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YOUR MAGAZINE FROM PENINSULA HEALTH • ISSUE 6 • SUMMER 2016

ALSO INSIDE Innovative health care

ADVANCES IN HEART HEALTH

A first in sight for the Peninsula Meet our new breast care nurse


Associate Professor David Langton performing an innovative procedure called ‘bronchial thermoplasty’ on a severe asthma sufferer at Frankston Hospital c

PENINSULA HEALTH CONNECTION

BRONCHIAL THERMOPLASTY


INTRODUCTION

Peninsula Health

THIS ISSUE

I’d like to thank you for your generous support in helping to refurbish the bathrooms at Rosebud Hospital – because of your efforts and generosity, construction is now underway. By February, the bathrooms will be ready for their first patients. Thank-you!

INNOVATION

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IN PROFILE

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RESEARCH

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A world first in sight for the Peninsula Professor Velandai Srikanth: from the mountains of rural India to Mt Eliza The new reality in falls prevention

SUE WILLIAMS

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Revolutionary advance in heart health

WELCOME TO OUR SUMMER 2016 ISSUE OF CONNECTION, DEDICATED TO INNOVATION. ur feature stories profile the cutting-edge research being done at Peninsula Health to change lives. Cardiologist, Dr Jamie Layland, is breaking new ground in heart health, and our new Professor of Medicine explains why medical research is so important for improving patient outcomes.

COVER STORY

MENTAL HEALTH 10-11

And it’s not too late a make a donation to support this important project – see page 17 for details on how to give. Our future is bright and we look forward to sharing it with you.

S ue

SUE WILLIAMS CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Connection is a community publication from Peninsula Health. This magazine is distributed across our campuses at Frankston, Hastings, Mornington and Rosebud, and sent to our volunteers and supporters. You can also download it from our website. To subscribe or be removed from the mailing list please contact us.

Innovative new approach to suicide prevention

BE AWARE

12-13

YOUR HEALTH

14-15

Bairnsdale ulcer on the march Welcome to our new breast care nurse What affects 1 in 7 men?

THANK YOU

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DONATE TODAY

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Thanks to our donors and supporters Your tear-out dontation form

EDITOR AMY JOHNSTON

WRITERS STEVE PEARCE JESSICA MILLS CLAIRE POLATIDIS

PeninsulaHealth @PeninsulaHealth PeninsulaHealth Corporate and Community Relations  |  Ph 03 9788 1501  |  peninsulahealth.org.au  |  fundraising@phcn.vic.gov.au Peninsula Health acknowledges and pays respect to the traditional people of this region, known as the Myone Buluk of the Boon Wurrung language group of the greater Kulin Nation and bestows the same courtesy to all other First Peoples, past and present, who now reside in the region.

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FEATURE

DR JAMIE LAYLAND

REVOLUTIONARY ADVANCE IN HEART CARE

by Claire Polatidis

DID YOU KNOW?

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Heart disease kills one Australian every 12 minutes. PENINSULA HEALTH CONNECTION


FEATURE

HEART SERVICE THAT BEATS THE REST

In a breakthrough for Peninsula Health, Associate Professor Jamie Layland has inserted an absorbable THE NEW PENINSULA HEALTH HEART heart stent in a patient at SERVICE IS HELPING TO SAVE LIVES ON THE Frankston Hospital. PENINSULA, WRITES CLAIRE POLATIDIS.

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ssociate Professor Layland and Dr Robert Lew, Peninsula Health cardiologists, are part of a worldwide team investigating the use of absorbable stents in patients with heart disease.

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Dr Layland is one of just a few cardiologists in the world to have inserted this new absorbable stent.

Trevor was rushed to hospital, where doctors treated him for chest pain.

