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FEBRUARY 2017

FREE

PENINSULA Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsula

Equine Angel • Hello Hannie • Lantasia • Kenny Brunner: Straight Outta Compton • Madeline Makes Her Mark • Healing The Soul • Foxy Lady • The Heart Of A Boxer • Breaking The Street Art Stigma • Must Try Dishes • Sorrento Mansion For Sale


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contents 7. Events 8. Window Shopping 10. Lifetime of Service

After a lifetime of service to the community, Hastings resident, Brian Stahl has been honoured with the Papal Award, the Cross Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice.

Writers: Melissa Walsh, Kristy Martin, Peter McCullough, Cameron McCullough Creative Director: Maria Mirabella Photography: Yanni, Gary Sissons, Jarryd Bravo Publisher: Cameron McCullough Advertising: Brooke Hughes, 0409 219 282 or brooke@mpnews.com.au Marg Harrison, 0414 773 153 or marg@mpnews.com.au General enquiries: essence@mpnews.com.au Registered address: 2/1 Tyabb Road, Mornington 3931 Phone: 5973 6424 www.peninsulaessence.com.au Follow us on Instagram

@peninsulaessence

/peninsulaessence /peninsulaessence

14. Equine Angel

After years of witnessing the abuse and mistreatment of horses, Corinna Horvath has started her own equine rescue and rehabilitation organisation on her Somerville property.

20. Hello Hannie

One of Australia’s best-loved playwrights, Hannie Rayson, has a deep connection to the Mornington Peninsula, and now comes back to her old stamping ground with her one woman show, Hello, Beautiful!

22. Lantasia

After the success of last year's illuminating festival at Boneo Maze, the lantern festival reopened this summer with the theme ‘Lantasia Dreaming’.

28. Murray Uncovers a 70 Year Old Mystery

In a serendipitous moment, author and history teacher, Brendan James Murray, met a man in a fish and chip shop that would change the course of his life. This chance meeting with an elderly veteran sparked a conversation that would result in the intriguing and compelling book, The Drowned Man.

30. Kenny Brunner: Straight Outta Compton

Expat Kenny Brunner is the director of coaching and head coach of the senior men’s program for the Western Port Steelers, and fills much of his time running coaching clinics and workshops for kids to young adults. But how did he get to our beautiful part of the world?

38. Madeline Makes Her Mark

Mt Eliza beauty, Madeline Stock, never dreamed she would end up in a pageant last year, but sure enough the 19 year old travelled to the Philippines in November to represent Australia and made it to the top 15.

40. Healing the Soul

All material is copyright, and may not be reproduced without the express permission of Mornington Peninsula News Group, or the original copyright holder in the case of contributions. Copyright of contributed material rests with the contributor. Disclaimer: The authors and publisher do not assume any liability to any party for any loss, damage or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. This publication is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should regularly consult a physician in matters relating to health and particularly with respect to any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention.

Peninsula Essence is produced monthly. 30,000 copies (mix of home delivery and bulk dropped at an extensive network of outlets across the peninsula).

Emma Skeggs works as a psychic medium and clairvoyant, fulfilling her soul purpose to help others, but this wasn’t always the case. The bubbly blonde mother of two ditched lucrative careers to pursue a passion that haunted her entire life, and has never looked back.

46. Foxy Lady

Jazz and blues singer. Cabaret performer. Pinup model. Mum. Rye’s Lady Fox has certainly got her hands full as her musical career soars to new heights.

50. The Heart of a Boxer

It appears a juxtaposition to put boxing and harmony together yet former professional boxer, Ron Smith, manages to set the record straight on how boxing can bring peace and transform lives forever.

58. Mornington Peninsula Weddings 66. Breaking the Street Art Stigma

Frankston artist Sheldon Headspeath is using his large colourful murals to help change people’s perceptions of street art.

72. Rising From the Ashes

When The Baths owner, James Gibson, swore that his restaurant would be back after it was ravaged by fire, he wasn’t kidding. Exactly one year and one week after the historic beachfront structure was destroyed; The Baths has reopened better than ever.

78. Loving Life by the Sea

The opening of Alatonero a few months ago meant that head chef Graeme Walter could combine his two great loves – working by the beach and cooking incredible food.

Cover Photo: Illuminating Festival Boneo Maze Photo: Yanni

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82. Must Try Dishes 96. Sorrento Mansion For Sale

Another of the Mornington Peninsula’s historic seaside mansions, Sorrento’s Nee Morna, is being offered for sale for only the second time in more than 100 years.

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Peninsula events

February

SAND SCULPTING AUSTRALIA PRESENTS LANDS OF IMAGINATION Dec 26 - April 25 Childhood dreams and fantasies will come alive in an instant! Over 3,500 tonnes of sand in our wildest, most whimsical and extraordinary sand sculpting exhibition to date, 'Lands of Imagination'. Frankston Waterfront, 510N Nepean Highway, Frankston.

MORNINGTON PENINSULA INTERNATIONAL PINOT NOIR CELEBRATION Feb 10 & 11 This Biennial event will be hosted at RACV Cape Schanck and various local wineries. Tasting and included in wine brackets selected by media commentators and sommeliers. Phone 5989 2377 www.mpva.com.au

SUNSET CRUISE WITH SEAROAD FERRIES

BURGERS AND BEERS AT RED HILL BREWERY

Feb 11 & 25, 7pm till 10.45pm Enjoy three hours of sailing the bay and along the coast whilst indulging in delicious finger food made using local and regional produce prepared by Chef, Brent Love. Regional wines, ciders and ales available. Live music. Searoad Ferries, Sorrento Phone 5257 4500 www.searoad.com.au

Every Friday until Feb 24 Friday is now Burgers and Beers and they are awesome! Only $15. Only on Fridays. Red Hill Brewery 88 Shoreham Road, Red Hill South Phone 5989 2950 www.redhillbrewery.com.au

HUMAN/ANIMAL/ ARTIST: ART INSPIRED BY ANIMALS

BLUES AT THE BRIARS 2017 Feb 25, 11:00 am till 11:00 pm Blues at The Briars Festival is entering its 5th year providing a world class blues festival on the stunning Mornington Peninsula. A determination by the organisers to feature the highest talent available has seen the festival become a "must see" event. The Briars, Mount Martha www.bluesatthebriars.com

Tue - Sun until Feb 19, 7pm A beautiful and innovative exhibition which includes contemporary artists who emulate, incorporate or refer to the works of animals. McClelland Gallery 390 McClelland Drive, Langwarrin Phone 9789 1671 www.mcclellandgallery.com

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Visit us at Open Day Saturday 18 February, 2017 Tours at 9:00am and 11:00am. Call 9788 7234 to book your tour or visit the website to learn more about Discover Toorak events. www.toorakcollege.vic.edu.au | Call 9788 7234


A LIFETIME OF SERVICE By Cameron McCullough

A

s awards go, they don't much higher than this. After a lifetime of service to the community, Hastings resident Brian Stahl has been honoured with the Papal Award, the Cross Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice. The boy who hailed from Wycheproof in North Western Victoria believes it was his small town upbringing that taught him the importance of community service. "In a small town, it was essential that everybody chipped in to help," said Brian. "I was lucky enough to have my formative years in a town that had people well ahead of their time, and that understood the importance of fostering community spirit and service in people from a young age." Brian speaks specifically of Norm Saffin and his wife who were involved in the higher elementary school in Wycheproof and who broadened the horizons of the country kids there, setting Brian up for a life of service. "Not only did they take us on field trips to broaden our horizon, we had exchange students from England (remember, this was the 1950's), and more importantly, a Junior Council in Wycheproof with elected junior councillors." By the time Brian and his late wife Bernice arrived in Hastings, community service was already intrinsic to the daily life of the pair. "We purchased the barber shop in Hastings. We'd heard about the BP Refinery, and the possibility of a deep-water port, and knew it was a place where we could work and raise a family". On his first day in the barber's, Brian was paid a visit by Tom Holland, a member of the local Catholic parish, and a fellow member of the Knights of the Southern Cross. "Day one I was involved. That was the kind of community Hastings was. Again, all shoulders to the wheel in those days". And there were a lot of wheels to be shouldered. Brian's list of community service and achievements is long and constant throughout the over 50 years that he has lived in Hastings. From involvement in the CFA, Hastings Cricket and Football continued next page...

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clubs (where he is a past president and life member), and Hastings Tennis Club (where he is a past president), Brian has served on more committees, clubs and associations than it is possible to mention.

"It was actually a notification that I had been awarded an Order of Australia Medal (OAM) for service to local government and the people of Western Port", said Brian.

Brian became a Justice of the Peace in 1978.

It was a great honour, but one he credited not just to himself, but to the whole community, and his late wife.

With the encouragement of retiring councillor, Jim Paton, Brian stood for council for the Shire of Hastings in 1987 and won. His role as a local councillor was at a time of tremendous change in local government in Victoria, with the Kennett government aggressively pursuing the merger of councils across the state. The Shire of Hastings merged with both the Shire of Flinders and the Shire of Mornington to make one shire covering the entire Mornington Peninsula. Brian was elected to the new Mornington Peninsula Shire in 2003, and served as a councillor until 2008, including a stint as mayor in 2005/6. In 2004, a letter arrived at the family home with "Personal in Confidence" stamped on the front. Brian, expecting it to be mundane and non-urgent, put it aside, but was encourage by his wife to open it

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Tragedy struck for Brian and his family with the sudden passing of his wife, Bernice on 20 June, 2014. During his entire life in Hastings, Brian has been a cornerstone of the local Catholic church, and served on the church building committee, the pastoral council, the finance committee and the board of Padua College. It was this service that saw Western Port Parish Priest, Father Michael Miles, and the current Western Port Stewardship Committee nominate Brian for the prestigious papal award. Brian was asked to attend St. Patrick's Cathedral in Melbourne on Sunday 20 November, where he was presented with the award from Archbishop Denis Hart, in front of family and friends. "Just as I did with my OAM," said Brian. "I accept this award not just as an individual, but as a representative of the entire community. All these achievements, these outcomes, could not be done by the work of just one person, but by the efforts of many."


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By Kristy Martin Photos: Jarryd Bravo

After years of witnessing the abuse and mistreatment of horses, Corinna Horvath has started her own equine rescue and rehabilitation organisation on her Somerville property.

I

f you had seen the terrible things Corinna Horvath has seen, you would probably dedicate your life to rescuing horses as well.

Corinna has seen horses so emaciated that their ribs are protruding from their skin; she has seen them in dire need of medical attention and overbred to the point where their insides are on the brink of collapse. She has witnessed horses writhing in pain on the ground and groaning in agony because they are so hungry. “I reckon the horse industry is one of the cruelest industries ever,” Corinna says. “There are terrible people in the horse industry. “There are a lot of dodgy dealers who are all about making the last dollar out of the horse.” After years of involvement with P.H.A.R.L.A.P, a foster, adoption and rescue group for unwanted horses, Corinna has started Angel Lodge Equine Guardians and is in the process of registering the organisation as a charity. Angel Lodge receives support from many local businesses and personal sponsors, who assist with the huge financial cost of rescuing and rehabilitating horses. Corinna also throws a lot of her own money into the organisation, which is one of her two passions in life (the other is netball). The mum of three admits she has always been a bleeding heart, even back when she was a teenager. “My mum used to say to me ‘Corinna, you always have to bring home a person in need or an animal in need. It’s going to be your downfall.’ “But that’s what I loved to do. “I have made Mum do an extra plate of dinner for many people who have needed help. “And I’ve always brought home a stray horse here or there.” These days, Corinna’s 25 acre property has dogs adopted from Melbourne Pet Ambulance and goats from the Keysborough Animal Shelter. She even found a feral cat asleep in her chook pen, which, after months of love and attention, has become another family pet. “Everything is just somebody else’s unwanted animal,” she says. “I’ve got four surrender horses here from people who have died. “I had a friend who surrendered a mare six weeks before she died of cancer. continued next page...

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“TO SAY NOTHING IS TO DO NOTHING. “IF YOU SEE IT, YOU MUST BE THEIR VOICE.” “I took her mare on, and then after she died I had to go up the road and take her gelding as well because her family just couldn’t support it.” Corinna’s love of horses goes back to her early teenage years when she worked at a place called Paradise Country in Queensland, which housed the horses for a nearby theme park with a dancing stallion show. “My first influence and mentor was an old cowboy in Queensland called John Wilson. “I still remember him saying ‘Corinna do you want a horse?’ “I’m like ‘Yes!’ – I was hanging out for my first horse. “He opened the back of the float and said, ‘Don’t expect too much’. “(The horse) nearly fell off the float; she was skin and bones, she had no hair - because in Queensland they get Queensland Itch (a hypersensitivity to the bites of midges) - and she looked like a donkey. “It was just unbelievable. “So that was my first rescue horse and he taught me how to rehabilitate her.” Over the years, Corinna has worked with breakers and pretrainers and has picked up a variety of skills in managing unhandled horses. She also completed an advanced certificate of horse breeding at TAFE in Wangaratta. But nothing has prepared her for the cruelty she has seen within the equine industry. “I’ve got one horse here who is 29 years old, she’s had about 11 foals, so she’s been continuously bred, she’s got a big swayback and her vulva and anus have sunken in because her insides have sunken and dropped. “I nearly cried when I saw her, it was just terrible.” Another horse was pregnant when surrendered to Corinna. “She was in a terrible state. You couldn’t even get near her. “I’d never heard a horse bark before and she barked because she saw my cat come near her and the baby. “It was the most distressing noise you’ve ever heard, but she was so scared.” continued next page...

