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JULY 2017

FREE

PENINSULA Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsula

The Falzon Boys And Their Desert Change • Sorrento’s Winter Wonderland • The Surfer’s New Driving Force Things Are Heating Up • And Baby Makes Three • Health And Beauty • State of Bliss • Travel • Winter Mornington Peninsula Stay And Play • Bending With The Times • Calombaris Brings Mastic to Red Hill


YEAR 7, 2018 & 2019 Single gender classes for Mathematics and English Smaller class sizes Targeted teaching House Spirit Positive Psychology

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contents 7. Events 8. Window Shopping 10. The Falzon Boys and Their Desert Change

Growing up on the Mornington Peninsula, three brothers Tom, Dan and Ben Falzon could never have dreamed they would find their destiny away from the water and deep in the heart of the desert in Alice Springs.

Writers: Melissa Walsh, Keith Platt, Peter McCullough, Cameron McCullough Creative Director: Maria Mirabella Photography: Yanni, Gary Sissons Publisher: Cameron McCullough Advertising: Brooke Hughes, 0409 219 282 or brooke@mpnews.com.au Marg Harrison, 0414 773 153 or marg@mpnews.com.au General enquiries: essence@mpnews.com.au Registered address: 2/1 Tyabb Road, Mornington 3931 Phone: 5973 6424 www.peninsulaessence.com.au Follow us on Instagram

@peninsulaessence

/peninsulaessence /peninsulaessence

All material is copyright, and may not be reproduced without the express permission of Mornington Peninsula News Group, or the original copyright holder in the case of contributions. Copyright of contributed material rests with the contributor. Disclaimer: The authors and publisher do not assume any liability to any party for any loss, damage or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. This publication is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should regularly consult a physician in matters relating to health and particularly with respect to any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention.

Peninsula Essence is produced monthly. 30,000 copies (mix of home delivery and bulk dropped at an extensive network of outlets across the peninsula).

14. Sorrento’s Winter Wonderland 16. The Surfer’s New Driving Force

Jenny Angliss-Goodall smiles as she tells the story about throwing away her legs, then adds that two friends then planned to use them to make a standard lamp for their home in England.

24. Things Are Heating Up

It’s a tough job but someone has to do it, and the lucky girl is Carolyn Donovan who organises the Victorian Firefighters Calendar each year.

28. Author’s Gloomy View As Angels Leave Our Skies

Watching as a pair of lightweight, sharp-eyed swallows built a mud nest under the eaves of a house in Seaford has, decades later, led to Geoffrey Maslen writing two books warning of the dangers facing “angels of the air” in Australia and overseas.

32. And Baby Makes Three

He’s six foot one, weighs 90 kilograms, and is a professional boxer and Australian Cruiserweight champion. She’s a five foot 10, slim, brunette international model who was runner up in the sixth season of Australia’s Next Top Model. Genetically they are a match made in heaven which they soon discovered after Sophie gave birth to their beautiful baby daughter, Laylah, on April 30 this year.

34. Harry’s Fans Bring Magic to Life 40. Health and Beauty 46. State Of Bliss

The Bhagavad Gita, the ancient Hindu scripture, states that “Yoga is the journey of the self, through the self, to the self”. A practice of self discovery, as much a practice of health and relaxation. Melanie Coghlan found peace through yoga, and now wants to spread the word through her business “State of Bliss”.

52. Travel 58. Winter Mornington Peninsula Stay And Play 67. The Courage and Determination of Sohila Zanjani 68. The Merchant of Venice Comes To Frankston

Bell Shakespeare presents The Merchant of Venice at the Frankston Arts Centre on Saturday, August 19.

70. Bending With The Times

Just as a blacksmith forges a piece of metal to create a shape, Glenn Kennedy owner of Peninsula Wrought Iron, has had to bend with the times.

76. Must Try Dishes 77. Josh Pelham Brings His Flavor To Cape Schanck

He’s worked at The Square Restaurant in London, The Press Club and Fenix in Melbourne to name a few, rubbed shoulders with George Calombaris, Raymond Capaldi, Gary Mehigan, Shannon Bennett and Marco Pierre White.

80. The Tragedy of Capel Sound

The story of a tragedy which occurred 150 years ago this month. It takes the reader into the seedy world of the illegal sports of nineteenth century Melbourne and the circumstances which drove some of the participants to their deaths.

Cover Photo Mornington Railway's K 163 Steam Engine in regular service, hauling passengers between Moorooduc and Mornington Image: Yanni

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July 2017

86. Crossword 88. Focus on Tyabb 90. The More Things Change the More They Stay the Same

Angelo Taranto strolls over to the Tyabb Railway Primary School from his massive 200 acres across the road where he has run Taranto Farm for decades.

94. Round House Sets the Standard

This remarkable home has been a notable landmark for thousands of people as they drove down to the peninsula since it was built in 1953.


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July

Peninsula events NAIDOC CELEBRATION

KINGDOM KIDS CHURCH

NIGHT NOISES Tue 11th, 7:00PM to 9:00PM Journey into the bushland to discover the native animals that emerge to make noises at night. Keep an eye out for wombats, wallabies and possums! Royal Botanic Gardens Cranbourne, 1000 Ballarto Road, Cranbourne. Ph 5990 2200 rbg.vic.gov.au

Wed 5th, 10:00AM to 2:00PM Celebrate the 2017 NAIDOC theme ‘Our Languages Matter’ at the annual Koolin-ik ba kirripbuluk. Activities include a free BBQ, didgeridoo playing, storytelling and much more. Royal Botanic Gardens Cranbourne, 1000 Ballarto Road, Cranbourne. Ph 5990 2200 rbg.vic.gov.au

Sun, 10.30AM Bring your children to have fun and learn with other children about the Bible. While waiting, join us for a cup of coffee at our "Cafe Style" Contemporary church service in the Church Hall on Sundays at 10.30am St Peter's Church Mornington, 3 Queen Street Mornington mmmanglican.org.au

ASTRONOMY VIEWING NIGHT

WE'RE GOING ON A BEAR HUNT

Fri 7th, 08:00PM to 11:00PM Astronomical Society hosts public viewing nights monthly at the Briars. Session starts with a talk and then moves out to the observatory for a firsthand look at the night sky. The Briars, 450 Nepean Hwy, Mount Martha mpas.asn.au

Wed 12th, 10:00AM to 10:55AM WE'RE GOING ON A BEAR HUNT is the wonderful story of SATURDAY 5 AUGUST 2017 a family out for walk and on the lookout for a growling bear. Frankston Arts Centre, JOSH EARL Fudge 27-37 Davey Street, Frankston. Ph 9784 1060 artscentre.frankston.vic.gov.au $120

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Boys THE

FALZON


By Melissa Walsh

G

rowing up on the Mornington Peninsula, three brothers Tom, Dan and Ben Falzon could never have dreamed they would find their destiny away from the water and deep in the heart of the desert in Alice Springs. But that’s exactly what happened when, seventeen years ago, the boys along with their dad Joey, arrived in the Alice and decided to do something big for the planet.

The result was the Earth Sanctuary World Nature Centre and it has become a leader in the field of sustainability in education and eco-tourism. “We took up 50 hectares of bush on airport land and went to work creating a complex where visitors can see, touch and marvel at a range of renewable energy equipment, learn about its use, look at the stars, and have a meal,” said the boys, whose inspiration came from wanting to help people understand living sustainability. “For a lot of the time we worked as paramedics for the St John Ambulance to raise the money for our dream.” Ironically, their often dangerous work as Northern Territory paramedics was turned into a series last year when the boys starred in a documentary for the Nine Network called Outback Paramedics. “The show has already had an audience of a million and the network has a contract for more screenings,” said the brothers. “We were rapt that, apart from showing some of the issues in the town, the documentary also highlighted the beauty of the area and gave it the respect it deserves.” For brother Dan, in particular, being in the spotlight was quite familiar. As a young man he had played Erinsborough heart throb Rick Alessi for three years in the Network Ten show Neighbours in the early 90’s, before moving to Darwin for a career change. As champions for the sustainability cause with a passion and knowledge of local ecology and culture, the Falzon brothers take their role seriously while making sure, in typical Aussie spirit, they have fun along the way. “Without sustainable thinking and practices, we may survive the short term but the long term becomes increasingly uncertain,” said the boys whose motivation is to engage, motivate and inspire social change for a sustainable planet. “Earth Sanctuary has a bold agenda. We want to see the subject of sustainability play a central role in education and tourism for all ages. If society as a whole now considers sustainability to be an integral subject for the future, then this must be proportionately reflected in education and tourism in the present.” The family’s dream merged with their passion and knowledge for local ecology, culture and astronomy to create a unique tourism business where visitors can experience sustainable technologies from wind and solar energy, water catchment and harvesting, horticulture, waste management and fully-functioning eco-domes. continued next page...

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“Since its inception in 200, Earth Sanctuary has introduced over 17,000 visitors to sustainable technologies, practices and concepts, with over 5,500 visitors recorded in the 2016 financial year,” said the boys, who now run the business with their families and children by their side. Dan and his wife Alana have a little girl. Tom and his wife Anna have a little boy, and oldest brother Ben recently married his partner Michelle in April this year with a huge family celebration. “We have built the business up to offer award - winning day and evening tours to visitors to the central Australian outback. Our vision is to be Australia’s leading provider of 100% carbon neutral education, tours and events.” And as for coming back to the peninsula, the boys and their families try to get to this part of the world as often as possible. “We still love coming back to the peninsula and it’s great to get near the ocean again. We always loved living near the water but, as it turns out, our destiny was to be in central Australia,” they said.

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“EARTH SANCTUARY HAS A BOLD AGENDA. WE WANT TO SEE THE SUBJECT OF SUSTAINABILITY PLAY A CENTRAL ROLE IN EDUCATION AND TOURISM FOR ALL AGES"

And it seems the boys have found their true purpose helping people discover the spirit of the outback from their magnificent eco centre, surrounded by red sand as far as the eye can see. “We are not only teaching about sustainable living but showing people what the outback has to offer with tourists from Australia and overseas,” said the boys who make sure it is an interactive and entertaining tour which outlines the wonderful history and culture of our country. “Whilst our family may indeed move back to Victoria one day, we will continue to focus our energy on the greatest challenge facing humanity, that being climate shift and the need for a truly sustainable planet.” Surrounded by the central Australian landscape, with thousands of stars as far as the eye can see, the Earth Sanctuary World Nature Centre is a perfect example of what can be achieved when you follow your dreams. Phone (08) 8953 6161 earth-sanctuary.com.au July 2017

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SORRENTO’S

WINTER Wonderland

By Melissa Walsh

T

his winter the Sorrento foreshore will be transformed into winter wonderland with the construction of an ice skating rink between the Baths and the rotunda. In a partnership between the Sorrento Portsea Chamber of Commerce and Ice Rinks Australia, a Somerville based company, the foreshore will have an ice rink from June 23 until July 16. Ice Rinks Australia managing director Rob Stoller could not be more thrilled to be bringing an ice rink to the peninsula. “We have lived on the peninsula for many years and this is the first time we have constructed an ice rink here,” said Rob, who has built ice rinks all over Australia, and on the sand of the beach at Bondi. “We have built rinks in Alice Springs, all the capital cities, and built international ice hockey standard rinks in places like Rod Laver Arena. We are excited to bring a new form of entertainment to families on the peninsula and as an attraction to bring people from outside the peninsula to Sorrento in what is a very quiet time commercially.” Rob says the process of setting up an ice skating rink has become straight forward with pack up and pack down taking about a week each. “When setting up the rink we have to be very sensitive about the environment so we use practices not to impact adversely the foreshore,” he explained. “First we bring in a tent or marquee with a level floor, then we plant and equipment we need to refrigerate the water to make the ice. We use propylene glycol which is a food standard refrigerant that is contained in a sealed system and circulated through a grid of aluminium pipes and chilled to minus 12. We then pour fresh water on the top of it and we have ice. The rink is going to be 25 metres by nine metres and will use approximately 10,000 litres of water. The water is delivered to us by truck to the site.” The partnership between the Sorrento Portsea Chamber of Commerce and Ice Rinks Australia should be great for the local economy, according to Natalie Garner, business development manager of Sorrento Portsea Chamber of Commerce. “We are thrilled to bring the first of its kind to the peninsula, and are setting it up so as to take advantage of its fabulous foreshore location. The sides will be clear plastic so you can see over the water when you are skating,” said Natalie, of the project that has been about nine months in the planning. “Everybody loves the peninsula in the summer but we wanted to bring an activity here that people could do in the winter too. If you’ve ever ice skated in Times Square or near the Eiffel Tower, get ready to add the iconic Sorrento foreshore to your list. sorrento.skatingat.com.au

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THE SURFERS' NEW

DRIVING FORCE By Keith Platt

J

enny Angliss-Goodall smiles as she tells the story about throwing away her legs, then adds that two friends then planned to use them to make a standard lamp for their home in England.

She believes her teaching was effective “Because it was not out of a text book; I could speak about life, there was no bull. It was not theory”.

Angliss-Goodall was in the UK after doing what seemed like the obligatory young Aussies’ tour of Europe.

Angliss-Goodall and her husband of 26 years, Ian, have also run a couple of businesses; one supplying collapsible wheelchairs and another selling therapeutic scented candles.

She was heading home after more than two years away and decided arriving legless would be a fitting finale. “My friends were gay, and said they’d join my legs and then add an electric cable and lampshade,” Angliss-Goodall explains. The legs in question were prosthetics, ones she’d had fitted when she was 12 after her own legs were amputated. “That decision to amputate was the best thing,” she recalls while sitting at the dining table of her Mornington home. “And then getting rid of the prosthetics was something that’s given me more mobility than I ever had walking, and I still had my wheelchair. These days wheelchairs are fantastic, my power wheelchair will take me to just about anywhere, and if this one won't I'll find one that will.” Angliss-Goodall was born with arthrogmyposis multiplex congenital (AMC), a condition that sees two or more joints become permanently fixed (bent or straight) before birth, leading to underdeveloped muscles and curved hands. “I could walk with crutches and my trunk was growing normally but my legs weren’t,” she says. “They wouldn’t amputate [someone with my condition] these days as they can do a lot more with early intervention, even doing tendon transplants. “I persevered with the artificial legs for 10 years, but in the end it was too difficult. You can look as a good as the next person, but you’d be propped up.” Angliss-Goodall says being sent to a special development school is another aspect of her upbringing that would not occur today. She has worked in offices (including telemarketing while in the UK) and taught “empowerment” at Chisholm TAFE “teaching people [carers and people working in the disability field] what I’m doing now. Giving them the tools to take control and manage their own lives to whatever ability is possible. Even choosing to have a sandwich over a pie is taking control over one's own life”.

Although now “retired”, her assistance dog Dudley can’t help himself, or ignore his former training. A couple of nights ago he was quietly eating a bone on his bed when Angliss-Goodall dropped the TV’s remote control. Without any bidding he walked across the room, gave the bone to Angliss-Goodall, picked up the remote and placed it in her lap before retrieving his bone and heading back to bed. Even more astounding for a Labrador – a breed not known for its dislike of food – Dudley has been known to return pieces of dropped cake to the table. The added dog slobber might not have made the cake so appetising, but Dudley showed remarkable restraint. Picking up soap dropped in the shower was another handy bit of help which Dudley was happy to provide. Part of the Angliss-Goodall family for nearly 12 years, Dudley is well travelled, having been 15 times in a plane’s cabin with Jenny. He even has his own fly-by points card. But there have also been two car accidents, the most serious four or five years ago in Main St, Mornington - which “did some damage to Dudley, more emotionally than physically”. Angliss-Goodall says Dudley will be hard to replace. Walnut, a 14-month-old Labrador, had to be returned earlier this year after eight weeks because he was a “random barker”. “It was heartbreaking,” Angliss-Goodall says. “We sent Walnut back to Sydney for advanced training. When he came back I took him to the National Gallery in Melbourne but he kept up with his barking. He now lives with a family which has three children and goes to school four days a week as a therapy dog. I am pleased that he is happy.” Further proof of not being one to let disability stand in her way, Angliss-Goodall has just been elected president of the Disabled continued next page...

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Surfers Association Mornington Peninsula (DSAMP) branch. Always ready to try anything, she joined the organisation soon after it was launched at a public meeting in October 2011. “I was in Canada when that meeting was held, but joined as soon as I got back.” The other members of the founding committee soon realised the value of their colleague when she continually volunteered to be “the crash test dummy” for any piece of equipment that was being trialed for the disabled surfers. Earlier this year Angliss-Goodall’s was one of the first wheelchairs to use specialised plastic matting laid across the beach to the water’s edge near Mt Martha Lifesaving Club. Last year the RACV (which had made a donation for special wide-tyred wheelchairs) sent a film crew to Point Leo to interview her about the DSAMP for its website. Now that she’s president of the branch, Angliss-Goodall is grappling with taking the stigma away from being a “disabled surfer”.

New season story ‘HIGHWAY TO NOWHERE’

in store now.