A stent is a small mesh tube used to treat narrow arteries in the heart. Traditionally, a metal stent is placed in an artery in patients undergoing a coronary angioplasty – a procedure which opens blocked arteries and restores normal blood flow to the heart. The metal stent stays in a patient for life. “The absorbable stent is similar to the traditional one but it dissolves after the device has served its purpose,” says Dr Layland. “This is a revolutionary advance in the treatment of coronary artery disease. The absorbable stent opens a blocked artery, just like a metallic stent, but then it dissolves over about two years. This allows the artery to return to a more natural state.” Heart disease is a major health concern, so the new absorbable stents are expected to benefit many patients on the Mornington Peninsula.

t was early evening in September, when Trevor Wharton suddenly felt unwell.

“It was a crashing feeling, all of a sudden my heart felt cold, is the only way I can describe it.”

Cases like this are not uncommon. Heart disease kills one Australian every 12 minutes – and remains the leading cause of death and disability for people in Frankston and the Mornington Peninsula. Making lifestyle changes certainly reduces your risk, but sometimes people need specific treatment. Our new Peninsula Health Heart Service helps meet that need. “Peninsula Health Heart Service is a state-of-the art facility designed to provide world-class care for cardiovascular problems,” says Dr Philip Carrillo, Director of our new Peninsula Health Heart Service. “It has the latest equipment and is modelled on the latest designs for patient safety and comfort. And best of all, services are bulk-billed, meaning no expense to patients,” says Dr Carrillo.

TREVOR IS ONE OF AROUND 2,000 PATIENTS A YEAR LIKELY TO BENEFIT FROM THE NEW PENINSULA HEALTH HEART SERVICE. “This new Unit was a surprise to me. The attention of the nurses and doctors has been great. “I’m now ready to return home and have an appointment for a further test and check up with the specialist,” says Trevor.

For more information visit www.peninsulahealth.org.au PENINSULA HEALTH CONNECTION

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INNOVATION

Dr Sara McKenzie says eye connect is a gamechanger.

by Jessica Mills

A WORLD FIRST IN SIGHT

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Leona Edwards was out in her garden when all of a sudden she felt a sharp pain in her right eye.

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eona headed to her GP who told her she had two options – travel up to Melbourne to see a doctor at the Eye and Ear Hospital or go straight to Frankston Hospital. In June, the Emergency Department at Frankston became the first in the world to use revolutionary telemedicine technology eyeConnect to treat patients with eye injuries. “When someone arrives at Frankston Hospital with an eye injury, we can send vital information and pictures of the eye straight to the Eye and Ear Hospital,” explains Dr Sara Mackenzie, Emergency Specialist Consultant at Peninsula Health. “A specialist eye doctor reviews the data, and advises if we can treat the patient here or if they need to be transferred to the Eye and Ear Hospital.


INNOVATION

“The device allows our doctors, who are not eye specialists, to manage patients locally, with the assistance of a remote Eye and Ear Hospital specialist if needed”, Dr Mackenzie says. Rather than catching the train all the way to the city, Leona went to Frankston Hospital where her doctor used eyeConnect to consult with an Eye and Ear specialist. “After about 30 minutes the doctor came back and confirmed that it wasn’t anything serious – just an allergic reaction. I could go home, get some eye drops and see an optometrist the next day,” says Leona.

EYE FACTS Eyes heal quickly. With proper care, it takes only about 48 hours to repair a minor corneal scratch. 80% of vision problems worldwide are avoidable or even curable.

“The machine was amazing. It saw what was going on in my eye and the best part, it saved me a trip to Melbourne.” Dr Mackenzie says eyeConnect is a game-changer for regional communities across Australia. “After looking at the numbers, we found we could have treated thousands of the patients who went to the Eye and Ear here at Peninsula Health if we had been able to consult an eye specialist,” says Dr Mackenzie. “eyeConnect will save patients time and money from not having to travel to the city”

“EYECONNECT WILL SAVE PATIENTS TIME AND MONEY FROM NOT HAVING TO TRAVEL TO THE CITY” More than 20 patients have already been treated using eyeConnect, and the number will only increase. Plans are underway to roll out the device to the Rosebud Emergency Department in early 2017. Leona’s right eye has now fully recovered. “I can’t speak highly enough of what happened to me that night, it was perfect.”

