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JANUARY 2018

FREE

PENINSULA Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsula

Behind the Scenes with Lachy Hulme • Peninsula Summer Music Festival • Wide Eyed The Luck of The Irish • Angling for Change • Purrfectly Pampered • Decorative Art • Keeping it Real Frozen Wonderland • Stars Align for SugaTree • Monkey See, Monkey Eat • Must Try Dishes


Enjoy 3 years complimentary scheduled servicing at Mercedes-Benz Mornington this January.* For a limited time only, Mercedes-Benz Mornington is offering 3 years complimentary scheduled servicing on all new C63 AMG models purchased this January. This offer is exclusive to Mercedes-Benz Mornington and there are 11 vehicles to choose from, all 2017 models – 5 Sedans, 1 Estate, 4 CoupÊs and 1 Cabriolet. Visit the team at Mercedes-Benz Mornington today to take advantage of this great offer. www.mbmornington.com.au *Offer exclusive to Mercedes-Benz Mornington. Complimentary scheduled servicing for 3 years/60,000kms, whichever comes first on all new C63 AMG 2017 models purchased between 1 - 31 January 2018, unless extended and while stocks last.

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contents 7. Events 10. Behind the Scenes with Lachy Hulme

Resident festival judge, versatile actor, and regular visitor to the peninsula, Lachy Hulme talks about his life, new role as the “fake tough guy” in Romper Stomper, and love of the Peninsula Short Film Festival that keeps him coming back year after year.

20. Peninsula Summer Music Festival Writers: Melissa Walsh, Keith Platt, Andrea Louise Thomas, Peter McCullough, Cameron McCullough Creative Director: Maria Mirabella Photography: Yanni, Gary Sissons Publisher: Cameron McCullough Advertising: Brooke Hughes, 0409 219 282 or brooke@mpnews.com.au Marg Harrison, 0414 773 153 or marg@mpnews.com.au General enquiries: essence@mpnews.com.au Registered address: 2/1 Tyabb Road, Mornington 3931 Phone: 5973 6424 www.peninsulaessence.com.au

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All material is copyright, and may not be reproduced without the express permission of Mornington Peninsula News Group, or the original copyright holder in the case of contributions. Copyright of contributed material rests with the contributor. Disclaimer: The authors and publisher do not assume any liability to any party for any loss, damage or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. This publication is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should regularly consult a physician in matters relating to health and particularly with respect to any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention.

Peninsula Essence is produced monthly. 30,000 copies (mix of home delivery and bulk dropped at an extensive network of outlets across the peninsula).

The Peninsula Summer Music Festival is rolling into town in the New Year, bringing the best in classical music to the people of the Mornington Peninsula.

25. The Luck of The Irish

At last we can say that Mornington has everything now with the recent opening of Irish restaurant and bar, The Dubliner. The brainchild of owner, Conleth Roche, it is the epitome of everything irish and offers a great place to sit, relax, enjoy a guiness and listen to some celtic tunes.

28. Wide Eyed

Mornington Peninsula landscape photographer, Mark Gray, is a determined man. Once he has an image in his mind, he is going to capture it no matter how long it takes.

34. Angling for Change

Guru Glenn is a man on a mission to show young people and those going through tough times a secret he learnt years ago through the joys of fishing. The co-founder of That's The Thing About Fishing (TTTAF), Glenn and a handful of fabulous volunteers donate their precious time and experience to taking people fishing across the peninsula.

38. Purrfectly

Pampered

Converting a 1920s dairy into a boutique cattery might seem like a crazy idea but for owners Denicce and Robert Breeschoten it was a way to combine their love of animals with a much needed service on the peninsula.

40. Decorative Art

One of the many pleasures of living on the Mornington Peninsula is discovering its hidden treasure. As well as spectacular scenery, the Peninsula is rich with creativity. Down a lush bushland gully in Red Hill resides a real hidden gem, the Marion Rosetzky Gallery.

54. Frozen Wonderland

Frozen Wonderland Ice Skating and Tobogganing is coming to Rosebud for the first time this year so families can experience the magic that ice skating has to offer. The rink is 30 metres by 15 metres; it is around the size of a basketball court with real ice at minus five degrees.

56. Stars Align for SugaTree

The moody, modal and timeless quality of Celtic music is brought to life by local trio SugaTree. Peninsula Essence talks to the trio about the formation of the band that is kicking goals in the music scene.

58. Keeping it Real

Fred Whitson is an artist on the Mornington Peninsula’s radar, having recently taken up the call of the muse and already exhibiting works locally and overseas. The Californian born painter has made his home on the peninsula and is fast becoming a key player in the artistic community with his penchant for the baroque masters and return to a time when art and skill mattered.

85. Monkey See, Monkey Eat

Cover Photo Far out in the southern oceans, crystal blue waves form as if from an artists paint brush and splash relentlessly upon the white and yellow canvas that are the beaches of the Mornington Photo: Yanni

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There’s a new restaurant in town offering the people of Dromana the best in modern cuisines with a bit of imagination. The folks at Monkey Business aim to give their patrons a memorable, and most importantly delicious, dining experience.

88. Must Try Dishes 92. Who Killed Jim Barclay?

A mystery with close links to the peninsula and Hastings in particular, Peninsula Essence looks into the murder of Jim Barclay.

100. Crossword 102. Focus on Western Port 106. Pilot Real Estate

From the smallest of beginnings back in 2011 Luke Woollard established Pilot Real Estate in Dava Drive, Mornington.


Mornington Racecourse THRILLING RACING, FAMILY FUN AND LOCAL FARE. IT’S EVERYTHING THE PENINSULA HAS TO OFFER. DON’T MISS OUT!

Friday 8 December Wednesday 13 December Wednesday 27 December

Monday 1 January Sunday 7 January Friday 26 January

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Peninsula events

January

PENINSULA SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL Monday 1 – Monday 8 For the 11th year there will be a cornucopia of delights, celebrating the unique musical and geographical environment of the Mornington Peninsula. Bookings essential Ph 0431 126 125 www.peninsulafestival.com.au

ALFA ROMEO PORTSEA POLO Saturday 13 Alfa Romeo Portsea Polo combines everything Melbourne has to offer - fashion, food, wine, social scene, love of sport, and uniquely, the excitement of polo. www.portseapolo.com.au

SHAKESPEARE IN THE VINES

PORTSEA SWIM CLASSIC

Sunday 14 Essential Theatre is proud to be celebrating their 16th summer of Shakespeare in the Vines, a tour of Shakespeare's classics, and Crittenden Estate is delighted to be hosting the group as they visit the Mornington Peninsula to perform Twelfth Night. Ph 5981 8322 www.crittendenwines.com.au

Saturday 20 The Portsea Swim Classic is a 1.5km open water swim beginning at the Portsea Pier and finishing at the historic Quarantine Station in the Point Nepean National Park. The swim distance is approximately 1,500m. www.portseasurf.com.au

BALNARRING PICNIC RACES NEW YEAR MEETING

BOAT & FISHING FESTIVAL Saturday 27 – Sunday 28 The inaugural two-day festival will feature fishing and boating displays, demonstrations and advice, complemented by family food and entertainment set among the historic setting of the Quarantine Station. www. morningtonpeninsulaboatfishing festival.com

Sunday 14 Visit the mounting yard as the horses are paraded, and, from track side, cheer your favorite home as the horses race around the track. There are bars and food stalls and numerous children's activities. Ph 0413874982 www.balnarringraces.com

Board a state-of-the-art gondola at the Arthurs Seat Eagle and fly to the highest point of the Mornington Peninsula where the views will take your breath away.

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BEHIND THE SCENES WITH

LACHY HULME E ssence

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By Melissa Walsh

Resident festival judge, versatile actor, and regular visitor to the peninsula, Lachy Hulme talks about his life, new role as the “fake tough guy” in Romper Stomper, and love of the Peninsula Short Film Festival that keeps him coming back year after year. Tell us about the new series for Stan: ‘Romper Stomper’. How did your involvement come about? When the producer John Edwards called me and told me he was remaking Romper Stomper it appealed to me as John and I have worked together for many years. Australia is going through sequelitis or remakitis as I like to call it. Everything is a sequel or being remade and none of them really appealed to me but Romper Stomper was the first time I thought there might be some legs in there. It centres on the son of Russell Crowe’s character which resulted from the brief liaison with Jacqueline McKenzie in the original film, and is a legitimate sequel with a very powerful cast. You look completely different as the character of Blake. What preparation did you do to change your appearance for the role? The first description of my character is that he is a silver backed gorilla, so I had to start power eating and lifting weights to get that thick neck. The character is the leader of a group called Patriot Blue which is a far right extremist group. He runs a business and has his mansion down at Point Cook but, behind that exterior hides a dark and violent person. To change my appearance I sat in the makeup chair for hours, making sure I had the right blonde hair colour and the $10 hair cut look. Getting into the mindset was something different and not a pleasant thing to do. It is a very dark place so you don’t want to stay there for too long. They are racists, homophobes and mentally disorganized. They are revolting people but they have a story to be told, and we tell this story by the point of view of the right wing extremists who are essentially a terrorist group. Was it hard to not stay in character when you are playing such an intense role? I realised very quickly there was not going to be any benefit from staying in this character so I was only in character form action to cut as it was too dark a space. Sometimes I love staying in character if it’s fun to play. Murph in the Hollowmen made me feel smarter than I actually am. I loved playing Kerry Packer, but this guy is a dark space and you don’t want to spend too much time there. continued next page...

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How did you get into acting?

What was it like with the Working Dog guys?

I have always wanted to be an actor and did my first play when I was seven. I did a couple of movies back to back that I thought showed versatility, an adaption of Macbeth with Sam Worthington and Victoria Hill, and then Boytown with Mick Malloy. I figured I would be able to show the people of Hollywood how diverse I can be, so went to LA but I couldn’t even get arrested there. I was going for leads and not corpses on CSI Miami, I wanted to play the 60 year old mentor and roles like that but the casting directors and producers didn’t believe I could do a role like that. It was the end of 2007 and within three months of coming home to Australia I was working doing the Hollowmen with Working Dog, and haven’t stop working ever since. I often say to people the biggest trick on the human race is California’s ability to export itself as a paradise. It’s not; it’s a bomb site. Detroit with palm trees.

I owe so much to Jane Kennedy who is going to be one of the judges at the Peninsula Short Film Festival. Mick Malloy is the MC, and Anthony LaPaglia is another judge. I’m thrilled Jane is doing it this year, as I really do credit Jane and the Working Dog guys for my current success. The first week I got back from LA there was a big rap party for a radio show Tony Martin did and that’s where I met the guys from Working Dog: Jane Kennedy, Rob Sitch, Santo Cilauro, Tom Gleisner, and we straight away hit it off with all of them but I felt like I’d known Jane for years. The next day she said to Rob "we should write the lead role for Lachy in the political satire you are writing". They had been asking about me anyhow and I had wanted to work with these guys for my entire life, I was blown away being on set with them, one of the things I am most proud of is the Hollowmen. We then did Any Questions for Ben? and then The Speechmaker which was the one and only stage show they wrote for Melbourne Theatre Company. We sold out before rehearsals had even started.

Is it necessary to go to LA to be a successful actor? People still do it but I know for me if the US had worked I would be very wealthy but very unhappy. I don’t like the area as there is no lifestyle but the money is amazing. I grew up in Melbourne; my family had property on the Mornington Peninsula for four generations so I spent half my life on the peninsula and in Melbourne where we had a great lifestyle. Getting cast in the Hollowmen which was a big hit opened a lot of doors. Thank God John Edwards then saw in me this ability to do a wide range of character roles, which is ironic as that’s what I had tried to do all along in Hollywood.

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What are your favourite moments in your career? People you have met? Films etc? Meeting Jane and all the guys at Working Dog, and certainly John Edward’s .There is a stunt coordinator whose name is Chris Anderson who is a legend in the Australian film and TV industry, I met him in 2001 when I was shooting the Crocodile Hunter movie with Steve Irwin. I just finished working with him coordinating the stunt scenes on Romper Stomper. I have been luckier that most in that 99 per cent of the people I work with have been wonderful. I think the trick is to take the work seriously but don’t take yourself seriously.


How did you become involved with the PSFF? This will be the sixth year we have done it. Steve Bastoni and I are very old friends; we met in 1999 at the Noosa Film Festival as we both had feature films we were in. I was a fan of Steve’s work and we did Matrix and Crocodile Hunter together as well, I think the world of him. When Steve moved down to Rosebud and got involved with the community down there I was helping with some of the acting workshops. He told me he wanted to do it the first time and organised this old flea market warehouse where they put in seats. It was winter, and he was terrified it was going to not work but on the night there were queues around the block, so they got a bigger venue the next year and held it on the Village Green. I had so much fun that first time I said "Count me in" every year. I’m technically meant to be a guest judge but they can’t get rid of me. I call myself the thing that wouldn’t leave and have now been couch surfing the festival for six years. What do you think of the quality of films? It has been consistent from day one. You get a mix every year. There’s stuff that is eye opening, and every year I am surprised at the talent and quality of film making. That’s what makes it exciting. You walk in knowing it is going to be good and that’s why the crowds keep getting bigger as the word is out how good it is.

continued next page...

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Do you spend much time on the peninsula? My family lived on the peninsula for four generations but have sold up now. I keep my finger in the pie these days through the film festival which is my favourite event of the year. We even have Cobb’s popcorn as our principal sponsor this year and there’s nothing more appropriate than a popcorn company sponsoring a film festival. Do you have any other projects on the go? I just did a great thing with Tony Martin and Sarina Rowell called Childproof. They had written these six half hour sitcoms about a couple who didn’t want to have children and the world hates them as a result. They shopped the project around and couldn’t get support from networks. One said it was too niche and only people without children would like it, to which Tony famously replied “that’s like saying the only people who watch Mash were surgeons in the Korean War”. He decided if he couldn’t get it made he would do it himself and put a cast together at this year’s Melbourne Fringe Festival. We read two episodes a night in front of a live audience to packed houses and it has all been bagged up into a podcast which is now the number one comedy podcast in Australia. continued next page...

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What is the best thing about your profession? The best thing about show business is you get to see and do things other people rarely can. When I was shooting Power Games the prequel to the Kerry packer story where I played Sir Frank Packer we played a scene at the printing press where he shuts down the publication of the newspaper. I got to actually shut down one of the biggest printing presses in the world while acting in a scene and then turn it on again. You look at your fellow actors and think "well that’s something you don’t get to do every day". The next thing you find yourself being dragged behind the Croc Hunter’s truck on a dirt road in far north Queensland going 80km an hour while Steve, just before filming, sits on the back of the truck and pulls out a live two metre king brown snake saying “don’t worry if it bites you I have the anti-venom in my sock”. Who gets to say they have done that? I know its acting and the fun is doing these wild adventures.

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PENINSULA SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL By Brodie Cowburn

T

he Peninsula Summer Music Festival is rolling into town in the New Year, bringing the best in classical music to the people of the Mornington Peninsula.

Over the course of a week, a wide array of genres under the classical umbrella will be represented, with world class music in intimate and unique places set to be performed. Artistic Director Julie Fredersdorff is looking forward to seeing the range of fantastic artists and sounds on offer. “The core program is classical. We also have other styles such as flamenco music and some jazz. There’s also an African kids concert, so it’s a bit of a mixture,” said Julia. “We’ve got a French conductor called Martin Gester coming out for a baroque opera gala concert, to be held on the lawn at St. Johns in Flinders which is really exciting. He’s going to be conducting a small orchestra accompanied by Lotte Betts-Dean. It’ll be nice to have that outside in the beautiful weather.” Other fantastic and interesting performers include acts that showcase music from the Nordic and Baltic region, as well as the Kiazma Piano Duo, which showcases captivating four hand piano playing. Julia first set up the event in 2008, upon realising the Peninsula, where her parents lived, would be the perfect place for her dream of a music festival. “The idea first popped into my head when I was still based in Europe, and I realised where I lived in France there were lots of summer festivals on, which were often in more regional and country areas with astronomic offerings. I realised the Peninsula was a perfect match for a music festival,” she said. “I thought it was a really great opportunity to get my colleagues who were visiting for the Christmas holidays onto the stage, and allow people to hear them while they happen to be in town. “ In the decade it has been running, Julia has watched the festival grow and expand. The festival now features over 30 performers, ready to wow the crowds on the peninsula.

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“It started out with only six concerts, with a pool of artists that was about 10 people. The event now has probably almost quadrupled in size. The appeal has also broadened in terms of the style. In the first year it was all classical music, and we’ve now gone a little bit more into the world music area with flamenco, and African groups,” she said. Julia is particularly proud of the young performers that make their way through the festival via the Peninsula Summer Music Festival Academy showcase. “Young artists have come and performed as part of the festival, we had one last year doing Acis and Galatea by Handel which was fabulous, a couple of years ago they performed at the Peninsula Community Theatre with a French conductor. For me, that’s the highlight, watching those academy performers. It’s so wonderful to see these young people coming together for a week and producing the most amazing results. One of these exciting artists making their way to the festival is vocalist Lotte Betts-Dean, a mezzo soprano who is sure to impress people with her vocal talents. “I was really attracted by the program and I’m so keen to jump aboard this project because the program focuses on French Baroque opera music, which I am kind of obsessed with. It continued next page...

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doesn’t tend to get performed that often so it’s a treat to have an opportunity to sing some of that music that I might not otherwise have had an opportunity to,” said Lotte about performing at the Peninsula Summer Music Festival. Lotte has built up an impressive resume at just 27 years of age, having toured with the Australian Chamber Orchestra, sung alongside big name artists such as Neil Finn of Crowded House, and performed at the Sydney Opera House. “I started working with the Victorian Opera when I was in my third year, and really began working as a professional soloist about five years ago. I’ve performed a lot around Australia, and I’ve done really fun tours with the Australian Chamber Orchestra, which is a group I’ve really looked up to since I when I was very young,” said Lotte. She has performed across the world, and is looking forward to returning to the Peninsula, where her burgeoning career first took off. “I’m based in London now, but I’ve been here for the Peninsula Summer Music Festival before. One of my very first recital engagements was at the festival in 2013, so it’s going to be really nice to return to that,” she said. “I’m so thrilled to be on board for what is sure to be a really exciting program of wonderful music.”