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For Corinna, the reward is watching the horses become healthy, rehabilitated and eventually re-homed. As well as her many sponsors, she gets plenty of help from local equine vets and farriers and ensures all the horses have their feet and teeth cared for, medical needs met and regular vaccinations. “I’m lucky because I’ve got so much help around me. “There are five of us in the (Angel Lodge) team and we’ve also got three foster carers - one out at Bunyip, one at Hastings and one in Tyabb. “I couldn’t do it all on my own. “I do what I do and I’ve done it since I was 14, but now it’s on a scale where I can help many more horses.” Corinna says the work is, unfortunately, never-ending. “We get phone calls weekly and texts saying, ‘Can you take this horse? “But we just can’t take every horse. “People then ask how we decide which horses to take. “It’s just something in you that says we’ll give this one a crack.” One of the biggest problems with other rescue groups, she says, is that they often take on too much. “People don’t necessarily like rescues because they think they are hoarders and that they take on more than they can handle. “And, you known what, a lot of them do. “There’s heaps that start out with the right intentions and before you know it, they are overcome with horses and it’s the middle of summer, or winter, and they can’t feed them.” The message Corinna hopes to get out there is that people shouldn’t be afraid to report animal rights abuses. “If you see something that doesn’t seem right, tell someone.” She recommends getting in touch with organisations like Project Hope Horse Welfare, the RSPCA, Department of Primary Industries or the Animal Cruelty Hotline on 1800751 770. “To say nothing is to do nothing. “If you see it, you must be their voice.” For more information on Angel Lodge Equine Guardians, you can find the group on Facebook.

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HELLO HANNIE

By Melissa Walsh

O

ne of Australia’s best-loved playwrights, Hannie Rayson, has a deep connection to the Mornington Peninsula, and now comes back to her old stamping ground with her one woman show, Hello, Beautiful! Rayson talks to Peninsula Essence about her wonderful, not-so-average life as a writer. How did your connection to the peninsula come about?

The connection is twofold. My parents lived in Mornington during the last part of my father’s life and the family used to go to Sorrento for holidays when I was a child in the 1960’s. I also got married in Sorrento We had a romantic wedding as it is such a special place for me. My husband Michael, who loves directing theatre, worked out with me how it should be. We were walking along the beach one day and he said "You should arrive by boat at dusk. Sail around the point, and then walk down the jetty as though walking down the aisle. We'll have singers and their voices will drift across the glassy water as you make your way towards us. We will wait for you here, on the veranda of the tearooms. Then the warm February sun will sink gently into the sea.”

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Did that time in Sorrento encourage you to write Hotel Sorrento?

Absolutely. Growing up and holidaying in Sorrento turned out to be the catalyst for my first major work which was Hotel Sorrento. We moved next door to two sisters whose family had settled in 1942 and we became best friends. So I got another sense of Sorrento through them. It is where I learnt to understand about the class divisions in society. I had friends who were clifftop people and friends who were servants, in an upstairs downstairs kind of way. Did you always want to be a writer?

Not at first. When I went to Melbourne Uni I thought I’d like to be a psychologist. I had an interest in people’s relationships and the human condition that I liked to look into. Then a fork in the road happened and I got into the Victorian College of the Arts as an actress. Actors are interpreters of the written word and I realised that I didn’t want to be an interpreter. I wanted to be the source of the quotes. I realised the process of sitting at a typewriter was much more suited to me. How did you make that transition?

There was a wonderful acting class I did called impulse


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classes and I never had an impulse. Finally I said I would rather be a writer and my teacher gave me the key to the front room and said ‘’Go and write a play". I started at the College of the Arts in 1978 and that beautiful gesture was the catalyst that made me start writing the following year. What was it like to write Hello Beautiful?

Writing Hello Beautiful was a completely different process. I had spent my life inhabiting other people writing for the theatre and you feel exhausted by it. The book took a year to write which is in the first person. I wrote it in the State Library in the Dome Room. How do you feel about performing the play onstage?

It’s actually a great experience, as if my life has come full circle from my brief acting days to performing in my own show, and sharing everything from a love letter to Melbourne, told through 43 vignettes. I speak directly to the audience about the experience of seeking out extraordinary moments in the everyday.

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AUTUMN February2016 2017


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Photos

Peninsula

After the success of last year's illuminating festival at Boneo Maze, the lantern festival reopened this summer with the theme ‘Lantasia Dreaming’. Mixing two traditions, the age old art of Chinese lantern making, and Aboriginal Dreamtime storytelling, guests at the opening night enjoyed wonderful indigenous entertainment and strolled through the gardens of Boneo Maze which was transformed into an ethereal light show.

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MURRAY UNCOVERS A 70 YEAR OLD MYSTERY By Melissa Walsh Photo: Yanni

I

n a serendipitous moment, author and history teacher, Brendan James Murray, met a man in a fish and chip shop that would change the course of his life. This chance meeting with an elderly veteran sparked a conversation that would result in the intriguing and compelling book, The Drowned Man.

In what Murray describes as the result of “all the stars aligning”, he embarked on writing the book which uncovers the truth about a shocking murder on an Australian warship and the surrounding homophobia that caused the incident to be covered up. “The Drowned Man is about a mysterious death on HMAS Australia during World War Two and writing it was influenced by a number of factors. I heard about it from the veteran but the most significant conversations took place with my grandfather, Richard Radcliffe, whom I was always very close to,” said Murray, of the man who gave him a fascination for naval history. For Murray, the book took about two years to complete, including reading as much as he could get his hands on about naval history and HMAS Australia. “My grandfather had served on that ship so we would sit and talk for hours about his memories and experiences,” said Murray who wrote the book while working as a teacher. “The research process was difficult as it wasn’t a topic that people wanted to talk about.

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Basically in 1942 a 19 year old man named John Riley was stabbed by his two 24-year-old shipmates, Albert Gordon and Edward Elias, whom he was probably threatening to blackmail as the two were well-established sexual companions on board the ship. It was kept quiet even though the two killers were identified and convicted. It is important to remember that, at that time, homosexuality was still illegal so, while the murder was known, the motive was always kept secret.” For Murray, who has always been a human rights advocate, writing The Drowned Man was an eye-opening experience. “I have always been a left wing, human rights advocate so have a sense of outrage at the way people were treated historically. In my research I found many men who served on HMAS Australia very heroically and yet were discharged from the navy and never received the pension, even after they had endured the most distressing battles,” said Murray, of a book that is not just about the experience of homosexuals, but violence in many forms. “It was at times difficult and challenging particularly talking to old sailors who still struggle with post-traumatic stress disorder, but mostly I am proud to be able to share their stories. It is my way of paying respect to them.” The Drowning Man is available at most book stores or through www.echopublishing.com.au


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By Cameron McCullough

T

he first time I see Kenny Brunner, he is walking out of the Breakers’ basketball stadium in Mornington. He is surrounded by a sea of kids, all “high-fiving” him as they parade through. Kenny is loving it and wears a grin from ear to ear. It goes without saying that in these parts, among the basketball fraternity, he is a celebrity.

US expat Kenny Brunner is the director of coaching and head coach of the senior men’s program for the Western Port Steelers and fills much of his time running coaching clinics and workshops for kids through to young adults. But how did he end up in our beautiful part of the world on the Mornington Peninsula? Well, it’s a story about trouble finding Kenny, jail time awaiting trial and ultimately redemption after he turned his life around. Despite having a rocky start in life, Kenny Brunner was destined for big things. Born in Los Angeles, he was raised mostly by his grandmother with help from his aunts. “My parents weren’t around. My mother was a drug addict and my father was an alcoholic, so it was up to my grandmother, Mary White, to raise me.” In fact, his parents only saw him play twice in his 137 games. “A mother teaches you to love. A mother teaches you to value women. A mother is supposed to help and support you,” said Kenny. “I never got that from my mother. I got that from my grandmother.” And raise him she did. In fact, she was the one who first put a basketball in young Kenny’s hands. “Initially, I was a football player. It was my grandmother and aunties who encouraged me to take up basketball.” Once that basketball hit his hands, he knew he was onto something. And by age thirteen, it was believed Kenny was headed for greatness. To help him in his development, the decision was made to send Kenny to school in Compton, which was an hour-long bus ride each way from home. “Compton was a rough place. It's a Crips’ neighbourhood, whereas Inglewood where I was from was a Bloods’ neighbourhood,” said Kenny, referring to the infamous red versus blue-wearing gang rivalry that is still synonymous with violence today. “But, you know… I’ve never been fearful of people. I will go anywhere and wear whatever colour I want.” Kenny fast got a reputation playing streetball in Compton; a showy form of the game, it was serious business back then for those on the road to the big time. “It was a good way to get noticed. Although these days, it is more about tricks and entertainment.” continued next page...

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Young Kenny: A 15-year-old Kenny Brunner playing for Dominguez Dons, his high school team in Compton in California

And Kenny ended up being noticed. As a teen he was considered the number one point guard in the country. Kenny enrolled at Georgetown University in Washington DC in 1997. After Georgetown, Kenny moved to California State University in Fresno, back closer to home. But trouble was not far away. He was charged after allegedly assaulting another student with a samurai sword, and suspended indefinitely from the team before playing a single game. “I was there, but it was more guilt by association,” said Kenny. The judge dismissed the charges against Kenny saying: "I think this started out as a bunch of horsing around … and it got out of hand." For Kenny, he was just happy to have the whole saga behind him and get back to what he loved; playing basketball. But things did not go smoothly. Back in Compton, he landed himself in more hot water. In May 1998, Kenny was arrested on suspicion of armed robbery. It was alleged he had held up Los Angeles City College basketball Coach Mike Miller at gunpoint inside the school's gymnasium, robbing him of about US$1,500. Thus began Kenny’s darkest time. He spent four months in the LA County Jail awaiting a trial that could see him imprisoned for a long time. Jail was a very tough place. A place with an abundance of violence and shortage of hope. Kenny looked for hope elsewhere and it was in jail where he developed a strong faith in God. “I knew I needed help. I needed love. In those dark times, God, and his plan for me was an enduring comfort”.

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Just two days before the trial, Kenny was cleared of all charges. “I was never there,” said Kenny. “They wanted to know who was there, but it wasn’t my place to say. I had nothing to do with it.” College of Southern Idaho was the next stop for Kenny. A town called Twin Falls, famous for where Evil Knievel held his failed attempt to jump the Snake River Canyon in the rocket-powered “Skycycle X-2”. It was also one of the whitest areas in America with just half of one percent of the population being African American. Here Kenny fell under the stewardship of Derek Zeck, a “pull no punches” coach who laid it all on the line for Kenny. “I have never been treated worse in my life, than I was under coach Zeck,” said Kenny. “But he was without a doubt the best coach I ever had.” Push, push, push was Zeck’s motto, and there was hardly a practice where Kenny wasn’t kicked out for not trying hard enough. “It was a daily routine. Kicked out of practice and made to come back and run five miles at 6am the next morning.” It wasn’t just the coach that was tough on him. In this predominately white part of the United States, the crowds from the opposing team often gave Kenny hell. “I remember one game against Utah Valley. It was the worst racism I ever had to deal with. The crowd were brandishing Samurai swords, and the ‘N’ word was bandied about. That was a low point.” Kenny was motivated to succeed though. He wanted to make his grandmother proud. He wanted to show his coach, his team and all the doubters that he had what it took to go all the way.


And his hard work was paying off. In fact, Sports Illustrated journalist Grant Wahl had come to town to do a story on Kenny’s rise against adversity, and his plans to enter the draft. The reports were glowing from the coaches and school staff. Everything seemed fine. Then, later that day came the bombshell from Coach Zeck that Kenny had been suspended indefinitely. “Coach Zeck was mad at the whole team,” said Kenny. “He told us all to leave and to come back at 10pm. I was like ‘I’m not coming back. I’ll see you at 6am’.” It was coach Zeck’s anniversary, and Kenny took it upon himself to make sure that his coach celebrated it. Kenny and a few teammates headed to the movies, but the coach sensed a mutiny. It wasn’t until the next day that Kenny was told the bad news. As the perceived leader of the rebellion, he was out. “Clean your stuff out – you’re done,” he was told. Kenny’s latest fall from grace attracted attention. Sports Illustrated magazine ran a story describing Kenny, sitting in the passenger seat of a pick-up truck in the parking lot of a convenience store, continued next page...