In 2014, 2,700 people travelled from the Mornington Peninsula to the Eye and Ear Hospital, the only specialist Ophthalmology Emergency Department in the state.

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IN PROFILE

IN PROFILE PROFESSOR VELANDAI SRIKANTH Rural India is a long way from Mt Eliza – Peninsula Health’s new Professor of Medicine tells us about his journey and how medical research changes lives. PROFESSOR VELANDAI SRIKANTH

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y principal interest will be to work with people suffering dementia. It is a huge and growing issue for patients and their families. Aside from this, I will also be invested in building a culture of substantial research across Peninsula Health”

by Steve Pearce

The Mornington Peninsula’s ageing population will provide plenty of challenges for healthcare in the area over the next quarter of a century. While many may shy away from the challenge of working with older people, for Srikanth this is not the case.

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“I HAVE A STRONG EMPATHY WITH OLDER PEOPLE, COMING FROM A CULTURE WHICH EMPHASISES RESPECT FOR THEM.” “One of my early stints as a young physician trainee in New Zealand was in geriatric

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medicine, with some truly inspirational doctors. I have a strong empathy with older people, coming from a culture which emphasises respect for them.”

FROM INDIA TO AUSTRALIA Srikanth grew up in southern India in the 1970s and 1980s, in an environment he sees as comparable to a different part of Australia. “I grew up in a region very similar to the Blue Mountains in New South Wales, in a town called Coonoor,” Srikanth recounts. Coonoor is a township in the Nilgiri Hills, locally called the Blue Mountains by the British, with a population of around 45 thousand people, a far cry from Melbourne’s flat sprawl and many millions.


IN PROFILE

“The reason for calling it the Blue Mountains were the blue gums that were transported from countries such as Australia,” adds Srikanth.

Srikanth lives in Mt Eliza with his wife and three secondary school-aged children. As a resident of the Peninsula, he has a particular insight into the medical problems facing the local community.

“After completing school, I moved to Chennai in 1982 (then known as Madras) to study medicine. I left soon after my internship in 1988, to go overseas and train further.”

“As an example of translational research, clinical researchers have recently found new and improved treatments for people suffering strokes. The challenge now is to translate this into the real world, by developing and enabling hospital and ambulance systems to effectively deliver such treatments to our patients.

Peninsula Health is now the beneficiary of that desire to travel and learn, as Srikanth takes up his role in Frankston as the first Professor of Medicine.

RESEARCH LEADER ON THE PENINSULA A specialist geriatrician and stroke physician, Srikanth will lead Research at Peninsula Health, as well as having a senior clinical role in the Department of Medicine at Frankston Hospital. “I am excited to take on the role of Professor of Medicine at Peninsula Health, and I look forward to the challenge of working to find innovative solutions to healthcare needs.” “The role of research is critical and integral to clinical care for our local community, and translating these findings into daily clinical practice will create better health outcomes for our patients. This approach is referred to as clinical translational research.”

Srikanth completed his PhD in the study of post stroke dementia at the National Stroke Research Institute at the University of Melbourne in 2003. As the Professor of Medicine at Peninsula Health, Srikanth will head the implementation of the research strategy over the next five years. He will also oversee the activities of the Peninsula Clinical School responsible for the teaching of student doctors from Monash University. Srikanth will also contribute to the clinical activities in the Department of Medicine at Peninsula Health, and emphasises that effective research is vital for improving daily patient care. “The next ten years will deliver some significant progress in strategic research directions here on the Peninsula,” said Srikanth. “By 2025, Peninsula Health is hoping to make significant advances in a number of areas, and my team and I will play a key part in those successes.” Srikanth started his new role at Peninsula Health in Frankston in September. It is another prestigious leg to add to the journey that began in Coonoor many years ago, and the people of the Mornington Peninsula are the latest to benefit.

