Page 1

FEBRUARY 2018

FREE

PENINSULA Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsula

St Andrews Beach - Home To A New Brewery • A Champion Immortalised • The Peninsula Picnic Peninsula Food + Wine Festival • A Moment Of Reflection • The Wonders Of Whistlewood Cooking Master Class • Must Try Dishes • The Balcombes And ‘The Briars’


NEW CONTAINERS ARRIVING REGULARLY KIBU HAS THE PENINSULA COVERED WITH UMBRELLAS From small beach umbrellas to our giant cafe 5x5m umbrella Most of our umbrella’s come with spare parts.

NEW STOCK RRIVE JUST A

D

OPEN 7 DAYS ■ INDOOR/OUTDOOR FURNITURE ■ HOMEWARES ■ GIFTWARE ■ TABLES ■ CHAIRS ■ LOUNGES ■ BAR TABLES AND STOOLS ■ SUN LOUNGES ■ MARKET UMBRELLAS ■ MASSIVE RANGE OF RATTAN ■ CUSHIONS, LAMPS, JEWELLERY, ARTWORKS AND MUCH, MUCH MORE

COLCHESTER ROAD FACTORY 2

BONEO RD

NEWINGTON AVE

Come in and visit us today to view some of our new stock or find us on

BONEO ROAD

2/1 Colchester Road, Rosebud ph 5986 6778 kibuimports@gmail.com


have your metal fillings replaced safely

Payment plans available Payment plans available 4 Russell Street, Balnarring Phone: 5983 5348 Opening Hours: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday: 9am - 5.30pm / Tuesday 9am - 7.30pm / Friday 9am - 2.30pm

www.balnarringdentist.com.au


contents 7. Events 10. St Andrews Beach - Home To A New Brewery

Situated on a sprawling 92 acre property, the newly opened St Andrews Beach Brewery is certainly as unique as breweries come on the peninsula.

16. Henna Heaven Writers: Melissa Walsh, Keith Platt, Andrea Louise Thomas, Peter McCullough, Cameron McCullough Photography: Yanni, Gary Sissons Publisher: Cameron McCullough Advertising: Brooke Hughes, 0409 219 282 or brooke@mpnews.com.au Marg Harrison, 0414 773 153 or marg@mpnews.com.au General enquiries: essence@mpnews.com.au Registered address: 2/1 Tyabb Road, Mornington 3931 Phone: 5973 6424 www.peninsulaessence.com.au

Follow us on Instagram

@peninsulaessence

/peninsulaessence /peninsulaessence

For Telisa Gardner, henna is more than just a job, it’s a passion. Upon seeing them for the first time herself, she dived right into the world of henna, and there’s been no going back.

18. A Champion Immortalised

Boxing Legend. World Champion. Survivor. Johnny Famechon’s life has been one full of accomplishment, and now the champion boxer has been recognised for an outstanding career and an outstanding life with the unveiling of his statue at Ballam Park in Frankston.

22. The Peninsula Picnic

Mark Saturday March 17 in your diary under “food, wine and boogie” as one of the country’s favourite boutique festivals The Peninsula Picnic presented by Melbourne MINI Garage, returns to Mornington Racecourse for its fourth year.

28. Peninsula Food + Wine Festival

Stunning Point Nepean National Park at Portsea will play host to the Mornington Peninsula Food+Wine Festival on 24 February 2018.

32. A Moment Of Reflection

After a handful of frightening, unavoidable, near misses while driving his car, Mt. Eliza resident Arthur Ranken decided to take the safety of cyclists sharing the road with him into his own hands.

36. Ulysses Motorcycle Club

Thousands of keen motorbike enthusiasts will be rolling into Mornington next year, as the Ulysses Motorcycle Club makes their way down to the peninsula.

56. The Wonders Of Whistlewood

All material is copyright, and may not be reproduced without the express permission of Mornington Peninsula News Group, or the original copyright holder in the case of contributions. Copyright of contributed material rests with the contributor. Disclaimer: The authors and publisher do not assume any liability to any party for any loss, damage or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. This publication is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should regularly consult a physician in matters relating to health and particularly with respect to any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention.

Peninsula Essence is produced monthly. 30,000 copies (mix of home delivery and bulk dropped at an extensive network of outlets across the peninsula).

The property Whistlewood in the hinterlands of Shoreham has a rich and storied history. Built in the 1870s by the Tuck family, the house has belonged to the McCulloch family since the early 1950s. The McCullochs have an extensive art background and so the property has served as a home for artworks by all sorts of respected and revered artists.

62. Blues At The Briars

Fresh off the back of 2017’s epic festival, Blues At The Briars returns on February 24 for its sixth celebration of blues and roots music on the Peninsula.

66. Cooking Master Class

For beginners, experts, and everyone in between, the cooking classes at Georgie Bass Café and Cookery are helping food enthusiasts find and form their favourite flavours .

68. Recipe Of The Month 70. Must Try Dishes 72. Dessert Oasis

Made with authentic Italian charm and flavour, the gelato and food at Vespa’s Pasta, Gelato & Wine Bar has heads turning and mouths watering in Mornington.

74. The Balcombes And ‘The Briars’ Cover Photo Sunsets on the Mornington Peninsula are said to be the best in Australia. The colours really come alive however during the summer months especially in the seaside town of Rosebud. Photo: Yanni

Proudly published by

E ssence

4 | PENINSULA

PEFC Certified

This product is from sustainably managed forests and controlled sources. www.pefc.org

February 2018

Balcombe: the Mornington-Mt Martha district is dotted with this name. There is a Balcombe Street, Balcombe Drive, Balcombe Reserve and the Balcombe Creek. It’s the name of a college and a pre-school and was the name of an army camp. Who or what was Balcombe?

82. Crossword 84. Focus on Frankston 89. Everything Old Is New Again

Built in 1887, and a stunning part of the rich Sorrento history, this state- of- the -art modern home is steeped in Sorrento’s colourful past. If the walls could speak they would talk of a time gone by where the home was built for the well-known Stringer family and remained with them for the next 34 years.


GARDEN

IT'S NOT JUST TOP NOTCH RACING

SOCIALISE IN STYLE AT THE STELLER GARDEN BAR Trackside location, live music, all inclusive package $160 per person


Peninsula events

February

RESPONDING TO THE LANDSCAPE CONVERSATION February 8 In-depth conversation with artists and the curator. Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery Civic Reserve, Dunns Road, Mornington. Ph 5950 1580 www.mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au

CRUDEN FARM OPEN DAYS January 21 – February 18 The garden will be open one Sunday per month from October to February. Wander at your leisure. 60 Cranbourne Road Langwarrin please enter via Cranhaven Road, Langwarrin. Ph 9789 1676 www.crudenfarm.com.au

PENINSULA FILM FESTIVAL

COOKING CLASS: PATCH 2 PLATE

February 9 -12 Come and enjoy the screening of an independent Australian film followed by networking drinks and nibbles. Village Green, Point Nepean Road, Rosebud, 3936 www.peninsulafilmfestival.com.au

February 10 Starting at our very own produce farm, at Mornington Park on the fringe of Flinders, our Head Chef will lead you through a forage to learn about seasonal produce and collect the hero ingredients for your dishes. Georgie Bass Cafe and Cookery Cnr Cook & Wood Streets, Flinders. Ph 5989 0201 www.flindershotel.com.au

MORNINGTON PENINSULA FOOD AND WINE FESTIVAL

BLUES AT THE BRIARS February 24 Blues at The Briars Festival is back by popular demand for its 6th year providing a world class blues festival on the stunning Mornington Peninsula. Briars Homestead. The Briars, 450 Nepean Hwy, Mount Martha. Ph 0419 900 189 www.bluesatthebriars.com

February 24 An inaugural one-day festival showcasing local food and wine produce, demonstrations, tastings and sales Quarantine Station (Jarman Oval) Point Nepean National Park, Portsea www.morningtonpeninsula foodwinefestival.com

As part of Melbourne Food & Wine Festival, Pt Leo Estate is hosting a four course dinner - Sense of Place. Phil Wood will celebrate the abundant produce of our backyard with wines matched from the estate. The menu for the evening will be primarily driven by local produce and seasons, showcasing the farmers and suppliers that we work with. Pt. Leo Estate is distinctively Mornington Peninsula; passionate about our region, connected with our local community and a celebration of the produce and producers in the area.

Tickets: $203pp. Limited places available. Celebrate with us on Monday 19th March 7.30pm 3649 Frankston Flinders Road Merricks VIC 3916

Tickets can be booked online through the Melbourne Food & Wine Festival website – www.melbournefoodandwine.com.au/program/ sense-of-place-6741

February 2018

E ssence | 7

PENINSULA


MARCELLE ON MAIN Accessories for every occasion. 42 Main Street, Mornington Ph 5976 3700

Peninsula

EMU PLAINS MARKET ANNI & KLEID Off the shoulder linen dress $120 The Emu Plains market is typically held on the 3rd Saturday of every month from October to April amongst the beautiful stringybark gums.

Styles

BAYSIDE SHOES You'll find the perfect purse to match your new shoe purchase at Bayside Shoes. 103 Railway Parade, Seaford Ph 9785 1887 baysideshoewarehouse.com.au

PRODUCTS FROM OUR ADVERTISERS WE ARE SURE YOU WILL LOVE

Emu Plains Reserve Coolart Road, Balnarring

MT ELIZA OPTICAL New Range of fashionable William Morris eye ware Arriving In February 5/89 Mt Eliza Way (Ritchies Centre) Mt Eliza. Ph 9775 2922

E ssence

8 | PENINSULA

WHISTLEWOOD GALLERY The luminous colours and individual design of Awelye by leading Utopia painter Emily Pwerle add eye catching colour to brighten any space. 642 Tucks Road, Shoreham Ph 59 898282 mccullochandmcculloch.com.au

February 2018


Where potential

meets possibility...

Here every student is encouraged to dream big and is celebrated for what they achieve.

Personalised learning, quality teaching Average class size of 17 Dynamic curriculum from ELC to VCE Innovative learning facilities State-of-the-art sporting facilities Supportive, caring environment

Discover Toorak College | Open Day Saturday 3 March Tours commence at 9:00am and 11:00am Register online at toorakcollege.vic.edu.au

This is possibility. This is Toorak.


ST ANDREWS BE ACH

HOME TO NEW

BREWERY E ssence

10 | PENINSULA

February 2018


By Brodie Cowburn Pictures Ebony Elise

S

ituated on a sprawling 92 acre property, the newly opened St Andrews Beach Brewery is certainly as unique as breweries come on the peninsula.

A visit to the Fingal property 15 years ago would have seen you walking into a facility for horse training, which housed up to 80 thoroughbred horses and featured its own 1200 metre grass training track. After a significant facelift, the centre of the old horse training facility is now where you will find a truly one- of -a -kind brewery. “The property used to be the Freedman brothers horse training facility from about 2001 to 2014, and in that time they were super successful, they had; over a hundred Group One winning horses in that time,” said Business Development Manager Tim Purchase. “My dad Andrew, who is part owner of the business, helped to build the track back in 2001, so he’s been good mates with previous owners. When they stopped training here he saw the potential of what we had here, and went about his vision of turning it into a craft brewery.” The training facilities on the property had previously been the home of many champion racehorses, such as Makybe Diva, who won the Melbourne Cup on three consecutive occasions, becoming the first horse to ever win the Melbourne Cup three times. After having previously set up a small microbrewery in the south of France with a friend, co-owner, Tim’s father Andrew Purchase set about the ambitious task of turning the one time race horse home into a state of the art brewery. “He saw a bit of a gap in the market, didn’t think there were any breweries of this scale down here, and because he knew the infrastructure he thought, 'why not?' This was a perfect opportunity to build something really unique,” said Tim. Given the unique situation of being placed on a repurposed facility for horses, the brewery has a distinct look and atmosphere. The former boxes that were once home to some incredible racing pedigree have been converted into sitting areas. Visitors can now relax in a past Melbourne Cup winner’s box while enjoying freshly brewed beers full of flavour and character. They can also grab something to eat while enjoying great conversations with friends and family. continued next page...

February 2018

E ssence | 11

PENINSULA


“Once you walk in it gives you a feel as to what the stables used to look like. We’ve refurbished the boxes into tables you can book, which are a pretty private space for people to come down and enjoy our beers and something from our kitchen,” said Tim.

finest aroma hops and heirloom variety malt to ensure each beer tastes fresh and flavoursome. Inspired by the unique story of the property, the core range of beers include US Pale Ale, Australian Lager, Golden Ale and Pilsner.

“It’s a super relaxed atmosphere as well; we’ve got a beer garden in the centre of it with tables and umbrellas. You can also walk through the beer garden into our indoor area where our bar is. When you order your drinks you can look straight into the brew house.”

“Our master brewer, Dermot O’Donnell, came up with all of the recipes for them, and then we’ve got a head day -to -day brewer, Matt Stitt. When you come to the brewery you can have more than one variety and not get tired of them, that’s what we were aiming for,” said Tim.

In addition to the transformation of the horse training facility, the former 1200 metre racetrack is now home to a variety of 8000 picturesque apple and pear trees, and the former stables is where you will find sheep, pigs and free range chickens. “With these apple and pear trees, we hope to be producing our own cider on site within four years. We’ve also planted a two acre vegetable garden to use in our kitchen, and we’ve also planted an acre of hops which we hope to use in the brew house as well. We’re hoping to be a fully integrated, self-sustaining brewery,” Tim said. St Andrews Beach Brewery brew on-site using some of the

E ssence

12 | PENINSULA

February 2018

Master Brewer Dermot O’Donnell boasts over 50 years of experience in the industry, having previously worked as a brewer at Asahi International, CUB, and Tooheys. Visitors can also enjoy something to eat from a delicious snack menu, with the team at the St Andrews Beach brewery having traded five star horses for five star courses. The menu consists of a variety of small plates, share plates, salads, pizzas, and burgers that go hand in hand with the core range of craft beers. The property is also surrounded by a number of the peninsula landmarks and is nestled comfortably amongst some of the area’s biggest attractions.


$100 back instantly *

when you buy any

Bridgestone Select Mornington is now open. Visit Travis and the team today! the friendly service we offer here at Bridgestone Select Mornington. We are experts in tyres and tyre maintenance and can offer you:

Tyre Range An extensive range of Bridgestone tyres, designed to meet all your driving & budget needs.

Wheel alignments

Wheel balancing

Pressure checks

To perfectly align your wheels and produce the least amount of tyre wear

For reduced tyre wear and a smoother ridewear

To prevent excessive tread wear

We also offer log book servicing, major servicing and repair work. We pride ourselves on providing great service and using quality parts and equipment. We offer a full range of basic service options, at extremely competitive prices, and can carry out all major mechanical repair work.

AN PE NE

HW

Y

D TR OS TEC PEN

Mon to Fri 8.00am–5.00pm Sat 8.00am–12.00pm

We offer Auto Service

E

2/1002 Nepean Highway 5924 1444

V TI A TAN

Bridgestone Select Mornington

Whatever your make service with one of our

*The $100 back instantly promotion is valid on purchases of four Bridgestone Alenza, Dueler, Ecopia, Potenza or Turanza tyres i n one transaction between 28/01/2018 and 24/02/2018. The discount will be applied on the invoice. Offer excludes government, fleet and wholesale purchases. Not available with any other offer and available while stocks last. Visit bridgestonetyres.com.au for full terms and conditions.


E ssence

14 | PENINSULA

February 2018


“We are dead centre in the middle of the local golf courses around here, and then also the hot springs are over the back fence, so we’re surrounded by tourist attractions,” Tim said. To sit in the former box of Melbourne Cup winning horses, and enjoy a beer from the St Andrews Beach Brewery core range of beers on tap, come in and visit St Andrews Beach Brewery for yourself. There are tasting paddles, and the whole place is family

friendly with a kids menu available. St Andrews Beach Brewery is found at 160 Sandy Road, Fingal. More information is available at www. standrewsbeachbrewery.com.au. They can be contacted at 5988 6854.

February 2018

E ssence | 15

PENINSULA


HENNA HEAVEN By Brodie Cowburn

F

or Telisa Gardner, henna is more than just a job, it’s a passion.

