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Thanks for giving

Wednesday Chance of a snow shower; still cold C12

Past donors to Peninsula Home Fund hailed C1

Peninsula Daily News November 24, 2010

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

50 cents

Sequim’s new police chief isn’t full-time He works fewer days to protect pension benefits By Paul Gottlieb

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — New Police Chief Bill Dickinson, who is paid $93,000 a year and receives full

city benefits, does not work full time, City Manager Steve Burkett confirmed Tuesday. Rather, Dickinson, hired Sept. 7, takes a few extra days off each month to protect law enforcement retirement benefits of almost $70,000 annually, Dickinson said Tuesday. Dickinson works what amounts to 21.5 days fewer

annually than employees who work 40 hours a week and 52 weeks a year and who total 2,080 hours a year, not including vacations and holidays, Burkett said. “I’ve heard lots of people raising concerns about this,” Burkett said, adding that Dickinson is salaried and doesn’t punch a clock. “One rumor said he was working half time.”

Dickinson said he objects to being referred to as part time. “The correct term is less than full time,” Dickinson said. “‘Part time’ suggests a person who works 20 hours a week. “A couple of citizens talked to me about it and said, ‘Gee, you’re part time,’ and I said, ‘I only work four weeks a month.’ They looked at me like that doesn’t sound like part time.

“Four weeks a month is virtually full time, but it’s just short,” Dickinson said. To maintain his state law enforcement pension, Dickinson, 60, does not work more than 159 hours a month — a day less than four full workweeks — and does not work more than 1,908 hours a year, Burkett said. Turn

to

Sequim/A5

Tricky driving, but no major wrecks Temperatures warming on Thanksgiving By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Under sunny skies, Kelli Sweeney, co-owner of Cherry Hill Florist shop in Port Angeles, chips away at an icy sidewalk in front of the Cherry Street store Tuesday.

La Niña right on schedule Peninsula Daily News news sources

The coldest snap in 25 years is expected — thankfully — to end after today as the mercury turns upward on Thanksgiving Day. Above-freezing temperatures and rain, not snow, are forecast for the lowland areas of the North Olympic Peninsula starting Thanksgiving night, according to the National Weather Service. But that will come after a chilly overnight today that could dip as low as 12 degrees in Port Angeles, 14 in Sequim and 19 in Port Townsend, the Weather Service predicted Tuesday. And maybe a hint of snow on the East End. If the temperature dips to 12 degrees in Port Angeles, that will break a record of 13 for the date that was set in the November blast of 1985. Turn

to

Cold/A4

Motorists are playing it safe in the wake of Monday’s snowstorm. No major wrecks were reported in the region as of Tuesday evening. But the partially melted surfaces froze solid overnight, causing another day of tricky driving on the North Olympic Peninsula. Through Tuesday morning, the National Weather Service reported total snow accumulations of 13 inches five miles southwest of Sequim, 11 inches near the Lower Elwha Klallam tribal reservation, 9.7 inches just southwest of Port Angeles, 7.6 inches at Mount Pleasant and 1 inch seven miles west of Forks. The Port Townsend, Chimacum and Port Hadlock areas each received about 4 inches of snow

Also . . . ■ Some schools open, some schools call it a week/A4 ■ Warming shelter to stay open in Port Angeles/A5 ■ AccuWeather’s five-day Peninsula forecast/C12

during the storm. The National Weather Service said things will begin to warm up on Thanksgiving Day. The forecast calls for cloudy skies with a balmy high of 44 in the lowlands Thursday. “We have some light precipitation moving into the area on Thanksgiving,” said Dennis D’Amico, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Seattle. “There’s a chance it could start off briefly as snow.”

said about 5,000 West End customers lost power shortly before midnight Monday when a tree fell into a power line. Electricity was restored at 7:30 a.m. Tuesday. The PUD reported small, scattered outages on Tuesday afternoon. “Nothing real major,” Howe said. Puget Sound Energy, which provides electricity to most of east Jefferson County, reported 376 outages in Quilcene and 82 in Port Townsend as of 5:55 p.m. Tuesday

No injury wrecks

The State Patrol reported no injury wrecks as of Tuesday evening. Port Angeles Deputy Police Chief Brian Smith reported a dramatic decrease in wrecks Tuesday from Monday. Outages Port Angeles police had to stack calls on Monday, but TuesMany in the Forks area will day, Smith said: “I don’t know of welcome a warming trend after a any accidents we responded to at night without electricity. all.” Clallam County Public Utility District spokesman Mike Howe Turn to Roads/A4

Storm stirs snow-related sales But business chills for other retailers By Tom Callis and Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

The winter wonderland that still envelops Clallam County has provided an early Christmas for some businesses and a snow day or two for others. Many stores that sell anything to combat the snow — whether snow chains, snow shovels, deicer or just thick clothing — reported sales Tuesday that would make even the Grinch smile. “It’s like white dollars falling from the sky,” quipped Mike Mudd, merchant manager for Swain’s General Store in Port Angeles. Forks Outfitters was also enjoying a busy day, said cashier Shawna Burrows, with snow shovels and de-icer topping the list. “We’re pretty packed,” she said. But some business owners, perhaps not seeing it profitable enough to keep their doors open or just unable to get to their businesses, have decided to close early or just not open at all since the storm blew through Sunday and Monday, dropping about a foot of snow on the North Olympic Peninsula. Turn

Retail/A4

to

*Plus with every purchase $250 will be donated in your name to one or all of the following charities:

New

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Phil Bischof, right, buys woolen socks from cashier Kim Wahto at Swain’s General Store in Port Angeles on Tuesday. In the center is Bischof’s brother, James.

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Inside Today’s Peninsula Daily News 94th year, 275th issue — 5 sections, 44 pages

Business B4 Classified C6 Comics C5 Commentary/Letters A7 Dear Abby C5 Deaths A6 Food D1 Movies C4 Nation/World A3

Puzzles/Games Sports Things To Do Weather

C7 B1 C4 C12


A2

UpFront

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2010, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942

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Reprints, commercial PRINTING! Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Buy PDN Photos Online” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527 To print your newspaper, brochure or catalog: 360-417-3520

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2010, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Cowell says Tyler is a perfect ‘Idol’ FORMER “AMERICAN IDOL” judge Simon Cowell said he’s happy that Steven Tyler will take his place. Cowell said, “I always said it had to be someone who wasn’t better looking than me, and they achieved it.” He poked fun at Tyler before collecting the Founders Awards at the International Emmy Cowell Awards in New York on Monday night. Cowell said the Aerosmith frontman seems like a nice guy, and Randy Jackson told him they were having a lot of fun.

Brody’s film image A federal judge in Los Angeles has blocked the makers of a thriller film starring Adrien Brody from using the Oscar-winning actor’s likeness until he is fully paid for his role.

U.S. District Judge Dale S. Fischer issued a ruling Monday blocking the makers of “Giallo” from Brody continuing to distribute, market or sell “Giallo” in the United States. Brody sued last month before the film went on sale in the states, claiming he was owed $640,000. He tried unsuccessfully to block its sale, but Fischer said Brody is likely to win the case and his likeness can no longer be used in the film or to promote it. His face appears twice on the film’s DVD cover.

Grey wins ‘Dancing’ Jennifer Grey was named the new “Dancing With the Stars” champ, despite painful neck and back injuries and a voting bloc for Bristol Palin. The 50-year-old actress, whose performances were almost always flawless during the season, beat out lastplace finisher Palin on Tuesday on the hit ABC show and actor Kyle Massey, who came in second.

Grey and professional partner Derek Hough earned a string of perfect scores on their way to the mirrorball trophy. The couple consistently topped the judges’ leaderboard throughout the season, but Palin’s cadre of voter support led to some surprising upsets, including Brandy’s elimination after earning a perfect score for her tango last week, prompting some viewers to question the veracity of the “Dancing” voting system. Grey went into Tuesday’s telecast in first place and effortlessly remained there. Palin made it to the finals despite mediocre and at times poor performances. “Dancing” producers said Tuesday that “a record amount of activity” overloaded its online and telephone voting systems after Monday’s episode. The judges had the final say Tuesday, when each of the three finalists performed two last dances for judges’ scores. Viewer votes counted for half of each competitor’s overall total. The season’s contestants got to perform one last number, with Brandy receiving a standing ovation for her two-step.

Passings Mr. Nolan came up with a well-known graph, called the Nolan Chart, to explain this phenomenon. The graph has two axes: one labeled economic freedom and the other called personal freedom. Under Mr. Nolan’s scheme, Libertarians dwell in the corner of the graph where both kinds of freedom are greatest. His hope was to persuade people to think of politics as a debate between libertarian and authoritarian positions rather than as one between the traditional left and right. Mr. Nolan hoped the party’s participation in elections would simply expose Americans to libertarian views as a means to effect change.

_________ WENDELL SATRE, 92, a longtime Spokane

business leader, has died. Mr. Satre rose from a transmission clerk to become president of Washington Water Power, the utility now known as Avista. A Post Falls, Idaho, native, Mr. Satre was involved in bringing the Expo 74 Worlds Fair to Spokane and in the construction of Washington State University’s Spokane campus. Mr. Satre became WWP president in 1971 and chairman in 1975. After a 46-year career, he retired in 1985. Mr. Satre was instrumental in spinning Itron out of WWP. Itron, a global provider of utility technology, is among the Spokane area’s largest publicly traded companies. Mr. Satre also helped bring together the people who launched Key Tronic, a computer keyboard maker.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1935 (75 years ago)

MONDAY’S QUESTION: How much are the state employee labor unions responsible for the state budget crisis?

A lot 

Somewhat 

Very little 

Scapegoat 

By The Associated Press

DAVID NOLAN, 66, whose opposition to the Vietnam War and former President Richard M. Nixon’s wage and price controls impelled him in 1971 to join with a few friends to found the Libertarian Party to fight against government power, died Sunday in Tucson, Ariz. Mark Hinkle, chairman of the party’s national committee, said Mr. Nolan appeared to Mr. Nolan have had a in 2006 heart attack or stroke while driving his car. He lived in Tucson. The Libertarian Party’s mix of conservative and liberal positions reflects an underlying belief that almost all government power is inherently coercive.

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

all 10 fingers when huge seas hit the freighter Ames Victory, bound for Japan 630 miles off the Olympic Peninsula coast. Five other crewmen also were injured. The Ames Victory reversed course and headed for Port Angeles, where the injured seamen were transferred to a Coast Guard plane and flown to Seattle Public Health Hospital.