On the road: Kenny photographed by Sports Illustrated during his time at Southern Idaho.

Dogg day: Kenny and rapper Snoop Dogg after beating Snoop's team in the 2006 Entertainers Basketball Classic.

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European baller: Kenny playing in 2006 for BG Karlsruhe in Germany's top division.

ringing his beloved grandmother, and sobbing down the phone: “Granny, I’ve got some bad news…”. Coach Zeck decided to take Kenny back. As bad as his actions had been to Zeck, he knew he needed the young point guard on his team. Kenny played out the season. Time was ticking for Kenny to achieve his dream on playing NBA basketball. At the end of the season, Kenny headed to the University of Georgia for a year, but was not cleared to play. This failure was to become the defining fork in the road; the moment Kenny’s dream to play in the NBA slipped through his fingers. Kenny headed home and out of the junior college system to play in the American Basketball Association competition, a semiprofessional league. “I was the highest paid point guard in the league in 2001,” said Kenny. His results speak for themselves, with Kenny averaging 16 points, 6 assists, 4 rebounds and 2 steals per game. Again, his career hit a hurdle when he broke his leg and injured his knee. After recovering, he delved into the world of “exhibition” basketball, where he could show off the “street-ball style” he had grown up playing.

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He went on the “AND1 Mixed Tape” tour in 2003 and 2004. The “AND1 Mixed Tape Tour” was a traveling basketball competition and exhibition presented by B-Ball and Company and the basketball apparel manufacturer AND1. Kenny and travelled through Europe and Asia playing the entertaining, streetball brand of basketball. He also played competitive basketball in Europe, the United States and Mexico The crowds loved him. He had the moves and the reputation as a bad boy of the game. “Bad Santa” they called him. Or “The Bad One”. He loved the attention and worked on marketing himself. He had a shoe made in his image, and had plans to market the Kenny Brunner brand. Fate would intervene in 2009 when Kenny received a call from Australian basketball coach Ryan Rogers. “I was playing in Mexico at the time,” said Kenny. “The phone rang and Ryan said ‘how about coming to Australia to play?’”. It was an opportunity too good to refuse. Kenny headed to Kalamunda in Western Australia where he began to settle in and get his rhythm. “I was averaging about 16 points and six assists, and getting my confidence up. One game, a guy came up from under me and tore my ligament from my bone.”


It was another blow for Kenny; the man who had been through more trials than most could imagine. It is telling that Kenny has Psalms 13 tattooed on his forearm: “How long wilt thou forget me, O Lord?”, it begins. “How long wilt thou hide thy face from me?” Luckily for Kenny, salvation arrived. Not as a light from heaven, but in the arrival of his first child. “My baby changed my view on coaching. It hadn’t appealed in the past, but I discovered I had so much to give, and that is what I wanted to do,” said Kenny. Two more children followed and a recruitment to become the coach at the Western Port Steelers in 2012. “I had found my place,” said Kenny. Kenny coached the Steelers until 2013 when he returned to Adelaide to be closer to his partner’s family, but found himself back in 2015. “The first year I came back, we made the grand final. The second year back, we won it!” Kenny’s life is one dedicated to promoting basketball, and fostering talent particularly among the young. Perhaps it is his own three boys that have taught him the value of youth. Or perhaps it was the grandmother who never gave up on him that has burnt the value into his psyche. “She has passed on now, as has my father,” said Kenny. “My aunty continued next page... AND1: Kenny joins the AND1 Mixtape Tour. Pictured here playing in Japan in 2008.

Road to victory: Above: Kenny coaching his players during the 2016 grand final against Coburg. Right: Being awarded the 2016 Coach of the Year Award for the Big V.

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Photos: Yanni

Karen and my cousins Brian and Brandon are still in the United States, and going strong!” When Kenny isn’t working his role as the director of coaching for the Western Port Steelers, he can usually be found at a local school running basketball programs. He runs coaching clinics at Penbank School (where he coaches all six of the school’s teams), Somerville Primary, Pearcedale Primary, Tyabb Primary and Mount Martha Primary. He also runs the Point Guard Academy for promising up and coming players. “I am happy to be where I am,” said Kenny. “I work seven days a week doing this, and I absolutely love it. “My faith has taught me that everything happens for a reason. Everything that has happened was supposed to happen. “I have been able to give back so much to others; especially kids. My heart is with the kids; I want to help them so they don’t have to learn life’s lessons in the same way I had to.” “I love my kids so much,” said Kenny. “My oldest boy is already shooting a ten-foot rim! I think he will be a baller”.

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Kenny has found himself in a lovely part of the world, and when he gets a few hours off, heads to the beach to unwind. But does he regret not making the ‘big time’? “I achieved my aims,” said Kenny. “I was the ‘Skip To My Lou’ of the East coast (a reference to famous West Coast streetballer Rafer ‘Skip To My Lou’ Alston), I had my own shoe, and I was the number one point guard in the country.” In fact, Kenny is confident in his legacy, and won’t let anybody forget it. “I am the best streetballer that has ever laced up shoes.” It seems fitting that this man, whose life has been through many trials, has that Psalm 13 tattoo etched on his skin. The tattoo graces his forearm, and begins with a message of being forsaken but ends with the earning of redemption: “But I have trusted in thy mercy; my heart shall rejoice in thy salvation. I will sing unto the LORD, because he hath dealt bountifully with me.”


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MADELINE MAKES HER MARK By Melissa Walsh

M

t Eliza beauty, Madeline Stock, never dreamed she would end up in a pageant last year, but in fact the 19 year old travelled to the Philippines in November to represent Australia and made it to the top 15.

“I was invited to represent Australia in the Miss Asia Pacific International Pageant last year. My brother had competed in the Junior Pan Continental in 2015 and the trainer asked me to do the pageant a month before it was starting,” said Madeline, who was quickly thrown into a fast track course of pageant training. “A lot of the training involved wearing six inch heels, pageant walk training, how to walk on the stage, how to pose and how to answer questions. I had five days of intensive training to take over from another girl.” And did Madeline thrive! Hitting the ground running, she landed in the Philippines to media interviews, photo shoots and two weeks of work and sightseeing, and loved every minute.

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“It was such a great experience and I made heaps of friends as well,” said the Mt Eliza girl, who sent all her measurements over for dresses to be made at the last minute. “I took two huge cases with me with outfits during the event, but the main pageant days were when I wore the gowns that were made for me over there.” While there is the formal ceremony, Madeline explains that you are being judged every day for the two weeks. “It is all about how you behave and hold yourself as well as your presentation with outfit, hair and makeup,” said Madeline, who was one of the youngest there. “I was competing with 40 other countries and would definitely do it again.” In the meantime, Madeline works as a face painter doing her fourth season at the sand castles, and has just completed her Diploma of Special Effects Makeup. “I might go into film makeup or start my own business doing freelance makeup but I will definitely consider doing another pageant soon,” she said.


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wonderful companionship and bonding that takes place between people and a variety of animals and the resulting healing effect this may have on their wellbeing is well-known. Delta’s amazing and devoted volunteer Therapy Dog Teams, brighten the lives of an estimated 20,000 Australians in hospitals and care facilities every week. We are very fortunate to have either Bec, who brings Lucky (a Whippet) or Susan, who brings Badger (an English Cocker Spaniel) visit our hospital every weekend to offer the wonderful benefits of pet therapy, spend time with patients and offer a chat, a floppy ear to listen and a paw to shake. For further information on the great work Delta Society Australia does, or to make a donation to help fund the fabulous programs they run, visit www.deltasociety.com.au How do you attend our hospital? Inpatients: you can choose who provides your rehabilitation after your acute hospital stay or if you have a referral

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HEALING THE SOUL


By Melissa Walsh Photos: Yanni

E

mma Skeggs works as a psychic medium and clairvoyant, fulfilling her soul purpose to help others, but this wasn’t always the case. The bubbly blonde mother of two ditched lucrative careers to pursue a passion that haunted her entire life, and has never looked back.

“The first time I realised I could see spirit was at the age of three. I had gone to visit friends with mum and dad and was off in the play room. When my dad came in I told him I was talking to a man on the couch whose name was Jobe. I told dad he just wanted to say hello and that he was very happy we were all there. It turns out he was the deceased husband of the owner of the house,” said Emma, whose father had similar abilities. “I am from a family of mediums, although the first to be formally trained. My dad used to take me to spiritualist church as a youngster, where unbeknown to me, he was teaching me to connect to spirit. I only went for the bickies and orange cordial and to amuse my dad. My mum, on the other hand, well let’s just say hearing me speak to passed over loved ones would send her screaming from the room. She even had me blessed as a child as she thought I was going to die.” While Emma experienced seeing spirits and her own guides from a young age, she was never scared of her gift, and thought that everybody saw the same thing. “I would see people in their cars that weren’t there and didn’t realise that others couldn’t see it. It’s a weird sensation, as if you see it in your mind,” she explained. “Looking back I can identify things that happened which were all related. I remember being thrown out of class the first day of prep because I was playing 'knock knock' with one of my guides, Jason. When it was time for school reports, mine always said ‘off with the fairies’, and I recall at seven, riding my bike down a very steep hill too fast to stop before I got to a busy road. I felt this presence behind me say ‘just breathe and go with the flow’. The bike hit the gutter and I breathed and just tumbled.” Emma says we all have guides to help us along our journey. “You are born with one, and then get them intermittently during your life so that you eventually end up with about six or seven guides,” she said. “My main guide is named Archi and I didn’t find him until I started to focus on development and figure out what I needed to do with my abilities.” Many mediums that experience their gift from a young age tend to suppress it when they reach puberty. “I was about 12 when I suppressed everything because, as an empath, I could hear what people were saying or thinking and knew if they were not telling me the truth. With hormones coming through and this feeling I had to live in the real world, I started to focus on more external things, and became less introverted,” said Emma, whose gifts would come and go over the years, usually during crises. continued next page... February 2017

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“I WOULD SEE PEOPLE IN THEIR CARS THAT WEREN’T THERE AND DIDN’T REALISE THAT OTHERS COULDN’T SEE IT. IT’S A WEIRD SENSATION, AS IF YOU SEE IT IN YOUR MIND.”

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“Normally, through a crisis, I would retreat and reconnect to who I was and my higher self and my guides would pop up again. I had Jason who has always been my age, and another guide is a security guard that keeps me safe and protected.” These days, Emma is so passionate about helping people that she does it for a living. “My journey always led me to this point. I had ticked all the boxes of society with career, education, a husband, two kids, big job and big money but each time I got what I wanted I became more miserable because I wasn’t on my path and purpose,” she said. “My passion is to help people find themselves, and help them make choices to bring bliss, joy and happiness. If you are not on your path or purpose, your guides will strip everything away from you, but I can help people define what makes them happy. Your life is a reflection of your soul. You experience your soul through your thoughts and emotions. The same way your thoughts can affect your emotions, they affect your physical body. How you see yourself, how you carry your stress and how you perform in our physical, third dimensional world are all directly related to how balanced your soul is feeling in your body. While your body is a reflection of your physical health, it is also a reflection of your mental and emotional state. If you want to heal one, you also have to heal all connected components; mind, body and soul.” continued next page...

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Often described as a helping hand that comes out of the darkness, Emma knew that she wanted to make a difference.

releasing that allows me to live in the moment. I have learnt to go with the path of least resistance.”

“I studied life coaching and counselling, but didn’t know where I fitted in to helping people. Eventually I decided to do a massage course and started massaging from home while still working full time. But every time I massaged I got aches and pains from the other person and eventually I could sense things they were feeling. I was intuitively getting stuff out of them so I looked on line and a friend had some tarot cards. She suggested that I should learn about energy and so I started meditating which gave me more peace and heightened my intuition.”

As for seeing dead people everywhere, Emma says she has learnt to control what she sees.

Before she knew it, the teacher appeared. Emma was in spiritual development courses and swapping massage for tarot classes. “After all of those years I came back to what I knew as a kid,” she says with a smile. “I have no idea what is in store for me and

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“Part of developing that side of me and learning about it is getting control over it. I am a human being and need to have a relatively normal life, so I don’t see people in cars anymore unless I want to.” Emma Skeggs Soul Healing offers a variety of services including psychic medium, tarot and lenormand readings, Akashic record readings, past life regression therapy, spiritual development classes, reiki and spiritual healing, psychic parties, and a meditation app. Phone: 0404 838 549 www.emmaskeggs.com


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FOXY LADY By Kristy Martin Photos: Gary Tate

Jazz and blues singer. Cabaret performer. Pinup model. Mum. Rye’s Lady Fox has certainly got her hands full as her musical career soars to new heights.