Ten years ago after a friend returned from an overseas trip, Telisa was inspired by the beauty of henna tattoos. Upon seeing them for the first time herself, Telisa dived right into the world of henna, and there’s been no going back. “A friend of mine had a family wedding over in India, and they all get all done up with henna for the wedding, and she brought some of the henna back and practiced on us. That’s when I fell in love with it,” said Telisa. “I just kept on doing it and then it turned from a hobby into an addiction, so we started doing craft markets and it built from there.” Henna is a safe, natural, temporary skin dye that is often used for wedding ceremonies or decorative purpose in overseas countries. It is used to create intricate designs on skin, often on hands or feet. Originally thinking she may work as a traditional tattoo artist, the prospect of working with henna was too appealing for Telisa. She set out to turn her obsession into her career, and opened Hint of Henna, her very own henna business. Hint of Henna operates in the markets of Mornington Peninsula, creating art and delighting customers who choose to try out this special brand of body art for themselves.

E ssence

16 | PENINSULA

February 2018

“There wasn’t a lot of henna on the peninsula, so once I started it just took off. Once it got out there was a henna artist here it just grew and is still going strong today. Craft markets fuelled our henna business so we turned it into a market business, and we’ve been doing that for the last six years,” said Telisa. “We have a lot of return customers, who we call henna addicts. They start by getting it for a special occasion, then all of a sudden they’ll be getting it every fortnight because they don’t like their hands looking bare. It becomes part of their personality.” For Telisa, working in the field she is so passionate about is an intensely rewarding experience. Of all her customers she works with and all the artwork she creates, Telisa says the work she does with cancer patients as the most rewarding and fulfilling experience of all. “I did my first ever henna crown on a customer’s head four years ago while she had breast cancer. After that I didn’t hear from her and what happened to her has always been in the back of my mind,” she said. “This month, four years later, I saw her again for the first time. There were tears and hugs, to see that she’s still here with a luscious head of hair with all of her family, that’s why I do it. That’s the awesome part about it, the people.”


In addition to her work with her regular customers looking to try something different or freshen up their look, Telisa also works with pregnant women. Using their bellies as a canvas, she is able to create larger, more extravagant and detailed designs, often inspired by fairies or fantasy elements. Hint of Henna is family run, with a focus on giving each customer a warm and positive experience. “My mum works the craft markets with me, my husband helps if he has the weekends off, and my best friends rotate helping out as well, so I think seeing a family dynamic is important, and it attracts families. It’s a family environment, it’s a fun environment,” said Telisa. Hint of Henna also works with hair feather extensions, adding a bit of colour and fun to hairdos across the Peninsula. In addition, they have also been working with henna on canvas. While henna may only be temporary, Telisa’s passion for her craft certainly is not. To get the latest up- to -date news on which markets are hosting Hint of Henna, or to see some of their designs, like their page on Facebook or follow them on Instagram @hintofhenna.

Expect to pay around half the price FOR AN APPOINTMENT CALL

1300 230 730 SUITE 6 UPPER LEVEL 38A MAIN STREET, MORNINGTON w w w. d i a m o n d c o c o . c o m . a u

February 2018

E ssence | 17

PENINSULA


E ssence

18 | PENINSULA

February 2018


A CHAMPION IMMORTALISED By Brodie Cowburn. Pictures: Gary Sissons

B

oxing Legend. World Champion. Survivor. Johnny

Famechon’s life has been one full of accomplishment, and now the champion boxer has been recognised for an outstanding career and an outstanding life with the unveiling of his statue at Ballam Park in Frankston. The journey to get the statue finished and installed has been full of complications, and at times it looked as if the project would be left unfinished. When the project was at its lowest point, Gary Luscombe was among those who put their hand up to help save it in honour of one of the finest boxers Australia has ever produced. “I came in to help with fundraising from about 2013. They couldn’t get funding and they couldn’t get sponsors so they were going to cancel it, and I decided to try some fundraising efforts to keep it going. We ended up fundraising until it was finished,” said Gary. “This was too important to be left unfinished, it had to be done. Johnny is a great Australian, and I had to help keep it going.” The statue, which was officially unveiled on the 21st of

January, has been in the works for a number of years, with sculptor Stephen Glassborow first being tapped on the shoulder to work on the statue in 2010. “The sculptor had already done a statue of Lionel Rose and the statue of John Coleman in Hastings. At the opening of Lionel Rose’s statue, Lionel Rose said to Stephen Glassborow that he wanted him to do a statue of his mate ‘Fammo’, and that’s how it was commissioned,” said Gary. Famechon’s storied career ranks among the best in Australian boxing history, with his lengthy list of achievements headlined by his WBC Featherweight Championship victory in 1969. Famechon won his world title against the far more experienced Jose Legra in the main event at Royal Albert Hall in the UK. On arrival home, Famechon was greeted by a parade with hundreds of thousands in attendance. He made his professional debut at a little over 16 years old, and just three years later, he was the Victorian State champion in his weight division. His rise was quick and meteoric, and he showed experience and class beyond his young years. continued next page...

February 2018

E ssence | 19

PENINSULA


Famechon was younger than all of the boxers he defeated in World Title bouts. Famechon was known for being a tenacious boxer who could defend well and grind out difficult results. While many of his wins came by decision, he also won plenty of matches by knockout, once decisively defending his world championship via KO. After holding the championship for more than a year, Famechon lost the WBC World Featherweight Title by decision to top contender Vicente Salvidar, who entered the bout with an impressive record of 35 wins and 1 loss. This was Famechon’s first professional loss in nearly half a decade. He retired afterwards, leaving the sport having never been knocked out with 56 wins to his name, a career so impressive that it is only fitting it be recognised with a statue. “Johnny is so honoured to have the statue built. He’s so happy the people of Frankston and the boxing people all worked together to pull it off. He’s very excited,” said Gary. Johnny Famechon was born as Jean-Pierre and moved to Australia from France as a young child. He is a long term resident of Frankston, and is still living there today with his wife. In the early 90s, Famechon was hit by a car, and had to learn to walk and talk again. “He wasn’t just one of the greatest Australian boxers; he was

E ssence

20 | PENINSULA

February 2018

one of the greatest Australian sportspeople. He was a fighter back then and when he had his accident he showed he was a fighter and inspired people again. He’s been an inspiration to people his whole life,” Gary said. “This statue is a dream come true. It’s a boxing statue of a boxing legend built by the boxing people. It needed to be done. I’m very proud.” Fifty-nine years to the day since his famed title win, he has had his likeness set in bronze, ensuring that future generations learn and remember the story of Johnny Famechon, champion of the world.


A food,wine & music gathering...

JOHN BUTLER TRIO

HARRY JAMES ANGUSANGIE VIKKI THORN WAIFS M MAHON FROM THE

FROM THE CAT EMPIRE

C

MAX’S RESTAURANT•QUEALY•PRANCING HORSE ESTATE DOC MORNINGTON•GREEN OLIVE AT RED HILL•STABLES SMOKEHOUSE•FLINDERS HOTEL

MONTALTO•ALATONERO•MERRICKS GENERAL WINE STORE•YABBY LAKE•T'GALLANT•POLPERRO

SATURDAY 17 MARCH 2018 peninsulapicnic.com.au February 2018

E ssence | 21

PENINSULA


THE PENINSULA PICNIC M

ark Saturday March 17 in your diary under “food, wine and boogie” as one of the country’s favourite boutique festivals The Peninsula Picnic presented by Melbourne MINI Garage, returns to Mornington Racecourse for its fourth year. Celebrating one of Australia’s great Food & Wine Regions and seamlessly blending a foodie festival with cellar door tastings, a farmers’ market and the sweet sounds of some of Australia’s best songwriters, The Peninsula Picnic is a food, wine and music lovers’ dream. With a line-up headlined by John Butler Trio, and pop-ups from award winning restaurants and winemakers from across the region, the one-day festival makes for the perfect day out on the peninsula. Other acts include Harry James Angus (of The Cat Empire) with his nine-piece Struggle With Glory project, Vikki Thorn, fresh from celebrating the 25th anniversary tour with The Waifs, and local up and coming songwriter Angie McMahon. continued next page...

E ssence

22 | PENINSULA

February 2018


Joining the entertainment are eight of the region’s best restaurants and six local wineries, including Max’s at Red Hill, Merricks General Wine Store, Polperro, Montalto, Flinders Hotel, Green Olive at Red Hill, DOC Mornington, Stables Smokehouse, Alatonero, Prancing Horse Estate, T’Gallant and Quealy. Beers will be flowing from the Yak Ales pop up bar, plus there’ll be sessions with top winemakers, market stalls from local producers and artisans and Dessert Lane to keep your glass and plate full across the day. Kid’s activities and the friendly, laid back atmosphere make The Peninsula Picnic a great day out for families. Tickets were on sale Tuesday 5 December, 2017, so head to the website to secure yours now. www.peninsulapicnic.com.au

4/3295 Point Nepean rd Sorrento Ph 03 5984 1614 www.cotesalt.com.au

Cote Salt curates ethical, bespoke, and exclusive interior pieces that tell a unique story Candles & Scents / Linen & Soft Furnishings / Art / Lighting / Ceramics & Tableware / Furniture / Homewares / Accessories

E ssence

24 | PENINSULA

February 2018


Peppers Moonah Links Romance Package Treat someone special this Valentine’s Day with our romance package$299pn double/ twin share.

Stay Overnight accommodation in a contemporary Open Suite

Eat Full buffet breakfast in Pebbles restaurant

To book call 5988 2000 Email: moonah@peppers.com.au www.moonahlinks.com.au

Celebrate A bottle of Pinocchio Moscato and Sunny Ridge chocolate covered, freeze dried strawberries on arrival


A

AUSTRALIA

B

VICTORIA

C

MELBOURNE PORT PHILLIP BAY

MORNINGTON PENINSULA

D

E

PHILLIP ISLAND

VEHICULAR FERRY TO QUEENSCLIFF & THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD

Portsea F

Sorrento

Rosebud Rye

G

H

I

Cape Schanck

J 1

E ssence

26 | PENINSULA

February 2018

2

3

4

5


SL

RD

RD CRAIG

Y HW

Y HW

Cranbourne Cranbourne

D AN

D AN

RD

CRAIG

Y W TON H

Y W TON H

FRANK S

SL

CRAN BOURNE CRAN RD - BFOURNE FRAN RANKST-ON KSTON

Mount Mount ElizaEliza

P GIP

P GIP

Frankston Frankston

STH

STH

FRANK S

HALL RD HALL RD

TO MELBOURNE TO MELBOURNE BAXTER - TOORAD BAXTER I-N TOORADIN

RD

RD

Baxter Baxter

RD

AD IN

AD IN

RD

TO PHILLIPTO ISLAND PHILLIP ISLAND

TYABB - TO OR

ningto n Peni nsula Fr

TYABB - TO OR

eeway

TO MELBOURNE TO MELBOURNE

Tyabb Tyabb

Mo r

11

Mo r

11

ningto n Peni nsula Fr

eeway

Mornington Mornington

Mount Mount Martha Martha Tuerong Tuerong Hastings Hastings Dromana Dromana

d

Bittern Bittern RedRed HillHill

Balnarring Balnarring

Merricks Merricks

Somers Somers

Main Main Ridge Ridge

N N

Flinders Flinders

S KIN

MEA

MEA

S KIN

RD

RD

Shoreham Shoreham

0

10

21

32

43

54

5

scale scale kilometres kilometres

6

6

7

7

8

8

9

9

10 10

11 11

12 12

February 2018

E ssence | 27

PENINSULA


PENINSULA FOOD + WINE FESTIVAL S

tunning Point Nepean National Park at Portsea will play host to the Mornington Peninsula Food+Wine Festival on 24 February 2018.

For one beautiful summer's day, the historic grounds of Portsea’s Point Nepean Park will be transformed into a giant outdoor lounge for a sensational day of food, wine and entertainment – the best part is, you’re invited! A festival celebrating all that the Peninsula is famous for, with scenic beauty, combined with top quality wines, beer, food and more produced on the Mornington Peninsula, this is the perfect place for a fantastic summer event that brings us all together! The Mornington Peninsula is known for its bountiful premium produce, including wine, beer, cider, meat, seafood, fruit, cheese, vegetables and more. It’s a place where the lush green vines of some of Australia’s best Pinot Noir and Sauvignon Blanc grow. It’s where sea meets land, and land meets sea; creating a crescendo of gastronomic experiences. Mornington Peninsula Food+Wine Festival brings all these delights together for one day, in one place, for your pleasure. You will not want to miss out. With entertainment from musicians Nick Barker, Lachlan Bryan, Kris Schroeder, Robb Papp, Lucky-Louise, The Boys and more, your senses will be tantalised as you sip on your new favourite beverage, savour a range of delectable treats and move to the music. All while taking in the gorgeous coastal scenery and panoramic views of Bass Strait and Port Phillip Bay. A hand-selected range of the wineries, breweries, cider-houses and spirit-makers will serve a delectable cross-section of beverages to cater for everyone’s tastes. The festival will also give you the opportunity to experience the region’s greatest gastronomic delights, as Peninsula chefs show their skills with premium local produce. Come wander the market area for all the quality fare from the region’s best artisan producers. Showcasing the fabulous food, wonderful wine and extraordinary entertainment for which the Peninsula is famous, the festival is the place to enjoy the sunshine and salt air as producers parade their wares and vignerons display the fruits of their passion. Some of the finest musicians the Peninsula has to offer will be on hand to perform a mix of sublime sounds for you to enjoy, so

E ssence

28 | PENINSULA

February 2018

all you have to do is bring your family, friends and the picnic rug and sprawl out in the summer sunshine within the park’s idyllic grounds overlooking the bay. The Mornington Peninsula Food+Wine Festival will capture the feel of the Peninsula and all its glory in a one day event that will be the perfect day out for all food and wine enthusiasts, and a real highlight of our summer. Book now and don’t miss out. Tickets and information about vendors and performers are available at morningtonpeninsulafoodwinefestival.com

VENDORS Portsea Estate Old Apple Shed Trofeo Estate Mornington Peninsula Brewery Blue Range Estate St. Andrews Beach Brewery Chirping Bird Wines Tarindah Estate

Jetty Road Brewery Blue Pyrenees Estate Red Hill Brewery Bass & Flinders Distillery

MUSIC (INCLUDES) Nick Barker (The Reptiles) Lachlan Bryan (The Wildes) Kris Schroeder (The Basics) Robb Papp Lucky-Louise


Whether Whether it is bespoke it is bespoke furniture, furniture, or or expertexpert reupholstery, reupholstery, we craft weour craft our piecespieces with love withand lovecare. and care. Together Together we willwe create will create furniture furniture that you that will you love willfor love a lifetime. for a lifetime. Visit our Visit Mornington our Mornington show room. show room.

10 Bennetts 10 Bennetts Rd, Mornington Rd, Mornington info@sorrentofurniture.com.au info@sorrentofurniture.com.au (03) 5975 (03) 0344 5975 0344


A MOMENT OF REFLECTION By Brodie Cowburn

A

fter a handful of frightening, unavoidable, near misses while driving his car, Mt. Eliza resident Arthur Ranken decided to take the safety of cyclists sharing the road with him into his own hands. The result has been the development of Arthur’s ‘SeeMe’ reflectors, a brand of self-adhesive reflector segments designed to be placed on bicycle frames, helping to increase visibility and giving drivers more time to react and slow down for cyclists when driving at night. “They’re made with no batteries, no moving parts, and no plastic mounts to break, just a strong, reflective, adhesive material. They create visibility for bicycles at a distance of 160 metres in low beam lighting from any direction. A lot of thought, research, and planning have gone into the product,” said Arthur. “This campaign is very important, because it’s designed to dramatically reduce accidents involving bicycles and cars.”

E ssence

32 | PENINSULA

February 2018

Each pack of SeeMe Reflectors comes with installation instruction, a spacing guide, and eight self-adhesive reflective segments, designed to be placed around the forks on the front and back of the bicycle. They are designed to be arranged in blocks of four, so that riders can be identified easily and be visible from any angle at night. “As you drive along you’ll see a block of four reflectors on the back of the bicycle, which will tell you that it’s a bicycle and not another vehicle. It’s important to identify that it’s a bicycle because they are the hardest to see on the road and the most vulnerable to accidents,” Arthur said. Arthur says the reflectors are made using some of the latest high powered flexible reflective material available, and that the product will be locally made in Victoria in Carrum Downs. Unlike other reflective materials on the market, SeeMe Reflectors are designed specifically for bikes. continued next page...


`

j

v

`j

jv

`v

`jv

h

Practical. Cost Effective.Door-to-door service.

