, more so than in form. This studio is an investigation into the processes of becoming, and as such, it fuses the two modes of thought into a unified phase space. One of the challenges in the studio will be to reinvention of the means of assessment, the development of notations and techniques that will document the forces and the production of ‘difference’ in the spatial manifestations of the generative systems. With the introduction of a secondary scale of time in the design process, borrowing a concept from biology, symbiogenesis will be the primary force in the evolution of the projects. Contingency could be defined as an event that originates from outside a predefined system, and is an occurrence that decouples stable sequences. The contingent event in Meillassoux’s words is, “something that finally happens something other, something which in its irreducibility to all preregistered possibilities of predictability.” In addition to that definition Robin Mackay states, “The formation of the solar system, the emergence of life on this planet, the descent of man, the determination of the structure of our unconscious through biological heredity and social evolution- itself now subject to the accelerated technological reformatting of capital…We are the product of contingent events, material histories, webs and networks of autonomous forces.” This studio will test new mediums of contingency through material experimentation and behavioral systems analysis, looking deeper into the intelligence and complexities that surround our everyday experience. How could Architecture exhibit its own contingent nature? How could speculative scenarios begin to unleash mediums and formations of a contingent behavior? The studio methodology consists of three feedback layers: generative diagram, prototyping model and video. The generative diagram is the assembly machine to forms. The physical model should be a method of rapid prototyping the limits of the generative diagram in order to make specific spaces/ scapes and formal behaviors in relationship to the

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In reference to his generative method of analyzing other philosophers, Gilles Deleuze once famously described it as a “buggery”, sneaking behind an author and producing an offspring which is recognizably his, yet also monstrous and different. Work with original ceramic pieces of Russel Wright, students identify and mined specific Euclidian traits from each by analyzing the whole artifacts and or choosing to highlight and extract particular moments or traits in the manifold. Once they were modeled and extracted students began to merge the characteristics with those of other Russel Wright pieces. The goal being to produce a Frankenstein or monstrous child from pairs of Russel Wright pieces. The new pieces did not retain any relationship to the original function of the piece, but did reference a genetic topological relationship with the parents. Put simply, no foreign geometry should was present in the new hybrids. The sibling pieces were bizarre and weird but clearly possess traits that from the American modern collection. The gentic variation were something that Russel Wright never designed, but could have. Free from the original functionality, the domestic vessels could then operate at and generate unique architectural consequences both tectonically and spatially.

WITHDRAWN MACHINES [4] PROTOMORPHS [5] CRITIC: Lasha Brown EMERGENT ONTOLOGICAL TA: Ramon Pena FORMATIONS

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ontology and mines the collateral effects of the synchronicities and divergences between them. The primary territory of feedback between abstraction, matter and narration is pattern. We seek novel patterns of organization, structure and articulation as architectural expressions within the emergent properties of feedback loops and rule based systems. In our contemporary condition, material is becoming indiscernible from media. Our current scientific advancements predict a not-so-distant future when a plethora of different scales of time, from the genetic to the geological, come in direct contact with our technical apparatuses. In this context, our hybrid languages increase their potency of affection of the ‘real’. What is at stake then, beyond notions of mimicry and optimization of matter is the search for a new type of poetry: a ‘logos’ inseparable from ‘becoming real’. Central to the studio agenda is the exploration of complex systems and their application to design. This will involve extracting the processes that operate within the physical world as well as developing new models of self-organization. Students are encouraged to engage closely with computational processes in order to develop an aesthetic and intuition of complexity that resides in a balance between design intent and emergent character. Embedded within the abstract diagram and code are certain fabrication constraints that allow for a final materialization facilitated by computer aided manufacturing tools. The studio will function as an open source research group of computational design. It will combine the larger resource of algorithmic and parametric modules developed for a series of programming languages, the hardware and software protocols of interactivity with the positive constrains of material behavior.

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SPATIAL DISRUPTIONS [6] OF FICTIONAL NETWORKS M ARCH

The design studio proposes the use of fictional narratives as efficient environments for typologic investigation. Architecture and cinema are contrasted as two areas of knowledge with a difference of potential ready to provoke productive shocks: architectural autonomy is juxtaposed to architectural agency: timeless spatial strategies are contaminated by ready made-fictions; typology is disturbed by human & non-human relations; architectural tropes reorganize networks of relations; Kahn gets disrupted by Tati, Ishigami by Ang Lee, Koolhaas by Zhangke Jia. Design projects are constituted as accidents, failures and unprecedented anomalies that may advance the field of Architecture. The design studio provokes clashes between non-directional spaces and schizophrenia, poche and revolution, served-and-service spaces and murder.

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sensations within the details or overall massing. Sensations can be evoked by manipulating those experiencing the space or at other scales by producing figuration with an attitude or by creating traces of a recently present figure. Material and form often become transfigured through this process becoming something other, something new. Beyond these formal and compositional studies the studio explored the sensuality of architectural space and the sensuality of those things that fill it by studying the boudoir. Every aspect of the interior is considered to be an aggressively sensual component revealing ways in which things such as furniture, water, light and human form can transform and create new relationships within these interiors.

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projects spatial/temporal thesis. The video component will be used as a different method of exploring, experimenting, generating spatial sequences, creating immersive environments, and building a narrative inside or through the architectural forms. The studio thesis will venture into an investigation that is embodied within a novel approach, to the relationship between the emerging narrations of two modes of time, architecture/city.

BERNINI AND BOUDOIRS [7]

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CRITIC: Michael Loverich TA : Emily Gruendel Part to whole relationships as well as site strategies were interrogated using material studies of soft bodies constrained within enclosures. Initial studies focused on pressurized membranes and foams whose composition referenced a specific Bernini work which expressed bel composto most clearly. Bel composto being the merging of various arts, typically sculpture, architecture and painting into one cohesive whole to convey a mood, atmosphere or narrative that neither alone could do as well; for example as shown in the Apse Gloria. Not being content to stop with those three we folded furniture, landscape and bodies into the mix. By taking design control of these elements and allowing them to interact together the proposals were able to veer between bodily and/or pastoral wholes. The interest in this underlying work is that legibility fluctuates between the parts and the whole while also conveying very specific and intense


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...two types of curational spaces are created, one existing within the poche and one that is around it. The drastic change in figure ground is a result of the polarity between surface condition and spatial perforation.

CRITIC: Andrew Saunders

STUDENT: Ruo Ning Deng

[1]

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...knot-like circulation & blurring of thresholds echoes the hiking trails over the landscape—vertical circulation in the gallery is located in a moment that cannot be defined as outside or inside but as a tertiary poche space...

CRITIC: Andrew Saunders

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...challenging the role of galleries by giving viewers the freedom to instinctually walking through the heterarchy of spaces & allowing for an unconscious development of personally founded interest & experience. #.2.2 # 3.2

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STUDENT: Yiqun Chen

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...five “bubbles” are placed along two axes, where all the main galleries are located on the south-north axis, flanked by a restroom & outside gallery...the geometry & interior changes like the interaction between real bubbles.

CRITIC: Abigail Coover Hume

[3]

STUDENT: Yuwei Sun

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The basic shape of the gallery is formed by five separated round bases on the ground & thirteen openings on top. By connecting bases & top openings, a pathway is formed, connecting the space as a whole.

CRITIC: Abigail Coover Hume

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ABIGAIL COOVER HUME

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Submergence

Russel Wright Gallery

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PENNDesign | Fall 2015 | ARCH 501Design Studio| Lasha Brown

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STUDENT: Portia Malik

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...provides intrigue through both revealing and hiding its circular structural members, beneath many layers of tensile fabric...Aggregation of different control curves at specified points produces an ever evolving frame...

CRITIC: Lasha Brown Ramon Pena (TA)

STUDENT: Shixiang (Andy) Zheng

[4]

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Folds and creases were introduced to give scale and definition to the continuous surfaces. Sectionally, a relationship is established between oculi, floors, and voids. Blurring the ground’s relationship to the exterior walls...

CRITIC: Lasha Brown Ramon Pena (TA)

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Yang Li

Studio |Danielle Willems

Yichen Wang, Siyang Chiao, Daniel Hurley, Ramune Bartuskaite

STUDENT: Daniel Wills Hurley

CRITIC: Danielle Willems

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...investigates the geometry of nested rock formations...The massing emulates the naturally occuring componentry of geological formations through seams, cracks, and tightly nested geometry... Yichen Wang, Siyang Chiao, Daniel Hurley, Ramune Bartuskaite

PENNDesign | Fall 2015 | ARCH 521 | Instructor Danielle Willems

STUDENT: Yang Li

[5]

PENNDesign | Fall 2015 | ARCH 521 | Instructor Danielle Willems

CRITIC: Danielle Willems

Images: 06 07 08 09

The behaviors of exterior skin include disintegration, layering, & peeling, which are demonstrated by the tectonics. The skin has a tranlucent finish, acquiring various permeabilties of light—a component of eroision. #.24

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DANIELLE WILLEMS

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Is it possible to create a flexible space where one can manipulate based on personality? To create good & evil spaces which are subjective to the user? To push spaces to limits creating highly uncomfortable spaces?

CRITIC: Eduardo Rega

STUDENT: Yiwei Gao

[6]

Images: 06 07 08 09

With the rise of the water, most low-altitude places have been submerged into the water...the solution of a floating house is capable of preventing and being submerged and responds to multiple water levels.

CRITIC: Eduardo Rega

[6]

EDUARDO REGA

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...part to the whole relationship, here, is not merely an aggregation of formal components but rather an aggregation of textures, fluid spatial sequences, and diffused lighting conditions

CRITIC: Michael Loverich Emily Gruendel (TA)

STUDENT: Alyssa Appel

[7]

Images: 06 07 08 09

Folds in the foam bodies become filled with rock, water, or air in response to the functional needs of the space. Water spills through the seams in the bodies as well, forming walls of water that delineate space.

CRITIC: Michael Loverich Emily Gruendel (TA)

[7]

MICHAEL LOVERICH

MICHAEL LOVERICH

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[4]

Annette Fierro ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

Andrew Saunders ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

Jonathan Scelsa LECTURER

Joshua Freese LECTURER

- MArch from Rice University (1984) - BS in Civil Engineering from Rice University (1980) - Author of The Glass State: The Technology of the Spectacle/ Paris 1981-1998 (MIT Press, 2003) - Lectured at Cornell University, Columbia University, and Penn as well as for the Institute of French Culture and Technology

- Principal of Andrew Saunders Architecture + Design (2004) - Received an M.Arch from Harvard GSD with Distinction for work of clearly exceptional merit. (2004) - B.Arch from Fay Jones School of Architecture, University of Arkansas (1998) - Winner of The Robert S. Brown ‘52 Fellows Program (2013)

- Prior to the founding of OP – Architecture Landscape - Worked as a designer and project manager in several high profile international offices - received his Master of Architecture in Urban Design with Distinction from Harvard University - He was the recipient of several prizes and grants including the Urban Design Thesis Prize

- Partner of Sp[a]de (2012) - Graduated with a Bachelor of Design in Architectural Studies from Florida International University and an MArch from Penn's School of Design - Previously was a designer at Interface Studio Architects, HWKN in NY, UN Studio in Amsterdam, and OMA in Rotterdam

[5]

[6]

[7]

Marcelo Lopez-Dinardi LECTURER

Danielle Willems LECTURER

Eduardo Rega LECTURER

-E  dited the architecture journal Polimorfo, which he also co-founded. -P  artner of A(n) Office based in New York and Detroit - Awarded several times by the AIA. - He was selected to represent the US Pavilion in the 2016 edition of the Venice Architecture Biennale with A(n) Office.

- Co-Founder of Mæta Design (2008) - Visiting Professor at Pratt University, Brooklyn NY - Earned a MArch from Columbia University, GSAPP (2007)

- Editor, & Art Director of the Editorial Project and Investigation system “From Spam to Maps” - Master of Science in Advanced Architectural Design at Columbia University - MArch from Polytechnic University of Madrid, ETSAM - BArch, University of Las Palmas, Spain

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Annette Fierro, Coordinator

FOUNDATION 502 FACULTY [1] [2]

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As architects, we find a uniquely fertile field of creative possibilities in the Carnival: an ideal conceptual framework for rethinking the urban environment, challenging the future of cities and expanding architecture’s cultural project. The carnival offers a testing ground for the radical abandonment of the Status Quo, it is an instrument of interconnection, a rehearsal of Utopia. Its protagonists acquire the power to participate in the formation of a new world. With its origin in the Roman Catholic Pre-Lenten festivities, the carnival is a liberation from restrictions and pressures of social order. Distinctions between actors and spectators are dissolved in the carnival, it responds to its own laws, it disrupts hierarchies and has maximum transformative potential. The carnival is also a form of action capable of revealing contradictions and unmasking truths. The carnival is the realm of freedom, a privileged space for critique and a laboratory for the elaboration of an alternative world. In order to expand, while problematizing, the limits of the field, architecture needs to be carnivalized. As it has been shown in recent, and not that recent, demonstrations and protestivals around the world such as Quebec City’s Carnival against Capital, Global Days of Action, Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, Reclaim The Streets and the Global Street Party, just to name a few, the carnival has proved to be a successful modus operandi to reclaim people’s right to an alternative world and, by extension, to the city. Following Lefebvre’s principles, the carnival can give response to human being’s anthropological needs for play, sexuality, physical activities such as sport, creative activity, art and knowledge in forms that are not satisfied by conventional commercial and cultural infrastructures. However, a Carnivalesque infrastructure of détournement, ready to receive and provoke counter-spectacles, could only exist in the geographical interstices of quotidian urban practice, infiltrated within the facilities of institutionalized modern spectacle. It is in these visible spaces of neoliberal globalization where discrepancy is currently made evident through the mentioned carnivals and protestivals. Pertinent programming possibilities would therefore be related to art, culture and leisure: A Regional Performance Center for greater Philadelphia. Considering its strategic location, as cultural entities of the city grow northward, our site’s position at the riverfront privilege it to become both an ideal site of artistic empowerment for Philadelphia’s art collectives, and a spot for public engagement of many imaginable sorts. Within the conjunction between the program and site, could we anticipate or even prepare for what might happen in the cracks of this spectacle? Can the actual cracks of carnival be architecturally designed?


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[1]

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MASKING

[2]

CRITIC: Andrew Saunders As a vehicle to activate and encourage integration of the public domain, the studio explores Carnival as a cultural mode of urban performance, resistant to status quo assumptions of normative and purely functional tendencies of typical planning in favor of movement, action and play as a way to bring new awareness of the urban landscape. Carnival has its origins in “ Roman Catholic pre-Lenten festivities occasioning “release from the constraints and pressures of the social order, generating relationships of amity even among strangers and allowing forbidden excess. “ Many counterculture groups have recently adopted the social act of Carnival as a creative act of protest, in opposition to violent confrontation typical of many political protests of the post ‘68 generation. The language and theatrical performance is borrowed from Carnival by protesters with the aim to impact and modify the world beyond the performance. An essential element of Carnival is costume and more specifically the act of masking. Masking hides individual identity and draws attention to the cause through the collective identity. The studio explores a primary tactic of Carnival; masking. The program of performance halls inher ently prescribes a series of layers from interior to exterior. Masking enhances the body through a variety of tactics including but not limited to refiguration, disguise, protection, uniformity, and selective revealing and or hiding. Students began by selecting a mask for analysis of cultural, performative, figural and spatial articulation. The performance of the mask is transposed to tectonic, spatial and formal tropes in a series of geometric exercises that inform architectural strategies both for the programing and figuration of the performance halls as well as their perception as urban instruments for Philadelphia.

THE PERFORMATIVE MASK

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CRITIC: Jonathan Scelsa TA : Agnes Xi Yao During the onslaught of parametricism, the performative became co-opted in architectural theory to describe the ability for an inserted body to exist within a given set of material flows, be they structural, environmental or phenomenological. In the theatrical context, the

LAMINAR ENGAGEMENTS [4] CRITIC: Joshua Freese TA : Miguel Abaunza A city is a composition; a complex set of evolving relationships between layers of geography and topology, urban morphology, political policy, and social demography. Sometimes these produce violent disjunctions between interest and necessity, specificity and practicality. Sometimes these produce elegant compositions of representation and integrity, participation and diversity. The city is a dynamic and active body, composing moments of integrity and disjunction between spatial, social and political layers. Each of these layers plays a role in defining the character of a city, formally and conceptually. Within the city there are cultural layers composed through the interaction of various social, geographic, ethnic and political agencies and organizations. These are often most visible and tangible in events like the spectacle, carnival, festival, parade, riot and protest. They can become emblematic of a city, its character and its culture, and often extend to broader layers of cultural, social and political networks, and are often propagated or replicated in various cities as an extension of those layers. Architecture and landscape design also work through composition and layers that perform specific roles in each system. Some underlying layers are imperceptible, but are incredibly potent and critical in the development and performance of the architectural and natural environment. For example, in natural systems, certain chemical constituents are the most influential in an ecosystem, but factors like salinity, acidity and other traits aren’t immedi-ately legible in the environment. Likewise, not all layers of architectural systems are superficially articulate. Material layers can be embedded or hidden, and other layers, like the geometric substrate for the building design may not register on the surface. The challenge for this studio is to make relationships, negotiations and compromises between the various layers we will engage and design. Sometimes these will matriculate into forms of systemic integrity; others will necessitate disjunction and autonomy. This studio seeks to define new ways or embedding, articulating, and interweaving layers and substrates to produce intelligent patterns: materially, spatially and temporally. We can observe how material, social, spatial and (infra-) structural patterns perform and behave in response to constraints of context and composition at a variety of scales. Investigating the layered patterns of the river and the city, students will design a cultural and performing arts facility on the Delaware River waterfront. This new facility is an opportunity to

FOUNDATION 502

As architects, we find a uniquely fertile field of creative possibilities in the Carnival: an ideal conceptual framework for rethinking the urban environment, challenging the future of cities and expanding architecture’s cultural project. The carnival offers a testing ground for the radical abandonment of the Status Quo, it is an instrument of interconnection, a rehearsal of Utopia. Its protagonists acquire the power to participate in the formation of a new world. With its origin in the Roman Catholic Pre-Lenten festivities, the carnival is a liberation from restrictions and pressures of social order. Distinctions between actors and spectators are dissolved in the carnival, it responds to its own laws, it disrupts hierarchies and has maximum transformative potential. The carnival is also a form of action capable of revealing contradictions and unmasking truths. The carnival is the realm of freedom, a privileged space for critique and a laboratory for the elaboration of an alternative world. In order to expand, while problematizing, the limits of the field, architecture needs to be carnivalized. As it has been shown in recent, and not that recent, demonstrations and protestivals around the world such as Quebec City’s Carnival against Capital, Global Days of Action, Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, Reclaim The Streets and the Global Street Party, just to name a few, the carnival has proved to be a successful modus operandi to reclaim people’s right to an alternative world and, by extension, to the city. Following Lefebvre’s principles, the carnival can give response to human being’s anthropological needs for play, sexuality, physical activities such as sport, creative activity, art and knowledge in forms that are not satisfied by conventional commercial and cultural infrastructures. However, a Carnivalesque infrastructure of détournement, ready to receive and provoke counter-spectacles, could only exist in the geographical interstices of quotidian urban practice, infiltrated within the facilities of institutionalized modern spectacle. It is in these visible spaces of neoliberal globalization where discrepancy is currently made evident through the mentioned carnivals and protestivals. Pertinent programming possibilities would therefore be related to art, culture and leisure: A Regional Performance Center for greater Philadelphia. Considering its strategic location, as cultural entities of the city grow northward, our site’s position at the riverfront privilege it to become both an ideal site of artistic empowerment for Philadelphia’s art collectives, and a spot for public engagement of many imaginable sorts. Within the conjunction between the

performative references the ability for the figure to act as a media or language in order to present a given narrative or set of scripted sequences for the consumption of an audience. Deployed for purposes of performance in the theater and carnival, a mask is able to dramaticize and politicize a surrounding field as an agent due to its appearance and resonance in cultural images and signs, while selectively de-familiarizing the figure it is concealing. At many times throughout history, the mask has been used as a political device for its ability to simultaneously mimic and provide anonymity for its encased figure. A mask both amplifies and belies its encased figure and simultaneously works to contradict and situate with its surrounding cultural and physical contingencies. It is the architect of its making that calibrates the alchemy of its confession, complicity, contradiction and deceit. In architecture, the mask has much theoretical pertinence in relationship to the building and what has become known its envelope or facade. To discuss this application in architecture, we must understand the nature of the figure to which it applies. For this purpose we will identify the figure as a form that is culturally understood and expected, a product. In architecture this concept of the figure disciplinarily might be the idea of typology in itself as a figure, the most generic formal expression of a particular use. In the context of our particularly studio, the generically driven form of the Proscenium Fly-House Theater and the Shoe-box Concert Hall might be considered a type of culturally expected product capable of being produce by the market as a figure of capital gain. It is the architect’s agency to shape, arrange and mitigate between these figures and the urban field beyond. For our purposes the Mask will be the architect's agent, the space of political resistance. A liminal spatial condition between the expected figure of capital and the outer interface with the field of the public. This studio will seek to establish new theoretical ground for what in building construction should be revealed from (program, figure, volume or structure) while establishing new methods of geometrically concealing and altering these conditions based on situated geometries in the creation of new masking building envelopes. The studio will investigate the construction of masks through geometric evaluation of the encapsulated figure as well as the urban and cultural context in which they situate. Given the consumption of figures is predicated on a reading of a silhouette, the studio will delve deeply into high contrast graphic design techniques exploring the analogues of 2D Graphic Masking in 3d producing legible high contrast forms from geometric techniques that revolve around platonic primitives, and developable surfaces (Conics, Cylinders etc).

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program and site, could we anticipate or even prepare for what might happen in the cracks of this spectacle? Can the actual cracks of carnival be architecturally designed?

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CARNIVAL


The Day After The Carnival: The Hangover of Work (in Late Capitalism) is a graduate architecture research and design studio focusing on ideas of work, non-work and the logic of the carnival or carinvalesque space. Architecture is not understood here solely as the domain of building as an isolated object, however, it is presented as a grounding device that is the output of larger forces that have spatial, organizational, formal, cultural, economical and aesthetic consequences. The studio worked closely weaving through the ideas contained in the larger premise of the carnival as disruptive performance with those related to the role of work and non-work in everyday practices, and how they are manifested in our culture and specific site in Northern Liberties and the Delaware River in Philadelphia. The projects investigated the various sites (media, politics, technology, image, space) and concrete grounding yet unstable realities in which architecture operates. The studio was supported by the reading of the book 24/7 Late Capitalism and the Ends of Sleep by Jonathan Crary, that analyzes current mechanisms and devices that are shaping a “high-performance” subject capable of sleep less and to produce non-stop work. We asked questions about, what are the manifestations of labor in the various modes

MESOMORPHIC MATTER: [6] LIQUID CONTINGENCY CRITIC: Danielle Willems TA : Chao Liu ‘Mesomorphic Matter’ perceives the architectural production as part of a larger, self-organizing, material process. While engaging in the production of Mesomorphic-architectural environments through the generative capacities of algorithmic / diagrammatic logics, our primary focus will be the relationship between waterscape and architecture. Finding the constitutive difference be-tween the two in time, more so than in form. Mesomorphic Matter is an investigation in the processes of becoming, and as such, it fuses the two scapes into a unified phase space.

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ARCHITECTURALIZING PHILADELPHIA’S CARNIVALS

[7]

network they establish with other actors using available archive and performing field work that will include visits and interviews. The research on Philadelphian actors/activists/community groups will be used to project their mission, goals, activities, strategies and relations on our studio site. Architecture will then spatialize their Carnival.

CRITIC: Eduardo Rega TA : Jung Jae Suh The studio’s main goal will be to blur the limits between carnival and architecture, boundaries that contradict both the utopian essence of architecture and the spatial nature of Protestivals and Occupy movements. Architecture is to be shaken by the carnivalesque social revolution. If we substitute the carnival by architecture and viceversa on the following quote from the general 502 studio syllabus, our take on the semester emerges: Distinctions between actors and spectators are dissolved in architecture, it responds to its own laws, it disrupts hierarchies and has maximum transformative potential. Architecture is also a form of action capable of revealing contradictions and unmasking truths. Architecture is the realm of freedom, a privileged space for critique and a laboratory for the elaboration of an alternative world. In order to expand, while problematizing, the limits of the field, the carnival needs to be architecturalized. Carnivals that involve local community enhancement, justice and defense of civil rights need to be architecturalized. The studio will investigate key Philadelphian agents that are active in the city representing the excluded, enhancing communities through art and culture, broadcasting people's narratives, amplifying and defending their rights to their city, demystifying class hierarchy, sexual repression and patriarchy, questioning the status quo and working to transform it. The studio will therefore research Philadelphian actors who’s mode of existence is that of the Carnival. With the use of video, diagrams and maps, students will investigate four local actors and the

FOUNDATION 502

FOUNDATION 502

CRITIC: Marcelo López-Dinardi TA : Ricardo Hernández-Pérez

The studio methodology consists of three feedback layers: generative diagram, prototyping model and video. The generative diagram is the assembly machine to forms. The physical model should be a method of rapid prototyping the limits of the generative diagram in order to make specific spaces/ waterscapes and formal behaviors in relationship to the projects spatial/ temporal thesis. The video component will be used as a different method of exploring, experimenting, generating spatial se-quences, creating immersive environments, and building a narrative inside or through the architectural forms. The studio thesis will venture into an investigation that is embodied within a novel approach, to the relationship between the emerging narrations of two modes of time, waterscape/architecture.

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THE DAY AFTER [5] THE CARNIVAL: THE HANGOVER OF WORK (IN LATE CAPITALISM)

of work existing around our site? What action, event or situation can be defined as work or non-work? What can be the role of architecture in producing organization of systems of work and non-work. If capitalism is non-stop and sleep-less, do we live in the hangover of excess? Can we reimagine the day after the carnival, or the hangover of work? One of the main goals of the studio is to produce alternative modes of reimagining political economy of work in space, its systems of organization, management, cultural aspirations and formal constructions; in other words, its architecture. Considering how a building’s networked conditions work within the unstable realities that shape and inform our practice, we explored strategies to formulate and architectural proposition. How do we assemble and idea that has architectural consequences? The projects were elaborated as multifaceted constructions that speak to various registers in which architecture is inevitable un-coherent –not comprehensive nor unitarian. We asked in the previous exercises by making mapping and program analysis drawings, the various sites and locations where architecture exist: industry, technology, economy, culture and politics. To make our architectural propositions each student developed what we called an architectural assembly. The word assembly is brought here by its double meaning as the collection of ideas, but also the collection or gathering of people together. As we assemble we suggest modes (always in plural) in which we collect those ideas and the subjects that participate in them, students developed arguments for those assemblies. An argument, different from a diagram or a formal operation, does not aim to justify an act, but rather it produces ideas in the form of articulated, multifaceted and multilayered concepts. The projects are, above all, argumentative as opposed to generative.

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investigate and establish a new understanding of the environmental composition, and reinvestigate which layers register on the surface. Our studio will investigate patterns at a variety of scales (surface, building, city) through a series of analytical and generative studies. The site and program research establish topical and technical methods for the generation of spatial models and organizational patterns resulting from experiments with operational techniques evaluated. Conceptual and practical ideas for materiality, structure, scale, etc. will emerge as further understanding of site, program, and conceptual pattern logics are refined through design investigation. The objective is to reinterpret patterns and relationships; between the various layers of material components, structures and environments, and people and spaces. Our understanding of the site, city and program will be integrated into patterns, both generated and studied, to produce rules and operational ordering systems that can define relationships between the site, the city and the River.


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“ABOVE THE PERFORMANCE - IN THE FLIES”

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Its magnitude activates a collapse between interiority & exteriority...the scale acts, simultaneously, as liberator from the city, mediator in the city, and inventor of the city anew.

CRITIC: Annette Fierro

STUDENT: Ryan Barnette

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As one proceeds into the performance hall, common features take on grander responsibilities: entryways become stage sets, seating becomes structural decorum, & the theater itself becomes the processional pinnacle.

CRITIC: Annette Fierro

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STUDENT: Alina Ahmad

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...it focuses on material contrast; it negotiates relationships between hard, shiny, normative areas and edges, with soft, matte, concave geometries by allowing them to erode away at the normative.

CRITIC: Andrew Saunders

STUDENT: Siyang Xiao

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When different pieces depart slightly from each other, it reveals a space for the exterior to see the interior and allows people to enter. The slippage between different pieces is used to define “semi-exterior- semi-interior”.

CRITIC: Andrew Saunders

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STUDENT: Ji Sook Yoon

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...inspired by attitudes of containing & accepting cruel insanity, which is not a social norm. This power of legitimizing cruelty & insanity within its boundaries inspires a place for protest—like gallery for art and stadium for sports.

CRITIC: Jonathan Scelsa Agnes Xi Yao (TA)

STUDENT: Yuwei Sun

[3]

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...by examining how it can activate the circulation of ground & provide a place that resonates with the existing identities & expectation of it's surrounding, while providing an iconic infrastructure bringing people to the water.

CRITIC: Jonathan Scelsa Agnes Xi Yao (TA)

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STUDENT: Mingxin He

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...transforming into 3D patterns, logic between pattern density & accessibility level of the site is expressed. The higher density, with concentrating coverage of patterns & deep excavation, interprets higher level of accessibility...

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CRITIC: Joshua Freese Miguel Abaunza (TA)

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STUDENT: Yiwei Gao

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With the process of projecting, distorting, boolean, erosion and overlaying on the pattern itself, outcomes produce systems of massing, landscape, space, structure, mullion, and detail were generated through these processes.

CRITIC: Joshua Freese Miguel Abaunza (TA)

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...the opaque, carnivalesque interior shell slowly emerges from the exterior glass shell, until the final building (proscenium theater) has no exterior shell at all... creating an experience that is continuously changing...

CRITIC: Marcelo López-Dinardi Ricardo HernándezPérez (TA)

[5]

STUDENT: Xinyu Wang

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...coordinating two important kinds of spaces under an urban context – space for humans & space for cars...the storage boxes act as the “wall” between these two spaces which not only divides but also mediates them.

CRITIC: Marcelo López-Dinardi Ricardo HernándezPérez (TA)

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description: Carnival is the tool for interconnection. It is a special place which offers a formation of a new world . This new Performing and Visual Art Center aims to enhance the relationship between the existing community with Philadelphia by drawing circulation between the site and spring Garden station. The design focus on how to generate meaningful understanding of space and tectonics using different input as a transformation to generate a total environments.

Flocking Space

Alignment, Separation, Cohesion are the basic system of the geometry. Base on this model , the nodes in the building interacts using simple behaviors of individuals producing complexed yet controlled behavior.

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Module1 : Cafe, Foold Hall, Supermarket

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Private Circulation Transporation

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Penn Design Arch 502 Studio - Spring 2016 - Instructors : Danielle Willems

Student : Jasmine Ya Gao

University of Pennsylvania School of Design

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STUDENT: Jasmine Gao

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Alignment, Separation, Cohesion are the basic system of the geometry. Base on this model , the nodes in the building interacts using simple behaviors of individuals producing complexed yet controlled behavior.

CRITIC: Danielle Willems Chao Liu (TA)

STUDENT: Marianne Sanche

[6]

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Graffiti has the capability of expressing chaos with the physical and social order of the city...similarly, at Carnival, citizens transgress the habitual boundaries of the sidewalk and take command of the city’s streets.

CRITIC: Danielle Willems Chao Liu (TA)

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...in the year 2100, spatial tactic creates its own elevated, fragmented and interconnected ground levels that develop perpendicularly in an arrangement of a structural cloud creating an elevated city-scape...

CRITIC: Eduardo Rega Jung Jae Suh (TA)

STUDENT: Yunyoung Choi

[7]

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These individual nodes utilize zones surrounding them to facilitate programs that can be temporal in nature or permanent. In spaces in which these zones overlap, the programs negotiate space to create a hybrid space...

CRITIC: Eduardo Rega Jung Jae Suh (TA)

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OCTOBER 28TH, 2015 THE IMPACT OF SMALL THINGS Robert M. Rogers, Rogers Partners, New York, NY.

The Stephen Gaynor School and Ballet Hispanico

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NOVEMBER 4TH, 2015 PUBLIC NATURES: EVOLUTIONARY INFRASTRUCTURES

Marion Weiss and Michael Manfredi, Weiss / Manfredi, New York, NY.

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FOUNDATION PAVILIONS

This semester the Department of Architecture at PennDesign launched a yearlong partnership with Manitoga, the House, Studio and 75-acre Woodland garden of famed mid-century American designer Russel Wright. Under the guidance of Associate Professor Andrew Saunders, 91 first-year students worked in 21 teams to construct full-scale prototypes for a new pavilion at Manitoga that could accommodate outdoor events, summertime dining and more. In mid-October, they presented their pavilions to a jury of faculty members and a delegation from Manitoga that included Executive Director Allison Cross, Board Member Dan Macey and Annie Wright, Russel Wright’s daughter, and former PennDesign faculty member Carol Franklin.”

PARTICIPANTS Constance Chang Laura Colagrande Ruo Ning Deng Margaret Jones Gregg Yi-Hsuan Hua Yewen Jin Siyi Li Tian Ouyang Julie Michele Pepitone Joanna Ptak Andre James Stiles Yuntao Xu Ji Sook Yoon Lauren E. Aguilar Ramune Bartuskaite Mingxin He Daniel Wills Hurley Jin Woo Lee Yang Li Yangchao Ni Matthew Paul Price Joshua A. Schultz Yichen Wang Morgan Leigh Welch Yiren Weng Si Yang Xiao Lillian Marie Candela Jun Cui Sarah E. N. Davis Jasmine Ya Gao John Patrick Hilla

Danielle Sorella Lands Graham Perron Nelson Jennifer Robyn Rokoff Kailin Wang Xinyu Wang Morgynn W.Wiley Yijun Wu Yuhao Wu Yue Cao Chaowei Chiang Pui-Lam P. Fung Kirin Kennedy Xuexia Li Portia T. Z. Malik Noah Tyler Medlinksy Madelyn M. Moretta Patrick Hawley Reeves Marianne Sanche Leetee Jane Wang Selin Liora Zakuto Shixiang Zheng Ramona Adlakha Alina Mairaj Ahmad Joud Saleh Baothman Yu-Te Chiang Jesus F. E. Gonzalez Yiwei Gao Chaeyoung Iris Kim Aahana Miller Mana Sazegara Mary S. Swysgood

Siqi Wang Shuxin Wu Tong Wu Zakariya Y. Al-Haffar Todd Slater Albert Alyssa Brooke Appel Yunyoung Lina Choi Emily Rose Dodson Hilary Kristin Lam Yisha Li Kaj A. Akil Marshall Margarida G.Mota Adam George Schroth Xiaoling Wang Yi Yan Huanan Ye Alexander Bahr Ryan Mc C. Barnette Yiqun Chen Katherine Engleman Jooyoung Ham Nikita P.Jathan Hae-Yun Kwon Farre Nixon Harper Ragin Yuwei Sun Irena Persis P. Wight Linnan Yu Wen Zhu

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PENNDESIGN ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS PARTNER WITH INDUSTRY TO BUILD GRADUATION PAVILION


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OVERCAST GRADUATION PAVILION Course 730: Techniques, Morphology, and Detailing of a Pavilion Faculty: Mohamad Alkhader Ph.D w/ Andrew Saunders

Courtesy ArchDaily.com

Course 501: M.Arch Design 1 Coordinator: Andrew Saunders Manitoga Pavilion Competition Winner: "OVERCAST" Margaret Gregg Ruoning Deng Siyi Li Yuntao Xu

Details

ArchDaily.com has named PennDesign's OverCast pavilion one of the best student design-build projects of 2016 from 20 countries worldwide.