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Founder and Artistic Director Julia has spent a decade now growing the festival into what it is today, and has chosen to step down and hand the reins to someone else. “I think that after eleven years it’s time for the festival to have a bit of new blood, and I’ve decided to with a heavy heart to move on. So there’ll be a new direction next year, and we’ll announce who is taking over during the festival,” she said. Julia, who spent ten years working in Paris as a baroque violinist, will also be stepping on stage in her final year in charge as part of the Bach Sonatas concert. In addition to performances at St. Johns in Flinders, there are a number of great shows taking place across the peninsula, in stunning locations such as Red Hill, Mooroduc, and Balnarring. Some of the great concerts showcased on the Peninsula include the guitar and vocal duo of Massimo Scattolin & Hannah Dahlenburg, Northern Cello, and Hair of the Dog – a flamenco Journey. The Festival will take place from the 1st – 8th of January. To see what the Peninsula Summer Music Festival has to offer, visit their website www.peninsulafestival.com.au to buy tickets and find out more details.


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THE LUCK OF THE IRISH By Melissa Walsh Photos Yanni

A

t last we can say that Mornington now has everything with the recent opening of Irish restaurant and bar, The Dubliner. The brainchild of owner, Conleth Roche, it is the epitome of everything Irish and offers a great place to sit, relax, enjoy a Guiness and listen to some Celtic tunes. “I have always been in hospitality,” said Dublin born Conleth, who came over to Australia 15 years ago with a wife and two small children in tow. “My wife Siobhan and I discovered the peninsula when I started working at Delgany and have never wanted to leave. It is nirvana.” After working in corporate hospitality among places like The Hilton, and Royal Carribean Cruises, Conleth has stepped back to his own routes with The Dubliner, and could not be a more perfect host for the Irish venue. continued next page...

I R I S H R E S TA U R A N T & B A R

Open 5 nights

Wed-Fri from 5pm Sat - Sun 11am-11pm The Dubliner hopes to open for Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week soon!

“A little piece of Ireland arrived in Mornington recently with “The Dubliner Irish Restaurant and Bar opening its doors at 23 Octavia Street , (behind main street). Proprietor, Conleth Roche said , he wanted people to experience what it was like if they traveled to Ireland and visited the Pubs and Restaurants of the Emerald Isle. With weekly Traditional Irish Music and a taste of Ireland on the Menu as well as the must have Guinness and Kilkenny on tap it is already off to a busy start with locals.

THE DUBLINER MORNINGTON 0419130139

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“I always knew that Mornington could use an Irish restaurant and bar like this. We try to focus on the food and the Irish music and the "craic", it has an Irish food slant and we do Irish music every weekend. We really want to show that is a friendly place to come into,” he said. “Pop in for a coffee or a bite to eat, we make our own Irish bread , have great seafood with local oysters and fresh mussels, Irish stew dish and a Dublin coddle, sausages and bacon, London potato skins, steak and kidney pie, and rib eye steak.” Even head chef, Philip Leahy is from Galway and brings an authentic Irish flavour to every dish he creates. It was a stroke of luck how the Irish restaurant and bar began, explains Conleth. “I started talking to the previous owners in July, and it was perfect timing as they were ready to sell up and I had been looking for a suitable venue to start our Irish restaurant and bar. We eventually opened our doors on December 2 after a one day delay due to massive floods,” said Conleth. Every weekend The Dubliner will have music with local Celtic trio, "SugaTree" performing and a variety of one, two and three piece acts playing a mixture of Irish and Celtic music. The Dubliner Mornington is at 23 Octavia Street, Mornington. Phone 0419 130 139. www.thedublinermornington.com

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WIDE EYED By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Gary Sissons

M

ornington Peninsula landscape photographer, Mark Gray, is a determined man. Once he has an image in his mind, he is going to capture it no matter how long it takes. His longest wait to record has been five years. That’s five years of returning to the same place at the same time in the same season and waiting for everything to align so that he can get that perfect shot. His portfolio reveals an astonishing number of perfect shots, which is evidenced in the number of awards he has won internationally. Determination and patience are two virtues that have made Gray’s photographic career an established success.

Photography wasn’t Gray’s first artistic pursuit- it was street art, which gave him a keen eye for colour and composition. He took these skills into his first profession as a web designer, a job that requires exacting composition and acute spatial visualization. At the same time, he was working as a DJ on the Melbourne music circuit, which further fueled his creativity. Ultimately love led Gray to photography. On a romantic weekend away with his partner in Apollo Bay, he was awakened

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at dawn by a beautiful glow coming through the curtains at their holiday accommodation. The light and colour attracted him and he stole outside to try and capture it with a digital point and shoot camera. The result just didn’t do justice to the extraordinary beauty he had witnessed, but there started his second love, landscape photography. Growing up on the Mornington Peninsula meant holidaying with the family in Rosebud every year. He spent most of this time at his grandmother’s favourite beach in McCrae where a lifelong connection to the outdoors began. During these visits to the holiday house, Gray discovered his parents’ collection of photographic books. He was intrigued and inspired by the images he saw, particularly those featuring scenic wonders of the world and the ‘top end’ of Australia. Gray feels the Peninsula is perfect for photography because it is unique in many respects. There is the colour to start with. For instance, the turquoise water of Safety Bay is spectacular. When there has been no rain for a long time the clarity of the water is continued next page...


exceptional. The peninsula’s geology is incredible too. He finds the rock shelves along the beaches from Portsea to Blairgowrie a great source of inspiration. They present photographic opportunities he hasn’t found anywhere else in the world. When the right tide and swell combine, the rock shelves create little waterfalls. Half an hour before and after sunrise or sunset is when the ‘magic light’ takes place. This is when Gray is on the scene looking for the right set of circumstances that will make a stunning image. He doesn’t use coloured lenses or digital manipulations to create his photographs. He relies entirely on nature. The key to getting the right shot is, “ Seeing the image in your mind before you create it. That’s where the art comes in,” he says. Of course, being in the right place at the right time is essential. Gray invests a great deal of time in planning where to be and when to be there. While he believes that light is the single most important aspect to creating a great image, there are other considerations that are vitally important. The position of the camera is key. He uses camera position to compose the image he has in mind. Timing is also critical to getting a great photograph. The position of the clouds, the breaking of the waves and other aspects of nature have to be just right. Gray has traveled the world extensively shooting all kinds of scenery, but he tends to gravitate to water as his predominant theme. He loves the ocean, beaches and rock pools because they remind him of his summers on the Peninsula, but he also finds a connection to water in other places, such as, the mountains of the alpine regions, particularly in places like Norway and Iceland where he is off to this month. One of the most noticeable features of Gray’s work, outside of the breathtaking images themselves, is the scale of the fine art prints he produces. Some are as large as 3 metres. To get the kind of clarity and definition he gets in a print that large is a sort of magic all its own. He feels the size of the photograph is very important in transporting the viewer into the scene. Originally inspired by the panoramic photographs of Australian landscape photographers, Peter Jarver and Steve Parish, Gray has definitely developed his own signature style featuring vivid colour and iconic scenery. While the equipment can be important, Gray says, “You can take brilliant shots on basic equipment.” As for the decision between using digital photography or shooting on film, Gray says both have their virtues. “Digital encourages more experimentation because there is no cost factor in taking multiple images and digital is more like what we see with our eyes. Film is unforgiving, but it offers greater contrast. Film is a lot harder, but it teaches you an appreciation for the craft of photography, “ he says. Regardless of the format the key to great photography is, “getting it right in the field.” The best equipment cannot make up for a mistake in composing the shot correctly.

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In Gray’s mind, the most important quality to being a great photographer is dedication. Of course motivation is critical too. “All the best technical skills are not useful if you can’t get up on time,” he says. His advice to budding photographers is, “Never give up!’ When he teaches students in his photography classes he emphasizes, “ The overall appeal of the image is more important than the technical proficiency. And always use a tripod!” Gray’s award-winning photographs can been seen at Mark Gray Gallery in Main Street, Mornington. Those with the deepest appreciation of the beauty of nature will be transported by his beautiful images.


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ANGLING TO CHANGE LIVES By Melissa Walsh Photos Gary Sissons and Yanni

G

uru Glenn is a man on a mission to show young people and those going through tough times a secret he learned years ago through the joys of fishing. The cofounder of That's The Thing About Fishing (TTTAF), Glenn and a handful of fabulous volunteers donate their precious time and experience to taking people fishing across the peninsula.

“I suffered an injury a few years back and was in a wheelchair with a lot of time on my hands. I was getting a bit down not having anything to do and someone who was looking after me took me down to the pier to fish one day. I had always had a passion for fishing and realised how much it can help with your mental attitude to get out with a rod and reel,” said the keen fisherman. “It occurred to me that many younger people probably did not know how to fish and may never know so I teamed up with another fisherman, Brian Rowley, who shared his vision of wanting to teach people about fishing and promote the sport.”

Glenn says that fishing is about far more than just catching a fish, as he discovered first hand. “Fishing can be used as a therapeutic way of changing lives by giving them a better quality of life and enjoying the benefits that fishing has to offer, both socially and personally,” said Glenn, who takes out people of all ages to go fishing. “We have fishing groups for kids and teenagers, for adults, those with physical and mental disabilities and we always have the best day together. There is something about casting a line and the patience and skill required, sitting there making friendships and sharing stories with other anglers that brings people together.” Since their beginning, Glenn and Brian have developed relationships with many organisations including those caring for disabled and disadvantaged persons of all ages as well as holding clinics during school holidays, all at no cost to the participants. “We aim to build programs that will get people of all ages outside, away from computer games, living in front of a TV continued next page...

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screen or on social media. They will learn to fish and, hopefully, this will encourage greater social interaction for them,” he said. “We work with law enforcement and schools to assist youth in trouble or at-risk teens by setting up programs in schools and elsewhere utilizing the benefits of fishing. It is a great outlet because of the pressures of their life due to everyday issues.” Glenn says that teaching a person to fish is more than just learning to fish. “It gives a person a sense of purpose and assists with mental health and motor skills. Our vision is also to alleviate boredom which can lead to senseless crimes, depression and, in the worst case, suicide. It is about teaching patience, building friendships and networks and giving our youth something productive to do. TTTAF also acts in a mentoring role for at-risk teens,” he said. The not for profit organisation has 18 volunteers that run regular clinics every week. “It’s about comradeship and mateship, and how fishing can be used for therapy. If they are lucky they might also catch a fish,” he said with a laugh. To find out more about TTTAF go to www.thatsthethingaboutfishing.org.au

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Welcome to Summer at Blairgowrie Yacht Squadron Marina Pens

January Marina Pen Rentals

Short Term – We have 36 marina pens from 10m to 20m available for short term rental all year round. There’s still some vacancies for the last two weeks of January. Mention this ad for 30% discount off our January rate. Visitors to the Marina are welcome to enjoy all the club’s great facilities including our deck and bistro, open on weekends and Thursday and Friday nights throughout the year, and 7 days a week in January.

Marina Pens for sale or rent

We have marina pens for long term lease from 10m to 20m, located in our newly extended 340 pen marina in the picturesque Cameron’s Bight at Blairgowrie.

Discover Sailing

Learn to Sail

Fabulous Functions

New Sailing Members Welcome. Let us introduce you to sailing through Discover Sailing Experiences. You can spend two hours with a qualified skipper on a small keelboat or we can help introduce you to boat owners who are looking for crew to join in the fun.

Adults and Kids. As a nationally accredited Discover Sailing Centre we have a range of courses for adults and youth in both dinghies of the beach and keelboats from the marina. For kids age 7-12 we have the Tackers program throughout the school holidays. We also have a devoted ladies program.

Our Southern Waters Room, in our new club building has sensational bay views and is the perfect place for your wedding, family celebration, business meetings and conferences. The room can be configured to suit from 20 people to groups as large as 200. And there are many catering options too.

Big Regattas

For serious sailors or those with an interest in sailing we have some big regattas this summer. • The finish of the Cock of the Bay Race on Boxing Day – Tuesday December 26 • The Petersville Keelboat Regatta December 27-30 • The Musto Skiff World Championships January 6-14 • The Volvo Ocean Race passes right by us December 27 and January 2

TCP/BYS/PE

For more information contact Blairgowrie Yacht Squadron, Ph 03 5988 8453 email us info@bys.asn.au or visit www.bys.asn.au


PURRFECTLY PAMPERED By Melissa Walsh Photos Gary Sissons

C

onverting a 1920s dairy into a boutique cattery might seem like a crazy idea but for owners Dennice and Robert Breeschoten it was a way to combine their love of animals with a much needed service on the peninsula.

After owning the Bittern property for 25 years, Robert realised the potential of the lovely building and started putting plans in place with his new wife Dennice to create a boutique cattery. That is how Windrest Cattery came to fruition and opened in April last year. The couple could not be more proud of the building and area they have created and were delighted to win the Creative Reuse of a Heritage place award for turning the heritage building into the home for cattery suites and office space. “We were only using the area for storage and it seemed like a waste. It is a lovely building that now houses our offices administration section, family villas where cats from the same family are housed

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with interconnecting rooms so they can be together,” said Robert and Dennice. “It took a lot of renovation and hard work but we are delighted with the area we have created.” The couple have always loved animals and decided to open a cattery after Dennice was volunteering for the RSPCA. “The big difference with us is we are a cage free cattery. There are 13 villas that cater for group or single stays. Each villa is themed with some looking like bathing boxes in keeping with the peninsula area. There is the pink princess room, the red room and each have fully enclosed individual spaces where classical music is also played. Cats get massaged every day and have dedicated play time,” said Robert and Dennice. Undoubtedly the ultimate in luxurious accommodation for your precious cat, Windrest Cattery will make sure your feline is pampered and well looked after in comfort and style. Windrest Cattery is at 102 Myers Road, Bittern. Phone 5983 0041 www.windrestcattery.com.au

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DECORATIVE ART By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Gary Sissons

O

ne of the many pleasures of living on the Mornington Peninsula is discovering its hidden treasure. As well as spectacular scenery, the Peninsula is rich with creativity. Down a lush bushland gully in Red Hill resides a real hidden gem, the Marion Rosetzky Gallery. It’s filled with light, colour and a variety of beautifully handcrafted wares. Working quietly away with nothing but birdsong for company is its humble proprietor. What she creates is unlike anything else in its field because she does what she does differently and her method cannot be replicated.

She paints intricately designed tri- coloured decorative tiles. When her three tile styles are put together they reveal a repeating pattern

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that is mesmerizing. Each tile is similar, but not exactly the same to any other because every tile is hand painted. While comparisons could be made to the decorative styles of Moorish architecture or the dot paintings of Aboriginal cultures, Rosetzky’s work is totally unique and uninfluenced. Her own style has evolved over many years and really could not be mistaken. Rosetzky was born and raised in Melbourne. Her parents were Hungarian and German immigrants. They had high hopes that their daughter would become a doctor so she was not encouraged to be artistic and, in fact, she didn’t think she was creative at all. She started her professional career in public service and then nursing. It wasn’t until her youngest son was in kinder and a friend put a lump of clay in her hands that she became connected to her artistic side and discovered that she loved it. She worked for many years as a self taught potter while her three children were in school. Her work developed to such a fine standard that she started selling to galleries and exhibiting in shows. When her children were grown up she decided to pursue a fine arts degree in ceramics at Prahran College (now Victorian College of the Arts). Coincidentally, she ended up at orientation day with her youngest son, David, who was beginning his studies at the same time in a different discipline. The kinder clay story came full circle, except

this time the son was a bit embarrassed that his Mum was driving him to school. Time at college gave her a chance to experiment with glaze techniques and decorating because she felt drawing wasn’t her strength. Whilst at Prahran College, one of her teachers was Australian surrealist sculptor, Deborah Halpern. “She sparked me. She gave me permission to play, ” Rosetzky says. So she started experimenting with techniques and applications and painting her ceramic ware differently. Having visited the Peninsula over decades with friends and family and having had a holiday house in Shoreham, when she and her partner decided to leave the city for the sea change, she hoped they would find a place near Shoreham. They looked at lots of properties, but didn’t find exactly what they were looking for. They had nearly given up the search when they looked at the last listing. When they saw the five acres of bush land they now call home, they fell in love with it. Initially, they camped in the machinery shed on the property until they built their mud brick home. It was during the designing stage that she says, “ I thought it would be crazy, because I worked with ceramics, not to have a go at decorating the tiles for our new home.” Then one thing lead to another. continued next page...

January 2018

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The National Gallery of Australia was looking for an artist to create decorative tiles for their Rubens and Renaissance exhibition to sell in their gift shop. Her work had caught their attention. They sent her some transparencies to show what they were after. “They were the antithesis of my rather naïve drawing. The Renaissance decoration was very precise with curls, neat and very organized. So I had a go and what I now do has come out of that. It’s much more refined than what it was at that time, but I’ve stuck to the same patterns. I just alter the way the colourways go,” she says. She’s been decorating her tiles for twenty-five years and still finds it meditative and satisfying. Marion Rosetzky’s Gallery is not just about her own work. It is features the varied creations of many fine artists working in textiles, ceramics, jewellery, glass, leather, wood and paper. There are even glass earrings and pendants incorporating her tile designs made by a local glass tile jeweller. A number of Australian artists are represented, but there are also fair trade goods from far points of the globe. One of the other lovely things about a trip to the gallery is a chance to have a chat with the artist who makes a killer cup of coffee. So, wind down the sign posted driveway to discover a quiet oasis filled with art and the aroma of espresso amidst the eucalypts.

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Photos

Peninsula

Peninsula locals and guests enjoyed a night celebrating at Moonah Links for the Peninsula Tourism Awards. On the other side of town Frankston Arts Centre played host to the FAC Season 2018 launch followed by an exclusive after party. Art lovers and locals alike enjoyed the arts centre preview to see what 2018 has in store.