Allen Sommers of Port Angeles is the “champeen” bone whittler in a nationwide contest conducted by Mechanics and Handicraft magazine of New York. Sommers received the $10 first prize from the editor of Mechanics and Handicraft that he won the magazine’s “Old Bones” contest. He entered the carving of a statuette of a woman and some little figures of elephants from ordinary pieces of butcher shop bone. 1985 (25 years ago) “I make the soup bone About 10 Clallam serve a double purpose,” he County Sheriff’s said. Office employees would be laid off next year if 1960 (50 years ago) the proposed department First Mate Edward Con- budget is approved by county commissioners. nel of Brooklyn, N.Y., lost

However, the Sheriff’s Office plans to lobby for more money than recommended by the former administrative coordinator when the commissioners begin hearings on the 1986 budget next week, said Undersheriff Dan Engel­ bertson. Up to five of the proposed layoffs would be sheriff’s deputies. The others would be jail employees, Engelbertson said.

39.9% 15.6% 11.8% 25.7%

Don’t know  7.0% Total votes cast: 1,164

Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■  To clarify, the city of Port Angeles could save between $300,000 and $400,000 a year if each household participates in a voluntary “demand response” program after advanced utility meters are installed in the spring. The program would allow the city to temporarily shut off water heaters during the hours of the day when electricity use is at its highest. The city could save $3 million a year if all of its electrical customers — including businesses — participate in some form of demand response, said Phil Lusk, city power resources manager. A story on Page A1 Thursday in the Clallam County edition erroneously said the water-heater shutoff program alone could save the city up to $3 million a year. ■  The lithium-ion storage kit that Catalyst Energy Technologies plans to install at The Landing mall in Port Angeles would be the company’s first.

Did You Win?

The company has installed other “storage kits” outside the United States, but those have used lead acid batteries. A story on Page A1 Monday in the Clallam County edition erroneously said the company has sold lithium-ion batteries before. ■  The Medal of Honor has been presented a number of times to living recipients for heroic service in Vietnam, and one of the two soldiers rescued by Staff Sgt. Salvatore Giunta survived. An Associated Press story on Page A3 last Wednesday erroneously said that Giunta was the first living medal recipient in nearly 40 years and that two soldiers died.

_________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, contact Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-417-3530 or e-mail rex. wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Seen Around

State lottery results

Peninsula snapshots

Tuesday’s Daily Game: 4-7-4 Tuesday’s Keno: 02-03-05-08-13-15-18-2025-26-32-44-48-49-56-65Laugh Lines 67-68-70-79 Tuesday’s Match 4: Lindsay Lohan 02-06-09-20 has a Christmas album Tuesday’s Mega Milthis year. It’s called “The 12 lions: 02-06-12-34-35, Steps of Christmas.” David Letterman Mega Ball: 33

A CAR DRIVEN in Port Angeles with a sign cautioning “Baby on Board” while the mom smokes a cigarette . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or e-mail news@peninsuladaily news.com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24, the 328th day of 2010. There are 37 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Nov. 24, 1859, British naturalist Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species, which explained his theory of evolution by means of natural selection. On this date: ■  In 1784, Zachary Taylor, the 12th president of the United States, was born in Orange County, Va. ■  In 1863, the Civil War Battle of Lookout Mountain began in Tennessee; Union forces succeeded in taking the mountain from

the Confederates. ■  In 1939, British Overseas Airways Corp. (BOAC) was formally established. ■  In 1944, during World War II, U.S. bombers based on Saipan attacked Tokyo in the first raid against the Japanese capital by land-based planes. ■  In 1950, the musical “Guys and Dolls,” based on the writings of Damon Runyon and featuring songs by Frank Loesser, opened on Broadway. ■  In 1963, Jack Ruby shot and mortally wounded Lee Harvey Oswald, the accused assassin of President John F. Kennedy, in a scene captured on live television. ■  In 1969, Apollo 12 splashed

down safely in the Pacific. ■  In 1971, hijacker “D.B. Cooper” parachuted from a Northwest Orient Airlines 727 over Washington state with $200,000 dollars in ransom; his fate remains unknown. ■  In 1987, the United States and the Soviet Union agreed on terms to scrap short- and mediumrange missiles. ■  In 1995, voters in Ireland narrowly approved a constitutional amendment legalizing divorce. ■  Ten years ago: The U.S. Supreme Court stepped into the bitter, overtime struggle for the White House, agreeing to consider George W. Bush’s appeal against the hand recounting of ballots

in Florida. ■  Five years ago: A giant balloon in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York snagged a street light and caused part of it to fall, injuring a woman and a child. ■  One year ago: President Barack Obama played host at the first state dinner of his presidency to visiting Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, an event marred by two gatecrashers, Tareq and Michaele Salahi. Kentucky officials said census worker Bill Sparkman, found bound and hanging from tree with the word “fed” scrawled across his chest, had committed suicide.


Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Second Front Page

Page

A3

Briefly: Nation Priest arrested for soliciting hit man to kill teen

had a small digital camera implanted in the back of his head — all in the name of art. Bilal said Tuesday that he underwent the procedure for an art project that was commissioned for a new museum in Doha, Qatar, in the Arab Gulf. Titled “The 3rd I,” it is one of 23 contemporary works commissioned for the opening of the Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art on Dec. 30. The exhibition is titled “Told/Untold/ Retold.” “I am going about my daily life as I did before the procedure,” the Iraqi-born artist said in a statement. Bilal, who is teaching three courses this semester at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, will wear the camera for one year. It is 2 inches in diameter and less than an inch thick.

SAN ANTONIO — In a murder-for-hire case worthy of a Dan Brown novel, a Roman Catholic priest has been arrested on charges that he solicited a hit man to kill a teenager who had accused him of sexual abuse. Authorities said John Fiala first offered the job to a neighbor, who blew the whistle and helped police arrange a sting. They said Fiala Fiala got as far as negotiating a $5,000 price for the slaying before investigators moved in. The 52-year-old clergyman was arrested Nov. 18 at his suburban Dallas home and jailed on $700,000 bond. In April, he was named in a lawsuit filed by the boy’s family, who accused Fiala of molesting the youth, including twice forcing him to have sex at gunpoint. The abuse allegedly took place in 2007 and 2008, when Fiala was a priest at the Sacred Heart of Mary Parish in the West Texas community of Rocksprings.

Ammunition clip found PHOENIX — A passenger aboard a Southwest Airlines flight found a full ammunition clip from a law enforcement officer’s service weapon during a flight Tuesday from Burbank, Calif., to Phoenix, an airline spokesman said. However, the owner of the clip remained a mystery. TSA Administrator John Pistole said he was confident the clip didn’t belong to a federal air marshal. He wouldn’t speculate about who might have brought the clip onto the aircraft. Passengers weren’t in danger because nobody else on the plane had a gun that could use the bullets, Pistole added. The plane landed safely in Phoenix, and passengers on Flight 1297 were taken off and rescreened. The plane was also searched, and no weapons were found. The Associated Press

Man gets third eye NEW YORK — A New York University arts professor might not have eyes on the back of his head, but he’s coming pretty close. Wafaa Bilal, a visual artist widely recognized for his interactive and performance pieces,

3 developments make AIDS outlook hopeful Study shows pill cut risk of infection in healthy gay men By Marilynn Marchione The Associated Press

In the nearly 30 years the AIDS epidemic has raged, there has never been a more hopeful day than this. Three striking developments took place Tuesday: U.N. officials said new HIV cases are dropping dramatically worldwide. A study showed that a daily pill already on pharmacy shelves could help prevent new infections in gay men. And the pope opened the way for the use of condoms to prevent AIDS. “I don’t know of a day where so many pieces are beginning to align for HIV prevention and treatment and frankly with a view to ending the epidemic,” said Mitchell Warren, head of the AIDS Vaccine Advocacy Coalition, a nonprofit group that works on HIV-prevention research. “This is an incredibly opportune moment, and we have to be sure we seize it.” President Barack Obama said

the groundbreaking research on the AIDS drug “could mark the beginning of a new era in HIV prevention.” The U.N. report said that new cases dropped nearly 20 percent over the last decade and that 33.3 million people are living with HIV now. “We can say with confidence and conviction that we have broken the trajectory of the AIDS pandemic,” said UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibe in Geneva.

Vatican’s historical shift Health officials credit part of the decline to wider condom use, and Tuesday, in a historic shift in church teachings, the Vatican said that using a condom is a lesser evil than infecting a sexual partner with HIV. Condoms remain the best weapon against AIDS, and the new prevention pill is not the chemical equivalent. But scientists called it a true breakthrough.

The pill, Gilead Science’s Truvada, is already used to treat people with HIV. A three-year global study found that daily doses cut the risk of infection in healthy gay and bisexual men when given with condoms, counseling and other prevention services. The drug lowered the chances of infection by 44 percent, and by 73 percent or more among men who took their pills most faithfully. Researchers had feared the pills might give a false sense of security and make men less likely to use condoms or to limit their partners, but the opposite happened — risky sex declined. The results are “a major advance” that can help curb the epidemic in gay men, said Dr. Kevin Fenton, AIDS prevention chief at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But he warned they may not apply to people exposed to HIV through male-female sex, drug use or other ways. Studies in those groups are under way. Because Truvada is already on the market, the CDC is rushing to develop guidelines for doctors who want to use it to prevent HIV and urged people to wait until those are ready.

Briefly: World Jawbone found on Aruba beach not Holloway’s

held anti-birth control stance against condoms doesn’t justify putting lives at risk. “This is a game-changer,” declared the Rev. James Martin, a prominent Jesuit writer and editor. SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — A The new stance was staked jawbone found on an Aruba out as the Vatican explained beach does not belong to missPope Benedict XVI’s comments ing Alabama teenager Natalee on condoms and HIV in a book Holloway, prosecutors in the that came out Tuesday based on Dutch Caribbean island said his interview with a German Tuesday. journalist. The Vatican still holds that The jawbone is human, condom use is immoral and that though it is unclear who it church doctrine forbidding artibelongs to. ficial birth control remains Dutch investigators compared the lone tooth on the bone unchanged. with dental records supplied by Holloway’s family, and “it can be U.K. immigration ruled out that the bone fragLONDON — Britain will ment came from Natalee Hollo- impose a tough annual limit on way,” the prosecutors said. the number of non-Europeans The bone was found recently allowed to work in the U.K. and by a tourist on a beach, and slash visas for overseas stuAruba prosecutors had asked dents as it seeks to dramatically forensic scientists in the Nethreduce immigration, the government said Tuesday. erlands to analyze it. Home Secretary Theresa They assured that the HolloMay told the House of Comway case has “the constant attention from law enforcement mons that the number of nonEU nationals permitted to work on the island.” in the U.K. from April 2011 will But John Kelly, an attorney be capped at about 22,000 — a for Holloway’s mother, Beth reduction of about one-fifth from Twitty, hinted that the media apparently found out first about 2009. But thousands of people who the test results. are allowed to work in Britain on intracompany transfers Vatican condom shift aren’t included in those figures VATICAN CITY — In a seis- — or under the new quota. Critics said that means it’s mic shift on one of the most profound — and profoundly conten- unclear how Prime Minister David Cameron’s government tious — Roman Catholic teachwill meet a pledge to cut net ings, the Vatican said Tuesday immigration, which also that condoms are the lesser of two evils when used to curb the includes students and families spread of AIDS, even if their use of visa holders, to below 100,000 by 2015, from about 196,000 prevents a pregnancy. The position was an acknowl- last year. The Associated Press edgment that the church’s long-

The Associated Press

Smoke billows from Yeonpyeong island near the border against North Korea, in South Korea on Tuesday.