Luxury Holiday Linen Hire

Holiday Rentals, B&Bs

Domestic & Commercial Washing & Ironing

Restaurants/Wineries

Accommodation & Table Linen Hire

Day Spas Medical Specialists

Proudly servicing the greater Mornington Peninsula region. E: info@baylinen.com.au P: 0438 387 344

baylinen.com.au


“I hope that parents make the disciplined decision that their children must have these reflectors fitted permanently to their bicycles. What you might get at hardware stores is limited in size and could peel back,” he said. “These things are designed to stay for life. I only obtained prototype samples of it from overseas last February and that was the first material that met all the specifications that I needed to create the SeeMe reflector product. It conforms to transport illumination regulations, there’s been heavy research involved, and we’re catering for bicycles.” Arthur is hoping to take his SeeMe Reflectors around schools state wide to promote them to children. He hopes that if all children were to use reflectors on their bikes, the number of accidents involving kids on bikes will fall substantially. “I’m starting a campaign in all the schools to try and plan a fundraising effort with them and get these reflectors onto bicycles for school and teenage kids. It’s been developed as a community effort, and the product really works well. So far I have circulated SeeMe Reflector information to about 90 schools on the Peninsula with a fundraising element included. Flinders

Christian Community College in Tyabb has been a leader in taking advantage of this offer,” he said. The project has been in the works for a number of years for Arthur, who hopes his self-adhesive reflectors will provide greater security and peace of mind for both cyclists and drivers sharing the roads. “This has been brought about by the fact that it’s taken me five years to find answers after struggling to see kids on their bikes at night with no reflectors or lights on. I saw a way this could be overcome. I got into production late last year, and this year is the year we’ll be pushing the product as much as we can,” he said. “All vehicle operators, including cyclists, have a duty of care to make sure their vehicles are properly visible to all other drivers on our roads at night. Last year there was unfortunately an increase in bicycle road fatalities in Victoria, so I want these on all bikes, because it’s so important from a safety point of view.” SeeMe Reflectors can be purchased online from www. seemereflectors.com. More information is also available on their website.

Commercial, Industrial & Domestic Electrical Specialists

Ecofit is a trusted Mornington Peninsula based company. The team have expertise in all aspects of electrical, varying from architectural design homes, refurbishment works, factories, commercial offices, shop fit-outs.

For further information about our services please contact us on 0408 012 731 or visit www.ecofitelectrical.com.au

E ssence

34 | PENINSULA

February 2018


Major makeover for local hospital In November 2016, St John of God Frankston Rehabilitation Hospital commenced their $9.7 million refurbishment. AFTER more than 12 months of renovations we are pleased to announce that our major renovations have been completed, with only some minor works remaining. New external signage will be also be completed in the next month. Many milestones have been achieved: • Refurbishment of 46 rooms and ensuites, including building four entirely new patient rooms • Increased single room capacity • New spaces on ground floor include: extended foyer with airlock entry, new Chapel, three new consulting rooms, multipurpose room and Café • Improved spaces on first level including Occupational Therapy (OT) ADL Kitchen, OT gym, outpatient waiting room and upgraded pharmacy. • Ambulance entrance has relocated to a new undercover area at rear of hospital; this will improve traffic flow and ease of patient entry. • Many behind the scenes mechanical and services include: a new 17 tonne generator, upgraded air-conditioning and plumbing. Chief Executive Officer/Director of Nursing, Sally Faulkner, said the most critical component of the refurbishment was to increase the number of single rooms at their hospital to better support patients through their recovery. “We have converted our three and four bed rooms to two bed rooms and refurbished all bathrooms. Providing our patients with greater comfort and privacy was our ultimate goal,” Sally said. For a rehabilitation hospital, access is incredibly important and new front and rear

entrances to the hospital will make it easier for patients as well as vehicles that transport patients after surgery or injury. “Whilst this was a comprehensive and detailed refurbishment, it occurred in stages to minimise the impact on our inpatient and outpatient services. There was a buzz of excitement as each stage finished and we are so pleased with the result”. “Living through a refurbishment is never easy with disruption and changes. We are very thankful to our patients and families for their understanding as we have undertaken this essential work. Our caregivers and contractors efforts to ‘keep calm and carry on’ during the refurbishment works whilst supporting our patients and families during this time has been wonderful.” Sally said. REFERRALS: Inpatient referrals: Tel.: (03) 9788 3380 Fax: (03) 9788 3304 Outpatient referrals: Tel.: (03) 9788 3350 Fax: (03) 9788 3280 General enquiries: St John of God Frankston Rehabilitation Hospital 255-265 Cranbourne Road, Frankston 3199 Tel.: (03) 9788 3333 Email: info.frankstonrehab@sjog.org.au Web: www.sjog.org.au/frankston

Chapel

Front Foyer

Front Foyer


ULYSSES MOTORCYCLE CLUB HEADING THIS WAY By Brodie Cowburn

T

housands of keen motorbike enthusiasts will be rolling into Mornington next year, as the Ulysses Motorcycle Club makes their way down to the peninsula.

The club is far from your typical motorcycle club; with member Rob Hunt professing that they do things a little differently. “We’re really more of a social club, that’s our huge difference. It’s for older motorcyclists. You have to be 40 or above to become a member, so it’s a social club for us older motorcyclists, likeminded people getting together to talk motorcycles and all other things,” said Rob. “Everyone laughs when we take our helmets off, they think we’re big bad bikies but we take our helmets off and they see us grey haired old farts.”

In 2019, this unique brand of motorcycle club will make their way onto the Mornington Racecourse to hold their annual rally for their members across the country, an event that Rob is the director of. They will be calling Mornington home from the 25th of February until the 3rd of March. The plan to come to Mornington for their rally has been in the pipelines for a while, and is now set to finally come to fruition. “Three years ago we had a meeting, and it was proposed we hold a meeting in Melbourne. We had a look at locations and came back with many different options, which were then submitted to our national committee. The decision was then made to hold our meeting at Mornington Racecourse,” said Rob. continued next page...

E ssence

36 | PENINSULA

February 2018


We Love it! Hate Housework?

Hate Housework? We Love it! Your We Number Oneit! Choice For Residential Cleaning Love Your Number One Choice For Residential CleaningAt

we specialise only in residential cleaning which means you Time For Acleaned Cleaning Service will have your home by a highly trained professional team who

At we specialise only in residential cleaning which means you will have your home cleaned by a highly trained professional team who will use our unique process to ensure excellent results each and every time. Spring Cleaning

Regular Cleaning

We offer a one-day blitz of your home. Ideal for ‘spring cleaning’ as well as after party emergencies, before guests, during house moves or after builders. The myhome spring clean takes just one day to get your home looking immaculate.

Our regular cleaning service is perfect for your needs, whatever size home you have. This flexible service allows you to choose the frequency of your cleaning visits, whether that’s weekly, fortnightly, monthly or even more often if you require.

ousework? Love it! Why choose

?

● Over 10 years experience

● Great customer service

● Fully trained full time staff

● Unique tri-colour system

● Our 48 point cleaning system

● Fully insured

● Consistant results

● Guaranteed results

For a FREE estimate call

13 22 31

www.myhomeclean.com.au

Mount Eliza

|

Mornington

|

Mount Martha

|

Frankston

|

Somerville

oice For Residential Cleaning At we specialise only in residential cleaning which means you will have your home cleaned by a highly trained professional team who will use our unique process to ensure excellent results each and every time. Spring Cleaning

Regular Cleaning

We offer a one-day blitz of your home. Ideal for ‘spring cleaning’ as well as after party emergencies, before guests, during house moves or after builders. The myhome spring clean takes just one day to get your home looking immaculate.

Mount Eliza

Why choose

|

Our livesour areunique becoming increasingly busytothese days with the will use process ensure excellent results pressures at work, each and every time.family obligations, ongoing responsibilities and then trying to fit in a social life… it’s nearly impossible to find theSpring time toCleaning clean. Regular Cleaning The simple answer to gaining control of your life is outsourcing Weto offer a one-day blitz of your Ourhave regulartime cleaning is help keep everything balanced and for service the more home. Idealthings. for ‘spring cleaning’ perfect for your needs, important Paying forasa cleaning service may nowhatever longer as after party sizebut home you have. This bewell considered asemergencies, a luxury these days a necessity toflexible keep before guests, during house service allows you to choose the a balanced life style and bring some harmony to an already moves or after builders. The frequency of your cleaning visits, chaotic world. But how do you choose? myhome spring clean takes just

whether that’s weekly, fortnightly,

There areto so many cleaners market, one day get your home looking on the monthly or evenindependents, more often if agencies and professional companies. immaculate. you require.

There are many questions and concerns when hiring people to Why choose ? they qualified? How much experienced come into your home. Are do they have? Are they covered by insurance and most importantly ● Over 10 years experience ● Great customer service can we trust them? ● Fully trained full time staff ● Unique tri-colour system If these are concerns for you but don’t have the time or energy ● Our 48 point cleaning system ● Fully insured interviewing and trialling cleaners, then you should choose a ● Consistant results ● Guaranteed professional company that have their systems inresults place to ensure the quality, safety and security in your home is met. MyHome Cleaning has all of this covered. For a FREE estimate call They are a professional cleaning company that has been servicing the Mornington Peninsula for over seven years and MyHome itself has been established in Melbourne for over 15 years.

13 22 31

www.myhomeclean.com.au

They provide our customer qualified staff, with regulated tools and equipment arriving in company cars and in company uniform. Our regular cleaning service is perfect for your needs, whatever standards, policies/procedures and experience means that Mornington | MountTheir Martha | Frankston | Somerville size home you have. This flexible we offer great security and safety of your home. Not to mention service allows you to choose the great results with our Unique Tri-Colour Cleaning Service. frequency of your cleaning visits, whether that’s weekly, fortnightly, monthly or even more often if you require.

Phone MyHome Cleaning Service on 13 22 31 www.myhomeclean.com.au

?

● Over 10 years experience

● Great customer service

● Fully trained full time staff

● Unique tri-colour system

● Our 48 point cleaning system

● Fully insured

● Consistant results

● Guaranteed results

For a FREE estimate call

13 22 31

www.myhomeclean.com.au

• Mount Eliza Mount Martha |

• Mornington| Frankston

• Frankston

• Mount Martha Somerville • Somerville

Mount Eliza • Mornington • Mount Martha • Frankston • Somerville


“We’re getting the community involved. We’ve got our Grand Parade on the Saturday after we arrive, which will cover about seven kilometres through the local streets. The community comes out in droves to see those couple thousand motorcycles driving down the street, the kids love it, and the older folks love it too,” said Rob.

of the club and residents of the hosting communities.

“There’ll be a public open day with manufacturers and all their new bikes there. There’ll be traders there selling all sorts of motorcycle stuff, the doors will be swung open to the public to come in and have a look.”

Residents will be able to see a massive variety of motorcycles parade through the streets, as all motorcycles are welcomed into the club.

They also plan to support the local area through hiring local musicians to entertain the members during their week long camp out on the peninsula. The event is run and planned entirely voluntarily by the members of the club, who donate their time to make sure the planned meetings go ahead and run smoothly for both members

“It started with a meeting at a hotel in Collingwood, I asked what they thought of this idea, and they said to progress with it. They asked for volunteers to take on certain roles, and I put my hand up to be the director. We then asked for other volunteers to fill the other roles, it’s all volunteer based,” Rob said.

Previously, the annual meeting of the Ulysses Motorcycle Club has taken them to places such as Launceston, Alice Springs, and Albany. They have been running their annual meeting since 1983. Their head office is in Sydney, and they have branches across the country, and even internationally. Keep an eye out for them in late February of next year.

Entertain outdoors all year round With The Retractable Roof System Made from aluminium and powder coated in your choice of over 140 colours along with mesh, acrylic canvas or PVC options, there is a system to suit every application. Motorised at the touch of a button the Retractable Roofing System will extend or retract effortlessly giving you a versatile area through summer or winter. Award winning installations and only using the finest systems from Europe Undercover Blinds & Awnings has got you covered.

10th Birthday Sale

Order in February and receive 10% off* • Internal & External Window Coverings • Motorised & Corded Options • Award Winning Installations • Customised To Suit Your Application • Expert Advice • Servicing Mornington Peninsula 21 / 61 Frankston Gardens Drive Carrum Downs (03) 9775 1726 www.undercoverblinds.com.au | info@undercoverblinds.com.au

E ssence

38 | PENINSULA

February 2018

*conditions apply


RESORT LIVING EVERY DAY. RETIRE IN SOUTH GIPPSLAND. Experience the boutique retirement dream at Mountain View Leongatha Be on a permanent holiday by joining our exclusive community. Choice of 2 & 3 bedroom master built luxury homes with single or double garages.

ONLY 45 VILLAS ON COMPLETION

A 24 hour emergency call service and secure caravan and boat storage for peace of mind. Contact us for further information.

Master built luxury homes. Double Garages now available Community Centre completed and operational.

RESORT LIVING EVERY DAY

OPEN FOR INSPECTION from 10am to 4pm Monday to Saturday. Ph: 1300 306 255 1 Dale Drive Leongatha VIC 3953 www.mountainviewleongatha.com.au


SPACE SAVING SLUMBER By Brodie Cowburn

or houses a little pressed for space or small apartment buildings, there are a number of tricks to try to open up the room. One you mightn’t have thought of is taking a look at beds that fold straight onto the wall.

F

designed for comfort. You can really get creative with your bedrooms, we have a revolving bookcase that swivels and a bed pops out, and we’ve also got desk beds and you can lower the bed down without taking anything off the desk.”

Wall Beds or other wall furniture can be a great and innovative way to get more use out of the room you have, allowing it to be transformed without hassle or worry. Fold Out Furniture is a business offering these Wall Bed solutions to the peninsula, and you’ll only need to look as far as Frankston for a show room.

Fold Out Furniture is currently showing off the intriguing concept of wall furniture at a new showroom in Frankston.

“It offers opportunities to make the most of space, now you can use furniture in a more clever way. It’s great for downsizing or for young people moving into a small house, it creates multifunctional rooms, allowing you to turn a study into a bedroom quickly. We specialise in furniture that has more than one function,” said Managing Director of Fold Out Furniture, Sue Frendin. “It’s about versatility, it can be cost saving, and they’re also

E ssence

40 | PENINSULA

February 2018

“We have three beds on display in Frankston. It features our white swivel bookcase in the window, which is like a James Bond bookcase. We also have a free standing wall bed, which is great for rental properties because you don’t have to mount it to the wall. There’s also one you attach to the wall which is a simple economical design, all beds come in single, double and queen sizes” said Sue. Fold Out Furniture are looking to show these small space living solutions in Frankston permanently, changing the beds and displays there frequently to show off the variety of their products. By staying permanently, Sue says she hopes to keep


making the lives of customers in the area easier. “It supports decluttering and simplification of life. It even helps in disability homes, nursing homes, and hostel retirement villages by providing a bed to pull down for carers to stay overnight. It helps them sleep comfortably and safely, saving them from having to sleep on lounges,” she said. “We only deal with quality products that are true and tried with good warranties and backup. There are other options around, but we pride ourselves on the highest quality local and imported products with locally sourced mattresses.” To check out their range visit their website www.foldoutfurniture. com.au or have a look at their showroom at Frankston Power Centre, 111 Cranbourne Rd, Frankston. They also have a larger showroom available by appointment at the Home Ideas Centre, 1686 Princes Highway, Oakleigh East. Call Sue at 0499 999 931 for a consultation or more information.

Simply Beautiful Shoes

LOOKING FOR WAYS TO CREATE

MORE SPACE

IN YOUR LIFE? DOWNSIZING?

Would you prefer that spare room to be a study, sitting room, yoga space or home office when it’s not accomodating friends or family? Reclaim your space - install a wall bed! Fold Out Furniture specialises in DIY and customised wall beds and small space living solutions, with displays now open in Frankston at the Home Innovations Centre and in Oakleigh East at the Home Ideas Centre. See our full product range at www.foldoutfurniture.com.au, or call us on 0499 99 9931 for more information. Reclaim your space in 2018!

SOLICITORS & CONYEYANCERS

BUYING? SELLING? SUBDIVIDING? FOR D SOL SALE

The best possible service at the best possible price

Bayside Shoes 103 Railway Parade, Seaford PH: 9785 1887 baysideshoewarehouse.com.au

(03) 5975 7611 www.morningtonlegal.com.au

mornington legal

AMPLE FREE PARKING February 2018

E ssence | 41

PENINSULA


Photos

Peninsula

The who’s who of the peninsula gathered together to celebrate the opening of the Mornington Art Show at Peninsula Community Theatre. While the young and the young at heart enjoyed spectacular circus antics with Silvers Circus. A few pints were enjoyed at the opening of the Jetty Road Brewery and also a nice drop at the Barmah Park Winery.