One of her aims is to have the disabled surfing “participants” more widely known and recognised as “surfers”. “They are surfers with a disability, not the other way round. You have to see the person first not the disability. “I also consider myself an advocate for those who can’t verbalise,” she says. “If people have behaviours, let’s learn about that person and what they’re saying.” “Nowadays we’re looking at things universally for everybody, not putting people in boxes. There’s no reason surfing can’t be for people of all abilities. “Calling them participants instead of surfers is like having a wheelchair sticker on my car.” The sticker she refers to indicates that the vehicle’s driver is sitting in a wheelchair. Angliss-Goodall has just taken delivery of a new customised van.

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A side door ramp allows her to drive her wheelchair into place Instragram @hellojardinerie Facebook jardineriesocialite

July 2017

continued next page...


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behind the steering wheel. The vehicle has voice-activated controls, including indicators, lights and horn. But getting back to her vision for the DSAMP, Angliss-Goodall says her main focus remains on the national organisation’s wish to “keep putting smiles on dials”. “We want to take people surfing and have a safe and happy day out at the beach with their family and friends, just like the rest of society. Many of these people are doing something they’ve never done before in their lives. It’s all about access.” Angliss-Goodall sees a boardwalk planned at Point Leo to allow people in wheelchairs to reach the beach as “the icing on the cake”. “No matter what situation you are in or who you are, you should have complete access to what I call 'the good things in life'.”

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IT’S A TOUGH JOB BUT SOMEONE HAS TO DO IT, AND THE LUCKY GIRL IS CAROLYN DONOVAN WHO ORGANISES THE VICTORIAN FIREFIGHTERS CALENDAR EACH YEAR

THINGS

ARE HEATING UP By Melissa Walsh Photos Yanni

M

arried to a 30 year veteran firefighter, Carolyn has seen first-hand the good they do for the community, but also the devastating effects fire can have on families and in particular children. It was for this reason she decided to start the calendar two years ago.

“The first calendar release was in 2015 but I started the concept the year before. I have seen the firefighters confronted by traumatic incidents through their work and so I decided to bring light-heartedness to them and raise money for a children’s charity at the same time,” said Carolyn who donates all the proceeds to the Monash Children’s Hospital. “I decided to do a calendar as the concept wasn’t around in Victoria and was unique to Victorian firefighters.” Tempting men to disrobe for a calendar shoot started with an advertisement saying they were looking for firefighters to volunteer themselves for the calendar. “When we put the call out for people to appear in the calendar we select the first 14 applicants as it is possible with such a career that one or two might not be available for the photo shoot,” said Carolyn. “The firefighters fill out an application with personal

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details and send an upper body shot which gives me a bit of an idea of what they look like physically. Upper body and facial features play a big role in determining what sort of shoot I want to do.” The call for applicants is put out to all firefighters across Victoria and so far Carolyn has firefighters that range in age from 28 to 45. “From the first calendar we have raised close to $15,000 for the Monash Children’s Hospital, which is fantastic, and we hope to achieve a lot more as the years go on,” said Carolyn. The 2018 calendar has been photographed around significant areas in Victoria. “We have shot some of it at Cruden Farm, some at The Enterprise ship at Docklands, Sea Shepherd, and the Fire Training Grounds at Bangholme,” said Carolyn, who says they get a lot of positive feedback from people. “If we are shooting in a popular area, you will often get people looking on. We started photographing this calendar in February and have taken two months to complete it.” This year our very own Peninsula Essence photographer, Yanni, photographed the calendar, travelling all across the state to capture images of the firefighters. The calendar will be launched at Mornington Peninsula Brewery in October. continued next page...

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“At Victorian Firefighter Calendar we have a simple but focused vision. We aim to produce a calendar which highlights not only the important work of our firefighters, but also delivers our commitment in providing help to children throughout Victoria, by ensuring all net proceeds raised from calendar sales directly benefit the Monash Children's Hospital,” said Carolyn. “Our mission would not be possible without the generosity of our firefighters, supporters and production team, who all volunteer their time, expertise and equipment in the production of this calendar.” For updates about the 2018 calendar visit victorianfirefightercalendar.com

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Expect to pay around half the price FOR AN APPOINTMENT CALL

1300 230 730 SUITE 6 UPPER LEVEL 38A MAIN STREET, MORNINGTON w w w. d i a m o n d c o c o . c o m . a u July 2017

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View our wonderful warm range of EMU footwear.

AUTHOR’S GLOOMY VIEW AS ‘ANGELS’ LEAVE OUR SKIES

Receive $20 OFF your EMU purchase on presentation of this ad (excludes specials, offer expires 31/7/17)

By Keith Platt Photo Gary Sissons

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W

atching as a pair of lightweight, sharp-eyed swallows built a mud nest under the eaves of a house in Seaford has, decades later, led to Geoffrey Maslen writing two books warning of the dangers facing “angels of the air” in Australia and overseas. Editor and author Maslen was inspired by the swallows. “They were the trigger for my interest in birds,” he said.

After years of writing books and articles for newspapers and Eyewear As Individual As You Are magazines, three years ago the former lecturer in education decided it was time to “write the bird book – something more important Eyewear As Individual As You Are Eyewear As Individualthan articles for The Age”.

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But early research for the book he envisaged as “a celebration of birds to be called something like Angels of the Air”, soon revealed Service Brands22 species had become extinct since the arrival of Europeans in Australia and the ongoing threat birds were facing as a result of Serviceclimate change. Brands “The change from writing about how wonderful they are to how threatened they are came when I discovered how many species are near to extinction, and climate change is just getting more serious,” Maslen says. “Both books are a result of my realisation about the threat to birds – a further 150 in Australia alone are endangered – and how little humans are doing to stop the extinction process.” The books, An Uncertain Future: Australian Birdlife in Danger and Too Late: How We Lost the Battle with Climate Change were launched by Sean Dooley at Coolart Homestead and Wetlands, Somers.

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Maslen is a less optimistic; “we’ve probably reached the point where it’s too late … cataclysms will wipe out most of life on earth, including us”.

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Former Greens leader, senator and environmentalist Dr Bob Brown states in his introduction to An Uncertain Future that the book is a “clarion call for Australia’s brilliant but disappearing birds”.

“I hold fairly gloomy prospects for the future of life on earth,” he says, adding that governments around the world cannot be relied on to lead the way.

57 Main Street, Mornington 5975 3235 28 | PENINSULA July 2017 57 Main Street, E Mornington 5975 3235


Research for the bird book took about three years and the 128page companion book on climate change was written during the editing of An Uncertain Future: Australian Birdlife in Danger, which is illustrated with photos by Dr Rohan Clarke. Book launch guest Sean Dooley, who is also known as Birdman and is editor of Australian Birdlife magazine, holds the record for spotting the most species of Australian birds in one year. Regarded as Australia’s most famous twitcher, Dooley has also written for TV comedies like Full Frontal, Hamish and Andy and Spicks and Specks, and is author of books The Big Twitch and Cooking with Baz. Maslen’s backyard in Seaford is designed to attract native birds, although he says some species have become too dominant, sometimes at their own peril. Noisy miners, a honeyeater that lives in colonies, drive out other birds, including the once-common yellow and red wattlebird. “We created ideal conditions for the noisy miners, which, in the long run, self-destruct by driving away the smaller birds that eat the insects that destroy trees.” Maslen’s rather ineffective solution is to throw stones at noisy miners. The equally noisy but more appreciated lorikeet has also “invaded” suburban Melbourne, but Maslen says their occupation is more of a return than colonisation. “The lorikeets were migratory but now stay here all year because of the flowering trees we’ve planted.” Although claiming it’s all too late to save the birds, Maslen hopes he is proved wrong, and that his two books will lead to better results. Geoffrey Maslen’s books are An Uncertain Future: Australian Birdlife in Danger and Too Late: How We Lost the Battle with Climate Change.

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Photos

Peninsula

Mornington Peninsula people never let the cool weather stop them getting out and about. Raising money for cancer, many enjoyed a Biggest Morning Tea at Empire Mall, which was sponsored by the Mornington Chamber with food donated by local businesses. Further up the hill, at the Red Hill Showgrounds, wine lovers gathered for the ultimate celebration at the opening of the Winter Wine Fest. While in Main Street, Mornington, Top Catch Traditional fish and chips played host to the Mornington Business Chamber Networking Night.

WINERIES AT THE WINTER WINE FEST

WINERIES AT THE WINTER WINE FEST

WINTER WINE FEST

WINTER WINE FEST WINTER WINE FEST

WINTER WINE FEST

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CHAMBER CANCER FUNDRAISER MORNING TEA

July 2017


Louvretec: The Architects Choice Louvretec: The Architects Choice Louvretec: The Architects Choice

Award winning Opening Roofs Louvre systems & external venetians, control the sun at the touch of a button. www.louvretecmelbourne.com.au Award winning Opening Award Roofs winning Opening Roofs Louvre systems & externalLouvre venetians, systems & external venetians, control the sun at the touchcontrol of a button. the sun at the touch of a button. www.louvretecmelbourne.com.au www.louvretecmelbourne.com.au


&

BABY MAKES THREE By Melissa Walsh

H

e’s six foot one, weighs 90 kilograms, and is a professional boxer and Australian Cruiserweight champion. She’s a five foot 10, slim, brunette international model who was runner up in the sixth season of Australia’s Next Top Model. Genetically they are a match made in heaven which they soon discovered after Sophie gave birth to their beautiful baby daughter, Laylah, on April 30 this year.

These days, life has slowed down for the young couple who met on New Year’s Eve four years ago and found out Sophie was pregnant while holidaying in Bali. “I met Kane at an event on New Year’s Eve but it took ages before I would go out with him. He was very persistent so I finally agreed to go on a date. Within the first ten seconds of being on our date, I texted my mum ‘keeper’,” said 26 year old Sophie, from the home

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she shares with her partner Kane in Langwarrin, while little Laylah rests snuggled up in her arms. For the model who has worked alongside Rachel Finch, Eamon Sullivan, Ruby Wilkins and Jennifer Hawkins, finding out she was pregnant came as a lovely surprise. “We were in Bali on holidays and to wind down after Kane’s fight with Danny Green,” said Sophie. “I was in a café and a Balinese girl started laughing at me saying I was pregnant. So I rushed to the shop and bought five pregnancy tests.” Peninsula born Kane said the biggest challenge was to get their house ready for the baby, as they were doing a massive renovation. “We bought the house in December and spent the next couple of months madly getting it renovated,” said the 34 year old, admitting the fact they were having a baby didn’t sink in until they were on the way to the hospital. “We were so busy getting


"STARTED BACK AT TRAINING A FEW WEEKS AGO PROBABLY FOR ANOTHER FIGHT AROUND JULY OR AUGUST”.

the house ready it is funny but it didn’t really hit me until Sophie was in labour.”

Luckily Kane and Sophie adapt well to change and their relaxed attitude is helping them get through the inevitable sleepless nights.

The couple agree that the pregnancy was a dream with Sophie only being unwell at the start.

“She has been a good sleeper until the last couple of nights,” said Sophie. “I get up to her and I don’t mind as Kane has to go to work in the plumbing business during the day.”

“I was a little bit unwell at the beginning, and then had a bit of back pain towards the end but all - in - all it was really good, although there was heaps of pressure on Kane to get the house finished in two months,” she said.

It seems pretty clear that these two have got it all sorted. While they are both loving parenting, Sophie will get back into modelling and Kane is already in training for his next fight.

Having the baby at Frankston Hospital was a wonderful experience for the young couple with Sophie’s labour lasting seven and a half hours.

“My last fight was in November so I took a few months off before Laylah was born and started back at training a few weeks ago probably for another fight around July or August,” he said.

“Good people come out of Frankston,” said Kane who was born there, and loves his new life with his two girls. “It is a huge adjustment having a baby. It’s all about timing and taking things with you when you want to leave the house.”

For Sophie, modelling was never far away during her pregnancy, doing maternity shoots for Ripe Maternity and Legoe. “I will get back into it but at the moment I am enjoying this new chapter in our lives with our little girl,” said Sophie.

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HARRY’S FANS BRING MAGIC TO LIFE Amid broomstick antics, wand waving and dragon slaying, Harry Potter fans came in droves to the Bay Hotel for the Harry Potter Trivia Night. Dressed up in costumes that would make Hogwarts School proud, was Harry himself, Professor McGonagall, Hermione Granger, Lord Voldermort, Professor Severus Snape and Sirius Black to name a few, all bringing to life the magic of the big screen on the Mornington Peninsula. The best loved characters in the wizarding world enjoyed a magical evening of Harry Potter Trivia with four rounds of 10 questions from the Harry Potter movie series. The Bay Hotel was decked out in the Harry Potter theme where Hogwarts Flags hung from the ceiling, candles and skeletons, headstones and coffins surrounded the guests. Prizes and giveaways throughout the night spiced up the excitement as tables of wizards and muggles shared a magical night. Photos Yanni

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Beautifully intelligent. The all new E-Class Coupé. Masterpiece of intelligence. The breathtaking, all new E-Class Coupé seamlessly combines stunning coupé design with new levels of automotive intelligence inherent in the E-Class family. This strikingly elegant true 4 seater coupé features uninterrupted views from the absence of the continuous B-Pillar and frameless doors to ensure nothing impedes your enjoyment of motoring pleasure. While sensors and assistance systems in the Driver Assistance package Plus ensure your safety on every journey. Discover beauty at its most intelligent with the all new E-Class Coupé at Mercedes-Benz Mornington.

MBM639A

www.mbmornington.com.au

Mercedes-Benz Mornington 29-31 Mornington-Tyabb Road, Mornington (03) 5973 9688


A shining star. Mercedes-Benz Mornington 2016 Rural Dealer of the Year. Mercedes-Benz Vans would like to congratulate Chris Thoday and the entire team at Mercedes-Benz Mornington on being awarded the 2016 Rural Dealer of the Year. Over the last twelve months they have consistently demonstrated the dedication and excellence that have been hallmarks of the Mercedes-Benz brand for over 130 years. Find out for yourself by visiting Mercedes-Benz Mornington 29 Mornington-Tyabb Rd, Mornington VIC 3931 T: 03 5973 9688 I F: 03 5973 9609 mbmornington.com.au

MBM639B


RELAX, UNWIND AND INDULGE Imagine a place that you can escape to and immerse yourself in complete relaxation, and you will have an idea of the experience at Moonah Day Spa. Moonah Day Spa offers a full range of rejuvenating experiences including facials, beauty, massage and body treatments. Moonah Day Spa therapists are trained in the art of responding to your needs and creating a warm and welcoming environment, Their facial treatments are designed and customized to your changing needs, be it emotional, environmental or physical so that you can put your best face forward.

Enjoy a wellness massage using coconut oil to hydrate the body that leaves your skin feeling silky smooth and immerses you on a journey of full body relaxation, or a 30 minute stress relief back massage. For those with more time on their hands, indulge the senses in a full body hands and hot stone massage with a combination of traditional massage and the water heated stones to offer enhanced benefits.

Moonah Day Spa even does manicures and pedicures, scalp massage, waxing, tinting and spray tanning. For the ultimate in relaxation and to find out more about the wonderful day spa specials contact Moonah Links Day Spa on 5988 2055 or check out moonahdayspa.com.au MOONAH DAY SPA is at Peppers Moonah Links Resort, 55 Peter Thomson Drive, Fingal.

The Dermalogica treatments are divine with a skin treatment customised to meet each different person’s needs upon personal face mapping skin analysis. There’s also the age smart treatment that gives a revitalising power boost designed to firm, nourish and energize.

JULY PAMPER PACKAGE 120 mins - $160 Package includes: Herbal tea on arrival 30 min foot Soak, Scrub & Pressure Point Massage. 60 min Full Body Massage  30 min Express Facial with BONUS Scalp Massage. Moonah Links Day Spa   03 5988 2055 | dayspa@moonahlinks.com.au www.moonahdayspa.com.au T&Cs: Applies to the month of July 2017. Cannot be used in conjunction with other specials. 

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Health & Beauty

THE FUTURE LOOKS LESS ROSY... Men and women can both suffer with 'red' faces, veins or 'rosy' cheeks, which can be a source of embarrassment and self consciousness. There are many causes of these conditions. The good news is that laser therapy, combined with skin rehabilitation, can not only reduce the redness within your skin, but you can also improve the overall appearance of your skin, giving you a fresher and more even complexion. At Dermal Aesthetics, our Dermal Clinicians and Nurses are experts at reducing skin redness and removing veins. Holding post graduate qualifications, our team not only provides effective laser and light

treatments, but can also assist in educating our patients on best skin practice and prevention of further skin damage. When a patient first books their skin assessment appointment, they are analysed for the best laser treatment mode. Skin vascularity is measured and pre-treatment photo's taken and filed. Our Clinicians fully explain the recommended treatment and the patient's lifestyle, medication and medical history is examined for clues to the current skin situation. A program is outlined for the patient and results can be seen within one treatment.

or erythema within our clinic is so rewarding for both our patients and our Clinicians. We have been improving facial skin for many years now and changing the way a person sees themselves. Improving their confidence is really what motivates our dedication to the industry'.