Tensions rise as North, South Korea exchange artillery fire By Hyung-Jin Kim and Kwang-Tae Kim The Associated Press

INCHEON, South Korea — North and South Korea exchanged artillery fire Tuesday along their disputed frontier, raising tensions between the rivals to their highest level in more than a decade. The communist nation warned of more military strikes if the South encroaches on the maritime border by “even 0.001 millimeter.” The skirmish began when North Korea warned the South to halt military drills near their sea border, according to South Korean officials. When Seoul refused and began firing artillery into disputed waters — but away from the North Korean shore — the North retaliated by shelling the small island of Yeonpyeong, which

Quick Read

houses South Korean military installations and a small civilian population. Seoul responded by unleashing its own barrage from K-9 155mm self-propelled howitzers and scrambling fighter jets. Two South Korean marines were killed in the shelling that also injured 15 troops and three civilians.

2 South Korean marines die Officials in Seoul said there could be considerable North Korean casualties. The confrontation lasted about an hour and left the uneasiest of calms, with each side threatening further bombardments. North Korea’s apparent progress in its nuclear weapons program and its preparations for handing power to a new genera-

tion have plunged relations on the heavily militarized peninsula to new lows in recent weeks. South Korea’s military was put on high alert after the shelling — one of the rivals’ most dramatic confrontations since an armistice halted the Korean War in 1953 and one of the few to put civilians at risk. “I thought I would die,” said Lee Chun-ok, 54, an islander who said she was watching TV in her home when the shelling began. Suddenly, a wall and door collapsed. “I was really, really terrified,” she told The Associated Press after being evacuated to the port city of Incheon, west of Seoul, “and I’m still terrified.” The attacks focused global attention on the tiny island and sent stock prices down worldwide.

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: Detroit parade sinks Mayflower plans

Nation: Thieves leave pizzeria with wrong dough

Nation: Man stiffs pizza parlor with $3,900 order

World: Iran’s enrichment program temporarily stops

Think your holiday travel plans are tough? Imagine being a Mayflower descendant who’s been bumped from Detroit’s annual Thanksgiving parade. June Gorman, governor and historian of the Society of Mayflower Descendants in Michigan, said she thought Thursday’s 1.5-mile trek down Woodward Avenue would be a perfect match for the nonprofit group. Instead, she said, their application was denied without reason. Anthony Michaels, parade president and chief executive, said the group failed to include a video and pictures with their application.

Police in New York City said thieves held up the owners of a pizzeria and then fled with a bag of full dough — the kind that crusts are made of. Police said Salvatore LaRosa was charged with robbery after surrendering to police. According to court papers, LaRosa and an accomplice followed the owners of Brothers Pizzeria on Staten Island. After donning masks, the papers said, they pointed guns and demanded the men turn over a bag they believed held the day’s proceeds. But instead, the bag was full of pizza dough.

A man wearing a Bob Dylan backstage pass who ordered 178 pizzas from a Massachusetts pizzeria has left the restaurant blowin’ in the wind. The man walked into Antonio’s in the college town of Amherst early Saturday morning shortly after Dylan performed at the University of Massachusetts and ordered $3,900 worth of pies. He said he would return in several hours and deliver them to Dylan’s crew. But he never returned, and the manager called police. Restaurant employees stayed until 5:30 a.m. making the pizzas. Antonio’s owner, Walter Pacheco, said his workers had no reason to doubt the man worked with Dylan.

Nuclear inspectors monitoring Iran found the country’s enrichment program temporarily shut down a week ago, the International Atomic Energy Agency reported Tuesday, reflecting a possible setback for the cornerstone of the country’s nuclear activities and source of national pride. Beyond noting that Iran continued to enrich in defiance of the U.N. Security Council, a report by the U.N. nuclear monitor also said that Tehran for the second year continued to rebuff attempts to investigate suspicions it had experimented with components of a nuclear program.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Wednesday, November 24, 2010 — (C)

Peninsula Daily News

Roads: Crews worked all night, did ‘great job’ Continued from A1 height of the storm Monday afternoon, including a nine“People did pretty well,” car pileup and two jacksaid Smith, who speculated knifed semis. Sheriff Tony Hernandez that many people stayed home with Port Angeles said Tuesday was “not even a tenth of what we saw yesschools being canceled. “It looks to me that the terday.” Hernandez said motorplow and road crews did a great job last night,” he ists largely heeded warnings to stay off the roads added. “They worked all night, unless they had to travel. “Today we haven’t seen and you can see the result much of anything,” Hernantoday.” Jefferson County Sher- dez said. Clallam County road iff’s deputies responded to a flurry of wrecks during the crews will begin plowing

and sanding at 6:30 a.m., County Engineer Ross Tyler said. Crews focused on widening the plowed portions of the main arterials on Tuesday. Tyler described a “spider web effect” in which crews focus on the major roads before spreading out to lesser traveled roads. “For the most part — except for some of the little side roads off Blue Mountain and some of the upper mountain roads — the main

roads are plowed and sanded, and that’s pretty much the story for the whole county,” Tyler said. Plow crews will start over when the weather warms up and the compact snow becomes slush, Tyler said. “We’re trying to watch our overtime and find a balance between the cost of overtime and our service to our customers,” Tyler said. Clallam County declared a emergency for severe weather Monday afternoon.

The declaration made the county eligible for federal disaster relief. County employees were given the option of arriving for work at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, but courthouse offices were up and running by 8:30 a.m., County Administrator Jim Jones said. Jefferson County did not declare an emergency because its populated regions received less snow than Clallam County. “We didn’t have anything unusual,” Jefferson County

Emergency Management Program Director Bob Hamlin said. Hamlin drove from Port Angeles to Port Townsend on Tuesday and said the roads were in “good shape.” “As soon as the sun goes down, I think it’s going to get pretty slick,” Hamlin added.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

Cold: 8 degrees in ’85 Retail: Warmer inside in Forks still a record Continued from A1 tends to be north — and its bull’s-eye is on the Pacific The Daily News, prede- Northwest.” La Nina is marked by an cessor to the Peninsula Daily News, quoted law unusual cooling of the tropiofficers as describing con- cal Pacific Ocean, which began in August. ditions as a “whiteout.” It is the opposite of the A low temperature of 8 degrees in Forks on Nov. El Niño event, which is 23, 1985, is still the lowest characterized by abnorNovember temperature on mally warm waters in that region. record since 1907. Both affect climates Sound familiar? worldwide by changing the direction and strength of Another similarity winds and altering air Outside of the whiteout pressure and rainfall patand chilly temperatures, terns. what is the other similarity between the storms of Tricky predictions 1985 and 2010? The National Oceanic The Pacific Ocean weather phenomenon and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Predicknown as La Niña. In both cases as well as tion Service, which has in 1996, 1999 and 2008, forecast the La Niña effects among older fall-winter to drench — or snow-in — periods, there’s above-aver- the Northwest into early age rainfall, increased 2011, acknowledges that snow pack and lower tem- it’s tricky to predict weather peratures before Thanks- for the North Olympic Pengiving, thanks to La Niña. insula because of its proAnd the same is fore- tective rain shadow from cast for now through the Olympic Mountains. But reviewing the 2007March. 08 fall and winter — the latest La Niña before the It’s ‘really building’ current phenomenon — “This La Niña is really shows that Hurricane building,” said Bill Patzert, Ridge logged a snowpack a climatologist with NASA’s in spring 2008 that was Jet Propulsion Laboratory 166 percent of average. in Pasadena, Calif., back in On May 2 that year, the September Ridge in Olympic National “The jet stream pattern Park still had 100 inches of

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Continued from A1 motorists willing to stop and shop. “No one is out and about, In Port Angeles, most noticeably affected was but they will be. That’s the downtown, which had only good news,” added DeSa handful of shops open hazer, whose shop has been a mainstay in Sequim for Tuesday afternoon. “More people come in to 25 years. She believes once cabin get warm more than anything,” said Karen Wolff at fever sets in, customers will PA Antiques before closing come around again for holiday shopping. at about 3:30 p.m. Ann Lembcke, sales Wolff said she had seen few other shops on the same manager of Olympic Resblock of First Street, in taurant Equipment, off U.S. between Oak and Laurel Highway 101 at 51 Dryke streets, open since Monday. Road, said her store was The onslaught of late- planning a big sale this autumn snowfall also put a week before the traditional chill on many businesses in after-Thanksgiving sale on Sequim and Carlsborg, but Friday to sell the many restheir owners are confident idential kitchenwares the things will bounce back for shop sells along with resthe holiday season once the taurant supplies. “We were expecting a snow clears. “When Mother Nature store full of people this makes a call, we just go week, and we haven’t had with it,” said Sue DeShazer, any,” she said, which has owner of Mad Maggie Bou- forced them to extend the tique and Salon on East sale another week beyond Washington Street down- this coming Friday. That’s a problem that town, which Monday was snowpacked and devoid of Swain’s in Port Angeles was

snow. Deep snow delayed the opening of the Sol Duc campground until May 23.

One fo the books? But given Monday’s unusual blizzard from the north, the 60 mph winds last week and an ultra-low temperature forecast for early today, is this year’s La Niña one for the record books? There’s no way to answer that question now. Kirby Cook, science officer for the National Weather Service in Seattle, noted for The Seattle Times on Tuesday that a La Niña pattern isn’t a perfect predictor of a harsh season. “You can have a wishywashy impact here, even with a very strong La Niña,” he said.

Tough nut to crack Some of the region’s most bitter winters have come during middling Las Niñas. “La Niña is a bit of a tough nut to crack in terms of how it’s going to pan out here,” Cook said. What is clear is that, on average, La Niña years are wetter, snowier and colder on the Peninsula and the Pacific Northwest. This season is following the playbook so far.