FOUNDATION PAVILLIONS

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Lillian Candela Constance Chang Margaret Gregg Huichao Han Jonathan Hein John Hilla Siyi Li Audrey Lin Ziyang Luo Tian Ouyang Andre Stiles Yuchen Wen Xeaniel Wu Xinnan Xu Yuntao Xu Ji Yoon


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STUDENT: Alina Ahmad

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STUDENT: Yijun Wu

CRITIC: Ezio Blasetti

STUDENT: Yuwei Sun

CRITIC: Jonathan Scelsa

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STUDENT: CRITIC: Alex Bahr Jonathan Scelsa The three building objects are centrally organized around an internal voided spire that allows a visual, physical and symbolic connection from all the theaters above to ground below.

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CORE 601

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Hina Jamelle LECTURER

Jonas Coersmeier LECTURER

Scott Erdy LECTURER

Kutan Ayata LECTURER

- Architect and Director at Contemporary Architecture Practice, NY (2003) - Graduated with an MArch from University of Michigan Taubman College, where she received the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Leadership Award. - Author of the upcoming book Migrating Architectural and Structural Formations (2013) and co-author of Elegance (2007)

- Founded Büro NY, NY (2004) - Received a Master’s degree from Columbia University GSAPP (2000) - Received an engineering degree from TU-Darmstadt (1998) & MIT Architecture (1996) - Teaches studios & research seminars at Pratt & serves as guest critic at Princeton and Columbia GSAPP

- Founding partner of Erdy McHenry Architecture, PA (1998) - Received MArch, Syracuse University (1990) - Received BSc Architecture, Ohio State University (1987) - Received the AIA Philadelphia Gold Medal (2001) and the AIA Philadelphia Silver Medal (2004)

- Co-founded New York-based architecture firm, Young & Ayata (2008) - Young & Ayata are winners of The Architectural League Prize (2014) - Received a MArch from Princeton University (2004) - Bachelor of Fine Arts in Architecture from Massachusetts College of Art in Boston (1999)

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Brian Phillips LECTURER

Justin Korhammer LECTURER

Ben Krone LECTURER

- Founder of Interface Studio Architects (ISA), PA (2004) - Received MArch from the University of Pennsylvania (1996) - Received BSEd from University of Oklahoma (1994) - Winner of the 2011 Pew Fellowship in the Arts - ISA has received multiple AIA Pennsylvania Merit & Honor Awards

- Partner Archi-tectonics (2016) - Co-owner of brooklyn, NY based studio, Anima (1999) - Has worked for Daniel Libeskind, Eisenman Architects and Steven Holl Architects. - Has taught design studios at the Berlage Institute in Amsterdam, Netherlands and at Columbia University in New York.

- Founded Gradient Design Studio, NYC (2006) - Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Florida (1999) - MArch degree from Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, GSAPP (2004) - Won the McKim Prize for Excellence in Design & the Sol Kaplan Traveling Fellowship.

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In 2011-12, we re-structured the ARCH 601 Design Studio to become an Urban Housing Studio that moves beyond the traditional programmatic housing studio approach to propose contemporary modes of living in an urban environment. Hybrid forms of housing/dwelling including a commercial or cultural program that can co-exist with housing is the topic explored during this semester. Due to the difference in scale between housing and a cultural program, an inherent curricular goal is to develop formal arrangements in accumulation and scalar variation that develop a speculative, comprehensive solution for a 50,000 sq. ft. building located in an urban environment. The use of digital techniques is a given for this semester’s projects, but the goal is to use these technologies in an opportunistic fashion for the generation of growth and the evaluation of patterns in the development of the overall form. In particular, each studio examines part-to-whole organizations and their potential for architecture by offering the tools to create effects that exceed the sum of their parts. Most part-to-whole organizations share common characteristics, including structure: defined by parts and their composition; and the interconnectivity of the various parts that have functional, structural, and spatial relationships with each other. During this semester, a primacy is given to formations that are varied, accumulative, and subject to change that may shift spatial experiences, scale, and material aspects. In addition, buildings are to incorporate program, spatiality, structure, and enclosure into a singular formation that incorporates a range of experiences and formal variations of gradated intensities and patterns. An exceptionally sophisticated part-to-whole relationship is one which goes a step further and resolves the integration of materials, structure, scale, and spatiality to allow for the overall formation to appear suspended, or possessed of a particular lightness. In terms of formal appearance, this lightness includes qualities of fineness and daintiness, determined within the multiple individual elements and parts that constitute the building design. The scale of the part to the whole [unit to building] is attenuated, adjusted with precision and refinement, in order to produce the desired effect. If the scale of the part is too diminutive in relation to the whole, or if the whole is constituted of too many smaller building components, then the occupant of the space may be overwhelmed. When the relation of part [housing unit] to whole [building] is attuned, unique living environments and innovative housing solutions can be achieved. The form of the building impacts the selected urban environment. Each instructor provides their own site for exploration within a city of the instructor’s choice. Each building’s goals contribute to and impact the city in which the building is located. The highly formed object incorporates a detailed façade and its relationship to the massing, plans, and sections, with an understanding of vertical and horizontal pedestrian circulation that maximizes their impact on the urban environment.


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CRITIC: Scott Erdy The studio confronts the social, economic and political underpinnings of homelessness in search of a transitional housing model purposed away from the temporary sheltering of the homeless toward a stable, permanent and sustainable housing solutions coupled with the supportive services and resources that will empower adults, seniors, and families to break the cycle of homelessness and poverty. The Divine Lorraine Hotel, originally built in 1894 as apartments to serve the wealthy elite, remains as an artifact, one of the most luxurious and best preserved late 19th-century apartment houses in Philadelphia. Acquired in 1948 by the Reverend Major J. Divine, a 1930’s civil rights leader and founder of the Cooperative Economic Plan, the Divine Lorraine became one of the first integrated hotels of its caliber in the United States. Most Philadelphian’s are familiar with this exquisite ruin on North Broad Street but few understand its importance to the Civil Rights Movement. Father Divine’s Peace Mission remains one of the most unorthodox religious movements in America. Early on, he preached a message of equality among men and the hope of heaven-on-earth to among races. His charismatic message of an interracial paradise on earth caught on in the North, and his Peace Mission would become well known for its aggressive efforts to desegregate all aspects of American society. From the beginning, Father Divine had ministered to the whole person, body as well as soul, and that approach found an eager reception among the impoverished. The movement rapidly built up a network of businesses, including restaurants, gas stations, grocery and clothing stores, hotels, farms, and many other enterprises. All provided high-quality goods and services

The programmatic goal is to undertake neighborhood based affordable housing, economic development, and environmental enhancement programs, as well as by providing access to employment opportunities, adult and youth education and health care. The building will be a sister structure to the Devine Lorraine and student will determine what physical connection their building has (if any) to the existing structure. The program will include the following programmatic components: - Affordable Housing (Single, Families & Elderly) - Café & Thrift Store (Employment Training/ Workforce Development Initiative) - Wellness Center - Legal Aid/Advocacy Center This mixed use facility will be a dynamic place that will integrate residential permanency with occupational training and person-centered primary medical care, behavioral health care, physical fitness, nutrition education, rehabilitative services, pharmacy, dental care, case management and peer-led health promotion in an empowering advocacy environment aimed at promoting self-sufficiency and individual responsibility necessary for sustainable independent living.

45 THOMPSON STREET [4] CRITIC: Kutan Ayata The proposal for this micro unit housing tower uses a system of cracks into the mass of the tower to not only allow for a system of aperture but also a system with very specific aesthetic qualities. The cracks also allow for an insertion of balcony entities that are a foreign protrusion from the cracks. The Balcony entities in turn challenge the cracks themselves by existing as ephemeral boundless objects with no hard edges. It is this strange tension that creates a dramatic spacial shift from the unit to the balconies. The secondary aperture system is the applied texture to the east façade, where it not only acts as a aperture system for the housing units but also aesthetically acts as a surface quality that challenges the solidity of a concrete, almost brutalist façade. They also have the added effect of obscuring the mass of the building by adding a hyper texture that obscures the reading of the mass of the building.

CORE 601

This studio will examine emergence and its relation to the formulation of architecture by using digital techniques in an opportunistic fashion for the generation of growth and evaluation of patterns in the development of form. In particular, this studio will examine part to whole organizations and its potential for architecture by offering the tools to create effects that exceed the sum of their parts. Most part to whole organizations share common characteristics, including structure: defined by parts and their composition; and interconnectivity of the various parts of a system that have a functional, structural and spatial relationships between each other. In this studio we will give primacy to formations that are in variation, accumulative and subject to changes that may shift in spatial experiences, scale and materials. In addition, projects using digital techniques incorporate program, space, structure, and enclosure into a singular formation that incorporates a range of experiences and formal variations of gradated intensities and patterns. An exceptionally sophisticated part to whole relationship is one which goes a step further and resolves the integration of materials, structure, scale and spatiality to allow for the overall formation to appear suspended, or possessed of a particular lightness and elegance. In terms of formal appearance, this lightness includes qualities of fineness and daintiness, determined within the multiple individual elements and parts that constitute the building design. The scale of the part to the whole will be attenuated, adjusted with precision and refinement, in order to produce the desired affect. If the scale of the part is too diminutive in relation to the whole, or if the whole is constituted of too many smaller pieces, then the occupant of the space may be overwhelmed, and the potential of producing elegance is lost. When the relation of part to whole is attuned, elegant sensations – rather than chaotic ones – may be achieved at the point of transformations. The intended result is a project exhibiting innovative architectural organizations using topological surfaces, unit arrangements and patterns scaling from an individual room to the entire building with different spatial and material qualities contributing to the development of architecture.

New York City. The studio simultaneously focuses on the two primary growth markets of New York City’s real estate: Luxury condominiums and Subsidized housing. We study these two extreme segments in context, probe into their interaction and systematically work out areas of synergy in order to add value for all stake holders and to the community at large. A slim housing tower reaches into the sky and redefines mixed urban housing developments by synthesizing luxury condominiums with minimal apartments. The new, 50,000 sf tower provides high exposure and breath taking views for a diverse clientele. Its structure and skin are flexible to adapt for varying visibilities, sun exposure as well as for its drastically diverse user demands and desires. The streetscape of 10th Avenue and the High Line elevated park will weave into the housing tower and continue as a vertical space of heterogeneous living experiences that are characteristic for this great metropolis. The city commonly provides incentives such as tax breaks and air rights for developers to include affordable housing units in new condomi nium developments. However, the incentivedriven combination of these two housing types has led to socially questionable results, and some of them point at an age-old form of segregation - ‘rich door, poor door’ - most of them not reflecting the genuine desire of all New Yorkers for an advanced housing culture within a heterogeneous society. The studio encourages the discussion of socio-economic and political forces in urban housing, and how they relate to architectural opportunities. The studio also takes a pragmatic position as it focuses on core architectural expertise. It insists on granting architecture the status of an autonomous discipline. Finally, the studio takes the hopeful position that architecture holds the potential for improving human coexistence. The LoLux tower is a space for communication, and the place for formal, casual and coincidental encounters. The studio promotes a mix of minimal and luxury apartments to speculate on how these communication attributes can be heightened in a very specific location and cultural setting. The new housing tower will not only provide breathtaking views and immersive spatial experiences, but it will also enable interactions and promote a new kind of urban encounter.

inexpensively, while creating jobs for Father Divine’s faithful. Students developed 50,000sf proposals on the 6000sf parcel to the south of the Devine Lorraine into Transitional Urban Housing, looking at Father Devine’s whole-person approach as a model to combat homelessness and poverty, while simultaneously looking at the Devine Lorraine Hotel as a precedent artifact for their work.

M ARCH

M ARCH

CRITIC: Hina Jamelle

Hyper density is a result of enormous real estate pressures and normative spatial assets. Slim housing towers pose a particular design challenge. Rooms are layed out according to minimal standard dimension to be fit for occupancy; access and egress are organized to minimize the loss of rentable floor area. In a series of spatial exercises the studio develops new systems of vertical agglomeration for living quarters and work spaces. The spatial organization is well informed by circulatory and infrastructural-, as well as by structural considerations. Additionally, the Highline location offers a specific primary set of a site pressures for a dense, vertical housing structure.

95

SHIFTING HYBRIDS: [1] LOLUX [2] CRITIC: Jonas Coersmeier TRANSFORMATIONS TA: Lyly Huyen FOR A NEW HOTEL AND The urban housing studio ‘LoLux’ invents RESIDENTIAL BUILDING IN combinatory logics for ultra luxury and low income housing, and proposes a prototype for new resiTRIBECA, NEW YORK CITY. dential towers along the High Line urban park in


96

[5]

CORE 601

URBAN WILDERNESS

[6]

CRITIC: Justin Korhammer TA: Brett Dong Ha Lee Urban dwelling has traditionally been considered the antithesis of living in contact with nature. In Delirious New York, Rem Koolhaas famously declared “that the subjugation, if not even the obliteration, of nature is the true ambition” of the metropolis. At the same time, living in contact or harmony with nature has been a constant desire of human beings, and a central concern of most architectural utopias. Ecological considerations are increasingly becoming an ethical or even regulatory obligation for a sustainable future of the urban environment.

The studio proposes an urban landscape hybrid, fusing residential dwelling units with a hydroponic farm. Located in a mixed commercial and residential zone at Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn/ New York, the project is intended as a prototype and laboratory for integration of natural and man-made systems, as well as an exploration of multi-species ecosystems. The studio will analyze hybrid/ mutualistic biological and functional relation-ships, to generate programmatic, topological and spatial strategies for a global building system, as well as the local dwelling unit. The goal is to develop a scalable component system that will allow for the aggregation of various dwelling types, sizes and spatial configurations. Of particular concern will be the relationship of individual to group and emergent patterns of organization. We will consider the building organism as a network of infrastructural and programmatic flows. We will specifically explore adjacencies and dependencies of natural and man-made environments, and develop an interface that maximizes the mutualistic effects between both systems. The integration of a hydroponic farm and aquaponic pond within the building organism will introduce a parallel program of distinct scales, levels of public access, and circadian rhythms. Rather than focusing on a finite, singular formal outcome, the studio will encourage the development of formal and performative strategies that allow for growth, adaptation, as well as recirculation of components during their life cycles. The aim of the studio is to develop a coherent design strategy that can be employed at multiple levels and scales, the physical as well as the evocative and experiential.

CRITIC: Ben Krone TA: Serena Yin Housing for the underprivileged is an enormous issue nation wide. Upscale and profitable development often undermines efforts to sanction land use to house lower-income families. For decades cities have been trying to figure out ways to deal with the issue. Early attempts included failed experiments in large-scale low-income housing developments that lead to a host of socioeconomic issues. As cities have evolved these traditionally poor neighborhoods have been endangered by the rapid expansion of market rate development in neighboring areas. In recent times an assortment of new innovative urban growth policies have been put to the test. One such example is ‘Inclusionary housing’ where developers are incentivized to provide a stipulated amount of lower income units in exchange for tax credits and relaxed zoning regulations that may significantly increase profits on a given plot of land. The benefits of this are twofold. First, it expands the issue of substandard living and income inequality from being strictly a governmental issue and opens it to the private sector where there is a more finely tuned infrastructure and available funding for providing housing at a large scale and at aggressive rates. Second it works to deal with housing shortages primarily caused by the rapid gentrification of traditionally poor neighborhoods. On the surface it appears to be able to achieve this with certain sensitivity toward issues of segregation and class inequality through the mixing disparate income groups. Inclusionary housing however has not been without controversy. One big issue with these mixed income developments has been how ‘integration’ is achieved. One hot topic has been how to design buildings to share the same physical space between low and high-income tenants without marginalizing one group or devaluing the real estate of the other. The immediate solution by developers has been the use of what has negatively been coined ‘the poor door’ or a separate entrance often on an adjacent street that services a single unit type. A move by many deemed as its own form of segregation. The issue of housing inequality goes beyond just full time living quarters. There are many famous examples of this issue extending to temporary housing as well, perhaps an even more complex problem in that the lowest income groups often do not have the means to support themselves in any long term housing situation. SRO (single room occupancy) is a type of transient ‘pay as you go’ housing available to the homeless. Many of these SRO units were never intended to become permanent living quarters instead were recognized as a means of

normalization for individuals attempting to reintegrate themselves into a more stable housing situation. Unfortunately as with many of these fair housing experiments, this is not historically how they have been used. A new trend in market rate development of both permanent and temporary housing has moved much closer to the models set up by transient housing of the past. Market rate hotels and apartment rental developments are offering alternatives to traditional unit typology with many shared basic amenities like kitchens common living areas, and even in some cases shared bathrooms. Cost is not always the driving factor in the choice to live in these developments. Millennial tendencies are toward the social space view housing more as necessity rather than a luxury, where the opportunity to socialize and mix with others is more important than larger privatized spaces. The disparity between this model and traditional low-income temporary and permanent housing is far less defined. It affords us a unique opportunity to envision a new building typology where the concept of integration in inclusionary housing is not simply to provide for varying incomes but actually to attempt to desegregate them.

CORE 601

Philadelphia, like many American cities, is riding a wave of post-recession investment. Young talent is moving in, or staying after graduating from one of the city’s many institutions, nightlife and entertainment are expanding, and the housing stock is expanding in volume and variety. However, the city remains full of challenges – poverty, crumbling infrastructure, poor schools, and dismal health outcomes. The urban core is vibrant and full of opportunity, while the neighborhoods farther afield continue to stumble. It is a city of many flavors and faces. However, remains a dramatic example of two distinct worlds – one of economic means and upward mobility, and one just the opposite. The edges and seams between these territories remain interesting laboratories for impact by design. While some might use the term “gentrification” to describe the changing edges between unlike neighborhoods (one gaining at the others expense), the asymmetry of urban fabrics and neighborhoods is as old as cities themselves. If there’s one thing that’s for sure – neighborhoods will change over time with their populations, economic strength and affordability shifting boundaries. The studio focused on a large site in West Philadelphia, adjacent to high speed transportation and slated for re-development by the Philadelphia Housing Authority. The site allows for an investigation of the background issues while proposing a mixed housing, mixed-use urban development project. The studio asks big questions that probe the politically, socially, and economically fraught dimensions of creating a major urban development. Projects were encouraged to engage within a set of complex, sometimes contradictory, forces that require the architectural proposals themselves to engage with the unfolding, and very current, crossdisciplinary dialogue around urbanism and housing.

URBAN HOUSING STUDIO [7]

M ARCH

M ARCH

CRITIC: Brian Phillips

The numbers have become commonplace but are sill staggering; By 2050, 70% of the urban population will be living in urban areas, and additional farm land the size of Brazil will be needed to feed this future world population. It is becoming increasingly clear that congestion alone is not the solution. Highly densified urban environments, although inherently more energy efficient than suburban sprawl, are reaching the limits of what can be supported by infrastructure and remote, decentralized support systems. Simultaneously our evolving capabilities to manipulate natural systems, and to generate synthetic organic structures and hybrid life forms, has blurred or even rendered meaningless the opposition of natural vs. man-made. This opens the possibility for a symbiotic coexistence of conditions formerly thought as incompatible, such as industrial scale farming and urban dwelling, leading to an altogether more fluid definition of buildings as emerging and non-permanent components within the urban landscape, defined by their biological performance as much as by their form.

97

MIXED MEDIUM


98

Rooftop Bar / Pool

99

Roof Level 8

Level 7

Level 6

Level 5

Level 3

M ARCH

M ARCH

Level 4

Hotel circulation

Residential circulation

Level 2

Level 1 Lobby

STUDENT: Angeliki Mavroleon

Hotel

Total Units: 45

This project explores the idea of an inlay as a threshold between exterior and interior, private and public spaces and different programmatic uses, all within a building that combines hotel rooms, residences and art galleries. The idea of the inlay comes and defines how the different types of program are inserted in the building, where the facade inlays in the interior and creates room separators/exhibition booths for the art galleries, but also systems of lighting and spatial organiwation for the hotel and residential units.

CRITIC: Hina Jamelle

[1]

HINA JAMELLE

HINA JAMELLE

Residence

CORE 601

CORE 601

Art Galleries & Studios

Ground


CORE 601

CORE 601

M ARCH

M ARCH

100

101

A

B OPEN TO BELOW

Shifting Hybrids looks to merge the programmatic requirements of high end residential design with a luxury hotel. This binary between programs plays out architecturally and aesthetically through the hybridization of Cartesian (Silver) and Curvilinear (Gold) geometries as a means to delineate between public and private spaces. When a user finds themselves in public space, they will experience a free flowing and painterly aesthetic that invites one to meander and lounge, whereas, within the confines of private spaces, a more rigid geometry allows for the more ergonomic needs of everyday living.

CRITIC: Hina Jamelle

[1]

16’-5”

1

16’-4.75”

2

16’-4.5”

3

4

1’-0” = 1/8”

HINA JAMELLE

HINA JAMELLE

STUDENT: Miguel Abaunza


“Lo-Lux” explores the possibility of combining low-income housing with luxury housing in one tower by giving these two types of housing a different interpretation in public space - in both domestic and the shared space of the tower. In standard luxury apartments there is tendency to maximize privatization. In this case, luxury apartments are located at the half of the tower which adjacent to the High Line...the public/shared space for housing needs to be subdivided and scattered.

CRITIC: Jonas Coersmeier Lyly Huyen (TA)

[2]

JONAS COERSMEIER

JONAS COERSMEIER

CORE 601

CORE 601

M ARCH

M ARCH

102

103

STUDENT: David Zhewei Feng


CORE 601

CORE 601

M ARCH

M ARCH

104

105

This residential project aims at providing not only affordable living space for young professional artists & musicians, but also luxury apartments for collectors, curators & conductors. This combination of residents are achieved by creating various shared space throughout floors, & continuous communal space on the building level. Shared space of different sizes & functions are designed for both residents & the users at each floor, to connect vertical neighbouhoods, to capture powerful urban dynamic among the surrounding streetscape & the elevated park, & to stimulate the social spirit.

CRITIC: Jonas Coersmeier Lyly Huyen (TA)

[2]

JONAS COERSMEIER

JONAS COERSMEIER

STUDENT: Chao Liu


CORE 601

CORE 601

M ARCH

M ARCH

106

107

This project seeks to provide for the homeless a transitional environment that gives access to well-care, legal assistance, job training and housing. The public realm extends into the building as an extension of the sidewalk and becomes a pathway that connects the visitor to the services and help they need to break the cycle of homelessness. Diverse programs are enclosed inside a perimeter skin that is finely tuned to control temperature, humidity and solar gain. This enclosure creates a microclimate that offers the homeless respite from their usual environment...

CRITIC: Scott Erdy

[3]

SCOTT ERDY

SCOTT ERDY

STUDENT: Yu Zhou


CORE 601

CORE 601

M ARCH

M ARCH

108

109

In order to establish its own critical competitiveness, the project pushes its solar orientation to an extreme. Standing on the south side with no highrise buildings blocking sunlight, the building takes advantage of the energy that is gathered from the sun in order to self-supply the whole project. This act reduces the living expenses significantly. Paradoxically, this efficiency is achieved by the employment of sophisticated and expensive sun-harvesting technology purchased through wealthy donors, expiating their capitalistic exploitation of the environment.

CRITIC: Scott Erdy

[3]

SCOTT ERDY

SCOTT ERDY

STUDENT: Yuheng Ouyang


CORE 601

CORE 601

M ARCH

M ARCH

110

111

Using a system of cracks into the mass of the tower to not only allow for a system of aperture but also a system with very specific aesthetic qualities. The cracks also allow for an insertion of balcony entities that are a foreign protrusion from the cracks. The Balcony entities exist as ephemeral boundless objects with no hard edges. The secondary aperture system is the applied texture to the east faรงade, where it not only acts as an aperture system for the housing units but also aesthetically acts as a surface quality that challenges the solidity of a concrete, almost brutalist faรงade.

CRITIC: Kutan Ayata

[4]

KUTAN AYATA

KUTAN AYATA

STUDENT: David Brian Harrop


CORE 601

CORE 601

M ARCH

M ARCH

112

113

The proposal desires a micro live-work hybrid building which offers a solution to the overcrowded city while the mixing of working and living satisfies the needs of different living styles. A fusion of working and living is required. A fusion of unfamiliar life style is suggested. A fusion of various micro units is a must. The project is a 20-floor-stack giant composed by over 100 old submarine nozzles. The nozzle(s) of each unit may fuse to its adjacent nozzle or keep itself along, a tension to fuse living and working, the unifiliar life style and building parts to whole.

CRITIC: Kutan Ayata

[4]

KUTAN AYATA

KUTAN AYATA

STUDENT: Shicheng Shen


114

115

1

2

3

4

5

6 A

8 B

9

10 D

11

12

13

E

14

15

16

F

17

18

G

PRIVATE YARD

19 H

PRIVATE YARD

20

21 I

22 J K

M ARCH

M ARCH

PRIVATE YARD

7

L

ROWHOUSES

M

STOREFRONTS + BIKE STORAGE

N

O

P PUBLIC PARK

PL R PE UP TO

TO

UP

PE

R

PL

AT

AT

FO

FO

RM

RM

PUBLIC PARK

CORE 601

CORE 601

COMMERCIAL WIRE

REWIRE proposes a new development on the vacant block that will establish a new relationship fabric to maximize interaction, promote social synergy and create engineered serendipity [micro]. Re-wire the urban block infrastructure to adhere to the modern spectrum of socioeconomic demographics [macro]. The complex plugs into the various wires of the city, such as the train, the neighborhood, the sky, and the ground. By the lifting of the groundscape, which provides a much needed recreational oasis for the area and creates a new ground plane platform.

CRITIC: Brian Phillips

[5]

BRIAN PHILLIPS

BRIAN PHILLIPS

STUDENT: Gary Polk


CORE 601

CORE 601

M ARCH

M ARCH

116

117

With a gradation of permanent to temporary and public to private, this project stitches together Market street and the adjacent neighborhood, creating a new type of urban node: at once a public forum, a creative laboratory and a flexible housing community. The design employs the use of fat party walls to strategically link or separate different rowhouse plots. With development organized in three parallel bars, these walls puncture through the site, providing the infrastructure for living and creating while forming a frame within which communities can make this project their own.

CRITIC: Brian Phillips

[5]

BRIAN PHILLIPS

BRIAN PHILLIPS

STUDENT: Michael O'Neill


CORE 601

CORE 601

M ARCH

M ARCH

118

119

Analyzing the symbiotic qualities present between cordyceps and insects, this project extracts the particularities of the relationship, and its beneficial factors. The process by which cordyceps latches onto organic matter produces a series of metamorphic conditions that replace organic tissue. The logic behind this relationship suggests a process by which the fungi and insect merge, creating a tertiary condition. This condition is then expressed by having the residential components and farming elements create a hybrid system. A complex relationship between all building components is formed, resulting in the building functions having a co-dependent quality.

CRITIC: Justin Korhammer Brett Dong Ha Lee (TA)

[6]

JUSTIN KORHAMMER

JUSTIN KORHAMMER

STUDENT: Gesu Almonte


CORE 601

CORE 601

M ARCH

M ARCH

120

121

The directional occupancies of the symbiosis model results in the different orientating of the programs, with the dwelling units stretching from inside out and the farming program growing from bottom up. The growth ends with expanding the end condition to get maximized exposure. The dwelling units compete for the street exposure while the farms compete for the light exposure. By lifting the lower floors, the building allows itself to interact with the canal and aims to root itself on the site as an integrated part of the larger context.

CRITIC: Justin Korhammer Brett Dong Ha Lee (TA)

[6]

JUSTIN KORHAMMER

JUSTIN KORHAMMER

STUDENT: Yihui Gan


GETTING STICH

The ribbon serves as the program for the SRO user. It cuts it’s way through the extruded building footprint, creating a network of units and services that repeats every three floors.

The organization of disturbed by the rib ganzie, and stich the the remaining space

M ARCH

M ARCH

122

123

THE RIBBON

SECTION FLOOR PLANS

NORTH / SOUTH

N

SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0”

Plan Type A

COMMUNITY CONNECTION

POSITIVE CONN

Opportunities for community connection occur at each of the transition moments between ribbon segments., At the end of the two wings there are kitchen and living spaces. At the middle junctions there are outdoor spaces SRO 5 Bed 1 Bed

2,450 SQFT 500 SQFT

1,360 - 1,480 SQFT

3 Bed Duplex

2,300 SQFT

The irregular conne a programmatic ele private terraces for t cut outs for the sing

CORE 601

CORE 601

2 Bed Duplex

Plan Type B

SRO 3 Bed 2 Bed

This project combines two types of residents (market-rate buyers & SRO users) in one building envelope, with the intention of creating a net-benefit for both types of users. The SRO units were designed as a network within themselves; a ribbon of program winds up and through the building completely interconnected. An SRO occupant might travel throughout the SRO ribbon system from floor to floor, interacting with other members within this established community and completely avoiding the circulation spaces shared by the “traditional” user.

940 SQFT 1,480 SQFT

3 Bed Duplex

2,300 - 2,450 SQFT

CRITIC: Ben Krone Serena Yin (TA)

BEN KRONE

BEN KRONE

STUDENT: Amanda Baker

1,200 SQFT

2 Bed Duplex

Plan Type C

[7] SRO 7 Bed

2,600 SQFT


124

125 M ARCH

M ARCH

Workin

1-Bedr

CORE 601

CORE 601

Studio

The design of the mixed income housing project will add to the value of the current neighbourhood and enhance the existing conditions through shared amenities for the public...This housing seeks to challenge the typical typology of the independent live and work spaces by creating a cohesion between the two. The housing will incorporate central workspaces amongst units for residents living within. It will seek to alleviate any tensions that may have once existed between different income levels through the incorporation of work or art studio spaces.

CRITIC: Ben Krone Serena Yin (TA)

[7]

BEN KRONE

BEN KRONE

STUDENT: Garesa Au


126 M ARCH

CORE 602

[3]

[4]

Simon Kim ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

Shawn Rickenbacker LECTURER

Hina Jamelle LECTURER

Kutan Ayata LECTURER

- Co-founded IbaĂąez Kim Studio, PA & MA, (1994) - Graduated from the Design Research Laboratory at the Architectural Association (AA) - Taught studios and seminars at Harvard, MIT, Yale, and the AA. - Director of the Immersive Kinematics Research Group

- Co-founder of Urban Data Design, NY (2010) - Received MArch with Certificate in Urbanism from the University of Virginia; received BArch from Syracuse University - Lecturer &/or juror at Washington Univ., Univ. of Virginia, Prairie View State Univ., Univ. of Illinois–Champagne/ Urbana, Yale, PennDesign, Cornell, Rice, Georgia Tech, & Univ. of Michigan.

- Architect and Director at Contemporary Architecture Practice, NY (2003) - Graduated with an MArch from University of Michigan Taubman College, where she received the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Leadership Award. - Author of the upcoming book Migrating Architectural and Structural Formations (2013) and co-author of Elegance (2007)

- Co-founded New York-based architecture firm, Young & Ayata (2008) - Young & Ayata are winners of The Architectural League Prize (2014) - Received a MArch from Princeton University (2004) - Bachelor of Fine Arts in Architecture from Massachusetts College of Art in Boston (1999)

[5]

Franca Trubiano ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR - Received a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania - Received both an MArch and a BArch from McGill University - Editor and co-author of the recently published Design and Construction of High Performance Homes: Building Envelopes, Renewable Energies and Integrated Practice (2012)

[6]

[7]

Nathan Hume LECTURER

Ben Krone LECTURER

- Partner at Hume coover studio (2008) - Editor & Founder of suckerPUNCH (2008) - Earned a Bachelor of scienc in Architecture from Ohio State University (2003)

- Founded Gradient Design Studio, NYC (2006) - Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Florida (1999) - MArch degree from Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, GSAPP (2004) - Won the McKim Prize for Excellence in Design & the Sol Kaplan Traveling Fellowship.

CORE 602

CORE 602

[2]

M ARCH

Simon Kim, Coordinator

CORE 602 FACULTY [1]

127

At its base, this fourth-semester design studio is the first to integrate construction knowledge, developed in a constellation of core courses, within its design production. Students work in small teams with a host of internationally recognized consultants to create architecture with structural, mechanical, and environmental systems refined in organization and scale. Offices such as Buro Happold, Arup, and AKT have been involved with the studio projects. The resulting architecture, informed by the polemics of the instructors, ranges from performative air, parts to whole strategies, contemporary discourse of inside and outside, the estranged and deterritorialized, to nonhuman agencies. Much of this work is done in the context of the city with a public and private component in the programme. This year has seen the inaugural masterlecture series of highly respected figures in their respected fields: Hanif Kara from AKT, Marc Simmons of Front, dean Vijay Kumar and Mark Yim from PennEngineering, Salmaan Craig from Harvard University. Each of these lectures present the greatest industry-standard of practice and academics to offset and augment the work of the students. At a disciplinary level, the histories and theories from our academic traditions also come into sharper focus with new and advancing media and techniques. The milieu of architecture, as a historic tradition and a projective pursuit, continually manages the meaning and cultural production of architecture. Its boundaries and what is considered its core values, both a-historic and tradition-bound, may therefore be examined and transformed as needed. For example, hierarchic orders, established in past centuries with its attendant types and combinatoric elements, may be continued as a historical project. Yet it must be able to resist or respond to pressures from newfound vectors such as multi-speciated ecologies from the stigmergic to the artificially alive. This is not only due to the plurality of our age with its variegated classifications and lengths of history, but also to the higher-order ramifications of architecture in service to a near-totalizing global enterprise, with adjustments for a wholly synthetic and new wilderness. When compounded with fast-approaching technologies, what is craft and what is intellect, previously made distinct, takes on hybrid dimensions. The ideas of what architecture may become, what it signifies and for whom, are addressed with precision and rigor in this studio. When tethering the ideological to the technical, the communication of intent will take many forms. The level of commitment to the absolute and to the relative is selected here, with all manner of assemblies and affects integrated within a cohesive design project. What is of primary importance is to ratify the often striking results with a clear position in this disciplinary milieu, supported by equally clear planimetric and qualitative documentation.


128

[1]

SYSTEMS THINKING

[2]

CRITIC: Shawn Rickenbacker Our studio begins with observations of system thinking, performance criteria design, aesthetic logic, and whether the logic of aesthetics is something that exist and or is transferable? Systems thinking is the process of understanding how things, regarded as systems, influence one another within a whole. In nature, systems thinking examples include ecosystems in which various elements such as air, water, movement, plants, and animals work together to survive or perish. Wikipedia.

CORE 602

The studio premise, surmises an architecture that is combinative in its roles as built form and productive in establishing an environmental equilibrium. The continued rise in the world’s urban populations is well documented and as a result urban centers continue to densify in all forms of material production as well as waste. One of the most problematic and harmful forms of waste is air pollution. The industrialized age in particular has recorded unprecedented negative environmental change in addition to staggering health related conditions. The post industrial through to the post modern era have each continued to further compromise the fragile environmental equilibrium that many scientist caution is necessary for our continued habitation of the planet. To address this worldwide problem the studio propose a new addition to urban infrastructure; an Air Remediation facility and International Carbon Exchange for the trading of international carbon credits. The goal of such a facility is to reframe the notion of building and building systems not as closed sealed systems but systems that are by design open, porous and vascular that engage with and interact productively with the environment. The proposals are developed as responses to local environmental data such as pollution types, air-flow and wind, solar, and precipitation. The production of responsive forms is and systems understood to be an emergent process, established in relationship to the creation of an air collection, processing and exhaust logic. The concept of emergence is this case is an explanation of how natural systems have evolved and maintained themselves. This concept has been applied to artificial intelligence, information systems, economics and climate studies. The logic along with its corresponding form is intended to provide prescription to other urban sites creating a larger network of remediation sites throughout the city. The pilot site is located south of the United Nations in New York City.

through structural and design techniques unleashing a series of new potentials for investigation, refinement and elegant solutions.