Mirielle, qualified Nurse Clinician and owner of Dermal Aesthetics says: 'treating patients with redness

Dermal Aesthetics S P EC I A L I S T S K I N & L A S E R CL INIC

T R E AT M E N T S F O R A L L S K I N C O N C E R N S

Skin Analysis

Specialised Skin Treatments

Advanced Peels

Pakages for Specialised Concerns

Specialised Treatments

Hair Reduction Solutions

Make Up

"Beautiful skin requires commitment, not a miracle" A team of clinicians and nurses providing evidence based solutions to encourage skin health, wellness and overall confidence. Our clinic services blend the strict standards of a medical environment with a calming ambiance, using clinical strength skin products from O Cosmedics and Skinstitut.

Monday - Friday 9am to 6pm (Nights by appointment) Saturday 10am to 3pm

Providing comprehensive consultations for all services, including professional Skin Analysis with our skin clinicians, we offer industryleading treatments and customised programs for optimised results for your best skin health.

Level 1/76 Main Street Mornington Phone 5975 2156

July 2017

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TWO GREAT LOCATIONS

ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA

OPEN 7 DAYS

MORNINGTON Bentons Square Shopping Centre, Dunns Road

Monday – Friday 9am – 7pm Saturday 9am - 5pm Sunday 10am - 4pm

Proprietors: Nathan Rudolph & Kerryn Rudolph

PENINSULA HOME Peninsula Home, 1128-132 Nepean Highway

Monday – Friday 8am – 6pm Saturday 9am - 5pm Sunday 10am - 5pm

Proprietor: Khai Tran

CHEMIST DISCOUNT CENTRE AT YOUR SERVICE Chemist Discount Centre now has two great locations on the Mornington Peninsula. Whether you are looking to have your prescription filled, or to stock up on essential vitamins, health and beauty or cosmetic products, Chemist Discount Centre is the place to shop. Why not pop in today and talk to your local Chemist Discount Centre Pharmacist, Khai at Peninsula Home or Nathan at Mornington (Benton's Square) who can assist with all your health needs and solutions. In addition, this month both stores have great specials on cosmetics: Revlon 50% off, 40% Off Max factor and Covergirl and 40% Off the Nude by Nature range. While you are there ask them how to join the Club Discount Card Rewards program, as it’s free to join. Shop at Chemist Discount Centre. “Always at the Centre of your Health”. CHEMIST DISCOUNT CENTRE is at Bentons Square, Dunns Road, Mornington and Peninsula Home, 11281132 Nepean Highway, Mornington.

For a hair salon you can trust, look no further than Salon Envy, situated in the heart of Mornington and home to a highly skilled and passionate team of talented stylists. Lounge in the comfort of our timeless environment, a perfect refuge from your busy life. You can expect careful, measured advice and styling guidance to help you achieve the result you are after. At Salon Envy we only use and recommend the best, therefore choosing Revlon Professional, Vanti-t and American Crew for all your in salon services and after care.

20% OFF* ALL NEW CLIENTS

Mention this offer at time of booking *July Only

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SHOP 5 REAR 136 MAIN ST MORNINGTON | salonenvy.com.au

CALL US FOR AN APPOINTMENT ON 5977 2076


Health & Beauty

EXPERIENCE, PROFESSIONAL RESULTS AND DISCRETION Conveniently located near Moorooduc Rd and Peninsula Link, Emily's Professional Beauty offer an extensive range of beauty services at affordable prices. With over 15 years experience Emily prides herself on quality service and results. Services include microdermabrasion, electrolysis, fat freezing, permanent hair removal and chemical peeling just to name a few. All your beauty requirements are covered in one discreet location.

Come and see Estelle and Alex, Juvenil Essence Cosmetic nurses for a consultation to discuss treatments such as anti wrinkle injections and dermal fillers. Clients are pleasantly surprised as to how refreshed and natural they look after treatment. Treatments are available to naturally enhance the facial features such as, dermal fillers that can be used for lip enhancements, lost volume in cheeks and target fine lines. Losing volume is the most common occurrence and dermal fillers give immediate results. Most clients that come for anti wrinkle injectables want to soften or prevent those pesky frown lines that make you look serious and angry. We assess your muscles in this area and start slow with treatment to not only see how you like

Summer bodies are made in

WINTER

FREE No obligation *

it but to enhance and soften so that it gives you a natural look. Come for a free consultation at no obligation to get yourself informed and a treatment plan can be devised that suits you and your budget. Juvenil Essence can be contacted via social media or email juvenilessence@ outlook.com or via mobile 0425737962/0425765465. You can also make an appointment to see us at Emily’s Professional Beauty in Frankston on 9785 9308 or visit emprofbeauty.com.au

Located at shop 3, 300 Heatherhill Rd, Frankston.

Emily’s Professional Beauty

CLUB O A CURVES TAKE THIS INT CONSULTATION &

7DAY* FREEL TRIA ION NO OBLIGAT

Guest pass *

apply * Conditionsclub check in

Conditions apply. Check in club.

Experience professional results and discretion at affordable prices.

Multiple membership options: Student discount No contract available

LIVE

STRONGE R

Fitness-only, or include weight-loss

• Fat Freezing • Microdermabrasion • Electrolysis - Permanent Safe Hair Removal

• Chemical Peeling

• Facial Treatments • Massage: Hot Stone, Relaxation • Spray Tanning • Waxing • Nail and Spa Treatments

Join a 12-week challenge before 31 July! All women aged 14+ welcome!

More information available on our website and Facebook

Estelle and Alex from Juvenil Essence are registered nurses who specialise in cosmetic injectables and total face assessment. Their focus is on enhancing features in a natural way using anti-winkle and dermal filler injections, giving a fresh, balanced and natural look.

Book a FREE consultation today!

Contact Juvenil Essence via juvenilessence@outlook.com or mobile 0425 737 962 / 0425 765 465.

Ph: 5975 5526

MORNINGTON

33/1140 Nepean Highway

www.curvesmornington.com.au

Shop 3, 300 Heatherhill Road, Frankston To make an appointment call: 9785 9308 www.emprofbeauty.com.au July 2017

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t s i l h erWis

t s i l h erWis

nt WiBRINGING

t & inFREE WFABULOUS

SEXY BACK

LASER HAIR REMOVAL

$9

LIP ADD $29 FOR FULL FACE

LASER HAIR REMOVAL

(was $29)

LOWER LEGS ADD $29 FOR BRAZILIAN & UNDERARMS

FULL LEGS

ADD $29 FOR BRAZILIAN & UNDERARMS

EXTRA ADD ON'S NAVEL, PERIANAL, AREOLA

BACK & SHOULDERS

$69

$99

(was $199)

$119

(was $288)

(was $269)

$10 (was $49)

ADD ON NECK FOR AN EXTRA $29 T&C’S Apply

T&C’S Apply

t s i l h s et rWi

st i l h s i nterW

in WFLAWLESS

SUPER WiBOOSTER

FILLERS

1 x SKIN ANALYSIS 1 x ADVANCED MICRODERMABRASION

LIP DERMAL FILLER 1ML ANTI-WRINKLE INJECTIONS 50u

1 x SUPER-CLEANSE EXTRACTION 1 x SUPER-BOOSTER OF YOUR CHOICE 1 x TAKE HOME INFUSION MICROROLLER

$469

$149

(was $587)

(was $248)

T&C’S Apply

T&C’S Apply

st i l h s i nterW

st i l h s i nterW

i W REJUVENATE &

Wi SQUAD

GOALS!

REGENERATE

REFER A FRIEND

1 x PLATELET RICH PLASMA 1 x SKIN NEEDLING

BOTH YOU & YOUR FRIEND WILL RECEIVE A

Free Micro

$799 (was $1,199)

FOR PURCHASES OF $50 & ABOVE.

T&C’S Apply

MELBOURNE CBD MOONEE HILLSIDE IVANHOE BRIGHTONHILLSIDE MOONEE PONDS IVANHOE MELBOURNE CBD BRIGHTON PONDS

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MORNINGTON MORNINGTON

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RINGWOOD RINGWOOD

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Mornington Clinic - 226Main MainStreet StreetMornington, Mornington, Mornington Clinic - 226 MELBOURNE CBD RINGWOOD HILLSIDE MOONEE PONDS MORNINGTON OAKLEIGH IVANHOE BOOK A FREE CONSULTATION Ph: Ph:5975 59752533 2533  australianlaser.com.au BOOK A FREE CONSULTATION australianlaser.com.au

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Mornington Clinic - 226 Main Street Mornington, BOOK A FREE CONSULTATION Ph: 5975 2533 australianlaser.com.au

THOMASTOWN

WILLIAMSTOWN


Health & Beauty

RECEIVE A WARM WELCOME FROM AUSTRALIAN LASER & SKIN CLINICS THIS WINTER The Mornington Australian Laser & Skin Clinics welcomes you with open arms. Centrally located on wonderful Main Street, the boutique medical clinic is a place you can come to receive the latest in medical-grade advanced skin, laser and non-invasive cosmetic treatments. As a proud new member of the Mornington community, the professional and friendly growing team of clinicians and nurses endeavour to follow the ‘Mornington Mantra’ of good vibes and positive attitude, combined with high clinical standards. “Our mission is to design treatments to each individual, and find the best

outcome based on client condition and needs,” said manager, Mako. “The strong team at our Mornington clinic consists of myself, our skilled ‘Senior Nurse’ Sue, caring ‘Senior Clinician’ Corinne, and our ‘Customer Service Coordinator/Clinician’ Emma who connects the right staff for you.” The Australian Laser and Skin Clinic Mornington are running an exclusive ‘Winter Wishlist’ Campaign to show Mornington and surrounds how much they value their clients. “We are also doing sexy back laser hair removal, with back and shoulders for $99, adding $29 for the neck,” said Mako. “Get the smooth hairless back and shoulders you’ve always desired! Experience that feeling of touching silky smooth skin.” There are super boosters to check out as well, offering skin analysis, advanced microdermabrasion, super cleanse

extraction to name a few. “This pack is an affordable, quick, non-invasive skin treatment. Ideal for cleaning, refining and smoothing the skins surface, leaving you looking ravishingly radiant,” said Mako. “This Winter Wishlist special has been carefully designed to rejuvenate and regenerate the skin, especially skin conditions relating to ageing and scarring. “ The Australian Laser & Skin Clinics also offers an introductory offer is the ‘crème de la crème’ of intro offers! Receive 50% off Laser Hair Removal & 20% off Skin Treatments on your first treatment. THE AUSTRALIAN LASER AND SKIN CLINIC is at 226 Main Street, Mornington Phone 5975 2533 mornington@australianlaser.com.au

July 2017

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STATE of

Bliss

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By Cameron McCullough

T

he Bhagavad Gita, the ancient Hindu scripture, states that “Yoga is the journey of the self, through the self, to the self ”. A practice of self discovery, as much as a practice of health and relaxation.

It is no surprise then, that devotees have often overcome great hurdles during their lives to arrive at the place where they have found peace and tranquillity. Melanie Coghlan of Mount Martha is one such person. Someone who has battled at times in her life, found peace through yoga, and now wants to spread the word through her business “State of Bliss”. “I had always struggled,” said Melanie. “That struggle manifested itself in many ways, but most prominently as an eating disorder.” “It began in my early teenage years. I felt so out of control and as strange as it sounds, my eating disorder was something I could control.” It was her natural reaction to hardship. To shut down. To turn inward. To refuse food. Her parents were supportive through her teenage years, and she finally broke out of her bad situation in year 2000 when she met her future husband, Brendon. “Brendon was great. A breathe of fresh air. But getting to know him better, I came to the realisation that he too struggled internally. “Men are told they can’t show any emotion. That they have to be tough. But I knew he battled with a form of anxiety,” said Melanie. “We were both very driven people, but something was missing. An inner peace.” It was in 2003 that Melanie started on her yoga journey. “I went to see a beautiful lady who ran yoga classes at Beleura Hill shops.” said Melanie. “It might sound strange, but I stepped on that yoga mat and thought ‘I’m here’. I felt an instant release and an instant calmness that I had never felt before.” The yoga journey had begun for Melanie and so had the life that she and Brendon started together. “We wanted to start a family. Before long I was pregnant and our first child, Savannah, was born in 2006.”

Photos Yanni

“She was such a beautiful baby. Six months later we thought ‘let’s have another!’”. But after six months of trying, Melanie and Brendon were still unable to conceive. A trip to the obstetrician confirmed that Melanie had polycystic ovaries and, although she had conceived naturally the first time, it would be difficult for her to again conceive naturally. “We decided to go down the route of IVF, which proved to be a very difficult time.” continued next page... July 2017

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“IVF is like a rollercoaster; there are plenty of ups, downs, twists and turns, it’s an emotional trip and a rock-solid relationship is the only way you’ll survive”. Luckily for Melanie, Brendon was very supportive. And during this time, Melanie finally sought out professional help for the lingering eating disorder. After three years of IVF their second child, Sebastian, arrived in 2010. “It was such a joyous time. We finally had our second child”. But the journey was to continue for Melanie and Brendon. “I had loved the dynamic of growing up in a house with three kids. And we had two embryos still frozen from IVF, so we thought we’d give it one last shot”, said Melanie. “One was found to be unusable, which left us with one viable embryo. “We thought to ourselves ‘If it is meant to be, it is meant to be’. We had it implanted and it took!” It was a perfect pregnancy, and everything was travelling as expected when their world was turned upside down. “I was involved in a car accident,” said Melanie. “The accident happened at lunchtime, and by 5.30pm, I was miscarrying”. That was February 2012, and the beginning of very dark times for Melanie. “Women are supposed to have children. I began to torture myself mentally about what had happened,” said Melanie. “I know we had said ‘If it is meant to be, it is meant to be’, but I really struggled with that”. Melanie needed to work out who she was and where she was going. “I threw myself into exercise,” said Melanie. “For some reason, I thought more exercise would make me a better person but really I was just running away from my issues and letting my ego take control.” That didn’t fix the internal issues for Melanie that continued to haunt her and take her away from her family. “In reality, what we needed was to come together more than ever. But my actions were pulling us apart”. It was only as injuries began to plague Melanie that she came to a realisation of where her happiness and peaceful place was. “It was time to get back on a yoga mat.” Yoga is now an everyday thing for Melanie. Husband Brendon does it two to three times a week. “This is the way I have found inner peace. I stopped letting my ego have control and started to listen to my heart.” “It is a total turnaround from where I used to be. I am now happy with my body and the fact it has been capable of carrying

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two beautiful, healthy children and on top of that I am by far the happiest I have ever been.” Of course, the story doesn’t end there. Melanie now spends much of her life on a yoga mat. But she struggled to find one that was right for her. “I kept on buying new ones, but they just weren’t right! Some slipped. Some smelt like rubber.” “Brendon, being the ‘ideas man’ that he is, piped up with ‘Why don’t you just make what you want?’” “State of Bliss” was born. Melanie researched what was in the market, set her sights on a mat that had a luxurious feel and then created the design. “We found a reputable manufacturer that made their mats out of natural tree rubber, microfiber suede, and non-toxic glues.” It started with an order of just 24 mats last September, and Melanie hit social media to show the world. “The internet is an amazing thing. Before we knew it, we had people from all over the world ordering our mats from our online store!”

This little business in Mount Martha has exported mats to New Zealand, New York, and even Egypt. “It has greatly exceeded my expectations“. The yoga mats were just the beginning; more recently State of Bliss launched an organic cotton clothing range. “I wanted to start with just a few key items, garments that were made ethically, used environmentally friendly fibres and were affordable. Our range of t-shirts, singlet tops, crew neck sweaters and hoodies have proved to be popular especially the hoodie now as we head into winter” said Melanie. “Social media has been amazing. Yogis are very active on Instagram. For example, the hashtag #yogaeverydamnday has over nine million posts!” So, it has been a long journey. Melanie’s business, “State of Bliss” continues to grow. But more importantly, Melanie has found a place where she is at peace and reconciled with herself as a person. As the Bhagavad Gita said, a journey of the self, through the self, to the self. Melanie has arrived. She has found her “State of Bliss”. For information, go to stateofbliss.com.au, or email info@ stateofbliss.com.au. Instagram: @state.of.bliss

SAIL lunch to

@ RORO Cafe on the Beach, Queenscliff. Return Ferry travel plus a 2 course lunch Includes Main Course, Sweet Treat and a glass of regional wine.

**WINTER SPECIAL** ADD A FREE SOUP OF THE DAY *See website for terms & conditions

only $39 per person. Book online today. www.searoad.com.au or call 03 5257 4500 July 2017

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Finance

your

DREAM

starts here…

Violeta Finance’s service is designed with families and busy parents in mind. Our office is child, baby and pram friendly! Or, we can come to you. We help families and small business owners achieve their home ownership and finance dreams; by ensuring they get a fair deal on their home loans, car loans and business finance. info@violetafinance.com.au

0424 849 034

violetafinance.com.au

PROPERTY INVESTMENT HOW TO GET YOUR FOOT IN THE DOOR With the right information and support property investment can be very profitable. These three crucial steps will help you get started:

CLARIFY YOUR FINANCES

1/14 Lakewood Blvd Carrum Downs

use the equity in your existing property towards the deposit for your investment property. Accessing equity, will require your current home loan to be refinanced. Create a budget – Research and calculate ongoing costs associated with purchasing an investment property and create a budget.

PINPOINT PROFITABLE LOCATIONS

List and review your assets and liabilities to determine how much you can borrow. This will help you create a target price range to narrow property search.