“I LOOK FORWARD TO THE CHALLENGE Frankston Hospital is already highly respected OF WORKING TO FIND INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS TO THE HEALTHCARE NEEDS as a tertiary teaching facility, and Srikanth’s appointment reinforces that position. OF OUR REGION.” PENINSULA HEALTH CONNECTION

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RESEARCH

THE REALITY IN FALLS PREVENTION Convincing people to have rails and ramps installed in their home is one of the biggest challenges for our Falls Prevention Service.

hat’s why we’re excited to be part of a research study by PhD student Michael Lo Bianco using augmented reality to give people a real-life view of what they will look like.

T

Michael created a list of common rails and visited the homes of clients from our Falls Prevention Service to show them what a hand rail might look like on their front porch.

Michael’s research was inspired by his grandmother’s experience.

“The app feeds in through the camera on the iPad. You can see the house through the iPad, you then place 3D models in the ‘virtual home’,” Michael explains.

by Jessica Mills

“My Nonna had a number of falls. She had a ramp installed, but she wasn’t happy with the way it looked and didn’t like that she couldn’t pick it out herself,” recalls Michael.

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To help combat this, Michael created 3D models using an augmented reality app on an iPad.

“You put in the rails and then walk around and see what these things will really look like.”

AUGMENTED REALITY IS A LIVE VIEW OF A REAL-WORLD ENVIRONMENT USING COMPUTER-GENERATED IMAGES

“If people know what they’re getting and can be part of the design process, they’re more likely to accept the changes. Then you’ll have a reduction in falls because they will be happier to use the modifications,” Michael says.

The technology is being used by companies like Ikea, to show you what their furniture would look in your home.

Falls Prevention Service client, Tom* said the application was clever. Names changed to keep the research results anonymous.

*

PENINSULA HEALTH CONNECTION


RESEARCH

“It’s excellent! It gives you a vision of what it is going to be like. I don’t have to rely on you telling me, I can see it!” remarks Tom. Peninsula Health’s Falls Prevention Service senior physiotherapist Lavanya Sundararajan loves the app. “It’s awesome and definitely better than just a line on a piece of paper,” she says.

FALLS FACTS Falls are the leading cause of hospitalisation in Australia for people aged over 65 – more than 200,000 each year.

Lavanya hopes that in the future a tool like this will help during home assessments.

More than 1 in 3 older Australians will have a fall each year.

“We’re really excited to be part of this research and to learn better ways of encouraging our clients to use rails and ramps,” she says.

Most falls occur at home.

Most falls are preventable – which is why we recommend people at risk of falls add ramps and rails to their homes.

Falls commonly result in hip fractures and other broken bones, especially in elderly women. Many people – especially as they get older – are less active out of fear of falling over.

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MENTAL HEALTH

MENTAL HEALTH MATTERS Mental health is everyone’s business. Almost half of us will experience mental illness at some point in our lives. All of us will have friends, family, classmates or colleagues who live with mental illness.

COMMON MYTHS ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH MYTH: People with Mental Illnesses are dangerous.

by Claire Polatidis

FACT: Despite what you may hear in the media – the vast majority of people with Mental Illnesses are not dangerous.

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They are much more likely to be the victims of violence and crime than the perpetrators. MYTH: People with Mental Illnesses can never be normal. FACT: Science has made great strides in the treatment of Mental Illness in recent decades. With proper treatment, most people with Mental Illnesses live normal, productive lives.

PENINSULA HEALTH CONNECTION

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emand for our mental health services is increasing every day – we saw a dramatic rise over the last year and it’s expected to increase by 10 percent over the next decade. A total of 664 Victorians took their own lives in 2014 – more than double the annual road toll. What’s more, Frankston has the highest rate of suicide in all of Victoria – a statistic we are working hard to reverse. To meet this growing demand, we need to improve our facilities, which is why the State Government has recently announced some important new funding for Peninsula Health. In April, we received a $1.5 million boost to upgrade our inpatient ward at Frankston, 2 West as it’s known – which was built in the early 1990s – to create a space that helps patients recover faster. And, $800,000 to help build a new dedicated mental health unit adjacent to the Emergency Department to deal with the increasing demand for mental health services through the ED. The new Unit will open early in 2017 and will make a big difference for patients, families and staff.