CRITIC: Hina Jamelle STUDIO CONSULTANTS: Daniel Brodkin & Matt Jackson TA: Hua Yang & Maru Chung

CONSTRUCTED TERRAINS

The site is on a rezoned lot on Charlton St between Greenwich Street and Hudson St in West Soho. This studio will examine emergence and its relation to the formulation of architecture by using digital techniques in an opportunistic fashion for the generation of growth and evaluation of patterns in the development of form. Digital techniques allow us to deal with the full complexity of material systems that lead to effects that are greater than the sum of their parts. We will examine organizations that are highly integrated formal and spatial systems which operate the same as organic systems where the forms result from their adaptation to performance requirements; in our case the structure, inhabitable surfaces and enclosure. Achieving an integrated whole entails the refinement of spatial and structural organization and the integration of building systems, including stairs, structure and skins inflecting and adapting to each other providing an overall intelligence of fabrication and assembly. The goal for each student is to develop a sophisticated understanding of form using strategies to design architecture that flows from topological surfaces and spatial arrangements in transformation, and to apply these to a range of familiar architectural issues. The final proposal of each student will emerge out of an inter-related working method between program, space, structure, material and fabrication logics that combine to develop an innovative building formation. Structural integration will be addressed through the material associations of each projects design development. These associations allow us to understand the behavior of materials such as steel, concrete or composites that will translate directly into structural diagrams and test models. This allows for an integrated design methodology by translating the compression and tension of transformed geometries. Refined and precise digital models allow for the development of structural models that feed-back through the designs immediately as the control of geometry and constructability becomes crucial to the success of each project. Computational tools have altered and expanded our ability as architects to design, so too have they expanded our capacity to make. These models establish a fluidity between the digital realm and the material one that can test structural strategies. Thus, the integration component to the studio will focus on the realization of design intent as it feeds back

CRITIC: Kutan Ayata

[4]

The discipline of architecture (as well as the arts) has always been occupied with the question of representing/recreating/redefining “nature” through various strains of its histories, i.e. from Baroque, Rococo to Art Nouveau, from Modernism, to Biomimicry, and even recent tendencies of green, sustainable approaches continue these ambition in specific trajectories in order to establish responsible relations with our environment. The two common pitfalls of all these attempts can be summed up as the following; One; some operate at the assumed fault line of nature-culture divide, as though only things that humans do not make have an inherent quality of “natural” authenticity, therefore they cannot be cultural and visa versa. Second; the aesthetics either aims to generate a simulacrum, resulting in literal interpretations of an assumed holistic unity or in absolute abstractions resulting in a reference filled experiential absence… What if we took this problem yet again but aim to operate away from these opposite poles? What if we claim that we can produce specific objects that can begin to undermine our assumptions of the culture/nature divide? What if we claim authentic “nature” can be constructed and these constructions can produce specific cultures. As our cities grow and demands of contemporary urban life reduce the chance to explore outdoors on a regular basis, certain outdoor recreational activities such as cycling, rowing, climbing, diving (and more) find new appropriations within the bounds of the city in the confines of built environments. These are programs which recreate specific conditions of landscape terrains through artificial means to simulate desired activities. What typically cannot be embodied in such transformation are the sublimity and majestic qualities of nature. The discipline of architecture’s respond to such a loaded problem has been one of dismissal where the architect is relegated to designing the shed around these artificial constructs. The studio explored an indoor/outdoor rock climbing facility on Pier 26 at the West Side waterfront of Manhattan. It was explored as part of the recreational activity chain which has been developing on the waterfront with the regeneration of the Island’s western edge. The main inquiry was the aesthetics of such an artificial construct and the specificity of its construction.

CORE 602

Architecture of augmentation and nonhuman agency is not historically addressed or held in a long tradition of parts and elements orchestrated in tectonics. The idea of an architecture that is sensate, nervous, and cooperative with human occupancy is an entirely new domain. We will address this challenge through the concept of Immersion and Bewilderment, a function whereby elements in a closed field becomes transposed by the same procedure to change the contents of that field to another. We will make cross-product Architecture. New programmatic conditions will establish patterns of usage, or rhythms of civic life that may become transformed with an anomaly not easily discarded due to its intrinsic links within the design discipline. Connecting known architectural types and devices for the unknown or the recently-lost through transposition will create a methodology to engage a synthetic world of nature and machine and architecture, where the machine is not reduced to a technological filter or interface. The inversion of nature and the uncanny agent-to-agent relationship is then highly compelling as The Immersive or Bewildered will come to mean an autonomous agent, a player or author as the architect is also a player or author - engaged in conversation. Founded in 1986, Socrates Sculpture Park is the only site in the New York metropolitan area specifically dedicated to providing artists with opportunities to create and exhibit large-scale sculpture and multi-media installations in a unique outdoor environment that encourages strong interaction between artists, artworks and the public. The park’s existence is based on the belief that reclamation, revitalization and creative expression are essential to the survival, humanity and improvement of our urban environment. The studio programme is to provide on-site offices, galleries, and performance spaces.

MIXED USE TOWER IN [3] WEST SOHO NEW YORK CITY

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CRITIC: Simon Kim

The intention of introducing systems thinking was twofold, one to provide a wider context of critical engagement, design consideration and outcomes and secondly to supplant predisposed objectives. Within this work, systems thinking and their respective spatial requirements albeit enhanced in the name of infrastructure are acting as instigators of productive form. The explicit challenge was to investigate processes that generate form(s) capable of responsiveness, and one(s) that disassociates from type or style in favor of outcomes, ultimately rendering the need for assessment based criteria beyond the form(s) itself. In this regard we posit form(s) that resembles less the pursuit of assemblage but one that offers a collective intelligence of spatial interactions.

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SHARED AGENCIES


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[5] SPATIAL INTERFERENCE [6]

CORE 602

Since the time of Vitruvius, the terms “interior” and “exterior” have been integral to the manner in which architecture is discussed. A building is fundamentally responsible for distinguishing spaces, thus establishing a relative understanding of being inside of one thing and outside of another. We have, over the course of time, come to expect certain things from this relationship. In Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture, Robert Venturi posited that “[t]he inside is different from the outside;” In The Dynamic of Architectural Form, Rudolph Arnheim stated that “perceptually and practically the worlds of outside and inside are mutually exclusive. One cannot be in both at the same time.” For both Venturi and Arnheim it is in this binary relationship between interior and exterior that the possibility of producing a powerful effect exists. More recent explorations in architecture of the two terms strive to produce a much wider range of spatial conditions that go on to traverse the previously established mutual exclusivity of the two terms, interior and exterior. It is in the multiplicity over the expected binary that such explorations see great potential. We will explore the subversion of the assumed mutual exclusivity between interior and exterior as a sort of glitch, an error in a structured system that is ultimately, and perhaps unexpectedly, beneficial. The interference will not be seen as a graphic mistake but rather independent logics with moments of exchange, resisting the in-between, in favor the simultaneous. Spatially this breakage cultivates tension over gradient conditions or smooth continu ation while avoiding incongruous collaged moments The statements of Venturi and Arnheim help to establish the structured system that we aspire to swerve as we identify strategies for the manner in which the strict division between interior and exterior can be broken, allowing one body to occupy both simultaneously. To explore volumetric interference the studio will explore the modern bank headquarters. Centers of tech, commerce, storage, and security, the headquarters are multifaceted buildings with a host of exchange points. There exists a rich lineage of bank projects ranging from The Bank of England to the submissions for the European Central Bank. Traditionally an inward looking complex with rings of security, the type has undergone change as banking has switched to a virtual realm. The projects will individually define the relation the building has to assets, whether it favors more virtual (bitcoin, ING) or physical (security deposit boxes, vaults) while also engaging in new

PERPETUAL MOTION

[7]

CRITIC: Ben Krone In the last two decades bicycle culture has made a significant resurgence. The development of new technologies in cycle frames and components making them lighter, faster, more mobile and nimble has had a significant impact in all aspects of the sport. This is true from high speed racing to endurance to mountain bike riding. Likely the greatest change though, at least in terms of widespread interest, is based in the commuting culture of biking. A combination of carbon footprint awareness, overcrowding of public transportation in big cities, and a new generation of people who see cars as a threat to public safety and health, has propelled the culture of bike riding to new levels. It is not difficult to understand the significant impact this is having in cities, from bike shares to complete re-designs of city master plans centered on reorienting bicycles as the primary form of transportation. This studio will be charged with gaining a high level understanding for the culture of bicycle riding, racing, and bicycle recreation, as it currently exists as well as a historical understanding of the sport. This research will form the foundation of each teams conceptual approach toward programming, and ultimately will be the basis for redefining the typology of the sporting event venue as a hybrid between bicycle recreation center, community center, and a competitive sport complex. The project starts with developing an intimate understanding of both current and historical precedents for arena sporting facilities. Although the ultimate goal of the studio is to develop a new typology far beyond the traditional understanding of the arena, it is important to understand its basic function to collect and contain the masses. Through this lens the typology of the arena is a significant physical indicator of society's reflexes. An example of this can be understood through the evolution of the section, from the sunken bowl amphitheaters of the Greeks with no public and private barriers, to the elevated bowl of the Romans fraught with hierarchy and multiple thresholds, to the Reich Sports field that forfeited functional considerations in favor of unity, order and symmetry.

CORE 602

This studio is dedicated to the design of High Performance Buildings that actualize the potential of “responsiveness” in positing important transformations for architectural design. The studio advances Responsiveness as both a process and a set of ideas that can be harnessed for achieving significant gains in sustainability. Whenever buildings are capable of selfmodification, internal regulation and tectonic adaptability, they are said to be responsive. Buildings can be designed to react intelligently to changes of various kinds, including changes in: environment (light, air, humidity, and temperature); use (program, occupant, density) ;material (decay, weathering). This studio asserts that buildings are never inert, static or limited by the initial process of construction. Like nature, buildings too are constantly subject to the dynamic forces of the environment in which they are located and as such should be designed to respond to a host of possible future conditions. Differently than in the past, contemporary buildings can be more symbiotically designed with the knowledge of such forces. In this studio students will be exposed to the qualitative and quantitative measures that define our experience of the elements that are light and air. As catalysts for design, these environmental forces help shape our buildings in design, construction and operations and form the basis of high performance design. The impact of light and air on a building’s skin and on the design of its structural and environmental section are of central interest to the studio. Moreover, being able to measure the outcome(s) of one’s design is the definition of building performance design and students will be introduced to design metrics via the latest building simulation software used in the industry to evaluate the environmental impact of our material and energy choices; be they measured in levels of illuminance, transmittance, solar absorption, air flow or wind speed. The studio is also focused on improving fabrication and construction skills by focusing on the production of physical models and construction details that support the tectonic idea of the project. As well, it will cultivate ideas about emergent materials that use light and air in reducing the environmental impact of our material resource. Students will also engage in a study of generative/fractal geometries in order to organize and structure their design proposals, regardless of scale.

CRITIC: Nathan Hume STUDIO CONSULTANTS: Edward Roberts, Chad Konrad and Jamison Guest TA: Andrea Yoas

The studio will investigate both space and geometry through careful research and experimentation into various manual techniques of weaving, stitching, stacking, molding and a host of other complex structural assemblies. These will be investigated initially at the scale of the body, involve notions of craft, and careful understating of how repetition and technique yield complex geometric systems. These results are embedded with the DNA for both spatial and geometric innovation that may be applied at various scales and utilized to test a host of programmatic functions. The studio’s research into the physics of motion will play a crucial role in translating small-scale geometric studies into programmatic and spatial manifestations.

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CRITIC: Franca Trubiano

forms of office organization. No longer defined by bank tellers or cubicles, the modern banking headquarters is a cluster of open zones more akin to a tech campus using activity based working. The headquarters will host a large number of employees as well as amenities for them including green space and a café. The organization should promote social interaction in the workplace. The need for connectivity throughout makes it a ripe typology for exploring spatial interaction and volumetric interference.

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OPTIMIZING ZERO


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Looking West 10’

20’

92’

Details 1. Chainmail Metal Membrane 2. Edge seal clamped to continuous plate 3. Structural Support 4. Pre Cast Concrete Wall Structure 5. Plastic Bubble 6. Plastic bubble frame 7. Metal Bracket 8. Steel Angle 9. Prefabricated Reinforced Fiberglass Plastic 10. Steel Plates 11. Pins 12. Poured in Place Slabs

67’

9

55’

12

5

1

3

8 4

2

42’

1

9

5

6 4

7 10

25’

CORE 602

CORE 602

11

0’ 9

As visitors enter under the belly of the building, they find themselves in a synthetic wetland that houses outdoor sculpture galleries and conditioned infrastructure and gathering spaces...visitors enter the body of the building via a grand staircase into a large atrium. A series of prefabricated pods containing bars and classrooms surround the atrium, pulsing in and out of the building mass on tracks. Spectacle and performance blur as visitors navigate the bewildering worlds of the East River’s hovering mass.

CRITIC: Simon Kim

Detailed Partial Section 0’

[1]

5’

-25’

10’

SIMON KIM

SIMON KIM

STUDENT: Douglas Breuer Michelle Chew


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CORE 602

CORE 602

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...challenges conventions by blurring the line between human & non-human agency, creating a pulsing vessel of worlds...Both performance and gallery art is now augmented by the fragmentation of the 4th wall—the project insists on questioning the degree to which science-fiction affects us as designers. The Project further defined a new role for the physical model, which was frankensteined from the early stages as part of a synthetic material study.

CRITIC: Simon Kim

[1]

SIMON KIM

SIMON KIM

STUDENT: Gary Polk Jungjae Suh


136

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1. Fan 2. Muffler 3. NO2 Pipe 4. Water Pipe from River 5. Horizontal HSS Rectangular Frame 6. Riveted Vertical HSS Rectangular Frame 7. Steel Angle 8. Bolt 9. Insulating Tempered Glass 10. ALBANG Fin Spider Clip 11. Silicone Sealant 12. HONO Pipe 13. I-Beam 14. Bubble Deck 15. Rigid Insulation 16. Mixing Tank Enclosed from Human Access 17. Lipid Membrane for NO2 Filtering from Air 18. Louver 19. Steel Plate 20. UVA Lights 21. Steel Panels 22. Solar Film 23. 3” Air Gap 24. HSS Horizontal Steel Frame 25. Mount 26. Base Plate (1/2”) 27. 2” Bedding Space 28. 5/16” Stainless Steel Screw 29. Concrete Foundation 30. 1” Washer 31. Anchor plate 32. Concrete Footing

19 3

22 24

20 21 23 25

4

600 Ft

550 Ft

500 Ft

450 Ft

CORE 602

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2 400 Ft

1

350 Ft

300 Ft

250 Ft

STUDENT: Aly Abouzeid Cynthia Anastasiou

CRITIC: Shawn Rickenbacker

150 Ft

SHAWN RICKENBACKER

SHAWN RICKENBACKER

200 Ft

100 Ft

...aims to insert itself into the global climate cycle by capitalizing on the scale of the building in serving two critical purposes. (01) Designed to use nitrogen dioxide pollution produced as a result of road traffic and other fossil fuel combustion processes to create radical hydroxyl particles that are released at a high altitude into the atmosphere...(02) system mobility allows it to be easily moved and utilized wherever needed. Serveing as a signal the end of the industrial age & the information age, ushering in an age of empowerment.

50 Ft

11 -50 Ft

[2]

10 9

12


138 ...marries extreme engineering, technology, and materiality as it adapts and transitions from one system component to another -- column to slab to arch to filtration mesh -- while simultaneously expressing the functional and structural system as the architectural motif...The beauty of Fractal Taxis lies in the physical expression of the multiplicity of functions embodied within each member. As the structure grows to assemble itself, programmatic spaces populate themselves into barnacle-like pods that grow where needed.

CRITIC: Shawn Rickenbacker

[2]

SHAWN RICKENBACKER

SHAWN RICKENBACKER

CORE 602

CORE 602

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STUDENT: Esther Hah Natasha Sanjaya


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%

6.5

6

%

6

5.5

%

5

Rooftop

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%

530’

Time 515’

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Level 33

4

Seed

Sprout

Branching

Budding

Blooming Level 30 485’

6

Level 20 335’

550’

Level 19 320’ Level 18

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305’

Level 16 275’ 3

Level 15 260

CORE 602

CORE 602

Rooftop 530’ Level 3 55’ 2

Level 2

Level 33 515’

40’

Level 1 25’

4

... the 34-floor-tower is a hybrid of hotel, office, media center and retail space. The design challenges the conventional idea of high-rise with regular horizontal divisions, and integrates various scales of spatial experience through spectacular transformation on exterior facade as well as interior space. Large three dimensional volume cuts through the building and penetrates the floor slabs, layering the depth of space in all directions, providing users with better opportunities to observe and experience the space.

Ground Level

CRITIC: Hina Jamelle Hua Yang & Maru Chung (TA)

0’

Level 30 1

485’

Level B1 -25’

Level B2 -50’

[3]

1 2 3

AUDITORIUM MEDIA CENTER OFFICE

4 5 6

HOTEL RESTAURANT | LOUNGE SWIMMING POOL

BUILDING SECTION

BUILDING WALL SECTION

1/16” = 1’0”

1/16” = 1’0”

HINA JAMELLE

HINA JAMELLE

STUDENT: Chao Liu Lei Yu


142

CORE 602

CORE 602

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143

...inspired by a type of lava called 'Pa-hoehoe', which eventually forms igneous rock with organic shape with seams and little gaps in-between. The coexistence of the liquid lava and solid igneous rock informs the final physical geometry of Pa-hoehoe. The large young population and the intensive creative industry will co-exist in a new type of life style. The diversity of working and living experience can provide a flexible use of space for different groups of people. It is going to be a new type of experiment.

CRITIC: Hina Jamelle Hua Yang & Maru Chung (TA)

[3]

HINA JAMELLE

HINA JAMELLE

STUDENT: David Feng Yihui Gan


CORE 602

CORE 602

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144

145

...cliffhanger operates as both exterior and interior climbing space. While as an object it is suspended above the pier on huge pilotis, mountainous towers erupt above. The whole building negotiates a play between these moments of eruption and a bounding box which is defined itself by the width of the pier. The different formal moves of the building allow for different types of climbing, and there are moments where the architecture and the pier are pierced through, and climbing is done over water.

CRITIC: Kutan Ayata

[4]

KUTAN AYATA

KUTAN AYATA

STUDENT: Hardeep Gujral Matthew Lewis


146

147 M ARCH

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Longitudinal Section 1/16� = 1’

03

01

04

CORE 602 The goal to vibrate between what is natural and unnatural, or rather what is perceived to be of fictional or real a para-fiction of sorts. Formally the goal was to generate dynamic climbing environments both internally and externally, but to have their existences be in stark contradiction. Internally the gym identifies itself by four different personalities which are manifested by four unique climbing chambers. The goal being to escape the contemporary rock gym vernacular for something more engaging, and unpredictable.

CRITIC: Kutan Ayata

[4]

KUTAN AYATA

KUTAN AYATA

STUDENT: Zachary Kile Dave Harrop

CORE 602

05


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120.00m

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107.00m

69.00m

58.00m

51.30m

34.00m

30.00m

26.00m

40.60m 22.00m

18.00m

14.00m

10.00m

6.00m

0.00m

21.30m

CORE 602

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2.40m

The development of an analogical bio-machine included the creation of a surface with extruded circular blocks designed to interfere with the water’s stream; a reservoir at the top of the mechanism to disperse water on the surface evenly; the project explored how water currents could contribute to architectural ideas and performance metrics for the building’s structure, architectural programming, environmental strategy, and material definition and detailing.

CRITIC: Franca Trubiano

[5]

FRANCA TRUBIANO

FRANCA TRUBIANO

STUDENT: Kaiyue Zhou Wenxin Chen


Kaleidoscope explores the field of daylight, more particularly the relationship between the vector and patterns of light. Our intention is to translate this relationship into a spatial logic that will provide an organizational strategy that is dynamic, informing the building’s section, its structure and its multivalent facade structure.

CRITIC: Franca Trubiano

[5]

FRANCA TRUBIANO

FRANCA TRUBIANO

CORE 602

CORE 602

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150

151

STUDENT: Samantha Aguilar Jiahua Xu


CORE 602

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153

The flicker between object & field, interior & exterior spatiality, & of continuously changing conditions within a geometric boundary set the character of the bank project. The convergence of the three create an urban canyon drawing the public through the exterior spaces within the building boundary, enabling the engagement between the users & the bank on multiple levels, spatially through a field of pods meeting the ground, or the interference of the voids & the building.

CRITIC: Nathan Hume Andrea Yoas (TA)

[6]

NATHAN HUME

NATHAN HUME

STUDENT: Alex Saroki Mark Chalhoub


CORE 602

CORE 602

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154

155

...by questioning the relationship between inside and outside, exterior bars were carved by the interior eggs and then become interior volume. In contrast, the interior eggs break through the bars and forms the boundary for outside. The tension in between provide chances for other spaces and volumes. Functionally, they can either belong to inside volume, outside volume, or become third type of space.

CRITIC: Nathan Hume Andrea Yoas (TA)

[6]

NATHAN HUME

NATHAN HUME

STUDENT: Pingle Li Shicheng Shen


CORE 602

CORE 602

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156

157

...a hyper-contextualized & yet completely novel cycling experience within the Brooklyn Bridge Park. Acting as a micro-network, the Vertigo Interchange cycling hub invites public & professional cyclists to play with our building & thus play with their surroundings. The moments of play are concentrated at four towers & the velodrome that is suspended between them. The result is a public hub for cycling that invites play, and celebrates activity of urban life.

CRITIC: Ben Krone

[7]

BEN KRONE

BEN KRONE

STUDENT: Katie McBride Andrew Singer Angeliki Mavroleon


CORE 602

CORE 602

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158

159

Compared to normal velodromes, the auditorium seating in this project is designed to be right above the velodrome, going across the whole racing track, rather than fitting it around the oval track. By doing this, the audience can watch the game by looking down through their feet, which makes it easier for the audience to see the details clearly and understand the whole game completely. This idea of the watching system as well as the overall form comes from an often-used biking strategy called “drafting�.

CRITIC: Ben Krone

[7]

BEN KRONE

BEN KRONE

STUDENT: Yangmei Cai Yu Zhou


160

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NOVEMBER 9TH, 2015 THE NEW SCIENCE OF DATA: SIMULATION, OPTIMIZATION, AND STRUCTURAL FORM-FINDING

LECTURE

LECTURE

Mario Carpo, Reyner Banham Professor of Architectural History and Theory, The Bartlett, UCL, London


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163

NOVEMBER 11TH, 2015 CITY FUTURES SYMPOSIUM, KEYNOTE LECTURE Reinier De Graaf, OMA Partner

LECTURE

LECTURE

De Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands - © Philippe Ruault.

Fondazione Prada, Milan, Italy - © Fondazione Prada.


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GALLERY

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STUDENT: Aly Abouzeid Cynthia Anastasiou

CRITIC: Shawn Rickenbacker

STUDENT: Gary Polk Jungjae Suh

CRITIC: Simon Kim

STUDENT: Yuheng Ouyang

CRITIC: Scott Erdy

STUDENT: Zachary Kile Dave Harrop

CRITIC: Kutan Ayata

STUDENT: Miguel Abaunza

CRITIC: Hina Jamelle

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reference page 136

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reference page 186

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reference page 118

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reference page 100

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701 Introduction by Winka Dubbeldam 704 Introduction by Ferda kolatan LECTURES GALLERY NEWS 2/2

176 220 268 272 282


[1]

[4]

Mattijs Bouw LECTURER

Simon Kim ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

Jason Payne LECTURER

- Principal of Farjadi Architects (1987) - Received a Graduate Diploma from the AA School of Architecture in London and an MArch with distinction from Tehran University - The work of her office has been exhibited and published internationally.

- Founding principal One Architecture - Rockefeller Urban Resilience Fellow, PennDesign

- Co-founded Ibañez Kim Studio, PA & MA, (1994) - Graduated from the Design Research Laboratory at the Architectural Association (AA) - Taught studios and seminars at Harvard, MIT, Yale, and the AA. - Director of the Immersive Kinematics Research Group

- Principal of Hirsuta - Co-partenered the awardwinning office Gnuform. - Worked as Project Designer for Reiser + Umemoto RUR architects and Daniel Libeskind Studio. - Payne holds a Master of advanced Architectural Design Degree from Colombia University.

[5]

[6]

[7]

[8]

Sulan Kolatan LECTURER

Daniel Wood LECTURER

Iñaki Echeverria LECTURER

Paul Preissner LECTURER

- Principal of New York-based KOL/MAC LLC (1988) - Received a MS in Architecture and Building Design degree from Columbia University - Holds a Dipl.Ing. Arch. degree from the RWTH Aachen, Germany - Her work has been published worldwide, notably, at MoMA, Cooper-Hewitt, Centre Georges Pompidou, and Barbican Art Gallery London.

- Co-fouded WORK as Architects with Amale Andraos. - Wood holds the 2013-14 Louis l.Kahn Chair at the Yale School of Architecture, the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture at the Cooper Union... - He is a licensed architect in the State of New York and is LEED certified.

- Architect and landscape urbanist based in Mexico City. - Founder of Iñaki Echeverria - The firm has been awarded numerous high profile commissions, both public and private. - Iñaki Echeverria holds a Masters degree from the Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation at Columbia University, a Bachelor’s degree from UNAM in Mexico and Art History studies at UCBerkeley.

- Founding partner of Paul or Paul. - AIA studied architecture at the University of Illinois (BsArch) and Columbia University (March). - He has has taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Syracuse University, the Southern California Institute of Architecture, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and served as the Hyde Chair at the University of Nebraska.

[9]

Thom Mayne PRACTICE PROFESSOR -F  ounded Morphosis in 1972. -M  ayne’s distinguished honors include the Pritzker Prize (2005) and the AIA Gold Medal (2013). -H  e was appointed to the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities in 2009, and was honored with the American Institute of Architects Los Angeles Gold Medal in 2000.

ADVANCED' 701

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ADVANCED' 701

[3]

Homa Farjadi PRACTICE PROFESSOR

Winka Dubbeldam, Coordinator

ADVANCED' 701

[2]

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177

Architecture 701 is the third year elective studio, focused on the critical relationship between City and architecture. Fall 2015 was the year the Department of Architecture celebrated its 125th year, and in that light the Department held the City Futures Conference, gathering a group of critical thinkers, designers and provocateurs. The conference did not intend to provide solutions to contemporary urban ills. Instead, by putting this diverse collection of practitioners and theorists in dialogue with one another, we hoped to produce visions, arguments, tactics, and other provocations for the types of cities we want to inhabit. The Conference more then answered this, provoking great visions and enticing dialogue. The 701 design studio moves beyond traditional planning to propose contemporary modes of inhabiting these new built environments, where there is a more critical relationship between architecture and the urban, between the micro and the mega, and between public and private. A new scale of architecture gets often developed in these studio’s; blurring the scale of the urban block with the scale of the building, introducing new public use and alternative modes of operating. The resulting designs function in three ways, as objects in the city that allow the city to respond to the proposals, as provocative responses to their contexts that negotiate the existing conditions in the city or a transformative relationship between the object and the context.


178 ADVANCED' 701

GROWING INTO ONE NYC [3] CRITIC: Matthijs Bouw, Kai-Uwe Bergman With Travis Bunt and Jeremy Alain Siegel One of the most exciting challenges for architecture in the 21st century is to deal with rapid change and with uncertainty. Architecture, long considered a ‘slow’ profession, needs to learn how to adapt to such diverse developments as the quickly changing business cycle, footloose urbanites, permanent election campaigns and climate change. One area where unstoppable but unpredictable future development of industry, commerce and housing comes together with challenges for climate change is the Brooklyn waterfront. In this area, between the Red Hook Container Terminal and the Brooklyn Army Terminal, many investors have acquired land for future development. Rather than based on an overall plan, these developers will each look to bring their own land to development, trying to balance market opportunities with the requirements from the perspective of the City and the local communities. Each developer will have to solve the puzzle of timing their proposed program to the development of the surroundings. The City and the communities will try to leverage all these individual developments into an overall improvement of the entire area, linking transportation, job development, (housing) equity and resilience. In this studio, students were challenged to develop ‘urban architecture’ projects for individual sites that can deal with uncertainty about program, timing, quantity and surroundings, and that can be combined into overall benefits for the entire area. In the research phase, students looked at the area with the perspective of One NYC, the City’s plan for ‘a strong and just city’. We learned a few key lessons. The area will indeed develop surely, but piecemeal. There is a

ARCHITECTURE 2.5: THE IMMERSIVE

[4]

CRITIC: Simon Kim Our discipline has dealt with Immersive Architecture for quite some time, but it has been denoted - and largely - marginalized as Architecture Machines. If we understand Machine as «Other» - or as non architecture - we can trace a lineage of the Other in the Machine from the past century. This Machine-as-Other has enjoyed some notoriety as industrialization reached the arts. Artists, writers, and architects have employed representations of machine processes as well as depictions of machines themselves. But more importantly, if we remove the idea of a machine altogether and organize architecture as sensate and animate matter, imbued with as much agency as any human, the foreground/ background objectification is removed. What becomes available is a disciplinary vector that engages human and nonhuman occupancies and desires, that takes on the design of what is a

shared and common endeavor that is architecture and the city. We understand that the dynamic condition of experience is already present in our environment whether we decide to engage it in design or not. What happens when this dynamic condition is attached to the object will permeate the polemic of the project. The studio will explore what are the architectural implications of responsiveness as the potential relationships between space and occupants and between parts of an ecology. Therefore various forms of responsiveness will be explored - augmentation, kinetics, input/output, feed-back loops, physical and embedded computing, material behavior, ambiance intelligence, dynamics, adaptive programming, memory, and duration. We will focus on how to generate a meaningful understanding of space and tectonics that is based on the ideas of experience and input/output as transformation in order to generate total environments, fully immersive environments, where the machine or the machine process is occupied. This condition recognizes that the total collection of physical objects and their augmentation are interlinked with an open response system. The site of the project is in Yeungdeungpo, Seoul, with the collaboration of the Seoul National University and professor John Hong. The area is a critical location of Seoul’s history and industry. The overlapping of what was light machining with galleries and labs provides a fecund location to produce Lab Life.

BIG BLACK BLANK

[5]

CRITIC: Jason Payne Sometimes significant buildings are not significant at all, at least not in whatever way was originally intended. This studio explores a class of architectural object that is resistant to signification in any standard sense despite its supposed responsibility toward just that. However strange this may sound such objects do exist in our discipline, in the same way asteroids exist in astrophysics: difficult bodies just outside easy categorization, each its own thing regardless of propriety. Experts in the field most often regard such objects as beneath them, not worth the time it would take to examine their specificities in the face of suspicion that in the end they will still very likely remain difficult. Better to stay more centrally located in one’s area of study so that relevance is assured. Tirana’s “Pyramid” is such an object in our discipline. Formally called the International Center of Culture, this building exists at the center of Albania’s capital city without fixed identity and no apparent use. Originally constructed in 1988 as

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Conceptual premise of the project takes on the Archizoom agenda for production of an imageless, limitless urban formation with the design of a housing project in London. Doubling the seemingly opposite conceptual directives to merge the two organizational typologies; to collapse a tall building with the horizontal urban scape of the no-stop-city. When Archizoom presented their project for ‘no- stop city’ in 1970’s their research on environ ment, mass culture and the city posed new questions that subverted the straight laced modernist agenda of technological optimism, of social agenda of housing provision based on existence minimum. They were after a non-hierarchized space of continuity. Residential car park project outlined their response to the production of a continuous space, a field city; configurations of buildings ‘swimming in a catatonic space of inexpressive, imageless undifferentiated repetition’. Elsewhere in their project, in a city covered with transparent cupolas, is a space with different itineraries, but this is above all as Branzi tells us, ‘a city where the system as a whole has not been conceived in the same way as the hierarchic construction of object but simply as an accumulation, like the shelving in a large warehouse, and like a self – service establishment selling functions’. Even apartments are real places where events occur: they are storehouses of memory, depots of object to be chosen on a case by cases basis. The refusal of organized city of architecture comes about through a city conceived as free in its itineraries and its choices. G Bianchino reminds us we can not forget that as in Land Art works on one side, and Arte Povera on the other, artists learnt how to discover the freedom of movement as well as the conditioning relationship between nature and object. ‘Branzi also sees the project’s center-less geometry merging the city with the building and the inside with the outside as a ‘liberating move corresponding to mass democracy. In the second text we pay attention to how contemporary London assumes its architectural character intersecting dynamic forces of change with local cultural trends and material technologies. At this moment the question of what the particular configuration of the urban form demands of its architectural form is faced with a global demand

big resilience and sustainability challenge. Any new housing cannot lead to displacement. In fact, much of new housing should be affordable. And the working waterfront, with jobs for the community, should not be gentrified out, either to housing or to jobs for the already rich. We also speculated about the long term future of living and work. In terms of jobs, one can not only see robotization and an increased scale of harbor activity (making much of the traditional port jobs less available). We also see, on the positive side, local manufacturing and maker culture resurgent. This leads to a hybridization of blue and white collar jobs; manufacturing, research, education, and sales are merging. We see this hybridization actually going further; the current strict zoning seems obsolete towards the future. But how all these developments, partly accelerated by digital technology, will concretely materialize, cannot be predicted. The different land- and building owners will each independently deal with it. How does one make projects in such uncertainty? We looked at urban and architectural strategies to deal with that. We looked at approaches to flood protection, and at how local solutions can be linked into a bigger, growing system. We looked at ways to be programmatically flexible in buildings. And we looked at planning strategies that start with small interventions. Within this context, 7 distinct projects where developed. Each of us selected a site, and a program. That the projects link together and can be understood to grow into one ‘system’ is, in part, deliberate, and, in part, coincidental.

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CRITIC: Homa Farjadi with Eleni Paulidou and Pierandrea Angius

for housing in London. Its configu-ration and image beyond its strictly historic centers is very much up for grabs. With the globalization of money and productive forces, design often overrides pragmatic logics. Tall buildings have come to be a favored type in this metropolis offering higher density for the investment capital and urban occupation of the urban ground. On our Battersea area site not far from the American Embassy quarters, we ask can the investment real estate accord with an imageless city in an architectural coincidence despite itself? What kind of typological, spatial strategies or organizational systems enable us to reach for both? We ask for concepts that would rethinks the urban grounding and its potential for verticality, dimensional mix, porosity, ecology in an accumulation of contemporary housing? how can No Stop city of Archizoom give new directives to achieve the ‘catatonic’ design state in this design project.

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HOUSING CATATONIC [2] LONDON. TWO COORDINATE OF IDEAS: NO STOP CITY + TALL BUILDING


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A natured culture project in Antalya, Turkey Invitation to the International Architecture Biennial Antalya and Collaboration with Bilgi University, EMBARQ Turkey and the Chamber of Architects Antalya Chapter

This studio has been invited by the Chamber of Architects in Antalya to participate in the International Architecture Biennial Antalya 2015. Students will fabricate an architectural prototype to be exhibited at this event. They will also travel to Antalya to visit the site, meet with the mayor and study the cultural and geological setting of this ancient Mediterranean city. A workshop with Bilgi University Architecture students who are working on the same site as well as a meeting with EMBARQ Turkey to discuss their biking studies for Antalya are planned for the Istanbul leg of the trip. The World Resource Institute for Sustainable Cities (WRI) and EMBARQ Turkey have targeted Antalya as one of their cities to promote sustainable urban mobility. Today, Antalya is host to Turkey’s highly regarded International Golden Orange Film Festival, now being controversially renamed the International Antalya Film Festival. The rise of Turkish cinema in the last decade, with many films competing in the international festivals and some winning top honors, is in turn putting pressure on the festival and its venues. The municipality is planning to build a permanent home for the festival.

[1] Can the mega object help strengthen the resilience of the city? [2] Can biking become a mega event? If so, can a link between mega-object and biking help strengthen the resilience of the city? [3] Do material and morphology as well as scale have agency in increasing urban resilience? [4] Can the city invent and remember at the same time? [5] The link between urban landscapes, spatial practices, and the generational transfer of collective memories formed through practice in these landscapes are critical to “urban sociological” resilience. Can architecture be a link between aesthetic desires and resiliency agendas? Is this the natured culture project?