Peninsula Tourism Awards

Peninsula Tourism Awards

Peninsula Tourism Awards

Peninsula Tourism Awards

Peninsula Tourism Awards

Peninsula Tourism Awards

Peninsula Tourism Awards

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Peninsula Tourism Awards


Peninsula Tourism Awards

FAC Season 2018 launch

FAC Season 2018 launch FAC Season 2018 launch

FAC Season 2018 launch

Peninsula Tourism Awards

FAC Season 2018 launch

January 2018

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MASTER JEWELLER M

inzenmay Jewellers is your Diamond Destination. Minzenmay is iconic to Mornington, celebrating 106 years in business within the one family. Paul Minzenmay 3rd Generation Master Jeweller and stone setter and his wife Bridie are proud to say that its their quality and creativity married with their excellent customer service that makes Minzenmay a jeweller you can trust. Boasting the largest workshop on premise with state of the art technology, Minzenmay is not only a retail store, but a design hub and a jewellery manufacturer specialising in restoration and repairs.

Minzenmay invite you to come in store and see for yourself. We have a viewer on hand for you to witness the magnificence of the 8 perfect hearts and 8 perfect arrows within the PASSION8 Diamonds. As a gift of gratitude to all those who support our family business, Minzenmay is offering an exclusive opportunity for one person to win a .40 carat PASSION8 Diamonds and a design and custom make consultation with Paul Kristian Minzenmay to the value of $5500. To go into the draw with a chance to win, simply spend $150 before 30 March, in store to enter. It has to be someone who wins this rare opportunity, why not let that someone be you.

If you can dream it, we can create it, it’s that simple. With millions of diamonds saturating the market place, diamonds are certainly not rare. However, diamonds of true quality are. This is why Minzenmay offer an exclusive product, that no one else on the peninsula can offer. That is the Passion8 Diamond. This diamond is pure quality & a genuine investment. Less than 1% of the worlds diamonds are of a high enough standard to become a PASSION8 Diamond. Once hand selected, the rough stones are expertly cut to exact and perfect mathematical proportions by some of the worlds most qualified diamond cutters and polishers. The result however is breathtaking. Each one of the 58 facets is cut to perfection, revealing 8 perfect hearts and 8 perfect arrows within the stone. This ensures that light refracting through the diamond only comes out the top surface, creating an extraordinary sparkle.

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(Golf Pro) Shane Johnson Ph: 5981 0100 or (Office manager) Debbie Hedges Ph: 5981 0120

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Exciting times for Mornington Garden Supplies! Owners Mark and Bindy Foley have bought a retail icon of the Peninsula “Garden of Quasimodo” and have moved their 40 year old business up onto the Moorooduc Highway (on the corner of Males Road) from Watt Road. “We are so happy with our new landscape centre!” enthuses Bindy. “We now have a huge selection of stunning pots and outdoor inspirational pieces to complement our existing bulk garden supply business.” Both “Garden of Quasimodo” and “Mornington Garden Supplies” have served the Peninsula for well over 30 years. To be able to combine them and inject some renewed energy and flair has been a wonderful challenge. We are over the moon with the results!” With a display pool, pizza oven, masses of garden products in bulk and in bags, tools, statues, bird-baths, pots and a huge selection of other outdoor delights there is plenty to get inspired by at the new site. Mornington Garden Supplies – same fabulous service (deliveries Mon – Saturday) - all the old favourites plus new stock, new ranges and a brand new space – come and visit you won’t be disappointed.

OPENING HOURS: MON - FRI 7AM - 5PM SAT 7AM - 3PM SUN 10AM - 3PM (No bulk loads or deliveries)

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SILVIE PALADINO RETURNS TO FRANKSTON ARTS CENTRE By Melissa Walsh

S

ilvie Paladino is one of Australia’s most versatile and talented entertainers performing throughout Australia, Asia and London’s West End. She is well known to audiences through her stage performances as well as her popular appearances on Carols by Candlelight. Accompanied by David Cameron on piano, Silvie will entertain at the Frankston Arts Centre on Friday February 9 with songs from her vast repertoire including classics from musicals, hits by female vocalists and songs of inspiration. “I have performed at the Frankston Arts Centre many times before and looking forward to doing it again. We are regulars to the peninsula as I have been coming down there since I was

a little girl. Every year our annual getaway is to our holiday house down there and we love every moment of the relaxing time,” said Silvie. Silvie has enjoyed a musical career spanning more than two decades. From performing in musicals on London’s West End to singing the national anthem at footy games to touring with seven prolific orchestras, Paladino is an obviously versatile performer. Beginning singing with a local teacher when she was nine years old, Silvie already had her first singing gig at 12 as the lead singer of a reception band that performed at weddings, baptisms and other local events. It wasn’t long before what

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began as a hobby turned into a full time career after Silvie won Young Talent Time when she was 15. Within four years, it was clear this would be a full time career for the talented singer, landing the role as Eponine in the production of Les Miserables which earned her Victorian Green Room Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress. “I have had to learn to act over the years even though my love is with music,” said Silvie who has career highlights spanning 20 years with singing at the AFL Grand Final, Carols by Candlelight for the past 20 years, making studio albums and the vast array of musical theatre she has been involved with. “When I put a concert together like the Frankston Arts Centre performance, I take into consideration what the audience want to hear, lots of songs form the musicals I have performed in, a little bit of more contemporary stuff, bit of Barbra Streisand, Whitney Houston, so a real collage of music that scans across my life in the industry. I have done many different genres of music so there’s something for everyone,” said Silvie. She will be performing in The Voice of Silvie Paladino on Friday 9 February, 10.30am and 1.30pm. Tickets are $20 and can be booked on theFAC.com.au, in person at Frankston Arts Centre or by calling 9784 1060.

Expect to pay around half the price FOR AN APPOINTMENT CALL

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SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE THIS SUMMER

T

he Cobs Peninsula Film Festival will run on both the Mornington and Bellarine Peninsulas this February.

The Festival will run from February 9-11 and includes the screening of an independent Australian movie, a FREE short film festival held in both Rosebud and Queenscliff locations and a filmmaking workshop with leading Aussie filmmakers. The FREE short film festival is the highlight of the program and runs on Saturday February 10. Australian filmmakers showcase their work in front of a panel of celebrities and film luminaries who award monetary prizes for the best short films and other categories including best film, best actor, best director and best animation. This year, the festival’s judging panel includes Isabel Lucas (Transformers, Knight of Cups, Home and Away), Lachy Hulme (Offspring, Romper Stomper TV series), Michala Banas (Upper Middle Bogan, McLeod’s Daughters), Jane Kennedy (Frontline, Triple M), Leah Purcell (Redfern Now, Lantana) and Wayne Blair (Director, The Sapphires and Redfern Now). Australian personality Mick Molloy will MC the Rosebud event. Film fans will roll out their picnic rugs to enjoy 20 short films and live music performances free of charge plus film foodies can enjoy a selection of dining options. Festival Director, Steve Bastoni, said extending the festival to the Bellarine Peninsula marks the fruition of a long-held dream and increases the exposure for independent Australian films to our West Coast audience.

www.peninsulashortfilmfest.com.au

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FROZEN WONDERLAND By Melissa Walsh

F

rozen Wonderland Ice Skating and Tobogganing is coming to Rosebud for the first time this year so families can experience the magic that ice skating has to offer. The rink is 30 metres by 15 metres; it is around the size of a basketball court with real ice at minus five degrees. The toboggan on the side which is an ice ramp is two and a half metres high and 30 metres long. Frozen Wonderland owners Ken and Nicole Jensen said they believed the peninsula was a perfect place for an ice skating rink. “It’s all laid out and the barriers are up and all in position so all we have to do now is turn on the refrigeration and make the ice,” said the couple. “It is set up at the Rosebud Central Shopping Centre inside the old IGA section. Last school holidays we were in Bendigo and so many people said we needed to go down to the Mornington Peninsula. Here we are setting up in December.” The couple are excited to bring ice skating to families who have never had the chance to experience it before. Frozen Wonderland Ice Skating and Tobogganing is based in Bundaberg, but has travels all over the country from Darwin down to Sydney and everywhere in between. “We aim the whole experience at families so it is very much beginner-oriented and if you don’t want to try ice skating, then tobogganing is also so much fun,” said Ken and Nicole. “Bring long socks, but gloves, helmets and wrist guards are optional.” Daily sessions are at 9.30am, 11.30am, 1.30pm and 3.30pm, while evening sessions are Thursday to Saturday 7pm-8.30pm. Frozen Wonderland Ice Skating is running from December 27 to January 28 at Rosebud Central Shopping Centre, 35 Wannaeue Place, Rosebud. Phone 0437 929 373. www.frozenwonderland.com.au

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STARS ALIGN FOR SUGATREE By Melissa Walsh Photos Daryl Gorden

The moody, modal and timeless quality of Celtic music is brought to life by local trio SugaTree. Peninsula Essence talks to the trio about the formation of the band that is kicking goals in the music scene.

T

he stars aligned for Celtic folk pop trio SugaTree when Natalie Parker and Ryan Pentland approached musician and producer Yanni Dellaportas to help record some of their songs. It was when the demo tracks were being laid down in his studio that it became apparent something else was needed.

“I just started playing some mandolin over the top of the songs and it all came together,” said Yanni, who has performed with other bands but says this feels like a great fit. “That was in 2012. Since then we have been recording our album, practicing and playing lots of shows together and now we have released our first full length CD 'This Time'.” For the trio, the Celtic band has come together seamlessly with the three musicians determined to just enjoy the process.

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“We had gigs where we did some Irish songs and everybody started dancing so we thought it was great for us,” said guitarist and songwriter, Ryan. “There’s not a huge amount of Celtic music in our area and the response has been fantastic.” As for music teacher Natalie, the transition to Celtic tunes has been easy with a voice that has just the haunting quality ideal for the dulcet tunes of Irish ballads. “I love performing and singing with these guys and the response we get from audiences when we play is incredible. I particularly love it when we perform outdoors amongst nature. People of all ages dance and sing along and we all have a wonderful time together,” said Natalie who has been performing and teaching for many years. “I even have a favourite tin whistle that I picked up along the line and love playing.” This Celtic-folk trio combine foot-stomping guitar riffs with catchy tunes and heartfelt lyrics. SugaTree blends genres of folk, pop and Celtic in their energetic live shows. Fast moving mandolin and


tin whistle melodies complete the original works with a kick drum and harmonica to get the crowd moving. With a unique, organic sound SugaTree plays wineries, festivals, restaurants, pubs and bars entertaining audiences of all ages and musical preferences. SugaTree are regulars at the Dubliner Mornington, Sound Bar in Capel Sound and will be performing at the Port Fairy Folk Festival in March and the Australian Celtic Festival in May. Visit their website for a complete list of upcoming shows and to purchase the new album This Time. www.sugatree.com.au

Town Planning Surveying Civil Engineering Project Management Urban Design Landscape Design

Mornington

Town Planning

WATSONS ARE LEADERS IN THE CREATION OF INNOVATIVE, QUALITY LIVING ENVIRONMENTS IN VICTORIA

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ART Mornington Since 1946 Watsons Pty Ltd has served the development industry throughout Victoria consulting on land-related issues and estates in the urban growth corridors and regional Victoria, with a historical emphasis on the Mornington Peninsula. Combining Town Planning, Land Surveying, Civil Engineering, Urban Design, Landscape Design and Project Management skills and experience allows us to take great pride in delivering to our clients a distinct market advantage. Watsons turns challenges and complexities into solutions producing high quality returns and products for our clients.

Watsons is presently designing and managing a number of prestigious Victorian land projects including Martha Cove at Safety Beach. Watsons is pleased to continue its long association with the Mornington Art Show. Mornington 5 Main Street Mornington 3931 Phone: 03 5975 4644

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The Urban Development Industry of Australia has recognised four of Watsons residential developments with environmental and urban design awards for excellence.

SHOW Watsons is presently designing and managing a number of prestigious Victorian land projects including Martha Cove at Safety Beach. Watsons is pleased to continue its long association with the Mornington Art Show. Mornington 5 Main Street Mornington 3931 Phone: 03 5975 4644

Melbourne Level 2 470 St Kilda Road Melbourne 3004 Phone: 03 9820 8144

Victoria, with a historical emphasis on the

Peninsula. Combining Town Planning,Mornington Land Surveying, Civil Engineering, Urban Design, Landscape Combining Town Planning, Land Surveying, Civil Engineering, Urban Design and Project Management skillsDesign, and Landscape experience allows Design us to and takeProject greatManagement pride in skills and experience allows us to take great pride in delivering to our clients a distinct market delivering to our clients a distinct market advantage. Watsons turns challenges advantage. Watsons turnsand challenges and complexities into solutions producing high complexities into solutions producing high returns and products for our clients. quality returns andquality products for our clients.

The Urban Development Industry of Australia

The Urban Development Industryfour of ofAustralia has recognised Watsons residential developments withresidential environmental and urban has recognised four of Watsons design awards for urban excellence. developments with environmental and is presently designing and design awards Watsons for excellence.

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19 – 26 Jan 2018 Open 10am – 5pm

Mornington

WATSONS ARE LEADERS IN THE Since 1946 Watsons Pty Ltd has served the CREATION OF INNOVATIVE, QUALITY development industry throughout Victoria LIVING ENVIRONMENTS IN VICTORIA consulting on land-related issues and estates Since 1946 Watsons Pty Ltd has served the in the urban growthdevelopment corridors industry and regional throughout Victoria Victoria, with a historical on issues the and estates consultingemphasis on land-related in thePeninsula. urban growth corridors and regional Mornington

managing a number of prestigious Victorian

Watsons is presently designing andMartha Cove at land projects including SafetyVictorian Beach. managing a number of prestigious Watsons is pleased to continue its long land projects including Martha Cove at association Safety Beach.with the Mornington Art Show. Mornington Watsons is pleased to continue its long 5 Main Street Mornington 3931 association with the Mornington Art Show. Phone: 03 5975 4644

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KEEPING

IT REAL E ssence

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Arts By Melissa Walsh

F

red Whitson is an artist on the Mornington Peninsula’s radar, having recently taken up the call of the muse and already exhibiting works locally and overseas. The Californian born painter has made his home on the peninsula and is fast becoming a key player in the artistic community with his penchant for the baroque masters and return to a time when art and skill mattered. Peninsula Essence talks to the renaissance artist about the light and shade of his craft, and tries to answer the age-old question of the nature of creativity.

Growing up in a creative household, Whitson spent a lot of time drawing which was something his music-teaching parents encouraged. “As a little kid back in the States we would have these family nights where we would take turns drawing things. Being an only child, I had a lot of time by myself so that’s when I did lots of drawings. I was always looking for something creative to do,” he said. “Dad was also into writing and even started this family newspaper called Star News which was all hand drawn, hand coloured and typed out. Mum was always into her music so the household was overflowing with creativity.” It was a natural progression for the young man to take up music and Whitson worked as a music teacher for the first couple of decades but drawing was never far from his heart. It took a drawing workshop in 2013 to reignite the artist’s passion and he hasn’t stopped drawing and painting ever since. “David Kassan’s three day workshop gave me the confidence I needed to look at objects or people in detail and recreate that to the best of my ability,” said Whitson who has since completed more than seventy paintings and drawings, held workshops all over Victoria, and exhibited in galleries in Milan and locally. “Focusing on the detail was brought to my attention again; it showed me how to observe intricate details and the ability to look at subjects differently.” “Even though I work as a musician, painting is something I am drawn to do,” said Whitson who is brimming with passion and natural creativity and became an artist after trying other vocations. “In the early stages you go from a completely blank canvas to a work of art you can be proud of,” said the self-taught artist. “I keep trying to improve my craft by going to galleries, looking at the work of others, and observing everything around me. I am always looking at subjects and contemplating how I would paint them.” Whitson describes himself as a tonal realist in the baroque style, which centres on light and shade, finding his inspiration from the Italian masters like Caravaggio, drawing inspiration from the use of chiaroscuro and elegance of the human form. continued next page...

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“IT IS ABOUT HAVING AN EMOTIONAL RESPONSE WHILE LOOKING AT THE WORK AND TO SEEKING TO MAKE SUBJECTS MORE REALISTIC, DEPICTING REAL EMOTION AND FEELINGS.” “There’s something about that style that resonates with me and I love the realism. As one who has also been actively involved with music professionally for quite some time now, I've always been fascinated with the raw emotions that art and music can evoke, and how closely the two forms have evolved together. To listen to a great work, or stroll through a gallery and take in the magnificence that hangs upon the wall, is to revel in the beauty that humankind is capable of,” said Whitson. “My first loves in art, are portraiture and figurative subjects; the drama and grace that the human form is capable of intrigues me, and I like to keep my mind open to new techniques and interpretations that allow me to adequately convey what it is that I wish to communicate. One of the things I love so much about art in particular, is the endless diversity of interpretations, styles and perceptions that each artist brings to the paper or canvas; at Life Drawing, it's so exciting to see that in a class of fifteen people, no two works are the same, in fact, they're usually not even close to being similar, except in subject.” The 21st century painter is undoubtedly a modern renaissance man, with his commitment to keeping the work of the masters alive, and pass down a skill set to others through his workshops and classes. “The realist baroque style is uncommon in Australia but it is something that I love, and I enjoy running classes for people to help fellow artists build their skill sets and develop their own styles,” said Whitson who combines his 30 years teaching experience with a natural ability as an artist. “With respect to teaching art classes, I believe if you can write your name you can draw. I take people through the basics and it is all about teaching them to be observational,” said the artist who

believes it is all about training, education and the culture of other artists. “When you start off you look at basic shapes, angles and negative spaces. You start off with something broad and refine it as you go along.” The perfect storm of skill and creativity is inherent through Whitson’s work which has been described as representing “a wide range of emotions and exquisite handling of the human form that delves into the core of the individual - revealing the passion that resides within all of us”, and one who “drags the viewer into a sophisticated universe, showered with delicate references to the western art and traditional iconology”. “With this style it is all about shadow and light,” said Whitson. “It is about having an emotional response while looking at the work and to seeking to make subjects more realistic, depicting real emotion and feelings.” As an artist, Whitson has learned the tradition of the baroque masters and moved one step further to challenge it, with a vision to create works of art like Let’s Make A Deal and Pensees Macabre that encapsulate the seventeenth century techniques with a modern vision. “In a world where there can be such chaos and unrest, art is a reminder of the beauty that humanity can create,” he said. Fred Whitson is available for workshops, classes, and commission work. He is holding a workshop called ‘A Tonal Approach to Realism in Drawing’ on February 18 at Peninsula Arts Society. Phone 0407 723 758 www.fredwhistonfineart.com

January 2018

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COAST: THE ARTISTS’ RETREAT – CAPE SCHANCK TO POINT NEPEAN F

or over 200 years, the Mornington Peninsula has been a muse and haven for artists. Attracting a stellar roll call of some of the most recognisable names in Australian art, the wild and rugged coast has inspired works from artists such as Eugene von Guérard, Nicholas Chevalier, Louis Buvelot, Violet Teague, John Perceval and Albert Tucker. This ambitious exhibition brings together masterpieces from these iconic artists as the basis of an extended conversation, considering our relationship to the coast, to the Australian landscape and our environment. Newly commissioned works from GW Bot, Megan Cope, Raafat Ishak, Euan Macleod and Kerrie Poliness tackle contemporary questions of our connection to landscape. These commissions, the result of a recently established artists in residence program at Police Point in Portsea, consider the beauty and magnitude of the coastline through painting, printmaking, sculpture, photography and video.