"FASTER AND MORE APPROPRIATE CARE HAS THE POTENTIAL TO SAVE LIVES" “This six bed unit means these patients would spend less time in the Emergency Department, which can worsen their distress. Faster and more appropriate care has the potential to save lives,” explains Sharon Sherwood, Peninsula Health’s Chief Mental Health Nurse.


MENTAL HEALTH

JUDY ANDERSON Judy Anderson talks to her colleague Michelle.

A CARER’S JOURNEY

Judy Anderson shudders at the memory of leaving her relative, Tim*, in the stark environment of 2 West, where her only consolation was the kindness of the nursing staff.

“Typically, patients stay for a short while, but it’s usually when they’re at their most vulnerable”, she says.

“They need a place that brings relief and calm, where they feel safe and cared about while being cared for – where carers feel confident that the care being provided Judy welcomes the recently announced State is the best possible.” Government funding to upgrade 2 West“. “I’m hopeful that with the upgrade, 2 West will become a place where each and every client’s recovery starts with “I really didn’t want to leave Tim in the Unit. admission to a fresh, invigorating environment.” Everyone there was incredibly supportive, but the physical environment was dismal, even prison-like.”

Readers seeking support and information on suicide prevention can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or the Suicide Call Back Service on 1300 659 467 We have changed the name for privacy and patient confidentiality.

*

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BE AWARE

ON THE MARCH It’s been called everything from a flesh-eating bug, to more medically, a chronic, debilitating, necrotising disease of the skin. DR PETER KELLEY

W

hichever description you favour, one look at the Bairnsdale Ulcer, and you’ll be in no doubt you want to avoid it. The trouble is, if you live on the Mornington Peninsula, it’s becoming harder to avoid. The Bairnsdale Ulcer is on the march and proving very difficult to stop. It’s a worldwide disease usually found in many tropical places, where it’s often called by other names like the Daintree or Buruli Ulcer. But whatever the name, cases on the Peninsula are escalating alarmingly. “There have been cases on the Mornington Peninsula since the early 2000s,” says Peninsula Health’s Head of Infectious Diseases, Dr Peter Kelley. “But since 2011 there has been a significant increase and nobody knows why.” There’s already been 108 cases so far this year – compared to just 66 at the same time last year. With summer nearly upon us, we expect that figure to rise by the end of the year.

Bairnsdale ulcer is a skin disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium ulcerans.

by Steve Pearce

The toxins made by the bacteria destroy skin cells, small blood vessels and the fat under your skin. This is what causes the ulcer and wound.

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Dr Peter Kelley is a world leading expert on the Brairnsdale ulcer.

PENINSULA HEALTH CONNECTION

Since the ulcer gets bigger with time, early diagnosis and prompt treatment can keep the amount of skin loss to a minimum.


BE AWARE

HOW DOES IT SPREAD?

EARLY INTERVENTION

For many years, it seemed the only reason to avoid mosquitoes in the south of Australia was to avoid the itchy red bites. But the Bairnsdale Ulcer is beginning to change that.

There are two pieces of good news though as we prepare for summer. The risk of contracting the disease remains very low and it’s not contagious.

“We know it has been associated with stagnant water and coastal vegetation,” says Dr Kelley. “There is some evidence that mosquitoes are involved.”

So if your friends and family do get it you don’t have to keep away or put them in isolation, but you do have to make sure they see a doctor as quickly as possible.

“It seems very likely that the disease is transmitted via mosquito bites. If you can avoid being bitten, you probably avoid the disease.”

If detected early, most cases can be successfully treated with a two-month course of antibiotics .

It sounds simple, but of course, it’s never quite that easy – think of children playing outside in the summer, working in the garden, or out on a walk at dusk, and you can see how easy it is for the mozzies to slip through the net. So, if you do get bitten this summer – what do you do? “All I can say is we just need to increase awareness among local GPs and the public. The key is to pick it up early when the lesions are still small” says Dr Kelley. A photo or two of what happens if you don’t catch it early is reason enough for most people to keep a close eye on any bites.