W

hat if?

It’s the age old question that many of us ask ourselves, but not too many of us are brave enough to act on. However, it was the question nagging at Sue-Ann Cozyn with such ferocity that she felt she had no choice but to do something about it. The Rye resident had always been musically talented and wanted to try her hand at a full-time singing career. After previous stints as a karaoke hostess, lead singer of a 12-piece swing band and female vocalist in a cover band, she decided to put music on the backburner and focus on motherhood instead. But, after a long hiatus from the industry following the birth of her first child, there was always that feeling that something was missing. “I kept thinking, ‘What if?’. “I just couldn’t live with myself if I didn’t give the singing thing a proper go.” Fast forward to today, and you are more likely to recognise SueAnn as Lady Fox, her dazzling alter ego with the haunting voice that is setting Melbourne’s jazz and blues scene alight. Lady Fox, or Fox, as she is affectionately known, is a singer, performer, pinup model and self-taught guitarist. She is the resident jazz singer at Melbourne vaudeville theatre Speakeasy HQ, where she performs up to three nights a week. This month, Lady Fox will launch her latest cabaret show, ‘Shades of Marilyn’, which sheds light on Marilyn Monroe’s little known relationships with people from the African American community. ‘Shades of Marilyn’ is her fourth self-produced show in which she spends up to 90 minutes on stage, singing and telling a story. “It’s something that I really like to do,” the singer says of producing her own shows. “And I’m very particular. “I’ll always find something different to write about, something that interests me.

“I love researching and writing about things that people don’t know about. “As well as people coming up and telling you they enjoyed the show or your singing, the best bit is hearing them say they learnt something.” Fox, who was born in South Africa and came to Australia with her parents at age one, is a versatile performer and doesn’t wish to be pigeonholed as a jazz singer. Performing since her teenage years, her range also includes blues, soul, lounge, rockabilly and acoustic. “I sing constantly. “I am always singing, whether it’s first thing when I wake up or last thing when I go to bed at night. “Performing gives me a lot of energy. “If I haven’t performed in, say, two weeks, then I really miss it.” Fox credits her father, who was a DJ in South Africa, and also her grandparents for her longstanding love of music. “My father was always playing music. “I’ve never had formal training as a singer, I just always mimicked the albums we listened to at home. “I found a real love of the old crooners like Billie Holiday and Nat King Cole through the records played at my grandparents' house.” When she was 17, Fox’s partner (now husband) recognised her talent and suggested she join his uncle’s band, which she did one night in the absence of the lead singer. The rest, as they say, is history. After taking an extended break from performing in 2002, she decided to branch out in 2007 and see if singing was, in fact, the career for her. “I started off doing a bit of burlesque. “It wasn’t until 2012 that I really got serious, found my alter ego and began performing as Lady Fox.” One night, Fox auditioned to be Speakeasy HQ’s regular jazz singer and was given the opportunity to sing two songs. She has been there almost every week since. “They must have liked me,” she laughs. continued next page...

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“IT WASN’T UNTIL 2012 THAT I REALLY GOT SERIOUS, FOUND MY ALTER EGO AND BEGAN PERFORMING AS LADY FOX.” In October 2015, Lady Fox performed her first solo show, ‘Harlem Soul’, which was written and produced specifically for her.

As if this woman wasn’t multi-talented enough, she even makes some of her own stage outfits.

She has since produced three shows herself – ‘With Love, From Ella’, ‘Birdland’ and ‘Live at the Apollo’.

Drawing on her love of all things vintage, Lady Fox is always dressed in pre-1950s clothing and accessories, with hair and make up to match.

Lady Fox also recently performed at the Melbourne Spiegeltent in the highly acclaimed circus cabaret show ‘Papillon’. She does regular gigs across the Mornington Peninsula with local blues and swing performer Diddy Reyes, who is helping her to improve her guitar skills. (“I am a very poorly self-taught guitarist,” she laughs.) And while she mainly performs covers, Fox also finds time to write her own songs. “Everything that comes out of me is blues,” she says. “I’ve written nine songs and would really like to do something with them this year.”

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When in character, she is glamorous and flawlessly made up, much like her grandmother was in the old photos she used to admire as a kid. However, when you are getting home from work at 2am and have to be up early to drop the kids at school, there is not always time for hair and makeup. “My grandmother would probably be turning in her grave if she saw what I wore to drop the kids off some days!” Recently, Lady Fox has journeyed into the world of vintage pinup fashion shoots and you can find photographs of her adorning the walls of the Spitfire Café in Rosebud.


She is also featured in this year’s ‘Black Pinups’ calendar, an international publication that aims to give women of colour more exposure in mainstream pinup photography. Looking to the future, Lady Fox says it is her dream to one day perform in her hometown of Cape Town, South Africa. And while juggling motherhood and her burgeoning career is often hectic and at times “overwhelming”, Fox takes great pride in knowing that she is providing a positive role model for her children, now aged 13, nine and four. Her two daughters, in particular, have seen her follow her dreams to take on an ambitious career in an industry that can be incredibly tough. “I think it’s good for them to know that they can do anything they want in life, and also to see that hard work pays off.” For more details on Lady Fox or to catch one of her shows, visit www.ladyfoxperforms.com

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THE HEART OF A

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By Melissa Walsh Photos: Yanni

I

t appears a juxtaposition to put boxing and harmony together yet former professional boxer, Ron Smith, manages to set the record straight on how boxing can bring peace and transform lives forever.

At 72 years of age, Ron is a true hero and inspiration to many people but this gentle soul has learnt his lessons from the school of hard knocks. These days, he and his wife, Sharyn run Mt Eliza Boxing Centre and The Centre for Lifelong Health and Fitness from their home in Mt Eliza. Born in Collingwood on June 8, 1944, Ron remembers what it was like to grow up in a poor family. “Mum and dad had come out from England. Dad was one of the Rats of Tobruk and badly wounded. He ended up in a Repat Hospital which is where I was conceived. We were very poor. I remember coming home from school and mum would be sitting on the front steps because we were kicked out, as we couldn’t pay the rent. I loved sport, but went to seven different schools as we were always moving. We moved to Castlemaine as a kid but I left school at 13 to get a job and help mum and dad out. Next door to our home was a big property where I used to get up early and help the old bloke out with the horses. At 13 I got a job as an apprentice jockey at the racing stables in Caulfield but grew too big by 15 and had to leave. By this stage my parents had a war service home in Montmorency so I lived there and started an apprenticeship as a fitter and turner in Preston.” Like many teenagers, Ron ended up hanging out with the wrong crowd but it was just the catalyst he needed to change his life. “I started thinking I was tough and knocking around with older boys who were pinching cars and breaking into shops. I was only 15 when we all got caught so I went to Children’s Court while the others ended up in jail,” said Ron. “I was put on probation and this was a turning point in my life as it was when I met George Newton. He was an unarmed combat instructor with the army and my probation officer. Part of the deal was I had to go to a police youth boys club which he ran in Eltham. I’d never even thought about boxing until I went there and I soon discovered that George was the toughest man I knew. He became like my pseudo dad, and taught me that if you work harder than everybody else you could be successful at what you do.” As it turned out Ron was quite good at boxing and within seven months had been in a dozen fights and won a Victorian amateur junior boxing title. “Two years later I fought for the Australian title to go to the Commonwealth Games in Perth. I was beaten in that fight in Sydney by the chap that ended up winning the gold medal. His name was Jeff Dynevor who became the first indigenous Australian to win a gold medal at the Commonwealth Games,” said Ron, who then went on to try out for the 1964 Olympics. continued next page...

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“I qualified to fight on Channel Nine with a guy who was in the weight division above me. He was selected and I received a pair of shoes. At the time I thought it was the most devastating thing that could happen. I was 20. When I look back I realise it is not the slightest bit important to my life.” In a decade of boxing from 15 years of age to 25, Ron had 108 fights, 90 bouts at a high level, with 18 pro fights televised on channel Seven’s TV Ringside, and spent thousands of rounds in the gymnasium sparring and doing interclub competitions. “It opened doors that normally a young kid from a poor family would never have and taught me a lot about life rather than boxing,” said Ron, who has made sure that he passed down his knowledge and philosophy from the golden age of boxing. “In my opinion boxing really started a couple of centuries ago and it was called the noble art of self-defence. And boxing in those days was what a lot of young boys learnt at school, youth clubs and orphanages around the world and it was really about learning how to protect yourself, how to defend , how to evade. It wasn’t about aggression. It was about learning skills, how to move, how to balance and score punches to achieve winning the competition. It certainly was not about trying to hurt another person and at the end of the day two people in the ring had the utmost respect for each other and that showed in and out of the ring.”

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Ron says he has learnt a lot about life through making mistakes but finally found his true calling when meditating at a Brahma Kumaris weekend retreat in Frankston. “Sharyn and I went there after we had moved down to the peninsula many years ago. I had an epiphany that I needed to help more people. I had been helping work colleagues and older friends with their health and fitness over the years and teaching kids boxing but I knew I had to do more. So I left a very good government job, we bought this property in Mt Eliza and began The Centre for Lifelong Health and Fitness. That was 17 years ago and we love every moment of it,” said Ron, who has been full time Personal training now since the year 2000. “I have now done 49,000 personal training sessions with clients from 82 to as young as 8. We help people with health issues who have had heart attacks, cancer, arthritic problems, and even have doctors that train here.” While Ron loves that he can help all ages to try and turn their life around, his real passion is for the kids. “We have kids from every walk of life, 50 percent from single families as that’s the way life is. There are lots of kids that have lost their way. We have had kids on the most serious drug you can get, locked up, bashed up and we have been able to turn them around. We’ve had cases where kids have dropped out of school at 15, got in with the wrong crowd but we have seen them through and attended their 18th and 21st birthday parties. We have seen kids


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“I HAVE NOW DONE 49,000 PERSONAL TRAINING SESSIONS WITH CLIENTS FROM 82 TO AS YOUNG AS 8." go on to adult apprenticeships, own businesses, and some have partners and children, and all I can say is that is better to me than training a world champion boxer without a shadow of a doubt.” For Ron the key is simple. “’I talk to them with respect. I’m not here to be their best friend. We run the classes and are fairly regimented, but while I instruct them in the boxing I will walk around and have a word in each kid’s ear to see how they are going." Ron recalls one of his proudest moments with a young lad who came to him with no confidence. “I used to have a whole group of Year 12 boys from Peninsula School who were gun athletes, but there was one kid who was coming along at the same time. He didn’t go to Peninsula School and came from a poor family. They all laughed as he couldn’t do one push up, whereas these kids could bang out 50. So this little tubby kid couldn’t do a push up but he kept coming along and I kept at him and at him. In the end he started helping other kids and kept coming along for five or six years. He joined the navy and did his training at Cerberus. Sharyn and I went to his graduation to see this once chubby kid with long hair and pimples march out in white full uniform with the gun, a grown, proud and happy man.”

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Another friend Ron admires and loves spending time with is his old boxing buddy, John Famechon. John and I were both competing at the same time. John was far better than me. In fact I believe that he and Lionel Rose were the best two boxers in my 70 years that I have ever seen. In later years our paths crossed a lot, and 24 years ago when John was hit by a car it was a turning point in his life. Now I work with him every week and I think I respect him even more than when he was in his prime as World Featherweight Champion. He still believes he has the chance to improve and I think that holding on to some hope keeps him going from day to day,” said Ron, who will continue to teach and train with the same feeling of hope and faith that John has. “I have great faith in the world with the future generations after spending time with kids all my life. In my 73rd year I am so comfortable with the generations that are coming through but I really believe that it's people like myself who have an influence, whether that’s a school teacher, a karate instructor or a dance teacher. And never take for granted that it is a huge responsibility.” www.lifelonghealthandfitness.com.au www.mtelizaboxingcentre.net Phone 9787 3093.