! t u O t Ge ocal! Go L

Superintendent Kandy Ritter. For more information, see www.capeflattery. wednet.edu/ or phone 360963-2329. Sequim, Port Townsend and Quillayute Valley schools in Forks will be closed for the rest of he week. Today is a snow day, and the rest of the week is the Thanksgiving holiday. Queen of Angels Catholic School in Port Angeles is closed for the rest of the week. No information was available Tuesday about whether Chimacum, Quilcene, Crescent or Brinnon school districts would be open today. For information about Sequim schools, visit http:// tinyurl.com/28twooc or phone 360-582-3260. For information about Port Townsend schools, visit http://tinyurl.com/2c3yft5 or phone 360 379-4501. For information about Quillayute Valley schools, phone 360-374-6262. For information about Chimacum schools, visit http://csd49.org/ or phone 360-385-3922. For more information about Quilcene schools, visit

Peninsula Daily News

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Port Angeles and Cape Flattery schools will be open today, while several other public school districts are remaining closed for the week after a snowstorm blew in Monday. All schools will be closed Thursday and Friday for the Thanksgiving holiday. Most were closed Tuesday after Monday’s snowstorm. Those included Port Angeles, Sequim, Port Townsend, Quillayute Valley, Chimacum, Quilcene, Crescent, Cape Flattery school districts. The Port Angeles School District will conduct classes today, but the start of school will be delayed by two hours, said Tina SmithO’Hara, spokeswoman. The district will follow the Route A snow and emergency schedule. Find the schedule on the school’s website at www.portangeles schools.org/ or phone 360457-8575. Cape Flattery schools in Neah Bay and Clallam Bay will be open on their regular schedule today, said

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Curbside Collections: There will be no garbage and recycling collections on Thanksgiving Day. Thursday collections will be on Friday and Friday collections will be on Saturday.

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Due to weather, collections may be on a later schedule. Leave containers out until collected. City offices closed Thursday & Friday for the holidays.

For more information see the Recycling and Garbage Guide in the front of your DEX phone directory, or log onto www.cityofpa.us

RCW 46.16.260 states, “A certificate of license registration to be valid must have the endorsed thereon the signature of the registered owner (if a firm or corporation, the signature of one of its officers or other duly authorized agent) and must be carried in the vehicle for which it is issued, at all times in the manner prescribed by the department.” Registration signatures are often overlooked by people when they get their new license tabs, but failure to sign it could result in a ticket. Violation of this law could result in the issuance of a $124 infraction. 0B5099503

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http://tinyurl.com/ 2cynqcn or phone 360-7653363. For more information about Crescent schools, phone 360-928-3311. For information about Brinnon schools, phone 360796-4646. Public bus schedules were returning to normal Tuesday, while state Department of Licensing offices were curtailing some services.

Public bus service Clallam and Jefferson Transit both were operating Tuesday. Buses are using chains and are on their mostly normal schedules, with some deviations. Clallam Transit bus service in Port Angles today will be hourly for routes No. 20, 22, 24 and 26. The No. 52 will not run down the final hill to the beach to Diamond Point, and the No. 10 Joyce bus will stop at state Route 112 and Lyre River Park. Service to Sequim is on its normal schedule. For Jefferson Transit information, visit www. jeffersontransit.com/ or phone 360-385-4777. For Clallam Transit information, visit www. clallamtransit.com/ or phone 360-452-4511.

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________ Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. com. Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Jeff Chew can be reached at 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ peninsuladailynews.com.

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clearly not having Tuesday as customers rushed to arm themselves against the snow and ice. Mudd said Monday was also busy, with sales up threefold. “It’s an early shot in the arm” before the day after Thanksgiving sale, he said. The store was sold out of snow shovels, sleds and deicer, Mudd said, adding that more are expected to arrive today. Lucie House of Port Angeles said she was there to buy warm boots, one of the more in-demand items. House, like other customers, said she was expecting much less snow. “It’s not supposed to do this this early,” she said.

The Port Townsend state Department of Licensing office was closed Tuesday and may be closed today, while the Port Angeles office was open but not conducting driving tests. The Forks office — which is routinely open only twice a week, according to the state Department of Licensing website, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today but will be closed Friday for the Thanksgiving holiday. Closures are made on a daily basis, said Tony Sermonti, spokesman for the state Department of Licensing. All licensing offices will be closed Thursday and Friday for the Thanksgiving holiday. To reach the Port Angeles office at 228 W. First St., Suite M, phone 360-4572545. To reach the Port Townsend office 2300 S. Park Ave., phone 360-3795053. To reach the Forks office at 41 Bogachiel Way, phone 360-374-6440. More information is available at www.dol. wa.gov.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Warming center remains open at least another day Serenity House “Even if you know shields homeless how to survive, it’s from the freeze risky. The only way

get the word out about the warming center. He said many of the homeless were preoccupied with rebuilding their camps after heavy winds hit Monday evening. Guy said that six people had used the center Monday, but he expected there would have been at least a dozen more if the wind hadn’t been high.

to survive is to get out of it.”

By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A warming center for the homeless will remain open at least one more day. Serenity House of Clallam County opened the center at 516 E. First St. on Monday to give the homeless a place to get out of the cold during the day as a blizzardlike storm rolled through the North Olympic Peninsula.

Guy a veteran who stays at Serenity House’s Street Outreach Shelter ‘Yesterday was miserable’

“People can’t survive out there in freezing temperatures,” said Collins, who is also a Port Angeles City Council member. That’s something that a volunteer at the center, a homeless veteran who would give his name only as Guy, said he knows all too well. ‘Subfreezing temperatures’ “Even if you know how to surBrad Collins, Serenity House vive, it’s risky,” said Guy, who stays deputy director of resource develop- at Serenity House’s Street Outment, said the nonprofit organizareach Shelter. tion plans to keep it open for a “The only way to survive is to third straight day today because of get out of it.” “subfreezing temperatures.” Guy said he had visited homeless camps in and around Port It will remain open ThanksgivAngeles on Monday and Tuesday to ing if needed, he said.

“Yesterday was miserable,” he said. “Today, we’re getting a little bit of sun, but that doesn’t bode well for tonight.” Volunteers at Serenity House’s two overnight shelters said they have seen a slight-to-no increase in clients. The warming center’s hours are from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. To volunteer, e-mail Collins at serenityhouse.brad@gmail.com.

________ Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsula dailynews.com.

(C) — Wednesday, November 24, 2010

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Briefly . . . Governor offers her budget ideas

federal appeals court has halted the killing of sea lions who make fast food of endangered salmon and steelhead at Bonneville Dam on the Columbia OLYMPIA — Gov. Chris River. The 9th U.S. Circuit Gregoire is laying out some budget-balancing options for Court of Appeals ruled state lawmakers. Tuesday that federal agenGregoire is sending the cies haven’t adequately information to legislators as explained how they they look for ways to balreached inconsistent conance the current year’s bud- clusions about the issue. get. The court questioned Gregoire had previously how the agencies can say cut spending to fill the budhungry sea lions are a get gap, but low tax collecthreat to fish survival but tions have made it even not target human fishing larger. that takes many more Gregoire’s letter spells salmon and steelhead. out big steps that could be taken, including elimination In the past decade, of the Basic Health Plan growing numbers of sea and raiding federal educalions have found easy picktion dollars. ings among fish waiting to But her plan won’t work head upriver at Bonneville without a special session of the Legislature in December Dam. In 2008, the federal govbecause it requires changes ernment allowed the states to state law before next year. of Oregon, Washington and Gregoire has given lawIdaho to kill the hungriest makers until Monday to of the sea lions. submit their budget ideas. So far, two dozen have been captured and given Sea lion kills lethal injections. PORTLAND, Ore. — A The Associated Press

Sequim: State pension limits hours police chief must work Continued from A1 That’s 172 hours fewer annually than the usual 2,080-hours-a-year worker and equals 21.5 workdays, or more than a month of total workdays off, to protect his retirement. Dickinson also received 10 days of vacation at hiring and will get 20 days of vacation a year along Dickinson with 11 paid holidays and one floating holiday. “I typically work one or two days less a month to keep myself at four weeks a month,” Dickinson said.

He added that he earns less than the $106,000 he would be making if he were hired at the top end of the salary scale offered when the city advertised the position. The arrangement allows Dickinson to receive retirement benefits from the state Law Enforcement Officers and Fire Fighters (LEOFF) 1 pension system, Burkett said.

Retirement benefits “Once you are retired and receiving benefits, you are restricted to 159 hours a month,” Burkett said. “Otherwise, you can’t receive benefits.” Dickinson estimated he receives “close to $70,000” in LEOFF benefits annually after 39 years in law enforce-

ment, including 30 with the King County Sheriff’s Department, retiring in 2003 at age 53. But he kept working, becoming the Tigard, Ore., police chief before being hired by Sequim. Dickinson is not on the state Public Employees’ Retirement System through the city of Sequim but does have some of his compensation deferred, Burkett said.

City contributes Dickinson said the city contributes to his deferred compensation fund. He also receives employee benefits, such as medical insurance, as does any city worker who puts in 30 hours a week or more, Burkett said.

The state Department of Retirement Systems administers the LEOFF program. “We don’t use the terminology ‘part time,’” agency spokeswoman Dawn Gothro said Tuesday. “We just have the designation of 160 hours being full time, fully compensated.” Dickinson’s contract with the city is not unusual, Burkett said. “There are lots of police chiefs out there and other law enforcement professionals who are already retired under the state pension system and, because they don’t want to stop working at a young age, have contracts to work as police chiefs and other law enforcement professionals.” Police Lt. Sheri Crain is Dickinson’s second-in-com-

mand and is the supervisor when Dickinson is not working, Burkett said. If an emergency were to arise, though, and if Dickinson had reached his monthly quota of hours, “he just does the job that needs to be done,” Burkett said. “Some accommodation would be made,” Burkett added, suggesting Dickinson might get extra days off the following month, adding that — depending on the work required — he might work 40 hours or 60 hours in one week. “Let’s get reasonable here,” Burkett said. “Who do you think will do the job? He’s the police chief. He will do the job. We’re not going to call someone else in here because he’s reached 159 hours this month,”

he said. Gothro said Dickinson’s LEOFF benefits will not be jeopardized if he “occasionally” works more hours than allowed and was not regularly scheduled to do so. Dickinson was selected from among 60 applicants for the position held by Bob Spinks, whom Burkett asked to resign and whose last day was July 2. Spinks worked a standard full-time schedule, Burkett said. His salary was $86,299, or $6,701 less than Dickinson’s.

________ Staff writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-417-3536 or at paul. gottlieb@peninsuladailynews.com.

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Thanksgiving meals dished in Clallam p.m. the day before Thanksgiving. The Dream Center is seeking help to obtain supplies, cook, serve the meal and help with cleanup. Particularly needed items include vegetable dishes, milk and apple cider. For more information, phone 360-452-2883.