Jetty Rd Brewery Jetty Rd Brewery

Barmah Park Winery

Jetty Rd Brewery

Jetty Rd Brewery

YOUR FUTURE LOOKS ROSY WHEN YOU ADVERTISE IN

Barmah Park Winery

Book into the next issue Call Marg on 0414 773 153

E ssence

42 | PENINSULA

February 2018

Barmah Park Winery

Barmah Park Winery


Mornington Art Show Mornington Art Show

Silvers circus

Silvers circus

Mornington Art Show

Mornington Art Show

Silvers circus

“OPEN AMBROSE�

Mornington Art Show

Sunday 11th March 2018 Four person combination $40 per person | $160 per team includes BBQ on completion Entries close 1st March 2018

Mornington Art Show

(Golf Pro) Shane Johnson Ph: 5981 0100 or (Office manager) Debbie Hedges Ph: 5981 0120

Mornington Art Show

February 2018

E ssence | 43

PENINSULA


PENINSULA BUSINESS AWARDS

each business is judged fairly and equally.

By Brodie Cowburn

The deadline to apply for the awards is the 28th of February. Over 200 businesses have already applied for an award, and more are expected to sign up before the cutoff date. Businesses can self-nominate online.

R

unning for the first time in 2018, the Peninsula Business Awards will be recognising the best businesses that the area has to offer.

Rhiannon Pilton started the project with the aim of giving local businesses some much needed acknowledgement for all the good work that they do. “I work with businesses of all sorts, and talking to different business owners it’s clear that they’d like to see some recognition. I work in HR and I know how important it is to recognise the staff, so we want to make them feel rewarded for what they’re doing. If we recognise the employees they’ll feel rewarded and put back into their small business, a pat on the back can do a lot for somebody,” she said. The awards will be judged by a number of set criteria, with extra emphasis being placed on unbiased judging, to make sure

LOOKING FOR MORE CUSTOMERS? YOU NEED TO ADVERTISE IN

Book into the next issue Call Brooke on 0409 219 282

E ssence

44 | PENINSULA

February 2018

“This isn’t about money or anything like that, we’re judging on customer service and what these businesses are providing to the community,” said Rhiannon “There’ll be a panel of three independent judges to make the decisions. Two of those won’t be peninsula based, so there’ll really be an unbiased opinion. One is a business coach with 20 years’ experience, and another is a bookkeeper with about 20 year experience who works with smaller business. We’re hoping to find a third judge in customer service so we can cover everything.”

There will be a wide and diverse range of categories contested, including the best of hairdressing, cafes, real estate, accounting, IT, and more. The finalists will be announced on the 30th of March. The final winners of each category will be announced at an evening at Safety Beach Sailing Club on the 2nd of May. “Obviously we’re inviting all our finalists and sponsors to our gala dinner at the Safety Beach Sailing Club. We picked the location because there’s a catering company that operates in the building and we wanted to give an opportunity to a smaller business. That’s the vibe we’re going for,” Rhiannon said. To nominate either your business or someone else’s, or to find out more information, visit www.peninsulabusinessawards.org


PENINSULA

BUSINESS AWARDS

2018

APPLICATIONS

OPEN NOW Registrations have opened for the Peninsula Business Awards!

To nominate a local business or to apply directly please visit; www.peninsulabusinessawards.org Don’t Delay! Applications Close: COB 28th February, 2018 Any questions or more information about nominations or sponsorship opportunities, please contact Rhiannon Pilton on 0402 807 144

sponsored by


Photos

UNTOLD EVENTS CO PROUDLY PRESENTS

botanika cinema

FEBRUARY 24 10Am to 3pm A SPECTACULAR NEW MONTHLY MARKET AT BEAUTY PARK, FRANKSTON SHOWCASING OVER 100 OF THE VERY BEST MAKERS AND CREATORS

WWW.LITTLEBEAUTYMARKET.COM.AU

E ssence

46 | PENINSULA

February 2018

BRAND NEW OUTDOOR CINEMA COMING TO FRANKSTON IN APRIL 2018 Proudly supported by Frankston City Council

GEORGE PENTLAND BOTANIC GARDENS GATES OPEN AT 6:30PM FOR LIVE MUSIC & STREET FOOD

TICKETS FROM $10 / CHILDREN UNDER 5 FREE

www.unscenecinema.com.au


Change your Life. Excite your Life.

Come and Sail! At Mornington Yacht Club there’s something special for every kind of sea-lover. • For the keen sailor - a tradition-steeped sailing community and first-class amenities • For the novice - of any age - an easy, exhilarating introduction to the magic of boating • For the kids - 7+ Tackers “learn to sail” programs with accredited instructors and all gear and boats provided. Membership isn’t necessary • For the goodlife gourmet - award-winning food from “The Rocks”, served on your exclusive sun-kissed clubhouse balcony. MYC, adjacent to the Mornington pier on Schnapper Point Drive, boasts magnificent views across the harbour and across the bay.

Make this your best sea-magic summer ever! Find out more by contacting the club or going to our website. Mornington Yacht Club Schnapper Point Drive, Mornington VIC 3931 Phone: (03) 5975 7001 www.morningtonyc.net.au

February 2018

E ssence | 47

PENINSULA


Eyewear As Individual As You Are Eyewear As Individual As You Are Eyewear As Individual

As You Are Eyewear As Individual As You Are • Professional Care • Top Quality Eyewear

• Prompt, Effiicient Service •Latest Fashion Frame Brands

• Professional Care • Top Quality Eyewear

• Prompt, Effiicient Service •Latest Fashion Frame Brands

Now stocking Paul Taylor Eyewear

Words & pictures by Yanni

MainStreet EyeCare MainStreet Eyecare 57 Main Street, Mornington 5975 3235 57 Main Street, Mornington MainStreet EyeCare MainStreet Eyecare 5975 3235 Now stocking Paul Taylor Eyewear

57 Main Street, Mornington 3235 57 Main Street, Mornington5975 5975 3235

Every Wednesday 9am - 3pm Home Baked - Handmade - Home Grown

Victoria’s longest running street market Free weekly raffle to win a market bag of produce Main Street Mornington...where the shops meet the sea mainstreetmarketmornington www.mainstreetmornington.com.au

E ssence

48 | PENINSULA

February 2018

G3682285AB-dp20Apr G3682285AB-dp20Apr

Mushroom Reef Rock Pool Ramble


R

anger Julia Pickwick enthralled and educated a group of excited rock pool ramblers at Mushroom Reef in Flinders on Wednesday evening. Mums and dads and kids alike fearlessly overturned rocks and seaweed, discovering a miriad of sea creatures and shell fish. continued next page...

February 2018

E ssence | 49

PENINSULA


Some of the sea life found included Green Chitons - a relative to the prehistoric Trilobite, crabs, elephant snails, tube worms, little green sea stars, banded brittle stars, blue periwinkles, false limpets, sea centipedes, flatworms, Waratah anemones and shrimp. All the found life was put back after it was studied - in the same place it was discovered in order to maintain the delicate ecosystem balance of the rock platform. Some of the younger children were so amazed at what they were finding, barely containing their excitement constantly calling Ranger Julia over to show what they had discovered.

MGS Ad2 126x192:Layout 1

12/11/17

6:30 PM

Page 1

Exciting times for Mornington Garden Supplies! Owners Mark and Bindy Foley have bought a retail icon of the Peninsula “Garden of Quasimodo” and have moved their 40 year old business up onto the Moorooduc Highway (on the corner of Males Road) from Watt Road. “We are so happy with our new landscape centre!” enthuses Bindy. “We now have a huge selection of stunning pots and outdoor inspirational pieces to complement our existing bulk garden supply business.” Both “Garden of Quasimodo” and “Mornington Garden Supplies” have served the Peninsula for well over 30 years. To be able to combine them and inject some renewed energy and flair has been a wonderful challenge. We are over the moon with the results!” With a display pool, pizza oven, masses of garden products in bulk and in bags, tools, statues, bird-baths, pots and a huge selection of other outdoor delights there is plenty to get inspired by at the new site. Mornington Garden Supplies – same fabulous service (deliveries Mon – Saturday) - all the old favourites plus new stock, new ranges and a brand new space – come and visit you won’t be disappointed.

OPENING HOURS: MON - FRI 7AM - 5PM SAT 7AM - 3PM SUN 10AM - 3PM (No bulk loads or deliveries)

E ssence

50 | PENINSULA

February 2018

1051 MOOROODUC HWY MOOROODUC TELEPHONE 5978 8700 www.morningtongardensupplies.com.au


Don’t sign until you’ve seen Living Design Double Glazing

Cool Gray 11 PMS 368

Non Flammable - BAL29 All Products Australian Made in ourwhite factory PMS 368

All Products Internally Glazed as Standard Enhanced Security Maintenance Free (No Painting ever) Non Corrosive Cyclone Rated/Weatherproof Eliminate Draughts Energy Efficiency

REHAU is a global leader in the UPVC window technology market. They supply High Weather Formula Window/Door frames– specifically designed for Australian conditions. We are a 5 star accredited REHAU manufacturer & Installer based on the Mornington Peninsula (REHAU quality assurance program).

Noise Reduction Sustainability Fully Welded Frames Affordable Dust Proofing 10 Year Unconditional Guarantee Locally Owned & Operated

For a NO OBLIGATION free quote call 5909−8040, Kim 041 222 1767 or Mich Factory showroom open to the public at Factory 1, 7 Lyall St, Hastings We welcome visitors to our factory where you can view our windows and doors being manufactured or view our extensive range of affordable UPVC Double Glazed Windows and Doors.

www. livingdesigndoubleglazing.com.au


It was an hour of wonder and discovery down at Mushroom Reef in Flinders as part of the Parks Victoria Junior Rangers school holiday program.

All activities are free, but bookings are essential at www. juniorrangers.com.au.Children must be accompanied by an adult at all times.

If you can’t make it to a ranger-guided activity this summer, you can still be a Junior Ranger. Check out the ‘Make and Do’ section of www.juniorrangers.com.au for fun activities you can download and take with you to any park or reserve.

For more information call 13 1963 or visit www.parks.vic.gov.au

9 9 9 9 9 9 9

Mobility scooters (portable, small, medium & large) Rollators Beds Lift Chairs Car hoists Stair lifts Full range of accessories

PLUS!

Sales and service Free in home demonstrations We’ll match all advertised prices, and their conditions

INTEREST ENTS FREE PAYM AVAILABLE

PHONE: 03 5915 2257 or 1300 851 661 Family owned business based on the Mornington Peninsula | www.mobilityhelp.com.au

E ssence

52 | PENINSULA

February 2018


GUTTER PROTECTION? GUTTER PROTECTION? WHY DO YOU NEED WHY DO YOU NEED WHY DO YOU NEED GUTTER PROTECTION? GUTTER WHY DOPROTECTION? YOU NEED GUTTER PROTECTION? GUTTER er m m u S e g u H r Special Offe

PROTECTION?

20% OFF!

WHY DO YOU NEED Before Before

After After

100% SUCCESS RATE 100% SUCCESS RATE

Before Before Before • Stop gutters from pre-maturelyAfter rustingAfterAfter • No more mud in your • Stop gutters from pre-maturely rusting • No more mud in your Before • Never climb ladders again After gutters Before After • Never climb ladders again gutters

100% SUCCESS RATE 100% SUCCESS • Stops RATE back flooding of rainwater into roof • Stops back flooding of rainwater into roof • Protect your most valued

cavities & eaves • Protect your most cavities & eaves • No more•mud in your No more mud invalued your 100% SUCCESS RATE investment – your home, investment gutters– your home, • No more overflowing gutters therefore prevents

100% SUCCESS RATE your building • No more mud in your

gutters fromgutters pre-maturely rusting rustingRUSTING • Stop fromPREMATURELY pre-maturely •• Stop STOP GUTTERS FROM •• Never NEVER CLIMB LADDERS • Never climb ladders AGAIN again climb again gutters • ladders No FLOODING more overflowing gutters therefore prevents • STOPS BACK OF RAINWATER INTO • water Stop gutters from pre-maturely rusting • Stops back flooding of rainwater into roof damage to foundations and the structural • Stops back flooding of rainwater into roof water damage to foundations and the structural • Protect most valued ROOF CAVITIES EAVES Protect your mostyour valued cavities &&eaves cavities &Stop eaves integrity of your • gutters fromagain pre-maturely rusting • Never climb ladders integrity ofhome your home • NO MORE OVERFLOWING GUTTERS THEREFORE – your home, • No more overflowing gutters therefore prevents investmentinvestment – your home, • No overflowing gutters therefore prevents PREVENTS WATER DAMAGE TO FOUNDATIONS •more Collect clean rainwater for re-use water damage to foundations and structural • Stops back flooding of rainwater into roof your building • Never climb ladders again • Collect clean rainwater for the re-use to foundations and the structural your building Tile roof Tile valleywater AND damage THE integrity STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY OF YOUR HOME of your home cavities & eaves integrity of home •• Ember protect for bushfire prone areasinto •your Ember protect forforbushfire prone areasroof • Gutters stay clean –•no COLLECT CLEAN RAINWATER FOR RE-USE Stops back flooding of rainwater • Collect clean rainwater re-use Gutters stay clean – no No more overflowing gutters therefore prevents •• Collect EMBER PROTECT FOR BUSHFIRE PRONE AREAS clean rainwater for re-use more cleaning cavities & product eaves •• Fire conforms to AS3959-2009 Fire retarded conforms to AS3959-2009 ••retarded Ember protect for product bushfire prone areas more cleaning •• Ember FIRE water RETARDANT PRODUCT CONFORMS TO to prone foundations protectdamage for bushfire areas and the structural • SaveCorrugated money andCorrugated timevalley ••and Fire retarded product conforms to AS3959-2009 AS3959-2009 No more overflowing gutters therefore prevents Bird and vermin proofing •• Bird vermin proofing roof integrity of your home Save money and time • Fire retarded product conforms to AS3959-2009 from cleaning • BIRD AND VERMIN PROOFING • Bird and vermin proofing water damage to foundations and the structural • PROOFING Possum proofing ••and Possum proofing Collect clean rainwater for re-use from cleaning •• Bird POSSUM vermin proofing • Possum proofing

your building • •No morestay mudclean in your gutters Gutters – no– no • Gutters stay clean gutters • more Protect your most valued cleaning more cleaning •investment –most your home, • •Protect your valued Save money andand time • Save money time your building investment – your home, from cleaning from cleaning • •your Gutters stay clean – no building integrity of your home more cleaning • Ember protect for bushfire prone areas • Possum proofing •

GUTTER PROTECTION? Follow us on Facebook and Instagram

• Gutters stay clean – no •more Savecleaning money and time Trim deck

from cleaning

• Collect clean rainwater for re-use

CALL NOW CALL USUS NOW

• Fire retarded product US conforms to AS3959-2009 CALL NOW

Deck valley

• Save money and time from cleaning

FORprotect A US FREE MEASURE AND QUOTE • CALL Ember for bushfire prone areas NOW A FREE MEASURE QUOTE • Bird andFOR proofing FOR Avermin FREE MEASURE AND AND QUOTE FOR AFire FREE MEASURE AND QUOTE retarded • •Possum proofingproduct conforms to AS3959-2009

0431 512512 0431239 239

• 0431 Bird and 239 vermin 239 proofing 0431 512512 www.cprgutterprotection.com.au

100% Australian Owned and Operated with over 20 years experience

20 YEAR

Follow us on Facebook and Instagram

CALL US NOW www.cprgutterprotection.com.au www.cprgutterprotection.com.au Tile roofFOR A FREE MEASURE Tile valley AND QUOTE www.cprgutterprotection.com.au MEMBER

• Possum proofing

* Valid Until 9/3/18

CALL US NOW 0431 239 512

FOR A FREE MEASURE AND QUOTE


MAKING A SPLASH A

s the weather has hotted up on the Peninsula, many families have turned to their backyard pools to stay cool during the summer time. Pools have long proved to be hits with families looking to make the most of the summer weather, with many looking to install pools in their homes to increase the fun in their lives and increase the potential value of the property. Over ten percent of Australian homes have pools installed, and if done right, a pool can make a house much more attractive for potential buyers. To make sure you get the most value possible from adding a pool to your home, it is important to make sure you are installing the right pool for your home, at the right price. One pool installation business based right on the Mornington Peninsula is Edgewater Pools. At Edgewater, they have acknowledged that pools have evolved from simple holes in the ground, and recognise that they must be adapted to fit with the needs of each individual home and family. “We strive to design and construct an environment that clients can

escape to, relax, unwind and enjoy with family and friends,” said Edgewater owner Kaz Hall. “Pools are no longer an eight by four hole in the backyard that rarely gets used, they’re direct extension of the house now. They can be incorporated into the house and built around the lifestyle of the owners.” Kaz says it is all about doing a consultation to find the right pool type and size. “I ask questions like 'do you have kids', 'what height are the people who will be using the pool', and take into account what the family would like from the new pool,” he said. “It all goes into the process of how you design each individual pool for each different home and family.” For people looking to buy on the peninsula, seeing a stunning pool which suits the property in the backyard can prove to be the difference. www.edgewaterpools.com.au

Free hearing tests to Seniors Say What?.. during Seniors Week

Personalised Service, Personalised Products

Did you know that many audiologists are not independent, and rely on commissions from only one supplier? At Nepean Hearing, we are proud to be able to offer the latest technical During Seniors Week innovations from the industry, regardless of the manufacturer.