COAST: THE ARTISTS’ RETREAT CAPE SCHANCK TO POINT NEPEAN An MPRG exhibition

For over 200 years, the Mornington Peninsula has been a muse and haven for artists. Coast features works by Eugene von Guérard, Nicholas Chevalier, Louis Buvelot, Violet Teague, John Perceval and Albert Tucker alongside contemporary artists GW Bot, Megan Cope, Raafat Ishak, Euan Macleod and Kerrie Poliness.

• FREE INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY Add a sea creature to the rockpool during the exhibition

8 DECEMBER – 18 FEBRUARY At Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery

WHAT’S ON

mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au adults $4 concession $2 Nicholas Chevalier, Tunnel Rock, Cape Schanck, Victoria 1862, oil on cardboard, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Bequest of Mrs Nicholas Chevalier 1919

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• SCHOOL HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS Workshops for primary school children and VCE Art & Studio Arts folio development


Welcome to the Peninsula’s Best Kept Secret Festival!

This magnificent and treacherous coast has attracted artists since the 1850s. Eugene von Guérard was one of the first of many artists to regularly visit Cape Schanck, often in the company of artistic friends. Swiss-born artist Nicholas Chevalier regularly sketched and resided with von Guerard on trips to the peninsula. His excursions began with tentative steps into accessible locations and later moved into explorations of the more difficult and wild terrain.

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Although belonging to a similar generation as von Guérard and Chevalier, the Swiss photographer and painter Louis Buvelot recorded the new contemporary obsession with the benefits of immersing yourself in nature, masterfully capturing images of visitors embedding themselves in the rawness of the coast on a wild and windy day.

at the fabulous Briars Homestead in Mount Martha

Violet Teague, renowned for her adventurous life (she once travelled from Frankston to Central Australia by taxi) embraced this spectacular coastline. Settling permanently in Mt Eliza, Teague’s boldness is conveyed in photographs that show the artist painting high on cliffs and battling howling weather.

11.00 am until late

During the mid-twentieth century, the peninsula became a key setting for artists camps and retreats. Friends Arthur Boyd, John Perceval and Albert Tucker regularly gathered on the Peninsula with other cultural luminaries including Anne and Tam Purves, who had recently opened Australian galleries in Melbourne; and internationally renowned art critic Allan McCulloch.

SATURDAY 24th FEB 2018

WORLD CLASS BLUES AND ROOTS ACTS ALL DAY AND NIGHT A J GHENT (US) BEN WATERS (UK) CHRIS WILSON AND THE HEINOUS HOUNDS Z STAR DELTA (UK) ...and many more local and interstate artists to keep you entertained!

tickets and more info at

www.bluesatthebriars.com

This tradition has been honoured with the establishment of the new artists in residence cottage at Police Point. It was here artists Euan Macleod, Kerrie Poliness, Raafat Ishak, Megan Cope and GW Bot dedicated time, immersing themselves in this landscape and creating commissions for Coast.

MUSIC

Macleod’s experience of the coast was not as he had expected however. “I was aware of the beachy nature from some of the more famous paintings; a summer paradise with people frolicking and blue skies. Instead, I found almost a darkness, an underbelly which I still don’t quite understand,” he said.

Daytime Music + Theatre

THE VOICE OF SILVIE PALADINO Friday 9 February, 10.30am & 1.30pm Tickets: 03

9784 1060

$20

thefac.com.au January 2018

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The Mornington Peninsula is heaven for lovers of antiques, vintage wares, curiosities and collectables with little antique outlets dotted throughout the villages. Little antique outlets are dotted throughout the peninsula villages, while the largest antique warehouse can be found in Tyabb with a passion for an era gone by and old wares.

Art and Antiques

ACROSS THE PENINSULA

Check out the retro and vintage clothing, jewellery, shoes, bags and hats at one of the many antique stores. Dealers from across the peninsula and Victoria display their collections at antique stores from Sorrento all the way across the peninsula, from Marlene Miller Antiques to Tyabb Packing House and everything in between. Stallholders bring their own special expertise and taste to what they sell, so patrons are sure to find that special item just right for their own collection. Stores are jam packed with English, Chinese, Japanese, French and Australian furniture, decor and collectibles. There is something for all tastes. And what great places to buy a gift with a difference.

HAVEN FOR ANTIQUES AND COLLECTIBLES The Tyabb Packing House is a place full of beautiful antiques, rare pieces and interesting collectables can be found in this historic and heritage listed building. For many years the building was the collection centre and cool store for the apple and pear orchards on the Mornington Peninsula, before being sent to the markets in Melbourne. Now it is the destination of discriminating and discerning collectors, interior designers and renovators. Whether you are looking for a burr walnut card table, a mahogany barley twist bookcase, or a dining table to seat 20 with matching chairs, this is where to find it and in the process, gain a wealth of knowledge on the craftsmanship and skills of the 18th and 19th centuries. Here too you will find fine examples of the Art Nouveau and Art Deco period in furniture, figurines and glassware or should your taste run more to the antiques of the future, there is a fine selection of mid-century modern and retro available.

OVER 30 DEALERS WITH NEW STOCK ARRIVING DAILY Open Thur-Sun 10am-5pm plus most public holidays

14 Mornington-Tyabb Road, Tyabb 5977 4414 www.tyabbpackinghouseantiques.com.au

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January 2018

Within the Packing House there is a specialist art dealer with a fine selection of original art from Georgian times through to contemporary, and a collection of limited edition prints. On site in the craft village, can be found the Guild Art Gallery whose exhibitors are local contemporary artists who are members of the McClelland guild of Artists. The Tyabb Packing House! A place filled with fine art and antiques, and never ceasing to amaze.


Art and Antiques Guide

SUMMER EXHIBITION – COOL ART at Coolart

representation of established an demerging Australian Artists.

Without Pier Gallery presents it’s 9th Annual Summer Exhibition at Coolart Wetlands Homestead in Somers on the Mornington Peninsula. Opening on Saturday 13th January it will run through to Sunday 28th January 2018.

Don’t miss this wonderful exhibition and picnic in the grounds at Coolart. A summer must. Enquiries: Terry Earle, Director Without Pier Gallery 0419 541 892 www.withoutpier.com.au

Presenting over 150 paintings, limited edition works on paper and photographs all works are for sale. The exhibition is further enhanced with beautiful hand blown glass featuring James McMurtrie, Eamonn Vereker and Sean O’Donoghue and Driftwood Wall sculptures by Charles Wilcox. The exhibition is presented in the upstairs area of the Homestead where a gallery like presentation enhances the art and provides the visitor and buyer with a wonderful selection of affordable Australian Art. Delivery and installation is free on the Mornington Penisula and metro Melbourne. You can trail work at home with no obligation or cost. Without Pier Gallery is located in the City Of Bayside and has an enviable reputation for quality and diversity in the

Summer Exhibition Coolart

Rhonda Gray - Girl With the Sapphire Earrings 122 x 76cm Oil on Linen

Robyn Rankin - Must me True as True is Love 45 x 45cm Acrylic on Canvas

13 - 28 January 10am - 4pm Daily Coolart Homestead, Lord Somers Rd Somers

Jane Flowers - Great Ocean Road Rolling In 122 x 152cm Oil on Canvas

ALL PAINTINGS, PHOTOGRAPHY & GLASS FOR SALE

Enquiries Terry Earle 0419 541 892 n enquiries@withoutpier.com.au n www.withoutpier.com.au

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SETTING THE HIGHEST STANDARDS The home of Australian sculpture, McClelland Sculpture Park and Gallery features over 100 large scale sculptures set amidst 16 hectares of bushland at the gateway to the Mornington Peninsula. The gallery also features a dynamic program of exhibitions and events. All the way up to March 18, visitors to the gallery can enjoy the Framing Nature exhibition which presents selected works from McClelland’s historical collection and recent acquisitions augmented by key loaned works, to explore diverse visual and conceptual approaches to nature. Landscape has always held a prominent role in Australian art, though conceived and represented in diverse ways. From the earliest paintings by Indigenous Australians through colonial art to modern and contemporary works, landscape has reflected a range of spiritual, social, political, scientific and philosophical concerns. Taken together, these varied approaches reveal the changing relationship between culture and nature. In surveying these varied conceptions of nature, Framing Nature attempts to more fully describe our complex and increasingly precarious relationship to the environment. The exhibition has been curated by Simon Lawrie, The Balnaves Curator of Australian Sculpture at McClelland. “Framing Nature reveals the changing perceptions and uses of the Australian landscape, and Siri Hayes’ photograph Wanderer above a sea of images 2009, a key work in the exhibition, points to both the challenge of representing nature and the implications of how we approach it in the Anthropocene,” said Mr Lowrie. Framing Nature includes works by Ethel Carrick Fox, John Constable, Nicholas Chevalier, Paul Davies, Brodie Ellis, John Farmer, James Geurts, John Gollings, Siri Hayes, Gabriella Hirst, Polly Hurry, Janet Laurence, Frederick McCubbin, Harry McClelland, Danie Mellor, Dorothy Napangardi, John Skinner Prout, Hanna Tai, and Fred Williams.

Continuing with its dedication to high standards in all areas, the McClelland Sculpture Park and Gallery has also appointed new director, Lisa Byrne, who is also a distinguished curator. Lisa Byrne has an impressive and varied career in the arts sector as a director/curator in Victoria, New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory across local, state and national arts organisations. She has held significant curatorial roles in both research and practice at Monash and RMIT Universities and leadership roles in several contemporary arts organisations in Australia, such as the Australian Centre for Photography and Canberra Contemporary Art Space. Lisa was closely involved in the development of the arts and culture programme for Realm, a library learning and cultural centre in the newly redeveloped Ringwood Town Square. As Curator for the Maroondah City Council she was responsible for its art collection where she successfully negotiated several major cultural gift donations by leading Australian artists.

Siri Hayes - Wanderer above a sea of images 2009

Gallery Open: Tuesday to Sunday 10am to 5pm Café Open: Wednesday to Sunday 10am to 4.30pm Address: 390 McClelland Drive Langwarrin Victoria Phone: 03 97891671 mcclellandgallery.com.au

McClelland Gallery+Sculpture Park

mcclellandgallery


Art and Antiques Guide

CRAIG DAVY AT PENINSULA GALLERIES Renowned Local Artist Craig Davy is holding a solo exhibition in Red Hill. A full time artist for only seven years Craig has won over 100 awards locally and interstate and is highly regarded in the art world as an accomplished self taught artist. His oil paintings depict the local area and capture the essence and beauty of the Mornington Peninsula whether it be a roughed seascape with rolling sand dunes or the vast landscape with distant views and billowing clouds. His modern impressionism style showcases the Peninsula in all its glory, capturing the light, mood and essence of the early morning, daytime or evening moonrise. Come and view the exhibition at the Mornington Peninsula’s longest standing gallery and Red Rabbit Bistro at 1175 Morninton Flinders Rd, Red Hill. Peninsula Galleries Ph 59892203 The exhibition will open at Peninsula Galleries, Red Hill on Saturday 6th January 2018 and continue until Sunday 28th. To receive an invitation to the opening night please contact the gallery.

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WITHOUT PIER GALLERY

SUMMER EXHIBITION COOLART 13 - 28 January www.withoutpier.com.au

WHITEPIER COASTAL Whitepier Coastal is the pretty new interior store in Boundary Road, Dromana. Away from the summer crowd but in an area surrounded with beautiful food and great atmosphere. This interior shop is coastal inspired which comes straight from the owner’s heart. A local artist with a passion for interiors, the owner has created Whitepier Coastal to offer a creative mix of art, furniture, homewares and jewellery in beach hues. Whitepier Coastal is a friendly place to visit with a relaxed vibe. WHITEPIER COASTAL is at 222 Boundary Road, Dromana. Phone 0455 760 009 Instagram @whitepier _coastal Styling advice and service also available

McClelland Gallery

FRAMING NATURE EXHIBITION 26 November - 18 March www.mcclellandgallery.com

Peninsula Galleries

CRAIG DAVY SOLO EXHIBITION 6 - 28 January www.peninsulagalleries.com.au

Whistlewood Contemporary Australian Art

20/20 A SENSE OF PLACE 2018 6 January - 4 February www.mccullochandmcculloch.com.au

Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery

COAST: THE ARTIST'S RETREAT 8 December - 18 February mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au

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Everbody’s talking about the pretty new interiors store Whitepier Coastal set along the peaceful group of shops on Boundary rd Dromana. The fresh interiors store is attracting a lot of attention, styled by the talented local owner, the store is a breath of fresh air with pretty interiors, art and jewellery.

Open Wednesdays - Saturday 10-4, Sundays 11-3 or by appointment 222 Boundary Rd Dromana | 0455 760 009 Instagram @whitepier_coastal


Art and Antiques Guide

GORDON STUDIO GLASSBLOWERS

MARLENE MILLER ANTIQUES

Nestled in the picturesque hills of Victoria's Mornington Peninsula, Gordon Studio Glassblowers gallery and studio caters for those wishing to view and buy an existing work of art glass as well as those interested in having customized hand blown glass art works. Visitors to the studio have the rare opportunity to witness glassblowing. Experience the searing heat of the furnaces, observe master glass artisans at work and learn about the ancient art of glassblowing. Gordon Studio Glassblowers is owned and operated by Australian glass artists Eileen Gordon and Grant Donaldson.

As you wander along the glamorous Sorrento shopping strip, you simply have to visit Marlene Miller Antiques, an Aladdin’s cave of unique and unexpected treasures.

“My passion for colour and form is greatly inspired by the environment of the Peninsula, its ocean surrounds, delicate sunrises and spectacular sunsets,” - Eileen Gordon. “I feel part of the Australian landscape, so my glasswork is a joyous process of exploration to find new and more challenging ways to express my feelings about it ” - Grant Donaldson. GORDON STUDIO GLASSBLOWERS is at 290 Redhill Rd, Red Hill. Phone 5989 7073 www.gordonstudio.com.au

As soon as you walk into the shop, there is so much to see, with two storeys of antiques and bric-a-brac, from crystal, coach lamps and fine china to fur coats, hats, dining furniture, photographs and frames. “Upstairs is a great range of antique books dating back to the 1700s. We even had a book from circa 1600. And our jewellery is stunning, with a selection from top Melbourne jewellers including Simon Kushnir, who is well known for his handmade rings and jewels of the finest quality, and very popular for engagement rings,” said Marlene. Marlene has a large selection of mourning jewellery, beautiful and macabre pieces that were created to mourn the death of a loved one, and a wonderful eclectic mix of English china, 1920s oil lamps, furniture by Jacob and Josef Kohn – established in 1849 – hat boxes, candles and Japanese room dividers. MARLENE MILLER ANTIQUES is at 128 Ocean Beach Road, Sorrento. Ph: 5984 1762

GORDON STUDIO GLASSBLOWERS

Red Hill

point.

Hand Blown Glass • Engraved Glass Glass Sculptures • Jewellery A WORKING HOT GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY 290 Red Hill Rd, Cnr Dunns Creek Rd, Red Hill | 03 5989 7073 gordonstudio.com.au | facebook.com/gordonstudioglassblowers

128 Ocean Beach Road, Sorrento t: 03 5984 1762 m: 0438 537 757 e: marlenemiller3@bigpond.com Specialising in antique jewellery, as well as newly-made jewellery by Melbourne’s top Jewellers

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Ar t , transforming spaces Sorrento | Flinders | Mt Eliza | Mornington | Malvern | Asia

The Peninsula at Play… The Manyung at Sorrento and Mt Eliza galleries are each featuring over 100 new works in our Summer Exhibition Series of wonderful, Australian contemporary paintings and sculptures. Rick Matear will be on exhibition from Saturday 7th January with over 20 new works. New paintings from Janine Daddo will be on exhibition at Sorrento from 22nd January.

One of Sorrento’s favourite so Rick Matear

Couta and fishing boats Rick Matear

Plan to visit Monthly exhibitio Summer Exhibitions Manyung’s throughout Throughout summer, art lovers can view over 400 Australian contemporary paintings and Galleries sculptures across five Manyung Galleries located throughout the Mornington Peninsula. summer at during your Sorrento and Each gallery has an individual personality and presents a broad range summer break of distinctive Australian artworks . All visitors are warmly welcomed. Mt Eliza As one of the longest operating commercial galleries in Australia , Manyung has been proudly supporting Australian artists since 1968.

Services include: hanging and installation, facilitating special commissions, general art consultancy and advice, and international freight.