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Mornington Peninsula Weddings Love of Roses With nearly three decades under their belt, Tyabb Roses have earned a much deserved reputation for quality and personal service with owners, Trish and Neil still as passionate about their flowers as the day they started. For Trish, the highlight is providing beautiful wedding bouquets and flowers for brides on their special day. “We have a wonderful range of colours for wedding and, on most occasions, have the exact colour the bride wants. Our roses are lovingly nurtured from growing to picking and arranging, and we have an incredible florist, Francine, who helps create magnificent arrangements,” said Trish. “We put our heart and soul into creating the most beautiful flowers for each couple and believe personal touch is the most important thing.” At Tyabb Roses, the expert rose team can create any style of bouquet or flower arrangement the

couple want, from delicate two or three rose bouquets with baby’sbreath to magnificent 80cm vases with flowers or large urns. For Trish, a highlight is seeing the expression on a bride when she takes over the bouquets. Tyabb Roses is at 45 O’Neills Road, Tyabb. Open from 8am till 5pm every day. Phone 5977 4652. www.tyabbroses.com.au

Opening Hours 7 Days A Week 8am-5pm 45 O’Neills Road Tyabb T (03)5977 4652 M 0400 567 215 info@tyabbroses.com.au www.tyabbroses.com.au www.facebook.com/tyabbroses @tyabbroses

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The One Stop Wedding Shop The Mornington Peninsula is the ultimate wedding destination in Victoria. Whether you wish to say your vows on a stunning cliff top overlooking crystalclear waters, or if you prefer an intimate country estate, MPW members can assist. So many brides and grooms choose the Mornington Peninsula for their wedding destination because it’s a peaceful playground for lovers to stroll along the beautiful beaches, watch the sunset from the many hilltop apartments over a glass of champagne, enjoy the company of family and friends in any of the wonderful restaurants, or BBQ on the inviting foreshore beaches. And the best part of it all? Access to the Mornington Peninsula from Melbourne is less then an hour's drive. Mornington Peninsula Inc. is a non-for-profit organisation of local wedding and event suppliers who together promote the Mornington Peninsula as a premier wedding destination. Our members live, work and play local. We love the area and are passionate about helping couples create the best wedding memories possible. Our success comes from our members who

all have a wealth of knowledge about the wedding industry and are reliable and professional. Come and talk to the leading local suppliers of Mornington Peninsula Weddings at our 2017 expo. Showcasing their products, services and expert advice, planning your wedding has never been so easy. Hosted at Mornington Race Course on the 4th June 2017, you will have 130 suppliers at your finger tips. From the highest quality venues right down to the headpiece you wear in your hair (and everything in between of course) you'll find everything you need at the MPW expo - 100% local wedding suppliers. Nothing is left to chance we even have wedding planners, so you can just kick back and let it all be organised for you from the beginning. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and more recently Pintrest for all your wedding inspiration. Refer to our website at www.peninsulaweddings.com.au for more information.

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Arts

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LARGER THAN LIFE By Melissa Walsh Photos: Yanni

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ith her flaming red hair and flamboyant presence, Carole Foster is an artist, self-proclaimed gypsy and country girl at heart, having traveled the globe and finding her home on the Mornington Peninsula. When visiting Carole at her property in Dromana with its elaborate studio out the back, this charming woman and her surroundings scream creativity. Magnificent paintings grace the walls of the artist’s sanctuary, some she has done herself and others by her extremely wide community of creative contemporaries. Recently returned from Europe and planning her next trip to India, the adventures still continue for 64 year old Carole, who is the sublime example of joie de vivre, and remains inundated with offers to exhibit her works. “I love my painting and have always done it even when I had small children,” said the mother of two adults, Candice and Matthew. “It’s the only thing I didn’t give up when they were little. They would go into care one day a week so I could paint.” Perhaps that’s the key to the success of this artist who has exhibited and sold paintings all around the world in more than 30 exhibitions, from the early ‘90s in New York to Bark Modern, (Hong Kong), Art n wine, (San Francisco), and Paint Box Fine Art, (London). She continues to paint and teach to this day, and in 2006 was commissioned to do 5 two metre tall paintings for a restaurant in San Francisco. Born and raised in Wangaratta, Carole showed a flair for drawing and painting at an early age, and always had a penchant for adventure. “It started from early childhood. I would be off for the day down at the riverbanks and always thought life was an adventure. We had always lived on the outskirts of town and I couldn’t get out of there fast enough, and so started my travels at a fairly young age,” said Carole who has lived in New Zealand, Norfolk Island, England, Finland, Holland and Germany, using these and other countries as a base to travel and to collect information for paintings. continued next page...

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“WHEN I WAS YOUNGER I WAS DYSLEXIC AND THAT IMPROVES OTHER SENSES LIKE SIGHT. I DON’T KNOW IF MY ABILITY TO OBSERVE THINGS CLEARLY IS NECESSARILY." “I ended up coming back when I got quite sick in India. I was 23 and decided that maybe I should make a life for myself so did normal work at the Windsor Hotel, then at Myer Corp and Rank Xerox. But I always did my paintings, which I had taken up as a hobby, doing the occasional Rotary Art Show.” It was in the early '90s that this part time painter decided to approach a few galleries. “I always approached galleries with a wad of work to do an exhibition. Before I knew it I was in New York, and Europe, lots of places, including traveling all over Australia. My first exhibition was in Melbourne at the Brighton Horizon Gallery, which then took me to New York.” Ironically, this sophisticated traveller tends to get her inspiration from the Australian outback, having discovered a love of nature growing up in the country, which came full circle as an adult travelling to the High County many years later.

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“I used to paint lots of birds when I was younger as they were always around me growing up. They were more realistic images than the funky birds I do these days where I have added a touch of cuteness to them, and add designer pieces to improve on what I see,” says Carole of the evolving process of her art. “When I first started out as an adult, I was interested in abstract, then had formal lessons and did impressionism, but I always liked people such as Brett Whiteley and Frederick McCubbin. Then became very connected to the Australian outback which has been my biggest connection after spending 20 years four wheel driving everywhere from the Simpson to Kakadu and the Kimberley. The Nissan Four Wheel Drive Club were part of rebuilding Craig’s Hut after it burnt down and I have painted that landscape many times over the years. With many years sitting on hilltops, it stays for you for the rest of your life when you see a place like that,” continued next page...


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says the artist, who admits to have had an amazing life so far. “Everything I have done has helped me understand nature more. You get a sacred connection with the bush which stays with you forever.” Describing her work as gestural and impressionistic, it is also romantic in quality, with the artist not restricting herself to landscapes, although the outback tends to evoke much emotion.

bands of the landscape where I see shapes to create patterns,” said Carole of the epiphany that happened when she started teaching at McClelland Regional Gallery and Sculpture Park.

With a solid foundation in realist art, Carole has been able to explore and teach a more contemporary approach to her subject while still being able to experiment. Her work has been described as a modern abstract impressionist style which has resulted in high energy vibrant pieces that equally capture the visually silent atmospheres in works of a quiet nature.

The spiritual lady with a wildly artistic soul says she never has periods where she doesn’t want to paint, and is delighted to be exhibiting her funky birds collection at various galleries as well.

It was only when Carole started to teach 15 years ago that she realised her strong observational quality. “When I was younger I was dyslexic and that improves other senses like sight. It is the observation of things that don’t belong, and seeing

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In between travel to exotic locations, painting and teaching in her home studio and the gallery, Carole loves to meditate and hang out at her ashram in Mt Eliza.

With a bucket list of places to go, and things to do, don’t be surprised if this free spirit climbs the Himalayas one day or is spotted on the Croatian coast or in the Australian desert, or simply sitting by the bay contemplating her next adventure. www.carolefosterart.com.au


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the street art stigma E ssence

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By Kristy Martin Photos: Jarryd Bravo

Frankston artist Sheldon Headspeath is using his large colourful murals to help change people’s perceptions of street art.

W

hen Sheldon Headspeath goes about his work, it is not uncommon for people to stop and ask if he is breaking the law. While the street artist is used to turning heads with his bright and bold murals, his style of art is still a controversial means of expression and is often lumped in the same category as illegal graffiti. “People will come up and say ‘Are you allowed to do this?’” Sheldon laughs. “But these days I’ve usually got a camera set up and I’ll block off the area, so it looks a bit more professional.” Sheldon is used to capturing people’s attention with his large scale spray-painted artwork, which is regularly commissioned by schools, councils and local businesses. “I’ve just always had an interest in art, since I can remember, and just gradually sort of went from graffiti to murals,” he says of his transition from teen tagger to talented street artist. Having always lived in the Frankston area, Sheldon was commissioned to paint his first wall in Beach Street back in 2000. Requested by a local business owner to paint a mural that would cover unsightly graffiti, Sheldon realised the potential to earn an income from his creative passion. He has since painted colourful, kid-friendly murals for local schools, including schools in Balnarring, Seaford and Rosebud. “I’ve probably been to Eastbourne Primary School about five or six times. “He’s good, the principal there; he just loves it. “The kids love it too, I had classes come out and sit and watch.” Sheldon has also painted walls at cafes, gyms and footy clubs. He once collaborated with 20 other artists on a mural in the Essendon Football Club carpark that took three days to complete. A couple of years ago, he painted an impressive snake mural on a private property in Frankston and set up a time lapse video to record his efforts. In December 2015, Sheldon and his wife Karlie opened ‘State of the Art’ art supplies on Olsen Street, Frankston. The store supplies street artists with specialised paints and markers, which they would otherwise have had to travel to Melbourne for. “I’ve always gone to the city to get paint and stuff, so just thought there was a need,” Sheldon says. Street art has, in recent years, become a more widely accepted and celebrated artform throughout the world. continued next page...

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Melbourne is now internationally renowned for its thriving street art culture and designated tours to places like Hosier Lane have become major tourist attractions. But there is still that stigma surrounding graffiti and tagging. “We don’t use the word graffiti,” says Sheldon’s wife, Karlie. “Everyone looks down on graffiti, so you want to say street art. “We are a street art shop, not a graffiti shop.” Karlie says it would be good if local teenagers had a place they could go to paint. “The problem with the peninsula is that there is nowhere around here like Hosier Lane. “If there was something like that, you wouldn’t see half the graffiti that you do now.” While people under 18 are not legally allowed to purchase the aerosol paints sold at State of the Art, teenagers often visit the shop accompanied by their parents. “Some of the parents are setting up big plywood sheets for their kids to paint on in the backyard at home,” Karlie says. “Kids are bored, so they are going to steal cars, they are going to do drugs, they are going to break into people’s houses. “If they’ve got somewhere legal to paint and they can come and get paint with their parents, the parents are going to be happy because the kids are not going to get a police record.” Sheldon and Karlie enjoy providing budding artists with the tools they need to express themselves. continued next page...

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Sheldon has witnessed teens who were once addicted to drugs take up street art instead and get a new lease on life. “Every day in here is like a counselling session,” he jokes While walls are his preferred backdrop, Sheldon also paints on canvases and skateboard decks and pretty much anything else he can find. State of the Art even has its own clothing line featuring his designs. He says while the past 12 months have been up and down, he is looking forward to expanding the business to include more clothing, shoes and perhaps even art classes. He would like to teach people, particularly teenagers, about how street art is accessible to everyone and can be used as a positive means of expression. To find out more about State of the Art, search for ‘State of the Art 3199’ on Facebook or Instagram.

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“I’VE JUST ALWAYS HAD AN INTEREST IN ART, SINCE I CAN REMEMBER, AND JUST GRADUALLY SORT OF WENT FROM GRAFFITI TO MURALS.”

DRAMA Warning: Contains coarse language.

Gasworks Arts Inc

HELLO, BEAUTIFUL! Wednesday 15 March, 7.30pm | Cube 37 Hello, Beautiful! is a funny and personal evening with Hannie Rayson, one of Australia’s best-loved playwrights. In this warm, self-effacing and hilarious show, Rayson delivers a piece of sublime comic storytelling – true stories spiced with wit, tenderness and intimacy. Tickets: Adult $40, Conc $37, U30 $30 Members receive a 12% discount off full priced adult tickets.

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Frankston Arts Centre is a business unit of Frankston City Council

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Eat & Drink

RISING FROM THE ASHES By Melissa Walsh Photos: Yanni

W

hen The Baths owner, James Gibson, swore that his restaurant would be back after it was ravaged by fire, he wasn’t kidding. Exactly one year and one week after the historic beachfront structure was destroyed; The Baths has reopened better than ever. Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, the rebuilding of the iconic landmark has taken just on a year to complete and James says it has already been incredibly well received. “We are open for seven lunches and six dinners and will do seven dinners in January. We are also getting lots of community groups in, corporate groups, and golf groups - and have some weddings booked as well,” he said of the modern Australian restaurant, set on the beach at Sorrento. “The Baths are renowned for our breathtaking views and relaxed atmosphere and whether you’re joining us for dinner after a day on the beach or celebrating a special anniversary, The Baths offers a unique dining experience in a beautiful location.” As part of the rebuilding process, James says there have been many improvements, none the least is the indoor-outdoor area. “We have created an indoor-outdoor room which is set up to accommodate about 40 diners with views even better than before,” said James. “And the venue is the ideal place for a wedding. You can get married on the beach and have the reception inside, or have the restaurant as a backup venue for the ceremony. We can do sit-down weddings for 150 and cocktail style for up to 180 people.” Rich in history, The Baths was named after the Sorrento Sea Baths which were located on the current site in the late 1800s and early 1900s. “The new building has a lovely, fresh clean feel, which people have described as beach décor. We have a weatherboard exterior with recycled timber posts, timber floor and decks, white and blue interior, marble bar tops and fire place,” said James. “We have also just employed a whole lot of local staff. Our head chef is Chris Jenkins, who came from New Zealand and has cooked all over Australia and the world. It is an approachable menu, with a great kids menu, lots of fish and seafood, and the best gourmet hamburger down this way.” continued next page...