15% discount on our hearing aids We offer personalised service and for self funded retirees. personalised products. Call us today and

book your free hearing assessment and make sure you’re getting the right device.

Ph: 9783 7520 Ph: 9783 7520 www.nepeanhearing.com.au

www.nepeanhearing.com.au 13 Hastings Rd, FRANKSTON

13 Hastings Rd,Health,185 FRANKSTON Hastings Community High St, HASTINGS “Hear Hastings Community Health,185 High St, HASTINGS

E ssence

54 | PENINSULA

to help”

“Hear to help”

February 2018


May 29 | Mornington Racecourse | One-Day Event Business. Innovation. Technology. Efficiency.

BITE CONFERENCE 2018 The Small Business Event of the Year Learn from leading influential keynote speakers. Network with entrepreneurs & business owners. From tech companies to service providers, BITE Conference is the business event for 2018.

BOOK NOW |

www.biteconferencevictoria.com.au

PROUDLY HOSTED BY

Level 1, 323 Main Street Mornington | T. 5911 7000 | smartbusinesssolutions.com.au

February 2018

E ssence | 55

PENINSULA


E ssence

56 | PENINSULA

February 2018


Arts

THE WONDERS OF WHISTLEWOOD By Brodie Cowburn. Pictures Yanni

T

he property Whistlewood in the hinterlands of Shoreham has a rich and storied history. Built in the 1870s by the Tuck family, the house has belonged to the McCulloch family since the early 1950s. The McCullochs have an extensive art background and so the property has served as a home for artworks by all sorts of respected and revered artists. “My father was a well known art critic, the founding director of Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery and the author of the first edition of the Encyclopaedia of Australian Art. He was a critic for 60 years in Melbourne and internationally and was instrumental in building the careers of many famous Australian artists of the 20th century,” said Susan of her late father Alan McCulloch, AO. Some of Susan’s earliest memories are of being surrounded by art on lecture tours with her parents and having artists staying at Whistlewood - such as Arthur Boyd who designed and helped build Alan McCulloch’s studio. “I originally trained as a singer then became a book publisher as well as an arts journalist for leading newspapers and was The Australian’s visual arts writer for eleven years.” Susan said. continued next page...

February 2018

E ssence | 57

PENINSULA


E ssence

58 | PENINSULA

February 2018


Nearly 150 years on from its construction, the McCulloch family's Whistlewood property doubles as both a family home and a gallery exhibiting largely Aboriginal art from around Australia. It is managed by Susan and her daughter Emily McCulloch Childs. “Whistlewood has been our business headquarters since the early 80s and has displayed art for decades. We find that people appreciate seeing art in a relaxed, home-like atmosphere,” Susan said. Susan’s interest in Aboriginal art stems from Alan’s organising of an exhibition of bark paintings from Arnhem Land from the Museum Victoria collection to show in the USA in the early 1960s and her own first trip to central Australia on a school trip at about the same time. “Many years later, as the visual arts writer for The Australian and working on our Encyclopedia, I realised there wasn't one book that traced the history of the contemporary Aboriginal movement through its regions and differing styles. So I started to travel extensively to the Kimberley, Tiwi Islands, Arnhem Land, the central desert areas and

elsewhere and wrote a guide to contemporary art,” Susan said. “These days I continue to travel, often with Emily who is my writing and business partner. We’re privileged to have access to an enormous range of places and artists in remote regions and consequently are able to present a huge range of art at Whistlewood. Our exhibitions often comprise 50 plus works from many different regions.” Susan regards her travels around Australia in order to find out more about Aboriginal art one of the most rewarding aspects of her working life. “All the experiences are very varied and wonderful. It’s really important to see the country and meet the artists where possible, as Aboriginal artists are so closely bound to their lands, it helps enormously to experience this to understand the art,” said Susan. “There's not just one Aboriginal Australian population, each language group has its own culture and art style.” continued next page...

February 2018

E ssence | 59

PENINSULA


E ssence

60 | PENINSULA

February 2018


The result of a life's worth of research is the exhibitions you’ll find at Whistlewood. Susan and Emily work with some 25 Aboriginal communities and present around 10 exhibitions a year. “Our range includes some of the most well known Aboriginal artists in Australia, as well as rising stars and mid generation artist. Aboriginal art is very intergenerational - it’s about the passing on of traditions. Our February show is ‘In Black and White’ and features black and white art from five regions,” Susan said. “There will also be an exhibition of a talented young artist who paints the night sky. Her paintings really capture the sense of space and grandeur of being in places with little electricity where you can see that

wonderful skyscape.” In addition to Aboriginal art, Whistlewood also shows a number of non Aboriginal contemporary abstract artists whose work sits very well alongside that of Indigenous artists and also presents talks, music, films and other events that relate to the art they show. Whistlewood can be found at 642 Tucks Road, Shoreham. Whistlewood is open from Friday - Sunday and public holidays from 11am until 4pm. (03) 5989 8282. www.mccullochandmcculloch.com.au

IN BLACK + WHITE - FEBRUARY 9 - MARCH 4

Paintings, ochres, barks + 3D celebrating the power of black and white in Aboriginal art PLUS: feature showing of night sky paintings by APY artist Vicki Cullinan WHISTLEWOOD 642 Tucks Road, Shoreham,VIC 3916 T: 59 898 282 | E: info@mccullochandmcculloch.com.au

Fridays, Saturdays & Public Holidays, 11am–4pm mccullochandmcculloch.com.au

February 2018

E ssence | 61

PENINSULA


BLUES AT THE BRIARS F

spiritual journey to experience her intense magic. Come and experience her live at the Briars.

A combination of great music, amazing food and wine, and a dedicated children’s area make this day a must in everyone’s calendar. The Peninsula’s best kept secret keeps delivering in the amazing rural setting of the historic Briars homestead and surrounds. Bring a chair or a picnic rug and soak up the landscape and vibe while listening to the best bands from Australia and abroad.

This year Blues At The Briars have pulled out all the stops with a sound and lighting upgrade so the tunes will be crisp and clear for all to enjoy.

resh off the back of 2017’s epic festival, Blues At The Briars returns on February 24 for its sixth celebration of blues and roots music on the Peninsula.

February’s festival is shaping to be the best yet. A.J. Ghent (USA) constructs an indie rock sound howling from the church to the blues. Z Star Delta (UK), described as the love child of Jimmy Hendrix and Nina Simone, takes you on a personal and

E ssence

62 | PENINSULA

February 2018

Blues At The Briars are also proud to announce the triumphant return of the best boogie pianist on the planet, Ben Waters (UK) joined by Derek Nash the best Sax player going around.

The VIP area returns with amazing food and drink packages, in a dedicated marquee where you can enjoy the show in luxury. Treat yourself this indulgence and make it a day to truly remember. A fully stocked bar with very reasonable non-festival prices will be open all day. www.bluesatthebriars.com


Welcome to the Peninsula’s Best Kept Secret Festival!

VIP TIXBLE!

KID14S ARE FREE!

UNDER

A AVAGIRLOOVE

LE!

IN STY

at the fabulous Briars Homestead in Mount Martha

SATURDAY 24th FEB 2018 11.00 am until late

WORLD CLASS BLUES AND ROOTS ACTS ALL DAY AND NIGHT

2018 International Cool Climate Wine Show Wine Entries Australia’s only International Cool Climate Wine Show will be held from 21 to 28 May 2018 The International Cool Climate Wine Show is an opportunity to benchmark in a show where ‘like is judged against like’, where elegant wines with restrained fruit are seen at their best, and where diversity is encouraged and rewarded. The Show attracts more than 600 wines from around the world, in 25 competition classes, and the wines are judged by highly credentialed and experienced judges, led by Chairman of Judges, Robert Paul.

EARLY BIRD SPECIAL

ENTER YOUR WINES BEFORE 31 JANUARY 2018 TO HAVE YOUR WINERY PROMOTED IN OUR FEATURED WINERIES SECTION ON OUR WEBSITE AND VIA SOCIAL MEDIA. Enter online at www.internationalcoolclimatewineshow.com/entry-form. Refer to www.internationalcoolclimatewineshow.com/conditions-of-entry-regulations for conditions of entry and regulations. Entries close 29 April 2018. Direct enquiries to Event Manager Paula Creek at info@internationalcoolclimatewineshow.com or call 0404 468 286.

A J GHENT (US) BEN WATERS (UK) CHRIS WILSON AND THE HEINOUS HOUNDS Z STAR DELTA (UK) ...and many more local and interstate artists to keep you entertained!

tickets and more info at

www.bluesatthebriars.com February 2018

E ssence | 63

PENINSULA


COMING SOON TO FAC Thomas Murray and the Upside Down River

FAC Theatre, Saturday 10 March, 7.30pm, 140 minutes, including interval, Member from $40, Adult from $45, Concession from $42, U30 from $27, Schools $18 Bookings: 03 9784 1060 or thefac.com.au

T

he Murray family have been farming the land along the Darling River for five generations. For Tom Murray, it's all he's ever known. When his childhood friends Lucy and Billy reappear, deep friendships are tested, and secrets, long buried, are finally awakened – Tom must make the long journey down-stream to reconcile past wrongs and to fight for his wife.

From the multi-award winning screenwriter of Last Cab to Darwin comes a thrilling new Australian drama, brought to you by the producers and creative team behind Stones in his Pockets including Grant Cartwright in the title role (Barracuda). “Reg Cribb is a writer whose imagination catches fire when presented with the everyday dramas and dreams of ordinary Australians…The play is a rich exploration of character and story. The language crackles with humour, bitterness and authenticity.” - Stage Noise, Diana Simmonds

E ssence

64 | PENINSULA

February 2018


MUSICAL THEATRE

DRAMA

“Thomas Murray is a lot of play for your money.” Sydney Morning Herald

A Stone Soup and Critical Stages Production

THOMAS MURRAY AND THE UPSIDE DOWN RIVER Saturday 10 March, 7.30pm

Tickets: 03

9784 1060

thefac.com.au

Daytime Music + Theatre

THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE Friday 9 March, 10.30am & 1.30pm Tickets: 03

9784 1060

$20

thefac.com.au February 2018

E ssence | 65

PENINSULA


COOKING

E ssence

66 | PENINSULA

February 2018


Eat & Drink

By Brodie Cowburn

F

or beginners, experts, and everyone in between, the cooking classes at Georgie Bass Café and Cookery are helping food enthusiasts find and form their favourite flavours. For those looking to fine tune their cooking skills, Georgie Bass Café and Cookery is offering something to help you, whether you’ve been putting together dishes for 20 years, or if you’ve never picked up a pan in your life. “These are classes for all skill levels. We run weekly Saturday classes with 11 people enrolled, creating a personalised, interactive, and fun environment for learning culinary skills,” said Events Co-ordinator Kate Poole. The classes are led by professional chefs who bring years of experience and expertise to impart to the participants. Georgie Bass is also the home of multi award winning chef Michael Cole, who designs the cafe and the class menus. Michael has been named Head Chef of the Year by Foodservice Australia, and has also been chosen to represent Australia in the prestigious biennial Bocuse d’Or World Cuisine Contest. Under his guidance, and the guidance of a team of experienced chefs willing to pass off their knowledge and wisdom onto those keen to learn, Georgie Bass offers a wide variety of different classes. You might be a health focused fitness aficionado, or you might be a sweet tooth looking for a little delicious dessert delight to go with dinner, but regardless of what your tastebuds desire, there’s a likely to be a class at Georgie Bass to suit you.

Their classes are run in conjunction with Miele, who provide the cooking appliances for use in the Georgie Bass classes. Kate says this relationship is so important, because it means that students may learn using the same quality tools available to experienced chefs that have been in the industry for years. “We work with Miele, so everyone taking our classes will be working with the highest quality utensils and cooking equipment. Our partnership with them means that our students will only be working with the very best,” she said. In addition to their classes, there is also a complete menu at Georgie Bass Café and Cookery, complete with a full offering of breakfast and lunch, using fresh local produce. Their picturesque café location is also pet friendly. The Georgie Bass Café and Cookery is run in partnership with the Flinders Hotel, with the two forming part of a happy family of food hotspots on the peninsula. Georgie Bass Café and Cookery can be found at 30 Cook Street, Flinders. If you’re looking to hone your skills and learn all the tricks to preparing picture perfect plates full of pleasure, visit www.georgiebass.com.au and book your lesson in today!

“We run seasonal classes, so there’s always something different for people to try, with different foods,” Kate said. Some of their upcoming of classes include ‘Salmon Tricks & Tips’ on February 17, ‘Get Your Gnocchi’ on the 24th of February, ‘Patch to Plate’ on the 17th of March, and ‘Death by Chocolate’ on March 24. February 2018

E ssence | 67

PENINSULA


Recipe MODERN STYLE AND TRADITIONAL CHINESE CUISINE. EXPERIENCED CHEF FROM CHINA.

Must try our new style chinese dishes and homemade dumplings. No MSG. BYO, dine-in, takeaway, home delivery, Private catering service available. 166 Main Street, Mornington (next to commonwealth bank)

5973 4376

E ssence

68 | PENINSULA

anskitchen.com.au February 2018


GEORGIE BASS SIGNATURE CHIA BOWL CHIA PUDDING:

GB GRANOLA:

TO SERVE:

Mia together 1 litre of almond milk, 200g chia seeds, 100g agave syrup, 1/2 tsp cinnamon, pinch of salt. Allow chia to hydrate for 30 minutes.

Mix together oats, almond flakes, coconut flakes, chopped dried apricots, dried cranberries, drizzle of honey, sprinkle of cinnamon and toast in a medium oven until golden brown.

Hull seeds out of half melon of your choice, fill empty seed well with chia pudding, top with sprinkle of granola and garnish with fresh berries, banana & your favourite nuts, edible flowers or other fruit.

Georgie Bass CafĂŠ & Cookery is at 30 Cook St, Flinders. Phone 5989 0031 www.georgiebass.com.au

Crittenden Estate WINE CENTRE

Enjoy seated tastings in our contemporary Wine Centre where knowledgeable staff will guide you through a custom designed wine journey. A large range of alternative and traditional wines can be sampled in a format that is innovative and makes tasting wine an experience in

Open Daily 10:30am - 4:30pm | Ph 03 5987 3800 | www.crittendenwines.com.au

itself. Proudly brought to you by Family Tree Finance

February 2018

E ssence | 69

PENINSULA


Dishes

Must try

Sichuan Spicy Beef. Tender, smooth beef cooked with chili oil and veggies; prepared mild, medium or strong to suit your taste.

Sulumi share plate with caprese salad St Andrews Beach Brewery 160 Sandy Road, Fingal Phone 5988 6854 www.standrewsbeachbrewery.com.au

An's Kitchen 166 Main Street, Mornington Phone 5973 4376 anskitchen.com.au

Salted cod with romesco, aioli, green beans, brik pastry and fennel fronds Monkey Business 1/277 Point Nepean Road, Dromana Phone 5981 0685

NOW OPEN JUST HYDROPONICS

MORNINGTON Open for breakfast everyday from 9am Monday to Thursday: 9am - 5pm Friday & Saturday: 9am - 10pm Sunday: 9am - 5pm Unit 4, 14 Latham Street, Mornington 3931 Trading Hours: Mon-Fri 9am - 5pm & Sat 9am - 4pm www.justthydroponics.com.au • Light Kits

• Coco Peat

• Plumbing

• Fans

E ssence

70 | PENINSULA

• Nutrients

• Grow Rooms

• Additives

• Systems and much more...