Manyung Group Other Gallery feature artists during the

Sorrento: 113A and Suite 6,119 Ocean Beach Road | Flinders: 37 Cook Street | Mt Eliza: 60 Mt Eliza Way Summer Exhibitions include: Mornington: Unit 7, 35 Progress St (by appointment) | Malvern: 6-10 Claremont Avenue (by appointment in January)

Terrence Hadler, Jenny Riddle, Ross Willsmore, Peter Coad, Annie Glass, [ all galleries] on 03 9787 2953 or email staff@manyunggallery.com.au Meredith Gaston, Rick Matear, Fred Colla, Rose Knight, Katherine Boland, Bron Lewis, Lisa Cox and Gerry Knight.

View 150 artists and over 2000 artworks on-line. For preview or purchase enquiries please call

Equine

www.manyunggallery.com.au

As the clouds roll by


Art and Antiques Guide

BUYING ART FOR PLEASURE There are two basic reasons to buy art. The first is you love it and need to have art around you, making your home or office a more attractive place in which to live. The other reason is you might be seeking to acquire investment art with a return on your investment over time. In almost fifty years of operation, the Mornington Peninsula’s Manyung Gallery has mainly dealt with people who buy art for pleasure and that is what this article will focus on. There is so much art to choose from locally and the Mornington Peninsula is not short of great artists, studios, galleries or art events. Deciding what you want will probably be the hardest part. Do you prefer paintings or sculptures? Landscapes or figurative works? Remember you will live with your choices for a long time, so just buy what really appeals to you! However, it is worth while taking a few practical issues into consideration. Carefully measure if you have to ‘fit’ a piece in a specific spot……..too small is as bad as too big. Is there enough natural and artificial light to really set off your new acquisition. The old saying ‘lighting maketh the painting’ is really true as there is no point in placing artwork into a perpetually dull location. It should be subtly lit. Some people focus on tonal fit with all elements in a space not clashing, but that is very personal. Where to go to buy art? Unless you are very familiar with an artist and are aware of their history, style and market value, please be wary of attempting to buy on-line as you may not end up getting what you thought you were buying! City galleries can be intimidating but fortunately those on the Mornington Peninsula are generally very friendly and inviting and always happy to assist. At a gallery or studio, you can get close and personal with art and you will soon know if a certain style is for you, especially if the gallery allows you [ most do] to view a piece at home, before deciding. Your summer holidays are a great time to consider your art needs and sort out those empty spaces. Manyung Gallery Group has galleries presenting quality and affordable original Australian art in Sorrento, Flinders, Mount Eliza and Mornington, so plan a visit but please check the website first www.manyunggallery.com.au as Summer opening days and hours vary by site.

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Art and Antiques Guide

“VIBRANTLY DIFFERENT’ LANDSCAPE SURVEY AT WHISTLEWOOD THIS SUMMER The large landscape exhibition 20/20 A Sense of Place returns as Whistlewood Gallery’s January show. Richly explorative in style, media and subject matter the show was pioneered at the gallery last summer and received a great response. It comprises a broad diversity of contemporary landscape art by 30 artists from around Australia with more than 60 paintings, ochres, barks, 3D, works on paper, Perspex and other media. “ Featured are both Indigenous and non Indigenous artists whose work shows a particular connection to place,’ says cocurator Susan McCulloch. As the long time home of three generations of the McCulloch family of art writers, curators, critics and gallery directors, Whistlewood has hosted many of Australia’s most famous landscape artists over more than six decades.

Sydney painter Sally West’s The New Purple, 90 x 120cm

Today’s artists include those with well established careers such as the Mornington Peninsula-based John Anderson, Miodrag Jankovic and Stephen May, Sydney-based Michael Fitzjames and Sally West, Far North Queensland’s Rosella Namok, Samantha Hobson and Claudine Marzik, Melbourne printmaker Martin King, Victorian painters David Beaumont and Adriane Strampp, the Kimberley’s Shirley Purdie and Betty Carrington, street artist and printmaker Tom Civil and both award winning and emerging Aboriginal artists such as the Ken family, Robert Fielding and others from the APY Lands, WA, Qld, Arnhem Land, Utopia and the NT. Newcomers include Tasmanian artist Jillian Catto whose mixed media abstracts were made on the land itself with paper placed on the earth and branches used as drawing tools and Kimberley painter Lindsay Malay whose textured ochres meld the traditional and contemporary. Three dimensional works include ceramic Bagu firemaker sculptures from Girringun, Queensland while the upstairs gallery features paintings by Papunya Tjupi artists of the Northern Territory.

The APY Land’s Marina Warari Brown Ngayuku Ngura, (My Home), 152 x 122cm

“A number in the show are artists whose work proved popular last year, but we also have many who we’re showing for the first time including those whose representative galleries – Australian Galleries, Gallerysmith and Salt Contemporary Art – we’re delighted to be working with again,” says Ms McCulloch. “Combining Aboriginal artists whose work we specialise in showing with a great variety of styles by artists from around Australia from diverse cultural backgrounds makes this a vibrantly different survey of landscape art.” 20/20 A Sense of Place opens on Saturday January 6 at 3pm and runs to February 4. Open: December 26-January 14. From January 15, FridaysSundays | 11am-4pm WHISTLEWOOD | Contemporary Australian Art Is at 642 Tucks Road, Shoreham T: 03 59 898282 E: info@mccullochandmcculloch.com.au mccullochandmcculloch.com.au

Far North Queensland painter Claudine Marzik’s, The Seasons, 136 x 12cm

January 2018

Papunya, NT painter, Candy Nelson Nakamarra’s Kalipinypa, 152 x 91cm

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Explore the

intro and map PENINSULA Art galleries, museums, history and culture, marine activities, restaurants and wineries galore, the Mornington Peninsula has something for everyone this summer. Wander through the art galleries with a vast array of paintings and sculptures to feast your eyes on. The antique shopping is second to none with Australia’s largest antique space right in Tyabb, and learn about the history with Victoria's earliest settlement and maritime defence fortifications. Explore historic homesteads; buy works of art in our galleries, and visit the plethora of stunning open gardens. Splash and sail in a marine wonderland with the Mornington Peninsula boasting more than 10% of Victoria’s shoreline. The 260 plus kilometre coastline includes everything from family friendly, sandy bay beaches to wild, rugged ocean coastlines.

This unique area is home to 500 plus species of fish, and 1000 plus marine plant species. It’s a magical diving and snorkelling area including marine national parks and more than 60 shipwrecks. You can swim with dolphins, meet cheeky Australian fur seals, or snorkel with delicate weedy sea dragons. Try paddle boarding, surfing, sailing, kayaking, fishing and more. Renowned for some of the world’s best natural golfing terrain, the Mornington Peninsula is home to 20 golf courses with magnificent views of the coast and countryside. Hot springs, day spas and spa retreats let you indulge in a relaxing experience or you can learn yoga in the fresh air on the beach before enjoying some market shopping and fresh local produce at weekend farmers markets. And of course a must see is the vast array of wineries, from large established to small boutique and intimate settings.

Explore

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the Mornington Peninsula this summer 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Barmah Park Wines Tyabb Packing House Manyung Gallery Mt Eliza Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery X Golf Mornington Mornington Yacht Club Bay Fish N Trips Mount Martha Golf Club Arthurs Seat Eagle Crittenden Estate Emu Plains Market Peninsula Galleries Pier Street Kitchen Heronswood Gardens Gordon Studio Glassblowers Whistlewood Art Gallery St Andrews Beach Brewery Marlene Miller Antiques Manyung Gallery Sorrento

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Explore the Peninsula

ARTHURS SEAT EAGLE The Arthurs Seat Eagle is the Mornington Peninsula’s newest attraction. Opened early December 2016, you can jump aboard a state-of-the art gondola and enjoy the peninsula as never before. The all-weather Eagle carries passengers between the Base Station in Dromana to the summit of Arthurs Seat, passing high over the beautiful State Park. Passengers can board at either station. The ride is approximately 14 minutes each way and in busy periods such as school holidays, guests may have to disembark at each station. A combination of enclosed and open cabins provides an allweather experience for passengers. The Eagle is all-inclusive and caters to the disabled, elderly, frail and toddlers. It is wheelchair and pram friendly. Board a state-of-the-art gondola at the Arthurs Seat Eagle and fly over the state forest to the highest point of the beautiful Mornington Peninsula. You will be torn between looking at the breathtaking view across the bay to the city and spotting wildlife as you soar high above the trees. Either way you have a bird’s eye view. The all-weather Eagle is fitted with windows for the winter season. Named after the Wedge-tailed Eagle and just like the ‘Wedgie’, the Eagle is one of the most impressive sights in the peninsula sky. www.aseagle.com.au

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2018: THE FUTURE LOOKS BRIGHT! 2018 looks set to be a huge year for the team at Untold Events Co. The season starts with the return of the muchloved Stringybark Cinema at the stunning Emu Plains Reserve in Balnarring. Six family-favourite films will be showcased over two weeks including popular titles such as of The Never Ending Story, Labyrinth, Top Gun and Footloose. Gates open at 6:30pm for some amazing street food, live music and a bar stocked with Peninsula favourites Red Hill Brewery beers and Chirping Bird wines. ‘January is a super busy month for us’, says organizer Vanessa Johnson. ‘We love seeing the Peninsula buzzing over summer with the influx of tourists and family and friends to the area – it really comes alive. It’s great to see people appreciate the stunning place we get to call home!’ she says. Other events in January include two twilight Emu Plains Markets on the 6th and 20th January. These markets truly showcase the EPM at it’s best with plenty of amazing food, live entertainment, workshops (book now for Peninsula Wild Flowers workshop on the 6th Jan), lots for the kids and

HAPPY NEW YEAR AND WELCOME TO A HUGE 2018!

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LOVE THE UNTOLD EVENTS CO TEAM

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stringybark cinema

JANUARY 27 10Am to 3pm

JAN

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under the stringybarks

A SPECTACULAR NEW MARKET IN THE HEART OF FRANKSTON SHOWCASING OVER 100 OF THE VERY BEST MAKERS AND CREATORS

See the EPM come alive during our Summer Twilight Sessions!

BEAUTY PARK, FRANKSTON

# iheartepm

WWW.LITTLEBEAUTYMARKET.COM.AU

Sat Jan 6th and Sat Jan 20th from 3pm to 8pm Bring the whole family for amazing live music, incredible food, beer & wine, fun for the kids, Peninsula Wild Flower workshop and the best collection of market stallholders in Melbourne!

Emu Plains Reser ve, Balnarring www.emuplainsmarket.com.au

Australia Day H A S T I N G S F O R E S H O R E F E S T I VA L

LOA DS O F F R E E F UN F O R T HE FAM I LY ! 9 AM t o 2 P M

M O R N I N G TO N P E N I N S U L A S H I R E C O U N C I L I S P R O U D TO B E A M A J O R S P O N S O R .

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JOIN US THIS SUMMER HOLIDAYS FOR A MAGICAL EXPERIENCE UNDER THE STRINGYBARKS W E D J A N 3 N E V E R E N DI N G S TO RY THU JAN 4 LA LA LAND F R I J A N 5 TO P G U N W E D J A N 10 WI L LY W O N K A T H U J A N 11 L A BY R I N T H F R I J A N 1 2 F O OT LO O S E PENINSULA PARTNERS: RED HILL BREWERY & CHIRPING BIRD

EMU PLAINS RESERVE BALNARRING GATES OPEN AT 6:30PM FOR LIVE MUSIC & STREET FOOD

TICKETS FROM $10 / CHILDREN UNDER 5 FREE

www.stringybarkcinema.com.au


Explore the Peninsula

of course over 230 of the very best stallholders Melbourne and the Peninsula has to offer! Next, the team present the wonderful Hastings Australia Day Foreshore Festival. Now in their second year running the event it will feature free family entertainment including a community breakfast, amusements, face-painting & craft with Faery Emma, live music, delicious gourmet food plus 80 of the very best stallholders from the Untold Events Co markets!

For more information on the creative, cool events the Untold Events Co offer jump online and take a look at www.untoldevents.com.au

Finally, after a crazy month the crew finish off January on the 27th at their new home in Frankston with the Little Beauty Market. This gorgeous market in the park has become the creative hub of Frankston showcasing over 100 talented makers and creators in the stunning surrounds of Beauty Park. Catch this market on the 4th Saturday of the month from Oct to Apr 10am to 3pm. And, if that doesn’t sound busy enough (!!!) the team take an exciting next step in April, with a sister cinema opening at the picturesque George Pentland Botanic Gardens in Frankston as part of the City Of Frankston’s Event Attraction Program. Four films will be showcased on the 6th, 7th 13th and 14th of April…stay turned for more details!

A TREASURE ON OUR DOORSTEP The Diggers Club is Australia’s largest and most respected gardening club – helping Australians create beautiful and productive gardens using heirloom seeds and plants since 1978. Heronswood Historic House and Gardens in Dromana is a spectacular jewel of the peninsula and the grounds are in full bloom throughout summer. Stroll among the gardens, visit the new gallery exploring the incredible art of the seed, pick up some rare and heirloom plants suited to local conditions and dine in the magnificent setting of the Heronswood kitchen garden restaurant. It’s the perfect day out for garden lovers. In 2011, the Diggers Club owners, Clive and Penny Blazey, gifted ownership of their business, the historic house and gardens at Heronswood and their second historic property at the Garden of St Erth in Blackwood, to the Diggers Garden and Environment Trust. This is a non-profit dedicated to seed and garden preservation, conservation, education and inspiration. This generous gifting has ensured that the jewel on our doorstep will be preserved and open for the public to enjoy in perpetuity. In March 2018, Heronswood comes alive for the annual Harvest Festival, featuring free garden tours, workshops, taste tests and much more. Or if you can’t wait until March they have a range of workshops and events running over summer to get your garden growing: Phone 5984 7321. www.diggers.com.au

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X-GOLF MORNINGTON Situated in the heart of the Mornington Peninsula, X-Golf is a state of the art addition to the magnificent golf courses within the area. For the first time a seven-day indoor golf offering for game improvement and entertainment will be available for golfers of all levels. Five X-Golf simulators offer access to close to 100 digital courses, providing modern game play options, while professional coaching and game analysis will help players improve their game. Sports, entertainment, group events and competitions are all part of the service and the enthusiastic team of golf lovers can’t wait to help you enjoy your visit. “We opened three weeks ago and offer a range of things including lessons, a driving range format, or you can play actual golf courses and with over 100 on offer. We do ladies days and bucks parties, hen’s parties, birthday parties, school and kids clinic,” said Rowan. X-GOLF is at 1/177 Mornington Tyabb Road, Mornington. Phone Rowan McGrath on 0459 780 914. www.xgolf.com.au/locations/mornington-victoria/

PLAY

THE ULTIMATE $20 INDOOR GOLF VENUE ITTLE FOR AS L

T H E U LT I M AT E PA R -T E E V E N U E

• 5 State of the art golf simulators • Space for up to 75 guests

• Food & Beverage packages • Membership Options

F A S T F O R M AT Play a full round in approximately 90 minutes

Birthdays, Xmas Parties, Bucks & Hens Nights, Club & Networking Events

Access to an in-house professional

V I S I T U S N OW A N D E N J OY A G O L F I N G E X P E R I E N C E L I K E N O OT H E R !

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J O I N X L E A G U E T O D AY

• Club Hire • Prizes available

TEAMS OF 3

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• Foxtel channels • Pool Table & Dart Board

• Free WiFi • Onsite Parking

9HOLE HEAD TO HEAD Food and beverages are available at all our venues.

Close to 100 international courses

Grab some friends and join your local X-League.

1/177 Mornington/Tyabb Rd, Mornington Phone: 0459 780 914 www.xgolf.com.au


Explore the Peninsula

BARMAH PARK Barmah Park has a brand new chef, brand new menu and has been totally refurbished to become one of the premier destinations on the peninsula. With a new cellar door with the bar made out of Victorian Oak, it is a stunning venue to taste local and estate wines. Dining has become top class as well with new chef, Yoshitaka Kojima, taking over the restaurant. His 20 years’ experience in the kitchen combines with a passion for beautifully presented, colourful and flavoursome food. Barmah Park take group bookings, have winery accommodation packages, and do wine tastings daily. Barmah Park Wines for tasting include a Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Cabernet Shiraz, Shiraz Cabernet and our special Shiraz Vintage. Barmah Park is offering readers of Peninsula Essence 10% off purchases made in the cellar door in January if they mention the magazine name. BARMAH PARK is at 945 Moorooduc Hwy, Moorooduc. Phone 5978 8049 www.barmahparkwines.com.au

Barmah Park is the place to be this summer with a brand new chef and total refurbishment. Enjoy scrumptious meals and fabulous wine at the vineyard and restaurant with its views across the vines, indoor tables and alfresco dining on the deck.

Open 7 days Barmah Park do breakfast and lunch as well as dinners on Friday and Saturday night with a modern Australian menu and a big cellar door where tastings are $5.

The restaurant has had a full refurbishment, has a new chef and is under new management. The food is as amazing as the views are spectacular. The Chef, Yoshitaka Kojima has 20 years experience in the kitchen and has a passion for beautifully presented, colourful and flavoursome food which will inspire you to come back time and time again.

945 Moorooduc Hwy, Moorooduc Ph 03 5978 8049 www.barmahparkwines.com.au

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A COOL WAY TO HOLIDAY THIS SUMMER Glamping is continuing to grow as a popular and unique holiday experience for many… and what better way to have a fun break on the gorgeous Mornington Peninsula. Cocoon Campers is a local business offering getaway packages in one of their retro inspired campers. They do all the hard work for you, delivering the camper of your choice and setting it up with gorgeous bed linen, kitchen accessories, outdoor furniture and much more. All you need to do is pack your clothes and food, turn up at your favourite campsite, festival or friends place, and within minutes you’ll be relaxing with a cuppa or glass of wine! Sounds easy doesn’t it? And if you need extra space for the kids, you can hire a tent and many other add-ons to create your perfect Peninsula holiday! www.cocooncampers.com.au Phone 0418 519 812

• Unique retro caravan, or new retro-inspired campers. • Delivery, set up in style anywhere on the Mornington Peninsula. • Maximum comfort and endless features. •campsites•festivals •extra holiday accommodation at your home•vintage tea party venue •make-up room for a bride •birthday sleepover in your own driveway!•prop for a party or event. Or you could tow a camper, and set off on your own adventure beyond The Peninsula….Book now for a summer getaway to remember!