MIAMI LOL (LEARNING FROM OCEAN LINERS)

[7]

CRITIC: Daniel Wood A hundred years after Corbusier waxed rhapsodically about the lessons to be learned from the luxury suites in cruise ships for his vision of housing the masses, cruise ships have become blatantly populist, much bigger, and much more experimental in terms of mechanics, form and organization of space. This studio looked to revisit the ocean liner as a site of speculation on urbanism, this time on the 21st century stage of Miamia place saturated with crosscultural ethnic eccentricity, popcultural

RURBAN STUDIO: [8] AICM (AEROPUERTO INTERNACIONAL DE LA CIUDAD DE MEXICO) CRITIC: Iñaki Echeverria TA: Chris McAdams The studio explored the potential of an urban agricultural development in Mexico City with the development of comprehensive strategies for a 700 hector parcel on the outskirts of the urban core. Engaging with political, cultural, agricultural and environmental agendas, the studio questioned the way architecture can provide resources for an every increasing population. Working in both urban and architectural scales, the project demanded that students engage with infrastructural works to provide an evolution in food production. The Studio’s aim is the following: avoiding the need for territorial expansion and redirecting to vertical structures that breed life, while making most

of scarce or limited resources such as water, energy and land, will radically transform the landscape that we know as urban and rural, merging into a hybrid. Such is the challenge of the studio: to explore the possibilities of this new productive landscape system to become designed, social and public: one capable of producing a site for economic & cultural creation, exchange and consumption. Architecture will become the mechanism to reconsider infrastructure as multifunctional to reconsider inefficiencies and its spatial delimitation while exploring new city typologies that will shape RURBAN SPACE.

BIG, DUMB OBJECTS

[9]

or, maybe the exploration of mistakes, or maybe just what happens when architecture is the product of contradictory anti-ambitions, or into formless, artless things for a change. CRITIC: Paul Preissner TA: Jonathan Scelsa

As long as cities have existed so has the ambition to offer each its focal point. An object so big and purposeful with symbol that civic pride is obvious and neighborly envy occurs. Originally started through the church with the cathedral, and later moved onto the train station and eventually into pure expression of engineering feats (like Eiffel) before settling on todays arms race of gross office and condominium projects. While the objective purpose of each might differ (even while the emotional point remains unchanged), rarely (to the point of never) have buildings pointedly tried to be anti-impressive or intended to spend time exploring the happiness that can only be possible through the exploration of the dumb or the clumsy, or the ideas that are possible by ignoring all that we know to be architecture (models of its structure, complexities of computa-tion, the classical beauty of representations, the manifestation of elements such as windows, corridors, doors, etc.). Often everything is the race to the top of engineering accomplishment, rather than the introduction of stupefying and perhaps ill advised concepts which would have more power to express personality, and at minimum offend sensibilities of what is properly considered archi-tecture. Where the world is looking for virtuosity to discover something new, we will look to delinquency. We will define some new fundamental concepts for architecture, expanding the field to include things like stuttering, limps, lumps, piles, squiggles, columns, hills, chunks, or other aspects of the material world that have more to do with compositional and organizational effects than they

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CRITIC: Sulan Kolatan TA: Hannibal Newsom

Antalya’s natural setting represents a remarkable example of Braudel’s conception of the Mediterranean world. The longue durée of its natural and geological evolution is omnipresent in the magnificence of its karst landscape: the mountains, the waterfalls, the caves, the travertine terraces, the fertile river valleys, the beaches disappearing into the sea and the cliffs rising from it. Our site comprises the grounds of a decommissioned Textile Factory from the 1950ies. The municipality intends to convert it into a cultural venue. The site is also one of two significant green patches left in the city of Antalya with a mixed and rich structure of trees, bushes and plants. The studio’s goal is to design alternative urban patch models to the late-20th century speculative development manifested in its surroundings and large sections of the city.

immediacy and fun, and politicocultural concerns of income inequality and longterm climate disaster. Today, Miami is the Dubai of the USA: unchecked, rampant development with no real master planning, little focus on infrastructural or environmental issues, and little critical analysis of its architectural and urban output. At the same time, its connections with Latin America, its early embrace of a South American form of Modernism, and its more contemporary urges toward the experimental and unique make it one of the country’s most interesting architectural proving grounds. Miami’s urban condition is also completely enmeshed with the phenomenon of the cruise ship. PortMiami is the largest and busiest purposebuilt cruise ship terminal in the world, responsible for over 5 million passengers annually and having an $18BN economic impact on the city. 180,000 people work for the cruise industry in Miami and the ships themselves form the urban skyline of Biscayne Bay. Not only has the scope of the pleasure cruise exploded in the last forty years, but its sociological nature has changed entirely as wellit is now the housing on land that is luxurious, and the staterooms of the cruise ship that are the cheap destination for the masses. In all, this studio attempted to answer the question: what can be learned from the populism, weirdness, and almost utopian ecological condition of the cruise ship in rethinking how we live in cities today? Whether it is about hedonism, sustainability, form, combined high/low culture, technology or new forms of mass consumption, we worked together to update Corbusier’s utopian dream and create new visions for Miami.

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3, 000 SEATS + 3,000 [6] BIKES: THE NEW HOME OF THE GOLDEN ORANGE FILM FESTIVAL.

The studio project will focus on the design of a 3,000-seat theater as the new home of the Golden Orange Film Festival. While thinking about the contemporary mega-theater house, as both an evolutionary type and a 21st century urban icon, students will consider the historic and natural setting as well as the new bike initiatives as a primary mode of transportation to and from the event space.

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an opera house but never used as such, the Pyramid has gone through multiple subsequent proposals for programs it might contain: museum, conference center, exhibition space, and various other functions fitting for a monumental building in center city. Tirana’s continual disruption, however, has prevented any program at all from taking root here. Instead the Pyramid sits empty. Various efforts to demolish the building have been proposed but each has met with strong public resistance. It would seem that citizens of the city love this empty object, an icon to nothing, and wish to preserve it in the way useless objects that are not buildings are often preserved - like an artifact. Our charge, then, is to imagine ways to do just this.


CRITIC: Thom Mayne TA: Andreas Kostopoulos Positioned at the intersection of urban planning and architecture, trans-portation hubs have always been a generative catalyst and the raison d'être for the urban ecology of any great city. Among the major three modes of public transportation: harbor, airport and train stations, rail has had the greatest impact at the urban scale and remains the most viable platform to redefine the identity of a city’s future.

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[10]

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PENN STATION REENVISIONED

The goals of this study of Penn Station are to speculate about the national crisis of transportation and to reclaim the importance of regional rail for the advancement of 21st century urbanism. In comparison to the enormous advances in public transportation throughout Europe and Asia, the United States suffers from an outdated operating system and generations of reactive development rather than nurtured strategic growth. This Studio researches and speculates about a new developmental strategy for Penn Station. We analyzed the historical issues (political, operational) that caused such severe ruptures in the Station’s history. Simultaneously, we examined the opportunities that lie within the city’s urban context and proposed strategies that address the social and economic challenges of the neighborhood.

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do with categorical usage. This new set of techniques will allow us to explore program and effect through the concepts of messiness, casualness and a democracy of objects, rather than through hierarchy, and control. This expanded idea of an architecture will also ignore larger aesthetic concerns with form and shape, and focus mostly on the accidental social spaces and bizarre circumstances that come from treating each programmatic aspect of a project as an autonomously complete world, and allowing those worlds to bump up next to each other, form new adjacencies, strange formal relationships and to create new attitudes of physical composition possible for architecture. The site for our experiment lies within one urban block of the Binz area within Zurich, Switzerland; a strangely bland part of the city with massive buildings due to its history as factory and company district, but not necessarily tall buildings. The Binz is home to Swiss Life and squatters (although they moved out, ref: http:// www.vice.com/read/shows-over-were-out) The city of Zurich, unlike most of Europe has never really been touched by modern difficulty or wars and their city shows it with the existence of expensive, bland new buildings and sturdy and strange old buildings. We will be interested in the old weird ones, and the qualities of oddity we can take from this fugue state of swiss environments, and allow for those minor features to be exploded into major foci. The Program(s) used develop a variety of specific mixed use projects for the city that also offer the opportunity to mix repetitive programmatic concerns with specific and idiosyncratic ones. By ignoring form and embracing the stupefyingly stupid forms that can result from investigating tackiness, clumsiness, and moronic sincerity, each project also becomes quite political in through a creation of new social spaces, strange connections to the city, culture, and art, and the introduction of a clumsy and awkward interior world of very useful architecture.


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HOMA FARJADI

[2]

HOMA FARJADI

This project is a building/ city, a housing project with its own city and its own natural environments. It takes Archizoom’s idea of an inexpressive catatonic space in architecture to liberate urban space within the building of the modern city. The urban is assumed to be a system based on “ repetition of signs, at once diffuse and fluid, within which architecture and nature, like so many exceptions and incidents, dissolved and disappeared into the amniotic space of the metropolis.” Cultural Natural Car Park; Perkham car park gave us the precedent study which as a disused building has been taken over as a site for pop up art installations, and a pop up roof top bar. social space finding its chance configurations within the structure. Our project assumed to find transformable infrastructural space where adaptive programing creates its own nature within the building/ city. One question we asked was how to liberate architecture from enclosure, by creating opportunities for occupation within nature? Building/ nature slabs: Modern metropolis has developed within its own logic in terms of physical and social phenomenon. Accumulating layers of different conditions starting from natural status, infrastructure, territorialization, developing properties of private and public, the city became rigid and less flexible structure. So we suggest our building as an apparatus experimenting diverse mutation of living patterns and territories by giving malleable limit and generate new inhabiting typologies for new kind of community life. layers of the building takes over 100% of the site while it accommodates temporary and permanent housing within open spaces on levels. Cells: the design developed in two directions. One focused on the infrastructure of nature, parks, picnic and camping grounds, and the other direction focussed on the design of cells which could be posited within the infrastructure. moveable walls attached the columnar grid accessible from different slabs to achieve flexibility of occupancy, relation with the open environment and impromptu programming in left over spaces.

CRITIC: Homa Farjadi Eleni Paulidou Pierandrea Angius

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Top Floor Plan 1:200

Typical Floor Plan B 1:200

Typical Floor Plan A

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IT Y TYPOLOGY

UP DW

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HOT & HUMID ZONE

1 Bedroom A

1 Bedroom B

WARM ZONE

1 Bedroom B

STUDENT: Ian Liu Szu-An Yao Due to rising problems of urbanization and air pollution, it is has been estimated that in the 2020s there will be a huge problem of food shortage and decrease in air quality. Vertical farming will play an important role to solve these upcoming plights. No-Stop Green-Housing is designed based on Andrea Branzi’s Archizoom by exploring the possibilities of creating a catatonic space in the urban fabric, by exploring ways to solve air pollution and unhealthy lifestyles technology has brought us. No-Stop Green-Housing seeks to face this rising problem by creating a microcosm within an apartment complex, which houses a multitude of climate zones for vertical farming and air purification. Different climate zones will respond to the exterior climate and bring fresh air into the building by filtering the intake air. The units in this apartment complex are scattered across each floor based on the logic of each climate zone, thus creating a wide variety of spaces for farming across the whole building complex. The goal of this complex is to create a space where humans can live healthily and engage in a healthy “live and grow” community.

Swimming Pool Sauna

CRITIC: Homa Farjadi Eleni Paulidou, Pierandrea Angius

TEMPARATE ZONE Alpine House Public Park Public Kitchen

COLD & ARID ZONE Flower Market COLD ZONE Library

[2]

HOMA FARJADI

HOMA FARJADI

1 Bedroom A

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Palm House Waterlily House


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MATTHIJS BOUW

[3]

MATTHIJS BOUW

We have studied this area with the perspective of ONE NYC, not only concentrate on the local issues, but also considering the connection with a larger area. The Brooklyn area is facing big changes and challenges, both in natural and cultural aspects. Along with the development in industry city, we see the poor condition of the neighborhood and disconnected water front area. By observing our site, we find the Costco as an opportunity and also, a trigger in our plan. How could the local community become more involved in the investment? How could we benefit from the connection between Costco and the city? And how could the investment benefit itself? Starting with the localization of Costco, we try to form a self-support community, which could bring financial and social resilience to the local community. Meanwhile, the overall development has been distributed to 3 different phases accordingly. In our design, the first phase start with projects that could bring cash flow to the local community, which could be used for the following phases. Despite the financial considerations, we try to attract the local community’s involvement, to break the traditional mode of real estate investment into a bottom up investment. The program and the size of the development could be decided by the demand and people who live there. For architectural ideas, our project also addresses the flexibility and the long term development possibilities. By applying multiple architectural strategies on our site, we could provide different kinds of spaces and buildings according to the demand of our consumers. Also, the modular and precast method could maintain lower construction cost. Our project is facing the uncertainty of the Brooklyn waterfront and future communities. We believe the plan which could strengthen human activities and social relationship is the certainty among all the uncertain factors.

CRITIC: Matthijs Bouw Kai-Uwe Bergman

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Waterfront residential tower

entrance

basketball center

height of path

Waterfront plaza

100 year flood line

seating berm plaza entrance to GBX GBX

playing yard

Kindergarten Stadium height of path 100 year flood line

Minor League Stadium

boardwalk wateredge

elevated street Kayak Center height of path 100 year flood line

berm wall

MATTHIJS BOUW

residential

GBX

residential

[3]

MATTHIJS BOUW

The Red Hook neighborhood of New York City is one of the oldest parts of Brooklyn, already marked in maps from 1776. However, the area became a distinct neighborhood through the ambitious efforts of Robert Moses who constructed the Belt Parkway, an elevated 6 lane roadway, which split Red Hook from the rest of Brooklyn. Moses aimed to make New York City a center of commerce, a hub of efficiency. In this Moses succeeded. In fact, Moses was the greatest force of change for NYC of the 20th century. Today a new force is transforming the city. That force is the force of nature. Climate change is causing sea level rise and slowly transforming the way coastal cities are constructed. Two ideas prevail in addressing sea level rise: retreat to high ground or construct barriers to protect existing capital. The former solution is wise, the latter is realistic. In a city with limited land and high property value protection is valuable. Our proposal aims to build a berm that protects the neighborhood from flooding. This berm will be programmed with sports facilities and housing. The building portions are integrated into the berm with the aim of disintegrating the line between nature and city. Previously we believed nature could be placed outside – Enkidu the wild man. Mechanical systems dominate the built environment. Climate change proved that we can’t place the problems outside any longer; indeed there may be no inside to go to in the future.

CRITIC: Matthijs Bouw Kai-Uwe Bergman

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residential

STUDENT: Yanghui Huang Jonathan Hein


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The Headquarter of Beauty critiques the beauty industry aspect of lab-life in South Korea. The problem of redundant plastic surgery questions what constitutes the definition of the body and its aesthetics today and how it affects architectural discipline. I propose architecture that has its own autonomous body, struggle through its own lifecycle, as humans do. Architecture cannot remain static or merely interactive, but talk about synthetic changes over time. Once I speculate on the shifted paradigm and challenge the current status of artificial life, a radically new mode of thinking and producing architecture can emerge.

CRITIC: Simon Kim

[4]

SIMON KIM

SIMON KIM

STUDENT: Brett Lee


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CRITIC: Simon Kim

[4]

SIMON KIM

Lab life 400 in Yeongdeongpo project started with material research and production of a prototype to manipulate the site drawings. The site drawings inspired the ground condition of the project with indeterminate fragmented and tilted ground to flood Han River in Yeongdeongpo. The next step followed to manipulate geometries over time to represent many possibilities for programs to be inserted in “box inside box inside box” relationship. As Yeongdeongpo was well known for textile industry back in the 70s, Silkworm growing lab and silk production programs are brought into Lablife 400 towers, creating a giant cocoon lab spaces for both silkworms and human. Subspaces created without non typical slabs are assigned to be silkworm living spaces at their different phases of short-term life: Egg, Larva, Pupa, Adult, along with living space for human. In the tower, silkworms lives are valued as humans, therefore silkworm’s silk production spaces are treated as same as human working spaces.

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SIMON KIM

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STUDENT: Rachel Lee


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CRITIC: Jason Payne

[5]

JASON PAYNE

The new design for the pyramid of Tirana aims to disrupt any singular reading of the original pyramid through the use of strange symmetries. While the new design loosely conforms to a central axis as an overall gesture, the edges, folds, and details of the pyramid depart from any strong sense of symmetry upon closer inspection. Any indication of symmetry, or a singular order within the pyramid, is purposely skewed – sometimes just so slightly. Where some elements seem mirrored; there may be a mismatch in scale. The individual folds of sarcophagus are meticulously juxtaposed in rhythm where a dumb (undetailed) fold sits next to a detailed fold. The interior is autonomous to its exterior. In journey inwards, the color moves from wine red that seems to soak up light to blackness. The artificial light installed in the inner periphery helps in blurring the boundary to make subtle transition from light to dark. While climbing over the sarcophagus, the folds act as steps. These are steps that leads nowhere that indicates journey into blankness! The design has big dark space within the center of pyramid. It generates an illusion of a crater. It raises a question if the darkness is physical space or a void of endless deep space.

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JASON PAYNE

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STUDENT: Batul Tinwala


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JASON PAYNE

BIG BLACK BLANK JASON PAYNE w/ MICHAEL ZIMMERMAN PENNDESIGN FALL 2015

SAMEEHA JOSHI

REPUBLIC OF ALBANIA Ministry of Tourism, Culture, Youth and Sports REPUBLIKA E SHQIPERISE Ministria e Turizmit, Kultures, Rinise dhe Sporteve

Louis Berger SAS Mercure III 55 Bis, Quai de Grenelle, 75015 Paris, France

DESIGN OF THE FUNCTIONAL, URBAN AND ARCHITECTURAL REORGANISATION OF I.C.C. “PJETER ARBNORI”

in Joint Venture with

ECE sh.p.k. Rruga “Deshmoret e 4 Shkurtit”, Pallati 7/ap8, Tirana, Albania

PROJEKTI I RIORGANIZIMIT FUNKSIONAL, URBAN DHE ARKITEKTONIK TE Q.N.K. “PJETER ARBNORI”

FLOOR PLAN +9.60

SHKALLA 1:500 TETOR 2015

GJENDJA EKZISTUESE DHE PRISHJET NE KUOTEN +9.60

844/AR/DF/06-C1

[5]

JASON PAYNE

Reality can support different truths at different times. Hence the objects of perception have their shifting properties, constantly changing the meaning of being of an object. The pyramid of Albania, is continually misplaced in time, space, history and interpretation. A building with no meaning but with many floating significances. The function of a sarcophagus is the total or partial eclipsing of an object, identifying with or completely estranging itself from its host. Eclipsing, is the obscuring of the host’s identity, obscuring of natural elements such as light, air, visibility etc and at the same time a very intentional and measured form or revealing. Estrangement on the other hand has a very unique meaning to this Project. While being antagonistic to the form of the Pyramid, it raises its importance by the Sarcophagus’ Monolith form. Its over-hauling formal tight-fit accentuates its precision as a mask. The heavily layered pyramid sarcophagus hints at something being intentionally and carefully hidden. Luminescence - its being and not being - Light plays a major role in defining darkness and depths of an object’s interiority. The lack of Luminance, more so the slight remainder of it, limits the perception of an object, its formal definition, degree of depths, rendering a sense of blankness. Hyper-informative environment identifies with multi-narrative bundles of qualities which are cross-sectional realities of the Sarcophagus. Certain formal and intangible anomalies in the object create tension between the visual and the interpretation of the content of the object’s being. Therefore, these qualities coming together allude to ideas flowing along two separate axes : one which has obvious familiarity and one which only hints at something familiar but is very anomalous. Thus Hyper-realism is alluded due to the creation and destruction of gaps regarding the bigness, blackness and blankness of the pyramid of Tirana. The degree of doing of its architectural intervention is as important as the degree of not doing its architectural intervention.

CRITIC: Jason Payne

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STUDENT: Sameeha Joshi


[6]

SULAN KOLATAN

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Antalya together with its natural features has so many attraction points for tourists as well as local people. Having big altitude differences between the sea level and the mountains, rivers and great coastal areas are some of the richness of Antalya and it naturally provides some activities for outdoor sports such as biking, hiking, trekking, rafting...which is also a way of viewing and experiencing those natural features and spaces. However, the green areas in the urban area which seemed to be public spaces are mostly not accessible -because they are agricultural areas or they belong to the hotels in the coastal zone which makes them private spaces. Our project intends to encourage outdoor sports by providing spaces for them in the urban areas combined with various ways of viewing for both local people and tourists. Paths surrounding the theatre spaces, a landscape and closed spaces will provide non-stationary sports such as biking and running; golfing, skating and also the stationary ones, which will be mainly an alternative for the actual sports; Wii games. Each sport will be combined with a way of viewing and different kinds of films such as; stop motion, trailer, short film, long film. The space will be accessible 24/7 and will consist of rentable spaces for groups and gaming. Ecological gaming is also a part of the concept and some areas in the landscape will be assigned for that purpose. For that purpose, the curves, cracks and cells also provides habitats for local animals and plants.

CRITIC: Sulan Kolatan Hannibal Newsom (TA)

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SULAN KOLATAN

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STUDENT: Eda Yeyman Runliang Song


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[6]

SULAN KOLATAN

Home to the Golden Orange Film Festival, the annual International event, Antalya is located on active geological formation featuring rich underground ecosystem. Inspired from cave ecosystem, the project explores the duality that exist in the cave formation. Three major categories to focus for the design of the theater are form, mass, and materials. The connectivity of long tunnels and series of chambers observed inside of the cave are translated into the interior of the theater. The outside, inside, and in-between spaces of two different minimal surfaces that are nested together, creating moments of inversions that interweave various programs together. The soft and hard materials not only contribute in functional role such as acoustic control and structural support but also challenges the idea of integration of sustainability into the design. The formation of the theater are populated in various scales throughout the site as landscape, providing inhabitable spaces for both flora and fauna while functioning as public park with strong emphasis on the bike-ride system.

CRITIC: Sulan Kolatan Hannibal Newsom (TA)

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STUDENT: Can Fu Grace Kim

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THEATER SPACE FORMATION


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Design District in Miami is a new district with the focus of luxuries and designer shops. A lot of the attention is focused on the rich and famous but omitting the average living style locals. This project seeks inspiration from cruise ships (the heart of Miami) to provide people with vertical plazas with the hop to bring Miami culture and art to Design District. The project provides opportunities to allow visitors and locals to share art and culture in one vertical space like what happens inside a cruise ship.

CRITIC: Daniel Wood

[7]

DANIEL WOOD

DANIEL WOOD

STUDENT: Haiteng (Andy) Liu


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9th FLOOR PLAN

13th FLOOR PLAN

[7]

DANIEL WOOD

Miami created its own architectural characteristics while reflecting on the changes of the design trends of the times such as Art Deco, Brutalism and Postmodernism. It was possible because of its distinguishing cultural aspects mainly influenced by geographical location and climate. Miami Design District which will be completed by the end of 2016 pursues new design hub for fashion, art, design and culture with luxurious buildings and. However, those “luxurious buildings” don’t really have characteristic of Miami Architecture rather they have fancy façade which meets high-end commercial needs or architects’ own experimental form without contextual consideration. I propose the new building collaged with several elements of Miami such as architecture, landscape, cruise ship and etc. The building is located by the new plaza and they have symbiotic relationship. The building itself works as big roof so it give huge shade to the plaza and cruise-like shape of bottom part of the building draws people at the plaza naturally so public programs in the building can be activated as the extension of plaza. The upper floor plan layout consists of residential units distributed on a double loaded corridor. The expanded corridor, tubes, atrium and interior stairs include several programs to encourage physical activity of residents with natural lighting and ventilation. The overall building’s shape is formed by sun path to foster the vitality and health of its inhabitants. Therefore, this is the building which has an irregular form with full of Miamia elements. If this building was a form of music, I would call this music “Miamian Rhapsody.”

CRITIC: Daniel Wood ADVANCED' 701

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STUDENT: Yongsu Choung

DANIEL WOOD

12th FLOOR PLAN

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8th FLOOR PLAN


Topographic agriculture warehouse is trying to manipulate urban fabric into topographic landscape, to provide artificial but traditional mountain landscape rounded living condition and in the same time to produce lots of food both in exterior and interior. Curved geometry creates diverse typologies working as a system to collect different mount of water and to farm different species.

CRITIC: Iñaki Echeverria Chris McAdams (TA)

[8]

IÑAKI ECHEVERRIA

IÑAKI ECHEVERRIA

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STUDENT: Fang Cai


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...vertical farming stems from the idea of switching the relationship between food and customer. The goal is to make food a transportable device for urban life. Through which, food can be transported to the people automatically. Such kind of new relationship between food and people might also provide a possibility to create new social unit for urban life. People might enjoy the process of food growing and being produced to their table. Such clear process could also greatly help minimize the food health concern.

CRITIC: Iñaki Echeverria Chris McAdams (TA)

[8]

IÑAKI ECHEVERRIA

IÑAKI ECHEVERRIA

STUDENT: Xiani Wang


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The Big Dumb Chocolate Factory is located next to a storage place and takes the place of an existing parking lot. Aside from another chocolate factory in Switzerland, the program also includes a big chocolate museum, headquarters, shop, restaurant, and the official Binz viewing deck @ 500 feet. The interior is interconnected with a dual ramping system so that no program is completely separate. The exterior ombre-ish coloring serves no purpose. The interior separation of colors serves as a program diagram with the small terrazzo being the public space, big terrazzo as museum space, pink brick as offices, and brown brick as chocolate factory.

CRITIC: Paul Preissner Jonathan Scelsa (TA)

[9]

PAUL PREISSNER

PAUL PREISSNER

STUDENTS: Aeree Rho Lyly Huyen


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At the CheeseSpa, you can feel cheese on many different levels. It is a union of two separate architectural programs: the spa and the cheese factory. The volumes of these programmatic spaces converge to a flat edge that meets the backroad entrance to the CheeseSpa. The ziggurat-shape of the cheese temple incorporates roaming pathways as well as care facilities that blends well with the natural landscape and allow workers to extract luscious milk from cows that happily live off the hills of the Binz. The ingredients are shared; to provide the highest quality cheese products for consumption as well as to be used in spa pools for special skin care needs. Each step of the craft cheese-making process is open to the public and shared by cow and human visitors.

CRITIC: Paul Preissner Jonathan Scelsa (TA)

[9]

PAUL PREISSNER

PAUL PREISSNER

STUDENT: Gene Kim Chris Mulford


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+6.0M +0.0M +0 0M -4.5M -9.0M

STUDENT: Jaeho Jin Wongi Su Yongjae Kim

[10]

THOM MAYNE

Penn station has very small volume and disconnected with MSG and other programs above the ground. So, the main issue was how the station and MSG have a new connection and how we can make maximized volume of the station still keeping the MSG at the existing site. MSG lifted up and has a new organization with void in the center, so they can have more flexible areas. As MSG and station is merging, they can also, have large area on the top of the roof as a park for New York city. The void in the new Station is an inverted urban territory where visitors can have a sense of magnificent space inside the building. Also, this architectural medium is a kind of reinterpreted history of stations and a novel icon in the New York City. There are various aspects that people can recognize the void. In the main concourse area, reversed openess is provided and in the middle of building level, it become a edge of the inner space where people can observe the continuous spectacle through the void. The most top level is an urban park which is new level of open space in the New York City in between tall buildings’ forest.

CRITIC: Thom Mayne Andreas Kostopoulos (TA)

Main Concourse

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THOM MAYNE

MSG

Hall(Stadium) +24.0M +19.5M

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W. 33rd

W. 28th

[10]

THOM MAYNE

ADVANCED' 701 THOM MAYNE

ADVANCED' 701

Positioned at the intersection of urban planning and architecture, transportation hubs have always been a generative catalyst and the raison d’être for the urban ecology of any great city. Among the major three modes of public transportation: harbour, airport and train/rail has had the greatest impact at the urban scale and remains the most viable platform to redefine the identity of a city’s future. The goal of this study of was to speculate about the national crises of transportation and re-claim the importance of regional rail for the advancement of 21st century urbanism. In comparison to the enormous advances in public transportation throughout Europe and Asia, the United States suffers from an outdated operational system and generations of reactive development rather than nurtured strategic growth. Penn Station, originally designed for 200,000 people, now services around 650,000 people a day which is almost the whole population of Boston moving through this tiny portal every day. Travellers using the Amtrak, NJ transit and the Long Island Railroad form a complex web of interweaving circulations that ends underneath the massive Madison Square Garden. This proposal instigates a radical change in a scheme that benefits the users and affects the urban fabric of lower west Manhattan. Many a times throughout history we have seen public amenities raise the property value around it. In the case of Penn Station, after the remodelling in the 1960’s this was not true. A recent study of the rental rates in New York City shows that properties surrounding Penn Station is almost half the rate when compared to those around Madison and fifth which is right next to it. Properties next to open spaces increases the land value exponentially. More specifically so, if within a 5 minute walking radius of any park; the value increases 33% as soon as such project are completed. The proposal was to address the existing situation of Penn Station by creating a large open space that gives a rejuvenated identity as a portal to the city. Penn station lies between 33rd street and 31st street. To make an open space as large as the Battery Park, the proposal requires extension up till the 28th street. The proposal expands into the city by adding one block south of the Farley post office. This block creates a continuity to the developing Hudson Yards project, thereby creating a steady line of tall buildings. To make this space open, Madison Square Garden is proposed to be moved underground beside Penn station and its extension. This opens out three city blocks of open space in the middle of the bustling city.

CRITIC: Thom Mayne Andreas Kostopoulos (TA)

M ARCH

M ARCH

218

219

STUDENT: Qi Tong Ram Annamalai Thennaapan Stephen Christy


[3]

[4]

Ferda Kolatan ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

Ali Rahim PROFESSOR

Homa Farjadi PRACTICE PROFESSOR

Cecil Balmond PRACTICE PROFESSOR

- Founding partner of su11 architecture + design, NY (2004) - Received an architectural diploma with distinction from the RWTH Aachen (1993) - Received MsAAD, Architecture from Columbia GSAPP (1995) - Selected as a Young Society Leader by The American Turkish Society (2011)

- Founded Contemporary Architecture Practice (CAP), NY (1999) - Received an MArch from Columbia GSAPP, where he won the Honor Award for Excellence in Design & the Kinney Traveling Fellowship - Books include Catalytic Formations: Architecture & Digital Design (2006), Elegance (2007)...

- Principal of Farjadi Architects (1987) - Received a Graduate Diploma from the AA School of Architecture in London and an MArch with distinction from Tehran University - The work of her office has been exhibited and published internationally. Received numerous prizes in international design competitions and awards of distinction for built work.

- Founding Principal of Balmond Studio, London & Columbo (2010) - Received a MSc from the Imperial College of Science, London, and a BSc, from the University of Southampton - Designed the 2006 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion with Rem Koolhaas - He has received numerous international awards.

[6]

[5]

[7]

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220 M ARCH

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The Architecture 704 Design Research Studio is an in-depth exploration of various architectural topics through rigorous conceptual thinking and advanced design methodologies. The primary goal of this final design studio of the Master of Architecture program is to equip the outgoing students with the ability to formulate a research interest, which reaches beyond graduation and puts them on a path to becoming leaders in the field of architecture. The challenges for architects today are unprecedented as multiple trajectories define the territories in which we operate. From global economic markets shaping our cities to the ecological realities of the Anthropocenic age, we find ourselves entangled in forces, which are seemingly elusive and yet impact our profession profoundly. In addition, new media and technology have given us powerful tools for design, which we are still in the process of understanding and developing. While individual technologies have matured enough to generate new formalisms, larger questions pertaining subsequent cultural effects are subject to current, and often contentious, debate. If one of architecture’s main characteristics is to materially express the contemporary context within which it operates, then we are finding ourselves in the exciting position to provide a vision for a new paradigm. This paradigm cannot be simply rooted in prior models of thought and design but must progressively and unwaveringly engage in the now. The Design Research Studio takes on this challenge and explores - through the individual expertise of leading architects in the field - various strategies and speculations that actively shape our environment, present and future. In this context we view design-research as both the indispensable element through which we critically reflect on our world as well as the laboratory in which specific and sophisticated design solutions are tested and applied.

[7]

ADVANCED' 704

Marion Weiss GRAHAM CHAIR PROFESSOR OF ARCHITECTURE

Florencia Pita LECTURER

- Co-founder of WEISS/MANFREDI Architecture/Landscape/ Urbanism, NY (1989) - Received her MArch at Yale University and her BArch from the University of Virginia - WEISS/MANFREDI is the winner of many architectural awards

- Prinicpal of FPmod. - She graduated in 1998 from the National University of Rosario, Argentina, School of Architecture. - Her work has been widely published and received many awards. - Her work has been exhibited in numerous museums, galleries and biennals.

[8]

[9]

Giancarlo Mazzanti LECTURER

- He graduated with a degree in architecture from the Pontifical University in Javeriana, BogotĂĄ (1987). He received a graduate degree in history and theory of architecture and industrial design from the University of Florence, Italy in 1991. - The won the Sustainable Architecture prize from the French Institute of Architecture.

[10]

Sulan Kolatan LECTURER

Tom Wiscombe LECTURER

Nanako Umemoto LECTURER

- Principal of New York-based KOL/MAC LLC (1988) - Received a MS in Architecture and Building Design degree from Columbia University - Holds a Dipl.Ing. Arch. degree from the RWTH Aachen, Germany - Her work has been published worldwide, notably, at MoMA, Cooper-Hewitt, Centre Georges Pompidou.

- Founder and Principal of Tom Wiscombe Design (2011) - Received an MArch from University of California, Los Angeles (1999) and a BArch from University of California, Berkeley (1992) - Louis I. Kahn Visiting Assistant Professor, Yale University (2012) - Senior Design Faculty and Applied Studies Coordinator at SCI-Arc

- Partner of Reiser + Umemoto, RUR Architecture(1996) - Received a BArch, Cooper Union, New York (1983) - Received a Bach. of Art in Urban Design & Landscape Design, Osaka University of Art, Japan (1975) - Awarded the Presidential Citation from President George Campbell from Cooper Union (2008)

Juan Ricardo Rincon CO-LECTURER

- He founded Parallel Workshop Architects (tallerparalelo.com) in 2010. - He teaches at the University of Upenn in Pennsylvania since 2013 and visiting critic at the University of Sci-Arc in Los Angeles. - Since 2010 he works as editor of architecture magazine exclaims (revistaexclama.com).

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Ferda Kolatan, Coordinator


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[1]

This project investigates the hidden potentialities of informal settlements in Cairo through five distinct speculations. Each of these speculations departs from a real condition and develops a fictitious narrative outlining possible tactical maneuvers to either improve the situation at hand or to see it in a different, more empowering light. Our premise was driving by the following questions: If we were to strip away all preconceived connotations of informal urbanism, what would we actually see? Where would we locate architectural qualities (be they performative or aesthetic)? And how could we produce unprecedented architectures without having to venture outside the “real” of the current situation? The five resulting fictions touch on emergent real estate markets and urban revitalization in “Realist Estate and Conglomerate Urbanism,” on the transformative ecology of garbage collection in “Conveyor House,” on the utilization of left-over spaces in “The Highway’s Underbelly,” on a new urban territories enabled through infrastructure in “Inverted Bazaar of Maspero,” and on a reclusive event space in “The Vault.” All five fictions are considered to be specific in their designs yet prototypical in their application.