Peninsula Daily News

Free public feasts will offer turkey, dressing and all the other trimmings — along with companionship — this Thanksgiving holiday. Although most of the feasts will be Thursday, Thanksgiving Day, two in Port Angeles are planned today, and another Port Angeles meal is set for Fri- Friday get-together day. The First United MethFeasts today odist Church, 110 E. Seventh St., will serve a free The Salvation Army will community Thanksgiving serve a Thanksgiving meal dinner at 5:30 p.m. Friday. with all the trimmings from The church holds free noon to 2 p.m. today. community friendship The meal at the organimeals each Friday. zation, 206 S. Peabody St., For more information, is traditionally held the day phone 360-457-8971. before Thanksgiving to Here’s a list of the Thursallow people time with their day feeds, presented by families on the holiday. community. The meal is free and open to those in need. Port Angeles The Serenity House Dream Center, 535 E. First ■  A free community St., also will host a Thanks- meal will be served at giving meal from noon to 5 Queen of Angels gym, 209

W. 11th St., from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day. The third annual dinner is open to the public. Reath Ellefson, who organizes the dinner, said she hopes to serve close to the 200 who enjoyed the meal in 2009. For more information or to make a donation, phone Ellefson at 360-460-3558. ■  Serenity House will serve its annual community Thanksgiving dinner at its Single Adult Shelter, 2321 W. 18th St., from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Community members are invited to share and enjoy the free Thanksgiving meal. Volunteers are welcome to help with meal preparation, serving and cleanup. For more information, phone 360-452-7221. ■  Seasons Cafe at Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline St., will serve a Thanksgiving meal during lunch and dinner hours Thursday. The meal will be served

from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. The cost is $10 per person.

Sequim ■  Hardy’s Market, 10200 Old Olympic Highway, will serve a free Thanksgiving dinner from 11 a.m. until supplies are gone Thursday. The meal is to thank customers for their support. Last year’s meal served about 150 people. For more information, phone the market at 360582-0240. ■  A free Thanksgiving dinner will be offered at Trinity United Methodist Church, 100 S. Blake Ave., at 3 p.m. Reservations are required for the traditional turkey dinner. Reservations can be made by phoning the church at 360-683-5367 between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. Monday,

Tuesday or Wednesday. The church also sponsors free community dinners the last Thursday of each month. ■  A complimentary Thanksgiving Day dinner for veterans, their families, widows and widowers also will be open to the general public. Reservations are requested. The dinner will be from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at VFW Hall, 169 E. Washington St. To make a reservation or for more information, phone 360-683-9546, leaving the names of people who plan to attend the dinner on the phone’s answering machine.

West End ■  Feeding the Five Thousand will host a free community Thanksgiving Day dinner at the Forks Senior Center on Thursday. The meal will be served from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the center at 41 Maple St.,

which has handicapped access and no stairs, said Laura Lafranz, an organizer. “We have all of the churches in Forks participating by donating food and helping,” said Lafranz, who said the event is organized by the Church of the Nazarene in Forks. The feast is a continuation of meals served regularly in the community. “Through all of the meals over the last three years, we’ve fed probably 8,000 to 10,000 people,” she said. For more information, phone Steve Bruce at 360374-3218. ■  A free Thanksgiving feast for Clallam Bay and Sekiu residents is set for 2 p.m. Thursday. The meal will be at the Sekiu Community Center. Turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy will be provided, and attendees are asked to bring a side dish. Seniors who need rides should phone Kathleen Haney at 360-640-0586.

Voters OK levy lid lift for Fire District No.6 Peninsula Daily News

BEAVER — Voters have approved a levy lid lift for Clallam County Fire District No. 6. The final vote, after the election was certified Tuesday, was 92 votes in favor to 86 against, or 51.69 percent approval to 48.31 percent opposed. After Tuesday’s final tally of the Nov. 2 election, the Clallam County Auditor’s Office had counted 34,079 ballots out of 45,611 mailed for a final voter turnout of 74.72 percent — making it 15th in the state.

Jefferson second Jefferson County came in second in the state, with an 81.56 percent turnout, with 17,738 ballots counted of 21,749 mailed. Columbia County had the

highest in the state, 84.75 percent, with 2,196 ballots returned of 2,591 mailed. San Juan County had the third largest turnout — 80.84 percent, or 9,382 ballots counted of 11,606 mailed.

249 voters within the 30-square-mile district on Quillayute Prairie in the allmail election. The measure required a simple majority to pass. The fire district’s budget is about $31,000 per year, while income is $29,400 — Levy lid lift which means that $1,600 per The levy lid lift measure year is drawn from reserves. will increase the property tax The all-volunteer district rate to 90 cents per $1,000 of has no paid staff. assessed valuation from the current 53 cents, an increase Final numbers of 37 cents. None of the outcomes That means the owner of reported for four contested a $200,000 home will pay county races changed after about $180 per year in prop- Tuesday’s final counts. erty taxes — an increase of County victories certified $74 annually. Tuesday are: The measure will finance ■  Mike Doherty, a Port improved fire-protection Angeles Democrat, retained operations, replace appara- his District 3 seat on the tus, provide staffing and Clallam County commission increase service levels, against Republican Robin according to the ballot. Poole of Beaver, with a final Ballots were sent to the tally of 16,578 votes, or 51.71

Maritime center service rescheduled Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — A Thanksgiving service involving a variety of religious traditions, which was originally planned Tuesday night, will be rescheduled. “An Interfaith Thanksgiv-

ing: A Weaving of Community Gratitude,” which was scheduled at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Northwest Maritime Center, will be held at a later date, said rabbinic pastor candidate Stephanie Reith, who is one of the organizers. Those participating

include the Peninsula United Church of Christ, Unity Church, the Medicine Wheel Rainbow Tribe, Grace Lutheran Church, a Meher Baba devotee, the local Jewish community, the local Baha’i community, Zen Buddhists, pagans and Quakers.

Death and Memorial Notice Joan Nanette Dahl February 29, 1932 November 7, 2010 Joan Nanette Dahl died at Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles, after a short illness. She was born in Chicago, Illinois, to George and Edythe Ostrand. She married Donald H. Dahl (now deceased) on September 22, 1956. Joan and Don lived in California until 1994, and then relocated to Sequim at that time. They traveled the United States, Central America, Iran, Pakistan and Australia for business and pleasure. Joan was a vivacious, well-humored, entirely kind person. She was active in art, dance, canasta, bridge and dominoes, The Red Hat Society, Sequim Arts and the Sequim Yacht Club. Her oil paintings, cross stitch and many afghans graced the walls and

Mrs. Dahl couches of her home and of many friends. For many years, she was a regular at the tap dance class, where she was known as “Ginger” to dance partner “Fred,” all in keeping with her largerthan-life personality. She made many wonderful friends in Sequim and enjoyed spending time with them in social activities. Joan was active in the community, volunteering

at the Sequim Visitor Center, the art gallery, and in support of the annual fundraising Fashion Show. Joan is survived by her sister-in-law, Mary Lou LaBerge of Seattle, Washington; nieces and nephews Chris (Ruth) LaBerge of Snohomish Washington, Paul (Michiyo) LaBerge of St. Louis Park, Minnesota, David LaBerge of Denver, Colorado, Judy Karel of Seattle, Washington, Laura Patterson (Steve) Wright of Loveland, Ohio, and Christine Patterson Rebholtz of Vacaville, California; and many grandnieces and nephews. She was a resident of 5th Avenue Retirement Center. A gathering of family and friends in celebration of her life with her husband, Don, will take place at a future date. Memorial contributions can be made in Joan’s name to M.A.D.D. (Mothers Against Drunk Driving) or the American Cancer Fund.

Remembering a Lifetime at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

votes, or 53.46 percent, to 13,347 votes, or 46.54 percent. ■  Treasurer Judy Scott of Port Angeles lost her position to Selinda Barkhuis of Port Angeles. Barkhuis won 14,368 votes, or 50.77 percent, to Scott’s 13,930 votes, or 49.23 percent.

Death and Memorial Notice G. Wayne Van Winkle

28, 1942, in Seattle, Washington. Mr. Van Winkle earned his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from University of Washington in 1944. He was employed as an Engineer at Boeing from 1944-1985, living in Seattle and Bellevue, Washington, until moving to Sequim in 1999. Mr. Van Winkle was a member of Sequim Bible Church. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy A. Van Winkle; sons and daughter-in-

May 20, 1915 November 13, 2010 G. Wayne Van Winkle, 95, of Sequim passed away on November 13, 2010, at Sequim Health & Rehabilitation. He was born on May 20, 1915, in Avon, Illinois, to George and Gladys (Cafferty) Van Winkle. He married Dorothy Arminta Zinn on August

law, David and Mary Lou Van Winkle and Frank Martin; daughter and sonin-law, Donna Van Winkle and Peter Charvat; sisters, Martha Cousins, Margaret Seasly and Edith Spence; grandchildren, Edith and Helena Van Winkle, Emma and Anthony Charvat. A memorial service will be held at Sequim Bible Church, 847 North Sequim Avenue, on Saturday, November 27, 2010, at 2 p.m.

Death and Memorial Notice Richie W. Bates

les; two daughters, Emily and Aliva; one brother, Ryan Bates; his grandfather, Robert (Liv) Baublits of Palmer, Alaska; niece, Abby, and nephew, Scottie; and many aunts, uncles and cousins. Richie was preceded in death by his grandmother, Karleen Baublits, and his uncle, Doug York.

July 23, 1977 November 16, 2010 Richie W. Bates passed away November 16, 2010, in Port Angeles at age 33. Richie was born in Port Angeles on July 23, 1977, to Mary Baublits. He was a proud graduate of Port Angeles High School’s Class of 1996. After high school, he spent three summers on Mackinaw Island, Michigan, working as a bell captain on a passenger ferry. At the time of his death, he provided caretaking services for seniors and others who needed assistance. Richie’s two beautiful daughters, Emily and Aliva, were the joy of his life. He loved taking them to movies, roller skating rink, and the Great Wolf Lodge Indoor Water Park near Centralia. Richie enjoyed fishing,

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“You’re always in my heart. Love you, Mom.” “Love you little brother, Ryan.”

Mr. Bates camping and riding quads on the dunes with his brother, Ryan, and his niece, Abby. He was close to his nephew, Scottie, who called Richie his “rock star.” Richie’s best friend was his cousin, Sarah, and the two shared lots of laughter and fun talks. He is survived by his parents, Mary and Daren Konopaski of Port Ange-

Arrangements are being made by HarperRidgeview Funeral Chapel. No visitation is planned. A graveside service will be held at Ocean View Cemetery, Port Angeles, on Saturday, November 27, at 1 p.m. Family and friends are invited to attend a reception immediately following the graveside service at the Eagles Club in Port Angeles.