Research property data and trends in the suburbs where you would like to invest, including: •

Average median house price

Calculate upfront costs including deposit and stamp duty. If you already own a property you may be able to

Property value increases over the past five or six years

Rental yields

WORK SMARTER, NOT HARDER. This tax-time, you have a choice. Make a positive change for your business and talk to the team at SMART Business Solutions. The same team that brought the highly successful BITE Conference to the Mornington Peninsula. The same team that continue to strive for industry excellence. The same team that aren’t afraid to be at the cutting edge of business and technology. The same team that will treat your business as if it were their own. This tax-time, be SMART.

www.smartbusinesssolutions.com.au Level 1, 328 Main Street, Mornington, VIC, 3931 www.smartbusinesssolutions.com.au

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LOAN OPTIONS

Factors to consider when comparing loan products are: The interest rate and any associated fees Whether there is an option to choose between a variable rate and fixed rate. To explore your property investment or home loan options give your friendly local finance broker Carl from Violeta Finance a call 0424 849 034 or email carl@violetafinance.com.au. VIOLETA FINANCE'S child and baby friendly office is located at 1/14 Lakewood Blvd Carrum Downs, or Carl can come to you!

Why BJS Mornington? Professional Innovative Australian Owned BJS Insurance Brokers are a family owned business, recently relocated to 315 Main Street, Mornington. We provide a holistic solution and advice for all business risks, including, but not limited to:

TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR • Business Insurance • Workers’ Compensation RETIREMENT, BE IT NOW • Corporate Insurance • Life Insurance AWAY • Tailored Products OR •YEARS Claims Management

• Risk Management • Personal Insurance We can help you actively manage your Superannuat We are offering local businesses obligation free reviews of their insurance programs. Call us today on 9860 4279 to speak to one of our team, or email us at southern@bjsib.com.au

TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR RETIREMENT, BE IT NOW OR YEARS AWAY We can help you actively manage your Superannuation

Our difference PHONE is our knowledge expertise of the entire 03 9783and 4999 peninsulafinancial.com.au insurance market andRepresentative our team of specialised insurance Authorised of Lonsdale Financial Group Ltd ABN: 76 006 637 225 | AFSL 246934 brokers have over 100 years experience in commercial and personal insurance. BJS truly are an “open market” placement broker, unlike some of our competitors.

OUR PHILOSOPHY: is to always be ‘moving forward’ as a company. Rather than a traditional mission statement we have one core question: Why are we here? The answer is simple:

PHONE 03 9783 4999 peninsulafinancial.com.au

• To be the best provider of insurance & risk management solutions • To be your trusted insurance adviser • To be a pro-active member of the business community.

Authorised Representative of Lonsdale Financial Group Ltd ABN: 76 006 637 225 | AFSL 246934

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E G A Y O V BON

TRISH MAKES HOLIDAYS TERRIFIC As one of the travel industry’s most successful agency consultants, Trish Stamp knows her business so when you visit Trish Stamp Travel Helloworld you are getting advice from the best.

Her Helloworld agency offers complete travel packages to suit all budgets, age groups and tastes. After being in the business for more than 40 years, Trish has also travelled the world extensively and can advise on the best value for money and holiday destinations. Trish Stamp and her team take pride in offering the best holiday advice and organisation in the

u

ndently can Express.

business, Trish was awarded the Helloworld Platinum Achievement Award 2016 and the Diamond Achievement Award in 2015 because of her reputation for excellence and professionalism.

Going on holidays should be fun and Trish and her team at Trish Stamp Travel Helloworld make sure you enjoy yourself from the time you start booking. You can rest assured that they will take care of all your travel needs from flight itineraries, insurance, tour bookings, visas, and cash passport cards. TRISH STAMP TRAVEL HELLOWORLD is at 70 Mount Eliza Way, Mount Eliza Phone 9787 5437 trishstamptravel.com.au

HAT TRICK OF AWARDS FOR PENINSULA TRAVEL!

It’s been an exciting couple of months for the team at Peninsula Travel. Not only has the Peninsula’s premier agency branched out from its flagship base at Mount Martha to open a sister agency in Red Hill, the team is also celebrating a string of victories at this year’s Helloworld travel awards. Director Michele Saunderson and her crew of skilled advisors won a swag of accolades at the May 19 gala ceremony on the Gold Coast, recognising the best of the best across the national Helloworld network of more than 1000 stores.

In a thrilling hat trick, the office picked up the State Sales Growth award, was named State Retailer of the Year for the second consecutive year, and also took out top honour with the prestigious National Retailer of the Year award. "We were up against the best in the Helloworld associates groups, of which there are hundreds across Australia some offices have 10 branches - so we are absolutely thrilled to have been chosen.”

9 Bay Road, Mt Martha Phone: 5974 3911 admin@peninsulatravel.com.au 87 Arthurs Seat Road, Red Hill, Phone: 5989 2393 redhill@peninsulatravel.com.au

PENINSULA TRAVEL WINNER OF OF THE THE 2017 HELLOWORLD WINNER NATIONAL RETAILER OF THE YEAR

We’re honoured to be awarded the Helloworld Retailer of the Year and promise to put our best into your travel plans.

Trish Stamp Travel Trish Stamp Travel

TrishTravel Stamp Trish Stamp

70 ElizaTravel Way, MT ELIZA VIC 3930 TrishMt Stamp 70 +61 Mt Eliza MT 5437 ELIZA VIC 3930 T: (3)Way, 9787 I E: trish@tsttravel.com.au T: +61 (3) 9787 5437 I E: trish@tsttravel.com.au

Malahide Limited as Trish Travel is independently Malahide Pty.Pty. Limited trading trading as Trish Stamp TravelStamp is independently owned and operated under licence helloworld andhelloworld American Express. owned and operated underfrom licence from and American Express.

Travel

9 Bay Road Mount Martha VIC 3934 87 Arthurs Seat Road, Red Hill Vic 3937 Telephone 03 5974 3911 www.peninsulatravel.com.au

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Travel CRUISEABOUT MT ELIZA Your one-stop shop for all your travel needs, the team of five are all experts in their field with many years of experience in the industry. They can help plan your holiday whether it be a flight, cruise, hotel, car hire and travel insurance, anything you need. Cruising is definitely growing in popularity with more than one million Australians taking to the seas. The choice and variety in cruising is continually growing with different standards and sizes of ships now cruising from Australian and overseas ports. There is so much to choose from and the team at Cruiseabout Mt Eliza can help you find the one

that best suits your needs, whether it is a short weekend cruise, a longer cruise to the South Pacific or New Zealand or a bucket list European River Cruise or Inside passage of Alaska. Don’t underestimate the value of a Travel Agent. They can save you time and money and have access to exclusive deals you wont find online. And it is comforting to know you have someone you can trust to ensure your trip runs to plan. They will be there when you need them even while you are travelling. So if you are thinking of a cruise or any other type of holiday be sure to call in and speak to one of the friendly team – Kathryn, Tanya, Elise, Emma and Jared.

Important Travel Tips Double check your passport. Make sure you have plenty of time before it expires. Some countries require more than six months validity, so it’s important to be sure you have at least that long. Check if you need a visa. Some countries will require a travel visa in addition to a valid passport.

Research the customs and culture of the country you are visiting. It is important to be respectful of your host country.

e night available on th Exclusive offers

INFORMATION SESSION

Learn enough of the language and key phrases to get around. Words such “thank you” and “please” are appreciated by the locals.

Join us for a FREE information session with APT & Travelmarvel! • Learn all about Europe river cruising, Canada & Alaska touring & cruising programs • Get insider tips from cruising experts

Wednesday 26 July 2017

Check your mobile phone’s international plan. It is important that you can access your phone to receive and make calls when needed.

Time: 6.30pm Where: Canadian Bay Hotel, 35 Ranelagh Drive

Make photocopies of IDs and credit cards. This will ensure you have access to all the numbers should they be lost or stolen.

To RSVP, please call Cruiseabout Mt Eliza on 9775 4033 or email kathryn.gregg@cruiseabout.com.au by Friday 21 July 2017.

9775 4033 cruiseabout.com.au

CRUISEABOUT MT ELIZA

62 Mount Eliza Way

Arrange travel insurance. Speak to your travel agent about travel insurance to ensure you are covered for any emergency situations.

Flight Centre Travel Group Limited (ABN 25 003 377 188) trading as Cruiseabout. ATAS Accreditation No. A10412. CAM77507

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E G A Y O V BON

FREE WINE FOR PILGRIMS ON THEIR WAY TO SANTIAGO! “Pilgrim, if you wish to arrive at Santiago full of strength and vitality, have a drink of this great wine and make a toast to happiness.” This sign near Estella in northern Spain is a joyous sight for pilgrims on Day 7 of RAW Travel’s full-length Camino walk. Having started their journey in the bustling Basque village of St Jean Pied de Port, nestled in the foothills of the Pyrenees mountains, they are 115km into their 780km walk to Santiago. Dave Reynolds, founder of RAW Travel, says that when their travellers complete the 22km section from Puente de la Reina to Estella they can make a visit to this free wine fountain, which is part of the ancient Monastery of Irache in Ayegui. “There are actually two fountains: one dispenses

wine and the other fresh water”, says Dave. “It’s a popular stop with Camino walkers but also local dog walkers!”

Apart from the joy of finding a free wine fountain, the Camino de Santiago has plenty of gifts for pilgrims along this stretch. “The historic towns along this section with their narrow cobbled streets, churches and stone bridges really live up to the Spain of people’s imaginations”, says Dave. The area is justly famous for its Rioja wine and fresh produce including delicate white asparagus, olives and orchard fruits. The Camino is Europe’s great historical and cultural walk and the staff at RAW Travel are Australia’s Camino experts. They have walked and cycled all the routes, so you can rely on them for up to date local knowledge and expertise.

“Whether you are spiritually minded or more of an adventurer, pilgrim routes can provide a unique holiday experience”,

says Dave. “We are the only company to offer fully flexible and tailormade Camino walking trips, from 3 to 41+ days, including the most popular route across Northern Spain; the less-crowded Portuguese Coastal Camino; and the Le Puy Route, one of the best loved walks in France, which continues to Santiago de Compostela. What makes this walk unique is the chance to stay in some beautiful, historic accommodation.” No matter which section you choose or how far you walk, you'll still find this iconic trail beautiful and transformational. So if you enjoy indulging in authentic food and wine, and you have a yearning to reflect, meditate and meet like-minded travellers, an iconic Camino adventure in 2018 might be just what you’re looking for. FREE INFORMATION NIGHT You can meet and talk to the team from RAW Travel at their free Camino information night on Thursday 27 July at

Experience Europe’s great historical & cultural walk Fully flexible + tailormade walking trips on the Camino (Spain, Portugal, France) 3 to 41+ days

Challenge, inspiration & connection

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Classic Camino Women’s trips Tailormade Cycling trips

Le Puy Camino (France)

Book now for 2018 earlybirds

54 | PENINSULA

Camino de Santiago (Spain)

Portuguese Coastal Camino

July 2017


Travel

the Best Western hotel in Mornington. They also have a fantastic limited offer for Mornington Peninsula residents: If you book one of their 2018 Camino trips by 4 August 2017 you’ll receive a complimentary Parador upgrade. These iconic one-of-a-kind historic hotels are the perfect treat for your tired feet. ABOUT RAW TRAVEL RAW Travel is a boutique tour operator specialising only in iconic walking adventures. They offer both guided

and self-guided trips in their chosen destinations. RAW Travel won’t try to fit you into a pre-determined itinerary. Every client receives personal, friendly, expert service. They will consider your fitness, achievements, motivations and desires and work with you to design an unforgettable journey. RAW TRAVEL is at Suite 7, 38A Main Street, Mornington Phone: 5976 3763 rawtravel.com

Why book your Camino trip with RAW Travel? We are Australia’s Camino experts!

• Our dedicated Camino team has walked and cycled all the routes, ensuring we are the destination specialists. You can rely on us for local knowledge and expertise.

Complimentary Parador Hotel Upgrades

• We offer fully flexible tailormade itineraries and will meticulously organise your adventure, including comprehensive pre-departure advice.

Book one of our Camino trips* by 4 August 2017 to enjoy a complimentary Parador Hotel upgrade (B&B).

• We send hundreds of walkers and cyclists to the Camino every year, combining great value with authentic experiences.

These iconic one-of-a-kind luxury hotels (converted historic buildings such as a monastery or castle) are the perfect treat for your inner soul.

• We directly book everything and make all arrangements from our local office on Victoria’s Mornington Peninsula. • Our staff on the ground in Spain are fluent in Spanish and English and available to help you with any emergencies.

Fantastic offer for Mornington Peninsula pilgrims!

* See website for T+Cs: www.rawtravel.com/camino

Free Information Night Camino de Santiago Limited places. Bookings essential: www.rawtravel.com/talks Date: Thursday, 27 July 2017 Venue: Best Western, 99 Tanti Avenue, Mornington @6pm

Call +61 3 5976 3763 www.rawtravel.com/camino

Light refreshments provided.

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Gourmet Travel ADVENTURES Gourmet Travel ADVENTURES

Australia 2017/18

Australia 2017/18 Featuring six very different and tasty, Featuring very premium,six all-inclusive, different and tasty, small group tours premium, all-inclusive,

small group tours

“Excellent concept. Looking forward to Tassie Trail in November.” ~King Island Looking Long Lunch, forward Feb 2017 “Excellent concept. to Tassie Trail in November.” ~King Island Long Lunch, Feb 2017

“A foodies haven that people should have the “A foodiestohaven that people should the opportunity experience .” ~Seafood Lovers,have Apr 2017 opportunity to experience .” ~Seafood Lovers, Apr 2017

CallCall 03 9875 1422 1422 03 9875 or 1800 044 or 1800 187 044 187

®®

info@australianairholidays.com info@australianairholidays.com

AVAILABLE FROM YOUR LOCAL TRAVEL AGENT

AVAILABLE FROM YOUR LOCAL TRAVEL AGENT

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australianairholidays.com.au

July 2017

australianairholidays.com.au

online booking available

online booking available


Travel AUSTRALIA – THE WORLD’S NEW FOODIE FRONTIER We all know how good the food and wine is on the Mornington Peninsula - spoilt for choice and quality right? But guess what - there are other great food regions that are flourishing throughout Australia. The wide brown land has become the land of milk and honey.

the Noosa Everglades is a highlight, as is a degustation at the award winning Spirit House restaurant. Staying at the luxurious Sofitel Noosa Pacific Resort, it doesn’t get much better than this! On the Seafood Lovers Weekend, tour Port Lincoln – the seafood capital of Australia, enjoy an exclusive master class demonstration from renowned local chef, Kris Bunder, then get to eat his delicious creations.

Culinary tourism is now all the rage and Australian Air Holidays has just launched a new mouth-watering foodies touring brochure.

Australian Air Holidays has been offering premium, allinclusive group touring experiences throughout Australia since 2003 and is part of the Reed Holidays Group.

Gourmet Travel Adventures features six very different and exceptionally tasty, premium, all inclusive, culinary tours. The focus of these tours is on fine local food, beautiful scenery, culture and history.

“Australia’s food experiences are now up there with the best in the world” says David Hayward, from Australian Air Holidays. “Gourmet Travel Adventures celebrates this fact and fills the growing demand for premium food tourism experiences.”

For example the tour Paradise on a Plate is centred in beautiful Noosa and its stunning hinterland. It is a four day food foray blended with fantastic touring. A cruise on

Call 9875 1422 for a brochure, visit your local travel agent or go to australianairholidays.com

Spirit House

Kris Bunder-Port Lincoln

King Island Long Lunch

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HAPPY TRAILS AHEAD OUR RIDES

Discover the experience for yourself Experience horseback trail riding through beautiful coastal bush-lands and spectacular beaches. Fresh air, gentle horses, stunning scenery and our friendly staff will ensure you enjoy a safe experience and create memories that last a lifetime.

At Gunnamatta Trail Rides we’ve been offering the best trail rides around for over thirty-five years. Situated on the glorious Mornington Peninsula, we’re very lucky to be only a short ride from both the beach and the bush. So, whether you’re looking to step hoof onto the golden sands of St Andrews beach, or wind your way through the intrepid bushland trails – our experienced & passionate guides will be glad to find a horse that’s right for you and head out!

ST ANDREWS BEACH RIDE The St Andrew’s Beach Ride is our signature ride here at Gunnamatta. In this mesmerising journey, you’ll explore the coastal bushland as soon as you leave Gunnamatta stables, then traverse the high sand dunes overlooking the ocean, where you may even spot some surfers enjoying the waters of St Andrew’s beach. Riding along the beach, you’ll be able to watch the waves gently lapping at the shore, and maybe even step hoof in the water, with our experienced guides watching over you. There truly is no better way to explore the area than on horseback. With a herd of over seventy-five horses, we have horses for all abilities and sizes of rider. Whether you’re a nervous novice or an Olympic champion; we guarantee that we’ll have a horse to make you feel safe, and have the time of your life.