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www.cocooncampers.com.au Email: info@cocooncampers.com.au Phone: 0418 519 812


Explore the Peninsula

FOR THE LOVE OF FISHING A mutual love of the ocean brought Sandra and Stuart together to start Bay Fish N Trips, where the couple get to share their penchant for fishing with people from all walks of life. “My husband and I have always loved fishing since the time we were little kids and he has been sailing on Port Philip bay since eight years of age,” said Sandra. “We both appreciate the bay and live on the peninsula, and love it here.” Stuart had been in the marine industry for 20 years, but started the fishing charters in 2010. “The idea came to us when we were sailing a 12 month stint around the South Pacific catching feisty Mahi, Black Cobia, Queenies, and Yellow Finned Tuna. Just the two of us on a yacht and we talked about what we would do when we came to Mornington. We both love fishing and have spent a lot of time on the bay so it was easy to decide our destiny, and we haven’t looked back,” said Sandra, a former school teacher. “We take out two trips daily, one in the morning and one in the afternoon with groups of diverse people. We often get families and a lot of international guests as well. It’s a marine experience and we offer a lot more than fishing. You get to experience what’s on offer on the bay all on our boat, the Plover, which was built in 1942 and has an incredible history itself.” For Sandra and Stuart, fishing is so much more than getting a catch for lunch, although the couple says there is a large variety of fish to be caught in the bay. “There’s something about the Plover, it has an affinity with local dolphins which often are attracted to the boat. We also have so many different species on offer to catch with snapper, flathead, squid, whiting, leather jacket, shark, stingray, just to name a few,” said Sandra, explaining all the reasons she loves being out on the bay. “Fishing is close to meditation as well. It is the chance to have an experience with nature which has this way of communicating without speaking. It grabs hold of people and draws them in. We have passengers who just want to be in amongst the natural environment and we have people ranging from four years old to 94.” With husband, Stuart as the captain of the Plover, and a carefully chosen crew of deckhands, guests enjoy a fabulous half day on the ocean, fishing, having a barbecue and taking in the sights that port Philip bay has to offer.

Enjoy a fabulous marine experience either fishing or cruising with your friends or family. Call 0418 349 364 to book your seats.

“Everybody gets a fishing rod and the crew teach the guests how to fish and catch something to take home for dinner. It is fabulous to see how people enjoy the experience, and share our love of the bay with our guests,” said Sandra. Bay Fish N Trips offers fishing charters from Mornington Pier, running morning, afternoon and evening trips. Phone 0418 349 364 www.bayfishntrips.com.au

w w w.bayfishntrips.com.au

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Looking for a summer challenge?

Why not try a round of golf at the Mount Martha Public Golf Course!

With some of the peninsula’s best views, our 18 holes of lush fairways and greens are sure to please golfers of all standards. After your game, kick back with a cool drink on the deck overlooking the course or take advantage of our free electric BBQs. Our onsite Pro Shop is fully stocked with new clubs and accessories for all your golfing needs. If you’ve never played before, our hire sets, buggies and motorised carts will help you enjoy your golfing experience. Bookings essential 5974 2266 mtmarthapublicgc.com.au

18 hole course | Club house bar | Pro Shop | Free BBQs


Explore the Peninsula

PIER STREET KITCHEN Pier Street Kitchen has become the hub for the local and visiting foodie with its warm friendly vibe and fabulous menu. “We are a perfect neighbourhood establishment, full of friendly people and good vibes. We are a reliable spot to enjoy breakfast, brunch or lunch and on occasion, we have special nights,” said owner John Filiopoulos. “Our menu is influenced by healthy, simple flavours from the Mediterranean and the Middle East and most items are produce driven – we change them seasonally depending on what’s available and what is best. 99.9% of everything is made in-house – we are very passionate about this. For those who love a smaller classy yet intimate venue for a special celebration, we can help.”

brilliant chefs who create incredible dishes along with the old favourites we have had since day one,” said John. “We make and sell our own dips so have a range of dips, hummus, baba ganoush, spiced carrot, beetroot dip, tzatziki, and our two serve lasagne take home packs we also make in house. We make beautiful organic grain salads daily that we change all the time using different ancient grains,” said John. “We are very passionate about food and creating different things.” Pier street kitchen is also licenced and sells wine to take home as well. PIER STREET KITCHEN is at 19 Pier St, Dromana. Phone 5981 4666 www.pierstreetkitchen.com.au

Formerly Dee’s Kitchen, the café has been rebranded to Pier Street Kitchen but it is still the same business with the same chefs, great menu and friendly staff. “We have always been known for the breakfast and lunch that we offer is quite different. It has a Middle Eastern Mediterranean feel, like the shakshouka which is basically a middle eastern salsa with spinach. We try to be seasonal with what we make. Everything is made in house, Alex Reed is the head chef and second in charge is Jarryd Hodgson, two experienced and

pier street kitchen. formerly known as dee’s kitchen. still offering the best seasonal food with a Middle Eastern twist We support local. We offer Mornington Peninsula wines, also available to take home, and source our produce from local suppliers for our breakfast and lunch menu. Everything is made in-house. Come and experience food made with passion and a commitment to excellence!

CATERING AND FUNCTION SERVICE AVAILABLE

PIER STREET KITCHEN

19 Pier Street, Dromana VIC 3936 (03) 5981 4666

Opening Hours 8am – 5pm Seven Days A Week January 2018

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MONKEY BUSINESS DROMANA MODERN BISTRO

BREAKFAST | LUNCH | DINNER Tuesday 10am - 4.30pm Wednesday - Friday 10am - 10.30pm Saturday 8.30am - 10.30pm Sunday 8.30am - 4.30pm Summertime Late December & January 7 days

1/277 Point Nepean Rd 3936 Dromana Bookings: 03 5981 0685


Eat & Drink

In order to keep their menu fresh and interesting, Monkey Business has taken the unique approach of switching up their dishes every five or six weeks. Regulars will always have something new to try and there is plenty to choose from no matter your tastes or preferences. Some of their highlights at the moment include their spring lamb dish, their modern approach to beef short ribs, and their locally caught squid. “Rather than having an extensive menu we focus on doing things really well, so we freshen it up,” said owner Luc Stijnen. “We have a lot of return clientele, we like to change the menu and challenge ourselves.”

MONKEY SEE, MONKEY EAT By Brodie Cowburn

T

here’s a new restaurant in town offering the people of Dromana the best in modern cuisines with a bit of imagination. The folks at Monkey Business aim to give their patrons a memorable, and most importantly delicious, dining experience. They’re doing their very best to put the fun back into going to a restaurant.

Monkey Business opened up shop in March of 2017, and is fast approaching its first full year of being in business. The business is in the safe and capable hands of owners’ Luc and Brad, who have over 20 years of experience in fine dining between them, with many of those years being spent overseas. The result of this experience is a dynamic and exotic menu of the best in international flavours. Their modern bistro offers a versatile range of foods, often made with Asian, French, Spanish, Mediterranean, or modern Australian influences. They make their dishes using great local produce from the Peninsula.

Beyond their menu, the restaurant aims to keep things light and do things differently in a number of different ways. “We’re a bright modern fitout, a lot more light and airy than anything else in Dromana,” Luc said. “We have a casual feel with fine dining food, we play the tunes we want to play, and it’s all about having a bit more fun.” Their casual feel is reflected in their name, with Monkey Business being chosen by the owners to reflect the relaxed, cheeky atmosphere you’ll find inside. “Monkey Business gives it an image of having a bit of fun and taking the seriousness here,” said Luc. Monkey Business has seen a lot of success in their short time in operation, with customers expressing their delight at the funky Dromana hotspot. “People are very excited, we have a lot of return clientele, we have a strong belief in what we do,” Luc said. “People come here excited about the food, it’s something new, we just want to bring something new to the peninsula. “ Monkey Business is fully licensed, and offers wines, martinis, bitters, whiskeys, gins, and much more behind their ever growing and evolving bar. Come in and visit Monkey Business to enjoy the experience for yourself! They can be found at 1/277 Point Nepean Rd, Dromana. Follow them on Facebook to see more.

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years. “It was a lot of fun. Everything was shiny and new, we have a new vineyard, winemaking was new and we had new customers, and plenty of new ideas. What we learned at university and what we were doing was different so it was great.” Becoming a winemaker was far from the norm in the 80s when it came to women choosing career but Kathleen has always followed her heart, being introduced to wine making as a kid. “Where I lived there were a lot of Italian people and they all made wine, which was fantastic. My husband worked at the Wantirna estate and loved it and decided to study winemaking as well so we were both on a similar path,” she said. Making smart decisions has been a significant contribution to the success of the winemaker’s business and Kathleen says it is important to follow a scientific formula. “It is very important to make good decisions based on science and not based on a romantic notion of what it’s going to be like to own a vineyard,” said Kathleen. “It is simple. If you put a good vineyard with the right varieties in the right place it is not a problem. If you find you haven’t got time to look after it, then someone will lease it from you.” Kathleen also says it has helped that they have such a large variety of wines.

QUEEN OF THE VINES

“Sometimes there are diabolical events like the weather which can destroy a crop but we have never had major issues as we have such a wide variety of wines. If you have a bad year for red, it might be a good year for white for instance.”

By Melissa Walsh

“Our first two wines were Pobblebonk, a white, Australian field blend, and Rageous a red blend,” said Kathleen, of the wines that are named after the frog and the mule. “Pobblebonk is named after the frog that lives here, while Rageous is the name of the mule that was here when we arrived.”

S

he is the first woman to be named Legend of the Vine by Wine Communicators of Australia; she is one of the first winemakers on the Mornington Peninsula, and has been named “Queen of Pinot Grigio.” She is Kathleen Quealy, a woman who has never conformed to social expectations, always marching to the beat of her own drum, and it has paid off enormously. Peninsula Essence Magazine talks to the legendary winemaker who has shaped the winemaking industry on the peninsula.

“Kevin McCarthy and I moved to the peninsula in the late 80’s. We both had winemaking degrees and we were looking for a region that would grow pinot grigio and the peninsula was perfect,” said Kathleen. “It was a lot quieter; less people lived here and less people holidayed here and it had the perfect cool climate we needed.” It was 1988 when Kathleen and Kevin began their peninsula winery, with the first vintage starting two years later. “Our first business was T’Gallant which we ran until 2003,” said Kathleen, who loved every moment of their adventure in those early

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After selling T’Gallant to Treasury Wines Estate in 2003, Kathleen and Kevin launched their first wines at Quealy Winemakers in 2006.

Over a decade later, and Quealy Winemakers is planted with Pinot Grigio, Friulano, Moscato Giallo, Riesling and Chardonnay with the whole lot fermented together to create an intriguing field blend. After all these years, the winemaking stalwart still has the same passion she started with when first moving down to the peninsula. “I still love it; it is a lovely industry to be in. There are so many different parts to it. We grow it, we make it and we sell it. We also get to tell people about our wines when they visit the cellar door,” she said. That is the wonderful part about Quealy Winemakers. When you visit the cellar door, you can be assured the people you are talking to are the actual people who make the wine. Quealy Winemakers is at 62 Bittern-Dromana Road, Balnarring. Phone 5983 2483 www.quealy.com.au


ST ANDREWS B E AC H B R E W E RY I S T H E L AT E S T C R A F T B R E W E RY TO C A L L T H E M O R N I N GTO N PENINSULA HOME. O P E N DA I LY I N SUMMER 11AM – 7PM

DRINK

E AT

Core range of 4 beers Pale Ale / Australian Lager / Golden Ale / Pilsner / Tasting paddles / Locally sourced wines

Light Snack Menu / Small Plates / Share Plates / Pizzas / Salads

P L E AS E C A L L O R EMAIL FOR ANY BOOKING ENQUIRIES

PHONE: (03) 5988 6854

ADDRESS: 160 SANDY ROAD FINGAL VIC 3939

STANDREWSBEACHBREWERY.COM.AU / INFO@STANDREWSBEACHBREWERY.COM.AU FACEBOOK/ ST ANDREWS BEACH BREWERY | INSTAGRAM/@SAB.BREWERY


Dishes

Must try

Unleavened Heaven paratha flatbread w beetroot hummus, margeaux sausage, and poached eggs

Tapioca Pudding coconut crunch, passionfruit, raspberries, peach, mango gel

Caramelised banana, European sweet waffles with popcorn and salted caramel sauce

Commonfolk Coffee

Merchant & Maker

Blue Mini Eatery, Emporium, Events

16 Progress Street, Mornington Phone 5902 2786 www.commonfolkcoffee.com.au

675 Point Nepean Road, McCrae Phone 5986 3385 www.merchantmaker.com.au

2 Colchester Raod, Rosebud Phone 5981 2520 www.bluemini.com.au

Donuts w honeycomb crunch

Tempura Salmon Burrito jumbo nori roll w cured salmon lightly battered and fried

Blue Mini Eatery, Emporium, Events

Merchant & Maker 675 Point Nepean Road, McCrae Phone 5986 3385 www.merchantmaker.com.au

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Commonfolk Coffee 16 Progress Street, Mornington Phone 5902 2786 www.commonfolkcoffee.com.au

Peninsula Picnic packs 2 Colchester Raod, Rosebud Phone 5981 2520 www.bluemini.com.au


PIONEERS OF THE WINE INDUSTRY By Melissa Walsh

T

hey have always been pioneers in the winemaking industry since Garry Crittenden’s long-standing love of wine saw him move from horticulture to viticulture and undertake his first plantings in 1982. That was on a mere five acres and since then he has led the way in the establishment of new grape varietals in Victoria including barbera, nebbiolo, dolcetto and sangiovese, ensured the evolvement of the wine industry on the peninsula, and now the family, including daughter Zoe and son Rollo, have set up a wine centre to offer a unique tasting experience. After growing up on the farm the second generation of Crittendens are now fully immersed in the running of the business. Rollo is now viticulturist and winemaker whilst Zoe takes care of the marketing. The third generation, whilst too young to be helping in the vineyard yet, enjoy the pleasure of being surrounded by vines and dirt. “At Crittenden Estate vineyard we have a tasting and wine appreciation venue which offers a different experience from your usual cellar door. Visitors are offered seats and asked which varieties they would like to taste by our very knowledgeable and friendly staff,” said Zoe. “There are lots to choose from and learn about as we make more than two dozen wines, including the region's signature pinot noir and chardonnay as well as Italian and Spanish varieties under the Pinocchio and Los Hermanos labels.” Winemaker Rollo Crittenden says the centre aims to be a new model for wine tourism in Australia, where visitors are offered seats and asked which varieties they would like to try before being guided through their choices with written notes or electronic tablets. “The plan is to also teach visitors about the more general attributes of the Mornington Peninsula as a wine region, and to offer information about the winemaking process,” said Rollo. The range of wines on offer at Crittenden, all available for purchase online and at the Crittenden Wine Centre, reflects Garry and Rollo’s innovative winemaking styles. As one of the first producers in the country to embrace styles from Italy and Spain they have developed a reputation for taking an experimental approach towards their wine continued next page...

Crittenden Estate WINE CENTRE

Enjoy seated tastings in our contemporary Wine Centre where knowledgeable staff will guide you through a custom designed wine journey. A large range of alternative and traditional wines can be sampled in a format that is innovative and makes tasting wine an experience in

Open Daily 10:30am - 4:30pm | Ph 03 5987 3800 | www.crittendenwines.com.au

itself.

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making. Tradition, however, also plays a large part in the production of their award winning Pinot Noirs and Chardonnays from an area that is now becoming pre-eminent as one of the country’s most well reputed regions for these two styles. “When you come into our wine centre, you are greeted at the door by very knowledgeable staff who will show you to your table and offer a journey of about eight different wines from our extensive list,” said Zoe. “It is about finding the right wine for each customer. The whole experience generally takes about 45 minutes.” A family that has always thought outside the square, the Crittenden’s farm their vineyards sustainably without using chemicals or sprays. “We have a massive compost area and use that instead of sprays. Dad started doing that in the 90s when he began exploring other options and converted to this way of farming in 2000,”said Zoe. “Straight away he noticed a difference in the health of the vineyard, the quality of the fruit, and then the quality of the wine.” The Crittenden mantra has always been that great wines are created in the vineyard and are only enhanced in the vats and barrels, a concept that probably comes from Garry’s horticultural background, but it is also overlaid with respect for the environment and a lot of common sense about how you treat the land sustainably. One thing is certain,

A unique, independent microbrewery with a hop garden, brewhouse, bar and accommodation.

Authentic American Southern Style, low and slow barbecue. Enjoy our beers in a relaxed, rustic bush setting amidst the hop vines. Our pop-up kitchen summer resident. The cellar door is open 3 days a week Fri-Sun 11am-7pm and public holidays. Extended days and hours in summer.

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88 Shoreham Rd, Red Hill South VIC www.redhillbrewery.com.au


the Crittenden family continue to pioneer new and innovative ways of creating great wine and tasting experiences. Crittenden Wine Centre at Crittenden Estate, 25 Harrisons Road, Dromana. Phone 5981 8322. www.crittendenwines.com.au

FOR ALL YOUR HOSPITALITY NEEDS, BOTH FRONT AND BACK OF HOUSE REQUIREMENTS

TRADE SALES DIRECT TO PUBLIC Open Monday to Saturday 9am to 5pm

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Who killed Jim Barclay? By Peter McCullough

T

HIS is the title of one of a number of books written about the unsolved murders which occurred at Wonnangatta Station in Victoria’s high country in January, 1918. The mystery has close links to the Mornington Peninsula, and Hastings in particular. Who was Jim Barclay?

next decade was spent around Mansfield although by 1897 Jim had moved from gold-prospecting to rural tasks such as sheep shearing and contract work such as post splitting. Ten years later he had leased land in the Howqua valley and trading in cattle had become an important part of his life. Jim was highly regarded in the area for his skills as a bushman.