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■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading

District elections. Kevin Van De Wege, D-Sequim, won 34,977 votes, or 56.18 percent, to Republican Dan Gase’s 27,277 votes, or 43.82 percent. Gase lives in Port Angeles. Clallam County Commissioner Steve Tharinger, a Sequim Democrat, won 32,300 votes, or 52.33 percent, to Republican Jim McEntire’s 29,427 votes, or District 24 results 47.67. McEntire is a Port of Also certified were dis- Port Angeles commissioner trictwide results in the 24th and a Sequim resident.

percent, to 15,479 votes, or 48.28 percent. ■  Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly, a Port Angeles Republican, won against a challenge from Sequim attorney Larry Freedman, a Democrat, by 16,708 votes, or 51.94 percent, to 15,459 votes, or 48.06 percent. ■  Sheila Roarke Miller of Carlsborg took the Clallam County Community Development Director post from incumbent John Miller of Port Angeles with 15,330

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Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Commentary

Page

A7

Oyster tales with an American icon There’s a disturbing trend in the media to use fleeting celebrity references as an excuse for responsible journalism. It was never that way with Pat Jim Whittaker Neal and me. Whittaker was the first American to reach the summit of 29,028foot Mount Everest in 1963. The image of Whittaker standing on the summit holding an American flag became a source of national pride that was only matched when Neil Armstrong stepped on the surface of the moon in 1969. Climbing Everest was a lot like landing on the moon, except as astronaut John Glenn said, Whittaker didn’t have a chimpanzee go first.

These two events were part of the rising tide of the post-World War II boom that made people proud to be Americans at a traumatic time for our nation, when the nightly news was otherwise filled with riots, assassinations and war. Whittaker and Armstrong showed Americans that they could do whatever they set their minds to. Mountain climbing was cheaper than space travel. That must be why our family decided to go backpacking. Those were the good old days when children were used as pack animals for family outings. We geared up at Jim Whittaker’s cooperative outdoor equipment store, REI, with backpacks, sleeping bags and waffle-stompers and hit Olympic Mountain trails. Never dreaming I would one day meet Jim Whittaker, but I did, this is my story. I had just crashed a charity

oyster bake for the Mar Vista Student Longboat Team at the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend — where I thought there Whittaker might have a bounty on this journalist after unraveling the dirty linen from the seamy underbelly of the wooden boat cabal, to expose the inconvenient truth that wooden boats are made of . . . wood — old-growth timber in fact. That somehow a hemp-weaving, drum-circling bunch of destruction-of-the-rain-forest protesters made an industry out of building boats from wood cut from the rain forest. I left, vowing never to return to Port Townsend, unless it was for an oyster binge. Then I saw him, Jim Whit-

Peninsula Voices Airport screenings It might come as a surprise to writer of the Nov. 19-20 letter to the editor [“Airport Security”], but Ben Franklin never flew on a plane next to a guy with a bomb in his boxers. As for the writer’s reference to the provisions of the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution, the TSA screening searches are quite “reasonable” in order to ensure aircraft passenger safety. Every person who buys an airline ticket is given notice that they are required to submit to security screening. No one is required to fly on an airplane. If you don’t want to be screened, drive, take a train or walk. It’s time to stop the infantile whining and sniveling about a minor inconvenience. Grow up and deal with it. Jim Myers Port Townsend

Sex education Communication is the essence of civilization. The Population Media Center (PMC) was created by American nonprofit supporters to communicate to those ignorant of sex

knowledge: what a birth control clinic is really for. PMC uses TV/radio to entertain-educate using a proven technique developed by Miguel Sabido, a Mexican producer, to hold the audiences attention while educating. Information for this letter is from the 2009/2010 annual report of the Population Media Center. There can be a multitude of no survival cultural practices in a developing nation that need be addressed even if the only need is to encourage the people to attend a birth control clinic. There is much skillful communicating to be accomplished. The dangerous and painful practice of female genital mutilation was so firmly embedded in the Ethiopian culture that it continued for some 10 years to be practiced regardless that it was against the law. Harmful other practices that must be addressed to raise the importance of females are: son preference, female infanticide, early marriage, marriage by abduction, and levirate marriage (a widow forced to marry the brother of her deceased husband). Nigeria with a fertility rate of 5.7 children per

taker, sitting at a table. As a journalist there were so many questions I had to ask, like, “Which way to the oysters?” After inhaling a bushel or so, we got heavy into the pineapple seltzer. I worked up my courage to ask a question about the old days, when he guided mountain climbers on Mount Rainier: “Did you serve oysters?” No, he cooked instant oatmeal, otherwise known as mountain glue, for breakfast after getting his clients up at 1 o’clock in the morning to climb the mountain. “You don’t conquer a mountain anymore than you can conquer a river,” Whittaker said. “The mountain lets you climb. The river lets you float down it. “You have to have respect for them. Conquer is a word the journalists use.” “Stinking journalists,” I said. “Hanging’s too good for ’em.” Still I had to ask how an American icon fell in with the

Our readers’ letters, faxes

is related to the relationship of tax rates to government revenue and economic growth. The Gross Domestic Product is the typical index of the health of the economy. The GDP and direct revenue figures are public records (see Congressional Budget Office at http:// tinyurl.com/2a47444. Comparing the figures from 1985-1993 with 19932001 and 2001-2009 provides interesting information. The percentage figures Tax cuts fail are changes that occurred Much current discussion over the eight year periods.

woman; woman desire seven and the men nine. They need plenty of skillful communicating to convince them that contraception is not against “the will of Allah.” Zero population growth is attainable through hard work and money. Send your contribution to Population Media Center, Box 547, Shelburne,VT 05482-0547 and/or disturb President Obama. Robert Maple Norman, Sequim

wooden boat bunch. “It’s part of a program called ‘Puget Sound Explorers,’” Whittaker said. “Kids around here are surrounded by water, but they have very few chances to go out on it.” The Mar Vista Student Longboat Team lets kids row an exact replica of a longboat out on the salt chuck from Port Townsend to the San Juan Islands and back. Longboats are a seaworthy craft you can sail or row with a crew of eight or 10. They were used by Capt. Vancouver in 1792 to explore, map and name our local waters. Student longboat teams are learning history by reliving it. I wonder if they serve oysters.

________

Pat Neal is a North Olympic Peninsula fishing guide and ­“wilderness ­gossip columnist.” He can be reached at 360-6839867 or e-mail at patnealwildlife@ yahoo.com.

and e-mail

Individual and corporate revenues are income taxes. For the Reagan/Bush years, the GDP increased by 159 percent, individual tax revenue by 152 percent and corporate tax revenue by 193 percent. For Clinton years, the GDP increased by 155 percent, individual tax revenue by 195 percent and corporate tax revenue by 128 percent. For the Bush years, the GDP increased by 139 percent, but individual tax revenue decreased to 92 percent and corporate tax

revenue to 91 percent. The Clinton tax increase produced no real change in the economic growth — the GDP growth remained almost the same. There was an increase in individual and corporate revenues. The Bush tax decrease did not stimulate the economy, and the GDP grew at a much slower rate. Individual and corporate revenues decreased. The actual numbers do not support the proposition that tax decreases produce a stimulus to the economy, much less economic growth large enough to increase revenues at the lower tax rate. Tax cuts are not selffunding. Conversely, tax increases do not greatly inhibit the economy, much less to the point that revenues actually decrease. Doubt political theater. Laurence Berger, Port Townsend

That warm feeling I just scooped 12 inches of global warming off of my sidewalks and driveway. I wonder what’s in store for winter? Gary Flesner, Sequim

Giving thanks through United Way By Jody Moss and Dan McKeen

not afford medicine or child care for their children? This is another form of abunAS WE EDGE closer toward dance — an abundance of difficult Thanksgiving and the start of the news and seemingly insurmountholiday season, most of us will be able challenges. gathering with family and preparTo get through this period, and ing a meal of turkey, stuffing, we will get through it, we will potatoes, cranberry sauce, pies, need to take care of one another. cakes and maybe something Taking care of one another will unique. require that local agencies work We may get together with together to share and not duplifriends, children, siblings, grandMoss McKeen cate resources. This is happening children. through coalitions like the HomeWhat an abundant season! But for some, the season is not failing businesses, high unemploy- less Task Force, Early Learning, Prevention Works!, the Clallam ment. abundant. And for some, it will get worse County Literacy Council and Many friends and neighbors as more budget cuts become a through United Way. are living shattered lives. reality. It also means making wise Others were born into lives of In January, child care assisdecisions about which services poverty, violence, of just not tance for low-income families will will help the most people — enough — not enough food, decrease. again, this local decision-making enough warm clothing, enough In March, the state Medicaid currently happens with these education, enough love. system will no longer cover precoalitions. And the bad news just keeps scriptions. Another way that strategic on coming. How will low-income individu- community investments are made Ever-growing budget deficits is through the United Way of and budget cuts lead to more peo- als and families maintain their ple in need, poor graduation rates, health or get to work if they canClallam County.

point of view

Peninsula Daily News John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

360-417-3500

n

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

Rex Wilson

Suzanne Delaney

360-417-3530 rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com

360-417-3540 suzanne.delaney@peninsuladailynews.com

Executive Editor

Michelle Lynn

Interim Circulation Director

360-417-3510 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com

Dean Mangiantini Production Director

360-417-3520 dean.mangiantini@peninsuladailynews.com

Ann Ashley

Newspaper Services Director

360-417-7691 ann.ashley@peninsuladailynews.com

Advertising Director

Sue Stoneman

Advertising Operations Manager 360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

Bonnie M. Meehan

Business/Finance Director

360-417-3501 bonnie.meehan@peninsuladailynews.com

Dave Weikel

Computer Systems Director

360-417-3516 dave.weikel@peninsuladailynews.com

United Way not only supports a strong local safety net, but it is also led by local volunteers who have studied the critical needs in our county and make recommendations for using donor funds where the need is greatest. They also monitor the work of the agencies who receive donor funds. In addition, the United Way of Clallam County funds Community Solutions, which addresses our bigger problems, such as literacy and health care. And now, through the Listening to Community VOICES project, United Way will kick off a new education initiative, investing in strategic projects with a goal of helping all children to be successful in school and in life. We are all feeling fatigued by this era, by the abundance of need. While it may be harder during this economy to be charitable and generous, many of us have enough to be able to do so.