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The Baths’ passionate team of chefs have put together a menu using fresh and seasonal produce to create a variety of exciting yet simple dishes. “Our chefs can cater for all dietary requirements such as vegetarian or gluten intolerance; just let our wait staff know. The Baths is a family friendly restaurant offering a children’s menu in addition to a la carte,” said James. The Baths offers an extensive wine list with all different blends of wine by the glass so there is something for everyone to enjoy. “We have a range of popular varietals and blends, both red and white from a number of vineyards throughout Victoria, expressing true regional characteristics,” said James. James says another major improvement to the venue is the extensive acoustic plaster to minimise the noise level for customers. “It is just all part of making the venue as functional and practical as possible for our customers.” A gift voucher from The Baths can be perfect for a birthday, anniversary, milestone, business gift or a thank you. The gift voucher can be for any amount and redeemable for lunch or dinner and may carry a brief personalised message. The Baths is at 3278 Point Nepean Road, Sorrento. Phone 5984 1500. www.thebaths.com.au

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BACK IN TIME In his 1876 Guide to Sorrento, Coppin described 'The Public Bath' constructed by his Ocean Amphitheatre Company in 1874-75, as 'superior to any in the colony', with its picket enclosure extending into the bay 850 feet, a clean sandy bottom, crystal clear water, safety from large fish, and convenient dressing rooms. Red or white flags showed when it was ladies' or gents' time to swim. Men who swam in the nude got into trouble. A single bath with towel cost sixpence, but a monthly ticket was only 5 shillings. A cafĂŠ at the beach end of the jetty named The Rustic Retreat began to serve light refreshments. The Manager at that time was Ben Sutton. Later managers included Messrs Ditchburn, Jackson, Erlandsen and Webb. By the 1930s, hot sea baths and special rooms for sunbathing, springboards and rafts, motor and rowing boats for hire, were all available. In spite of all these attractions, the popularity of 'bathing paddocks' like these was to fade with increasing freedom of manners and waning prudery. By the 1970s the baths proper had all but disappeared, and the jetty, with fishermen's shed half-way along, was gradually falling to pieces. The cafĂŠ and fish and chip shop developed into one restaurant and then another, under different names, altering several times, until only a few traces could be found of the Rustic Retreat and the ticket office for the baths. Under its most recent, and appropriate, name The Baths restaurant became popular for parties and weddings as well as day to day catering ... and then, in October last year, a fire caused by an electrical fault destroyed most of the building, and the rest had to be pulled down, spoiling many party plans for the months to come. The Baths is now rebuilt on the same footprint, and back in business.

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A SIP STARTED IT ALL By Melissa Walsh Photos: Yanni

S

et among the rolling vines of the Red Hill hinterland, there’s a wonderful surprise in store when you come across the winery with the unusual name, that’s often hard to pronounce. Myrtacae Vineyard and Winery is full of interesting facts and history, the first one being the origin of the name. Combine the fact that many of the indigenous plants of the region belong to the Myrtacae botanical family, with the scientific and teaching background of owners, John and Julie Truman, and the reason is clear.

“We didn’t want to give it the usual name, and were busy planting and working on the grounds when the word myrtacae kept coming up and we thought it was perfect,” said the couple, who started the vineyard in 1985. “The other point is that half of the property is designated to protecting the greenery through the Land for Wildlife scheme so it seemed fitting.”

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The journey into becoming vineyard owners started the day the couple went on their honeymoon to the Barossa Valley 40 years ago. There they first tasted good wine and have never looked back. “That was in the 70s and wine wasn’t very big then,” said John and Julie. “We became obsessed and planted 12 vines in our backyard in Frankston as soon as we got home and the rest is history.” For the young couple, whose interest in wine and winemaking continued to grow, the next step was to buy a property. “We looked everywhere but the peninsula was our favourite spot so we bought our 14 acres and went to work,” said the couple insisting that it was a huge learning curve. “It was a massive challenge for us but we persisted because we are very passionate about what we do. We have learnt the hard way though. Our first vines were cabernet which is how we found out cabernet doesn’t grow in the hinterland.”


Today, the vineyard produces award-winning chardonnay and pinot noir, with new addition of rose; the result of their son Glyn taking a keen interest in winemaking. “We have just released our rose called Selwyn’s Fault, which won an award at the 2016 MPVA show. We were delighted as our son was very passionate about the project,” they said. And it seems the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree in more than just winemaking. Glyn came up with the name Selwyn as a play on words; Selwyn is both he and his father’s middle name and it also is the scientific name of one of the two fault lines that formed the Mornington Peninsula. These days, Myrtacae has two and a half acres under vine and a cellar door that’s open on weekends and public holidays, a far cry from the property when it was full of blackberries with just a house on it. The relaxed atmosphere the couple have created clearly comes from their own laid back attitude, and a genuine love for their wine. “We are still learning as we go but have a good system in place,” said Julie, who is the winemaker, while John takes care of the vineyard. “Opening the cellar door in 2004 was great too as it meant we got a chance to meet the customers and give them a bit of understanding into the Myrtacae label.” For John, meeting the customers has become one of the best parts of the job. “You get to meet so many people, and learn all about them, both locals and visitors,” he said. The couple are also very proud of being the only winery with the Riedel rolling taster glasses. “These glasses provide the best way to let people experience the full flavour of our wines. It’s great seeing their face when they sip a wine and then roll it and take another sip. It’s like we have opened a whole new world to them,” said Julie. Perhaps it’s the passion of the owners, or the fact that they do all the work themselves that makes this boutique winery a real standout on the peninsula. “When you grow the grapes and make the wine yourself on your own property, there is such a sense of satisfaction to see people enjoying it,” they said. Myrtacae Vineyard and Winery is at 53 Main Creek Road, Main Ridge. Phone 5989 2045. www.myrtacae.com.au

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LOVING LIFE BY THE SEA By Melissa Walsh

T

he opening of Alatonero a few months ago meant that head chef Graeme Walter could combine his two great loves – working by the beach and cooking incredible food.

The 31 year old who everybody calls ‘Ginger’ started his cooking career further inland in the beautiful Yarra Valley. However, once he and his partner, Sarah, discovered the peninsula, they knew this is where they needed to be. “I’ve been working kitchens for 16 years, starting with washing dishes after school at the local clubs and pubs. I’d get off the bus and go over and do dishes. At first I just wanted to work, but eventually I decided to do an apprenticeship at what was then called the Yarra Valley Dairy, and made a career as a chef,” says Graeme from the beachside restaurant, Alatonero. “Once I qualified at 18 I took off and worked on the islands for a few years.” Doing his apprenticeship and training in the very formal old school French techniques has served Graeme well, giving him the work and life skills he needed to master all cuisines.

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“I started out in the Yarra Valley doing my apprenticeship first at the Yarra Valley Dairy, then the Sebel, and qualified with chefs that taught me how to cook the hard way,” says Graeme. “It was the best experience anyone could have with incredible mentors.” For this well-travelled chef, coming down to the peninsula to live and work happened by chance after a holiday with his partner 12 years ago. “It was in 2005 and Sarah and I came down here for a weekend. As soon as we got here we loved it, and fell in love with the water, the farms and the restaurants. We stayed down here for two nights, went home, packed a bag and came straight back down to live,” he said. As a testament to their determination, the young couple lived in a tent on the Rosebud foreshore for the first four months. “We were both working at Stillwater at Crittenden at the time and Sarah would do her hair and makeup in the tent and I would iron my chef ’s uniform,” he said. “Eventually we moved out and bought a house in Capel Sound, which we are still in today.”


Working at various venues across the peninsula over the years, Graeme says he continues to learn and be inspired. “I became friends with the owners of Stillwater at Crittenden, Zac and Jacqui, and met and started working with Chef Pierre Khodja from Flinders Hotel, who really taught me how to be a man, and lead from the front. This is what I have brought with me to my own staff now. I make sure I am the first to get here and the last to leave as I believe it is all about example,” said Graeme. As for the transition from French cuisine to Greek, Graeme says it is quite simple. “With Jacqui and Zac, who now own Alatonero, having a love affair for Santorini, it was a no-brainer starting a Greek restaurant here and the cooking transformation has been fairly easy. Once you know how to cook it’s simple and this restaurant is about representing authentic Greek cuisine which is basically good fresh produce with simple flavours cooked well. It’s all about good honest cooking with no pretention. There’s not a massive difference when it comes to the treating of the elements. It’s just about getting into the mind-set of the Greek people, with lots of food and big feasts,” said Graeme, who has incorporated classic Greek dishes with some locally grown elements. “I love wandering along and collecting fresh saltbush which I often add to dishes like the lamb shoulder. At the moment one of my favourite things is using the charcoal oven so I use that for heaps of dishes. The one I love is the octopus served on fava with house pickles and wild fennel,” he said.

Alatonera has been lovingly and painstakingly put together by the very people who work there, with Graeme and his sous chef, Anthony, working tirelessly day and night to get the kitchen and venue up to scratch. “We would work here for days on end, scrubbing and cleaning the kitchen, on our hands and knees till it was perfect, and now we have a wonderful venue to show for it,” said Graeme. And Alatonero is all the better for it, with a wonderful, welcoming family atmosphere that the Greeks are famous for. Bright, breezy and bursting with the Mediterranean colours of Santorini, the restaurant across the road from the water offers a stunning mezze style menu of all the Greek delicacies, including saganaki, fried calamari with harissa aioli, chargrilled octopus with wild fennel, fava and pickles, slow roasted lamb shoulder with caper berries, dill, cucumber, saltbush and Moussaka. As for Graeme, life doesn’t get much better than working as a much respected chef on the peninsula, and having his beloved water just metres away from him where he often takes a dip at break time. Alatonero is at 671 Point Nepean Rd, McCrae. Phone 5981 1202. www.alatonero.com.au

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Recipe RECIPE CHARGRILLED OCTOPUS, FAVA, PICKLES AND WILD FENNELL INGREDIENTS THE OCTOPUS 1kg Fremantle octopus hands 2lt water 250ml Greek red wine vinegar 250ml lemon juice Bay leaf Pepper Salt

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THE PICKLE 100g carrots sliced 100g cauliflower pieces 100g red onion sliced 1lt water 100ml good wine vinegar 150g caster sugar

February 2017

THE FAVA 500g split dried yellow peas Water to cover and rinse 60g peeled aussie garlic 250ml kalamata olive oil Sea salt

THE FENNEL This time of year... and almost all year round I like to pick mine each day from boneo road, but really can be found almost anywhere, so keep an eye out


METHOD OCTOPUS Combine all liquids, spices, salt in pot bring to boil, skim, check seasoning. Shock the octopus in the liquid... this is done by dunking the octopus 3 times for 10 seconds. each time, then fully submerge and simmer for 25 mins... or until tender. Remove the octopus from liquid and chill with a damp cloth covering to stop drying out. PICKLE Combine water, sugar, vinegar bring to boil pure over the vegetables "individualy" cover and allow to cool. FAVA Soak the peas covered in water for 30mins, change water and rinse thoroughly, cover peas with water in pot and bring to boil skim the foam and add garlic,

cooks until tender and and water is all but gone, with a stick blender pure adding lemon juice, olive oil and salt, check seasoning. TO PLATE Roast the octopus over hot coals until warm and tender "a bit more if you like it smoky!" and dress with olive oil and lemon juice Warm the fava and use for a base for the octopus. Add your pickles "as much as you like". Garnish with your wild fennell... sometimes you can find the fennel pollen, I like to add a little for sweetness. Enjoy with a chilled grigio or golden ale. opa!

Alatonero is at Alatonero is at 671 Point Nepean Rd, McCrae. Phone 5981 1202. www.alatonero.com.au

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Dishes

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Baghdad Eggs

Glazey Eye

Strawberries & Cream Pancakes

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Commonfolk Coffee

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675 Point Nepean Road, McCrae Phone 5986 3385 www.merchantmaker.com.au

Baked scallops in the half shell with garlic and herb butter, topped with prosciutto crumb

Mornington Symphony Porkestra

Fish and chips

The Boathouse

16 Progress Street, Mornington Phone 5902 2786 www.commonfolkcoffee.com.au

366 Nepean Highway, Frankston Phone 9770 5330 www.theboathouserestaurant.com.au

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Commonfolk Coffee

Blue Mini Eatery Emporium Events 2 Colchester Road (corner Borneo Road), Rosebud Phone 5981 2520 www.bluemini.com.au


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History

The murder at Foxey’s Hangout By Lance Hodgins

N

ear the top end of Hodgins Road is an historic site. “Foxey’s Hangout” has been a tourist attraction on the Mornington Peninsula for over 70 years. A large gum tree at the intersection of Balnarring and Tubbarubba Roads was the place where two local trappers held a friendly competition by displaying their fox catch each year.