[2]

CRITIC: Ali Rahim TA: Maru Chung Disjunctive Continuity studied Haute Couture to underline its innovation, new techniques in production, provocative forms of presentation and cutting edge assembly. With a keen interest in fabrication and new materials, and contribution to the developments in the design and manufacturing of garments, the building combines the latest form, materials and technologies with a keen interest in continuity with difference and material qualities to provoke a new way of thinking of continuity in architecture. The project is to speculate on the flagship headquarters for Joyce, Hong Kong. The program includes a flagship store, a workshop with fitting rooms, a runway, offices and conference rooms, as well as a museum for past collections and art. All the research and development for Haute Couture will happen at this facility, including fashion shows, displays and other modes of presentation as well as the testing of technology, new material and textile developments for the winter and summer

CRITIC: Homa Farjadi As in previous years the format of this research studio is focused on the analytical overlap of two significant documents of architectural thinking, in words and in design. Unrelated in their chronology, the two create coordinate of ideas brought together in this studio to frame a dialogical discourse prompting a new conceptual premise and design parameters for a contemporary project of architecture. When archizoom presented their project for ‘no- stop city’ in 1970’s their reseach on the environment, mass culture and the city posed new questions that subverted the straight laced modernist agenda of technological optimism, of social agenda of housing provision based on existence minimum. They were after a non-hierarchized space of continuity. Residential carpark project outlined their response to the production of a continuous space, a field city; configurations of buildings swimming in a catatonic space of inexpressive, imageless undeferentiated repetition. Theirs is a project merging criticism and design. It is not meant to be a humanist remedy for alienation but recognizes alienation as part of the life of the city. Andrea branzi’s introductory quotation reads from thomas mann’s royal highness: ‘ the time is noon on an ordinary weekday ; the season of the year does not matter. The weather is fair to moderate. It is not raining, but the sky is not clear; it is a uniform light gray, uninteresting and somber and the street lies in a dull and sober light which robs it of all mystery, all individuality. It seeks the state of undifferentiated space, of the condition that robert musil sought to describe in man without qualitites. For us images of hopper, warhol or david lynch and ed ruscha may be more familiar. The architectural / urbanistic project of such an aesthetic stance is what the no stop city sought to formulate. Elsewhere in archizoom projects, we find a city covered with transparent cupolas, a space with different itineraries. But this is above all as branzi tells us, ‘a city where the system as a whole has not been conceived in the same way as the hierarchic construction of object but simply as an accumulation, like the shelving in a large warehouse, and like a self – service establishment selling functions’. Even apartments are real places where events occur: they are storehouses of memory, depots of object to be chosen on a case by cases basis. The refusal of organized city of architecture comes about through a city conceived as free in its itiner-

aries and its choices. G bianchino reminds us we can not forget that as in land art on one side, and arte povera on the other, archizoom learnt how to discover the freedom of movement as well as the conditioning relationship between nature and object. ‘Branzi sees the project’s centerless geometry merging the city with the building and the inside with the outside as a ‘liberating move corresponding to mass democracy.

GLOBAL INSTITUTE FOR NATURAL ADVANCEMENT

[4]

CRITIC: Cecil Balmond TA: Robin Zhang This research studio will investigate non-linear algorithmic procedures at both a methodological and tectonic level. The exploration will take the form of design research, which will be tested through a rigorous and concrete architectural proposal. Design research is not defined here as a linear scientific optimization process with objective outcomes, but rather as the iterative, non-linear and speculative process with the ability to reassess and shift our disciplinary discourse. The ‘Global Institute for Natural Advancement’ is a contemporary model for the Academy. G.i.n.a. is an interdisciplinary institute of advanced studies with global scientific outreach. The Institute is an independent, postdoctoral research center for theoretical research and intellectual inquiry ‘to the utmost degree that the facilities of the institution and the ability and faculty of the students will permit’. It is a place for highly specialized and speculative thinking that seeks to flourish the exchange across multiple disciplinary boundaries. Its fields of study include all branches of science and philosophy. The goal is to produce advances in knowledge that will change the way we understand the world. The scope of the institute is augmentation in an expanded field of ‘natural philosophy’. The term predates the development of modern science and describes the exploration of the cosmos by any means necessary. The institute aspires to endow preeminent scholars of the 21st century with the best academic resources and atmosphere. Knowledge is not a linear closed system, but rather an endeavor into the mind. Essential educational centers of the human history shared this openness of spirit from the different ancient civilizations to the institutes of modern science.

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DISJUNCTIVE CONTINUITY

TWO COORDINATES: [3] KIKUTAKE’S METABOLISM ARCHIZOOM- ANDREA BRANZI: NO STOP CITY

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CRITIC: Ferda Kolatan TA: Michael Zimmerman

seasons. The project aims to collect the world’s most provocative fashion designers under one roof. The challenge of the program is to achieve a single architectural entity by balancing the different haute couture labels while giving the individual couture house maximum exposure. Joyce Boutique Holdings Limited has become a member of Lane Crawford in 2003 and is engaged in the franchise of internationally renowned fashion, accessories and cosmetics designer brands in Greater China, operating 66 points of sale. The Lane Crawford Joyce Group is now collecting and actively promoting the products of haute couture houses and testing them in the American market. Miami, Florida, has been selected for the location of a new regional flagship and headquarters, specifically the Miami Design District. Miami has exploded into a well-known destination that attracts the top artists in the world. The city is now home to more than 20 distinct pop-up art events and festivals during the first week of December during the Miami Design Week. At the nexus of North America and Latin America, the Art Basel Miami presents artworks from across the globe. Over 250 of the world’s leading galleries participate, drawing over 70,000 visitors each year. This has led Miami to become the hot bed of exciting novel architecture designed by Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid and Herzog and de Meuron. Recent developments in the fashion industry include innovations in form, material and technology. New forms in architecture are developed using sculpted surfaces, structural boning and voluminous pleating inspired by nature. These formal techniques include integrating differences into surface continuity with varying opacity and transparency as well as luminosity. Structure is also integrated into the compositions, particularly a new method of structuring and contouring called boning which is constructed by advanced plastics, reducing weight and increasing flexibility and formal definition. In addition to lightweight aluminum and glass, latex and silicones have been refined for the use in new technologies for architecture so that their consistency is ideal for molding and smoothness, while allowing for flexibility in movement. The combination of such design research in the development of architecture brings to the fore a new aesthetic for architecture.

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[5]

CRITIC: Marion Weiss TA: Eric Bellin

This studio was initiated with a three week research project on bridging conditions, with case studies bridging the scales of furnishing to the scale of infrastructure and bridging the distance between the academy and the entrepreneur. This research informed strategies to connect Roosevelt Island and the surrounding areas of Manhattan and Queens with program rich infrastructures. The Tech campus and its inevitable need to create connections to Long Island City, suggests that the bridge can host events that are supportive to the hyper connectivity that has generated the proliferation of industry wide events, conferences within the academy, ideal places to transform the universe of the desk bound researcher into a nomadic territory of lounges, lecture halls, touchdown benches: a new academic and work landscape that amplifies potential connections between industry and the academy. This studio studies these new environments and their ideological agendas to bring the scale of research from the campus, both academic and corporate, to the chair, table, and territory for research and production. Building on the research by hybridizing the qualities of multiple case studies in a new proposal, the studio developed visions

[6]

CRITIC: Florencia Pita TA: Lois Suh This studio will investigate the fabrication of artificial landscapes, within the context of industrial infrastructures and a river of concrete. The LA River is undergoing mayor transformations, what once was nature, is now a hardscape of concrete that spans 51 miles. The potential of this river to shift from infrastructure to public spaces could transform the city of Los Angeles, and provide a new model of reuse, were active (as opposed to obsolete) infrastructure can perform multiple urban capacities. The LA River is not only an urban connector with un-interrupted linear path, but also it carries water, which flows toward the ocean. This extravagant expenditure of water in a desert city seems paradoxical. This studio will take on the topic of water from a painterly manner. Architecture’s contribution to this topic cannot try to imitate the work done by engineers, indeed we recognize the contribution of the Bureau of Sanitation and the Department of Water and Power, but our potential resides in design, and design ideas. For this reason we will look at water in the manner that painters look at water, not for what it means but for what is exposes, a kind of semblance of water. The ‘Los Angeles River Revitalization Master Plan‘ is an extensive proposal that takes into consideration the 51 miles of the LA river, our studio will focus on a particular area within the master plan which is located in Downtown Los Angeles Arts District, between the 1st Street and 4st Street Bridges. Specifically the land that is currently housing the LA Metro Maintenance Facility with rail and rail storage, located at the west side of the river. Both west and east sides of the river are currently land areas zoned for industrial use, while the further east neighborhood of Boyle Heights is a residential zone. This area is dominated by light industrial and manufacturing land uses, but the emerging residential community of the Arts District to the west call upon the advancement of public spaces and pedestrian connectivity. The lack of green spaces in these park-deficient zones, require that we reevaluate the potential of the river and its potential to rethink the idea of parks.

[7]

CRITIC: Giancarlo Mazzanti The course explored the value of design not only as a product itself, but also the behaviors, actions and relations it produces. By investigating how to trigger new modes of behavior between the people that use the buildings, we engage a dimension where architecture can be a mechanism for social inclusion and an open structure that allows multiple ways of usage and pleasure. Then, how do we get ahead of the foreseeable uses and trigger other forms that are not previewed by an architect? How can a building itself can be a mechanism for discovery and learning? Thus, the course aimed to reflect upon and critically analyze certain phenomena associated with the practice of architecture and urbanism in emerging and conflictive urban contexts; in particular, the role of the architect and urban designer in the contemporary world and their potential for transforming the material world through the design of processes for constructing collective spaces and its public meaning. We explored the role of the architect/designer and its role as a world changer through a material practice. Concepts like repetition, indeterminacy, the incomplete, anomalies, instability, contradiction served as strategies and protocols of use, leading to research for a practice that is adaptive, open, unstable and shifting; a disciplinary and practical response to the new, shared global fabric of fragility and uncertainty. We envision the development of architectural thought as an open and adaptive method than a fixed or closed one. The course is sited in the Colombian city of Cartagena. Cartagena is a laboratory of spontaneous forms and resourceful everyday life operations of its inhabitant; as well as a major touristic city. The course aimed to subsume these characteristics and deploy them on a larger scale; thus being used as strategies to generate solutions to architectural and urban problems, such as actions capable of rethinking public policies and the physical dynamics of the city.

IN MOMO BITE

[8]

CRITIC: Sulan Kolatan TA: Hannibal Newsom The studio project is situated in Stockholm, the political and cultural capital of Sweden and the most populous city of Scandinavia with 2.2 million people currently living in the metropolitan area. While

it ranks as the largest conurbation in the Nordic countries, globally it is considered a mid-size city. This discussion of relative size is significant to the eco-morpho-aesthetical agenda of this design research as emerging economic and resilience findings tell us that mid-size cities have current advantage compared to mega- or small cities. Stockholm’s advantage starts there and continues to increase due to a number of other factors. One of these is the remarkable territorial balance between blue, green and grey space, namely, 30% water, 30% green space and 30% urban building fabric. Other factors include Stockholm’s place in the top 20 of the Copenhagenize Index, and its position as number 8 on the EU Start-up City list, number 5 on the 2015 UN City Prosperity Index and number 8 on The Economist’s Global City Competitiveness Index. Stockholm is also the 6th Most Resilient City (2014) in the evidently first ever such ranking attempted. While these evaluations and rankings are to be understood as subjects open for discussion, the studio will nonetheless operate on the assumption that Stockholm’s current record as both, an economically and ecologically thriving city is worthy of study. It is in many ways a testing ground for enlightened ideas about our urban futures and their successful implementation. The spring semester project will provide a unique opportunity to learn from this intriguing city. Our main tools for doing this will be the trip, the collaboration with the Stockholm Resilience Centre and the establishment of a citizen science platform through which data can be obtained for this project. This studio will investigate new architectural forms engendered by intermodal mobility, in particular, in the transfer from water transport to cycling. Current urban transportation strategies are moving away from cars as the primary mode of mobility in the city toward greater reliance on public transportation. For coastal cities like Stockholm the connective and boundless presence of water offers a valuable opportunity for alternate mobility, especially given the city’s geographic situation not merely on the Baltic Sea but within a group of 24-30,000 islands called the Stockholm Archipelago! The studio will meet with KTH Royal Institute of Technology to discuss and reference their waterbus proposal for Stockholm. A complementary mode presents itself as biking. Firstly, it is already an increasingly popular way of transportation in Stockholm (see reference to Copenhagenize Index above). And secondly, it goes beyond avoiding the problems of urban pollution and congestion by providing positive benefits to public and environmental health. Intermodal transfer terminals are an increasing present-day urban building type. The studio will

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In 2011, New York City announced its partnership with Cornell University and Israel’s Technion University, to create “Cornell Tech”, a pioneering plunge intended to recast New York City as a global technology hub. This two million square foot campus, an island incubator, is intended to forge vital connections between research and innovation and redefine Roosevelt Island as a vital urban character within the borough of Manhattan. The aspiration of this new institution to catalyze new collaborations with the tech industry creates demands for growth that cannot be contained within the boundaries of the site. While the potential for growth on Roosevelt Island is finite, the opportunity in Long Island City Queens is nearly unlimited. As such it is the charge of this studio to propose schemes for a‘program rich bridge’ connecting Cornell’s new Roosevelt Island Technology Campus to Long Island City in Queens.

WATER MATTER

ADAPTIVE, OPEN, UNSTABLE AND SHIFTING

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The invention of a 21st century research institution committed to advancing the evolution of the technology presents an uncommon opportunity to reframe the relationship between the academy and the entrepreneur.

for new program rich campus bridge buildings, able to leverage the latent ecologies of the site while connecting talent with technology, research with practice, and academia with enterprise.

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BRIDGING SEQUENCE AND SECTION


CRITIC: Tom Wiscombe TA: Andreas Kostopoulos This semester we explored architecture as world through radical interiority. Our point of departure was Machado and el-Khoury’s concept of “hollow monoliths”, where the solidity of a monolith seems to be undermined by its emptiness. The task of the studio to use combinations of actual void with the illusion of void, as well as use techniques such as liners, habitable poche, nested objects, and extrusions from new grounds. The globalization of cities today is such that they are constituted by private, discreet entities and the illusion of public space. The contemporary city is becoming a series of independent geopolitical and economic interiors. Rather than presuming an architectural ontology where building’s exterior expression (posture, shape, contextual linkages, social function) is primary, we will attempt to create architecture which inverts that implied hierarchy. Some of the repercussions of this inversion are that architecture might tend to deflect semiotic readings through exterior muteness, and create its own internal density, language, scale, and even physics on its interior. Interiors could begin to contain objects and formations that might ordinarily be encountered on the earthen surface we refer to as ‘Land’, but in strange juxtapositions, awkward orientations, and improbable scales. Architecture, in this way, becomes a container for a new, nested world. The container itself may serve as a new ground. The interior may appear as large as a city, or as miniature as a diorama. We aimed to produce a sense of mysterious, indeterminate scale, without referent to the human form.

The studio sets up a retroactive landscape, looking back on the 2020 Olympics and generating a new type of urban campus. The Olympic hangover was a common fixture of 20th century urban history. With the development never going quite according to plan, it inevitably spawned periods of civic introspection and reevaluation. Over the last few Olympics, however, the question of the aftermath has assumed a central role in planning efforts. A notion of sustainable frameworks for urban regeneration has formed the basis of bids since Sydney’s, though the proposals have widely diverged in practice. Tokyo’s plan for the 2020 Olympics follows suit, calling to retrofit existing venues and integrate new construction with plans for the city at large. The bid aims to scale down the urban and economic footprint of the Games, describing strategies that suggest an overall compactness and adaptability. However, controversy over the construction of new venues, most notably the National Stadium, has diverted the discussion away from urban considerations. As a result, the central organization of major event venues has been diffused into the periphery, and various other construction projects have been put on hold. Spurred into action by the troubled stadium, the design community has responded with its own critique of the city’s bid and management of preparations. A symposium decried the original scale of the stadium plan and found its redesign an unsatisfactory compromise. Supporters of a further reduction in its size suggested moving the ceremonial and public functions to a separate location, and subsequently rethinking the event distribution of the Games. The disputes surrounding the stadium, in this sense, have had wide-ranging effects on the entire Olympics, and its site has become representative of the compromised urban plan. Forming a compelling notion of what the future Park could be, the project investigates the potentials latent in the adaptation of Olympic programming, confronting the challenge of facilitating a transition from present to future uses in strict architectural terms. Overall, the studio hopes to exploit the concentration of difference inherent to an overprogrammed site, extending its various possibilities into a definite proposal. It remains invested in the initial Olympic role, but asks what this infrastructure can mean to the city, to the local inhabitants, and for the site after its symbolic appeal has worn off. To begin, each student chose a land formation, a distribution of forces, material, or discrete forms. Unrelated to the scale or content of the

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[9]

CRITIC: Nanako Umemoto TA: Hilary Simon

Olympic program, this land formation is used to engage with issues of planarity, inflection, continuity, surface relief, and field organization. Moving forward, the projects were reinterpreted according to material and programmatic logics, as well as develop a response to the social and urban issues entailed in the premise of an Olympic Park’s reuse. In the final part of the semester, the projects synthesized the two states of the project into an infrastructural matrix of interventions and transformations that would unfold over time.

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OBJECTS CONTAINERS WORLDS

TOKYO OLYMPIC PARK [10]

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develop this transportation typology without limiting itself to an optimization paradigm typical for infrastructural projects. By definition and necessity these kinds of projects are typically discussed on the basis of speed (fastest way from A to B) and investment (lowest cost). These two issues will be among an expanded number of parameters considered in the studio. Students will be encouraged to base their In MoMo BiTe projects on contingencies and “satisfycing” (good enough) scenarios derived from these parameters.


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FERDA KOLATAN

[1]

FERDA KOLATAN

Walking through the busy and animated streets of Izbit Khayrallah, one is suddenly confronted with a long perimeter wall. The curious minded will venture alongside it until a small opening signals an entryway. Upon squeezing through it one encounters a vast area of open space, unlike any in this neighborhood. Many activities are possible here, from children playing soccer, to spontaneous gatherings of celebration and debate, to street vendors and idlers. The courtyard is simultaneously public and private, almost intimately framed in the context of the sprawling city around it. A place for the people to own in a neighborhood that leaves many of its inhabitants disenfranchised. After spending time in the courtyard, one moves closer to the building itself, which appears like a massive shrine in front of you. Again, the entrance needs to be discovered first, as it appears withdrawn and seemingly detached from the courtyard itself. The effect of this introversion becomes compellingly clear once one gets inside the main hall. Suddenly, a new and fully unexpected world opens up, filled with light, intricate geometries, large spaces, and smaller nooks. The interior of this building, just like the courtyard, is equally full of potential without being determined in any singular way. At times larger events like concerts occur, while at other times the people of this neighborhood utilize The Vault as they wish. To this day, The Vault remains the gravitational object around which the neighborhood coalesces. Few tourists know of this place and most activities here emerge unplanned but are invariably tied to the architecture of the depot and its courtyard. Plans to institutionalize the Vault have all failed, partly due to the opposition mounted by the people and partly due to the specific character and properties of the building, which have been left intact even though the interior has been altered to allow for a larger variety of potentialities.

CRITIC: Ferda Kolatan Michael Zimmerman (TA)

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STUDENT: Brett Lee Fan Cao


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FERDA KOLATAN

[1]

FERDA KOLATAN

Along the small streets of Maspero, workers have begun to install a new infrastructural system to support the derelict housing stock. While this infrastructure does not directly intervene with the existing buildings, it does provide a new lifeline for the neighborhood. A simple elevated grid system delivers water, electricity, and scaffolding to the disconnected areas of Maspero, reaching into buildings from the top without having to break through foundations or dig up roads. This "inversion" of infrastructure to building creates all sorts of unprecedented opportunities for the neighborhood. In addition, this system also doubles as a shading device, which transforms the narrow streets into bazaar-like alleyways. The shaded alleyways and the fresh infrastructural supply have encouraged many homeowners in Maspero to open businesses on the ground floors of their buildings and attract customers from nearby business districts. While most owners operate smaller cafes and convenience stores, more unconventional endeavors can also be seen. Tapping water from the new piping system has allowed for the cultivation of small gardens on rooftops and back-alleys. In other instances miniature squares with fountains were built, finally addressing the much desired need for communal gathering space. Some neighbors have partnered up to combine the interstitial spaces between their buildings to create larger and more upscale establishments to lure in more affluent customers from other parts of downtown. The inversion of building envelope to building systems coupled with the prohibition to renovate old housing stock, has motivated some owners to expand from their property into open areas of the street itself. This unique phenomenon of "constructed voids" is a direct consequence of the constraints imposed on the building owners and has been widely celebrated as a new form of informal urban resistance.

CRITIC: Ferda Kolatan Michael Zimmerman (TA)

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STUDENT: Dunbee Choi Joseph Giampietro


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232

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ALI RAHIM

[2]

ALI RAHIM

This flagship headquarter, located in a creative neighborhood for fashion and design in Miami, is dedicated to a new exploration of curating multiple experiences throughout a formation of architecture. The fabricating techniques in the field of couture allow for three distinct presentations of the building facade. Layering the properties, maximizing the dimensions, and accumulating the qualities establish the extent to which the rigidity and flexibility of individual visages are carefully achieved. These local capacities, unlike the discourse of entire continuities and transitions in contemporary architecture, are sewn with attention to the very details whose seams undertake the abrupt shifts between the different qualities of the facade. This whole arrangement emerges from the tangency between the exterior and the interior, where a series of rivets fastens the two garments of architecture. Towards the exterior it triggers the layer of sudden shifts that forms the silhouette of the body, whereas to the interior it forms multiple facets that people hardly perceive the distinction between the folds and the seams when they step through the spaces. The large seams outside are, thus, trimmed and dissolved into the interior in which people no longer belongs to the singular experience. The spaces for this architecture is, hence, tailored through the bespoke set of materiality and formation that exercise the assemblage of rich venues within a single architectural entity. This formative exploration with the greatest precision, beyond reductive and abstract ontology, will embellish the palette of the modern architecture, upon which many colors of experiences will emerge and further illuminate the spectrum of the city of Miami.

CRITIC: Ali Rahim Maru Chung (TA) ADVANCED' 704

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STUDENT: Ryosuke Imaeda


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CRITIC: Ali Rahim Maru Chung (TA)

[2]

ALI RAHIM

The project is a boutique store for Miami Design District. Haute Couture techniques are borrowed to find ways of designing through redundancy and excessive material formations. Mostly continuity with great qualitative difference in abrupt ways manifests in exterior to exterior, exterior to interior and interior to interior difference which heightens the senses while shopping for haute couture collections. Layering and seaming were the two techniques that have been excessively repeated to recreate Haute Couture effect. Ruffles, shingling the shells were more specific techniques that established the aesthetic of the design. From exterior to interior, layering and seaming are meshed up together to represent coherently different characteristics within Haute Couture. The same language was maintained from exterior to interior, the only difference was the intensity of controlling the use of techniques. While it is seemingly single toned, the diversity of how you use the technique makes the differential qualities which meant to stage the intention of Haute Couture shopping experience curated by Joyce.

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ALI RAHIM

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STUDENT: Aeree Rho


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HOMA FARJADI

[3]

HOMA FARJADI

In No Stop City, Andrea Branzi created a nonhierarchical world that without the quality of the city itself, individuals can achieve their own personal interests and living conditions. The idea that “architecture must become an open structure for intellectual mass production as the only force symbolizing the collective landscape” inspired us and gives us a new way of rethinking the existing proposal for Governor Island. The current proposal by West 8 is actually sacrificing a large ground area by placing artificial hills on the south side of the island which create a iconic landscape form that is not only blocking the view from the ground but also loses the open field that can contain large crowds simultaneously. Since our proposal is to redistribute the festival events happening on the island, we prefer Branzi’s idea to leave the land to the public and allow everyone to occupy and explore. In order to make use of the public space, the design intends to remove hierarchy through enlarging the roof level area. By trying to achieve the “absolute horizontality- as a datum space without qualities”, we leave the roof level as flat as it can be, but keep the lower level to follow the natural land form with opportunistic occupations of its slopes for public to experience music events. Three types of arch structures are combined in different ways to frame the horizontal space -adapting to the topography. The configuration of each arch structure is also adapted to the changing landscape to maintain the continuity of the landscape itself. Flipping domes which we call “bowls”, hang down from the circular pattern generated by the primary structure creating closure space for the music venues and related activities.

CRITIC: Homa Farjadi

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STUDENT: Jie Xu Jingxian Xu


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section 1/64”=1’-0”

HOMA FARJADI

[3]

HOMA FARJADI

The project takes two radical texts from late ‘60s and early ‘70s with two radical methods of thought transpired from opposite sides of the world. Andrea Branzi and the Archizoom Associati in Italy and Kiyonori Kikutake and the Metabolist movement in japan. In Branzi’s “No-Stop City”, architecture is described as a medium “where technology & nature [are] not harmonized but merged together.” It is “a high-tech Amazonia within which all functional zonings are accumulated and dissolved.” Concurrently, Kikutake’s Ocean City is “[a] dynamic reality where what is needed is not a fixed with a static program but rather one which is capable of undergoing metabolic change.” Individual, programmatic identity is rejected for multifaceted pluralities that create qualities of limitlessness through uniformity. The goal is not to seek a singular object, but instead an infrastructural logic that is flexible, accommodating, and has the potential for growth. Mass repetition of spatial conditions will unshackle the users from the tyranny of “a positivist linear notion of modern progress.” The formation of the infrastructure is meant to be adaptable; unlike conventional methods of city planning. It follows an “expand as you need” notion, where the demand for square footage is the primary driving factor for its location and intensity. The method of construction mimics that of any contemporary bridge making. Caissons are first created as foundations for which columns are erected upon. These columns serve as footings for cranes to transport supplies to where their needed. Finally, radial reinforced concrete platforms will extend from one structure to another, thus forming the template of a city. Amongst the field of disks, there lies the “hidden” slabs. Exteriorly, they appear to be no more than thickened versions of their surrounding counterparts. It is only from an internal point of view do they reveal a whole plethora of different worlds. Pools, museums, performance halls, and gymnasiums all become concealed compartments of a city as an archive.

CRITIC: Homa Farjadi

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STUDENT: Seung Bae Max Hsu


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240

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CECIL BALMOND

[4]

CECIL BALMOND

This project is about Platonic Academy. We used subdivision to create a space for the new Platonic Academy, which is right on the ancient one. The archeology site located downside was a great place where philosophy emerged here. By doing research about the Allegory of the Cave, proposed by Plato himself, we used the form of good to be the fourth dimension. Due to the fact that Greeks don’t learn from the usual way, sitting in the classrooms, they tend to grab beer and food and learn when they are taking a walk. So we created some space intertwined both of the inside and outside. The boundary of the outline of the building is deliberately ambiguous. For the most basic element of the building, we call them cells. They are the simplexes coming directly from the fourth-dimensional Platonic Solids. The simplexes are the most basic geometry not only in Platonic Solids but also in the fourth-dimensional space, too. Equally importantly, we are willing to break the traditional boundary that divides the space into pieces by using new things other than walls. We designed the Oculus part and the Rose Windows. For different parts of the build, the experiences of light are impressively different. The light, on the one hand, can be the metaphor of the form of good. It can also be the alternative to the wall to divide the space with different light experiences and lead people to different places. According to the light experiences and the Allegory of the Cave we organized the programs. This is our project. Please allow me to offer our thanks to Cecil Balmond, Ezio Blasetti, and our TA, Robin Zhang.

CRITIC: Cecil Balmond Ezio Blasetti (TA) ADVANCED' 704

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STUDENT: Jieming Jin Wei Chen


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CRITIC: Cecil Balmond Ezio Blasetti (TA)

[4]

CECIL BALMOND

Hyprotrochoid fleeting formations is a computational proposal for an applied material science research facility. The facility is sited on the edge of the Pacific Ocean near the Salk Institute in San Diego, California. The proposal reinterprets a research facility not as a building to house research but instead a building that is the research. Where the act of construction is the applied material research. The building is proposed to be continuously constructed, the continuous construction is the continuous use of the building for research. To create the form and pattern the project is based on a system of rotation, inspired by the rotation of an object along another object. The patterns and spatial organization come from the periodic nature of the rotations within the system of rolling. Formal characteristics of the building come from two procedures, the first being a calibration of the ratios between the track and the object rolling along it, the second being rotation and stereo graphic projection of the organization utilizing a fourth dimensional axis of W. The ratio that was used was an irrational number allowing the building trace to continue to infinity. Using this the building carves out space by ordering segments within the complete system, allocating segments to be materialized and segments to be removed.

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CECIL BALMOND

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242

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STUDENT: Stephen Christy Peng Wang


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CRITIC: Marion Weiss Eric Bellin (TA)

[5]

MARION WEISS

Manhattan is getting too crowded with no space to grow and develop. Thus, how to extend or connect the island to the surrounding is essential. The project is a new typology of urban infrastructure that not only connects the two sides of water, but also contains sustainable space modules inside, creating a place and a new urban typology for New York. The bridge can be seen as an extension of city block that grows out from Long Island City, over East River and reaches Roosevelt Island. We have two kinds of movement strategies for the project. People who want to go cross the river can take the Fast Movement system. On the other hand, people who work or live on the bridge can take the Slow Movement system to wander through, experiencing the interior space and natural garden. In our project, there are mega-structures that hold up the whole bridge over the water. Besides, there is secondary structure, a framework, that goes between mage-structure, on which units with programs could be built. The framework makes the bridge flexible for future development and change. This ‘bridge’ is not only a campus building, but also a long-term urban sustainable strategy.

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MARION WEISS

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STUDENT: Guancheng Sun Jinghao Wang Beidi Zahn


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MARION WEISS

[5]

MARION WEISS

Infrastructural systems are the enduring forms of urban evolution, multiply as cities grow and requiring expanding swaths of territory to accommodate more and more monofunctional requirements. As the very momentum of exchange incrementally overwhelms our urban landscapes , we wonder what new forms of public nature might emerge if highways, communication right of ways, flood resistant structures, railways, subway lines, and distribution grids were to become institutions of culture and recreation.Infrastructures are vital for human life and economy. And within the transportation infrastructures, bridges are key elements for connecting places and delivering goods. For this reason, bridges have been built since many centuries ago. In some way, the advances of cultures have been related to their ability of constructing bridges. Realizing the limitations of monofunctional infrastructure, we advocate for a more hybrid, resilient, “thick� infrastructure where large scale regional ambitions We imagine a definition for an evolutionary infrastructure that is both projective and pragmatic, an intrinsically agile prototypical ideal, capable of optimizing ecological and social agendas . We see great potential for alternative strategies that structure more lateral, resilient, and pliable systems capable of hosting unpredictable uses and activities, absorbing cycles of flooding, accommodating variable traffic volumes, and generating cultural value. By bending the loose ends of architecture, landscape, and engineering together, we imagine an alchemy that transcends the limitations of single use infrastructure, generating a more bountiful and inhabitable interpretation of its potential. During periods of rapid urbanization, with the shortage of available build land in Manhattan Island, New York City is looking for new development chance and motive. This Twin Bridging project challenge the monofunctional bridge infrastructure, aim to construct a city block dimension bridge as an extension of urban fabric and urban life which connect Queens and Roosevelt Island. Even in the future the large scale infrastructure could extend to Manhattan .Within these two bars, Incubator spaces are located along a pedestrian path, which can be occupied by Cornell Tech and emerging high tech companies. Cone structure afford a exterior hang out space with amazing water front landscape around Roosevelt Island.

CRITIC: Marion Weiss Eric Bellin (TA)

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STUDENT: Ruo Wang FeiFei Zhao


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The physicality of dripping, pooling, bleeding pigments traversing dissonant colorways embraces artifice and an uneasy exuberance in the proposed urban landscape. Each shift in scale reveals ephemeral states of tactility and perception with the emergence of juxtaposed patterns and amorphous figures, suggesting a certain ambivalence between the highly cultivated and the uncontrolled. Elevated pedestrian platforms gesture between the east and west banks, creating dreamlike, meandering connectionsabove the city. Fluted landscapes cradle the barren channel on either side, harkening to the area's fertile past, while simultaneously speculating upon its revitalized future.

CRITIC: Florencia Pita Lois Suh (TA)

[6]

FLORENCIA PITA

FLORENCIA PITA

STUDENT: Elizabeth Young


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CRITIC: Florencia Pita Lois Suh (TA)

[6]

FLORENCIA PITA

Converting the portion of the LA River in the Arts District into an urban landscape is a method of promoting a new type of sustainable architecture that both keeps the iconic nature of the massive concrete channel while also creating a graphic park. Through studying Gerhard Richter and his techniques of blurring, blending, and distorting and applying it to the site, the channel takes on a character of its own by using the color palate of Los Angeles; while it is foreign in the nature of what it is, it is still able to nest itself and blend in with the city. The park uses existing elements and highlights them with the placement, or lack of placement, of the pixelated platforms to show the footprint of the preexisting buildings or hide then. The extruded walkways give it a sense of directionality while paying homage to the old train tracks below. Different levels along the channel allow for different experiences: on one end, you would be able to traverse above the actual site to create a bridge view along its entire expanse and also allows for occupation during flooding of the channel. Another level would allow for users to go into the channel itself.

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FLORENCIA PITA

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STUDENT: Lyly Huyen


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[7]

GIANCARLO MAZZANTI

This project is about rethink of the great potential of old wall in the heart of old town of cartagena.This old wall has been perserved very well and transformed from a simple fence for protecting citizens in old time to a dynamic activilities connecter in old city. Our proposal tries to strenghten and trigger different public activites around old wall by adding movable and flexible components. Those activites can relate to whole year festivals happened in cartagena. In this case, the wall become the holder and platform for all fesitival ceronomy. All of the movable components are produced and manufactured in a designed factory acoss the lagoon. More than a simple factory , it is a place for people to visit , communicate, study and play and this permenant factory becomes a new node for old wall in order to connect different part of city. The value of this “factory� lies not only in iteself but also trigger new ways of appropriation and behavior between the peolpe that use the buildings, where architecture is a mechanism for social inclusion .

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CRITIC: Giancarlo Mazzanti

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GIANCARLO MAZZANTI

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STUDENT: Fang Cai Liangjie Zheng


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GIANCARLO MAZZANTI

[7]

GIANCARLO MAZZANTI

A New Wall of Cartegena Cartegena, Colombia. The Eco Loop challenges the relationship between human and nonhuman: what it is and what it can be. It seeks to enhance an existing ecosystem, bringing to light the forgotten presence of water surrounding and within the city and integrating different groups of people. Through the curation of multiple environments, the Loop utilizes things that by their nature separate space, such as the Old Wall and the Lagoon, in order to merge, blurring the division between parts of the city, between urban and natural, between human and nonhuman. This project is called Eco Loop a cyclical ribbon space along the edge of the lagoon in Cartagena. The project addresses the city's social and environmental issues by exploring the relationship between human and nonhuman, in order to trigger improvement of the lagoon environment and, moreover, to connect La Matuna neighborhood and the slums of the eastern side of the city, which are currently separated from each other by the existing wall, the highway and the lagoon itself. The loop completes the broken circuit of the Old Wall, plugging into a chain pocket plazas in the Old City and creates a new circuit of its own around the lagoon. The project consists of five parts, which are organized by a linear walking space, each of which respond to its surrounding environment either ecologically or with urban relevancy: water purification, highdensity residence for birds, a new mangrove sanctuary which cuts into the existing land, a market, and market extension into the peninsula. The Eco Loop triggers interaction between human and nonhuman, ultimately reactivating the waterfront and fostering connection between both sides of the city.