February 2018

945 Moorooduc Hwy, Moorooduc Ph 03 5978 8049 www.barmahparkwines.com.au info@barmahparkwines.com.au


Open faced fillet steak sandwich, house eggplant relish, Swiss cheese & balsamic reduction

Barmah Park Big Breakfast 2 eggs 'your way' on sourdough, tomato, mushroom, spinach, bacon & hash brown

Dutch carrot soufflĂŠ, brown butter, wild scampi roe

The Ranelagh Club'Mt Eliza

Barmah Park Restaurant & Cellar Door

3 Rosserdale Crescent, Mt Eliza Phone 9787 0265 www.ranelagh.com.au

945 Moorooduc Hwy, Moorooduc Phone 5978 8049 www.barmahparkwines.com.au

3649 Frankston-Flinders Road, Merricks Phone 5989 9011 www.ptleoestate.com.au

Pt Leo Estate

Seniors Discounts & Gift Vouchers available

February 2018

E ssence | 71

PENINSULA


DESSERT OASIS By Brodie Cowburn

M

ade with authentic Italian charm and flavour, the gelato and food at Vespa’s Pasta, Gelato & Wine Bar has heads turning and mouths watering in Mornington. Co-Owner Roberto Biguzzi is in charge of overseeing the varied and extravagant range of gelato to be found inside Vespa’s. He has a wealth of experience, and is able to bring authentic international flavours with him to this trendy Main Street hotspot. “I was in Italy in 2015 and studied at the University in Bologna to learn how to produce gelato. I met a girl and she brought me here,” said Roberto of how he brought his gelato expertise to the peninsula. “Living here and being Italian, I’ve always wanted to do something different from all the others. I thought the gelato wasn’t well made and properly done like it is in Italy. I wanted to give the families and young kids something of good quality. We are for everyone, and I love everything about that.” With study in Bologna under his belt, Roberto is a certified gelato master. After opening Vespa’s in Mornington a little over two years ago, he has helped to form their extensive gelato menu, which is full of classics as well as some interesting and unexpected flavours. “We’re predominately ice cream producers; we’re a sweets and dessert

E ssence

72 | PENINSULA

February 2018

place. We have come up with some great flavours. We have our main sellers like vanilla and chocolate,” Roberto said. “We have our popular lemon, we also have a melon and mango flavour, we do panna cotta with figs, so we’re always playing. We’re always changing and giving customers some variation when they come and see us.” What separates Vespa’s from the rest is the method that is undertaken to get that perfect gelato feel, a method Roberto has worked on and perfected both overseas and here. The result is great tasting gelato for customers of Vespa’s as well as the customers of the many restaurants that sell it. “We make all our gelato in house and we are producing gelato for many restaurants around the peninsula. It’s made using local ingredients, local milk, everything is made fresh daily. Our Gelato is made with top ingredients,” said Roberto. “We receive the milk that is already pasteurised, then we re-pasteurise the milk by ourselves. So using the cream, the milk, and the sugar we’re able to do that. There’s no water, we use milk coming in fresh from Mornington, and then we add the flavour in. We have some flavours from Sicily, or some salted caramel, or for vegans we have a vegan chocolate with a water base. We use all fresh fruit and get really intense flavours.” Vespa’s Pasta, Gelato & Wine Bar also takes their unique brand of gelato on the road, taking their mobile cart all around the peninsula to service anything from community events, to parties, to weddings.


“We also have the ability to do functions with our gelato. We don’t just stay here, we can go everywhere with our cart. I love the fact that we’re everywhere. We want to do some more weddings and be able to take our nice cart there. We make our own gelato, customers come to us saying what flavours they want, and we design the flavours for them. They can have vegan, sugar- free, cream -based; they can have anything they want. We do the whole Mornington Peninsula too,” Roberto said. They also feature a regular menu also full of Italian flavours, such as lasagne, and a ham and cheese panini. Vespa's specialty cakes are also stunning and popular, and their crepes and waffles round out the delicious dessert dining experience. They have a large range of vegan options on offer to customers as well. By taking such care in their method of making some of the best gelato to be found on the peninsula, it seems these Mornington sweet tooths have got their just desserts. Vespa’s Pasta, Gelato & Wine Bar can be found at 31 Main Street Mornington.

for all your K I TC H E N ES SE N T I A LS TRADE SALES DIRECT TO PUBLIC

We stock major brands covering commercial catering equipment, kitchen utensils, professional barware, glassware, uniforms, tableware and more.

Opening hours - Monday to Saturday 9am to 5pm 71 BARKLY STREET MORNINGTON, VIC 3931 (03) 5977 2020 | DHSUPPLIES.COM.AU

February 2018

E ssence | 73

PENINSULA


THE BALCOMBES and ‘THE BRIARS’ By Ilma Hackett - Balnarring and District Historical Society

Balcombe: the Mornington-Mt Martha district is dotted with this name. There is a Balcombe Street, Balcombe Drive, Balcombe Reserve and the Balcombe Creek. It’s the name of a college and a pre-school and was the name of an army camp. Who or what was Balcombe? A clue may be found in St Peters Anglican Church where a stained glass window commemorates the pioneering Balcombe family, while a drinking fountain, recently re-located to ‘Mornington Park’, has a plaque to Alexander Balcombe "early pioneer and benefactor" whose leasehold station ‘Tichingorourke’ once covered the area that is now Mornington. ‘Tichingorourke’ / ‘Checkingurk’ – “The Voice of the Frogs” Crown land of the Port Phillip District was opened up to squatters in the late 1830s - early 1840s. Land could be taken up under licence or lease for pastoral pursuits. An annual fee of £10 was imposed with an additional cost per head on the number of stock held on the run – initially one half-penny per sheep, three half-pence for cattle and three pence for horses. [Billis & Kenyon: Pastoral Pioneers of Port Phillip, preface p vi] Six thousand acres of land, covering the area from Tanti(ne) Creek in the north to a knoll at the base of Mt Martha in the south and from the coast inland as far as the present Moorooduc Highway, was once the grazing run ‘Tichingorourke’. The name was Aboriginal,

E ssence

74 | PENINSULA

February 2018

echoing the sound of frogs heard along the creek that wound across the land. Smythe’s survey map of 1841 described the land as open forest country, good grass, timbered with gum, she-oak, stringy bark, lightwood and wattle trees. The run was first taken up by Captain James Reid who established his station near the junction of two creeks a few miles inland from the estuary. He ran cattle. At first things prospered for the early squatters but the years between 1842 and 1844 saw supply far outstrip demand; cattle were selling at a fraction of their original price and sheep were being used for tallow. Banks failed and, in an economy based on credit and loans, those who had not set aside cash had nothing to fall back on. Reid went bankrupt and, having paid his creditors ten shillings in the pound, returned to England with his young family. [Hales & Le Cheminant: The Letters of Henry Howard Meyrick letter XXVIII ,1847 p.43] The lease was taken up again in 1846 by A.B. Balcombe: "Grandfather and his bride came to a weatherboard hut near a level crossing of gravel over a creek" [Dame Mabel Brookes Crowded Galleries, p.2] “Grandfather” was Alexander Beatson Balcombe and his “bride”, Emma Balcombe née Reid. The couple had been married for five years and had a two-year-old daughter, Jane. The weatherboard hut was a slab construction with a thatched roof erected by Captain Reid (no relation to Emma). Although somewhat rough-hewn, the


History hut or cottage was quite comfortable and was described by Richard Howitt when he walked the length of the Peninsula in 1843 as being "outwardly very rustic yet agreeable . .one of the rooms I entered was a strange medley of military – elegant English – and homely bush furniture. Yet everywhere was evidence of taste...". Neighbour, Georgiana McCrae made a sketch of the station in 1844 which shows not only the homestead cottage but numerous outbuildings, fenced paddocks and cleared land with shady trees. The dusty road that linked the outlying stations of the peninsula to the increasingly sophisticated centre that was Melbourne crossed a creek at a ford not far from the homestead cottage. A turbulent boyhood Alexander Balcombe was born in 1811 on the South Atlantic island of St Helena, the sixth child of William and Jane Balcombe. His father was a respected trader and representative of the British East India Company. The little boy had a privileged childhood until the family’s abrupt departure from the island when he was seven years old. Napoleon Bonaparte had been exiled to the island in 1815 and the family’s friendship with the former French emperor had aroused the suspicions of British authorities. William sailed for England to clear his name. They never returned. Instead, in 1823, William Balcombe was offered the posting of Colonial Treasurer in the fledgling colony of N.S.W. When the Hibernia docked in Sydney Cove the following year, the passenger list included W. Balcombe Esq., Mrs Balcombe & family and 2 domestics, Mrs Abel and child. It had not been a happy voyage. Eldest daughter, Jane had died while the ship was

crossing the Indian Ocean and had been buried at sea. Mrs Abel was second daughter, Betsy, whose husband had abandoned her, leaving her to raise an infant daughter. “Family” were the three sons- William Jnr, Thomas and Alexander. The young Alexander was thirteen years old. The family settled into their new home in O’Connell Street in the centre of Sydney. It was a pleasant, two-storey, brick house and the family was welcomed into Sydney society. Along with his brother Thomas, Alexander attended Sydney Grammar School. Things changed with the death of his father six years later. The family was left with little money, mounting debts, and no house to live in as the O’Connell Street property had been leased. Their assets were sold, including land grants near Goulburn but they retained land at Molonglo where William Junior was farming. On completing school Alexander was given employment as a clerk but was dismissed for negligence. In the turmoil that followed his father’s death, the teenage Alexander left Sydney to join his brother at Molonglo to take up life on the land. His mother, sister Betsy and her child were to return to England. In 1839 Alexander, now in his 20s, joined a party led by a neighbour, William Rutledge, trekking south to explore the Port Phillip District of the colony. The area had recently been opened up by the government for grazing. Impressed by the land’s potential he returned to the Goulburn district and made preparations to move south as a permanent settler. continued next page...

Below: Grazing Runs of the Peninsula 1840 – 1846.

February 2018

E ssence | 75

PENINSULA


Marriage Part of his plan was to find a wife and he courted Emma Juana, younger daughter of his neighbour, retired naval doctor, David Reid of ‘Inverary Park’. Tall and blue-eyed, she was a practical and eventempered young woman whose voice held a faint Scottish lilt. Their wedding took place in 1841, close to Emma’s eighteenth birthday. Alexander was thirty. Within a few months preparations were complete. Leaving his new wife, now pregnant, at ‘Inverary Park’ with her family, Alexander overlanded cattle south to a lot on the Merri Merri Creek, a temporary arrangement until he could acquire his own run. Once set up there he returned to Goulbourn and in September, 1842 brought Emma and their baby son back to Melbourne by ship. The little boy, Stephen, grew to be a happy toddler in their new home but, sadly, died accidentally when he was eighteen months old; according to family folklore he had eaten green apples. Emma was heartbroken and, when she again found herself pregnant, went back to ‘Inverary Park’ to await the birth of her new baby. A daughter, Jane Emma was born at the close of 1844. Neighbours to the McCrae family By March 1846 Alexander had acquired the lease to Tichingorourke and the family moved to the peninsula. Over the next few years he set about stocking his new run, extending the yards Reid had already constructed, taking on staff and planning for the future. One of the first things he did was to choose a new location for his house. A prefabricated weatherboard building was purchased and brought from Melbourne. This was sited on the hill to the south of Reid’s cottage. It consisted of two rooms and a small scullery. .The building was roofed with wooden shingles, cut and shaped on site. This dwelling, ‘The Hutch’, provided living space while a permanent homestead was being built. A son, Alexander Stephen (Alick) was born in 1847 and on the birth certificate his father gives his status as ‘settler’. The land, Alexander decided, "was bad for sheep, fair for cattle, good horse country and in 1854 he was grazing 50 horses and 250 cattle". [Dame Mabel Brookes: Crowded Galleries, p 6] Emma made the acquaintance of her nearest neighbour, Georgiana McCrae. The McCraes had the Arthur’s Seat run, twelve miles to the south. The two women shared a Scottish background but whereas the aristocratic Georgiana clung to her European heritage, Emma was a ‘colonial’ having been born at sea a few weeks before the ship bringing the Reid family to Australia had docked. She had never known a life in Europe and had been brought up in rural NSW. Georgiana, who had come to live on the peninsula the previous year, gave Emma flower cuttings - wisteria and roses, a camellia and olive trees. These flourished and can still be seen in the gardens surrounding the homestead. In the early 1850s Peninsula lands were being surveyed for sale as selections. Alexander applied to buy his land under Pre-emptive Right. He was granted the square mile around his homestead but certain areas of his original 6,000 acre lease were reserved for specific purposes. This included land along the coast and an area for a proposed township. Alexander gradually bought up further acreage until he owned outright about 1,100 acres. He also purchased several lots in the new township of Schnapper Point, just a few miles from his home. Now that tenure was secure he set about enlarging and improving his buildings. A brick homestead was joined to ‘The Hutch’. It had two main rooms, and two small rooms at either end of a veranda. Bricks for

E ssence

76 | PENINSULA

February 2018


Facing page top and bottom: Alexander Beatson Balcombe and Emma Juana Balcombe. Pen drawings made about the time of their wedding. Above: Grazing lease, 1850.

the building were made from clay by the creek and fired nearby in a small kiln. Balcombe employed Thomas Coxhell, a ‘brick master’ from England to oversee the work. It was roofed in slate. According to Balcombe descendant and family historian, Dame Mabel Brookes, ticket-of-leave men carried out the construction which continued over the next decade. A kitchen building of four rooms was separate but linked to the homestead by a covered walkway. A wing, consisting of laundry, dairy and extra room of corrugated iron, was sited further up the hill. Outbuildings, including a barn and stables were added to the farm over a period of time In the meantime the family was growing. In 1850 Emma gave birth to a third son, William but again heartbreak; the child died within weeks of birth. A daughter, Agnes, joined the family in 1851. Emma and Alexander now had three lively youngsters. . An additional bedroom wing of timber was then added to the homestead. This had four rooms and a veranda overlooking the orchards and the valley to the north. Gold fever Everything that was happening in the early 1850s was overshadowed by one momentous event – the discovery of gold. People flooded into the newly-proclaimed state of Victoria. Between the years 1852 and 1854, two hundred and fifty people per day arrived in Melbourne [A.G.L. Shaw ‘La Trobe’s Melbourne’. Victorian Historical Journal, Sept. 2002, p 41]. All were intent on finding their fortune at one of the diggings that sprang up throughout Victoria. Alexander himself was lured to the goldfields, probably to Bendigo to join his brother-in-law. While he was away

Emma was left to oversee the station hands and the household staff. It was during Alexander’s absence that two armed bushrangers, having escaped from Van Diemen’s Land and landing in an isolated bay on the west side of the peninsula, ransacked the homestead. Emma fed the men, gave them provisions and directed them to the Melbourne Road. The women and children at the homestead were left terrified but unharmed. Alexander’s prospecting did not yield much gold and he realised there was more to be made producing food for Victoria’s rapidly increasing population. He returned to ‘Tichingorourke’. Droving cattle to Melbourne took several days and in 1853 Alexander purchased land, at about the midway point, to be a resting place for his livestock. The area is now Mentone and the road that was originally the track to his land became Balcombe Road. He also bought land in East Melbourne where a pre-fabricated cottage was erected. This was later replaced by a more substantial home –‘Eastcourt’ - the Balcombes’ city home. Briars House – an echo of St Helena Throughout the late 1850s and 1860s Balcombe’s wealth continued to increase. As the township of Schnapper Point grew so did his prestige. He became a member of the first Mt Eliza District Road Board, a fore-runner of the Shire council. He was the first trustee and warden of St Peter’s Anglican Church. He promoted the building of a school and was appointed a J.P. for the district. His notebook from the time mentions some of the cases that came continued next page...