It all started in 1936 when Jack Johnson came into the district looking for work. To Herbert Downward of “Maxwelton” the 55 year-old seemed a likeable chap, so he arranged some trapping jobs and a place for him to stay on his property. As time went by, he realised that Jack had an interesting story to tell. His real name was Philip Elmer Johnson and he came from Latrobe, near Devonport, Tasmania. His grandmother, “Dolly”, was quite famous - reputedly the first legally registered half-caste Tasmanian, the product of a white sealer and his aboriginal partner. Although Dolly and her husband became very successful in farming and business, they also had 13 children which meant that the family farm, “Sherwood Hall”, was eventually split up. By the time grandson Jack was of working age, there was little family inheritance left and he found he was a farm labourer with no property of his own.

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When First World War broke out, it seemed like a good idea for Jack to enlist. Although he was small in stature - only 1.68m tall and weighing 64kg – he was relatively mature at 34, and single. In no time he found himself in the Middle East. Unfortunately, Jack had serious problems coping with the stress of army life and saw little more than the insides of various hospitals in and around Cairo. Within months he was discharged suffering “general nervous disability”and he returned to civilian life in Tasmania. This was no more successful and his constant drinking led to several encounters with the law, and by the early 1930s Jack was really suffering. He had lost both of his parents and he was having trouble obtaining his war service bond from the government. He decided to try the mainland and drifted around several old goldfields before he ended up on the Peninsula - where he may well have been drawn to the old goldfields of Tubbarubba. Herbert Downward owned a large grazing property nearby and when someone recommended Jack as “the champion fox catcher of the island state”, he thought he would give him a go. He gave Jack 30 traps and set him to work protecting his sheep. Jack proved to be good at his job. He would proudly hang his catch of assorted wildlife on the various fences of the area.


Left: Jack working timber on "Maxwelton" in 1938. (Balnarring & District Historical Society). Right: Jack Johnson

He kept busy earning his fox levies, prospecting on the old diggings, cutting wood, and doing assorted odd jobs for Downward and his neighbours, the Firths and the Heggens. Jack was a good worker. He was “on the wagon” as far as alcohol was concerned and Downward grew to like and respect this barely literate but highly trustworthy fellow. When the neighbours gathered for a beer and a chat around the table at “Maxwelton”, he would prefer a cup of tea instead. On one of those evenings when the boys had gathered for a yarn, a friendly banter broke out between Jack and one neighbour, Lou Connell, who prided himself on being a great hunter. Each man bragged of having the better trapping ability. To settle matters, it was decided that each man would hang his fox catch on a double-trunked tree situated between their two properties, and Downward would oversee and adjudicate the result. Jack would use one trunk of the tree and Lou the other in a friendly competitive display. And so the tradition of “Foxey’s Hangout” was begun. Draped continued next page...

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with carcases, the tree soon became a popular tourist attraction as passing motorists eagerly waited to see the outcome of each year’s catch of foxes. Visitors, especially American servicemen during the war years, soon marked it on their maps as a point of interest. The Foxey’s Hangout story, however, does not have a happy ending. By the end of World War 2 Jack had left the Downward property and moved into a hut on a nearby property. Two Hastings orchardists, Frank and Les Whitten, had bought Connell’s large grazing property at the top of Hodgins Road and they installed “Old Jack” in the hut as caretaker.

In mid-July, 1946, Frank noticed that Jack had been missing for a few days, but he was not overly concerned. Jack may have taken off for a visit to his family in Tasmania, or he may have gone away for a few days with his new friend, a “city fella”, who had moved in to share the hut and chores a few weeks earlier. Downward, however, was not so sure. The barely literate Jack had always trusted and relied upon the Downwards to read him his letters from home. They had always made the arrangements for Jack’s previous trips. No such plans had been made. Five days later, Fitzroy CIB received a sobbing phone call from a person claiming to have murdered a man on a farm at Hastings. Local police were contacted and, on the night of Wednesday July Above: Foxey's Hangout during the war years. Left: Foxey's Hangout still displaying the district's catches in the 1960's. Below: Dick Downward and Jack Johnson had many happy times on the Downward property. (Balnarring & District

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17th, local Constables Gosling and Lamprell paid a visit to the Whitten property. No-one was in the house, but numerous 12 gauge shotgun pellets were noticed embedded in a gumtree near the wood heap, indicating that a shotgun had been fired at close range from the back doorway of the house. Drag marks through the leaves and chips led the constables to a low-limbed wattle tree, 25 feet northwest of the hut, where they found Jack’s body lying face down under a sheet of tin. There were gunshot and axe wounds to the back of his head. A subsequent report stated that death was caused by a fracture of the skull, laceration of the brain, and shotgun wounds. On searching the water tank they found three axes and the dead man’s hat riddled with shot pellets. In the hut was a shotgun containing a discharged cartridge. Earlier that day, the city detectives had recognised the identity of the sobbing phone caller and had implored him to come into the Fitzroy police station. When Trevor McKenzie, 46, a tailor, entered the station later that afternoon he made a full statement of confession. McKenzie’s story was that he had gone to live with Jack six weeks earlier to “get away from the city” and to “straighten himself out”. They seemed to be always arguing about little things – sometimes about the “horrible” program on the radio and at other times about “inadequate” food supplies. On the morning of the shooting, they had an argument about sitting in front of the fire. About 11am, Jack went outside to gather eggs from the fowl yard and, as he returned to the hut, McKenzie “let him have it with the shotgun – both barrels”. Then, in a mad frenzy, he had “picked up an axe and hit him on the head with the back of it.” Detective Heath had no hesitation in charging McKenzie with murder and he was remanded without bail. By the time of his trial, however, McKenzie’s story had changed considerably. He claimed that he had nothing to do with Johnson’s death. There had been two arguments that fateful morning, after which it was he who had left the hut to stack timber on another part of the property, a quarter of a mile away. When he returned an hour later he stated that he found Jack’s body lying on the hut wood heap with an axe beside it. McKenzie denied he had shot him or battered him with anything.

Above: Jack Johnson Below: Johnson's hut in relation to Foxey's Hangout.

He claimed that, since they had argued, he feared the police would not believe him and arrest him instead. In a panicked state, he threw the axe into the tank and, after considering throwing the body in there as well, he hid it under some sheets of tin. Next he changed his clothes, which he did not remember doing, and found himself boarding the train at Frankston. McKenzie went into Melbourne and began drinking heavily. He scoured the newspapers daily, but when no report of the finding of a body appeared, he thought he must be going mad and simply imagining things. He then contacted the police in a fragile mental state and made a statement to Detective Heath, none of which he remembered. He had certainly not fired any shots at Johnson or beaten him with an axe. It took a jury three hours to agree that a murder had been committed. But they also found that McKenzie was of an unsound mind and therefore unfit to plead. After considerable legal discussion, however, Justice Lowe explained that he could not accept their verdict. The question of sanity had never been considered in the trial.

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Forced to retire for a second time, the jury returned with a verdict of guilty of murder, with a strong recommendation for mercy, which Justice Lowe assured would be passed on to the proper authorities. He then sentenced the prisoner to death. Over the following two months, McKenzie made several unsuccessful attempts to appeal against his death sentence. Just when all seemed lost, however, the State Executive Council finally reviewed the prisoner’s medical report and considered the jury’s recommendation for mercy. The death sentence was commuted to life imprisonment with remissions. Twelve years later in 1958, suffering deteriorating health and with not long to live, Trevor Francis Sanderson McKenzie was released from gaol. The locals were asking just who was this Trevor McKenzie? When Detective Heath of Fitzroy CIB had picked up the phone and the caller sobbed “I think I have killed a man at Hastings”, he recognised the voice. Trevor McKenzie had a list of prior convictions as long as his arm and his unfortunate life had seen him constantly in trouble with the police and repeatedly being sent to gaol. Born in 1900 to a Bendigo foundry worker, he had moved to Melbourne at 14 after his mother died. Although he was only 1.64m tall and 54kg he enlisted in the army 16 and spent 1917-18 on the battlefields of France. The teenage veteran soldier came home to commence life as an adult in an Australia that was returning to normal after “the War to

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end all Wars”. He found employment as a tailor’s presser, married a 21 year old schoolteacher from Geelong and fathered two children. It was not long, however, before he felt the need to supplement his income by other means. After a number of burglaries he was caught and sentenced to three years in HM Pentridge Prison. His wife divorced him and took custody of the children. On his release, it was only eleven days before he stole again, was quickly arrested, and sentenced to another three months in prison. After a brief stint on his sister’s farm in Boort, the bright lights and “opportunity” beckoned McKenzie once more. In January of 1932 he was sentenced to 12 months in gaol for stealing a wireless from an unattended car parked in busy Bourke St in the City. In the January of 1936, during one of his brief stints of freedom, he was enjoying the fresh seaside air of Rosebud when he befriended a tram driver from Melbourne. Three weeks later, McKenzie landed on his new friend’s doorstep in Brunswick begging for help so he was allowed to use the sleep-out at the back of the house rent free. When possessions went missing, McKenzie was apprehended by the police with pawn tickets for the items. By the time of his trial in March, McKenzie was already in custody, having been sentenced in Dromana Court to six months in prison for another crime he had committed whilst on the Peninsula that summer. The Brunswick theft added a further six months to his prison term. In handing down his sentence, the Judge labelled McKenzie as “most ungrateful in robbing a man who had befriended him” and suggested there was “very little good about him”.


After serving his time in Pentridge, McKenzie was again arrested In September 1939. Admitting ten prior convictions, he was given 3 to 5 years for larceny and receiving. This time he spent most of the war years in prison. Just out of gaol in October 1943, McKenzie ostensibly headed for a fresh start in the country and set up a tailoring service in Camperdown, where he was welcomed at the RSL as a returned digger. Within a few months, however, he had “done a runner” and he was not seen again for a couple of years. Ironically it was for another fresh start in the country that led McKenzie to Foxey’s Hangout to share a hut in 1946 with Jack Johnson. At right, there are no longer real foxes at Foxey's Hangout today. The tree has been replanted, and an information board provided. The memory of Jack Johnson lives on. This story is one of the chapters in the recently published book "It happened here - People and events in Hastings' past" by local historian Lance Hodgins. Copies are available from the author for $15. Ring Lance on 5979 2576.

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Corner

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ACROSS 1. Dream up 6. Ineffectual 11. Self-important 15. Firearm 16. Denture 17. Fashioning 18. Relieve 21. Pencil rubbers 22. Available at premises (2-4) 23. Striking tool 24. University compositions 28. Difficulty 30. Drug addict 32. Penny-pinching 35. Borders on 37. Snooze through alarm (5,2) 38. Under way (of plan) 40. Offence 43. Generators 45. In pursuit of 47. Finances 48. Overlooked 52. Irish Republican Army (1,1,1) 53. Military equipment 56. Set flush with surface 58. Less industrious 60. Nunneries 61. Small ducks 62. Express road 64. Spy group (1,1,1) 65. Toddler 67. Gradually abolish (5,3) 69. Considerable 72. Heavenly 75. Paper rounds 77. Eye part 78. Dry 79. Abate 81. Aviator, Amelia ... 83. Food professionals 84. American lizards 86. Wolf's cry 87. Utilisation 90. Leotard fabric 92. Twinge (of pain) 93. Grins 95. Funeral procession 96. Hiker 98. Buddies 99. Consume (3,2) 100. Lower leg joint 101. Hurting 102. Thunderous sound

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103. Peruse quickly 104. Unit of power 106. Basil sauce for pasta 110. Carved brooch 113. Male children 115. Trounce 116. Cold-blooded animal 117. Patriotic hymn 118. Sleazy gaze 119. Zones 122. N African nation 125. Parsley or mint 126. Retribution 127. Of shipping 129. Stricter 130. Flexible pipe 131. The one here 132. Wine vat 133. India/China continent 134. Douse 137. Apparition 138. Lauded 142. Cloth scrap 143. 2240 lbs 145. Aerosol container (5,3) 146. Wood-shaping machine 149. Rebellious youth 151. Joined forces, ... up 152. Red/yellow mix 154. Inventions 156. Confer knighthood on 157. Receding 159. Houston's state 161. Mexican dip 163. Herring relative 168. Henpecking 171. Whiff 172. Trembles 176. Secreted amount 177. Sharper 180. Double 181. Electric cord 183. Terse 187. Felt hat 188. Judges, ... up 190. US cotton state 191. Market on TV 192. Proceed (from) 193. Dopey, Doc or Bashful 194. Formed (of conclusion) 195. Water boilers 196. Bullfighters 197. Ringlets