PRODUCT RANGE: •

Beach Rides

Bush Rides

Packages - offered in conjunction with local tour operators

Kids / Teen / School Holiday Programs

Lessons - Private / Group

Clinics

ADDITIONAL ASPECTS OF BUSINESS:

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GTR has also created a community focused Club (The Little Gunna’s Club) for existing horse owners and non-horse owners with an opportunity to lease a horse for each rally held monthly

The Gunna Club - only for Experienced Riders (“Experience Essential”)

The only place anywhere that offers a diverse range of dedicated Horse Activities conducted by qualified and passionate experienced adult Instructors

All Ride durations are time riding in saddle - best value for money


Winter

Mornington Peninsula / Stay & Play

MT ELIZA’S FARMERS MARKET

UNIQUE, EXCLUSIVE, CREATIVE

Mt Eliza provides the ideal village atmosphere for a farmer’s market with its locally made goods, certified organic and conventionally grown vegetables, juicy fruits, cheeses, boutique beers and wines.

The Melbourne Collective believes it's time for a new and exclusive Design Market. A more creative and enjoyable way to bring together unique brands and independent designers.

With 50 stall holders that vary with the seasons, there’s nothing better than taking a trip down to the Mt Eliza Farmer’s Market to pick up some delicious delicacies and take part in this fabulous community event. Enjoy Flinders Sourdough bread, baked traditional sourdough in Flinders’ original wood fired oven. Check out the award winning Bluebay cheese, a handmade and awardwinning dairy product from farm-fresh and locally sourced milk. There’s also Mumma Made, a Mornington Peninsula business creating delicious jam and chutney, as well as stalls with muesli, olive oil, jams, dog treats, potatoes, fresh vegetables, apples, honey, cakes, chocolate, chestnuts, hazelnuts, citrus, meat, flowers, and hot donuts, scones, chai and duck pancakes. Enjoy the next two monthly markets which will be held on Sunday July 23 and Sunday August 27, 2017. mtelizafarmersmarket.com.au

A Lifestyle event that provides a feast for the eyes and imaginations of our Event visitors, who will be spoilt with high end quality design, homewares, fashion and art. ​ he Melbourne Collective prides itself on offering the T highest level of customer service for exhibitors & visitors. With qualifications and years of experience in the Interior Design Industry, we aim to select a diverse array of high quality handcrafted and designer brands. ​ isitors to The Melbourne Collective Design Market can V also enjoy creative workshops, high quality food options, cool tunes and fun for the kids. Sponsored by the Sports and Injury Clinic, The Mornington Design Market will be held on Sunday 23rd of July from 10am till 3pm, at the Peninsula Community Theatre. Cnr Nepean Hwy and Wilson Rd, Mornington. For more information or to shop online visit the melbournecollective.net

T H E M O U N T E L I Z A C H A M B E R O F C O M M E R C E P R O U D LY P R E S E N T S :

2017 MARKET DATES 4TH SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH 9am - 1pm 9.00am - 1.00pm Cnr Mt Eliza Way & Canadian Bay Road

JANUARY 22105 F1) JULY 23 (Mel Ref: AUGUST 27 FEBRUARY 26 SEPTEMBER 24 MARCH 26 OCTOBER 22 APRIL 23- 1.00pm 9.00am Mt Eliza Way & Canadian Bay Road NOVEMBER 26 MAYCnr 28 (Mel Ref: 105 F1) JUNE 25

Upcoming market dates 2017 MARKET DATES July 23 and August 27 4TH SUNDAY SPONSORS OF EVERY MONTH 9am - 1pm

9.00am - 1.00pm 9am-1pm: rain, hailBay & Cnr Mt Eliza Way & Canadian Roadshine

G JULY 23 G AUGUST 27 FEBRUARY 26 SEPTEMBER 24 MARCH 26 Find us at the Cnr Mt Eliza Way & Canadian Bay Road M OCTOBER 22 APRIL 23MFor 9.00am - 1.00pm more information: Cnrinfo@mtelizafarmersmarket.com.au Mt Eliza Way & Canadian Bay Road Email. M NOVEMBER 26 MAY 28 (Mel Ref: 105 F1) www.mtelizafarmersmarket.com.au JUNE 25 www.facebook.com/mtelizafarmersmarket

JANUARY 22105 F1) (Mel Ref: BYO reusable shopping bags & coffee cups OUZLAN GROUP AUSTRALIA

OUZLAN GROUP AUSTRALIA

MORNINGTON DESIGN MARKET SUNDAY 23RD JULY 10AM - 3PM INDOOR SHOPPING 100 FREE SHOW BAGS GIVEWAYS LIVE MUSIC KIDS ACTIVITIES FOOD TRUCKS COFFEE ATM ONSITE FREE PARKING $2 ENTRY ADULTS  KIDS FREE

GOUZLAN GROUP AUSTRALIA GOUZLAN GROUP AUSTRALIA

M M M

PCT CRN NEPEAN HWAY & WILSONS RD MORNINGTON

SPONSORS

GOUZLAN GROUP AUSTRALIA

July 2017

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RT EDGAR - THE PENINSULA EXPERTS Founded in 1896, RT Edgar has an enviable reputation with the knowledge and skills that have been earned through many seasons of marketing properties for sale and rental in Melbourne and on the Mornington Peninsula. With a unique understanding of the local area, we strive to provide professionalism and good old-fashioned personal service. As one of the most respected and longest-serving real estate agencies in Melbourne, RT Edgar is renowned for exceptional results, outstanding service, personal integrity and utmost professionalism. For over one hundred years, RT Edgar has grown to become Melbourne’s prestige property experts, proudly representing some of the finest homes in metropolitan and greater Victoria. RT Edgar Portsea offers a wide range of holiday rental accommodation to suit all budget requirements, from the moderately priced beach cottages to luxury cliff-top homes. Our Portsea office manages holiday rentals from Portsea to Rye and a few select properties at Dromana, McCrae, and Martha Cove at Safety Beach.

ATTENTION HOLIDAY HOME OWNERS If you are under utilising your holiday home, consider holiday or permanent rental with the leading agent on the Mornington Peninsula. Demand exceeds supply so your asset can provide an income stream. For an obligation free market appraisal and advice on how best to prepare your home for holiday or permanent rental, please contact our professional and friendly property management team.

holidayrentals@rtedgar.com.au portsea.rtedgaraccommodation.com.au

Phone – 5984 4500 www.rtedgar.com.au

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The properties we offer are suitable for golf and wedding accommodation, family getaways and couples weekends for relaxing or visiting the local wineries and restaurants. We offer a selection of pet friendly homes, pools and spas, tennis courts, Bay and rural views, close to villages, shops and beaches. View our holiday rental website portsea.rtedgaraccommodation.com.au/holiday/ accommodation Our experienced team includes, real estate agents, sales negotiators, auctioneers and property managers, all of whom are committed to delivering the best possible results for our clients. Each RT Edgar agent offers an extraordinary depth of expertise, with an average of 15 years experience across our Melbourne real estate professionals. Our friendly Holiday Rental Team will assist you in making the right choice to suit your requirements for a relaxing and enjoyable time on the Mornington Peninsula. Please call us on 03 59844500 or email to holidayrentals@rtedgar.com.au


Winter WINTER DELIGHTS AT THE PORTSEA HOTEL Winter is a great time to visit Portsea without the hustle and bustle of the summer crowds, and so many cosy cafes and wineries to visit. Portsea Hotel is no exception, the thriving venue with views over the water as far as the eye can see, and a restaurant that is open for lunch and dinner every day. Enjoy food and a few wines in front of one of our open fireplaces, with a great selection of local wines and craft beers to choose from. Why not make a weekend of it and enjoy one of the en suite rooms with balconies and views of the water. The Portsea Hotel has country style accommodation just up the stairs above the pub, so you can rest

WEEKDAY SUPER SAVER

$

250

2 NIGHTS ACCOMMODATION IN AN ENSUITE ROOM ———— 2 RETURN TICKETS ON THE EAGLE ARTHURS SEAT SKYLIFT ———— A BOTTLE OF CAPE SCHANCK SPARKLING ON ARRIVAL ———— $50 FOOD & BEVERAGE VOUCHER

Mornington Peninsula / Stay & Play

assured everything you need is at your fingertips, making it perfect for a family getaway or a romantic escape. Accommodation packages include passes to the Arthurs Seat Eagle, a state-of-the-art gondola that flies over the state forest to the highest point of the beautiful Mornington Peninsula. You will be torn between looking at the breathtaking view across the bay to the city and spotting wildlife as you soar high above the trees.

PORTSEA HOTEL is at 3746 Point Nepean Road, Portsea Phone 5984 2213 portseahotel.com.au

There is also an accommodation package including Peninsula Hot Springs, food and beverage vouchers to enjoy during your stay and a bottle of bubbly and chocolates to enjoy on arrival. Call the Portsea Hotel reception team to check availability and book one of our Winter Accommodation packages. Larger rooms and upgrades are also available on the packages.

ROMANTIC ESCAPE

$

270

1 NIGHT ACCOMMODATION IN AN ENSUITE ROOM ———— 2 RETURN TICKETS ON THE EAGLE ARTHURS SEAT SKYLIFT ———— A BOTTLE OF CAPE SCHANCK SPARKLING & CHOCOLATES ON ARRIVAL ———— $50 FOOD & BEVERAGE VOUCHER

STAY, DINE & BATHE

$

2 NIGHTS ACCOMMODATION IN AN ENSUITE ROOM ———— 2 BATH HOUSE BATHING PASSES FOR PENINSULA HOTSPRINGS ———— A BOTTLE OF CAPE SCHANCK SPARKLING ON ARRIVAL ———— $50 FOOD & BEVERAGE VOUCHER ————

———— LATE CHECK OUT

POINT NEPEAN RD, PORTSEA

BOOKINGS (03) 5984 2213

495

LATE CHECK OUT

WWW.PORTSEAHOTEL.COM.AU

EXCLUDES PUBLIC AND SCHOOL HOLIDAYS, BOOKINGS SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY

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Group Accommodation • • • •

Aulua lodge for smaller groups up to 36 Warrawong lodge for up to 60 Cosy lounges with open fireplaces Exclusive use of retreat for 100+

Glamping Experience • • • •

Experience camping… in luxury! Stunning views Get back to nature Enjoy your own private camp fire

Bohemain Luxe Weddings • • • •

The perfect blank canvas to design your day Outdoor bush chapel by the meadow Food truck catering Onsite guest accommodation

Red Hill South, Mornington Peninsula Ph: 5984 0888 www.ilukaretreat.com.au


Winter

Mornington Peninsula / Stay & Play

ILUKA RETREAT Iluka Retreat is a breathtakingly beautiful 36 acre property in Red Hill South, an easy 80 minute drive from Melbourne. It is perfectly located in close proximity to beaches, restaurants, wineries and attractions. Whether looking for a group getaway, wedding venue, family holiday or romantic weekend away, Iluka Retreat ticks all the boxes. Already known as the premier getaway region of Victoria, the Mornington Peninsula is the ideal destination for your next escape from the city. There’s plenty to do or you can just relax and enjoy some wellearned relaxation without having to leave this stunning hinterland retreat. With group lodge accommodation for up to 100 people, a luxury glamping village and camping zones, there is an accommodation style to suit everyone. Get back to nature in your group hideaway while enjoying time with family and friends. Cars are only permitted at the top of the property to ensure a serene escape without the noise and the lake and bird wetland ensure the sounds of nature are abundant. If you’ve never tried glamping, you can’t go past Iluka for a glamping experience. The luxury bell tents are beautifully styled with all the special touches to make your experience a truly memorable one. You can even have your own private camp fire. Enjoy walking around the lake, watching birds in the wetland area, challenge valley and even stand up paddling or canoeing on the lake during the warmer months. Team building activities are also on offer for groups seeking a bit more structure in their day. The retreat is an easy1500-metre walk through the rolling landscape will bring you to Shoreham Beach for a surf, swim or stroll along the beautiful beach. For group retreats, lluka is an oasis of beauty and privacy. Your hosts will help you create your own unique group retreat for a group of any size. You can also experience glamping and camping in luxury. Just turn up with an overnight bag and enjoy your back-to-nature escape in beautifully styled bell glamping tents. Or you can pitch a tent and enjoy this stunning private campground with all the camp amenities you need for an easy camping holiday. For weddings and events, it provides the perfect festival wedding or event location, complete with bush chapel, versatile catering options, stunning bush surrounds and luxury glamping. It is also brilliant for school camps and education groups as the ultimate school holiday program venue, with camping or lodge accommodation, 36 acres to explore and activities for all ages. Aulua Lodge looks over the valley and is a great getaway for a retreat, family gathering or event. With seven rooms in a combination of single bunks and double beds, Aulua Lodge can sleep up to

36 guests. Along with a large dining / lounge hall, fully equipped kitchen, barbecue area and open fire place plus two bathrooms. You can self-cater or your hosts can organise a catering package. On site lake with canoe hire is available, so you can jump in for a swim or sit back and enjoy the serenity. Warrawong Lodge is the larger of the two lodges and overlooks the beautiful property and onsite lake. With ten bedrooms and a combination of single bunks and double beds, this lodge can sleep 60 guests. A large fully equipped kitchen for you to self-cater or a catering package can be organised. Huge dining / lounge hall with open fire place and an outdoor barbecue area. This lodge is perfect for any large group getaway. ILUKA RETREAT is at 20 Shoreham Rd, Red Hill South Phone 5984 0888 ilukaretreat.com.au

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AAhead WOMAN of Her Time E ssence

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Arts By Melissa Walsh

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onstance Stokes was one of the leading artists of her generation and the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery is holding a retrospective of her work, which runs until September 17.

The exhibition is the brainchild of Constance’s daughter, Lucilla Wyborn d’Abrera and a testament of a daughter’s love and respect for her late mother. “Very few female artists received as much attention and praise as my mother did in her early years,” said Lucilla. “She was admired and encouraged by then National Gallery of Victoria director Lindsay Bernard Hall and various critics, and her works were purchased by the NGV and prominent Victorian families such as the Carnegies and the Murdochs. I have put together a book on her work over the years as a way to resuscitate interest in her work which was overshadowed by a male dominated art fraternity.” The retrospective brings together work from her early days as an art student at the National Gallery Art School, in the late 1920’s, through to paintings made in the early 1980’s. The exhibition will include over 35 paintings and drawings and cover the breadth of Stokes’s artistic practice across 60 years, exploring stylistic developments and highlighting her stunning portraiture and use of colour. Growing up with an artist mother, Lucilla says here earliest memories were the wonderful smell of oil paint and turpentine throughout the house. “I would get home from school to find mother still wearing a paint-covered smock and slumped in a chair. I knew she had been painting all day, and that her exhaustion was the result of a few precious hours at the easel,” said Lucilla of a mother who later described herself as ‘half-mother, half-painter’. “However despite this she was able to produce the early richly glazed classical works of the 30s and 40s so eagerly sought by collectors and by galleries around the country. This was an amazing feat for a married woman with children as most artists in those days were not married.” There is no doubt that Constance was a woman ahead of her time, and her artistic skills were recognised from a young age. In 1929 she won the Travelling Scholarship at the National Gallery School, Melbourne, to study for two years at the Royal Academy in London. During her time abroad, Constance spent a period studying under the French Cubist artist André Lhote in Paris and visited the major galleries in Europe. Her early career is framed by struggles over her desire to be an artist with the expectations of marriage and family life. Further opportunities abroad and the consolidation of her classical painting style were a feature of her mid-career. In 1953 she was one of 12 Australian artists included in an exhibition at Burlington Galleries, London, alongside Ralph Balson, Arthur Boyd, Russell Drysdale and Sidney Nolan. continued next page...

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“VERY FEW FEMALE ARTISTS RECEIVED AS MUCH ATTENTION AND PRAISE AS MY MOTHER DID IN HER EARLY YEARS”

Constance Stokes had a late career flourish in her 70s, embedding a Matisse-inspired vibrancy and freedom of form and colour into some of the strongest work she produced. The exhibition will include never before seen archival material from the artist’s estate including journals, sketchbooks, letters, photographs and drawings, which give a fascinating insight into the life and career of this important artist. “My mother was one of Australia’s finest artists who never let the fact that she was a woman stop her from being able to paint and exhibit. She never called herself a feminist however. She was an artist who wanted to be treated the same as all artists,” said Lucilla. Visitors to the Constance Stokes exhibition will have the opportunity to revisit the great heritage of art in Australia through the work of one of its finest artists. The Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery is at Civic Reserve, Dunns Road, Mornington. For bookings go to mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au or phone 5950 1580

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grandmother, both survivors of domestic abuse, Sohila tried to find a new life for herself in Australia. But to her horror she discovered that living with her father had been gentle in comparison to the reality of her new married life. “Writing the story about myself, my mother and grandmother was something I had always wanted to do and when I came to Australia and was married I felt so alone that it became a way of communicating with myself on the paper,” said Sohila, who by this stage had found herself unwittingly in the same domestic abuse situation as her mother. “By 2002, it was over 2500 pages long and by 2009 it was over 3000 pages, partly in English and partly in Persian. I had to give the essence of the story so I hired a ghost writer, David Brewster, who helped condense and put everything in order. It turns out the essence of 3000 pages is 300.” Determined to make a difference in the world with a pure heart to help others, Sohila is the epitome of a strong, empowered woman, with the same elegance and style that she talks about in her mother.