CRITIC: Giancarlo Mazzanti

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STUDENT: Peter Hiller Tai Feng


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[8]

SULAN KOLATAN

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Our project is called GeoHub, where its main function is waterbus terminal and bike storage. It’s a GEOHUB because it captures the essence of the site. It is build using rammed earth collected from the site and is housed by steal sheets that resemble the factories around the area. It brings reminisce of nature, birds and people into one GeoHub. We began our project with minimal surfaces to generate a series of modules that have varying resolutions. We kept in mind the different relationships between plants, birds, people, bikes and boat while we generate our floral forms. We categorized them from XS to XL spaces that are occupied by different things. Ultimately we nested the modules into one terminal unit. The floral form is the heart of our project where nature and people coexist into one moment. If you would pass through the terminal, your experience would be that as if you’ve entered an artificial cave that takes you one step closer to nature. GeoHub collects memories on the site from building materials, construction process and the importance of natural habitat in Stockholm in to its own essence. It’s not only a water terminal that stores bikes but also integrate all these fragments of memories to create its own urban culture

CRITIC: Sulan Kolatan Hannibal Newsom (TA)

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STUDENT: Dailong Ma Haiteng Liu


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Circulation

Our concept is synthetic grotto, instead to build a simple function-based terminal in Stockholm, we decided to create a spiritual, fascinating space for the city, which can encourage the interaction between people and nature, and release the urban pressure for people. We found that many ferries in our site are not energetic enough. So we decided to stimulate the place with the nature-inspired morphologyGROTTO. Our project would not only connect to the public transportation, but also respond to the local natural context. Regarding the bike garage, we researched general typologies and developed the folds on our building. You will see the bike parking space is very continual, from the waved floor, curve wall, folded column to the waved ceiling. In our grotto, the bike garages would never be isolated. We think they are parts of landscape. Combining the use of biological and natural materials, including clay, canvas concrete, glowing concrete and rubberized concrete, biking, the most daily event in Stockholm can be an aesthetic event in our synthetic grotto.

CRITIC: Sulan Kolatan Hannibal Newsom (TA)

Examples of the Concrete canvas being the structure

[8]

SULAN KOLATAN

SULAN KOLATAN

STUDENT: Qiuyun Chen Ziyang Luo

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How concrete canvas being structure


[9]

TOM WISCOMBE

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This architectural design studio introduces a design strategy using three entities: gure, liner and shell. The gures are located inside the liner, with varying orientation aected by multiple gravities. The liner is located inside the shell, acting as a secondary container. The shell is a monolithic mutelooking massing, which hide the multi-gravity world inside. By simple addition and subtraction of the gures, liner and massing, we are creating spaces that are not separated from each other, but interact with each other. For design of the shell, we rendered the building’s interior gures and reproject the rendering to the shell to form the patterns. So the nal patterns on shell are quite displacement of interior programs, resulting mysterious and bizarre interior experience. The materials are carefully selected: - metal material makes the shell reect the environment, let the building mute and disappear; - black material between the shell and liner/gure emphasizes the totally dierent inner world with multiple gravities. - metal material re-appears inside the gures, representing the smaller worlds inside the giant black inner world.

CRITIC: Tom Wiscombe Andreas Kostopoulos (TA)

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STUDENT: Can Fu Hua Yang


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[9]

TOM WISCOMBE

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Exploring architecture through the lens of objects, containers, and worlds, the Black Diamond addresses issues of vastness, monolithic exteriors and radical interiors. Basic principles are derived from modern and postmodern practices in attempt to create spaces that address circulation and space through the use of liners, habitable poche, nested objects, and extrusions from new grounds. Through this approach, the Black Diamond is what Timothy Morton refers to as a hyperobject - an object that is beyond immediate comprehension. It is an object that transcends time and space and is seemingly uncontrollable. The geometries within the object are derived from various sized crystallines that create spaces of improbable and disorienting scales. The ambiguity of recognizable space deemphasizes the typical anthropocentric focus that most designs have; thus, creating a completely different kind of space to house a world trade center. The approach focuses on the object itself and its extreme juxtapositions. Ambiguity is apparent on multiple scales - on the exterior, materiality is integral in the reading of the overall building as well as delineating nuanced details.

CRITIC: Tom Wiscombe Andreas Kostopoulos (TA)

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TOM WISCOMBE

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STUDENT: Dawoon Jung Audrey Lin


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ROOF

PROGRAMS

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BLEACHERS BLEACHERS STRUCTURE

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STUDENT: Chengda Zhu The formation of the project was based on the shape and also the natural forces which generate the lava figures. It is worth mentioning that when the volcano erupts and the lava starts to flow, the surface of the lava cools while inside the lava is still flowing, which creates the “pocket” shapes. The lava flows from high to lower points; they push each other and twist to form the unique shape. Basically there are three layers that exist: ground surface, skin and enclosure. The organization of program on the skin is mainly based on the texture of the skin, whereas the edges of the programs are bound by the direction of the curves on the skin. Meanwhile, some of the programs are grouped to optimize the organization of function and circulation. The organization of existing surface is based on the contour lines and the programs above. The main structure is the diagrid. When the diagrid “pockets” come together to one point or to one curve, they become the main structure which holds the skin. The bleachers are treated as attachments to be removed after the Olympic Games. Thereafter its use will be given to the public.

CRITIC: Nanako Umemoto Hilary Simon (TA)

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This project speculates on a new model for the congregation of varying programmatic typologies. Building on the controversy surrounding the latest Olympic stadium, the proposal aims to consolidate the majority of the Olympic program onto the site promoting new forms of spectating in addition to a more considered post Olympic life for the site. The project considers the new program to be contained within a single, folded and undulating plane deformed to accommodate program. The singular plane, both structure and surface, contains all necessary infrastructure for the current Olympic program while being flexible enough to accommodate future uses of the site.

CRITIC: Nanako Umemoto Hilary Simon (TA)

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STUDENT: CRITIC: Mingyue Hu Giancarlo Mazzanti Tong Niu ...designed to work as a hub that connects different neighborhoods. It will create connections, flows, points of communication and inclusion which will dissolve the lines of exclusion and collision.

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IPD STUDENT TEAM LILU WINS THE IDESIGN PRIZE Lilu is a dual-purpose nursing and pumping bra that automates breast compression so that moms can pump milk more efficiently and keep their hands free. Lilu was the brainchild of three IPD students—Gilbert, Adriana Vazquez Ortiz GEng’16, and Alexandra Looney GEng’16—along with Sujay Suresh Kumar GEE’16, a master’s student in electrical engineering. The team is currently focused on bringing the idea to market. Since winning the iDesign Prize the team was also selected to be Y Combinator Fellows. 2016 was the second year for the iDesign Prize a competition promoting the design of physical objects that solve a real world problem. The $50,000 prize was developed to create the next generation of product design leaders by providing funding for graduate student teams to start their own companies.

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On May 10th PennDesign Instructor Nanako Umemoto, alongside Princeton University Professor Jesse Reiser, Tsinghua University Professor Weiguo Xu, and Nagoya Institute of technology Professor Keisuke Kitagawa participated in the Super Jury Alternative Vision for Tokyo Olympics 2020!

AN EXHIBITION AT THE EGYPTIAN PAVILION IN THIS YEAR’S ARCHITECTURE BIENNALE IN VENICE The Department of Architecture at PennDesign recently kicked off a new collaboration with the Ministry of Heritage and Culture in Cairo, Egypt. The partnership began this semester with the 704 Research Design Studio “Real Fictions” led by Senior Lecturer Ferda Kolatan, which took students to Cairo for a week in March. The studio culminated in an exhibition at the Egyptian Pavilion in this year’s Architecture Biennale in Venice, Italy, on view May 28 – November 27, 2016. Winka Dubbeldam, Professor and Chair of Architecture, says, “The studio is an exemplary model for the new directions the Architecture Department is taking, not only in the direct involvement with the “real,” but also in the international dialogue concerning the site's conditions."

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SUPER JURY ALTERNATIVE VISION FOR TOKYO OLYMPIC 2020


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DESIGNING OUT OF THE BOX,

SOCIAL IMPACT PROJECT FUNDED: BLOSSOM INTERACTIVE

PennDesign Students Try on Clothing Design for Wharton Charity Fashion Show What happens when a group of adventurous young architects and city planners team up to send their own looks down the runway — alongside Stuart Weitzman shoes, Warby Parker eyewear and the latest season's offerings from retailers like Bloomingdale’s and Anthropologie?

BLOSSOM Interactive is a 2016 PennPraxis Social Impact project aimed at raising muchneeded funds and awareness around food security and hunger in the Philadelphia region. The team behind BLOSSOM is building a large-scale kinetic sculpture that "blooms" with input from passersby, to be unveiled on the Penn campus this fall, bringing awareness to hunger as a community problem which requires a community response.

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The team includes Jono Sanders and Philip Chang, both of the Integrated Product Design program, and Sarai Williams, a dual degree candidate in City and Regional Planning and Landscape Architecture at PennDesign. The team is partnering with the local nonprofits Broad Street Ministry, Philabundance, Coalition Against Hunger, and The Food Trust to provide them with publicity and increase their social media activity.

JONATHAN SCELSA COLLABORATE WITH HIJAC ON A PAVILION

ANNETTE FIERRO'S PARIS PROGRAM HOSTS AT FRAC

Jonathan Scelsa/op.AL's to collaborate with hiJAC on a pavilion for Farragut Square in Washington DC, for Fall 2016.

Associate Professor Annette Fierro and PennDesign Alum Andrew Lucia, currently Cass Gilbert Visiting Professor at the University of Minnesota, are very excited to announce their presentation this past Friday at FRAC in Orleans! This event included a showing of students films, which will now be exhibited by the FRAC.

JULY 2016 ALUMNI AND THE ARCHITECTURAL SOCIETY OF SHANGHAI CHINA VISIT

SHARING MODELS: MANHATTANISMS

FREDERICK STEINER

Our Chair, Winka Dubbeldam’s former student at PennDesign, Shiying Liu (Class of 2006), visited us today with the ASSC (the Architectural Society of Shanghai China), alongside Chair of ASSC, Mr. Cao Jiaming, and the Secretary General, Mr. Ye Songqing.

Our Chair is part of the Storefront exhibit “Manhattanisms”.Our department chair, Winka Dubbeldam, will be participating in this year's Storefront exhibition with her firm Archi-Tectonics, NYC.

Acclaimed scholar, teacher, and alumnus Frederick Steiner (MRP’77, MA’86, PhD’86) became Dean and Paley Professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design on July 1.

Excerpted from the Dutch daily de Volkskrant and translated from the Dutch: With her office Archi-Tectonics, she has built in Paris, London, Liberia and China, ranging from residential renovations and exclusive fashion boutiques to office towers and an orphanage. Currently she is working on an urban building plan for the Colombian capital Bogotá. Yet she only has fifteen employees. “I want to be involved in each project.” She is also Professor & Chair of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania. In the recent book Conversations with Architects in the Age of Celebrity (DOM Publishers) by architectural critic Vladimir Belogolovsky, she is the only Dutch architect among famous colleagues such as Zaha Hadid, Norman Foster and Daniel Libeskind.

ADVANCED RESEARCHERS AWARDED Daniel Barber begins a Fellowship for Advanced Researchers awarded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, hosted by the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society in Munich. He will spend the next four summers there developing a digital database on architecture and climate.

MARCH 2017 TAD, TECHNOLOGY | ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN Franca Trubiano is the founding Executive Editor of TAD, TECHNOLOGY | ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN ( http://tadjournal.org) , a peer-reviewed international journal dedicated to the advancement of scholarship in the field of building technology, with a particular focus on its translation, integration, and impact on architecture and design. The journal’s first issue is due out March 2017.

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ARCHITECTURE CHAIR WINKA DUBBELDAM PROFILED IN 'DE VOLKSKRANT'


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SITE 88 Story Apartment Building, 432 Park Avenue, Manhattan, New York City 10022 To better explain the relationship of Manhattan to capital we have developed a seminar titles “The Architecture of the City of New York” with topics that review the most important developments of the skyscraper in the history of the development of Manhattan. 432 Park Avenue is in midtown Manhattan where most property currently is owned by foreigners. Manhattan is uniquely equipped to translate and speculate on Asset Architecture into novel architecture and urban proposals that are unprecedent that links global capital to the financial capital of the world. Ali Rahim, Coordinator

Ferda Kolatan ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

Robert Neumayr LECTURER

Nathan Hume LECTURER

- Founded Contemporary Architecture Practice (CAP), NY (1999) - Received an MArch from Columbia GSAPP, where he won the Honor Award for Excellence in Design & the Kinney Traveling Fellowship - Books include Catalytic Formations: Architecture & Digital Design (2006), Elegance (2007), Contemporary Techniques in Architecture (2002), & Contemporary Processes in Architecture (2000).

- Founding partner of su11 architecture + design, NY (2004) - Received an architectural diploma with distinction from the RWTH Aachen (1993) - Received MsAAD, Architecture from Columbia GSAPP (1995) - Selected as a Young Society Leader by The American Turkish Society (2011)

- Co-founded of Unsquare Architects. - studied architecture in Vienna and Paris - Received his MArch with distinction at London’s Architectural Association Graduate School Design Research Lab. - awarded the Bronze Medal at the Miami Bienal 2003

- Partner at Hume coover studio (2008) - Editor & Founder of suckerPUNCH (2008) - Earned a Bachelor of scienc in Architecture from Ohio State University (2003)

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MANHATTAN’S RELATION TO CAPITAL In the history of the development of Manhattan with the growth of the city, by means of laying a grid over vast territory, architecture becomes the expression of capital due to its increase of land value. The land value of Manhattan was generated by modes of densification of building mass. Within the beginning of “the liberal city” architecture becomes the outcome of vertical expressions based on its relationship to its land. The hypothesis of the studio “Asset Architecture” is to speculate on the idea that architecture incorporated elements of the city in order to increase its value as a commodity. Has it been in the 19th century the incorporation of the land into the building by the repetition of floors and in the beginning of the 20th century an interest in aesthetic styles into order to express the building as a mode of commerce, then within the 30’s the Skyscraper incorporated the whole city under one Roof. In order to search for Asset Urbanism, it would mean that we turn the building away from its means as a human inhabitation and purely understand the architectural objects by means of generating capital. The thesis taken within the studio is that the Architecture of the New York City increased its value as a commodity by fusing urban elements into a new form of architectural interiority.

Ali Rahim PROFESSOR

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ASSET ARCHITECTURE: In times of immense growth in capital due to economies in China, India and the Middle East including the UAE and Qatar there is more capital than ever in the world today. The capital has more than doubled from 2001 to 2011 in the world from $37 trillion to $80 trillion. While monetary capital has always played a significant role in determining the built environment, recent shifts in the character of global finance have resulted in a new relationship between investment practices and buildings. Traditional assets of relatively stable locations as treasuries and municipal bonds are yielding very low returns. As the capital has grown investors have circumvented these stable assets for real estate which directly affects architecture and urbanism. Due to the amount of capital that has been channeled towards realest ate there is volatile fluctuation between growth and decay the same as assets in the stock market. The functioning of architecture and urbanism assets has been throughout history but the degree to which space functions as an asset has increased radically. Architects and architecture have not responded to this issue in any way.

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THE LIVE FAÇADE The Modules on the façade are designed to fit nine different types of drones, categorized by the shape and scale of their landing fixtures (Point, bar or ring). A sequential study of how to categorize non-uniformed industry products into modular fixed architectural structures was conducted through a series of simplification of the geometries and articulations of the forms. The different sizes and geometry of the drone paired with different size and geometry of the module result in a variety of configurations. To provide a safe landing environment, the tower projected a new method for drones to dock horizontally onto their corresponding platforms with the fitting shape and scale; the platform with docked drones can be flipped vertically to be in parallel with the tower façade. The façade is constantly animated as the platforms flip outwards and backwards to nest back into it. The overall organization of the façade uses layering as means to maximize surface area, with two overlapping exterior layers and an inner layer. A hierarchy is established as the size of drones and modules is smaller in the inner layer creating a more intricate interior that can be accessed by the smallest drones by a major opening in the façade. The transparency of the tower changes constantly, while the tenants of the building-the drones fly in and out. The flickering lights of the battery station behind each module help with navigation and also indicate the occupancy percentage of the building as well.

ALI RAHIM

Drone technology, adopted by many large corporations, has become a leading trend in the field of fast-delivery, aerial mapping, commercial advertising, government inspection, and film making. As recent years have witnessed a rise in the development of drone technology, several major corporations, such as Amazon, DHL and Walmart, have begun investigating the use of drones in high speed delivery service. As more and more people live on internet-based lifestyles, these “small flying robots” could easily become an ordinary part of future everyday life. The demand for high speed drone delivery is estimated to increase continuously in the upcoming years. However, legal restrictions on the navigation of drones are currently standing in the way of drastically broadening the use of drones in various aspects of our daily lives. No-fly zones and conditions to maintain visibility with the drone at all times are two of the main constraints. “The Hive” is an infrastructure project that can better meet the emerging demand for incorporating advanced Drone technology into daily life in New York City. The project was proposed as an alternative asset argument for the usage of the land on 432 Park Avenue, the project aims to create a central control terminal that hosts docking and charging stations for personal or commercial drones (unmanned aerial vehicles) in the center of Manhattan. The current air-zoning regulations are to be re-shaped in a vertical highway model around a tower. This centrally-controlled model will be more appealing to the legislative sector as it adheres to the concerns about regulating drone traffic. The primary location of the building does not only gather the commercial power of Manhattan, but also stands away from the no-fly-zones set by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration).

CRITIC: Ali Rahim Ferda Kolatan Robert Neumayr Nathan Hume Maru Chung (TA) Kristy Kimball (TA) Andrew Gardner (TA) Lois Suh (TA)

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STUDENT: Jennifer Yifeng Zhao Hadeel Ayed Mohammad Chengda Zhu


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The Vertical Garden integrates public green zones in between the private residence. In exchange for giving some of the lower spaces to the public, the tower is allowed to more air rights. Since, the value of residences increases dramatically by its height, the residences are built higher on top of the public zone in order to maximize its value. This makes this tower the tallest tower in Manhattan. Usually, the mid-lower parts of the tower is the most difficult to sell as it typically has bad views and poor relationship to the street. By transferring that zone into a public space, not only can the building be higher, but the green zone will act like Central Park, increasing the value of properties adjacent to it. A technique of layering, interweaving is used to control density and daylighting. The interweaving becomes loose, and bundles together to allow for sunlight to pass through not only to the garden but to the city as well, which increases the value of the whole district, by reducing dark zones.

CRITIC: Ali Rahim Ferda Kolatan Robert Neumayr Nathan Hume Maru Chung (TA) Kristy Kimball (TA) Andrew Gardner (TA) Lois Suh (TA)

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A Veblen good is a commodity whose disposition opposes the standard laws of economics, namely supply and demand. When the price of the Veblen goods increases, so does its demand. This term applies to the most luxurious of commodities; however, a problem exclusive to architecture is that it exists permanently in the public’s gaze. An expensive car that is not driven remains parked in a garage whereas an apartment building uninhabited stands as an empty husk in the middle of the city. Our solution is to use architecture to house other Veblen goods by means of art storage. Where preceding art storage facilities are inconspicuous, our Veblen tower takes an alternative route by letting the architecture perform as a financial asset that reflects contemporary aesthetic sensibilities. By exuding and concealing wealth simultaneously, the formal operations bear the art but also becomes the art and despite this contrariety, the transition is imperceptible. A client is given the opportunity to live amongst their assets in one of the tallest buildings in New York City; gazing outwards, the client experiences spectacular views blocked only by their own assets.

CRITIC: Ali Rahim Ferda Kolatan Robert Neumayr Nathan Hume Maru Chung (TA) Kristy Kimball (TA) Andrew Gardner (TA) Lois Suh (TA)

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This skyscraper is conceived to establish a unique setting of infrastructure in which people are able to invest their capitals in an unprecedented way. It generates a new mode of mercantile on the streetscape where people can acquire the facade of the building as their own tangible assets. The privatized elements of this architecture augment individual statuses by visually representing their properties based on their esthetics. Its siteless feature allows people to invest their capitals in this building from anywhere in the world, globally publicizing the individual assets and its architectural identity. By virtue of the proximate features to real estate, jewelries are solid asset that people can gain the long-term opportunities for their investments against economic deflations. This mechanism not merely creates a new target of investment upon the architectural surface, but resolves one of the largest architectural dilemma that people have never gained opportunities to invest in the exteiority of architecture. The formation of this architecture offers the manifold experiences along with the new ways of investing their capitals from the scale of the streets, to the density of the urbanism, and to the speed of the global economy. Through this architecture, thus, people will be able to mine their virtuous situations in which they can engage their investments with their own esthetics, uniquely scraping the new landmark of the city.

CRITIC: Ali Rahim Ferda Kolatan Robert Neumayr Nathan Hume Maru Chung (TA) Kristy Kimball (TA) Andrew Gardner (TA) Lois Suh (TA)

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STUDENT: Ryosuke Imaeda Wei Chen Qiuyun Chen


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Annette Fierro ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

Andrew Saunders ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

Ezio Blasetti LECTURER

- MArch from Rice University (1984) - BS in Civil Engineering from Rice University (1980) - Author of The Glass State: The Technology of the Spectacle/ Paris 1981-1998 (MIT Press, 2003) - Lectured at Cornell University, Columbia University, and Penn as well as for the Institute of French Culture and Technology

- Principal of Andrew Saunders Architecture + Design (2004) - Received an M.Arch from Harvard GSD with Distinction for work of clearly exceptional merit. (2004) - B.Arch from Fay Jones School of Architecture, University of Arkansas (1998) - Winner of The Robert S. Brown ‘52 Fellows Program (2013)

- Founding Partner of ahylo, Athens, GR (2009) - Received an MSAAD from Columbia University GSAPP after having previously studied in Athens and Paris. (2006) - Founder of algorithmicdesign.net - Taught at Pratt Institute, the Architectural Association, and Columbia University

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In the final semester of the Master of Architecture program, students may select to take Independent Thesis rather than the more typical Research Studios. They must qualify through several stages, so this is an honors program. The thesis gives students the opportunity to undertake a critical and speculative exploration of a topic or theme, independent, but under the supervision of a Thesis Advisor. By individually framing and developing a project through one’s own topic and methodology, the thesis project initiates a set of issues and methods that students may continue develop as they embark on their professional or academic careers. A thesis project is oriented toward the future, but also reflects on the student’s past. That is, by instigating their own project, students necessarily confront the scope of their education and choose to extend or alter directions in which they have been taught. The thesis project at Penn is by definition an open work, that is, its scope is limited only by the parameters of the question posed. This question, the thesis topic, however properly speculative, must necessarily establish a relationship to ideas formally or popularly identified as architectural, whether belonging to the realm of building or the multiple discourses embraced within the architectural discipline. For many students, the process of selecting a topic begins simply with questions still open from previous studios or coursework, but topics may be chosen from a wide range of architectural thinking. Through the thesis process, these questions are concurrently researched, elaborated, edited, and finally manifested in a work of architectural dimension. A thesis project is a work of craft, building a set of ideas into a final statement and set of conclusions.

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STUDENT: Christopher D.Mulford

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GEOMETRY OF SOUNDSCAPES Architecture produces the conditions of architectural acoustics and flavors the soundscape that we hear when experiencing space. There is an important relationship that architectural design has with acoustic design. As the science of acoustics developed into its discipline around 1900 it took on its own vocabulary and tools, moving the conversion of acoustics from the design studio to the laboratory. The interaction of architecture and acoustics has not been forgotten however. This project uses the conversion of acoustics a vehicle to explore the geometric possibilities to control reverberation. If the goal is only to remove sound, spaces begin to sound similar as well as look similar. Reverberation is not something to be eliminated, it can be used as an architectural material and generator of formal and programmatic relations. By manipulating architectural parameters such as volume, surface; reverberation can also be manipulated. The geometry of soundscapes considers an iterative and empirical approach to test the ability of different spatial configurations to produce a gradient of reverberant zones. These relationships are set against the programmatic background of an architecture school and asks; what are the architectural consequences when reverberation in a soundscape is utilized as a design tool?

CRITIC: Andrew Saunders

[2]

ANDREW SAUNDERS

ARCHITECTURE IN THE IMAGE OF URBANISM_ THE ARCOLOGY AND THE NEW URBAN ARTIFACT Paolo Soleri proposed a new urban model, the Arcology, in response to the danger that the ever-expanding city posed to the earth and the soul of the urban dweller. These autonomous megastructures were imagined as self-sustaining cities within a single architecture. The instinct behind the “megastructure age” and the turn to large scale structures as a way to address humanity’s large scale problems proved to be ineffectual. The desire to establish an urban autonomy, however, remains a compelling tool to resist homogeneous urban growth, which not only has the ability to destroy our planet, alienate and isolate urban dwellers based on social and economic status, but also restricts our ability to create unseen futures and new lifestyles within the city. The compression of all of the functions and qualities of a city into a singular architectural act is the genesis of the “urban artifact”. In this context, the urban artifact, at a variety of scales, is an architectural object that is programmed to serve many city functions. Rather than relying on zoning, the urban artifact relies on the architecture itself to inscribe the footprint of urban activities - the user then occupying and re-negotiating the architecture imbues it with life and vitality. This can be called, “the urban effect”. Is it possible to replicate the necessary networks, infrastructures, and qualities of the city using only the tools of architecture - is the Arcology imagined by Paolo Soleri a viable urban model? To what degree can we use urban autonomy to critique the political and physical homogony of our current urban model - in order to produce novel urbanisms and new urban lifestyles?

CRITIC: Annette Fierro

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NEGOTIABLE SPACES To what extent, can Interactive Architecture learn to interpret human generated data so as to include users in the negotiation of their environment? A clever invasion of gadgets, gizmos and intelligent networks has disrupted the way in which we live, interact and experience the physical world. Creating an operational deviance, they mine uncomfortable amounts of information from us in order to deliver new affordances, only sustained by an ever-growing library of decision-making and predictive algorithms capable of processing such vast seas of meta-data. We hypothesize that if architecture were to instill within its spatial medium the intelligence to interpret user-generated data, it could provide spatial repercussions in real time that are synchronous with our metrics of value. This project is to deal with the representation of a form of crowd-sourced architecture. One that through means of actuators is able to change its geometry and operation based on feedback from a collection of users and thus raises the question of how to design such multi faceted spaces. Through shifts in geometry, can architecture be negotiated in real time? How do we manage multiple interests in one urban site? What are the computational methods needed to regulate and operate an architecture that is always in motion?

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EZIO BLASETTI

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STUDENT: Ramon G. PeĂąa Toledo

CRITIC: Ezio Blasetti

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Ramon G. PeĂąa Toledo, Prarabolic Lidar Projection


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Editors: Michael Royer, Walaid Sehwail, Michael Zimmerman Hatch is a collection of conversations that took place at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design during the spring of 2015. The conversations were led by a group students and hosted one or two faculty members. The purpose of the conversations was to interrogate the current status of architectural discourse and the implications of the quick image within that status. Contributing faculty include Kutan Ayata, Josh Freese, Ferda Kolatan, Michael Loverich, Eduardo Rega, Andrew Saunders, and Tom Wiscombe with a foreword by Nate Hume.

HATCH

I don’t know, I’m giving you explanations I never thought of before now. Marcel Duchamp, The Afternoon Interviews A few years ago, I showed up in a dimly lit basement room where a group of PennDesign students were waiting. Unsure of their motives but interested in their curiosity, I had agreed to meet and chat. I was fortunate to have been invited to what became an invigorating discussion full of charged questions and positions. When it ended my hope was that they’d drag more people down into their interrogation room and develop a platform for them to have conversations with those whose work and teachings they were curious about. The group was looking for ways to spark a bigger conversation. They wanted an open dialogue with their mentors and an outlet to bring up their concerns for the discipline. That conversation was an early indication of a dramatic shift that PennDesign has undergone in the past few years, which has revitalized the school. New and visiting faculty, excellent lectures and events, an updated curriculum, studio competitions, and publications are just a few of the elements contributing to the new discussions and tendencies emerging in the school. The changes are most clear in the students and their engagement with each other and the faculty. A strengthened community has emerged, which is talking and debating. The students and their commitment to being part of the larger dialogue

HATCH

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This collection of conversations represents the culmination of many chats, debates, and musings that were fueled by frustrations over how flat the current discourse seems. Early discussions were rooted in the challenge of attempting to locate ourselves within the discipline at a moment when the discipline seemed to be represented by a clutter of projects that championed the state of density, quickness, and lack of canon. The discipline, as we see it, is currently defined by a vast plurality of projects and a new age of viewing (and judging) work via online blogs and social media sites. These sites highlight visual content and quick images, typically with little concern for curation or cohesion. For us, the quick image blurs categories and disciplinary positions to mere images of form, shape, color, style, and trends. Even the boundaries between professional work and student projects are being blurred. We applaud and take part in the current culture of dense, visual media but we’ve also attempted to approach these conversations with concern over the disconnection between the image and its disciplinary content. These conversations are an interrogation of the current status of architectural discourse and the implications of the quick image within that status.

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they face in the field as they move toward graduation have largely driven this conversation. The students who pulled me into the basement years ago have succeeded in expanding those conversations and also in rewiring the culture of the school. It’s not just in the formal conversations they’ve arranged but also in the ways those have spilled over. From hallway follow-ups to updates after lectures, these conversations continue and multiply.

The following selection of transcribed conversations captures the energy and curiosity at the school today. A bubbling up of thinking best captured through talking. It is in these conversations where architects articulate their thoughts, not as calibrated essays but honest musings, that new ideas and realizations are unpacked. They provide a moment to step back and articulate what they are working through. Moments of fresh understandings, half thoughts, or maybe even false starts all elucidate the excitement of their offices and teachings. Discussions like these are vital for the field and essential for an architect’s development. The project undertaken by Hatch encapsulates many of the key discussions taking place at PennDesign and in the discipline at large. It has also amplified the students thinking about the polemics they face and how they can enter into the field. Not satisfied to blindly produce or watch quietly, they have forged a platform for dialogue between their mentors and colleagues; a place to ask questions and delve deeper into their pressing concerns. These conversations beautifully illustrate the school as a place for thought and inquiry. An important multi-generational conversation has been started. Nate Hume May 2016

HATCH

HATCH

There has been a healthy rise of discussion series emerging from schools and finding their way to print and video. These recorded moments help capture the interests and explorations going on within the field. Perhaps a reaction against the anonymous nature of the web or calculated nature of essays and lectures, these discussions meander, take turns, and uncover the unexpected. In a time of oneline anonymous Internet comments and 140 character rants, deep conversations are needed more than ever. These act as a tool for students to understand how one progresses and defines their project and a statement for peers to react to. It’s through talking with each other that new understandings will emerge in our work and our field.


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METHOD The project was introduced in two “layers,” developed one on top of the other to establish the basis for the studio: (1) exploration of iterative techniques for exploring thermodynamic narratives and (2) discovery of those narratives in the different sites and climates. The first considered the different scales and time-frames at which the built environment adapts to different kinds of change and the second explored the many opportunities of the site, program, and climate. The performance goal of the studio is bioclimatic hybridization, a building that keeps itself comfortable without explicit conditioning equipment. That is paralleled by a comprehensive, life-cycle analysis, using e[m]ergy synthesis to evaluate the tradeoff between the materials of construction and operation, and the advantages of adaptation over time. William W. Braham, Coordinator

-R  eceived an MArch and a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and a BSE from Princeton University -O  rganized the Architecture and Energy symposium and published the books Rethinking Technology: A Reader in Architectural Theory (2006) and Modern Color/ Modern Architecture: Amédée Ozenfant (2002)

Brian Phillips LECTURER - Founder of Interface Studio Architects (ISA), PA (2004) - Received MArch from the University of Pennsylvania (1996) - Received BSEd from University of Oklahoma (1994) - Winner of the 2011 Pew Fellowship in the Arts - ISA has received multiple AIA Pennsylvania Merit & Honor Awards

Mostapha Sadeghipour Roudsari LECTURER - Researcher at Environmental and Energy Design Departement at Building and Housing Research Center (BHRC) - Environmental Consultant at CARBON Ideas Studio - Integration Applications Developer, Thornton Tomasetti, CORE Studio - Master in Environmental Building Design University of Pennsylvania

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NEW CHAUTAUQUA The project for the studio is for the New Chautauqua Institute, a national research and development corporation, leading the transition to a renewable economy and inspired by the travelling Chautauquas of the late 19th century. The first phase is a series of 50,000 sf buildings in cities of different climates around the country that serve as a hub for the activities of the institute and demonstrate the principles of bioclimatic design. The buildings include facilities for outreach and education, mixing the typologies of university, conference hotel, and business incubator. The facilities will need to be flexible; able to adapt as the institute’s mission evolves and the cities, economies, or climates in which they are located change.

William W. Braham ASSOC. PROFESSOR OF ARCHITECTURE; DIRECTOR OF MASTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL BUILDING DESIGN ARCHITECTURE

MEBD

Contemporary buildings are inherently hybrid, intertwining the traditional, bioclimatic elements of buildings—walls, windows, doors—with powerful technologies for delivering modern services. These systems of power and control are mostly used to compensate for the inadequacies of the bioclimatic building, but when they are successfully hybridized, a new, more powerful building emerges. Bioclimatic hybridity remains the foundation of any approach to environmental building, and forms the starting point of this studio. Climates (and weather) are inherently variable and difficult to predict, even more so with the uncertainties of global climate change, and bioclimatic buildings mitigate those uncertainties by their design and by different modes of response and adaptation. From the opening and closing of window blinds to the use of machine learning techniques embedded in building systems, environmental buildings adjust their capacities to enhance their performance as shelters. Buildings also experience many other kinds and scales of change, and the studio will simultaneously consider the different kinds of adaptations that might be demanded by future changes in the climate, economy, transportation, and urban settlement patterns. Contemporary standards of building require a remarkably luxurious flow of energy and resources to enable everything from ready comfort to rapidly prepared food and the pulsing streams of information and entertainment. This studio will examine the building-asa-system-of-exchanges, investigating both the techniques of environmental building and the design methods by which they are achieved.

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BIOCLIMATIC HYBRIDS


CRITIC: William W. Braham Brian Phillips Mostapha Sadeghipour Roudsari Hwang Yi (TA)

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STUDENT: Shin-Yi Kwan Jeeeun Lee Mingbo Peng


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STUDENT: Niccolo Benghi Evan Oskierko-Jeznacki


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-D  irecting Associate at Jump Associates, a growth strategy firm -R  eceived a Master of Science in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago (1997) and a Bachelor's in Foreign Service from Georgetown University (1995) - Prior to her career in consulting, Sarah worked as an assistant to the Cultural AttachĂŠ at the Israeli Embassy in Washington, DC.

advanced" IPD

IPD 551, DESIGN PROCESSES This studio is structured for IPD students as an intensive, interdisciplinary exploration of Design. The goal of the studio is to give students a firsthand experience of various processes involved in creating successful integrated product designs. Students will go through various stages of the design process including problem definition, concept development, ideation, prototyping, and idea refinement. The purpose of the IPD design studio is to offer options of ways to approach and resolve larger design objectives. This year, the class designed objects of their choice that convey their personal brands. Professors: Sarah Rottenberg, Carla Diana

Sarah Rottenberg PROFESSOR

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IPD 799, FINAL PROJECT The last two semesters of the IPD studio sequence consist of the IPD Final Project. Students are given the opportunity to work on design problems that follow their passion or to work on a real world problem provided by our partners in academia, industry, or the non-profit world. The Final Project enables students to put the skills that they have developed in engineering, design arts and business into practice, following the process from initial opportunity identification into the development of a working product with a complementary business plan. Interdisciplinary group work is encouraged on final projects. Working in teams offers students the opportunity to collaborate across skill sets and learn from teammates from different disciplines. Final Projects provide students with ample opportunity to learn leadership and collaboration skills that are invaluable in today's workplace. Professors: Sarah Rottenberg, Peter Bressler, JD Albert.

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The Integrated Product Design Master’s program brings the School of Design together with two other world class institutions, the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Wharton School of Business, to offer students an opportunity to develop a holistic understanding of the product design process. There are few programs like it in the country and none that place equal emphasis on all three disciplines. We bring in students from design, engineering, and business backgrounds and teach them to understand and integrate the other disciplines. Our graduates go on to become design engineers, leaders of innovation teams, product designers and entrepreneurs. The Integrated Product Design program addresses many trends that are reshaping design. Businesses increasingly acknowledge the impact of design on their bottom lines, and bring designers into the product development process earlier and in strategic roles. Anyone interested in creating digital or physical products can do so at low costs. Rapid prototyping capabilities like 3D printing have shrunk the resources required to prototype, test, and manufacture products. And the products, services, and experiences that attract both customers and capital are those that combine hardware and software to create a compelling user experiences.