BAIRNSDALE ULCER SYMPTOMS A spot grows bigger over days or weeks. A spot may form a crusty, non-healing scab. A scab that disintegrates into an ulcer. An ulcer or wound that continues to grow in size. Unlike other ulcers, this ulcer is usually painless and there is generally no fever or other signs of infection. The limbs are more commonly affected. The infection may sometimes present as localised pain and swelling with fever, but no ulceration.

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YOUR HEALTH

JENNY MACINDOE

A FIRST IN METASTATIC BREAST CARE FOR PENINSULA HEALTH Jenny Macindoe has been helping women with breast cancer for the last twenty years.

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enny Macindoe has been helping women with breast cancer for the last twenty years.

She is now extending that care to breast cancer patients and their families on the Peninsula, after joining Peninsula Health as Victoria’s first McGrath Foundation Metastatic Breast Care Nurse. “Metastatic breast cancer patients have specific needs, so I really wanted to specialise in this area of nursing so I could help these patients,” Jenny says.

by Jessica Mills

Metastatic breast cancer is late stage, incurable cancer – when it has spread from the breast to other parts of the body.

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Patients with metastatic breast cancer have specific needs and the demand for the support provided by the specialist care nurses is growing. “I’m a really good listener and will be there to offer advice and support for dealing with the disease and the impact it has on patients and their family,” adds Jenny.

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“I will be that link person, someone who you can call on to provide specialised knowledge and clarify information – I can help translate complex medical information into understandable terms.”

IN SOUTH-EASTERN MELBOURNE ALMOST 1,000 PEOPLE WILL BE DIAGNOSED WITH BREAST CANCER THIS YEAR AND 140 WILL DEVELOP METASTATIC BREAST CANCER. “The McGrath Foundation is doing an excellent job at placing breast care nurses in areas of high need so all women in Australia have access to breast care nurses when they need to,” says Jenny.


YOUR HEALTH

I’M TOO YOUNG TO GET PROSTATE CANCER, SO I’LL BE FINE, WON’T I? DARREN

1 in 7 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year in Australia. This is Darren’s story:

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arren was 44 when he found out he had prostate cancer. With a wife and three kids, it was a massive shock. He wasn’t too worried when he went for his regular check-up. He thought he was fit and healthy. But, the biopsy results showed Darren’s worst fears – cancer! Luckily for Darren, his cancer was small and slow-growing, so he didn’t need chemo or radiation – he’s has check-ups, and his cancer is under control.

Darren’s cancer is under control. But, he wanted to share his story so men across the Peninsula know that check-ups with your GP could save your life!

All that doctors need to diagnose prostate cancer is a biopsy. But there is no prostate biopsy kit at Peninsula Health. Instead, we have to hire the machine in – but this can only be done once there are enough patients to all have a biopsy on the same day. Patients like Darren often wait three long, anxious months to get a proper diagnosis. That’s why it’s so important to have this kit, so all men – across the Peninsula, can have a biopsy within days of needing one.

Give today to help buy the transperineal biopsy kit so we can diagnose prostate cancer fast. Give today at peninsulahealth.org.au/donate or call 03 9788 1284 PENINSULA HEALTH CONNECTION

by Amy Johnston

But not all men are as lucky as Darren – we know that as many as 1 in 10 men who get prostate cancer don’t survive.

HELP DIAGNOSE PROSTATE CANCER FAST

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THANK YOU

THANK YOU TO OUR DONORS AND SUPPORTERS W

e are so grateful to our many wonderful donors and supporters.