THE COURAGE AND DETERMINATION OF SOHILA ZANJANI By Melissa Walsh Photo Yanni

“Life shrinks or expands according to ones courage.” Anais Nin

W

hen Sohila Zanjani was a little girl, she was surrounded by strong women with the role models of her mother and grandmother. Little did she know that one day their three stories would be intertwined in her book Scattered Pearls, which spans 100 years and tells the story of Sohila, her mother Shahin and grandmother Laya. It tells of the injustice and abuse meted out by the men in their lives, and the resilience and courage of three generations of women. “Scattered Pearls is the work of 35 years,” said Persian-born Sohila who lives on the Mornington Peninsula, and started writing her memoir on the flight to Australia in 1981. “I wanted to write my mother’s story. She was an extremely beautiful, elegant woman. She had class, but with my dad she was brought down to a totally different level of social standing. I saw she was hurting at times and her pride was shattered, and I am talking about the days when my mother was not aware of her rights.” Scattered Pearls is a story of cultural misogyny in both Australia and Iran, and the women’s search for a loving, equal relationship. It opens in pre-evolutionary Iran, where Sohila grew up under the threat of violence, intimidation and the control of her father. Resolving never to tread in the footsteps of her mother and her

Not only did the mother of four create a beautiful piece of writing with her memoir, she has also run a successful business for 18 years and is now a qualified lawyer after returning to university as a mature aged student. “I arrived in Australia in 1981 and seven years later I divorced my husband while I was pregnant with my twins,” said Sohila, who although educated, had been unaware of her rights and highly intimidated by her violent husband. For Sohila, the idea of Scattered Pearls came from the realization of how destructive fear is in our lives. “After I left my husband and left the fear of that environment within seven years I was running a successful business. I had constructive energy and, with the support of family and the law in Australia and financial assistance I was able to find myself again,” said Sohila who is now a strong advocate for family rights and hopes to work permanently at the Legal Aid offices in Frankston to give back to the community. “If you give people the pension and provide a roof over their heads this investment will come back with a return that is much more positive. It is all about prevention, and Scattered Pearls shows that prevention and help pays back tenfold. The Victorian Legal Aid was so helpful to me and I want to give people the same experience I was fortunate enough to have.” Sohila says that it is very important to always treat people with respect and that is something she makes sure she does when helping people in court cases and domestic situations. “When you go through a period of hardship and despair, it feels like there is little hope for the future but I know that with resilience, faith and courage it is possible to succeed against all the odds,” said Sohila. “I want people to be inspired with reality. This book is really about love. There is no hatred there. Life is what we make of it and Scattered Pearls is an example of that. The book is not just about three Persian women. It is about a universal theme and that is love.” Scattered Pearls is available in paperback and eBook at all good bookshops. July 2017

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THE MERCHANT OF VENICE COMES TO FRANKSTON

By Melissa Walsh

Money makes the world go around. Portia has it. Bassanio wants it. Shylock lends it. Antonio owes the value of it. Love also plays a part. Portia offers it. Bassanio wants it. And Antonio may lose a pound of flesh for it.

B

ell Shakespeare presents The Merchant of Venice at the Frankston Arts Centre on Saturday, August 19. This uncompromising and dark production explores the tense relationship and prejudices between those that have, and those that don’t. Dark in its humour and bawdy in its romantic hijinks, The Merchant of Venice takes audiences on a journey of love, mercy and justice. Featuring three-time Helpmann Award winner, Mitchell Butel (Janet King and Rake) as the defiant Shylock, and Jessica Tovey (Wolf Creek and Wonderland) as Portia, the production will be directed by Anne-Louise Sarks (Belvoir’s Jasper Jones and Medea). Jacob Warner, a regular at Bell, plays the very popular Lancelot in this year’s production and is looking forward to performing in his hometown. “I was born in Frankston and some of my family are still there but when I was quite young mum and dad moved to Gippsland,” said Jacob. "Both my grandparents still live on the peninsula so I come down and visit them quite regularly.”

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Playing the role of Lancelot is a thrill for Jacob who found a love for Shakespeare after seeing his first Bell Shakespeare show, Two Gentlemen of Verona, three years ago. “My role is a comic role so I have the luxury of trying to make people laugh every night which I enjoy as Shakespeare is a heavy show and its great to be able to add lightness,” said Jacob, who has fulfilled his dream of becoming a stage actor after studying at Drama School in Sydney for many years. “Seeing a couple of Bell Shakespeare shows including The Merchant of Venice is one of the reasons I wanted to be an actor on stage and now I have come full circle as I am working with them.” Jacob has also performed in the special Merchant of Venice courtroom scene alongside John Bell for the festival of Dangerous Ideas- exploring the concepts of Justice and Mercy. He appeared in last year’s smash hit Romeo and Juliet, and recently played James Pinnick in the Mel Gibson film Hacksaw Ridge. “It was great doing the Mel Gibson film with Andrew Garfield last year. It was an amazing experience and I loved playing and dressing up every day in the WW11 experience,” said Jacob. “And now being involved with Bell Shakespeare for this production of The Merchant of Venice is exciting. We always tend to make Shakespeare accessible to the audience as I believe it is something that must be performed rather than read.”


Bell Shakespeare began its remarkable journey in 1990 with the premise of creating a theatre company dedicated to producing the plays of William Shakespeare in a way that was relevant and exciting to Australian audiences. Since 1991, Bell Shakespeare has inspired and awed audiences with productions like Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth Night, The Comedy of Errors, Measure for Measure, The Tempest, Othello, Macbeth and, of course, The Merchant of Venice. In the past 25 years, it has gone further than its visionary founder, John Bell, could have ever imagined and has become a brave teacher in the school of life. Over the years, the stage has become the springboard from which the company has dived into some extraordinary work, leading to incredible touring products and education programmes. In a wonderful twist of fate, Bell Shakespeare is using Shakespeare’s universal insights to bring inspiration and truth to minds living in an uncertain world. And, of course, it is connecting beauty and art with imaginations of all ages. Now 25 years later, Bell Shakespeare enjoys the fruits of its labour: a history rich with legends of the stage; the establishment of a creative development arm, which ensures its artistic vibrancy; theatre, education and community programmes characterised by unrivalled national reach and impact; and a loyal and passionate audience that has made the Company that began in a circus tent into a national icon.

GPO HOTEL

The Merchant of Venice will be performed at the Frankston Arts Centre on Saturday, August 19 at 7.30pm. For bookings phone 9784 1060 or thefac.com.au

"THE MERCHANT OF VENICE IS ONE OF THE REASONS I WANTED TO BE AN ACTOR ON STAGE AND NOW I HAVE COME FULL CIRCLE AS I AM WORKING WITH THEM NOW.� -Jacob Warner (above)

Rebranded, Refurbished, Refined

Kitchen open all day - Breakfast/Lunch/Dinner

MORNINGTON PENINSULA

Check out our Winter Menu and Texas BBQ options

Upcoming entertainment and current menus at www.thegpo.com.au 1003 POINT NEPEAN RD, ROSEBUD 5982 3200 July 2017

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WITH THE TIMES

NG

By Melissa Walsh Photos Yanni

JUST AS A BLACKSMITH FORGES A PIECE OF METAL TO CREATE A SHAPE, GLENN KENNEDY OWNER OF PENINSULA WROUGHT IRON, HAS HAD TO BEND WITH THE TIMES. YOU DON’T LAST MORE THAN THIRTY YEARS IN A TRADITIONAL TRADE LIKE THIS WITHOUT LEARNING TO BE FLEXIBLE AND THIS PENINSULA BLACKSMITH HAS CERTAINLY DONE THAT. PENINSULA ESSENCE VISITS GLENN IN HIS TYABB FACTORY WHERE THE HEAT OF THE FURNACE IS A SHARP CONTRAST TO THE COLD WINTER DAY OUTSIDE.

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ith a grandfather who worked Clydesdales, young Glenn was introduced to horses from an early age and was soon doing his farrier apprenticeship in Gisborne. However, a chance encounter with Scottish blacksmith Edward Martin would change the young apprentice's life forever. “Edward came over from Scotland doing clinics and was staying at my old boss’s place in Gisborne. He stayed for several days and that is when I was first introduced to artistic blacksmithing,” said Glenn, of the man who had a profound influence on farriers worldwide. “I was already doing my apprenticeship but I realised then the other things I would have the skill to do.” For three decades, Glenn has managed to stay in a trade that has been around for hundreds of years and evokes images of rugged old bearded men covered in soot from the furnace, pounding the anvil in pioneer days. “I guess I am one of the lucky people who have always managed to do what they love,” said Glenn. “The business has evolved over the years but the practical skills have stayed the same. Apart from small advances, blacksmithing is the same as it was hundreds of years ago.” Starting out as a farrier, Glenn packed up and moved to the peninsula in 1990 where there was plenty of horse work. “I worked as a farrier for years but always kept my artistic blacksmithing on the side,” he said. “Being a farrier is a tough gig as it is physically very hard on your body when you are under a 500kg horse.” These days, Glenn can’t remember the last time he made a horse shoe and says it’s not often that you see an 80 year old farrier as the body can’t sustain it. continued next page...

“BEING A FARRIER IS A TOUGH GIG AS IT IS PHYSICALLY VERY HARD ON YOUR BODY WHEN YOU ARE UNDER A 500KG HORSE”

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Luckily for Glenn he had the perfect balance of artistic talent and business mind to transition to the next stage, and sustain a career as a full time blacksmith. “As the years went on I realised I had this artistic side and would start making more and more creative things,” said Glenn. “It’s like anything. The more you do it, the better you get. But I did realise that you can’t just be artistic. You have to be smart in business too. I originally started the business in Melton as Kirkton Forge but changed it to Peninsula Wrought Iron when I moved to the peninsula.” Moving to live in Somerville, Glenn worked the business from a humble workshop on his property. “From there it operated two coke forges offering a broad based general blacksmithing service including the shoeing of light and heavy horses whilst also manufacturing custom practical and ornamental ironwork direct to the public and trade. From this small workshop Peninsula Wrought Iron produced some of the largest scale gate projects ever seen on the Mornington Peninsula of the time. After two and half years the workshop was then re-located to Balnarring where, whilst still continuing to produce custom work direct to the public, Peninsula Wrought Iron designed and developed a

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range of indoor and outdoor furniture which was sold for many years exclusively by Sequel Furniture in High Street Armadale, Melbourne,” he said. “As the business has grown I have needed more space and now have a huge factory in Tyabb where I do ornamental ironwork and general blacksmithing.” Glenn says much of his work starts with clients having a vision for what they are after. “I will do a consultation with them and find out what they are looking for. Then I turn that vision into a reality,” he said. “I work with the client every step of the way.” Over the years Glenn has made everything from wrought iron gates and fences to doors, garden ornaments, sculptural work, garden and entrance gates, balustrade and fencing, indoor and outdoor fixtures and fittings. “We specialize in unique one-of-a-kind pieces and make sure our rust prevention is second to none. I always say to clients I don’t want to see you again until you need something new made,” said Glenn. Peninsula Wrought Iron is at Factory 8, 4 Cannery Court, Tyabb. Phone 0423 021 662. peninsulawroughtiron.com


Bell Shakespeare

THE MERCHANT OF VENICE by William Shakespeare | director Anne-Louise Sarks

Photo: Pierre Toussaint

Saturday 19 August, 7.30pm Tickets: $27 - $71

DRAMA Tickets: 03

9784 1060

thefac.com.au

@the_fac | #thefac Principal Theatre Partner

Frankston Arts Centre is a business unit of Frankston City Council.

FRANKSTON AUCTION MART 7 FACTORIES OF NEW, USED AND RETRO FURNITURE

Something to suit every style & taste! BARGAINS GALORE!

DIRECT TO THE PUBLIC Call in and be surprised with our range & prices. NOW STOCKING EX DISPLAY HOME FURNITURE AND DECOR

42-54 New St, Frankston • Ph 9783 9613 Open Mon-Fri 9.00am-5.00pm, Sat 9.00am-4.00pm

www.frankstonauctionmart.com.au July 2017

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CALOMBARIS BRINGS MASTIC H TO RED HILL

By Melissa Walsh

e’s been on the peninsula for years with his family holiday home. He uses only the best mushrooms from Benton Rise Farm in his restaurants and he is one in the trio of celebrity judges on Channel Ten’s popular MasterChef Australia. We are talking, of course, about George Calombaris who plans to bring his wholefood cafe Mastic to this end of the world at a Mornington Peninsula eco retreat.

The Red Hill property, Hummingbird Eco Retreat, has on site accommodation, conference facilities, a day spa and existing restaurant and George believes it is the best place to bring his beloved brand of cooking with his Mastic café. "We're excited to take Mastic to the peninsula, a region that screams 'good stuff' in every way," Calombaris said. "The best local produce, local suppliers within arm's reach, and fresh air. It makes sense." Calombaris says even though the café is moving from Kew to Red Hill, it will continue to focus on the Hellenic diet. “It will be the same with a wholesome twist focusing on lifestyle, health and happiness,” he said. "We're in the process of finalizing all the details and we can't wait to share them. It's been a dream of mine to share our Mastic store with the local community down here. It will be worth the wait." It has been more than two years since Calombaris embraced the life-enhancing properties of whole foods and opened his Mastic café in Kew, abutting his modern Greek tavern, Hellenic Republic. While undoubtedly mindful about health and diet, Mastic, which is named after a health-giving plant resin, isn’t preachy. Like the Mornington Peninsula, it’s unpretentious and punches out fresh, flavoursome fare. Calombaris has always loved the peninsula since he started bringing his children down here a decade ago. “I’m a big fan of Safety Beach. It’s a little gem. I reckon it’s one of the safest and cleanest beaches in the country,” he said. “If you’re standing on the beach, to your right are the picturesque hills of Mt Martha and if you look south, you look into Red Hill and its beautiful wineries. I love it dearly – the whole area also has a great energy because there are a lot of artisans and a creative community. And only an hour from Melbourne with the new Peninsula link.” The celebrity chef, owner of top Melbourne restaurants, (The Press Club, Hellenic Republic and Jimmy Grants), cannot wait for his sea-change to the Mornington Peninsula, with plans for Mastic to be open in 2018.

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Eat & Drink

IN LOVE WITH MUSHROOMS By Melissa Walsh

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roud suppliers of farm fresh goods, Benton Rise Farm has its heart set on quality, freshness and the best in seasonal produce. Located on the Mornington Peninsula, owner Ryan Sharpley says quality produce is paramount.

When celebrity chef George Calombaris sent his team to find fresh quality produce on the Mornington Peninsula they were so impressed with what they found at Benton Rise Farm that they decided to use the mushrooms and other produce on a regular basis.

“We understand that sometimes the convenience of farm fresh goods sourced directly from the farmer is hard to find. The day to day routine of heading 'down the street' to one of the 'big boys' to buy your fresh produce is easy, though after the second day when the leafy greens are droopy, the apples no longer have the 'crunch' you expect - you have to ask yourself - 'How long have these goods been in a cool room and out of their natural environment?'” said Ryan. “That's why quality produce is paramount for us at Benton Rise Farm; we aim to provide you the most cost effective produce on the Mornington Peninsula. Sure, we can't always be the cheapest (though often we are!) but what we do promise to provide is fresh, high quality goods from our farm.”

“We have been growing mushrooms for a couple of years now and wanted to find a product we could do on a small scale. The peninsula had a gap as far as mushroom supply so it has taken off and now we have been growing and selling mushrooms for two and a half years,” said Ryan. “One of George’s executive chefs found us through the MPP Produce website and contacted us that way. They have been supporting us with that and other produce ever since.” Benton Rise Farm is at 150 Coolart Road, Tuerong. brf.com.au

FOR ALL YOUR HOSPITALITY NEEDS, BOTH FRONT AND BACK OF HOUSE REQUIREMENTS

TRADE SALES DIRECT TO PUBLIC Open Monday to Saturday 9am to 5pm

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Dishes

Must try

Barramundi with burnt onions, green beans and citrus dressing

Pressed Beef Brisket with Herb Crust, burnt onions, green beans and peppered demi glaze

Korean popcorn sticky chicken sticks with coriander

Ranelagh Club

Ranelagh Club

Blue Mini Eatery Emporium Events

1 Trent Jones Drive, Cape Schanck Phone 5950 8038

3 Rosserdale Cres, Mount Eliza Phone 9787 0265

2 Colchester Road (corner Borneo Road), Rosebud Phone 5981 2520 bluemini.com.au

Char-grilled swordfish on pearl cous cous with chorizo, broccolini and lemon crème fraiche

Butterscotch brulee with cinnamon dusted cannoli dipped in white chocolate

The Boathouse

366 Nepean Highway, Frankston Phone 9770 5330 theboathouserestaurant.com.au

Pistachio and rose water Friandes - Gluten Free Blue Mini Eatery Emporium Events 2 Colchester Road (corner Borneo Road), Rosebud Phone 5981 2520 bluemini.com.au

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366 Nepean Highway, Frankston Phone 9770 5330 theboathouserestaurant.com.au

The Boathouse


of my apprenticeship at Fenix which is where I met George, Gary and Raymond.” For Josh working at Fenix opened his eyes to a world of cooking. “It is a very international kitchen with people like Raymond Capaldi, and it fuelled my fire and passion for working overseas for such a long time. In the end I was working overseas for seven years, including five years working at the one restaurant, The Square, which was a two Michelin star for 22 years,” said Josh, who started at the London restaurant at just 18 or 19. “It was a huge part of my life that I spent there; It helped the way I cook but also the person I have become. Phil Howard, chef and coowner was my mentor and taught me a lot of life lessons. He was such a kind gentleman who knew how to cook that’s for sure.” Making the move to the Mornington Peninsula for such a huge role is not unusual for a person like Josh, who thrives on constantly challenging himself and his food also reflects this philosophy.] “It was a huge challenge for me taking myself out of my comfort zone again at the RACV Cape Schanck Resort as it’s a business with a lot of facets I have to run,” he said. “It’s about learning to manage a big business which involves aspects like catering, functions, events, looking after the café, and of course fine dining in the restaurant. Before I started here is was with Scott Pickett at Estelle ESP and we launched and rebranded restaurants together, which gave me the confidence to pursue this.”