Basecamp is designed for those who want to bring a hint of outdoors adventure into their home or office. Three independent torches turn on upon opening and provide a campfire like glow.

CRITIC: Sarah Rottenberg Carla Diana

STUDENT: Phillip Chang Dew Spring is an exploration into the engagement of the artificial and the natural by using the natural phenomena of condensation to drive the design, aesthetic, and functionality of the project. With Dew Spring, a vase is no longer a just place to display a plant, but rather becomes an ecosystem and an artifact that enables a plant to thrive.

CRITIC: Sarah Rottenberg Carla Diana

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SARAH ROTTENBERG

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David Leatherbarrow, Chair Akbarzadeh Masoud Daniel Barber William Braham David Brownlee Winka Dubbeldam Annette Fierro Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto John Dixon Hunt Simon Kim Frank Matero Joan Ockman Ali Rahim Andrew Saunders Franca Trubiano Marion Weiss Aaron Wunsch

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For many years, scholarship in Penn’s Ph.D. Program has operated under a double constraint: the development of knowledge that is both descriptive and productive. Although dedication to productive knowledge may not be common in other fields, it is entirely relevant to architecture. Marx’s dream for philosophy—to change, not merely interpret the world—is nothing special in architecture; rather, it is a fairly obvious commonplace. Architecture is a form of engagement par excellence, aimless if not oriented toward given conditions, intent on their transformation. The particularity of architecture’s productive sort of knowledge, that it gets its hands dirty in the actual transformation of the environment in which we live, has been and remains a central concern of Penn’s architectural scholarship. Dedication to both descriptive and productive knowledge may be apparent in the titles of some of the books published by Ph.D. graduates. Among the recent books are: Jin Baek, Nothingness: Tadao Ando’s Christian Sacred Space; Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto, Medici Gardens: From Making to Design; Thomas Beck, La Villa; Nathaniel Coleman, Utopias and Architecture; George Dodds, Building Desire: On the Barcelona Pavilion; David Haney, When Modern Was Green: Life and Work of Leberecht Migge; Zhongjie Lin: Kenzo Tange and the Metabolist Movement in Japan; Alex Anderson, Modern Architecture and the Commonplace; Claudio Sgarbi, Vitruvio ferrarese De Architectura, la prima versione illustrate; William Braham, Modern Color/ Modern Architecture; Judith Major, To Live in the New World: A.J. Downing and American Landscape Gardening; Harry Mallgrave, Gottfried Semper: Architect of the Nineteenth Century; Gevork Hartoonian, Ontology of Construction; and Cornelis van de Ven, Space in Architecture. These books clarify developments in a number of periods and investigate a range of subjects related to architecture, landscape architecture, building technology, and urbanism. Concepts are examined— space, style, or surface color, for example— but also particular figures: Le Corbusier, A.J. Downing, Gottfried Semper, and Mies van der Rohe. This range indicates the real possibility of striking a balance between architecture’s disciplinary identity, ultimately based in practice, and its engagements with several subjects and dimensions of scholarship in the university at large. Yet more than balance is at issue here, for we have learned that neither scholarship nor practice in architecture can be realized fully without reference to the other, that neither drawing nor writing can realize its potential when pursued in isolation. In reciprocity, though, they can help us know the world by productively engaging in its transformation.


Benjamin H. Latrobe, “Section from West to East, looking Northward,” from Latrobe, Designs of Buildings erected in the Year 1799. Courtesy of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

STUDENT: Catherine Bonier

DISSERTATION COMMITTEE: David Leatherbarrow

BENJAMIN H. LATROBE’S PHILADELPHIA WATERWORKS OF 1801: INSTRUMENT AND EXPRESSION OF AMERICAN EQUILIBRIUM

Peter McCleary

so radically alter the nation that the design soon seemed unintelligible, or unsensible. My hope is that it is more interesting to assess it for all that it captured before the equilibrium shifted, to view it as an essential pivot in the history of American infrastructure, urbanism, and ideas – marking a transition from ancient theories of cultivation and environment to the nineteenth century technical management of the industrial city.

Broadly speaking, my proposal is that major urban infrastructures, what might be called civil architecture and landscape, are often designed in response to perceived crises and always conceived to align with theories of health and environment. I am interested in the ways in which the architectural design of technological interventions reflects changing theories of body and nature. The first American municipal waterworks was constructed in Philadelphia between 1799 and 1801. The system was centered on a marble engine house, a monument located in the center square of what was, during the final decade of the eighteenth century, the capital of the new nation. The ideas embodied in Latrobe’s design for Philadelphia, the perfection of its symmetry and the concentring of its systems, mark its historical significance. It represents a fleeting, and perhaps imagined, moment of balance. Latrobe’s design froze in stone the most important elements of early republican thought. These theories of natural law, human sensation, and common equilibrium would

Professor of Architecture, University of Pennsylvania Professor of Architecture, University of Pennsylvania

Antoine Picon

Professor of the History of Architecture and Technology, Harvard University

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Benjamin H. Latrobe, “Second, or Center Engine House No III, East and West Elevations facing Market Street,” in Designs of Buildings erected in the Year 1799 in Philadelphia, by Benjamin Henry Latrobe Archt. & Engineer, Presented as a token of Sincere affection to his Brother C. I. Latrobe. Courtesy of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.


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According to a July 2014 United Nations report [https://www. un.org/development/desa/en/news/population/world-urbanizationprospects.html], 54% of the world's population lives in urban areas, and the proportion is expected to reach 66% by 2050. In celebration of the 125th anniversary of the Department of Architecture, the University of Pennsylvania School of Design presents “City Futures,” an international conference to investigate the critical relationship of city and architecture from November 12 – 13, 2015. The conference brought together wellknown architects, planners, journalists, writers, theorists and geographers to exchange ideas on the possible futures of cities and how they can be imagined. Winka Dubbeldam, organizer and Chair of the Department of Architecture, explains: “Rather than solutions to contemporary ills, ‘City Futures’ aims to produce visions, arguments, tactics and other provocations for the types of cities we want to inhabit.”

City Futures

ORGANIZERS AND PARTICIPANTS: Daniel D'Oca Partner, Interboro

Reinier de Graaf Partner, OMA

Winka Dubbeldam Chair, Department of Architecture, PennDesign

Daniela Fabricius Ph.D. Candidate, Princeton University

Selva Gurdogan

Partner, Superpool, Istanbul

Andrew Herscher Associate Professor, University of Michigan

Laila Iskandar Minister of Urban Development, Egypt

James Lima

President, James Lima Planning and Development

Thom Mayne

Practice Professor, PennDesign, Founder at Morphosis

Paul Preissner

Paul Preissner Architects, Lecturer, PennDesign

Vyjayanthi Rao

Director of Terreform Center for Advanced Urban Research

Shohei Shigematsu Partner, OMA

Tom Verebes

Lecturer, PennDesign

Marilyn Jordan Taylor, Dean and Paley Professor, PennDesign

Gregers Thomsen

Partner, Superpool, Istanbul

Alfonso Vegara

Founder, Fundación Metrópoli

Joseph Watson

Ph.D. Candidate, PennDesign

Liam Young

Tomorrows Thoughts Today

“City Futures” was organized around three themes: INFRASTRUCTURE + CITY FABRIC THE UNPLANNED CITY THE IMAGINARY/SPECULATIVE CITY “City Futures” is organized by Winka Dubbeldam, Chair of the Department of Architecture, with co-organizers Daniela Fabricius and Joseph Michael Watson.

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 12 INTRODUCTION, 6:30PM: Marilyn Jordan Taylor, Dean and Paley Professor, PennDesign Keynote speaker: Reinier de Graaf, Partner, OMA

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13 INTRODUCTION, 9:45AM: Winka Dubbeldam, Chair, Department of Architecture, PennDesign PANEL 1, 10:00AM – 12:00PM: INFRASTRUCTURE + CITY FABRIC This panel explores the role that infrastructures (hard and soft) and urban fabrics can play in redefining how cities function, whether the aging metropolises in the Global North or the burgeoning megacities in the Global South. Moderator: Daniela Fabricius. Confirmed speakers include James Lima, Thom Mayne, Marilyn Jordan Taylor, and Tom Verebes. PANEL 2, 2:00PM – 4:00PM: THE UNPLANNED CITY This panel examines the sometimes striking commonalities and the very stark differences between informal urbanisms, and how the new potential of bottom-up systems [planned and unplanned] will shape future cities. Moderator: Winka Dubbeldam. Confirmed speakers include Daniel D'Oca (Interboro), Selva Gurdogan and Gregers Thomsen (Superpool, Istanbul), Andrew Herscher, Laila Iskandar, and Shohei Shigematsu.

PANEL 3, 4:30PM – 6:30PM: THE IMAGINARY/SPECULATIVE CITY This panel intentionally, even provocatively, plays at a double meaning of “speculation”: as an act of gambling on the real estate market or as an act of visionary or utopian scheming. While the two types of speculation would seem to have little in common, or even to be fundamentally at odds with one another, both similarly envision alternatives to the city as it exists. Moderator: Joseph Watson. Confirmed speakers include Paul Preissner, Vyjayanthi Rao, Alfonso Vegara, and Liam Young. 7:00PM: RECEPTION

City Futures

CITY FUTURES

Architects have historically been prone to imagining future cities. The early 20th century is filled with visionary schemes— some realized, most not—for New York Tokyo, Paris, Algiers, Moscow, Rio, and countless other cities across the globe. Whether designed as a serious remedy to contemporary ills or simply as a ludic provocation, each of these proposals represents part of a perennial problem that is by no means architects’ alone.

THE CURRENT IMPASSE PRESENTS AN OPPORTUNITY TO ASK A NUMBER OF QUESTIONS: What form—civic, social, cultural, as well as physical—will the city of the future take? How will infrastructures hard and soft, define its contours? Will formal plans, information occupations, or some combination thereof shape its spaces? What role will speculation play in transforming cities? What new models have been produced by today's urban realities? What will the future challenges of the city be? What role will architects play in shaping the city of tomorrow?

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Thom Mayne

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Stefan Al, Andrew Herscher, Daniel D'Oca, Shohei Shigematsu, Laura Baird, Gregers Tang Thomsen, Selva GĂźrdoÄ&#x;an, laila Iskandar, Winka Dubbeldam

Daniel D'Oca

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As architecture has become a global discourse that spans cultures, economies, and building practices, PennDesign provides a number of opportunities for students to travel and study abroad. Travel opportunities range from a full semester abroad at the Architectural Association in London with Homa Farjadi (see Architecture 701) to new summer programs in Paris, Colombia and Greece, to week-long study trips in design studios at the 700-level to cities such as Mexico City, Tokyo, Madrid, and London to name a few. We also have an annual exchange with SNU in Seoul, which was generously funded by Alumnus Mr. Jeong, Young Kyoon, CEO of the Heerim Architecture and Development Company in Seoul, South Korea.

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KOLATAN STUDIO TRAVELED TO VENICE BIENNALE, ITALY – SPRING 2016

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“The room was very dark and everything was rendered in white on white,” says Ferda Kolatan, Associate Professor of Practice in Architecture at PennDesign. “The models looked like small modernist houses.” He’s describing the project he and 12 students recently unveiled at the Venice Biennale of Architecture through a new partnership with the Egyptian Ministry of Culture. “There was a level of preciousness,” he continues. “Everyone was allowed to take each piece into his hands, to look at them as if they were very precious design gems.” Called Five Speculations, the installation comprised about a third of the Egyptian Pavilion at the celebrated fair, which continues until November 27. But the sparkling models weren’t parks-inthe-sky inspirations for gleaming skyscrapers or waterfront developments.

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Instead, they were the culmination of a semester-long research/design studio, Real Fictions, that began when the students visited Cairo at the invitation of Egypt’s National Organization for Urban Harmony. “We were asked to come up with an architectural response to informal settlements,” Kolatan says. ”We addressed what we found — some of it expected, like houses that look like ruins, kids running around in torn clothing, trash everywhere, dogs and cats all over the place — in speculations that concentrated on the surprises, the architectural and cultural potentials.”


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The Summer Study Abroad Program in Colombia is a four year project. It researches and tests architectural design in its role to provoke change within the Forms of Informal urban development in three cities in Colombia: Bogota, Medellin and Cartagena. An important part of the program involves visits to neighborhoods, buildings, events, architecture offices, interviews to politicians, urban and community activists and architects. Last year, the first installment of the program, was invested in understanding and unpacking the overall forms of informal dynamics in the three cities in a broad level. A week-long workshop allow for meeting and collaborating with local students.

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The Summer Study Abroad Program in Greece organizes a series of visits to both archeological sites as well as modern and contemporary architectural sites. PennDesign students exchange and collaborate with a selected group of Greek architecture students during a week-long design workshop. There is a series of lectures from professionals and academics, which frame the proceedings of the workshop. The final presentation takes the form of a symposium and an installation in Athens.

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This five-week long program is a long-established academic program based in Paris, where students live near the Latin Quarter, go to lectures and visit sites all around the French capital. The program combines evening talks about Parisian architecture and urbanism from the city's most prominent architects, engineers and scholars, with accompanied morning tours to buildings, parks and professional offices. Recent programs have addressed issues of technology found within architecture, urbanism and landscape in a particularly Parisian frame of reference.

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systems. Tactility, material, scale, profile, shape, color, Architecture works primarily in the assertion of these modes, and the meaningful production and control of these modes of communication are imperative for all designers.

ARCH 512 – HISTORY AND THEORY II Joan Ockman – 2016A This course examines the history of modern architecture since World War II, with an emphasis on relationships between architectural practices and increasing knowledge of the environment. Buildings, projects, and texts are situated within the historical constellations of ideas, values, and technologies that inform them through a series of close readings. Rather than presenting a parade of movements or individuals, the class introduces topics as overlaying strata, with each new issue adding greater complexity even as previous layers retain their significance.

ARCH 531 – CONSTRUCTION I Franca Trubiano – 2015C Lecture and digital modeling course exploring the basic principles of architectural technology and building construction. The course is focused on building materials, methods of on-site and off-site construction, architectural assemblies, and the performance of materials. Topics discussed include load bearing masonry structures for small to medium size buildings, heavy and light wood frame construction, glazing, roofing, sustainable construction practices, emerging + engineered materials, and integrated building practices. The course also introduces students to Building Information Modeling (BIM) in a series of 5 workshops that result in construction documents for a residential masonry load bearing/ wood frame building.

ARCH 521 – VISUAL STUDIES I Nathan Hume – 2015C Visual Studies-I is the engagement of graphic and visual information found in the world and in media, and its ability to contain – and more importantly, to convey – meaningful information. Intelligence in visual information is deployed to transfer cultural values, to educate and influence, and to create new relationships not easily expressed through mathematics, linguistics, and applied science. One of the challenges in the course is the re-invention of a means of assessment, the development of notations and techniques that will document the forces and the production of difference in the spatial manifestations of the generative

ARCH 522– VISUAL STUDIES II Danielle Willems – 2016A Visual Studies-II extends the use of the computer as a tool for architectural representation and fabrication by engaging in digital three-dimensional modeling. Modeling is approached first of all as a set of techniques for exploring and determining design intent and direction. Attention is given to precision and detailed modeling, paralleled by the development of the critical understanding for the constructive translation between physical and digital working environments. This course analyzes the intensive and extensive properties at the scale of the city through a series of mapping exercises. Computational strategies of transformation are deployed to create explicit formations, by utilizing the analytical methods as generative procedures. The resulting systems become the basis for experimentation with computer aided manufacturing tools of the school. In parallel to the development of modeling skills, exercises in visualization emphasize both the analytic and affective possibilities of computer generated imagery.

ARCH 532 – CONSTRUCTION II Phillip Ryan– 2016A A continuation of Construction I, focusing on light and heavy steel frame construction, concrete construction, light and heavyweight cladding systems and systems building. ARCH 533 – ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS I Ilana Judah – 2015C An introduction to the influence of thermal and luminous phenomenon in the history and practice of architecture. Issues of climate,

health and environmental sustainability are explored as they relate to architecture in its natural context. The classes include lectures, site visits and field exploration. ARCH 534 – ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS II William Braham – 2016A This course examines the environmental technologies of larger buildings, including heating, ventilating, air conditioning, lighting, and acoustics. Modern buildings are characterized by the use of such complex systems that not only have their own characteristics, but interact dynamically with one another and with the building skin and occupants. Questions about building size, shape, and construction become much more complex with the introduction of sophisticated feedback and control systems that radically alter their environmental behavior and resource consumption. Class meetings are divided between lectures, demonstrations, and site visits. Course work includes in-class exercises, homework assignments, and a comprehensive environmental assessment of a room in a building on campus. ARCH 535 - STRUCTURES I Richard Farley – 2015C Theory applied toward structural form. The study of static and hyperstatic systems and design of their elements. Flexural theory, elastic and plastic. Design for combined stresses; prestressing. The study of graphic statics and the design of trusses. The course comprises both lectures and a weekly laboratory in which various structural elements, systems, materials and technical principles are explored. ARCH 536 - STRUCTURES II Richard Farley – 2016A A continuation of the equilibrium analysis of structures covered in Structures I. A review of one-dimensional structural elements; a study of arches, slabs and plates, curved surface structures, lateral and dynamic loads; survey of current and future structural technology. The course comprises both lectures and a weekly laboratory in which various structural elements, systems, materials and technical principles are explored. ARCH 611 – HISTORY AND THEORY III Daniela Fabricius – 2015C This is the third and final required course in the history and theory of architecture. It is a lecture course that examines selected topics, figures, projects, and theories from the history of architecture and related design fields during the 20th century. The course also draws on related and parallel historical material from other disciplines and arts, placing architecture into a broader socio-cultural-political-technological context.

COURSES

ARCH 511 - HISTORY AND THEORY I Joan Ockman – 2015C The century between the Crystal Palace and Lever House witnessed the emergence of a dramatically new building culture with far-reaching consequences. In this overview of international architecture from the second half of the nineteenth century through the first half of the twentieth, we will situate the icons and isms, the pioneers and hero figures within a broad technological, economic, sociopolitical, and cultural context. The thirteen lectures will move both chronologically and thematically, tracing architecture’s changing modes of production and reception; its pivotal debates, institutions, and tendencies; and its expanding geography, highlighting the ways the culture of architecture responded to and mediated the unprecedented experiences of modernity. We will also reflect on modernism’s legacy today. The objective of the course is not just to acquaint students with seminal buildings and their architects but also to foster a strong understanding of history and of architecture’s place in a modernizing world. Readings drawn from primary and secondary literature as well as a recently published text that is among the first to place modern architecture into a global perspective will supplement the lectures and provide a rich introduction to the historiography of the hundred-year period.

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ARCH 631 – TECH CASE STUDIES I Lindsay Falck – 2015C A study of the active integration of various building systems in exemplary architectural projects. To deepen students’ understanding of the process of building, the course compares the process of design and construction in buildings of similar type. The course brings forward the nature of the relationship between architectural design and engineering systems, and highlights the crucial communication skills required by both the architect and the engineer.

ARCH 632 – DEPLOYABLE STRUCTURES Mohamad Al Khayer – 2016A The objective of this course is the introduction to the history, theories and application of the rapidly growing field of deployable structures and folded plates (complex geometric structural configurations that are used as temporary and rapid assembly configurations) through hands-on experiments conducted in a workshop environment. The course’s objective is to introduce various concepts and techniques to the design, modeling, simulation and the physical building and execution of deployable structures. Experiments will be conducted using the hand (during the construction and observation of physical models), and computer Modeling of deployable structures using computer simulation software (Solid Works). The course is divided into two parts: in the first part, students work individually on weekly assignments building deployable structures related to the topic taught that week; in the second half of the semester, students work as one team in the fabrication shop, designing and constructing a full-scale deployable structure (working prototype). Studies include geometric studies of Platonic and Archimedean solids, space filling geometries, topology and morphological transformations, studies of different mechanical joints, and computer simulation.

ARCH 632 – DETAIL DESIGN STUDIO Lindsay Falck – 2016A This class will explore notable buildings at the overall building’s scale and at the very “close-up” detail scale. At the “middle scale” the class will study elements such as stairways, apertures (windows, doors, skylights) and shading devices for external surfaces, such as louvers, tensile membrane elements, etc. At the smallest scale fragments of buildings such as door handles, handrails, hinges, etc. The role of the craftsperson, building user, fabricator, installer, will be traced as an integral factor in the design process. Students will research, in depth, aspects of the above which interest them, document them with drawings, text, photographs and physical models built in the Penn Fabrication laboratory. This will be a very “close-up” “hands-on” class focusing on the joy of thinking out details, documenting them, and testing them in use. The Architectural Archives and the many written works on detail design will be used as reference material, as will existing buildings students visit. ARCH 632 – TECH DESIGNATED ELECTIVE: DAYLIGHTING Jessica Zofchak – 2015C, 2016A This course aims to introduce fundamental daylighting concepts and tools to analyze daylighting design. A wide range of topics includes site planning, building envelope and shading optimization, passive solar design, daylight delivery methods, daylight analysis structure and results interpretation, and a brief daylighting and lighting design integration. Each session is composed of a lecture and a workshop. The lecture part will cover the

ARCH 632 – PERFORMANCE AND DESIGN Yun Kyu Yi – 2016A This course develops techniques for integrating environmental performance analysis and the design of buildings, with an emphasis on parametric methods. Performance analysis techniques can provide enormous amounts of information to support the design process, acting as feedback mechanisms for improved performance, but careful interpretation and implementation are required to achieve better buildings. Parametric descriptions will be combined with decision-making methods to achieve more complete integration. Students will begin by using analytical tools to examine the environmental performance of buildings. Following the analysis, the students will be introduced to decision-making and parametric form control methods to achieve high performance designs. The course will be given on specific topics each session. No computer programming background is required

for this tutorial. However, students are assumed to have some background in using geometric modeling tools such as Rhino, Grasshopper and basic of building environment. ARCH 632 – PRINCIPLES OF DIGITAL FABRICATION Mike Avery – 2016A Through the nearly seamless ability to output digital designs to physical objects, digital fabrication has transformed the way designers work. Over the past several years the techniques of sectioning, tessellating, folding, contouring, and forming have received a great deal of attention and have become standard methods of practice in the field. Drawing from the tradition of the architectural installation as a test bed for new technologies, this course will review the established modes of digital making while focusing primarily on the exploration of 3D printing and its place within this continuum. It is our belief that the 3D printed component has the ability to offer a unique perspective on digital fabrication, one that sidesteps the subtractive and material intensive ‘traditional’ digital techniques, and can bring with it novel ways of looking at assemblies and structure at the level of the detail. ARCH 632 – MATERIAL AND STRUCTURAL INTELLIGENCE Mark Nicol – 2015C The semester long project will involve a gradual development of architectural ideas that are intimately informed by and centered on knowledge of Structure and Materiality. Employing both physical and digital simulations, the students will synthesize knowledge acquired in previous courses in structures, materials, and construction methods to develop architectural solutions within a carefully selected set of determinants. Work will begin with individual research and experimentation into formal systems using a given set of material and structural constraints. It will grow into a collaborative small group effort with a focus on the rationalization, resolution and execution of the design for a small scale architectural intervention. The students will learn to develop solutions by starting with a wide variety of ideas which are then funneled through critical assessment, elimination, and enriched through the constant inquiries into efficiency and elegance. The process would thus take them from concept design to design development, culminating in the development of detailed drawings and building systems for a well resolved design. ARCH 638 – BUILDING ACOUSTICS Joe Solway – 2016A This six-week course covers the fundamentals of architectural acoustics. The lectures cover the following topics: overview of acoustics in the built

environment, the role of the acoustic consultant and the interaction with the architect, fundamentals of sound - sound measurement and representation, sound generation and propagation, sound absorption and reflection and sound isolation and transmission, acoustic materials, case studies of acoustics in building projects, the history and future of performance space design. The course includes measurements and testing in Irvine Hall and two assignments, one practical (Boom Box) and one theoretical (Sound Space). ARCH 638 – SIX FACTS, SIX SCALES Billie Faircloth – 2016A This seminar proposes a seven week dissection and remapping of six numerical facts, originating at six numerical scales above or below the macroscopic scale – or the scale at which an object can be measured and observed by the naked eye. Numerical facts, originating from disciplines such as industrial ecology, biogeochemistry, microbiology, biology, materials engineering, geoengineering and applied geography, will be dissected and relationally mapped to identify each scaled fact’s potential participation as a parameter in the generation of innovative design solutions for the built environment. ARCH 638 – MECHANISMS FOR DESIGN Jonathan Albert – 2016A Mechanisms enable everything from scissor lifts and corkscrews to elevators and accelerator pedals. To design a properly working mechanism requires knowledge of how to achieve the desired motion and a source of power to make it happen. We will examine a variety of mechanisms to understand how they work and how to apply those concepts to solve mechanical problems at a human scale and beyond. ARCH 638 – BUILDING ENVELOPES Charles Berman– 2016A This class will provide an overview of enclosure design with a focus on materials, methods, and detailing strategies that contribute to a high-performance building envelope. An overview of design criteria, structural design of framing members and cladding materials with consideration of governing codes and standards will be given. Performance standards and rating systems such as LEED, Passive House, and Net Zero will be compared in the context of envelope design. How the design of the envelope intersects with the design and development of other building systems (including mechanical system, lighting, finishes, and structural systems) for a total building performance will be discussed. Case studies of new construction as well as retrofits of various building types will provide a basis for analyzing the development of the curtain wall through all phases, including schematic design, design development and construction

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fundamental knowledge and case studies that focus on effective daylighting design. The workshop will cover key daylight analysis tools currently used in the industry, and students will have opportunities to explore them to work on assignments and the final project. In addition, in order to orient the students to understand actual light levels, students will keep a daylighting journal with a light meter to discuss interesting daylight encounters via photos and measurements.

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ARCH 621 – VISUAL STUDIES III Nate Hume – 2015C The final of the Visual Studies half-credit courses. Drawings are explored as visual repositories of data from which information can be gleaned, geometries tested, designs refined and transmitted. Salient strengths of various digital media programs are identified and developed through assignments that address the specific intentions and challenges of the design studio project.


ARCH 638 – TECH SPECIAL TOPICS: WRITING FOR ARCHITECTS Nicholas Klein – 2015C This seminar will focus on honing concepts and mastering the most dynamic ways of expressing them. Students will sharpen their skills towards becoming more confident, sensitive and evocative. ARCH 671 – PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE Philip Ryan – 2015C Arch 671 is the first of a three course sequence that discusses the issues and processes involved in running a professional architectural practice and designing buildings in the contemporary construction environment. Arch 671 will begin by briefly outlining the overall course sequence in order to locate the first section in the context of the next two courses, Arch 672 and Arch 772. From there the course will describe the methods involved in getting, designing, and constructing a building project. The lectures will draw connections between the student’s studio design knowledge to date and the instructor’s experience in practice including local building examples and guest lectures by relevant professionals. The second half of the semester will build on the under

ARCH 672- PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE II Charles Capaldi – 2016A A continuation of ARCH 671. Further study of the organizational structures of architectural practices today, especially those beyond the architect’s office. The course is designed as a series of lectures, workshops and discussions that allows students and future practitioners the opportunity to consider and develop the analytical skills required to create buildings in the world of practice. ARCH 711 – TOPICS IN ARCH THEORY I: DOODLE CITIES Paul Preissner – 2015C This looks at themes for urban areas from existential (albeit derided) city circumstances, as well as accidents, mistakes, art, sociology, etc. including the subjects: plain cities, messy grids, sister cities, corporate fantasies, suburbanized urban experiments like cul-de-sacs and dead ends, and small, weird buildings. Additionally, the course will explore themes and actions like doodles and scribbles, glitch art, unorganization and carelessness, etc. Each of these will be looked into as both visual and organizational phenomena that allow for cities to introduce new freedoms, and provide opportunities for subversion of dominant ideologies. ARCH 711 – TOPICS IN ARCH THEORY I: URBAN IMAGINARIES, FROM THOMAS MORE TO REM KOOLHAAS Joseph Watson – 2015C The city in its various forms has provided a consistent source of inspiration for visionary thinkers throughout history and across cultures: in works of fiction it is the centerpiece of a transformed society; in works of modern architecture it is the starting point from which transformation will spread. This course explores how architects, novelists, filmmakers, theorists, and other intellectuals have used the city as a medium through which to imagine alternative spatial, social, and political worlds. One goal of the course is to develop an understanding of works of architectural and literary speculation as historically produced objects of collective hopes, desires, memories, and anxieties, as much as the unique visions of individual authors. Another goal is to consider through discussions and drawings how the history of these ideas continue to bear on the globalized context of contemporary design discourse. Themes to be explored include the relationship between ideal visions and material realities; the intertwining of memory and anticipation; the roles of technology, forms of production, and

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habitation; gender and race relations; the relationship between architectural form and social change; and the globalization of the economy and society. ARCH 711 – TOPICS IN ARCH THEORY I: THE AGENCY OF AUTONOMY, TOOLS FOR AN ARCHITECTURE OF TRANSLATION Eduardo Rega – 2015C Architecture cannot be reduced to an introverted disciplinary discourse, nor can it be understood solely through its actions and relations with other entities outside of itself. The debate developed in the last 40 years between architecture’s project for autonomy vs architecture as an instrument for social and political change, serves as a premise for this seminar, which analyzes and seeks to instrumentalize both theoretical positions. Adopting Graham Harman’s terms, the seminar positions itself in a theoretical territory that neither undermines architecture through an essentialist discourse (Autonomy) nor overmines it through a purely relational one (Agency), but rather does both at once. The readings, presentations, debates and projects will capitalize on the differences and transferences in order to develop research and design tools that enable the translation between architecture as an autonomous discipline and its potential to provoke change in the social and political milieus of which it is a part. ARCH 711 – TOPICS IN ARCH THEORY: ARCHITECTURE OF PATTERNS David Salomon – 2015C From the structure of the universe to the print on your grandmother’s couch, patterns describe a vast array of conceptual and physical phenomena. For architecture, something that so easily traffics between scientific rigor and personal taste demands attention, which partly explains their revival. While traditionally marginalized as frivolous decoration or overly deterministic principles, recent advances in digital and materials technology have helped produce a new generation of patterns with protean vitality and multifarious intelligence. These current versions are imbued with properties of elasticity, aperiodicity, opulence, variegation, and idiosyncrasy – qualities that enable them to simultaneously engage numerous operative and material domains. Their newly developed capacity to link seemingly disparate intellectual and cultural categories – such as organization and sensation, graphics and behavior, and process and content – provides an opportunity for a more precise and expansive role for patterns in architecture. ARCH 711 – TOPICS IN ARCH THEORY I: CULTURE, CLIMATE, AND TECHNIQUES OF MODERN ARCH IN JAPAN Ariel Genadt – 2015C This seminar surveys modern architecture in Japan since its so called “opening” to the West and its

rapid process of industrialization in the second half of the nineteenth century. It looks at built case studies in particular through cultural, aesthetic, climatic, technical and material perspectives. Each session discusses a group of architects whose work exemplifies salient topics and turning points in the history of the practice in Japan. The seminar seeks to develop a critical understanding of the diversity of interpretations of modern architecture in Japan in relation to its particular climatic, historic and cultural setting. By studying graphic, textual and audio-visual accounts of key buildings and architects, techniques and ideas, it will establish a vocabulary to discuss contemporary works in relation to their context and antecedents. ARCH 711 – TOPICS IN ARCH THEORY: ARCHITECTURE’S CULTURAL PERFORMANCE: THE FAÇADE David Leatherbarrow – 2015C This course will ask about the interrelationships between topics of design that seem to be categorically distinct: the project’s functionality and its style, its provision of settings that allow the enactment of practical purposes and its contribution to the image and appearance of our landscapes and cities. Our concentration will be at once historical and thematic. We will study and reconsider buildings from the twentieth century and we will ask questions that resonate through the past several decades into the present, questions about the building (its materials, construction, and figuration) as well as the process of design (description, projection, and discovery). Throughout the course we will return to the building’s most visible and articulate surface: the façade. Added to the typical concerns with production and representation will be a topic of design and experience that is often overlooked: performance. A simple analogy should show the environmental import of this topic: what adaptation is to the organism performance is to the work of architecture. The attributes of the façade: its materials, fixed and moving parts, dimensions, and spaces give it capacities to act in response to its encompassing milieu. Seen as a whole, the course will argue a simple thesis: the way the building’s looks is largely determined by what the building does – how its acts, adapts, and performs, in the city, the country, and the environments that bind these places together. ARCH 712 – PHILOSOPHY OF MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES Manuel DeLanda – 2016A This lecture series introduces students to the basic philosophical concepts needed to understand contemporary science. Most of the examples and case studies discussed in class come from two fields that are intimately connected with architecture: structural engineering and materials science

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ARCH 638 – WATER SHAPING ARCHITECTURE Jonathan Weiss – 2016A While efforts in sustainable design have focused on energy use, carbon footprint, light and materials impacts on human occupants, it could be argued that water is the ultimate test of sustainability. Without water, there is no life. Water impacts, influences and shapes architecture in many different aspects. As our planet is ever more challenged to provide for increasing populations with finite resources, our approach to water will need to evolve to meet our new and future realities. This course is an investigation of the ways that architecture is informed by the water resources and availability of each specific project region. We will cover a range of subjects including; the physics of water, the systems to gather, distribute, supply and treat potable water, grey water, waste water, including the correlation to energy and recycling that are integrated into the architecture of buildings. How do our choices as architects impact access to water, and how are those issues predetermined on a building, local, regional and continental scale? How can our projects react resiliently to changing climate and changing reality? If Sustainability is about providing for our needs while allowing for future generations to do the same, how does our outlook on water shape our decision making process?

standing of the project execution process to then shape how an office is formed and managed. This foundation will set up the segue to Arch 672 which will delve into more detailed analysis of legal, financial, and risk/quality management practices.

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detailing, the bid process, mock-up testing, field installation, and on-site field testing. Research developments such as adaptive facades and energygenerating facades will be examined.


ARCH 712 – URBAN IDEOLOGY: WAYS OF BEING INNOVATIVE WITH ARCHITECTURE VIS-À-VIS ACTIVISM Srdjan Jovanovic Weiss – 2016A This seminar explores expanding roles of a designer engaged in urban activism, that engulf fields and knowledge of architecture, urbanism and art. The course provides tools for critical thinking to interpret urban tensions that are often self-organized, anonymous and spatial. At the same time we will look into tools to interpret recent shifts in the work of Peter Eisenman, Herzog & de Meuron and AMO/OMA as well as explore younger innovative and alternative practices. The course is given by Srdjan Jovanovic Weiss, PhD (Goldsmiths Centre for Research Architecture, London) and former architect and cultural researcher with Herzog & de Meuron Architects (Basel, Switzerland), founder of NAO (Normal Architecture Office) and co-founder or SMS (School of Missing Studies). The participants in the seminar will be involved in conceptualizing and creating the exhibit Romancing Power commissioned by the Anderson Gallery at The New School in New York to open February 2015. The exhibit will be produced in collaboration with Nina Krushcheva, grand-dauther of cold war president of Soviet Union, Nikita Krushchev.