James Barclay (or “Jim” as he was better known) was born in Hastings on 18 February 1869. He was the fourth child of James and Mary Barclay who had come to Hastings in 1860: he had an older brother (John) and sisters (Jean and “Tossie”), and a younger sister (Molly).

In 1910 life changed for Jim Barclay when he married 19-yearold Lizzie Cantieni who had been living with Jim’s neighbours in Howqua, the Fry family. The civil ceremony held on 23 December was not attended by any member of the Barclay family, possibly due to the fact that Lizzie was seven months pregnant at the time; in fact his family did not find out about the marriage for some years.

James Barclay senior, an immigrant from Scotland, had owned a fishing vessel named Hero and when he purchased land in Barclay Crescent, Hastings, in 1880 he built the family home and named it Heroville. The house was only demolished in 1996.

Lizzie gave birth to a son on 22 February 1911 in Mansfield; christened James he was always known as “young Jim.” The joys of marriage and parenthood were to be short-lived for the couple as Lizzie died of a form of tuberculosis on 18 September, 1911.

Jim Barclay attended school in Hastings and had regular encounters with authority for fighting and a minor case of arson in which the police were involved. Religion played a large part in the family life of the Barclays and was apparently a cause of friction between the devout James senior and his son.

Jim Barclay was a tall man, with a strong physique and a reputation for his skill with horses and cattle. Burdened with a baby and no family within hundreds of miles, he turned to the friends he had made in Mansfield and they, in turn, gave him support and assistance. But by 1914 young Jim had been sent to live with his aunt Molly and her husband (Jack Campbell) at Vermont.

In 1883 Jim left school with a “certificate of a child being sufficiently educated” and worked at Heroville until 1886 when he departed to seek his fortune on the goldfields. Most of the

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In 1912 Jim Barclay first visited the Wonnangatta valley when he called on the Bryce family in his capacity as a cattle trader.


History

Left:Arthur Phillips (left) with Jim Barclay on the Howitt High Plains. Above:Jim Barclay in his younger days. Top right: Jim Barclay’s mother, Mary. Right:Jim Barclay’s father, James Barclay.

Meanwhile, Jim did contract work for Arthur Phillips, the owner of Glenroy Station near Mansfield. When Phillips became the joint owner of Wonnangatta Station he sought out a capable manager: Jim Barclay was considered the ideal choice for the job because of his industry knowledge, his association with the area, and Arthur Phillips’ trust in his skills and judgement. So in April, 1915 Jim Barclay became manager of Wonnangatta station. Where is Wonnangatta Station? Once described as “the most isolated homestead in Victoria”, the Wonnangatta Station was a cattle property located in the remote Wonnangatta River valley. Access was by horse or foot only. The nearest population centres were the goldfields towns of Talbotville, about 20 miles (32km) away, Grant and Dargo to the south-east, and the larger town of Mansfield, about 80 miles (130km.) distant over the Great Dividing Range. The station had been established in the 1860s by Oliver Smith, an American who came across the valley when prospecting for gold. Smith’s common-law wife Ellen and her son Harry joined him and a homestead was built near the junction of the Wonnangatta River continued next page... January 2018

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Above: Young Jim Barclay with his uncle Jack Campbell. Above Right: Jim Barclay prior to taking up his appointment at Wonnangatta Station. Below Right: “Heroville” in Barclay Crescent Hastings, just prior to its demolition in 1996. Below: Jim’s wife Lizzie (nee Cantieni). She died aged 20.

and Conglomerate Creek. Ellen subsequently died in childbirth and Smith sold out to William Bryce, eventually returning to the United States. The Bryce family, which eventually included 10 children, then occupied the Station and built a new homestead; Ellen’s son, Harry, moved down the valley and established himself at Eaglevale. The Bryce family remained at Wonnangatta for over 40 years until Mrs. Bryce died at the age of 78 in 1914. The Mansfield owners then bought the property and installed Jim Barclay as manager. What was the background to the murders? Jim Barclay led a solitary existence at Wonnangatta and his only close friend was Harry Smith at Eaglevale. By late 1917 he had convinced the owners (Phillips and Ritchie) that he needed a hired

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hand who could do general work around the property and also cook for the extra station hands needed during busier times such as cattle musters.

Above: Wonnangatta Homestead circa 1900. Below: Wonnangatta valley showing the homestead. Bottom: The family cemetery, Wonnangatta Station, circa 1918.

Labour was in short supply because of the war and Barclay would have had little to choose from; on 14 December, 1917 61-year-old John Bamford from Black Snake Creek (near Talbotville) started work. Bamford was not well regarded in the area where he had lived for 20 years: he was variously described as “surly”, having “a quick temper”, and even being suspected of having murdered his wife. The storekeeper at Talbotville (Albert Stout) is known to have warned Barclay “not to be drawn into any arguments with Bamford.” Be this as it may, a stockman who visited Wonnangatta in December 1917 recalled that the two seemed to be on good terms. Barclay and Bamford were last seen alive in late December 1917. They had been to Talbotville to cast their votes in the Reinforcement Referendum, the second of the two conscription referenda in Australia during the First World War. They stayed the night at Talbotville, before leaving for Wonnangatta early in the morning of 21st December. How were the murders discovered? On 22nd January, 1918 Harry Smith arrived at Wonnangatta Station about 6pm to deliver mail. Barclay and Bamford were both absent but the words “Home tonight” were written in chalk across the kitchen door. Smith stayed two nights but when no-one appeared he went on to Eaglevale on the 24th January, 1918. In the late afternoon of 14th February, 1918 Harry Smith returned to the Wonnangatta homestead to find it still deserted and the mail sitting where he had left it on the kitchen table. Furthermore, Barclay’s favourite dog, “Baron”, was starving and neglected. Smith briefly searched the area but left for Dargo the next morning to raise the alarm. From there the owners in Mansfield (Phillips and Ritchie) were telegraphed. On 23rd February,1918 Phillips and stockman Jack Jebb arrived at continued next page...

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Above: Harry Smith at his hut at Eaglevale. Left: Harry Smith on the Howitt High Plains.

Eaglevale from Mansfield and the next day, accompanied by Harry Smith, they returned to Wonnangatta. After a prolonged search they found a badly decomposed body near Conglomerate Creek, about 420 paces from the homestead. The body had been buried in a shallow grave but wild animals had apparently uncovered it; only the skull was protruding from the sand. From the remaining pieces of clothing, a belt and a tobacco pouch Smith identified the body as that of Barclay. After the body was reburied, Phillips returned to Mansfield and informed the police. From Melbourne Detective Alex McKerral was despatched, together with Constable Ryan who had grown up in the district and had good local knowledge. Several days later the police party set out on the 80 mile ride from Mansfield to collect Barclay’s remains and return them for a postmortem at Mansfield hospital. On arrival at the homestead another disaster was narrowly averted when two of the policemen decided to prepare an evening meal of bacon and eggs. They sprinkled pepper from a tin on the mantlepiece and were about to eat when the eggs turned a peculiar colour. The “pepper” was in fact rabbit and dingo poison, and the case had almost taken a very dramatic twist! Police found a shotgun in Barclay’s room; although it had been discharged recently there were no bloodstains in the room. His bed was in a state of disorder. Bamford’s room was also in a state of disorder, and his horse, “Thelma”, saddle and some belongings were missing. On the return journey with the remains the police party came across “Thelma” running wild without a saddle or bridle on the

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Above: The grave of Jim Barclay with his parents at Tyabb Cemetery in Hastings. Above Right: Conglomerate Creek where Jim Barclay’s body was found. Right: The pile of logs at Howitt Hut where Bamford’s body can be seen.

Howitt High Plains. The post-mortem found that Barclay had been murdered by a shotgun blast in the back and had been dead for several weeks at the time of discovery. At the inquest that followed Detective McKerral said “I am of the opinion that Barclay and Bamford had an argument over working matters and that Bamford loaded the gun and shot Barclay. He removed his working clothes and dressed himself in Barclay’s suit, which is missing, saddled his horse and, after dragging the deceased to the creek, rode the horse away.” The verdict of the inquest was murder by person or persons unknown. Jim Barclay’s body was released to his extended family and he was buried in the Tyabb cemetery in Hastings on 9th March,1918. On March 16th The Leader carried the following report: HASTINGS. The remains of James Barclay, the victim of the Mt. Howitt tragedy, were on Saturday buried in the local cemetery. The deceased’s brother is an orchardist here. Many of the deceased’s schoolmates attended the funeral. The deceased, who was 49 years of age, left Hastings for the North-East when a youth. He has the reputation of being remarkably expert in the mustering of cattle. A wreath composed of leaves from Barclay’s favourite tree at Wonnangatta Station was placed on the coffin. To mark his resting place the family added to Jim’s parents’ gravestone the words: AND OUR DEARLY LOVED BROTHER JIM.

JANUARY 1918 AGED 48 YEARS With the notoriety the murder caused, the simple wording showed the family wanted to place the tragedy behind them. Did they find Bamford? Bamford was the obvious suspect-perhaps too obvious-and a state-wide search was soon underway. A reward of 200 pounds was offered by the government for information regarding Barclay’s murder. The police search was side-tracked by repeated reports of sightings of the suspect from all over the state. Furthermore, two men were apprehended at the time, each believed to be Bamford. The first was arrested by Constables Farley and Ryan of Frankston police station: they received information that a man answering to the description of John Bamford had been seen between Seaford and Carrum. The police found the man at Carrum but, according to a report in The Leader, when Constable Ryan questioned the suspect he “found that he was apparently out of his mind.”Due to his mental state, the constable arrested the man on a vagrancy charge and took him to the Frankston lock-up. The man told police that his name was John Thomas and that “he had just arrived from heaven to save the world.”The Frankston police were quick to advise investigators that the man arrested was not John Bamford. continued next page...

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Right: The article in The Argus dated 11th November 1918. Above: An article from The Argus on 28 February 1918.

Then on 11th March,1918 another man believed to be Bamford was apprehended at Balloong, near Yarram. He attempted to elude police but, when arrested, confessed to the murder of Barclay. He was charged and the following day Detective McKerral and Constable Hayes from Dargo arrived at Yarram to transport the prisoner back to Melbourne. Constable Hayes knew Bamford and, as soon as he saw the prisoner, he realized that this was not the missing man. It turned out that “Bamford” was in fact a vagrant who was suffering from delusions. The winter months made searching difficult. Then in early November,1918 Constable Hayes, together with local bushmen Harry Smith, William Hearne and Jim Fry, was searching the Mt. Howitt area when Hearne noticed a boot protruding from a pile of logs near the Howitt Plains hut. Under the pile they found Bamford’s body. The reason for the search of Mt. Howitt was ostensibly that Harry Smith had dreamed that Bamford would be

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found there! As the route to Mansfield was still under snow, the body was taken to Dargo. The post-mortem found a bullet lodged in the skull and, again, at the inquest a verdict of murder by person or persons unknown was made. So who killed Jim Barclay? Up to this point it had been taken for granted that Barclay had been killed by Bamford. One might have thought that the discovery of Bamford’s body provided him with a reasonable alibi. This was not the case and he remained the chief suspect: speculation now followed the line that Bamford did in fact shoot Barclay and he in turn was hunted down and shot by some friend of the manager in a revenge killing. Police suspicion naturally fell on Harry Smith, especially as his “dream” had led to the finding of Bamford’s body. But there was no direct evidence. In addition he would have had


What happened to Jim junior After he finished schooling, Jim Barclay’s son, Jim junior, spent many years working for Harry Smith at Eaglevale. Harry died in 1945 aged 86 and left the property to young Jim. He lived there until he eventually sold it and moved to Stratford where he worked for the Country Roads Board. At the time he had set up in one of the Country Roads Board’s huts but one day a fire broke out which destroyed the hut . Jim managed to escape unscathed but unfortunately a lifetime of Harry Smith’s prized possessions, including documents and letters, all went up in smoke. The truth as to what really happened at Wonnangatta Station may well have disappeared as well. Jim Barclay junior married Lottie Binns later in life and he lived at Lindenow South after his retirement from the Country Roads Board. It was there that he was visited by one author

(Wallace Mortimer) and his enigmatic comment on the murders was “It was a long time ago and both the murderers are long since dead. It’s all best forgotten.”He followed Mortimer out to his car and his parting words were “You know, Harry Smith told me that the men who killed my father were Robert Klingsporn and Jack Ware.” This stunned Mortimer: was the least likely explanation perhaps the correct one? Young Jim died at the age of 77 on 27th May, 1987. The Wonnangatta Station homestead was accidentally burnt down by careless bushwalkers in 1957. Some stockyards and the old cemetery survive. Today the area is part of the Alpine National Park, and is only accessible by 4WD, horse, or foot. The nearby mining towns of Grant and Talbotville have disappeared.

to carry out a complex deception about the discovery of Barclay’s body, and he was present at the discovery of Bamford’s. It is also unlikely that he would have knowingly allowed the body of his friend Jim Barclay to lie where the murderer left it and be disturbed by animals for three weeks. Smith was not charged. A variation of the “Bamford did it” theory expressed by one writer suggests that Bamford killed Barclay following an argument but, full of remorse, he committed suicide when he reached Howitt Hut. This seems unlikely as it does not accord with the general view of Bamford’s temperament. Besides, there was no sign of the revolver in the vicinity of the Hut, and Bamford could hardly have buried himself under such heavy logs. Another point which suggests the killer was not Bamford is that he was quite a small man and yet Barclay was tall and strongly built. It seems unlikely that he could have dragged the body of Barclay 420 paces to the burial site. The second main theory is that the two men were the victims of stock thieves who had been caught at work. The police report refutes this, pointing out that the only stock missing from Wonnangatta was Bamford’s horse, and that had been recovered on Mt. Howitt. Be that as it may one author even names the killers as Jack and Sid Beveridge, renowned cattle duffers from the Buckland area; he maintains that Sid admitted his guilt to a neighbour in his old age. It is apparently part of the folk lore on the Buckland that Jack Beveridge courted a local lady named Dolly Eccleston for 40 years and he visited her every Sunday night wearing Jim Barclay’s good suit! This was the suit listed by Detective McKerral as “missing” at the inquest. This second theory has an interesting variation expressed by one author. He suggests that Jim Barclay was a cattle thief who would stop at nothing to make money and become as successful as his brother John. This obsession led to him going too far with someone’s livelihood and as a result he was murdered. The regard in which Barclay was held by Arthur Phillips and others would suggest

that this variation of the cattle thieves theory is not plausible The third theory that is at times presented is that Jim Barclay was a ladies man who was killed by a jealous husband. Although one author discredits this suggestion as “the work of a novelist who had obviously done little or no research in the matter”, another author names the object of Jim’s affection as Annie Klingsporn from Merrijig. The killers were her husband, Robert Klingsporn, and his brother-in-law, Jack Ware. This theory also has several variations: one is that the killers were in fact Robert Klingsporn and one or both of his brothers; another is that Jim Barclay had not honoured promises made to Robert Klingsporn’s sister, Fanny, and was made to pay the price for his indiscretions. The Klingsporns and Jack Ware were highly respected in the area and this seems a very unlikely theory. Besides Jim Barclay had been at the remote Wonnangatta Station for almost three years and a liaison with Annie, Fanny or some other lady would seem to be highly unlikely. The current descendants of the Barclay family who still live in the Hastings area not only stress the remoteness angle, but also state that Jim’s brother, John, was firmly of the view that Jim was “not that sort of a person.” The Wonnangatta murders were the subject of many yarns in pubs and around campfires in the high country; many claimed to know who had killed Barclay and Bamford but no-one would tell. The mystery remains. Credits Thanks to Jennie Bryant of Tyabb for her assistance; her grandmother was a niece of Jim Barclay. BIBLIOGRAPHY Some of the books on the subject are: n Leydon,Keith and Ray,Michael “The Wonnangatta Mystery:an inquiry into the unsolved murders.” Warrior Press,2000.

n Mortimer,Wallace “The History of Wonnangatta Station”Spectrum Publications,1980. n Mortimer,Wallace “Wonnangatta Station-the Next Twenty Years.”McPhersons,1995 n Mortimer,Wallace “Who Killed Jim Barclay?” 2009 n Ricketts,JohnJ. “Victoria’s Wonnangatta Murders” E-Gee printers, 1993.