JOSH PELHAM BRINGS HIS FLAVOR TO CAPE SCHANCK By Melissa Walsh Photo Yanni

H

e’s worked at The Square Restaurant in London, The Press Club and Fenix in Melbourne to name a few, rubbed shoulders with George Calombaris, Raymond Capaldi, Gary Mehigan, Shannon Bennett and Marco Pierre White. At 31, Josh Pelham has already achieved the highest industry accolades and now turns his hand at another challenge as Executive Chef at Cape Schanck RACV Resort.

“My inspiration for being a chef mostly came from sharing a meal with friends and family as to me that is what it’s all about. I love being able deliver something that most people can’t do at home and it has pushed me to keep pursuing this career every day and every step along the way,” said Josh who has been working at the RACV Resort since February this year. “I started at 17 at Matteo’s in North Fitzroy, and then spent the following two years

Since then Josh has developed new menus for winter and has made a few changes to the current menu adding a few more healthy options to the golfers lounge but keeping the current business achieving what it already has been. “I have recently tweaked and refined the restaurant menu to slowly introduce different dishes,” said Josh, who doesn’t like to have one signature dish. “I don’t like to pigeon hole myself to a signature dish as I like to continue evolving. I not only follow food trends but create them.” Josh says he plans to utilise the wonderful ingredients and suppliers we have on the peninsula and has already been along to Max’s Mushroom Walk where he enjoyed chatting to the fellow chef. “Even last weekend I went out early and went for a walk to pick mushrooms, that’s the beauty of being down here,” said Josh. “I am also working on new menus and currently using Boatshed Cheeses which is a beautiful cheese from Dromana, Gippsland beef, and honeycomb sheets with specially made frames. We are now developing relationships with local truffle growers, the diggers to get heirloom seeds, olive growers, and have just built the first stage of our herb garden. Cape Schanck RACV Resort is at Trent Jones Drive, Cape Schanck. Phone 5950 8000. racv.com.au/travel-leisure/racv-resorts/our-destinations/ cape-schanck-resort

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Recipe CONE BAY BARRAMUNDI WITH MUSSELS, LEAKS, KALE AND SCHOOL PRAWNS INGREDIENTS 500g royal blue potatoes 100g salted butter 150ml milk 6x180g portion barramundi 3 leeks 500g mussels 1 bunch kale 1 bunch chives 300g school prawns 1 lemon Rock salt for baking potatoes

METHOD 1. Preheat oven to 200c, on a baking tray lay a thin layer of rock salt, pierce the potatoes with a knife and bake for 60 minutes. 2. Trim and wash the leek, season with salt and olive oil, bake on a wire rack for 30 minutes at 200c. Once cooked cut into 3cm batons and remove the outer layers. 3. Melt the butter and milk in a sauce pan, once the potatoes are fully cooked cut them in half and remove the soft flesh, pass

through the drum sieve, slowly incorporate the milk and butter to your desired consistency, season with salt and white pepper. 4. Wash and de-beard your mussels, place a large pot with a lid on the heat and bring the temperature till you see a little smoke. Add the mussels, a small splash of water and then the lid, agitate the pot holding the lid on. Cook for around two minutes. Pour the mussels into a colander with a bowl underneath and a

Cape Schanck RACV Resort is at Trent Jones Drive, Cape Schanck. Phone 5950 8000. racv.com.au/travel-leisure/racv-resorts/our-destinations/cape-schanck-resort

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damp towel over the top until cool. Once cool remove the mussel from the shell and reserve the cooking juice to store the mussel meat. 5. In a large pan, fill 1/3 with frying oil to deep fry the kale. Fry at 180c until crisp. 6. In a large frying pan heat a little oil, season the barramundi and seal the skin side down for four minutes on a medium heat, place the barramundi into the oven

skin side up for three minutes. 7. Once the barramundi is cooked add a table spoon of butter to the pan and sautĂŠ the peeled prawns, add the mussels, chives, leeks and lemon juice. 8. On a plate, place the barramundi, pipe the mash potato around the fish, sauce the fish with the prawns and juices and garnish with crispy kale.

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The Tragedy of Capel Sound By Lance Hodgins

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arly on Tuesday July 9th 1867 two steamer tugs left Sandridge, Melbourne’s port, carrying 200 passengers on a clandestine adventure. The tugs were each towing several smaller boats to be used in landing their passengers but the destination was unknown. The contract simply called for a destination “at least 20 miles down the Bay” and this vagueness was to avoid being followed by the police. The passengers were “sportsmen” mostly from the hotels and bars of Melbourne and the world of gambling, rat baiting and prize fighting. Prize fighting was a popular sport of 19th century England but strictly speaking it remained illegal - and so it was in the colonies. After spending several hours in the southern part of the bay looking for a suitable landing, the tugs chose Capel Sound off Rosebud and began to send the boats ashore with their unsuspecting passengers. The excursion was to have a tragic ending. Difficulties were encountered in crossing the surf zone and six people lost their lives. What follows is the story of a tragedy which occurred 150 years ago this month. It takes the reader into the seedy world of the illegal sports of nineteenth century Melbourne and the circumstances which drove some of the participants to their deaths.

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The Promoter George Strike owned the most famous sporting hotel in Melbourne in the 1860s - the Butchers’ Arms in Elizabeth Street (below). It had no pretentions to be a first class hotel. It was a sporting house where its clientele were immediately recognisable: short, thickset, generally clean-shaven, affecting comforters around the neck as if they had just dropped in during a training run. It was the scene of regular ratting matches for which a specially designed rat pit was constructed in mid-1859. It opened with an


History irrespective of size or colour, which makes rat-catching a profitable industry for some. Butchers, slaughtermen and others employed near the wharves add considerably to their weekly wages by caging rats. There is a fatty and rancid aroma about the place but there is no disorderly conduct or bad language – only a little chaff, plenty of tobacco smoke and a little betting. There are “swells” in the gallery, racing men who love sport, betting men, smart-looking trainers with the air of a millionaire, jockeys of renown, and people of all nations.

exhibition of several terriers killing rats against time, and betters were encouraged to back the dog which could kill the greatest numbers of rats in a given time. There were also combats between rats and ferrets, a snake and a mongoose, and on another occasion an echidna was pitted against a dog. “Rats, Rats, Rats. 200 to be killed in 20 minutes” rang out the poster on the bar window of the Butchers Arms. Once inside, men are everywhere and in the bar the conversation is a lively one about the night’s sport. In a room at the rear of the hotel the seats are arranged as if in an amphitheatre so the spectator can see the whole show without moving from his position. The pit is 10 feet by 10 feet and lined with mirrors. Admission fee is one shilling. Strike pays sixpence a dozen for the rats,

Strike is the eccentric pit-man. He steps into the pit and commences to draw 200 rats, one after the other, from a cage by their tails without being bitten and drop them to their doom. When they are all in, Strike gives the signal “Bring the bitch” and the fun commences. A 22 pound white bull terrier, “Rosy” is handed in and held and when time is called she goes about her business. Snap, crunch, scrunch, snap, one bite, and it is all over. She wends her way from corner to corner, dealing death and destruction at every grip. After a couple of five minute rest breaks, during which time the betters furiously negotiate, “Rosy” returns to finish the job with five seconds to spare. The spectators settle their bets, and then file out to have a drink at the bar and talk about the next encounter. Strike’s pit, however, was not confined to rat-killing. In it he arranged lessons in the manly art of disfiguring an opponent’s continued next page...

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face, and many old time pugilists met in the back parlour at Strike’s swapping experiences and, no doubt, lies. The Butchers Arms became famous as the “pug’s hangout” and prize fighting was always a topic of conversation. Sparring sessions and benefits for prize fighters were held regularly and George Strike, the former London street seller of fruits and vegetables, was invariably the matchmaker and stake-holder for the would-be participants.

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Strike had gained considerable notoriety in connection with the prize ring - not as a pugilist, although he was handy with his fists. At every prize fight he was there as a bottle-holder or sponger, or simply as a spectator.

The third boat was the Istamboul. The people on board the Resolute had been given confidence by seeing the first boat from the Sophia reach the shore and a boat being towed was brought around from astern for loading.

He was not always successful in arranging prize fights. In July 1866 conditions and stake-money were all in hand for a contest between Alf McLaren and George Belcher when McLaren unexpectedly called at the Butchers Arms to announce that he would listen to no proposition from Belcher, and that he would forfeit his money as he was about to leave for Sydney.

The Istamboul was a whaleboat 24 feet long, 4 feet 10 inches wide and 1 foot 6 inches deep, and capable of carrying 18 passengers. At the rudder was William “Fifey” Mentiplay, a fisherman wellacquainted with the area while on the oars were the boat’s coowners, Bill Hayes and James Newman, two watermen with over 50 years experience between them.

Twelve months later, however, Strike finalised a deal with McLaren to fight Jack Carstairs – a contest that had the “sporting set” of Melbourne buzzing with excitement.

Other watermen on the Resolute, however, were not so confident. Alf Holland and George Nichols implored them not to go and, if they did, to not take many passengers. Their advice went unheeded and the Istamboul continued to prepare for its fateful errand.

The Boats Head For Shore On 7 July 1867 the two tugs and their landing boats headed down Port Phillip Bay to hold the contest. After grounding on Mud Island they turned eastwards towards Rosebud, where they anchored beyond the sandbar of Capel Sound. By that time, however, the wind had whipped up a fairly rough sea and the first two boats containing the organisers and the materials for the makeshift ring barely reached the shore safely. The spectators began to prepare for landing.

As the unsuspecting passengers got into the boat it sat considerably lower into the water. Mentiplay was ready to leave as soon as 6-7 were in the boat and said as much. Just then, however, several more jumped in (including the ill-fated Joseph Cheshire and Charles Bramston) which doubled the number. George Jones was already on board. Young Richard Banner, of the All Nations Hotel, looked over continued next page...

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the stern and yelled that this was too many, to which Mentiplay agreed, but some of the passengers thought they could get through and one even said “Well, at any rate, we could swim for it if we had to”. As they pulled away from the vessel, Mentiplay told the rowers to be careful in crossing the bar. Even after 100 yards he was still cautioning them that they were carrying too many. Newman replied that he had carried that many in the past and it would be alright now. Mentiplay knew it was too late for them to turn back. They reached the first bar and were soon surrounded by breakers which were “falling over in lumps”. Mentiplay spread out his coat against the rollers but it had little effect, the water rising up over it and half filling the boat from both sides of the stern. It was very clear that once they were in this zone it was impossible to return - the only thing to do was to try and get through it. Some of the passengers stood up and wanted to bail out the water but were told by Mentiplay to sit down as another wave would swamp them. The men were not drunk, only excited and anxious after the first swamping. The oarsmen pulled away as hard as they could while the water was smooth in between waves and Mentiplay steered straight for the shore as he had done so many times in the past in even rougher conditions. The boat was now 200 yards from the steamer. The anxious onlookers from the Resolute would see them disappear from sight for about 30 seconds, and then come into view gallantly pulling as the white foam of the surf broke over them. After a time distance made them so small that their fate became unknown to those on the Resolute. They hoped that they had made it, but there was enough doubt in their minds to discourage

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any further attempts to go ashore. The boat was now sitting very deep in the water and it was an easy target when another wave swept over it. Mentiplay found himself afloat and being grabbed by one of the passengers, who was blinded and smothered by his poncho which had been driven over his head. Mentiplay pulled it free and then swam for shore 300-400 yards distant where he scrambled onto dry land - the only one to do so completely unassisted. The capsized Istamboul was clung to by those dumped into the water. They were doomed by the fact that many of them couldn’t swim and those who could were hampered by the cloaks and great coats they were wearing. Oarsman Hayes advised those who could swim to strike out for shore. Hayes was a good swimmer and he made it to within 10 yards of the beach where he was rescued. Jeremiah Quinlan, the landlord of the Kilkenny Hotel in Therry Street, was also picked up by a boat while swimming to shore. He told his rescuers he recalled seeing passenger Wollicott also swimming, wearing a poncho. He was washed away a couple of times and brought back by Quinlan. Wollicott called out “What will become of my wife and children?” just before he sank and was not seen again. This whole episode had been observed by Sawdy, Anderson and Edwards from the shore and they immediately pulled back to the spot and lent assistance. When Sawdy reached the stricken vessel he passed an oar to Hayes, who was on the point of sinking, and pulled him into his boat. Sawdy then rescued Ashton, a butcher from Prahran, who was also close to exhaustion. Cheshire and Bramston were nearby but they sank before they could be saved and their bodies drifted ashore.


Edwards picked up three passengers as well and took them to the beach but, in all, five were lost from this boat. Sawdy and Edwards were later praised in no uncertain terms for their valour in having saved the lives of 14-16 people by their efforts. It was fortunate that they had reached the shore safely in the first place and then could return to render assistance to those in trouble. Conclusion. Rather than being banned, bare-knuckle prize fighting continued in Australia for another decade. One of its best known proponents was Ned Kelly (right), who fought Wild Wright in a famous bout in Beechworth in 1874. Kelly won after 20 rounds. Yet, by pure coincidence, the year of the Capel Sound tragedy marked the beginning of the end of the bare-knuckle prize fight. In 1867 a set of rules was put in place in Britain by the Marquess of Queensberry which added some respectability and laid the foundations of the modern sport of boxing. The deaths at Capel Sound were regarded as collateral damage and, as such, consigned to the relative obscurities of history. This story is an extract from the book "The Tragedy at Capel Sound" by local historian Lance Hodgins. Copies are available from the author for $15. Ring Lance on 5979 2576.

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Corner

Puzzle

ACROSS 1. Naval clergyman 5. Arrange symphony 11. Party in lawsuit 15. Ultrahigh frequency (1,1,1) 16. Actor, ... Gibson 17. Spasms 19. Quickly 21. Relinquish (rights) 23. Hoarse 25. More sensible 27. Female verse writer 28. FM receiver 30. Killer whale 31. Regales 32. Layout 33. Tertiary college 34. Stocking bands 35. Abate (4,3) 36. On any occasion 38. Gambling cubes 40. Blow 42. Hop 44. Popular Asian cuisine 45. Bonus 46. For fear that 48. Lump of gold 49. Travel permit 50. Singing pitch 51. Large-beaked bird 52. Virginal 53. One of the Great Lakes 54. ... & aahs 55. Rifle recoil 56. Stratagem 58. Beguiled 59. Jailbreak 61. Obliterate 63. Cow sound 64. Lease out 65. Proposals 67. Australian wild canine 69. Living creature 71. Physicist, ... Newton 73. Brown photo shade 74. Massaged 76. Chafes 78. W African republic 80. Zodiac crossover 82. Summit 83. Supervise 85. Unfastens (door) 89. ... & dimes

91. Shins 93. Rink blade, ... skate 94. Type of clock 96. Gardens 98. Attila the ... 99. Lancelot's title 100. Anyone 102. Military flying facility (3,4) 103. Allow 104. Pupil 105. Hardy cereal 106. Bullring cheer 107. Cost 108. Boulevard 110. Jogged 112. Held gently 114. Ham it up 117. Refrains 120. Pistol blast 123. Ancient Peruvian 125. Extinct Japanese volcano 127. Bubonic plague, Black ... 128. Nail varnish 131. Regards smugly 133. Squander, ... wastefully 134. Bellows instrument 135. Readjust 136. Rowing team 137. Plane detector 140. Cloth flap 141. Him or ... 142. Slants 145. Withdraw formally 147. Baby's ... cord 148. Videotaped 150. Cold cuts 151. Pubs 152. European currency unit 153. Terrible tsar 154. Waters that parted for Israelites (3,3) 156. Tramp 158. Scram! 160. Rude comment 162. Accurate 163. Protector, guardian ... 164. Previous spouses 165. Eager, ... as mustard 166. Debutantes 167. Gradually weakens 168. Recite, ... off 170. Partial overlay 172. Peculiarity 173. Ruin 174. Taunt

1. Hurricane 2. From the menu, ..carte (1,2) 3. Replying 4. Members of religious orders 5. Family crest, coat ... (2,4) 6. Blokes 7. Fencing weapons 8. Pulled 9. Wrong 10. Materialise 11. Garbed 12. Drink addict 13. Cry of discovery 14. Kids' store (3,4) 18. Paltriness 20. Compels by force 22. Neuter 24. Outmanoeuvred 26. Minor quakes (5,7) 29. Sedate for operation 37. Property assessor 38. Attack from air (4-4) 39. Closely inspected 40. Frolicking 41. Brightly illuminated 43. Thorny shrub 44. Pour with rain 47. Lob 57. Lebanese trees 60. Lunch on the grass 62. Small sour fruit, crab ... 66. Golfer's two under par 68. Requiring 69. Swiss capital 70. Clench (teeth) 72. Admitting 73. Buffet-style meal

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E ssence

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75. Atop 77. Long tale 79. Revitalised 81. Medical practitioner 84. Chubbier 85. Guided (to seat) 86. Loose-leaf folders 87. Gashes or wounds 88. Shields 90. Goalies 92. Leisurely walk 95. Mends (of bones) 97. The Da Vinci Code author, ... Brown 101. Evil spell 109. Curry bread 111. Objective 113. Log vessel 115. Antelope 116. Onto terra firma 118. Jug 119. Slope 121. Lie snugly 122. Carrion-eating animal 124. 100-year old folk 126. Simple to work (4-8) 129. Taken by surprise 130. Shackles (3,5) 131. Brilliant people 132. Track competitors 138. Disinclined 139. Cosmos scientist 143. Position of news boss 144. Subtle difference 146. Slimming plan 149. Charged atoms 155. Disincentive 157. Talks indistinctly 159. Secured in vice 161. Not pretended 165. Seizes 169. Love affair 171. Bloom segments 172. Eldest 175. Speak slowly 176. Anaesthetic gas 177. Russian mountains 178. Move with effort 181. Additionally 184. Skin irritation 186. Meditation art, t'ai ... 190. Carry

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177. Rising (path) 179. Exercise ring, ... hoop 180. Swelter 182. Senior citizen 183. Expiring 185. Mount up 187. Swamped 188. Maxim 189. Italian seaport 191. Spanish coast, Costa del ... 192. Kangaroo pouch 193. Spike heel 194. Dignity (4-7) 195. The H of H2O

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Tyabb

on

Tyabb is a township in a semi-rural location, 57km from Melbourne. It has an area of 66.5 km2 and is part of the urban enclave on Western Port comprising Tyabb, Hastings, Bittern, Crib Point, and Somerville.