February 2018

E ssence | 77

PENINSULA


Above: The first homestead, constructed 1851. Bottom right: . ‘The Briars’ c.1870. In the foreground is Captain Reid’s cottage. The homestead is on the hill. Between the two are orchards and vineyards.

before him: "salvaging a body from the sea; finding a child dead from climbing a tree for possums; re-making the broken end of the Mornington pier" [Dame Mabel Brookes: Memoirs, p 18]. Two more daughters had been born, Maria in 1855, then Lucia three years later. By then the Balcombe property had a new name - Briars House, named both for the home where he had grown up on St Helena and the home he had known in N.S.W. Eldest son Alick, twelve years old, was enrolled at the Melbourne Church of England Grammar School where he would be a boarder for the next couple of years. Now wealthy, Alexander and Emma designed a grander main wing for their farmhouse. This incorporated a front entrance accessed from a circular drive at the head of the long, tree-lined avenue to the property. The new wing had four spacious rooms, each with its own marble fireplace. A central hallway linked it to the rest of the house. French windows opened from each room onto a covered veranda that ran around the building. Beneath one of the rooms was a large cellar where things needing coolness could be kept, including the wine that was produced from the vineyards Balcombe had planted. This venture wasn’t a great success and the family called the wine “Balcombe’s Vinegar”. Wine-making was not a pursuit Alexander kept up. The remaining vines were eventually grubbed out in the 1920s after outbreaks of phylloxera. Another son was born to William and Emma in 1861 - Herbert Henty (or ‘Bertie’). Emma fell ill in 1864 and went to Melbourne to be cared for

E ssence

78 | PENINSULA

February 2018

by friends. During her absence daughter Jane became the lady of the house, looking after the smaller children and supervising the household. Alexander wrote poignant letters to his wife, telling her of life on the farm and how much she was missed. She returned to Mt Martha and the couple’s last child, daughter Alice was born in 1865. This completed their family of two living sons and five daughters. Family and Financial Difficulties The late 1860s ushered in a period of family and financial difficulties. The property was in arrears. Friction had developed between husband and wife. ‘Eastcourt’ became Emma’s preferred home and her absences caused problems; on one small practical matter an urgent telegram was despatched asking where the cellar and barn keys were kept. Although she returned to The Briars, Emma increasingly yearned to be at ‘Eastcourt’. She found their Mt Martha property too isolated and fretted about her children’s social prospects. She urged Alexander to lease out the property and move the family to East Melbourne. He wanted to stay; he was happiest on the land. Deeply unhappy, Emma considered leaving Alexander. This drew a letter of reproval and advice from her older sister: Lady Murphy pointed out that country living was less expensive and healthier and that by remaining at The Briars they could afford to give Alick and Jane a good start in life and the younger children a good education. She reminded Emma of her wifely duties and urged her to stay with her husband despite his “difficult nature”. Then father and eldest son had a heated quarrel that resulted in


Alick leaving home and going to Queensland to work on an uncle’s property. An embittered Alexander disinherited him. They were deeply in debt. Alexander considered leasing all or part of the property. He mortgaged it for £3,000 in 1871 and that took five years to repay. Finally, in 1873, the homestead and approximately 900 acres were leased to T. Baines and A. Cane and the family moved to East Melbourne. Alexander’s health had deteriorated. Even so he continued to take an interest in his country property and kept up a long-standing dispute with the Shire over the building of a road through his land. He died from pleuro-pneumonia at ‘Eastcourt’ in 1877 at the age of 66 years. "The Briars" was left to Emma for her lifetime. For a brief period, after Alexander’s death, the property was with Henry (“Money”) Miller and his son. Miller was a prominent banker, insurance agent, money lender and politician and this may have been a form of financial assistance to Emma. However by 1881 Emma had regained the property which remained with Balcombe descendants for almost another century. A new generation - a new purpose Emma did not return to live at ‘The Briars’. In 1891 the Balcombe’s youngest daughter Alice and her husband, Melbourne solicitor Harry Emmerton, ‘leased’ the farm from Emma at one shilling per annum. The Emmertons used the homestead as a holiday residence while Harry managed the business-side of the farm for his motherin-law. "He fattened cattle for grandmother, grew some crops, had riding horses and the family reaped the advantages of vegetables and flowers sent to Melbourne every week" [Dame Mabel Brookes: Memoirs p.17]. Alterations were made to the main building to suit the Emmertons’ life style. The bedroom wing was demolished

and in its place a ballroom was built. It was constructed of red, factory-made bricks with full length French windows opening onto the garden. A magnificent fireplace, modelled on one in a stately home in England, occupied almost an entire wall while the raised ceiling added to the feeling of spaciousness. The house rang with music and laugher. The Emmertons had a croquet lawn and a tennis court built for the entertainment of their guests. Their only daughter, Mabel, invited her friends to spend weekends at ‘The Briars’. Amongst them was her beau, a Davis Cup player with the Australian team. Norman Brookes proposed to Mabel during one such weekend. Mabel, later Dame Mabel Brookes, gives a picture of life at The Briars during those years in several books she wrote. She also drew on the experiences of her grandmother to describe colonial life. In her later years, Emma reluctantly re-visited her old home. She had suffered several small strokes that curtailed her movements. When there she loved to sit on the wide veranda shaded with the climbing roses and wisteria she had planted in earlier days and reminisce. Her favourite rose, a climber named Cloth of Gold, rambled over a wooden trellis in the garden Emma died in 1907 and was buried alongside her husband, infant sons and two of her daughters in the Old Melbourne Cemetery. Alexander & Emma were the first of six generations of the same family to call ‘The Briars’ home. The Briars Today Two gate posts either side of a cattle grid mark the entrance to The Briars. Today it is public parkland managed by the Mornington Peninsula Shire Council. The three sons of Elizabeth a’Beckett, great-grand-daughter of A.B. Balcombe, gifted the Homestead and surrounding eight hectares jointly to the National Trust and the continued next page...

February 2018

E ssence | 79

PENINSULA


Mornington Peninsula Shire in 1976. The remaining 225 hectares of the a’Beckett land were purchased by the Shire in 1978. The homestead is open to the public. Guided tours are conducted through the building and its immediate surrounds to get a feeling of life in a by-gone century. There is also an unexpected dimension. The link between the Balcombe family and the French Emperor, Napoleon Bonaparte, during his final years in exile, is apparent in a collection of Napoleonic relics collected by A.B. Balcombe’s grand-daughter Dame Mabel Brookes and displayed in the homestead.

Above:“Where are the keys?’ telegraph message. The original is with the Mornington & District Historical Society and is reproduced with permission. Right: The Briars Homestead 1908. Eldest daughter, Jane Murphy and youngest daughter, Alice Emmerton at the main entrance.

To subscribe phone Mornington Peninsula News Group on 03 5973 6424 or complete the details below.

INS

ULA

ESS

2017

$48 twelve month subscription (12 issues) or $30 six month subscription (6 issues)

PEN

FREE

PEN LA U S N I N PENINSU INSULA PE LA ENC

AUGUST

E MA Y 20 17

PENIN

SULA

Mattres ses Bedroo Mattresse Bedr Furnitu s oommFu rni re Manch ture ester Man ches ter Pillows Pilulalow n Penins ningto Ho mewares on the Mor Home visiting waress Living &

ESSE NCE

MAY

Living & vi SEPTEMBER sitin 201 7g on FRE the

Ro os se R eb bu ud’s ’s De essd D tin naation ti on fo forr Qu uaalitity Q lity B Beed ingg dddin AUGU

ST 2017

EMor ni

Living &

Proudl Proudlyy stocking stocking Austral Australiian Made an Made mattre mattre sses from sses from Sleepm Sleepm aker and aker and Slumb Slumb erest. erest.

visiting on

the Morning

ngto

n Pe

Briars’ Homestead volunteers, Keith & Shirley Murley, especially their detailed studies of family history and Balcombe properties. n Richard Howitt: “My walk to Western Port and Cape Schanck 1843” from Australia: Historical. Descriptive, and Statistic (1845) p.144 * All photos are from the collection held by The Briars and are reproduced with the permission of The Briars and the National Trust.

6 AND 12 MONTH SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE NOW AVAILABLE Select the subscription period and each month, Peninsula Essence will be mailed to you in a sealed plastic bag.

LOVE PENINSULA ESSENCE AND DON’T WANT TO MISS A COPY? David Barke David Bark e Beddin Bedd ingg

References n Billis and Kenyon: Pastoral Pioneers of Port Phillip. n [Dame] Mabel Brookes’ books: Riders in Time, Memoirs and Crowded Galleries Resource material held by The Briars including:n The Briars Conservation Analysis Report 1984 prepared by Allom, Lovell & Sanderson for the National Trust n The excellent research papers of

2017

FREE

Name ...............................................................................................................

nins

ula

ton Peninsu

la

Address .......................................................................................................... ........................................................................................................................

LIVING & VIS

Phone..........................................................................................................

ITIN G ON THE MORNI

n.

NGT

nt to ow

ON PEN INSULA

LIVING

or rmance nical gn, perfo ity, desi bines tech ting on qual C 350 e com e crea z promise while we’r motoring. to com edes-Ben z. And nt of n’t have le. The Merc edes-Ben and enjoyme details vehic of Merc nt Hybrid ring. Full nature exciteme of moto to the sheer ly, true on the evolution promise g the next er com embracin is des-Benz

The Be Fort auty of Wine Framewo Burlesque rk Trave llers • The Ca • Pushing • If It ll Aint of the Mu the Boun Baroq da ue Do sic • Ma ries • He n’t Fix n Up an r Ne It • He d Ge xt Wave nry Ho t Waxe is ward’ d • Th Waiting • e s Jo A Heart for urney Legacy Kate Wa Helpi lks Tal • Fo of Art Mason’s Miss ng • Dance with cus l Liv Dept ion on Mo es On • h Style • Glassblow A Long File • Home unt Eli ing in the and Garde Way from Cairo Family • za • Moving n • Movin The True In the Right g In Meaning Direction of Hospitalitythe Right Direction • When Footy • Focus on Red Hill Came to the Penin sula

& VISITIN

NG ON

G ON THE

& VISITI

MORNINGTON

THE MORN

ULA

PENINSULA

of A Legacy

PENINS

INGTON

bb ington-Tya 9-31 Morn

LIVING

Only at 1263 Pt at Da ngths David Her Stre le vid Ba Nepe an Bark Channels esty rkee Be Swimmer Hearty and Hom ard Bedd Road Ro Poetry • dding ad,, Ro me, ng it Forw ing Rose ther with sure • Wholeso n • Payi sebu budd People Toge is Trea Morningto • Bringing • Five Per Cent nck • Focus on •• Ph Ph::59 the Town Scha Veins Talk 59 in Their at Cape The86 86ofly55 with 55Ice44 44• Fire! The Duel The Fami the Ages 3 LMCT44

n (03) Morningto Road,

5973 9688

Visa

Mastercard

(please select)

Card number ........................................................................................... Expiry date ...............................................................................................

Post to Peninsula Essence Subscriptions PO Box 588, Hastings Vic 3915

E ssence

80 | PENINSULA

February 2018


February 2018

E ssence | 81

PENINSULA


Corner

Puzzle

ACROSS 1. Very hard wood 5. Sympathy 11. Warmed (6,2) 15. Fire residue 16. From the menu, ... carte (1,2) 17. Swerved 19. Smell 21. Biff 23. TV watcher 25. Magnified map section 27. More foolish 28. Formerly Ceylon, Sri ... 30. Enthusiast 31. Chargers 32. Marijuana cigarette 33. Reproduced 34. Public service 35. Rarer 36. Dublin republic 38. Rugged peak 40. Robin or swallow 42. Probability 44. Defendant's bond money 45. Butchered 46. Eye membrane 48. Shorten 49. As far as (2,2) 50. Farm produce 51. Earmarked 52. Opposed to 53. Swollen heads, big ... 54. Musical symbol 55. Departure 56. Cancel out 58. Oppress 59. Underground storage room 61. Proverb 63. British award (1,1,1) 64. Informer 65. Romantic poet, Lord ... 67. Sharp crest 69. Bloodsucking insects 71. Russian mountains 73. Painter, Leonardo da ... 74. Intrusively 76. Baggier 78. Green shade 80. Stage scenes 82. Observation platform 83. Sheep clipper 85. Prepares (oneself ) 89. Finest

91. Tabloid tell-all 93. Flavour enhancer (1,1,1) 94. Cottage pie topping 96. Worried 98. Clean-up, working ... 99. Non-governmental organisation (1,1,1) 100. Unspecified person 102. Icing utensil 103. Four-stringed guitar 104. Invitation holder 105. US media baron, ... Turner 106. Naval exercises 107. Give authority to 108. Shaggy-haired dog 110. ... de toilette 112. Exhilarated 114. Gain from benefactor 117. Willing torturers 120. Peeks 123. Herr & ... 125. Smallgoods shop 127. Taunts 128. Pose 131. Tropical fruit 133. Mexican farewell 134. Dutch bulb flower 135. Picasso's homeland 136. Not mistaken 137. Marshal's reinforcements 140. Olympic Games body (1,1,1) 141. Horse-like animal 142. White heron 145. Undercoat 147. Investing as Sir 148. Look over 150. Huge 151. Monopoly street, Pall ... 152. Coil 153. Actress, Meg ... 154. Avoidance of responsibility (3-3) 156. Invisible emanation 158. Tomato variety 160. Mrs Marcos 162. Manifestation 163. Fossil resin 164. Floor rugs 165. Geological eras 166. Adds soundtrack to 167. Rests on chair 168. Yorkshire valley 170. The Netherlands 172. Eve's cover (3,4) 173. Wine, ... spumante

174. Presentations 177. Wedding attendant, ... of honour 179. Oil cartel 180. Light scarf fabric 182. Unsurpassed (favourite) (3-4) 183. Inuit snow shelter 185. Struggle roughly 187. North African nation 188. Argentina's Buenos ... 189. Suspended above ground 191. Nocturnal bird 192. Bind 193. Sang in unison 194. Holiness 195. Filthiest

DOWN 1. Transportable 2. Fuss, ... & cry 3. Supplements in food 4. Starchy tubers 5. Conversational 6. Gallows halter 7. Spoken exams 8. Afoot 9. Case-harden 10. Italian seaport 11. Actress, Goldie ... 12. Moving forward 13. Droplets on lawn 14. Processions 18. Stopping for gas 20. Jordan/Kuwait region 22. Taking notice of 24. Petit point 26. Matrimonial split-up 29. Building design 37. Pressed (clothes) 38. Huddles closely 39. Throughout the world 40. Every second year 41. Perceives 43. Actor, Danny ... 44. Fleshy sugar source 47. Strongroom 57. Weirder 60. Soak up 62. Cowgirl, ... Oakley 66. Bring up (children) 68. Discourteous 69. Chimney 70. Single

72. Admitting 73. Envisaging 75. Norwegian capital 77. Revise 79. Business ventures 81. Audio discs (1,2) 84. Fatuous 85. Partial refunds 86. Rectified 87. Magma-based rock 88. Wives 90. Recline (3,4) 92. Bloom segment 95. Apportion 97. Practicability 101. Dress edge 109. Uncouth yokel 111. Lend a hand to 113. Pop artist, ... Warhol 115. Great Depression drifters 116. Employee's itinerary 118. Circle parts 119. In comparison to 121. Subsides 122. Marketplace announcer, town ... 124. Ambitious 126. Extremely loud (3-9) 129. New Zealand city 130. Quips 131. Screen images 132. Rearranged words 138. Carry to excess 139. Lunar rockets 143. Nixon's successor (6,4) 144. Glaze 146. Ostrich relatives 149. Spreading trees 155. Sweaters 157. Fanatically 159. Japanese paper folding 161. Unpunctual guest 165. Stretchy tape 169. Book quote 171. Lingers (on) 172. Palms off 175. Synagogue scholar 176. Angle 177. Florida resort 178. Pithy 181. Apple MP3 player 184. Committed perjury 186. Largest Brazilian city, ... Paulo 190. Trump card

MT ELIZA OPTICAL Shop 5 / 89 Mount Eliza Way (Ritchies Centre) Mount Eliza Ph 9775 2922

E ssence

82 | PENINSULA

February 2018


1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

15

17

19

20

26

30

21

22

27

28

31

38

33

39

40

51

54

57

59

63

67

69

74

75

85

86

92

88

93

108

100

110

117

123

112

118

129

113

119

130

134

120

131

139

133

148

143

156

157

158

165

160

167

168

171

174

176

177

182

187

191

169

172

175

181

161

164

166

170

153

159

163

144

149

152

155

186

142

147

151

180

126

141

146

122

136

140

173

121

132

135

162

193

111

125

128

150

101

107

124

127

185

106

109

116

154

95

99

105

145

90

103

104

138

79

89

94

102

137

78

82

87

98

66

72

77

81

97

115

71

76

84

65

70

80

91

60

64

68

73

114

55

58

62

43

47

50

53

96

42

46

49

52

41

45

48

83

29

35

44

61

14

24

32

37

56

13

23

34

36

12

16

18

25

11

178

179

183

184

188

189

190

192

194

195

See page 87 for solution February 2018

E ssence | 83

PENINSULA


Frankston on

Frankston City is a local government area in Victoria about 40 kilometres south of the Melbourne CBD. Frankston has an area of 131 square kilometres.