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Julie C. McCormick, contributing freelance reporter, 360-382-4645; juliemccormick10@gmail.com ■ Jennifer Jackson, Port Townsend Neighbor columnist, 360-379-5688; jjackson@olypen.com

This year, be abundant with your local giving. Support United Way of Clallam County, United Good Neighbors of Jefferson County, the Peninsula Daily News’ Peninsula Home Fund or your favorite charity. Give a little, give a little more, volunteer to help. Let this be a season, and a year, of abundance. To make a donation to United Way, you can send cash or a check to United Way of Clallam County, P.O. Box 937, Port Angeles WA 98362. Other donation options are available, such as with a credit card, through PayPal or by regular billing by calling the United Way office at 360-457-3011.

________ Jody Moss is executive director of United Way of Clallam County. Dan McKeen, the fire chief for the city of Port Angeles, is 2010 United Way campaign chairman.

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson, weekday commentary editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Happy Thanksgiving! IF YOU’RE A weekend-only subscriber to the Peninsula Daily News, getting the PDN only Friday and Sunday: Look for the PDN at your home on a third day this week — on Thursday morning,

Thanksgiving Day. Weekend-only subscribers also get the PDN on major holidays. By the way, our Thanksgiving edition is one of the largest PDNs of the year — stuffed with both news and holi-

day ads. To our readers across the North Olympic Peninsula — best wishes for a wonderful Thanksgiving with friends and family. John Brewer Publisher and editor

Customer service hours scaled back Affected are Prosecutor’s Office, District Court No. 1 By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — In response to a staff shortage in the halls of the county courthouse, Clallam County will close the customer service windows of its Prosecutor’s Office and District Court No. 1 between 8:30 a.m. and 9 a.m. and from noon to 12:30 p.m. The changes — approved by the three commissioners Tuesday — will take effect Wednesday, Dec. 1. Except for the half-hour lunch closure, the public can speak to a real person between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. The original request came with an hour closure between noon and 1 p.m. Court is not in session during the lunch hour. “If we salvage half the noon hour for citizen access, to me, that’s important,” Commissioner Mike Doherty said in Monday’s work session.

Consistent change The new customer service hours are consistent with a recent change in the Superior Court Clerk’s Office. Commissioners have said

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — “The real gym is outside,” Kristin LaMoure, owner of Sequim Gym, has been known to say. She will make good on that statement Thanksgiving morning with her first Turkey Trot, a 5-kilometer — 3.1-mile — run/walk starting at Railroad Bridge Park, 2151 W. Hendrickson Road. Registration will be at 8:30 a.m. at the park, with the run/walk starting at 9 a.m.

Short-staffed “All of the county offices are short-staffed, whether it’s more cases coming in or less people to do what we have to do,” said Wills, who is losing one of six clerks. Each department had to cut its budget by 3 percent to help balance a $3.1 million deficit in the general fund. The gap is now $1.5 million, and the county will draw from its $9.5 million reserve pool to balance the budget when it is adopted Tuesday, Dec. 14. Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly has said she will lose one attorney next year and fill one open secretary position to help offset the loss. Judge Rick Porter’s District Court No. 1 takes most misdemeanor cases in Clallam County, with a territory that spans from the eastern county line to Lake Crescent

devices on their shoes, dress warmly in layers and hand off pieces of clothing to friends along the way. She and volunteers will provide two water stations on the route, plus warm cider and snacks for everyone after the race. First-, second- and thirdplace medals will be

awarded in the men’s and women’s divisions. For more details, phone 360-477-1877 or visit www. SequimGym.com.

________

be expanded. “We have the ability to be very creative because we don’t have a large budget,” Burke said. He is the former owner of a pool construction company and has a bachelor’s degree in public administration. Also at the meeting, the commissioners approved a $547,740 budget for 2011 that includes a property tax levy rate that will remain stagnant at 14.85 cents per $1,000 assessed valuation. While the rate will remain the same, the district is expected to receive $10,000 less in tax revenue due to dropping property values. The tax applies to all One of nine applicants property owners within the Burke was one of nine district’s boundary, which is applicants. the same as the school disHe said he plans to sched- trict’s. ule meetings shortly ________ with organizations that use the pool, such as the Reporter Tom Callis can be Port Angeles School District, reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom. to see how programs can callis@peninsuladailynews.com. from the city of Port Angeles in June 2009 — opted last August to hand over most of those tasks to the pool’s two supervisors and have the director focus more on expanding pool programs and increasing attendance. Burke, 45, replaces former director Jayna Lafferty, who resigned last month. Lafferty had run the pool since July 2007 but had the title of interim director while working for the district. The commissioners had planned to open up the position to applicants before she resigned. Lafferty declined to apply due to the drop in pay and hours.

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challenging, but pretty and peaceful” along the Olympic Discovery Trail route from the entrance to Railroad Bridge Park west to Carlsborg Road and back, she said. “I love running in the snow,” LaMoure said, adding that it’s one of the best workouts out there. She wants to make the Turkey Trot an annual thing. “I love running races; that’s why I’m doing this. There aren’t enough races to run” around Sequim, she said. LaMoure urged participants to use quarter-inch hex screws or other traction

Port Angeles public utility workers Richard Hixon, left, and Logan Dean string up Christmas decorations across West First Street in downtown Port Angeles on Tuesday. Holiday decor is expected to be in place by Thanksgiving, the traditional beginning of the holiday season.

Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

0B5104689

‘Postcard day’ singing ngs, Hanukkah selections “It’s going to be aand posthecard direction of day . . . that much more

strung up

Burke hired as new pool district director

they want all departments to have the same business hours beginning Saturday, Jan. 1. Staff will perform mandated tasks and try to “keep up” with day-to-day work when the doors are closed to the public, District Court No. 1 Administrator Keith Wills said.

Entry fee of $10 The entry fee is $10 and tax-deductible, since all proceeds will go to the Sequim and Port Angeles food banks; LaMoure also hopes participants will bring donations of nonperishable food. “We want to run ‘over the river and through the woods,’” as the song goes, LaMoure said, adding that she and the runners who have signed up in advance are wholly undeterred by the snow blanketing the woods.

All

and includes the cities of Port Angeles and Sequim. The West End has its own court: Forks-based Clallam County District Court No. 2. Later in Tuesday’s meeting, commissioners approved an updated six-year transportation plan. The 2011-2016 Transportation Improvement Program reflects a loss in federal funds that will scale back road maintenance from a preferred 70 miles per year By Tom Callis to about 30 miles per year. Clallam County has about Peninsula Daily News 500 miles of road in its sysPORT ANGELES — tem. Steve Burke is the William Shore Memorial Pool DisGrant-dependant trict’s new executive direcTransportation Program tor. The district’s five comManager Rich James has said new construction proj- missioners unanimously ects will depend on grants adopted his employment contract Tuesday. the county receives. Burke, who served on the The largest of 16 funded district’s advisory commitprojects next year is the $6.5 million underpass near tee, will earn $30,000 a year Deer Park cinemas east of and work at least 20 hours per week. Port Angeles. He will be responsible for Clallam County will build running the William Shore a road that goes under U.S. Memorial Pool, developing a Highway 101 and loops from capital facilities plan for the the movie theater to Buchfacility and expanding pool anan Drive into an acceleraprograms. tion lane on the westbound Previously, the director side of the highway. was a full-time employee No public testimony was who earned $60,000 a year taken on the transportation and was focused more on the plan. day-to-day management of ________ the pool. The commissioners of the Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. district ­— which took over ollikainen@peninsuladailynews.com. ownership of the facility

Turkey Trot to be wintry dash over river, woods By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News


Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

BUSINESS, POLITICS & ENVIRONMENT Page B4

Golf

A PGA year painful to recall WHO KNEW THAT one year ago Friday the world of professional golf would have been turned on its head? And that the cause would Michael have been the Carman discovery of marital indiscretions and a subsequent auto accident in a gated Florida subdivision involving the world’s No. 1-ranked golfer? My grandmother was an adult life-long viewer of “As the World Turns” and “Guiding Light,” so I watched a few episodes growing up and became familiar with some standard soap opera cliches. This one was hard to top, even by Hollywood standards. After a winless 2010 season, Tiger Woods now sits second in the World Golf Rankings, his record streak of 281 straight weeks atop the leader board ending in October when he was passed by Lee Westwood. He may even drop to No. 3 if PGA Championship winner Martin Kaymer finishes in fourth or better in Dubai over the weekend. Westwood and Kaymer also recently announced their decisions to play full-time on the European Tour, another blow to the health of professional golf in the United States. Hopefully, the mega ocean-going cruise liner that is the S.S. Tiger Woods rights itself completely in 2011.

Turkey Day tourney I wrote last week that golfers could get a workout and burn off Thanksgiving meal calories at SkyRidge Golf Course’s first PostTurkey Day Two-Person Scramble. Players will probably still have that chance but SkyRidge organizers are being flexible. If the big drip (rain) happens and things are ready to go by Friday, then the tourney will tee off at its scheduled 8:30 a.m. start time. If things need another day, the tournament will switch to a Saturday start. SkyRidge co-owner Jeff Pedersen said that the blowing winds from Monday’s mini-blizzard left many of the course’s greens bereft of the white stuff. The details for the tournament remain the same. The cost is $60 per team with an optional honey pot. Power carts will be $10 a seat. The tourney includes gross and net prizes, lunch after play, a T-shirt and KP’s. Team handicap will be 30 percent of combined individual handicap. There also will be an optional team horse race after the tournament. Call or stop by the course to sign up. For the most up-to-date information, stop by the course at 7015 Old Olympic Highway in Sequim or phone the clubhouse at 360-6833673.

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula College men’s soccer players Brent Ricigliano, from left, Jeff Mullen and Miguel Gonzalez each hold trophies from winning the NWAACC championship. Mullen is holding the traveling trophy that stays with the winning school for a year, that is holding the championship game ball in the trophy’s cup. Standing with three of his star players is head coach Andrew Chapman.

Championship caliber Pirates savor first men’s soccer NWAACC crown By Brad LaBrie

Peninsula Daily New

PORT ANGELES — Nothing beats the feeling of being better than the rest. And there’s no squad better than the Peninsula College men’s soccer team right now. The Pirates earned the school’s first NWAACC crown in history with a 1-0 shootout victory over West Division nemesis Highline on Sunday at Starfire Athletic Complex in Tukwila. The two teams had tied 0-0 through regulation and overtime before Peninsula edged Highline 5-4 in shootout penalty kicks. After two years of knocking on the championship door, making it to the NWAACC Final Four but losing 1-0 in the semifinals, the Pirates broke through

in the third straight Final Four appearance. And now the Pirates have that championship feeling. “It’s exciting, it’s good,” offensive star Miguel Gonzalez said on Tuesday about how it feels to be on top. “It feels pretty good,” midfielder and defensive star Jeff Mullen added. “I was glad we won because we are only the second [Peninsula College] team to win [an NWAACC] championship.” The Pirates won a men’s basketball title almost 50 years ago.