TYABB FACTS Median house price for Tyabb is $470,000 and median rent is $408 per week. Median unit price is $165,000. The population of Tyabb in 2016 was estimated at 3,335. Once, the heart of the apple growing industry, Tyabb is now Victoria's antique wonderland. Most of the town's main street is lined with quality antique stores, and just around the corner are some larger antique stores. There is also a quaint craft village that houses even more antiques along with a myriad of arts and crafts. The Post Office opened on 9 March 1891 shortly after the arrival of the railway in 1889. The local area was well known as a fruit growing area in the early twentieth century and was identified by the "TYCOS" brand, which was the name used by the local growers co-operative. Tyabb is a small township with four primary schools and one secondary school, a Country Fire Authority station, bakery, antique store, motel, cafe and unmanned railway station. There are a number of businesses in the town including fruit processing, cabinet makers, arborists, motel, cafes,

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pharmacy, equine outfitters and engineering workshops. Tyabb is well known for its many antique shops. The largest, the Tyabb Packing House Antique complex is housed in an historic cool store building dating from the area's fruit growing past. The Tyabb Packing House Antique complex reputedly has one of the largest retail antique collections under one roof in the southern hemisphere. There are several other antique shops in the Tyabb township. Tyabb also has Tyabb Airport, a private airfield which has been operating for more than thirty years. The airfield hosted an internationally recognised Air Show for several years. The airfield provides access to the area for emergency services. It is also an important part of the town's economy. Tyabb Airport has plans to develop and expand its runways and helipads. In the last decade there has been rapid residential development in the town, changing its rural character. Tyabb has its own cricket and football teams known as the Yabbies competing in the Mornington Peninsula Nepean Football League. There is also a baseball team, the Bulldogs, that plays at the central ground.

COFFEE SAFARI Fresh brewed coffee is a must have for weekends away and Tyabb coffee is second to none with great coffee haunts around the town. Here are a few to check out when head down to this beautiful end of the world.

TILLY’S AT TYABB 1552 Frankston - Flinders Road Great décor, delicious food and amazing coffee in a home styled café.

THE HART OF TYABB CAFÉ 14 Mornington-Tyabb Road In the centre of the Tyabb Packing House this café has some of the best food and coffee in town with an all-day breakfast menu and great light treats.

THE HUNGRY PEACOCK CAFÉ 16 Mornington-Tyabb Road Enjoy a coffee or a meal with friends in a café like this where kids can play happily.

TYABB TAKE-AWAY 1556 Frankston - Flinders Road For a quick tasty takeaway coffee, check out the local Tyabb Takeaway and perhaps pick up a tasty cake or slice.


WHAT TO DO?

Whether it’s visiting the many antiques and collectibles stores in the heart of Tyabb, strolling down the main shopping strip which retains its old world charm, or checking out the fabulous Tyabb Airfield and all its vintage planes, there is always something to do in this charming town where you feel like you have stepped back in time.

Tyabb is one of the few towns in Australia that does not have a pub. Although the town is over 100 years old it has never had a pub, however two liquor vendors are operating in the town.

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In 1907 the Tyabb Railway Station school was opened, coexisting with the older school at Jones Road.

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A public hall was built in 1899 and a progress association was formed in 1902. It succeeded in laying out a recreation reserve in 1904, and a racecourse north of the old Bunguyan homestead was regularly used during the 1900s.

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The Tyabb area was in the Bunguyan pastoral run which was taken up by Martha King in 1845. The Bunguyan Reserve, north of the town’s centre, commemorates the site of her homestead.

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Tyabb has given its name to the Tyabb Fault, an ancient geological formation extending from Tyabb across the Peninsula to Mornington, and Tyabb Loam, the characteristic soil of the district. The Tyabb Fault produces many small earthquakes throughout the year.

In 1861 a Tyabb township was proclaimed immediately north of present day Hastings, later known as Old Tyabb Township.

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The More Things Change,

THE MORE THEY STAY THE SAME By Melissa Walsh Photos Gary Sissons

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ngelo Taranto strolls over to the Tyabb Railway Primary School from his massive 200 acres across the road where he has run Taranto Farm for decades. The walk to the school is a familiar one for the grandfather, who started there as a young lad in 1947 when the whole school consisted of 20 pupils and each year level was together in the same school building. These days, Angelo drops into the school to visit his twin grandsons. Three decades before, he would walk over with his own kids. As the children play outside in the playground, laughing and giggling as they test out their Indonesian buggies for Indonesian day, Angelo sits in the school that is celebrating its 110th anniversary this year, and recalls a time when life was simpler. “I was five when we came down to Tyabb. It was soon after the war finished and dad wanted to come down here, that’s when I started at the Tyabb Railway Primary School,” says Angelo. “There was the wooden school building and the little enclave

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where we hung our coats and hats. A massive gum tree stood outside that was so enormous but was cut down. The two big oaks which still stand there were planted when the school opened and looked as big to me then as they do now.” From memory, Angelo says it was the Cole family that owned the whole block from Frankston Flinders Road to the Crescent, and what is now Dandenong Hastings Road, but was called Cranbourne Road then and was made of gravel. “Old man Cole donated this land for the school and the church back in the 1800s from what I’ve been told,” he says. “We only had the building and little annexe and there were about six kids in grade one and two.” Angelo says the average school day was probably not much different to today, still doing school work and being in class for many hours every weekday. The difference began outside with the rules and regulations not as stringent as in days gone by. “When we were little we would wait out the front on certain


Three generations of the Taranto family attending Tyabb Railway Station Primary School

days when the old farmers would come up with their drays. Wednesdays we all lined up out the front waiting for the horses to go past,” said Angelo. “You would also never see cars, as there were only two families that came to school in a car. One was the Grants who had about 400 acres where BHP is. One of the kids had polio and was in a wheelchair so rode in the back of the car. The other was the Thornell girls who came in a car as they weren’t allowed to ride a bike. The rest either rode a bike or walked and a lot walked through our paddocks. After the war there was a shortage of everything and kids would come to school with newspaper wrapped around their pants, tied up with string to keep dry going through the paddocks as they didn’t have boots. Then they would take the papers off and light the fire in the school house.” For Angelo, and many others of his generation, punishment was well and truly allowed in school. “If a kid did something wrong you got in trouble. The cupboard in the corner near the fire had the straps and the cane. It was

the last resort for my teacher to give the strap but we got it occasionally. His thing was, if you played up, he would make you go and pick up a bucket full of acorns and then he would go out and throw them in the long grass and you would have to pick them all up as your punishment. He had a pet hate about throwing stones. If you did that, it was a bucket of acorns.” Just like the kids today, Angelo and his mates played footy and cricket. The one main difference was how they got to the games. “If we played footy in Somerville we would run up the railway line all the way to the Somerville oval. We were in grade one and I don’t think that would happen these days. We had about ten boys then so never a team. We always reckon they were robbing us of a victory because by the time we had run there we were exhausted,” he says with a laugh. “Occasionally if my dad had time he would load the whole school into the back tray of his truck when we continued next page...

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Principal Emma Slater and Vikki Buchan

went to Hastings as it was too far to walk. He would put all 20 odd kids on the tray and tie a rope around them so no one fell out. He would pull the rope tight and tie a couple of loops at the back so no one slid out. I think that sort of thing went on in a lot of country schools.” With three generations of the Taranto family involved with the school, Tyabb Railway Station School Principal Emma Slater and long time staff member Vikki Buchan believe the successive generations of students are indicative of the community spirit the school continues to have. “It is the sense of connectedness that we still have here that will make all the difference to the future of our students. We have 119 students and we ensure that we know each child’s name and how they are going personally and academically,” said Emma. “I am aware that students in the 21st Century have access to a wealth of information and they are not always able to digest and understand such vast amounts. In Angelo’s day is was simpler and

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the information wasn’t as readily available to them. We want to teach our children how to sift through what’s true, what’s relevant, and have the necessary literacy skills to be able to put everything into context.” Emma says it is also imperative that the children have a voice no matter what their age. “I want them to be able to ask the questions they need to, in order to satisfy their curiosity about mankind and the world around them. We encourage our students to have a voice and to speak up and to share their thoughts and ideas,” she said. “If our students are confident and resilient, have information and are well educated, then they are going to make the most brilliant members of society. I want them to have an imagination and an understanding of the endless possibilities that this world has to offer. The key to having a happy healthy and productive society is one where curiosity, creative thinking, communication and collaboration are nurtured.” For Vikki, who has been fortunate enough to work with a number


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of principals over her 20 years with the school, it has been a privilege to watch many of the student’s journeys as they grow to adulthood. “They then return with their own children, and a new journey with the next generation begins,” she said. “Currently I enjoy watching chickens roam the school grounds and having the joy of being able to watch my granddaughter, who is now a student, become a member of this beautiful community with its rich history.” Tyabb Railway Station Primary School is celebrating 110 years of educating children this year. The school is restoring the original schoolhouse with generous donation of services and supplies from James Carr - P.R.Griffiths.Pty.Ltd and Paul Leeden Bowens Hastings. Tyabb Railway Station Primary School is at 88 The Crescent, Tyabb. Phone 5977 4324 tyabbrailps.vic.edu.au

Specialising in Woodlands Mount Eliza and leafy Frankston South, the Dunn team have become known for their higher than expected sales results which has lead to many referrals outside this core area. Let one of their vendors explain what makes the Dunn Team the right team for you “Selling a home can be a roller coaster of emotions - I couldn’t have asked for better support - when you work with Janice and the team, you don’t just get an agent, you get an entourage. They worked hard, kept us focused, looked after our home and the potential buyers like family would - in short they cared about us and the home as well as getting amazing results.” - Sonia

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July 2017

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IT MIGHT BE HIDDEN BEHIND A TI- TREE FENCE AND FOLIAGE BUT THE ICONIC FRANKSTON ROUNDHOUSE STILL STANDS PROUDLY ON THE APPROACH TO OLIVER’S HILL, A TESTAMENT TO A POST WAR ERA WHEN FRANKSTON WAS SETTING THE STANDARD FOR MODERN HOME DESIGN.

ROUND HOUSE SETS THE STANDARD


Real Estate By Melissa Walsh

T

his remarkable home has been a notable landmark for thousands of people as they drove down to the peninsula since it was built in 1953. Representing the border between the city and the holiday destination, it was the sign that meant you were close to the beach. Built for the Henty family, the building is completely round and an elegant example of the architect Roy Grounds’ emphasis on basic geometric form in building design. The interior is also informed by the building’s shape, with all pipes and service ducts hidden within wall cavities to maintain the pure circular lines. The house was so highly thought of at the time of its construction that the internationally renowned Bauhaus architect Walter Gropius travelled to Frankston specifically to see it during a lecture tour of Australia in 1954. The people of Frankston, however, had a different opinion on the property. Glenda Viner, president and historian of the Frankston Historical Society says that there was quite an uproar when the round house was built. “I remember in Frankston it was the talk of the town even ten years after it had been built,” said Glenda. “When people saw new things they tended to call them an eyesore but it is a very important building and historically significant. I think it stood out on its own for quite a while because at that time the 1950’s was very conservative. The older people who had lived there for a while were probably quite set in their ways and shocked at the building being constructed on Oliver’s Hill.” Roy Grounds was one of Australia’s most important 20th century architects designing many significant buildings across Australia, including the Victorian Arts Centre (incorporating the National Gallery of Victoria), and the Wrest Point Casino in Hobart, which is essentially an 18-storey version of the round house. When he designed the property for Mrs A. F, Henty in 1953 he saw nothing strange in building a round house, stating that the conditions called for it. The design for his own Toorak home (Roy Grounds House), built in the same period, was a circle within a square. “It was built after the war when Frankston was going through lots of change, pulling down the old buildings and modernising the appeal of the bayside town,” said Glenda. “After the war, we needed to modernise because the world had changed and we needed to change with it. Both men and women had been away to the war and they wanted something different. There wasn’t as much around it in those days. Now you don’t really see it when you drive up the hill but then it was a spectacular sight.” Pat Bentley has lived in Frankston since the 1950’s and remembers the round house as an iconic landmark for the area.

“When I moved here in 1959, the roundhouse was already well established and considered one of the first to start up the system of doing round buildings. The Australian Academy of Science Shine Dome building is actually built on the same system as the round house by the Roy Grounds,” said Pat, who remembers the house before the block was subdivided. “It had a nice garden that swept right down to the boundary. Even though the house is now heritage listed, it was able to be subdivided as they didn’t include the gardens. It does however have a national heritage listing which is the highest classification of heritage listing.” The Sydney Morning Herald on Jan 28, 1954 described the round house as “A round house set on a hill like a nest”. Today the roundhouse stands as a testament to the modern vision of Roy Grounds, and if you look closely when you drive down Nepean Highway just as the road starts to ascend Oliver’s Hill, you might get a glimpse of one of Frankston’s most important homes.

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168 Main Street Mornington VIC 3931 T. 03 5975 6888 Mount Martha

Auction

11 Paramount Crescent, Mount Martha Baywatch Brilliance, Fabulous Family Space Dramatic sunsets across the bay, ships passing through the channel, and the imposing silhouette of Arthurs Seat are just a snapshot of the views experienced from this custom-built four-bedroom, two-bathroom family residence. Three living zones across a single-level floorplan are tailormade for family living, while the renovated kitchen boasts granite benchtops and Smeg appliances. Space and light enhance every room including the tranquil sea-viewing master bedroom with spa ensuite, while an entertaining balcony is perfect for sunset cocktails. Features central heating, evaporative cooling, double carport, an enormous workshop and expansive gardens. Beautifully positioned on the edge of the Esplanade between the villages of Mount Martha and Safety Beach, within minutes of the beach, Martha Cove Marina and schools. Auction Saturday 8th July at 12.00pm Inspect As advertised or by appointment Contact Tashkin Hassan 0432 567 061 Alex Campbell 0432 344 394 bowmanandcompany.com.au

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bowmanandcompany.com.au


168 Main Street Mornington VIC 3931 T. 03 5975 6888 Mount Martha

For Sale

18 Frances Drive, Mount Martha Carinya – Unique Family Living Alive with warmth, ambience and personality, this four-bedroom, two-bathroom western red cedar residence creates a fabulous first impression, supported by lofty light-filled interiors and impressive 824sqm (approx.) grounds with a series of sun-soaked entertaining decks. Blonde timber floors feature throughout the interior while soaring vaulted ceilings accentuate the expansive open-plan living and dining room with study nook. Lustrous granite tops the renovated kitchen with a central island and entertainer’s stainless steel stove. A ground-floor master suite with spa complements three additional bedrooms. With a four car garage, heating and air conditioning, this home enjoys a brilliant position close to Bentons Square, a choice of schools and childcare options, buses, the nearby beacht and Main Street’s cafes and boutiques. For Sale Inspect As advertised or by appointment Contact Giulia Chapman 0439 385 390 Robert Bowman 0417 173 103 bowmanandcompany.com.au

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bowmanandcompany.com.au


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