February 2017

DOWN 1. Magazine edition 2. Yawning gulf 3. Frostily 4. Therefore 5. Compensates for 6. Achievements 7. Glacial period (3,3) 8. Out of action (4,2) 9. Throwing weapon 10. Foist (upon) (4,3) 11. Lord 12. Intended 13. Marine world 14. Coward 19. Camera glass 20. At that time 25. Actor, ... Neill 26. Of hearing 27. Sink in middle 29. Healing gel, ... vera 31. Properly positioned, in ... 32. Pig enclosure 33. Cross 34. Slimy gunk 36. 50s bohemians 39. Car distance gauge 40. Arm bone 41. Troubling 42. In truth 44. Beauty queen's ribbon 46. Travel by bike 47. Trip over 49. Respected expert 50. Beginning of era 51. Warps 53. Lounge seat 54. Liqueur, Tia ... 55. Tidy 57. Sloping (typeface) 59. Michaelmas daisies 63. Adore 66. Giveaway 67. Sacred songs 68. Sometimes, once in ... (1,5) 70. Onto terra firma 71. Hooked (fish) with pole 73. Allow 74. Hire agreements 76. Printed bulletins 80. Stargazers 82. Corrosion 85. Gape stupidly 88. View favourably 89. Choux pastries

90. Parasites 91. Risked 94. Overhanging roof edges 97. Comic actor & director, Woody ... 104. Reneges (on debt) 105. Two's company, ... a crowd (5'1) 106. Glossy shoe material, ... leather 107. Coarse tobacco 108. Spend freely, ... out 109. Mauve shrubs 111. Horse's neck hair 112. Extra people 113. Execute on the block 114. Holy day of rest 120. Redecorates 121. Took turns at 123. Cruelty 124. Sundry 127. Worry 128. Last-mentioned 135. Expect 136. Raw 139. Tehran natives 140. Antelope 141. Fencing sword 144. Cab 147. Tallies 148. Fireside shelves 150. Plays (the fool) 153. Highly excited 155. Cosmetics house, Elizabeth... 158. Beer 160. Greenish blue 162. Land measure 164. Primate 165. And not 166. Solar timepiece 167. Marks of shame 169. So! 170. Kip 172. Rectangular courtyard 173. Claim 174. Exhilarated 175. Cuts timber 177. Flair 178. Precise 179. Internet post 180. Rough sketch 182. Accomplishments 184. Reproach 185. Russian mountains 186. Maples & poplars 187. Current crazes 189. Transmitted Š Lovatts Puzzles


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Somerville

on

Somerville is a township and coastal rural locality in Victoria, Australia, 53 km southeast from Melbourne's central business district, as a part of the urban enclave on Western Port comprising Somerville, Hastings, Bittern, Crib Point, and Tyabb. The official population of Somerville as of the 30th June 2015 is 11,243. The size of Somerville is approximately 38 km².

SOMERVILLE FACTS Originally an orchard town, Somerville has experienced significant population growth over the last twenty years. The town was known during the early 1900s up until World War Two for the fruit which was produced in its orchards. A harvest festival was held once a year and special trains ran from Flinders Street Station to the town during the festival. The township was once located on Lower Somerville Road, with several original buildings still there today. Somerville Post Office opened on 21 November 1870 and closed in 1893. The railway came to Somerville in September 1889. The station was a mile or so from Lower Somerville Road and the town centre moved from there to its current site during the 1890s. Somerville Railway Station Post Office opened on 15 August 1890 and was renamed Somerville in 1907. In August 2009 two teenagers burnt down the original station. The Somerville Hotel was built in the early 1900s as well as a Mechanics' Hall which formed part of the Station Street

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February 2017

shopping strip. The north side of the station street lining the railway had historical buildings which were burnt down in 1987 as an act of vandalism. The Somerville war memorial was unveiled on November 4, 1923 at the intersection of Frankston Flinders Road and Eramosa Road West. With the increasing population and traffic, the memorial was moved from this busy intersection to Clarinda Street in 1966. From November 2014 to April 2015 the memorial was moved from Clarinda Street to the Fruit growers Reserve. The cenotaph was restored with markers surrounding it telling the residents the history of the area. Trees were also planted surrounding the memorial remembering the lost soldiers. An avenue of honour was originally located on Eramosa Road East where road was lined with plane trees in 1917. Each tree represented a resident who fought in World War 1 in Somerville. These trees were removed by the local Shire and footpaths laid in their place in the 1970s. In early 2013 a new avenue of honour of ornamental pear trees was planted along Station Street. continued next page...

COFFEE SAFARI Fresh brewed coffee is a must have for weekends away and Somerville coffee is second to none with great coffee haunts around the town. Here are a few to check out when head down to this beautiful end of the world.

DUCKY BROWN CAFÉ 17 Eramosa Road West Fabulous coffee and a great selection of hot and cold food, Ducky Brown Café has a relaxed vibe and plenty of tables.

ERAMOSA COFFEE HOUSE 17/17 Eramosa Road West Best coffee, shakes and burgers, this coffee house offers a taste of Melbourne on the peninsula.

FAMILY RETREAT MINI PLAY CAFÉ 18/49 Eramosa Rd West Perfect mums’ getaway, this café is set up for mums to relax with a good coffee while the children play amongst the toys.

MISS MOOSE TUCK SHOP 1/25 Grant Road A great place to have breakfast and a coffee in a casual, trendy setting.


WHAT TO DO? A township and coastal rural locality in Victoria, Somerville is 53 km southeast from Melbourne's central business district, as a part of the urban enclave on Western Port. The official population of Somerville as of the 30th June 2015 is 11,243. The size of Somerville is approximately 38 km². Originally an orchard town, Somerville has experienced significant population growth over the last twenty years. There are plenty of places to eat from kid friendly venues like the Family Retreat CafÊ and the renovated Somerville Hotel, to international cuisine with Indian, Thai and Chinese restaurants all within a few kilometres of each other. Enjoy horse riding at the Willow Lodge Riding Ranch, or check out the dinosaurs at Dinosaur World. Photography: Yanni

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janine harrison,

the key to all your real estate needs. Call today for personalised service and professional real estate advice. Janine offers free market appraisals, with an extensive knowledge and passion for the stunning Mornington Peninsula and surrounding areas.

The Somerville Fruitgrowers Reserve once held annual festivals every year to celebrate the local fruit growers in the area. Following World War 2 the people of the area donated a period cannon to the community reserve. In recent years the local Shire sold this cannon for scrap. The Mechanics' Hall is a popular venue for local bands to play and do small school plays. On January 7, 2015 a massive storm ravaged Somerville and neighbouring town Tyabb ripping off the roof of the hall. The roof was later restored the following week. A clay quarry is owned and operated by The Bayport Group on 9 pottery road Somerville, digging to a depth of 30 metres over 60 acres. This was the original site of Peninsula Pottery which operated from 1901 to 1991 making bricks for some of the historical buildings in Somerville including St. Andrews Anglican Church, and The Somerville Hotel in 1901, but all historical kilns and the chimney were knocked down and removed in 2004. Inghams has a large factory north of Somerville that employs a large number of the town’s population. The median house price in Somerville is $450,000 and unit is $325,000. The Somerville Police Complex opened in 2016.

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To start your campaign contact 0487 000 666 or admin@janineharrisonrealestate.com.au Janineharrisonrealestate.com.au

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First Lesson

Free!

* DIETITIAN & DOCTOR DESIGNED, CHEF PREPARED, HOME DELIVERED

REAL. EASY. HEALTHY.

Our scientifically formulated and delicious meals are designed for both rapid weight loss and healthy eating whilst meeting your nutritional needs. Why are we different? We only use REAL FOOD with no added sugar, nothing artificial, and 4-12 vegetables per meal. Visit our shop at 19 Eramosa Road East, Somerville *conditions apply 55 Grant Rd, Somerville VIC 3912 5977 7711 www.somerville.ymca.org.au

Open Mon - Fri 9.00am - 5.00pm Sat 9.00am - 12.00pm NEW STORE OPENING - FEBRUARY 2/49 Mornington Tyabb Road, Mornington Please Call 1300 263 257 or email us at info@befitfood.com.au

February 2017

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Sorrento

MANSION FOR SALE

THE RICH HISTORY OF NEE MORNA

By Melissa Walsh

A

nother of the Mornington Peninsula’s historic seaside mansions, Sorrento’s Nee Morna, is being offered for sale for only the second time in more than 100 years. Nee Morna is one of the original, historical mansions of Sorrento and its ownership, including the prime, clifftop land on which it sits overlooking Sorrento and Port Phillip Bay has been held by prominent Australian families since its establishment, including George Coppin, and Walter Howard Smith. The sale of the largest residential landholding on the southern peninsula coast comes just months after part of the former Moondah estate in Mt Eliza sold for close to $40 million. CBRE, the agents who sold the Kunyung Rd property, has been appointed to sell the 3106 – 3118 Point Nepean Rd property on behalf of the Lipe family – headed by New York-based banker, Alex Lipe. CBRE expects the property – on four separate titles – to sell for more than $20 million. The land has views of Sorrento and Port Phillip. Expressions of interest in Nee Morna close 3pm 28 February.

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Nee Morna is one of the original, historical mansions of Sorrento and its ownership, including the prime, clifftop land on which it sits overlooking Sorrento and Port Phillip Bay has been held by prominent Australian families since its establishment, including George Coppin, and Walter Howard Smith.

Original site purchased in 1875 by George Coppin, the ‘Father of Sorrento’. The estate was purchased in 1875, together with other prime land in Sorrento totalling 95 hectares by The Ocean Amphitheatre Company, a company formed by George Coppin to promote Sorrento as an exclusive seaside resort, principally for residents of Melbourne and its visitors.

In 1882, George Coppin and his partner Peter Nettleton purchased the property from the Ocean Amphitheatre Company and, in 1892; Mr. Nettleton became the sole owner of the property.

The property was then purchased by Walter Howard Smith in 1909. Mr. Howard Smith was one of Australia’s most successful shipping merchants who, together with his brothers, built the Howard Smith Co. formed by their father, in 1854, into Australia’s leading shipping company. By this time, Sorrento had become the premier summer


Real Estate

resort for wealthy Melbourne families and, while his younger brother, Bellingham Howard Smith, built “Colwyn” just beyond the Sorrento village, Walter built “Nee Morna” atop the “first sister”.

Sometime after it was completed, Nee Morna was described as: “one of the finest residences around the bay, built on a hill commanding a magnificent panorama of the ocean, bay and surrounding country, and replete with every modern convenience, having its own electric lighting system and sewerage, private jetty, with large boathouse, bathing pool, and bathing box”. (Argus newspaper, 15 September 1923)

The Nee Morna Estate, both the historical mansion and its prominent location on the clifftop visible for 360 degrees from the bay to the backbeach and along the coast in each direction, has captured the imaginations of visitors, residents and mariners, alike, since it was built.

The property even caught the attention of one of Australia’s most prominent artists, Sir Arthur Streeton who, while staying with friends in 1921, painted “Sorrento from Point King” depicting Nee Morna in the distance sitting proudly on the clifftop overlooking the bay.

February 2017

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168 Main Street Mornington VIC 3931 T. 03 5975 6888 Balnarring

For Sale

7 Azure Avenue, Balnarring Flawless Modern Luxury By The Village A style statement from start to finish, this sublime custom-designed residence has been expertly crafted with the strength of natural stone and the openness of glass to create a superb living environment in a quiet setting just a few minutes’ walk from vibrant Balnarring Village. Feature rich and built on green credentials, the four-bedroom, 3.5-bathroom residence is crafted into three distinct wings linked by a glassed gallery walkway flanked with bi-fold doors that offers the ultimate in family living and entertaining. Features northern living/dining, luxurious Madagascan granite kitchen, generous 2nd living room, two en suites, spa bathroom, rear deck and balcony. The sustainable design incudes solar electricity/hot water, 45,000 litre underground water tank and double glazed windows alongside every mod con! For Sale Inspect As advertised of by appointment Contact Robert Bowman 0417 173 103 Damian Smith 0481 875 243 bowmanandcompany.com.au

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bowmanandcompany.com.au


168 Main Street Mornington VIC 3931 T. 03 5975 6888 Moorooduc

Auction

234 Coolart Road, Moorooduc Magniďƒžcent Lifestyle Property This stunning five acre (Approx.) property with a floodlit sand based arena delivers a flawless family environment set in picturesque country surroundings with a magnificent north-facing four-bedroom, two-bathroom home spilling out to an entertaining mecca staged around a 13-metre heated pool, covered lounge and cabana with heated spa. Highlights include three living areas including a billiards room with bar, dining room with bi-fold doors, superb Corian entertainer’s kitchen, surround sound, post and rail fencing with interlinked paddocks and day yards, huge multi-purpose barn with bathroom and extensive shedding within close proximity to shopping villages, schools, beaches and Peninsula Link. Auction Saturday 25th February at 12.00pm Inspect As advertised of by appointment Contact Ayden Nelson 0419 447 038 Robert Bowman 0417 173 103 bowmanandcompany.com.au

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bowmanandcompany.com.au


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