ARCH 714 – MUSEUM AS SITE: CRITIQUE, INTERVENTION AND PRODUCTION Andrea Hornick – 2016A In this course, we will take the museum as a site for critique, invention, and production. As architecture, cultural institution, and site of performance, the museum offers many relevant opportunities. Students will visit, analyze, and discuss a number of local exhibitions and produce their own intervention in individual or group projects. Exhibition design, design of museum, the process of curating, producing artworks ranging from paintings to installation and performance, as well as attention to conservation, installation, museum education, and the logistics and economics of exhibitions will be discussed on site and in seminar. These topics and others will be open for students to engage as part of their own creative work produced for the class and an online exhibition. ARCH 717 – PHILOSOPHY OF URBAN HISTORY Manuel DeLanda – 2015C Cities are among the most complex entities that arise out of human activity. For some of these cities (Versailles, Washington DC) the process through which they emerge is not hard to grasp because it is planned up to the last detail by a

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human bureaucracy. Other cities, such as Venice and its labyrinthian system of streets, emerged spontaneously without any central agency making the relevant decisions. But even those cities in which urban structure was the result of a deliberate act of planning, house many processes which, like Venice, represent the spontaneous emergence of order out of chaos. This seminar will examine a variety of these processes, from markets to symbiotic nets of small producers, from epidemics of urban diseases to the creation of new languages and urban dialects. It will also explore the interaction between these self-organized phenomena and centrally controlled processes which are the result of human planning. ARCH 721 – DESIGNING SMART OBJECTS Carla Diana – 2015C Today’s children enjoy a wide array of play experiences, with stories, learning, characters and games that exist as physical stand-alone objects or toys enhanced with electronics or software. In this course, students will explore the domain of play and learning in order to develop original proposals for new product experiences that are at once tangible, immersive and dynamic. They will conduct research into education and psychology while also gaining hands-on exposure to new product manifestations in a variety of forms, both physical and digital. Students will be challenged to work in teams to explore concepts, share research and build prototypes of their experiences in the form of static objects that may have accompanying electronic devices or software. Final design proposals will consider future distribution models for product experiences such as 3D printing, virtual reality and software-hardware integration. Instruction will be part seminar and part workshop, providing research guidance and encouraging connections will subject matter experts throughout the Penn campus. ARCH 724 – TECHNOLOGY IN DESIGN: IMMERSIVE KINEMATICS/PHYSICAL COMPUTING: BODY AS SITE Simon Kim – 2015C The aim of this course is to understand the new medium of architecture within the format of a research seminar. The subject matter of new media is to be examined and placed in a disciplinary trajectory of building designed and construction technology that adapts to material and digital discoveries. We will also build prototype with the new media, and establish a disciplinary knowledge for ourselves. The seminar is interested in testing the architecture-machine relationship, moving away from architecture that looks like machines into architecture that behaves like machines: An intelligence (based on the conceptual premise of a project and in the design of a system), as

part of a process (related to the generative real of architecture) and as the object itself and its embedded intelligence. ARCH 724 – TECHNOLOGY IN DESIGN: A PERIODIC: THE MATHEMATICS OF TILING IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN Josh Freese – 2016A Repetition and difference in geometric tiling patterns produce visual complexity, intricacy, economy and articulation. From textiles and ceramics to architectural design, the tradition of tiling has culled from mathematical systems that inscribe two- and threedimensional geometric conditions, ultimately yielding cultural effects that are unique to their time. By examining this tradition across time and disciplines, this course will explore a range of mathematical systems, tools and media as well as how they advance contemporary architectural topics such as parametrics, optimization, fabrication, and implementation. Through lectures, readings and workshops, the course will lead students to develop contemporary and future-oriented methods that establish new parameters for tiling systems. Students will identify particular tiling families from guest lectures, historical precedents and readings, and will establish conditions for scripting new assemblies for generating three-dimensional patterns and assemblies. Fabrication methods will consider an economyof-means, using minimal variation in base models and molds to achieve maximum differentiation in the aggregation of tiles into 3-dimensional volumetric models. It is through this negotiation between fixed rules and variable freedoms that tiling systems have historically asserted their cultural value – and this will be the ultimate goal of the course. ARCH 724 - TECHNOLOGY IN DESIGN: DATA AND ADAPTATION Mark Nicol – 2016A Data + Adaptation seeks to study emerging tools and workflows that allow designers to tap into abundant sources of data and leverage them towards crafting adaptable, dynamic constructions. Low cost sensors and simple scripting techniques will be used to collect and visualize complex data fields. Design tools within the Rhino/Grasshopper or Maya ecosystem with the capability of designing and simulating dynamic responses to shifting data fields will be explored. In the end, students will take a position with regards to how data might affect design and furthermore how architectural constructions might be designed with the capacity to dynamically adapt to those fluctuating data. ARCH 726 – CONTEMPORARY FURNITURE DESIGN Katrin Mueller-Russo – 2016A This course provides a platform, in the form of furniture, to execute and deploy architectural

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ARCH 712 – BUILDING ENVELOPES: ARTICULATION AND PERFORMANCE Ariel Genadt – 2016A In the 20th century, building envelopes have become the prime architectural subject of experimentations and investments, as well as physical failures and theoretical conflicts. This seminar examines the meaning of performance of 20th -century envelopes by unfolding their functions and behaviors in salient case studies, in practice and in theory. While the term performance is often used to denote quantifiable parameters, such as exchanges of energy, airs and waters, this seminar seeks to recouple these with other, simultaneous actions performed by the envelope and by the building it encloses. Albeit numbers cannot describe those performances, their consideration is key to the interpretation of quantifiable ones. Ultimately, the articulation of the polyvalence of envelopes becomes the measure of their architectural pertinence. Each class meeting includes a lecture, students’ case studies presentation and documentary film screenings. Lecture topics address construction techniques, environmental conditioning, perception and representation, while each lecture relates one kind of performance to specific buildings where it was articulated most poignantly.

ARCH 712 – TOPICS IN ARCHITECTURE II: BAROQUE PARAMETERS Andrew Saunders – 2016A Deep plasticity and dynamism of form, space and light are explicit signatures of the Baroque Architecture; less obvious are the disciplined mathematical principles that generate these effects. Through art historians, Rudolf Wittkower, Heinrich Wölfflin, and John Rupert Martin in addition to philosopher Gottfried Leibniz (via Gilles Deleuze), Robin Evans and the history of mathematics by Morris Kline the course will examine how geometry and mathematics were integral to 17th-century science, philosophy, art, architecture and religion. The new revelation of a heliocentric universe, nautical navigation in the Age of Expansion, and the use of gunpowder spawned new operative geometry of elliptical paths, conic sections and differential equations. The geometric and political consequences of these advances are what link Baroque architects Francesco Borromini and Guarino Guarini to other great thinkers of the period including Descartes, Galileo, Kepler, Desargues and Newton. Through the exploitation of trigonometric parameters of the arc and the chord, Baroque architects produced astonishing effects, performance and continuity. Generative analysis by parametric reconstruction and new speculative modeling will reexamine the base principles behind 17th century topology and reveal renewed relevance of the Baroque to the contemporary paradigm.

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and engineering. But in addition, the class deals with the philosophical underpinnings of two other fields, one which has been the backbone of science since its inception, mathematics, and the other which has revolutionized mathematical models by setting them into motion: computer simulation.


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ARCH 732 - ADVANCED ENCLOSURES Charles Berman – 2015C This seminar seeks to expand a framework of understanding enclosures as integral to the student’s architectural intentions. We will seek to move beneath the numerical facts of what is accepted as facade design (criteria, codes, loads, forces and consumptions) to seek a deeper understanding of the generative process underlying these physical criteria in order to evade the mere acceptance of these external facts to the intentions of the Architect. The nature of enclosures will be explored through methods of analysis and interrogation of materials, their attributes, their forms of assembly and the natures of their manufacture. The vehicle for this interrogation will be the act of drawing and assembling. Case studies of new materials, new processes and new applications will provide the basis gaining this dissecting /cutting ability (Frascari). In addition the students will engage in generative detailing exercises, at simultaneous

ARCH 734 – ECOLOGICAL ARCHITECTURE CONTEMPORARY PRACTICES Todd Woodward – 2016A Building is an inherently exploitive act – we take resources from the earth and produce waste and pollution when we construct and operate buildings. As global citizens, we have an ethical responsibility to minimize these negative impacts. As creative professionals, we have a unique ability to go farther than simply being “less bad,” We can learn to imagine designs that heal the damage and regenerate our environment. This course explores the evolving approaches to ecological design – from neo-indigenous to eco-tech to LEED to biomimicry to living buildings. Taught by a practicing architect with many years of experience designing green buildings, the course also features guest lecturers from complementary fields - landscape architects, hydrologists, recycling contractors and materials specialists. Coursework includes in-class discussion, short essays and longer research projects. ARCH 738 – THE MODERN HOUSE TECHNOLOGY THEN AND NOW Annette Fierro – 2016A In the current age of new fabrication methodologies, methods are emerging for the conception and design of the contemporary house which have radical potential for enclosure, habitation and practices of daily life. This course begins by examining the canonical houses of the original avant-garde-Adolf Loos, Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe and Alvar Aalto—on the premise that their houses were working manifestos for rethinking space, form and indeed ideas of life itself —all of which were prompted by new concepts of construction. From this spectrum of issues, contemporary houses and contemporary methods and materials will be studied extensively to develop equally new ideas between matter and quotidian life. As the primary task of the course, students will work in teams to develop highly detailed constructional proposals for a portion of a speculative home. ARCH 740 – FORMAL EFFICIENCIES Erick Carcamo – 2016A The seminar is a discourse based in the use of multilayered techniques and production processes that allow for control over intelligent geometries, calibration of parts, and behavioral taxonomies, normalizing an innovative field of predictability. Our goal is to explore innovative, potential architectural expressions of the current discourse around form through technique elaboration, material intelligence, formal logic efficiencies and precision assemblies as an ultimate condition of design.

The seminar will develop and investigate the notion of proficient geometric variations at a level of complexity, so that questions towards geometrical effectiveness, accuracy and performance can begin to be understood in a contemporary setting. ARCH 741 – ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN INNOVATION Ali Rahim – 2015C This seminar will explore systemic thinking and digital design techniques that yield architectural forms that have contributed to the contemporary discourse of architecture. ARCH 743 – FORM AND ALGORITHM Cecil Balmond and Ezio Blasetti – 2015C A course on the philosophy and generative tools of Informal design, which is defined in terms of non-Cartesian, non-linear geometries and borrows algorithmic procedures from models in mathematics and the physical sciences. The course reviews readings on the topic, introductory instruction in scripting and assignments through which students gain familiarity and skill with specific non-linear models. ARCH 744 – DIGITAL FABRICATION Ferda Kolatan – 2016A This seminar course investigates the fabrication of digital structures through the use of rapid prototyping (RP) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) technologies, which offer the production of building components directly from 3D digital models. In contrast to the industrial-age paradigms of prefabrication and mass production in architecture, this course focuses on the development of repetitive non-standardized building systems (masscustomization) through digitally controlled variation and serial differentiation. Various RP and CAM technologies are introduced with examples of use in contemporary building design and construction. ARCH 750 – PARAFICTIONAL OBJECTS Kutan Ayata – 2016A This Representation/Design Seminar will start with series of lectures examining the histories of Realism in Art spanning from French Realism of 19th Century through Hyperrealism into Parafictional Art of the recent past with their aesthetic provocations at the center of this inquiry. Weekly discussions of the reading material will be followed by student presentations on assigned topics. The design portion of the seminar will proceed with the generation of “Still Life bound” objects with parafictional scenarios. The process will carry through multiple mediums of image patterning, line drawing, 3D modeling and surface mapping, exploring the potentials of cross-medium translations, evaluated through weekly pin-ups. These objects will then be fabricated to gain physical presence in the world. The realism of these objects

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ARCH 730 – TECHNIQUES, MORPHOLOGY, AND DETAILING OF PHILADELPHIA CITY PAVILION – Mohamad Al Khayer – 2016A The course will focus on the design morphology, detailing, and the construction of “Moment Lab Pavilion” which is to be constructed in Spring 2015 at the southeast corner of Philadelphia City Hall. The course will develop through hands-on workshops and will focus on acquiring knowledge through

ARCH 731 – EXPERIMENTS IN STRUCTURE Mohamad Al Khayer – 2015C This course studies the relationships between geometric space and those structural systems that amplify tension. Experiments using the hand (touch and force) in coordination with the eye (sight and geometry) will be done during the construction and observation of physical models. Verbal, mathematical and computer models are secondary to the reality of the physical model. However these models will be used to give dimension and document the experiments. Team reports will serve as interim and final examinations. In typology, masonry structures in compression (e.g., vault and dome) correlate with “Classical” space, and steel or reinforced concrete structures in flexure (e.g., frame, slab and column) with “Modernist” space. We seek the spatial correlates to tensile systems of both textiles (woven or braided fabrics where both warp and weft are tensile), and baskets (where the warp is tensile and the weft is compressive). In addition to the experiments, we will examine Le Ricolais’ structural models held by the Architectural Archives.

scales, to analyze and apply these decontextualized results to reveal their nature manifest in facade.

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ARCH 728 – DESIGN OF CONTEMPORARY PRODUCTS Carla Diana – 2016A Smart objects are information-based products that are in ongoing dialogs with people, the cloud and each other. By crafting rich interactions, designers can create expressive behaviors for these objects based on sophisticated programmed responses. At the same time, sensor technologies have enabled us to introduce natural gestures as a means of interacting with a product. (Not only can we push, pull and twist a data value, but we can wave at, caress, tilt and shake it as well.) With an explosion of new possibilities for object interaction and human control, it is the designer’s role to envision new solutions that are both meaningful and responsible. This course will explore product design solutions through a combination of physical and digital design methods. Beginning with an examination of case studies, students will gain a sense of the breadth of product and interaction design practice as it applies to smart objects. Through a series of lectures and hands-on studio exercises, students will explore all aspects of smart object design including expressive behaviors (light, sound and movement), interaction systems, ergonomics, data networks and contexts of use. The course will culminate in a final project that considers all aspects of smart object design within the context of a larger theme.

making (Techne), understanding the morphological transformation of a given geometric packing, and building using readily available materials. The process consists of building and testing physical models that simulates the actual pavilion. In addition to digital simulation sessions to realize the desired design, which answers to the program developed by the Moment Lab curators* The second half of the semester will focus on using lightweight materials to fabricate the pavilion’s actual components, including structural members, panels, and joints, which are required for pavilion’s superstructure and envelop.

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and engineering principles at full scale. It will be conducted as a seminar and workshop and will introduce students to a variety of design methodologies that are unique to product design. The course will engage in many of the considerations that are affiliated with mass production; quality control, efficient use of material, durability, and human factors. Students will conduct research into industrial design processes, both traditional and contemporary, and will adapt these processes into techniques to design a prototype for limited production. Instruction will include; model making, the full scale production of a prototype, its detailing; design for mass production and the possibility of mass customization; design for assembly, furniture case studies; design techniques, software integration, optimization studies; Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) and a site visit to a furniture manufacturer.


ARCH 754 – PERFORMANCE DESIGN WORKSHOP Yun Kyu Yi – 2016A The workshop applies simulation and diagramming techniques to a series of discrete design projects at different scales. The emphasis is on refinement and optimization of performance based building design. Performance analysis techniques can provide enormous amounts of information to support the design process, acting as feedback mechanisms for improved performance, but careful interpretation and implementation are required to achieve better buildings. Energy, lighting, and air flow are the three main domains covered in the workshop. Students will learn how to utilize domain tools at an advanced level, and utilize them as applications to examine the environmental performance of existing buildings. Using the results of analytical techniques, the students will develop high-performance design strategies in all three domains. Lectures will be given on specific topics each week. A series of analytical class exercises will be assigned to provide students with hands-on experience in using the computer models. A case-study building will be provided at the beginning of the course and students will model different components each week throughout the semester. Every week students present the progress of their work, which will be used to correct methodological and technical issues.

COURSES

354 COURSES

ARCH 753 – BUILDING PERFORMANCE SIMULATION Mostapha Sadeghipour Roudsari – 2015C The course provides students with an understanding of building design simulation methods, hands-on experience in using computer simulation models, and exploration of the technologies, underlying principles, and potential applications of simulation tools in architecture. Classroom lectures are given each week, with a series of analysis projects to provide students with hands-on experience using computer models.

ARCH 816 – ADVANCED TOPICS IN ARCHITECTURE CULTURE FROM WORLD WAR II THROUGH 2001– Joan Ockman – 2016A This seminar will be taught as an advanced section of ARCH 512. It is primarily for students who are in their first year of the PhD program in Architecture but it is open to other upper-level students with instructor permission. In addition to the weekly discussion-format seminar on Tuesday afternoons (1. hours), students are also expected to attend the lectures associated with ARCH 512 on Tuesday mornings (10:30–12). Assigned readings will go beyond those on the 512 syllabus to include more complex and sophisticated source material. The subject of both ARCH 512 and 812 is the evolution of the culture of architecture from World War II to the turn of the twenty-first century. Starting with the period of wartime planning and postwar reconstruction in the 1940s, we will move decade by decade up to the present century, considering the transformations of modernist culture under the impact of social, political, technological, and urban changes. We will address the challenges posed to architecture from inside as well as outside the discipline and from around the world, attending to material and ideological developments and to relations between individual protagonists and larger historical and institutional forces. Note: This course is intended for Ph.D. students. Others will be admitted by permission of the instructor.

M ARCH

M ARCH

ARCH 751 – ECOLOGY, TECHNOLOGY, AND DESIGN William Braham – 2015C The course draws on theories of ecological design and on the history and philosophy of technology to examine the complex interaction between the built and natural environments. The energy diagramming techniques of HT Odum are used as a common framework for projects in the course.

ARCH 765 – PROJECT MANAGEMENT Charles Capaldi – 2015C, 2016A This course is an introduction to techniques and tools of managing the design and construction of large, and small, construction projects. Topics include project delivery systems, management tools, cost-control and budgeting systems, professional roles. Case studies serve to illustrate applications. Cost and schedule control systems are described. Case studies illustrate the application of techniques in the field.

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as things in the world will be further explored through a project in rendering and photocomposition as each object will be inserted into different Still Life painting.


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INSTRUCTOR: Andrew Saunders Constance Tsai-Hsuan Chang Laura Colagrande Ruo Ning Deng Margaret Jones Gregg Yi-Hsuan Hua Yewen Jin Siyi Li

INSTRUCTOR: Danielle Willems Lauren Elizabeth Aguilar Ramune Bartuskaite Mingxin He Daniel Wills Hurley Jin Woo Lee Yang Li Yangchao Ni

INSTRUCTOR: Ezio Blasetti Lillian Marie Candela Jun Cui Sarah Elizabeth Nicole Davis Jasmine Ya Gao John Patrick Hilla Danielle Sorella Lands Graham Perron Nelson

COMPLETE ROSTER

Yue Cao Chaowei Chiang Pui-Lam Penelope Fung Kirin Kennedy Xuexia Li Portia Tinuviel Zeneb Malik Noah Tyler Medlinksy

Matthew Paul Price Joshua Alexander Schultz Yichen Wang Morgan Leigh Welch Yiren Weng Si Yang Xiao

Jennifer Robyn Rokoff Kailin Wang Xinyu Wang Morgynn Whitnee Wiley Yijun Wu Yuhao Wu

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Loverich Zakariya Yaseen Al-Haffar Todd Slater Albert Alyssa Brooke Appel Yunyoung Lina Choi Emily Rose Dodson Hilary Kristin Lam Yisha Li

Madelyn Margarita Moretta Patrick Hawley Reeves Marianne Sanche Leetee Jane Wang Selin Liora Zakuto Shixiang Zheng

Chaeyoung Iris Kim Aahana Miller Mana Sazegara Mary Stephens Swysgood Siqi Wang Shuxin Wu Tong Wu

Kaj Anderson Akil Marshall Margarida Gomes Mota Adam George Schroth Xiaoling Wang Yi Yan Huanan Ye

INSTRUCTOR: Abigail Coover Hume Alexander Bahr Ryan Mcchord Barnette Yiqun Chen Katherine Engleman Jooyoung Ham Nikita Prashanth Jathan Hae-Yun Kwon

Farre Nixon Harper Ragin Yuwei Sun Irena Persis Patricia Wight Linnan Yu Wen Zhu

ARCH-601 DESIGN STUDIO III, 2015C INSTRUCTOR: Hina Jamelle Miguel Angel Abaunza Ruiyi Chen John Dade Darby Emilija Kaia Landsbergis Jin Li Xueyan Sabrina Li

INSTRUCTOR: Brian Phillips

Wenxin Chen Danielle Marie Dong Daniel Fachler Ricardo Arturo Hernandez-Perez Zachary Michael Kile Matthew Roy Mayberry

Angeliki Mavroleon Katie Ann Mcbride Yunxiu Peng Lara Zoe Steiner Lei Yu

Haiyin Tang Jiateng Wang Haosheng Yu Kaiyue Zhou Yu Zhou

Michael Patrick O’Neill Gary Polk Andrew Townsend Singer Benita Trenk Jiahua Xu Mengjie Zhu

INSTRUCTOR: Matthijs Bouw Xinyi Chen Yue Chen Lu Han Jonathan Hein Yanghui Huang Joongho Lee

INSTRUCTOR: Jason Payne Kaihong Chang Joseph Michael Giampietro Emily Canby Gruendel Sameeha Rajendra Joshi Aidan J Kim Karen Larissa Martin

Chuanzhang Li Ruo Wang Xianping Wang Siyuan Yin Yawei Zhang Kunyu Zhu

Batul Ismail Tinwala Peng Wang Jie Xu Andrea Grace Yoas Chaoran Yu

INSTRUCTOR: Jonas Coersmeier

INSTRUCTOR: Joshua Jordan / Daniel Wood

INSTRUCTOR: Kutan Ayata

INSTRUCTOR: Sulan Kolatan

Aly Medhat Abouzeid Samantha Phoenix Aguilar Cynthia Anastasiou Zhewei Feng Hardeep Singh Gujral Insung Hwang

Douglas Alec Breuer Mark Anthony Chalhoub Shimou Chen Aaron Stephensen Dewey Esther Hah

INSTRUCTOR: Benjamin Krone

INSTRUCTOR: Eduardo Rega Calvo Ramona Adlakha Alina Mairaj Ahmad Joud Saleh Baothman Yu-Te Chiang Jesus Fernando Elizondo Gonzalez Yiwei Gao

Elizabeth Caroline Bland Yangmei Cai Hannah Lynn Gompers Luis Hilario Jasso Violette Levy Yuheng Ouyang

Noor W Al Awadhi Garesa Hao En Au Amanda Leigh Baker Wing Sum Cheng Alexander Bertin Colucci Clay Edward Gruber

Matthew Wood Lewis Pingle Li Chao Liu Alexander Yalda Saroki Chwen-Ping Wang

David Brian Harrop Yunhwan Jung Kunil Paik Shicheng Shen Jung Jae Suh

Katrina Louise Healy Elsa Listiani Caroline Marie Morgan Roxanna Nisuel Perez Agustina Maria Sklar Qi Wang

Morgan Jessilyn Brown Yongsu Choung Wei Guo Zuoda He Haiteng Liu Tianxin Luo

Xingfeng Chen Can Fu Dami Kim Grace Kwieun Kim Audrey Tseng Lin

INSTRUCTOR: Laura Baird Chen Ju Taylor Michelle Knoche Daniel Kin Hoe Lau Ning Ma Yingfei Wang Mengyao Ye

Matthew Lee Mark Chenyi Shen Jun Yan Bo Zhang Shuang Zhang Tuobing Zheng

Runliang Song Di Wang Eda Yeyman Heunsun Yoon Shengkan Zhang

Shanshan Yin Ge Zhang Qinheng Zhang Feifei Zhao Liangjie Zheng

INSTRUCTOR: Justin Korhammer

INSTRUCTOR: Homa Farjadi

ARCH-701 DESIGN STUDIO III, 2015C

ARCH-703 POST PROFESSIONAL DESIGN STUDIO, 2015C

Gesu Omar Almonte Valentin Michelle Ann Chew Colin Patrick Curley Yihui Gan Julianna Haahs Chi-Wei Huang

INSTRUCTOR: Iñaki Echeverria Fang Cai Keun-Hyuk Jang Tanuja Jayant Manohar Yuchi Shi Wei Tang Wei-An Wang

INSTRUCTOR: Simon Kim Seung-Hyeok Bae Brett Dong Ha Lee Moon Rachel Lee Feici Liu Rajika Maheshwari

INSTRUCTOR: Paul Preissner Peter Caleb Hiller Lyly Tonnu Huyen Gene Kim Jung Hyo Lee Christopher Dean Mulford Ae Ree Rho

INSTRUCTOR: Thom Mayne Stephen Christy Irina Dukhnevich Basak Gulsen Huner Jaeho Jin Ryan Thomas Kane Yong Jae Kim

Jiyeon Lee Yuan Ma Rosanne Pitarresi Natasha Scalia Sanjaya Judith Vazquez

Xiani Wang Jingxian Xu Hua Yang Xingzhe Yang Zhuang Yanhua

Ramon Gabriel Pena Toledo Chuanjingwei Wang Caleb William White Elizabeth Young

Jessica Soe Xinhui Wen Xi Yao Jianan Zhang

Dongni Lu Roza Patricia Pattah Zachary Ehrhart Reiser Wongi Su Ram Annamalai Thennaapan Qi Tong

Dunbee Choi Whitney Wing Yin Chow Heng Gu Yuhang He Hyemi Kang Ian Liu Di Meng

Shiyuan Wang Szu-An Yao Chi Zhang Tong Zhang Kangyi Zheng

INSTRUCTORS: Ali Rahim, Nathan Hume, Ferda Kolatan, Robert Beelitz Yun Ai Fan Cao Qiuyun Chen Wei Chen Wooyoung Choi Peichao Di Kelsey Marie Dressing Luan Feng Shuojing Feng Tai Feng Marcos Esteban Gonzalez-Bode Huichao Han Ryan Pan Hao Naifei Hou Mingyue Hu Yubei Huang Ryosuke Imaeda Weiran Jia Jieming Jin Dawoon Jung Ritika Kapoor Han Kwon Jungha Lee Fengyan Li Jiyuan Liu Lu Liu

Xiaoran Liu Wensi Lu Ziyang Luo Dailong Ma Junxiong Ma Hadeel Ayed Mohammad Nan Mu Tong Niu Jifu Pan Bo Peng Joohwan Seo Jayong Shim Guancheng Sun Jinghao Wang Lixu Wang Shuo Wang Yuchen Wen Xuanlei Wu Xue Xiao Yi Yang Beidi Zhan Xinyu Zhang Zheng Zhang Yifeng Zhao Chengda Zhu

COMPLETE ROSTER

COMPLETE ROSTER

INSTRUCTOR: Lasha Brown

Tian Ouyang Julie Michele Pepitone Joanna Ptak Andre James Stiles Yuntao Xu Ji Sook Yoon

INSTRUCTOR: Scott Erdy

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ARCH 501 DESIGN STUDIO I, 2015C


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INSTRUCTOR: Annette Fierro Ryan Mcchord Barnette Constance Tsai-Hsuan Chang Chaowei Chiang Laura Colagrande Jesus Fernando Elizondo Gonzalez Yi-Hsuan Hua Hae-Yun Kwon

Po-Tsen Meng Aahana Miller Matthew Paul Price Adam George Schroth Mary Stephens Swysgood Morgan Leigh Welch

INSTRUCTOR: Andrew Saunders Alina Mairaj Ahmad Jin Woo Lee Yisha Li Noah Tyler Medlinksky Yangchao Ni Harper Ragin Jennifer Robyn Rokoff

INSTRUCTOR: Danielle Willems Yu-Te Chiang Emily Rose Dodson Jasmine Ya Gao John Patrick Hilla Yewen Jin Hilary Kristin Lam Siyi Li

INSTRUCTOR: Joshua Freese Zakariya Yaseen Al-Haffar Joud Saleh Baothman Pui-Lam Penelope Fung Yiwei Gao Mingxin He Nikita Prashanth Jathan Xuexia Li

Ramona Adlakha Alexander Bahr Sarah Elizabeth Nicole Davis Chaeyoung Iris Kim Danielle Sorella Lands Yang Li Kaj Anderson Akil Marshall

INSTRUCTOR: Marcelo Lopez Lauren Elizabeth Aguilar Ramune Bartuskaite Lillian Marie Candela Yiqun Chen Margaret Jones Gregg Kirin Kennedy Margarida Gomes

Patrick Hawley Reeves Marianne Sanche Mana Sazegara Shuxin Wu Tong Wu Yi Yan

Madelyn Margarita Moretta Graham Perron Nelson Tian Ouyang Joshua Alexander Schultz Andre James Stiles Kailin Wang

Farre Nixon Yuwei Sun Leetee Jane Wang Yichen Wang Yuntao Xu Ji Sook Yoon

Jooyoung Ham Daniel Wills Hurley Portia Tinuviel Zeneb Malik Joanna Ptak Xiaoling Wang Yijun Wu

Julie Michele Pepitone Xinyu Wang Irena Persis Patricia Wight Morgynn Whitnee Wiley Huanan Ye Linnan Yu

ARCH-602 DESIGN STUDIO IV, 2016A INSTRUCTOR: Simon Kim Miguel Angel Abaunza Douglas Alec Breuer Ruiyi Chen Michelle Ann Chew Clay Edward Gruber Emilija Kaia Landsbergis

INSTRUCTOR: Hina Jamelle Garesa Hao En Au Danielle Marie Dong Zhewei Feng Yihui Gan Insung Hwang Yunhwan Jung

INSTRUCTOR: Benjamin Krone Amanda Leigh Baker Yangmei Cai Julianna Haahs Katrina Louise Healy Angeliki Mavroleon Katie Ann Mcbride

Luis Hilario Jasso Elsa Listiani Agustina Maria Sklar Jiahua Xu Kaiyue Zhou

Jin Li Chao Liu Kunil Paik Jiateng Wang Lei Yu

Andrew Townsend Singer Haiyin Tang Haosheng Yu Yu Zhou Mengjie Zhu

INSTRUCTOR: Shawn Rickenbacker

INSTRUCTOR: Eduardo Rega Calvo Todd Slater Albert Alyssa Brooke Appel Yue Cao Yunyoung Lina Choi Jun Cui Ruo Ning Deng Katherine Engleman

Samantha Phoenix Aguilar Wenxin Chen Wing Sum Cheng Alexander Bertin Colucci Aaron Stephensen Dewey

Xueyan Sabrina Li Michael Patrick O’Neill Gary Polk Jung Jae Suh

Aly Medhat Abouzeid Gesu Omar Almonte Valentin Cynthia Anastasiou Elizabeth Caroline Bland Colin Patrick Curley

INSTRUCTOR: Kutan Ayata Noor W Al Awadhi Shimou Chen Daniel Fachler Hardeep Singh Gujral David Brian Harrop Zachary Michael Kile Jiyeon Lee

INSTRUCTOR: Nathan Hume Mark Anthony Chalhoub John Dade Darby Pingle Li Yuan Ma Caroline Marie Morgan Yuheng Ouyang

Nyasha Felder Hannah Lynn Gompers Esther Hah Ricardo Arturo Hernandez-Perez Natasha Scalia Sanjaya

Fan Cao Dunbee Choi Joseph Michael Giampietro Heng Gu Yanghui Huang Hyemi Kang

INSTRUCTOR: Homa Farjadi Seung-Hyeok Bae Peichao Di Luan Feng Chang Yuan Max Hsu Keun-Hyuk Jang Ritika Kapoor

Grace Kwieun Kim Brett Dong Ha Lee Moon Rachel Lee Hadeel Ayed Mohammad Chi Zhang Xinyu Zhang

Jifu Pan Lixu Wang Shuo Wang Jie Xu Jingxian Xu Zheng Zhang

Jiyuan Liu Junxiong Ma Bo Peng Zachary Ehrhart Reiser Joohwan Seo Hua Yang

Lu Liu Jayong Shim Peng Wang Xuanlei Wu Yi Yang

INSTRUCTOR: Nanako Umemoto Marcos Esteban Gonzalez-Bode Huichao Han Lu Han Basak Gulsen Huner Han Kwon Daniel Kin Hoe Lau

INSTRUCTOR: Florencia Pita Kelsey Marie Dressing Irina Dukhnevich Emily Canby Gruendel Ryan Pan Hao Lyly Tonnu Huyen Aidan Kim

INSTRUCTOR: Ali Rahim Xinyi Chen Ryosuke Imaeda Dami Kim Ae Ree Rho

Weiran Jia Fengyan Li Rajika Maheshwari Matthew Lee Mark Guancheng Sun Jinghao Wang Ruo Wang

INSTRUCTOR: Sulan Kolatan Roxanna Nisuel Perez Alexander Yalda Saroki Shicheng Shen Lara Zoe Steiner Benita F Trenk Judith Vazquez

INSTRUCTOR: Thomas Wiscombe Kaihong Chang Wooyoung Choi Can Fu Yuhang He Dawoon Jung Jungha Lee Audrey Tseng Lin

Nuo Bu Wei Chen Stephen Christy Shuojing Feng Jieming Jin

INSTRUCTOR: Marion Weiss Matthew Wood Lewis Matthew Roy Mayberry Yunxiu Peng Rosanne Pitarresi Qi Wang

ARCH-704 ADVANCED DESIGN: RESEARCH STUDIO, 2016A INSTRUCTOR: Ferda Kolatan

INSTRUCTOR: Cecil Balmond, Ezio Blasetti

Qiuyun Chen Whitney Wing Yin Chow Yubei Huang Haiteng Liu Ziyang Luo

Xiaoran Liu Wensi Lu Tanuja Jayant Manohar Chenyi Shen Jessica Soe Chengda Zhu

Gene Kim Nan Mu Di Wang Andrea Grace Yoas Elizabeth Young

Wei-An Wang Yuchen Wen Heunsun Yoon Yanhua Zhuang

Xue Xiao Xi Yao Siyuan Yin Beidi Zhan Feifei Zhao Kangyi Zheng

Dailong Ma Karen Larissa Martin Mengyao Ye Shanshan Yin Yifeng Zhao

INSTRUCTOR: Giancarlo Mazzanti Fang Cai Tai Feng Zuoda He Peter Caleb Hiller Mingyue Hu Ian Liu

Tianxin Luo Di Meng Tong Niu Shiyuan Wang Yingfei Wang Liangjie Zheng

ARCH-706 INDEPENDENT THESIS, 2016A INSTRUCTOR: Annette Fierro Caleb William White Morgan Jessilyn Brown Christopher Dean Mulford

Ramon Gabriel Pena Toledo Dana J Rice

ARCH-708 MEBD, 2016A INSTRUCTOR: William Braham Majed Ahmad Albakr Niccolo Benghi Munazza Javed Bhatti Ashish Jayanti Khemchandani Ksenia Knyazkina Shin-Yi Kwan Jeeeun Lee

Pegah Mathur Evan Oskierko-Jeznacki Mingbo Peng Shengliang Daniel Rong Janki Ashutosh Vyas Yuntian Wan

COMPLETE ROSTER

COMPLETE ROSTER

INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Scelsa

Siqi Wang Yuhao Wu Si Yang Xiao Selin Liora Zakuto Shixiang Zheng Wen Zhu

INSTRUCTOR: Franca Trubiano

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ARCH-502 DESIGN STUDIO II, 2016A


PENN DESIGN WAS APPROVED FOR ACCREDITATION SPRING 2016


PENN DESIGN WAS APPROVED FOR ACCREDITATION SPRING 2016


PENN DESIGN WAS APPROVED FOR ACCREDITATION SPRING 2016


CREDITS & ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Copyright Š2016 University of Pennsylvania School of Design All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America on acid-free paper

Editorial Team

Winka Dubbeldam, Professor and Chair Maria Teicher, Graduate Publicity/Promotion Coordinator

Copy Editor Maria Teicher

Design

WSDIA | WeShouldDoItAll (wsdia.com) Typefaces: Founders Grotesk & Tiempos designed by Kris Sowersby of Klim Type Foundry

Publisher

University of Pennsylvania School of Design Department of Architecture Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

Printing

CRW Graphics (crwgraphics.com)

Photo Credits

Maria Teicher All work, including illustrations and photographs, is used by permission.

ISBN: 978-0-9796087-6-6

Contact the Office of Communications with publishing/ external requests Maria Teicher, Communications Director 215.898.5728 teicher@design.upenn.edu

University of Pennsylvania School of Design Department of Architecture 212 Meyerson Hall 210 S. 34th Street Philadelphia, PA 19104-6311 215.898.5728

CREDITS

www.design.upenn.edu/architecture


Pressing Matters 5  

Pressing Matters 5 is a publication from the Department of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design. It has been publ...

Pressing Matters 5  

Pressing Matters 5 is a publication from the Department of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design. It has been publ...