FRANKSTON FACTS The city is located on the eastern shores of Port Phillip, and is bounded on the north by the City of Kingston and the City of Greater Dandenong, on the east by the City of Casey, and on the south by the Shire of Mornington Peninsula. The boundaries of the City are defined largely on the north by Eel Race Road and Thompsons Road, on the east by the Dandenong-Hastings Road, and on the south by a complex boundary featuring Baxter-Tooradin Road, Golf Links Road and Humphries Road. Despite its similar area and name, Frankston City is a different entity to the former City of Frankston which existed from 1966 until 1994, which was a continuation of the former Shire of Frankston and was abolished under the Kennett local government reforms. The Frankston City population forecast for 2016 is 137,041, and is forecast to grow to 152,494 by 2036. Frankston Memorial Park (Frankston Cemetery) is located on the corner of Cranbourne Road and Moorooduc Highway (McMahons Road), Frankston. Land was set aside for a cemetery in Frankston in 1864-65. The first recorded burial was 1878, although there were almost certainly burials prior to this date before the keeping of records.

E ssence

84 | PENINSULA

February 2018

The City of Frankston was created in 1994 out of the remains of three abolished councils — all but the suburb of Mount Eliza from the former City of Frankston; the suburbs of Carrum Downs, Langwarrin and Skye from the City of Cranbourne; and part of Carrum Downs from the City of Springvale. The major part of the City was first incorporated in 1860 as the Mornington Roads District, which became a shire in 1871 and was renamed Shire of Frankston and Hastings in 1893, losing its western riding to form the Shire of Mornington, which has since been amalgamated into the Shire of Mornington Peninsula. On 19 October 1960, the Shire of Frankston and Hastings split in two, with the western part remaining as the Shire of Frankston, and the eastern part being incorporated as the Shire of Hastings. Frankston was officially proclaimed as a City on 24 August 1966. Frankston City is one of six Central Activates Areas (CAA) being developed by the State Government. It has attracted significant public funding for urban renewal, landscaping and community facilities with some major projects planned. continued next page...

COFFEE SAFARI Fresh brewed coffee is a must have for weekends away and Frankston is a must visit destination with great coffee haunts around the town. Here are a few to check out when head down to this seaside township.

STEREO ESPRESSO  4 Wells Street Specialty coffee and jaffles.

OLIVE & FERN CAFE 435 Nepean Hwy Situated under the Quest Hotel in Frankston. Excellent coffee with soy milk, lactose free milk, and almond milk alternatives.

THE MILKMAN CAFE  8 Kananook Creek Blvd

Set in a picturesque location, The Milkman serves simple and delicious food made with locally sourced, fresh produce alongside coffee supplied by Code Black Coffee Roasters.

OL' MATE COFFEE 465 Nepean Hwy Organic, fair trade coffee and brekkie served in a laid-back cafe that supports social projects.


WHAT TO DO? There’s always something to do in Frankston, with its familyfriendly beaches, calendar of events, retail zone and cafes. Head to the revitalised pier precinct for family fun, shop up a storm at Bayside Shopping Centre, enjoy an exhibition or show at the Frankston Arts Center, or take in the views from the lookout at Olivers Hill. Photography: Yanni


Median house price in Frankston is $435,000 for sale, and $340 per week rent. Frankston is a modern city, fronting Port Phillip Bay. The commercial centre of Frankston incorporates the Bayside Shopping Centre and the Bayside Entertainment Centre that includes cinemas, eateries and fashion outlets. A short distance east is the Karingal Shopping Centre and Star Zone, an entertainment precinct featuring Village Cinemas, restaurants, indoor play centre, gym, TAB, hair and beauty stores and free parking Frankston has a thriving arts and theatre scene with the popular Frankston Arts Centre and several galleries. A visit to the McClelland Sculpture Park & Gallery is a great experience. The beaches around Frankston are mainly calm and sandy, perfect for swimming, boating and other water activities. To the south, the sandy beaches make way for rocky cliffs and headlands. Panoramic views can be enjoyed across Port Phillip Bay and north along the beachside suburbs from vantage points such as Olivers Hill. The Frankston Waterfront precinct incorporates Frankston Pier, a visitor information centre, restaurant/cafe, a scenic boardwalk that extends to the boat ramp at the base of Olivers Hill to the south and crosses the Landmark Bridge to the north and ends at the Waves restaurant. In the early 1850's a small settlement of about 200 residents had grown in the cove at the foot of 'Old Man Davey's Hill' (now known as Oliver's Hill), and the mouth of Sweetwater Creek. These were

E ssence

86 | PENINSULA

February 2018

mainly fishermen who lived in tents or humpies on the foreshore. As a result, the original pier was built at the base of Oliver's Hill. The fish were transported to Melbourne either by boat from the pier or by horse and cart by using the road (and beach) down through Mordialloc. In 1857 a short pier was built on the site of the present pier further to the north. In 1863, after a petition presented by local residence to the Public Works Department the pier was extended into deeper water. In 1867, The Frankston Fish Company was established for the sole purpose of supplying fish to the Melbourne Fish Markets. Auction sales were held every morning at the Melbourne Markets. Horse drawn wagons left Frankston in the middle of the night, reaching the Melbourne Markets in time for the morning auction sales. The Frankston Brick Company used the pier during the 1880's for shipping bricks to Melbourne and receiving firewood for their brick kilns on the foreshore. Around this time a permanent lamp was built at the end of the pier and a “Lamp Lighter” was employed to keep the light burning at night during fine and foul weather. According to local residents one of the most famous visitors to use the pier was Lord Brassey, later becoming the Governor of Victoria from 1895 – 1900, when he tied his yacht “Sunbeam” up to the pier during his around the world journey in 1876-77. In the early 1920's at the entrance to Frankston pier there was the "Fairy Garden" with a number of small

pavilions along the beachfront. These were designed by the famous architect Walter Burley Griffin. The first Australian Pan Pacific Scout Jamboree was held in Frankston from 27th December 1934 to 13th January 1935. This was the first international gathering of Scouts outside of the United Kingdom and the only Australian Jamboree attended by the founder of scouting, Lord Robert Baden-Powell. Frankston is home to the largest stage in Victoria outside Melbourne's CBD. Opened in 1995 by then Prime Minister, Paul Keating, the Frankston Arts Centre has an 800-seat theatre, two exhibition galleries and a 192-seat black box theatre. Cruden Farm is a small piece of country set amid suburbia. It has been an icon of the Frankston region for decades, and has been well preserved so it will continue to be for years to come. Frankston TV originally began as Australia's first community driven YouTube network in 2011 and has evolved into a big success, with more than 250 videos uploaded. It was so successful, that it was turned into a weekly television show on Channel 31 on Sundays. Every year the Norfolk pine tree outside Frankston's civic centre is adorned with more than 4000 globes as families turn out for one of the great Christmas events on Frankston's calendar. Frankston beach took out the title in 2011 and 2012 for Victoria's cleanest beach in the Keep Australia Beautiful Awards.


Can't Sing? Yes you can. With just one generation of not being sung to, people think they can’t sing. Just one. To get good at things we practise, but for some reason we think that music is different. You have talent or you don’t. NOPE! Like anything, the more you do it the easier it is. Technology permeates our lives and we’ve become passive consumers, not makers. Lost is what was once second nature; the joy of sharing music with a child. Let’s take it back and nurture a generation of people who can sing. That sing lullabies to their own babies. Let's flood our bodies with feel great hormones like oxytocin and endorphins. Let's change the way their young brains grow, for the better. You may not be Beyonce but your child does not care, you’re their world! Sounds Like This for Kids is proud to provide families with tools to become more musical together. In our classes, we’ll provide you with the very best research based tools to support your child’s musical development, through play. Start where you are. Learn more. Create lifelong memories.

HANDS ON I   PLAY BASED  I  BRAIN CHANGING

PARENT-CHILD MUSIC MAKING What do peninsula parents have to say? "It's a wonderful music class that I can highly recommend!!" - Siobhan Moon

www.soundslikethis.net

"We've been taking our daughter to classes before she could crawl, let alone walk or talk! Watching her development has been amazing! She absolutely loves classes, they're certainly the highlight of our week! The tools I've learnt and use constantly at home have been exceptional! " - Jaynaya Pharaoh "What a fantastic program for children. My son went today for his first session and loved it - as did I. Thank you! We cannot wait for his next class!" - Megan Pearce

www.soundslikethis.net C O N S O L

M A H O G A N Y

A

E

I

N S E

T

B U F

F

T

S

T

L

U T

T

Y

E

I

R E

I

L

I

V

R

E

B A

S

I

S

T O

I

E G O S

N E G A

T

V

I

I

N C

I

I

N O S

I

E

S E

T

A N X

I

L

N N V

N H E R

E E

A

I

I

L

T

O S

T U

L

I

P O S S E P R

V

I

U

I

O C

M A

C O P O U T

D

E

U

E O N S

L

A S

T

T U S S I

A

L

I

L

Y C

R

D I C

G H T R

L

R

O W L

C H O R U S E D

L

A I

S A

L

L

B

N

I

N T

E V

E

F

T

T U R A

L

C

A

T

R

I

L

P

D

E

L I

I

W

G L

A N C E S

I

B

R

E

N

A D

I

O S

E

G H T

E G R E

T

N

R Y A N

L M E

L

D A

M

M A

T

S

A

L

E

S

T

T

D A

L

E A

F

C

O P E C

I

I

G L

T

N E S S

M

I I

I

E

D A

E

E D

I

R T

I

E X

R

G L O O

R E S S

T E

I

E D

T R O N

I

E S

I

F

M E

N

L

P E R U S E

R O L

I

V E

S

E M P O W E R

N

N G

T

I

R

W H O E V E R E

O L

A

S

T O

L L

T

O L

N O B A

I T

A R

B Y R O N

A S S

A M L

E X

N

N

G

B Y A

N

I

D E

N

M A

E

A G G E D

R A

S

A M B E R I

E

E

I

B R E D O D D S

L

R O M A S

A

M

I

L

U K U

I

A

E

S

C E

P O T

U

A W A R D S I

L

S E

H

I

E W E R

I

I

T

I

T

P A P A Y A

S P A

L

R

O P S S

E D U P

N

E S

E

I

A N D

P

I

T

A N K A

H

N G O

S A D

I

V

D E C K

E A U

E

W

L

M S G

E D

D

L O O S E R

D U B S

E

C

L

T

G N

V O

I

I

A U R A

O

O

I P

S

S

N

E A S

N

K N L

I N

A N C E

P

R

H O L

T

M E R

M E G A

L

I

R D

I

A

S C A R C E R

I

L

A

F R A U U

B E S O

C O L

L

H E A L

E R

E G G S

B E E

T U

O

O

N G

T

A

R E A D

E

S P A

F

B

L

U

S L

O U S

N

S I

I

I

L

E R

F

E X P O S E

S

I

Y R A N N

R

R

U

A

R E E

B

M B E

N

S H E A R E R

I

T

D G E

L

L

A N T

E

O N

N

D

U P

L

E S S E N

I

S

E

L

I

L

C R A G

R

A D A G E

L

E E D S

O E

I

A T

T H U M P

A R O M A

M

V E E R E D

R

O

A S H

D

U

O

I

R

C

P

E S

T

February 2018

E ssence | 87

PENINSULA


LIFESTYLE BY DESIGN

E ssence

88 | PENINSULA

February 2018


Real Estate

EVERYTHING OLD IS NEW AGAIN By Melissa Walsh

B

uilt in 1887, and a stunning part of the rich Sorrento history, this state- of- the -art modern home is steeped in Sorrento’s colourful past. If the walls could speak they would talk of a time gone by where the home was built for the wellknown Stringer family and remained with them for the next 34 years. These Stringers were of the Herbert Stringer branch, brother of Walter Stringer of Stringer’s Stores. A later owner, William Schiipalius who had the property from 1923 to 1970 was well known in Sorrento for his Slippy’s Ice Cream. While living in the home, William sold his ice cream from a horse drawn cart and later from a motor vehicle, claiming he was the only one to sell from the back of a car in those early days. Along with his two sons, William worked at his ice cream business until the 1960s.

These days, the home remains a unique property in the Sorrento township, nestled just 150 metres from the town centre, Sorrento Hotel and Sorrento Park, and is being offered for sale by Prentice Real Estate. Selling agent, Mark Prentice says the home is a perfect blend of old world charm and modern conveniences, with a central location second -to -none. “It is a perfect blend of old world and new world, and location wise it is brilliant in terms of access to hotels, park and the village,” he said of the heritage listed property that is a rare offering in the Sorrento real estate market. “It is particularly rare to find a property so close to the park and the village.” Boasting four generous-sized bedrooms and four luxurious bathrooms you will have enough room for the whole family and friends to enjoy. continued next page...

February 2018

E ssence | 89

PENINSULA


* Sales * Owners Corporation

Celebrating 7 years in Mornington 650 body corporate units managed PILOT employs 4 staff members directly We support more than 150 tradespeople and suppliers

$1,000,000 in works carried out in 2017 $6,929,000 total value for residential and commercial sales in 2017 Average 4.9/5 star rating ( source: ratemyagent.com.au) instagram.com/pilotrealestate/ Shop 2, 1 Hoylake Grove, Mornington

E ssence

90 | PENINSULA

February 2018

www.facebook.com/thepilots/ www.pilotrealestate.com.au

5976 1273


A blend of limestone and weatherboard exterior sets the pace of this modern Hampton style residence which is meticulously designed to be functional and oozing class throughout with state of the art Swarovski crystal chandeliers and expert lighting. “Enjoy huge living spaces, a butler’s pantry and two fire places so the property can be enjoyed all year round. In addition to all the latest mod cons internally, externally entertain whilst be surrounded by irrigated vertical gardens which give you an outstanding light show at night,” said Mr Prentice. The property has been tastefully renovated with no expense spared to create an ideal home for retired couples with children and grandchildren, young families or those looking for the ultimate holiday home or weekender. “The heritage listed property has original bullnose verandas, fretwork features and pine boards, limestone façade and limestone footings under the house,” said Mr Prentice. “In just two short weeks, we have already had significant interest from perspective purchasers, which is not surprising with a home of this calibre and unique features.” x The price range of 38 Hotham Street, Sorrento is $3.2 million to $3.5 million, and registration to attend the auction closes on Thursday February 15, 2018 at 3pm. For further details phone Mark Prentice on 0408 117 772 or go to www.prenticerealestate.com.au

Introducing Honor Baxter A local agent with 20 years sales experience in Mount Martha, is now part of a 48 strong office network. 0418 148 468 | 5973 5444 hbaxter@hockingstuart.com.au

Peninsula Survey Group Consulting Land Surveyors We Measure Up

• • • •

Residential and Rural Land Easement & Covenant Advice Property Boundary Surveys Site Context Surveys

• • • •

Land Development & Management Site Development Investigations Subdivision Applications Dual Occupancy Developments

24A Progress St, Mornington www.peninsulasurvey.com.au Ph: 9787 2980 February 2018

E ssence | 91

PENINSULA


$39,900 is the maximum recommended drive away campaign price of the standard specification A180 City Edition ordered between 1 January – 28 February 2018 at participating authorised Mercedes-Benz retailers, unless offer extended.

The A-Class City Edition. Inspired by the city.

This special edition A-Class isn’t only designed for the city, it’s inspired by it. With its stylish black accents and impressive 18" AMG Multi-Spoke Black Alloys, it’s loaded with added value for a limited time. Speak to Mercedes-Benz Mornington before 28 February, or while stocks last. www.mbmornington.com.au

A180

$39,900

* drive away

• LED Headlights • Black Design Accents • Tinted Privacy Glass • 18" AMG Multi-Spoke Black Alloy Wheels

Mercedes-Benz Mornington 29-31 Mornington-Tyabb Road, Mornington (03) 5973 9688

LMCT443

Peninsula Essence February 2018  

Peninsula Essence February 2018

Peninsula Essence February 2018  

Peninsula Essence February 2018

Advertisement