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Corner

Puzzle

ACROSS 1. Degree ceremony 6. Crazed 10. Stockpile 15. Primary 18. Document attachments 19. Feminists, women's ... 20. Clay lump 22. Economise, ... & save 23. Spiritualist meetings 24. Refine 25. For the time being, pro ... 26. Pursuit 28. Diner 30. Octopus fluid 31. Lightweight timber 32. Nicholas or Ivan 33. Sunbeams 34. Demand as right 35. October stone 37. Famed London gallery 39. Wedding promise (1,2) 40. Properly positioned, in ... 42. Sheet of glass 45. Unscrambled (secret message) 48. Space flight agency 49. The N of NB 50. Disbelief in deities 53. Unit of resistance 54. Hang on 56. Try to vomit 59. Natives of Inverness or Aberdeen 61. Globe 62. Address to king 63. Coal by-product 64. Charged atom 65. Restore to health 66. Musket or pistol 68. Dithering 69. Gallivant (about) 70. Miss alarm call 71. Examiners 72. Offshoot 73. Distributed (6,3) 74. Liqueur, ... Maria 76. Traditional (3-4) 78. Eludes 80. Follower of Brahma 81. Reworked (script) 84. Wolves' homes

85. Mariner 87. Exemplify 89. Haute cuisine exponent 92. Breadwinners 94. Tyrant 96. Take full advantage of 97. Fermented 98. Seem to pass slowly 100. Verbal repetition 101. Tide movements, ... & flows 104. Guillotine 105. Country singer, ... Nelson 107. Pastoral 108. Electrician or mechanic 112. Cries in pain 113. Uncertain 115. Vienna is there 117. Couple 118. Dampener 120. "No" vote 121. Filling (bag) again 123. Quick (response) (5-4) 125. Knack 126. Organiser 127. Offensive youth 129. Leaning Tower of ... 130. Mob crime boss 131. Hairpiece 133. Sweetly appealing 134. Scold persistently 136. Human trunk 137. Setting 140. Mediterranean republic isle 141. Tell falsehood 142. Get rid 146. Jazz legend, ... Fitzgerald 147. Horse colour 148. Begrudges 152. Household dirt 154. Jog 155. Thou shalt ... steal 156. Week divisions 157. Streak in cheese 159. Milk-bottle container 160. Chimed 162. Robust 164. Dices 165. Phooey! 167. Throat growth 169. Oregon & Wyoming's neighbour 171. Bar bill 173. Give way

174. Female warriors 175. Sculpted figure 177. Fleur-de-lis 178. Moronic 179. Postural exercise regime 180. Pong 181. Withdraws (troops) 182. Removed errors from 183. Collided with flank

DOWN 1. Fitness clubs 2. Burning out of control 3. City known as the Riviera of Mexico 4. Signify 5. Ninjutsu fighter 6. Prejudices 7. Send back to homeland 8. Covert spying, ... surveillance 9. Actor, ... Grammer 10. Monastery superior 11. Well-defined (5-3) 12. Lose 13. Inclusive of costs (3-2) 14. Swirl 16. Misbehave (3,2) 17. Agile 20. Forms into ridges 21. Emergency contact, next ... (2,3) 27. Typist 29. Murdered by hit man 35. 4-sided shape 36. Father of Cain & Abel 38. Concede 41. Hawk's claw 43. Slugs 44. Small earphone 46. Cone bearing 47. Dead 51. Covers up (6,2) 52. Notoriously 55. Centre of church 56. Held royal office 57. Veil netting 58. Dash, ... it 60. Toothed wheels 67. Aspirant 69. Skimpy underwear (1-6) 72. For a specific purpose (2,3) 75. Supermarket lane 77. Lifeless (object)

79. Namby-pambies 82. Engrossed 83. Stringed instruments 86. Foolish 88. Principle 90. The H of HMS 91. Low cloud 92. Stroke gently 93. Furtive 94. Lyrical poem 95. Burgle 98. Challenged (to) 99. Plane-travel complex 102. Cajoling talk 103. Coward 104. Draughtsman's detailed sketches 106. Abnormal thinness 108. Maths branch 109. Holds fast (to) 110. Sewer gas 111. Parochial (6-6) 114. Crested parrot 116. Extremists 119. New wife 122. Corporals, sergeants etc. (1,1,2) 124. La Scala highlight 125. Ex-California governor, ... Schwarzenegger 128. Spool 130. Laundry machine 132. Excessively sunny 135. Divinities 138. Shifting 139. Heading for Arctic 141. Combine 143. Tickles 144. Braiding 145. Accelerating, ... up 149. Guided 150. Moulds in relief 151. Mini-series lead (1,1,4) 153. Brown pigment 158. Instil 161. Geronimo's tribe 163. Spoke with defect 166. Pen name 168. Type of lily 170. World map book 172. Consumed (3,2) 173. Citrus peel 176. Scraped by, ... out a living

MT ELIZA OPTICAL Shop 5 / 89 Mount Eliza Way (Ritchies Centre) Mount Eliza Ph 9775 2922

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WesternPort

on

Only 50 minutes’ drive from Melbourne, Western Port is renowned for its maritime history, antiques and collectables. The area of Western Port is 682 km2.

WESTERN PORT FACTS

Fresh brewed coffee is a

From history buffs to nature lovers, Western Port is nature at its best with eco sanctuaries, farm visits, extensive walking trails, horse trails and bike paths. If you’re water-bound, we have a coast that is renowned for its waves for the surfers and beautiful beaches perfect for a picnic at any time or to cool down in summer.

It is the second largest bay in the state. Geographically, it is dominated by the two large islands; French Island and Phillip Island.

From Pearcedale to Cape Schanck, Western Port is a journey of discovery – small farm houses lie tucked in folds of rolling hills, while vines stretch across the landscape in ordered rows – the occasional glimpse of a rider in oilskins and hat adds to the sense that time somehow, has stood still. Along the route unique townships give visitors a chance of a different experience, the pace is a little slower and the hilly nature of the coastline means that the towns and villages are more rurally placed.

It is visited by Australian fur seals, whales and dolphins, as well as many migratory waders and seabirds. It is listed under the Ramsar Convention as a wetland of international significance.

The Western Port region is the right side of the Mornington Peninsula, starting from Pearcedale and through to Cape Schanck. French Island is also a part of the region. Western Port, commonly but unofficially known as Western Port Bay, is a large tidal bay in southern Victoria, Australia, opening into Bass Strait.

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COFFEE SAFARI

Contrary to its name, it lies to the east of the larger Port Phillip, and is separated from it by the Mornington Peninsula.

must have for weekends away and Western Port is a must visit destination with great coffee haunts around the towns. Here are a few to check out.

BEACH-HUT CAFE 55 High Street Fantastic food, friendly staff and lovely relaxed atmosphere

LELLEYS COFFEE HOUSE 23 High Street Great coffee and excellent service with

The area around the bay and the two main islands were originally part of the Boonwurrung nation's territory prior to European settlement.

alfresco and indoor areas with diverse

Western Port was first seen by Europeans in 1798 when an exploration crew in a whaleboat led by George Bass, journeyed south from Sydney to explore Australia's south eastern coastline.

28 Victoria Street

The bay is home to the three Marine National Parks—French Island, Churchill Island and Yaringa, while the land adjacent to the north is largely used for farming purposes including cattle and wineries. continued next page...

menu

MOOZ CAFE Old fashioned café with great service and even better coffee

GALLEY CAFÉ Lot 17 Mullett Street Awesome café with a good selection of food and extra good coffee


WHAT TO DO?

There’s always something to do on the Westernport side of the peninsula, with its calm waters for fishing and boating, or drives through the hills of Flinders. Head down to the cafes on the water in Hastings and enjoy watching the boats in the marina, or check out the small town feel of the village shops in Tyabb. The antique capital of Australia, there’s something for every collector in Tyabb and surrounding areas while the airfield is home to vintage and new planes. Photography: Yanni


Today the bay is mostly used for recreation; however, there is also a naval base (HMAS Cerberus), shipping and oil production facilities adjoining the bay. Western Port is around one hour from Melbourne by car and a small number of holiday villages with sandy swimming beaches lie on its shores.

The coastline, including that of the islands, is some 263 km.

Western Port has several industrial complexes, including a BlueScope Steel - steel processing works and the major Royal Australian Navy training base, HMAS Cerberus. Holden Australia's proving ground is located just east of Western Port.

The bay and its islands are crisscrossed by seven seismically active fault lines and experience numerous minor earthquakes every year.

Prior to European settlement, the Bunurong people lived around Western Port living off shellfish, mutton birds and plant life.

In recent years, numbers of whale sightings (mostly southern right and humpback) have increased, and local institutes conduct researches of their presences in the bay along within vicinity to the bay and Port Phillip Bay, asking public to report sightings.

The waters of Western Port cover an area of 680 km² of which 270 km² are exposed as mud flats at low tide.

Fishing, pleasure boating and yachting are some of the popular pastimes on the bay.

The topography of Western Port is dominated by two large islands: French Island and Phillip Island.

The town of Hastings is the main boat landing in the bay with the Yaringa Marina at Somerville also offering boat harbor facilities.

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104 | PENINSULA

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B E H E A D

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0418 148 468 | 5973 5444 hbaxter@hockingstuart.com.au

S A R

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A local agent with 20 years sales experience in Mount Martha, is now part of a 48 strong office network.

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Introducing Honor Baxter

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Development plans for the Port at Hastings would see it become the major shipping port for container and bulk freight in and out of Victoria.

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“Working as a movement consultant in Canada on the Will Smith blockbuster I, Robot in 2004, I met a lot of Canadian brewers and smokers and learned about the art of smoking meat and brewing beer. This year I decided to create the Beerlicious range of condiments as well as a rub for smoking meat which is becoming huge now,” said Paul. “When I first started smoking meat there were a handful of restaurants doing it, now it is very popular.” The new range of Beerlicious includes the Kick Ass Hot Beer Mustard and the Spicy Beetroot Chutney. “The range has some serious flavours and, unlike most mustard has very little water except for what is in the beer. The mustard is made with Mornington pale ale and the beetroot chutney is made with the stout,” said Paul. “I could also see there was a real market for rubs. I do slow smoked briskets and pork and I used them in my café so I could see there was a market for it as well.” Paul launched the rub range in September last year, and the rubs and Beerlicious condiments can be bought in the flagship Richies IGA stores, Village Meats Somerville, Lindons Fresh Meat Benton’s Square and online.

A LABOUR OF LOVE

“The range has lots of big flavours, I like big flavours and lots of depth where you get one flavour and another takes over, with the sourness of the vinegar, the added punch of the turmeric, garlic, chili and saffron and a hint of sweetness. They are definitely not one dimensional,” said Paul, whose labour of love is creating good quality food with punchy flavours. www.paulmercurio.net

By Melissa Walsh

I

t was an out of work period that first inspired Paul Mercurio on his food journey and a new career path experimenting with food, cooking and brewing. The wellknown actor, dancer, choreographer, television presenter and TV cook says he had always been drawn to cooking since he was a kid working in fast food restaurants. A road he has stayed on since early 2000, Paul is now releasing a new food range with his Beerlicious condiments.

MORE THAN JUST ANTIQUES

Bakelite Crib Toy

Isle of Wight Perfume Bottle

Open Thur-Sun 10am-5pm plus most public holidays

iittala Candleholder

Italian Silver Coffee Set

14 Mornington-Tyabb Road, Tyabb 5977 4414 | www.tyabbpackinghouseantiques.com.au January 2018

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PILOT REAL ESTATE F

rom the smallest of beginnings back in 2011 Luke Woollard established Pilot Real Estate in Dava Drive, Mornington. With a staff of just four, Pilot Real Estate now manage an impressive 650 body corporate units with an insured value of more than $204,000,000. Pilot Real Estate this year alone has contracted more than 150 peninsula based trades people and suppliers to carry out $1,000,000 of organised works for home services to their extensive list of body corporate customers

getting your property sale-ready by using our extensive network of tradespeople. We also have fantastic associations with more than 100 Mornington Peninsula builders to create win-win outcomes for home sellers”.

Pilot Real Estate is the little agency that can. With highlights for 2017 including total sales for all residential and commercial property totalling just under $7,000,000, the agency also set an area sales record with 12 Carnoustie Grove, Mornington earlier in the year.

“We were very pleased to help the community garden with this grant. I believe that the garden is important as it gets senior community members out and about which is good for their wellbeing. We are now putting a shout out for the next $500 Bank Of Awesome grant recipient which will be announced on 15th February.”

“We are not a volume agency. “ Director Luke Woollard explains. “We instead specialise in client satisfaction. Our sales service includes

YOUR FUTURE LOOKS ROSY WHEN YOU ADVERTISE IN

Book into the next issue Call Marg on 0414 773 153

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This year Pilot Real Estate also launched their ‘Bank Of Awesome’ community grants programme, with the first $500 recipient being the Mornington Community Garden. The grant was used to assist in the purchase of a solar hot water system.

In addition to their local grants, Pilot Real Estate also created the


Real Estate

Agents Of Mercy campaign which has now raised over $3100 to build houses for the poor in the Philippines. To find out more about Pilot Real Estate and their Bank Of Awesome community grants contact them at Shop 2/1 Hoylake Grove, Mornington or phone on 5976 1273. The company also use an extensive social media platform to promote all their trades people and services, and through Instagram are always showcasing the peninsula at its finest. instagram.com/pilotrealestate/ www.facebook.com/thepilots/ www.pilotrealestate.com.au

* Sales * Owners Corporation

Celebrating 7 years in Mornington 650 body corporate units managed PILOT employs 4 staff members directly We support more than 150 tradespeople and suppliers

$1,000,000 in works carried out in 2017 $6,929,000 total value for residential and commercial sales in 2017 Average 4.9/5 star rating ( source: ratemyagent.com.au) instagram.com/pilotrealestate/ Shop 2, 1 Hoylake Grove, Mornington

www.facebook.com/thepilots/ www.pilotrealestate.com.au January 2018

5976 1273

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MORNINGTON BUILDER LEAVES BIG IMPRESSION By Brodie Cowburn

R

obert Rolls comes from humble beginnings. Growing up on a farm, Robert spent time holidaying with his family on the peninsula in Mt. Martha. Through his farm life, Robert learned to be practical, resourceful, and creative to keep things up and running around the property. It is this resourcefulness and creativity that has seen him grow to become one of the most exciting and innovative builders on the Peninsula today. The experienced builder likes to do things a little differently, and has recently seen his business, First Impressions Projects, recognised as one of the best the building industry has to offer. First Impressions Projects focuses on larger, complex, and highly detailed builds. “We’re only a bespoke building company, and we specialise in intimate builds. We’re big on detail and our collaborative

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It is this long history of hard work and creativity that led to one of Robert’s premier achievements, recognition from the Master Builders’ Association of Victoria. At the MBAV 2017 Excellence in Housing Awards, Robert was recognised for his outstanding achievement in building by taking home the award for Best Custom Home over $2,000,000 and the prestigious Master Builder of the Year prize for 2017. The house that Robert received the award for was an intricate, multi-million dollar home at Somers, built in collaboration with revered Melbourne architect Selwyn Blackstone. Robert was awarded the honours at a night at Crown, where the awards are hosted each year. “We were lucky enough to win the builder of the year award from the MBA, and it really is a shared award with all the people involved in a project like that, the design team, our building team, and a passionate client,” said a humble Robert. “The house at Somers was on a cliff face; it was on a triangular block enlarging as it fell away from the road side. The house was designed in such a way to encapsulate the views across Western Port, and towards Phillip Island and The Nobbies. It’s over three levels and is really cleverly designed. From the road front it nestles in with the landscape, but then it expands and takes in all of that sprawling view. Every room, including the garage, takes in those views.” The project had its challenges and complications, but proved to be an intensely rewarding project for Robert. approach, we’re creative with our solutions, and we go above and beyond to make it happen,” said Robert of his business. “We put our heart and soul into every job and we work hard with our clients. This is recognised by our client testaments and referrals.” Walking into Robert’s office in Mornington, you can see why his creativity is revered by his clients and peers. Upon stepping through the door, you might feel a little akin to Charlie Bucket stepping into Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory for the first time. The walls are designed to look like stacked timber on a site, with decorative saws half sticking out of the wall at intermittent points. A step through the elaborately designed bathroom door sees you look up into a mirrored ceiling, and you can wash your hands from a pendant light integrated tap fitting. The office ceiling is a backlit giant shoji screen which creates a softness to the space. The walls in the foyer are decorated with images of his stunning projects and designs, showing off the fruits of his labour. It is a remarkable showcase of his innovation. Robert began in the industry as an apprentice carpenter and studied architecture at night, eventually leading to him starting his own business which has been up and running for close to two decades.

“It was quite a complex project. Given the cliff face site we had to work our way out and be quite methodical about timing. There was a deck right down on the water’s edge at the bottom of the cliff, so as we built out we lost access,” Robert said. Despite the challenges, the hard work has clearly paid off for the award-winning builder. “This house was close to a two year project. For the architect, the client, and the builder, there’s that collaboration of working through detail. It was quite rewarding bringing it all to fruition.” In addition to their award on the night, the company also won a number of HIA 2017 Eastern Victorian Regional Building Awards, including winning best New Bathroom, Best Kitchen Design, Best Custom built home over $2 million, and Home of the Year. Previously Robert has been recognised as the Young Builder of the Year for 2012. Robert also co-founded Cellar Creations, installing handcrafted and unique wine cellars Australia wide. More details about First Impressions Projects can be found at www.firstimpressionsprojects.com.au They can be contacted at (03) 5988 5466 and 0408 994 274

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168 Main Street Mornington VIC 3931 T. 03 5975 6888 Mornington

For Sale

240 Bungower Road, Mornington Dalywaters, 10 stunning acres Magnificent from first impression to final detail, Dalywaters is set on a breathtaking 10 acres (approx.) with beautiful landscaped gardens complementing a true country four-bedroom, 3.5-bathroom home with a multitude of living areas. The park-like grounds filled with roses, pinot noir vineyard and winding walks lead you through fragrant arbours, Evergreen Alder glade, entertaining gazebo, ornamental dam with jetty, to the wetlands and Balcombe Creek. Designed to host weddings, Dalywaters features an exquisite garden Chapel and extensive parking opening up an exciting opportunity for the purchaser to carry on the tradition, retain for private purposes or bring to life their own business venture. For Sale $3,500,000 - $3,850,000 Inspect As advertised or by appointment Contact Damian Smith 0481 875 243 Sam Galvin 0447 343 513 bowmanandcompany.com.au

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168 Main Street Mornington VIC 3931 T. 03 5975 6888 Mount Martha

For Sale

11a Hakea Drive, Mount Martha A Sun-filled Trend Setter Yet to celebrate its first birthday, this as new single-level three-bedroom, two-bathroom residence is the embodiment of first class lowmaintenance living in a prime location. Private, light-filled and stylishly detailed, the home enjoys set-back seclusion, sun-drenched alfresco entertaining backdropped by rose lined low-maintenance gardens in addition to a double remote garage. Separate living and dining rooms each feature walls of glass sliding open to expanses of decking; while the kitchen hosts on trend appointments from a stone island with breakfast bar to Smeg appliances. Ducted heating and cooling add to the excellence close to Bentons Square shopping, parks, buses and schools. For Sale $720,000 Inspect As advertised or by appointment Contact Robert Bowman 0417 173 103 Kylie Miller 0404 041 554 bowmanandcompany.com.au

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bowmanandcompany.com.au


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Peninsula Homemaker Centre, Cnr Nepean Highway & Bungower Road, Mornington VIC, 3931 (03) 5973 6333

Peninsula Essence January 2018  
Peninsula Essence January 2018  

Peninsula Essence January 2018

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