• L ioness Club of Dromana • Lions Club of Dromana • Lions Club of Rye Your extraordinary • Lions International, generosity helps give District 201v3 the highest quality of • Michael & Janet Buxton care to our patients and Foundation their families. • Monash University In the last four months Physiotherapy Society we received the following • Mr Darren Isom donations over $1,000: • Mr David Newman • Bauer Media Group • Mr Don Clifton • Blairgowrie Senior • Mr Giorgis & Mrs Citizens Club Dianne Gjergja • Dromana Dees • Mr Greg Shalit & • Dromana T.O.W.N. Club Ms Miriam Faine • Estate of Lorna Butler • Mr Nathan Kelley • Estate of Robert • Mr Peter Spencer Trevaskis • Mr Samual Miller • Flinders District Lions • Mrs Fay Kitching Club • Good Guys Foundation • Mrs Valerie Johnston • Ms Johanna Symons • Harry Secomb Foundation, managed • Peninsula Boys Car Enthusiasts by Perpetual Trustees • Peters Place Op Shop • Joe White Bequest • Lifestyle Communities • Pink Ladies Auxiliary – Frankston • Lifestyle Communities • Rosebud • Hastings Branch Hospital Auxiliary Social Club

Contact us

• R osebud Hospital Kiosk Auxiliary • Rosebud Hospital Pink Lady Auxiliary • Rosebud Rock 'N' Rods Festival • Rotary Club of Mt Eliza • Rotary Club of Sorrento • SeaSwell Peninsula Charity Walk • Sorrento Women's Action Team • State Trustees Limited • Teele Family Foundation • Uncle Bobs Club • Victoria Police Blue Ribbon Foundation • Victoria Police Blue Ribbon Foundation – Peninsula Branch Donations given in memory of: • Mrs Margaret Ann Young • Mr Damien Lewis • Mrs Connie Moss • Mr Stephen Spencer • Mr Raymond Hayles • Mr Peter Bradbury • Ms Karen Tatman • Mr Angus Gibb

Call our Supporter Hotline: 03 9788 1284 email fundraising@phcn.vic.gov.au or visit www.peninsulahealth.org.au 16

PENINSULA HEALTH CONNECTION

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Ms Isabel Lurley Ms Dianne Peters Ms Kirra May Daw Mrs Elizabeth Starr Mr Thomas Jones Mrs Yvonne Robinson Mr Paul Menzies Mrs Lois Dowsett Mr Kevin Knorr Mrs Valmai Isabel Mouser Mr Timothy Lucas-Moore Ms Gloria Taylor Mr Ian Thomas Kelly Mrs Doris Loone Mr Peter Karageorgiou Mrs Marcia Anne Maher Mr Gareth Price Ms Kaye Coughlan Mr Patrick Hannah Ms Ivy Davies Mr Haydn Tracy Mrs Linda Owens Mrs Janet Stocken Ms Marjorie Morton Ms Betty Edwards

We would like to thank and acknowledge all our donors for their generous support.


CUT HERE

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YES, I WANT TO HELP GIVE THE HIGHEST QUALITY OF CARE TO PATIENTS AND THEIR FAMILIES.

I would like to give:   $50   $100   $250   (an amount of my choice)

  $500

ALL DONATIONS OVER $2 ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE. PLEASE GIVE GENEROUSLY. I would like to give to:   Where it’s needed most   Breast Cancer Services   Frankston Hospital   Rosebud Hospital

YOUR DETAILS Name: Address: Suburb: State: Postcode: Phone: Email: Please send me information about how I can:   host my own fundraiser   include Peninsula Health in my Will   become a regular donor   volunteer my time

  Aged Care Services   Mental Health Services   Palliative Care   Other (please specify): PAYMENT DETAILS I would like to pay by:   Cheque (payable to Peninsula Health)   Money Order   MasterCard

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PLEASE RETURN TO: Fundraising Team, Peninsula Health PO Box 52, FRANKSTON VIC 3199

Peninsula Health respects your privacy and observes the provisions of the Privacy Act 2001. To change your communication preferences, please call us on 03 9788 1284. ABN 52 892 860 159. *

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Independence for you Peace of mind for your family

24 hour monitored, personal support and alarm service. By real people.

Live your life – in the comfort of your own home – with help just a touch of a button away.

Connection November 2016  

Connection Magazine from Peninsula Health

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