Three-time winner And then there’s the unique perspective that Peninsula College president Tom Keegan brings to the table after winning

PT Golf Club Port Townsend Golf Club has something fresh on tap that will run until spring. First on tap is its Winter Eclectic, an individual four-month long best ball tournament. Participants must play nine holes at a time, and like other tournaments have a playing partner to sign and attest each score card submitted. Turn

to

Carman/B3

His teams traditionally make the playoffs, and have made the Final Four three consecutive years, but broke through to win it all this year with a team of 20 freshmen and only seven sophomores.

Hard working It’s no secret why this particular group broke through, according to Chapman. “These guys just wanted to work hard,” Chapman said. “We have good, skilled players with good attitudes who are good human beings.” Keegan plays up on the good student and citizenship angle of the team. “This championship is the result of the work of [athletic director] Rick Ross, Andrew Chapman and [assistant soccer coaches] Kanyon Anderson and Tim Tucker. “Our coaches and players have committed themselves to excellence.” Turn

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Kentucky nips No. 13 Huskies l

No. 8 Wildcats give Washington its first loss of the early season The Associated Press

Disco Bay golf Coming up in December, Discovery Bay Golf Club in Port Townsend will offer unlimited golf all month for $75. The course restaurant is now closed for the winter, but the banquet room and kitchen is available for rental by groups ranging in size from four to 120 people. For more information on anything Discovery Bay Golf Clubrelated, phone 360-385-0704.

an NWAACC men’s soccer title as a player, coach and now college president. He won a title playing for Skagit Valley in 1977 and later coaching Skagit Valley in 1983. It’s the feelings radiating from the players themselves that Keegan relates to the most. “After coaching a championship team and watching our team win the championship [Sunday], I noticed it’s the look in the eyes of the kids that’s the same. “It’s a beautiful, beautiful thing to see in the moment. You can’t describe the feelings but you can see it in their eyes. “As a player and a coach I have had that feeling deep down, a sense of excitement and pride. “As the college president, I have a deep sense of pride for the coaching staff — for all their hard work — but mostly for the kids.” Head coach Andrew Chapman brought the first title to Peninsula in his eighth year.

The Associated Press

Kentucky’s DeAndre Liggins (34) drives to the basket while being defended by Washington’s Scott Suggs.

LAHAINA, Hawaii — Terrence Jones had 16 points and 17 rebounds, and Brandon Knight scored 24 points to help No. 8 Kentucky hold off No. 13 Washington 74-67 in the Maui Invitational semifinals Tuesday night. A 4.7 earthquake centered on the Big Island shook courtside tables and chairs with about 6 minutes left, but play continued and few people in the gym seemed to notice. They were too busy watching the back-and-forth action. Kentucky (4-0) had an abysmal night from 3-point range — 3-for-17 — but smothered Washington on the perimeter defensively and came up with all the big plays down the stretch.

The Wildcats move on to the championship game against Connecticut, which knocked off No. 2 Michigan State in a roughand-tumble first semifinal.

Blocks four shots Jones, who spurned Washington for Kentucky, overcame a rough shooting night (4-for-13) with hard work, scrapping for rebounds and blocking four shots. Isaiah Thomas had 13 points on 3-of-11 shooting and Justin Holiday added 11 for Washington (3-1), which shot 38 percent and was 3-for-13 on 3-pointers after hitting 17 the night before. Turn

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Gray’s 20 points leads No. 22 Zags The Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Gonzaga stopped a rare two-game losing streak by getting in a zone — a 2-3 zone. Steven Gray scored 20 points and the 22nd-ranked Bulldogs beat Marquette 66-63 on Tuesday night in the third-place game of the O’Reilly Auto Parts CBE Classic. The Bulldogs (3-2) lost to then-No. 25 San Diego State 79-76 last week and to No. 4 Kansas State 81-64 in the semifinals on

Monday, a rare losing blowout. The zone made the difference as the Bulldogs held Marquette well below the 50 percent shooting mark they allowed in the losses. “We’ve always played a lot of zone especially early in our seasons and sometimes late in our seasons,” Gonzaga coach Mark Few said. “I’ve been kicking myself on getting away from it a little bit. Today I was telling myself that I had to have more of a conviction to

stay in it a little bit. “We strung some stops together. Our guys were more comfortable in it. We talked in timeouts and they wanted to stay in our 2-3.” Elias Harris had 19 points and reserve Mangisto Arop had 15, 10 in the second half when he kept the Bulldogs in front as Marquette (4-2) kept chipping away at an 11-point second-half deficit. Turn

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B2

SportsRecreation

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Today No events scheduled

Thursday No events scheduled

Friday Men’s Basketball: Peninsula College at Lower Columbia - Red Devil Classic, 8 p.m.

Saturday Boys Basketball: Chimacum at Crosspoint Academy or North Mason, 3:45 p.m. or 5 p.m. Girls Basketball: Chimacum at North Mason or Crosspoint Academy, 2 p.m. or 2:45 p.m. Men’s Basketball: Peninsula College at Lower Columbia - Red Devil Classic, 3 p.m.

Area Sports Basketball PORT ANGELES PARKS AND RECREATION Adult League Nov. 20 Standings Irwin Dental Center 1-0 Blue Sharks 1-0 4 In The Key 1-0 Burley Construction 1-0 Cougars 0-1 Langston Professional Services 0-1 Seven Cedar’s Casino 0-1 Ulin Concrete Pumping 0-1 Sergio’s/Tracy’s Insulation 0-1

Bowling LAUREL LANES Mix-N-Match Men’s High Game: John Troglia, 255 Men’s High Series: Joe Morrison, 665 Women’s High Game: Rena Peabody, 215 Women’s High Series: Rena Peabody, 513 League Leaders: OF IMA

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Men’s Clubs Nov. 18 Throw Out Three Worst Holes Individual Gross: Gary Thorne, 59 Individual Net: Eric Kovatch, 47; Jack Morley, 48; David Henderson, 51; Leroy Chase, 51; David Boerigter, 52; Gene Norton, 53 Team Gross: Lane Richards and Eric Kovatch, 68; Lane Richards and Jeff Colvin, 70 Team Net: David Henderson and GAry McLaughlin, 62; Eric Kovatch and Jeff Colvin, 62; Eric Kovatch and Quint Boe, 63; Lane Richards and Quint Boe, 64; Gene Norton and Jack Morley, 65

Volleyball Nov. 20 Coed League Standings D.A. Davidson 4-0 Blind Ambition Blinds 4-0 McCrorie Carpet One 4-0 High Energy Metals 3-1 Fitness West 3-1 Michael’s Seafood and Steakhouse 3-1 A Brewed Awakening Espresso 2-2 Joyce General Store 1-2 Captain Zak’s 1-2 Elwha River Casino 1-2 Olympic Medical Center 1-3 Northwest Wood Products 1-3 Dave’s All-Around Repair 1-3 Les Schwab Tire 0-3 Drake’s U-Bake Pizza and Subs 0-4

Basketball NBA Standings and Schedule WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 12 1 .923 — New Orleans 11 2 .846 1 Dallas 9 4 .692 3 Memphis 5 9 .357 7 1/2 Houston 3 10 .231 9 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 10 4 .714 — Utah 10 5 .667 1/2 Denver 8 6 .571 2 Portland 8 6 .571 2 Minnesota 4 11 .267 6 1/2 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Lakers 12 2 .857 — Golden State 7 7 .500 5 Phoenix 7 7 .500 5 Sacramento 4 9 .308 7 1/2 L.A. Clippers 2 13 .133 10 1/2 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Boston 10 4 .714 New York 7 8 .467 New Jersey 5 9 .357 Toronto 5 9 .357 Philadelphia 3 11 .214 Southeast Division W L Pct Orlando 9 4 .692 Miami 8 6 .571 Atlanta 8 7 .533 Washington 5 8 .385 Charlotte 5 9 .357 Central Division W L Pct Chicago 7 4 .636 Indiana 7 6 .538 Cleveland 5 8 .385 Milwaukee 5 8 .385 Detroit 5 9 .357

GB — 3 1/2 5 5 7 GB — 1 1/2 2 4 4 1/2 GB — 1 3 3 3 1/2

All Times PST Tuesday’s Games Indiana 100, Cleveland 89 New Jersey 107, Atlanta 101, OT Washington 116, Philadelphia 114, OT New York 110, Charlotte 107 Dallas 88, Detroit 84 Chicago at L.A. Lakers, LATE Today’s Games New York at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Milwaukee at Cleveland, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Toronto, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Miami at Orlando, 4:30 p.m. Detroit at Memphis, 5 p.m. San Antonio at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Dallas at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Golden State at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Chicago at Phoenix, 6 p.m. New Orleans at Utah, 6 p.m. Thursday’s Games Washington at Atlanta, 5 p.m. Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Cleveland at Orlando, 4 p.m.

The Associated Press

A

show of arms

Kansas guard Tyshawn Taylor, right, passes to a teammate while covered by Texas A&M-Corpus Christi guards Michael Bables (10) and Garland Judkins during the first half of their NCAA college basketball game in Lawrence, Kan., on Tuesday night. The Jayhawks rolled 82-41.

SPORTS ON TV

Today 1 p.m. (25) FSNW Basketball NCAA, Washington State vs. Portland (encore) 2 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA Maui Invitational, Third Place Game, Site: Lahaina Civic Center Lahaina, Hawaii (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Virginia Commonwealth vs. Tennessee, NIT Season Tip-Off, Semifinal 1, Site: Madison Square Garden - New York City (Live) 4:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NBA, Miami Heat vs. Orlando Magic, Site: Amway Center Orlando, Fla. (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, UCLA vs. Villanova, NIT Season Tip-Off, Semifinal 2, Site: Madison Square Garden - New York City (Live) 7 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Maui Invitational Championship, Site: Lahaina Civic Center - Maui, Hawaii (Live) 7 p.m. (25) FSNW Basketball NCAA, Charlotte vs. Oregon State (Live) Midnight (47) GOLF EPGA, Dubai World Championship, Round 1, Site: Jumeirah Golf Estates Dubai, UAE (Live) 3 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Dubai World Championship, Round 1, Site: Jumeirah Golf Estates - Dubai, UAE (Live) Basketball National Basketball Association Oklahoma City Thunder: Signed C Nick Collison to a multiyear contract extension.

Football Houston at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Indiana, 5 p.m. Dallas at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Chicago at Denver, 6 p.m. LA Clippers at Phoenix, 6 p.m. LA Lakers at Utah, 6 p.m. Golden State at Memphis, 6:30 p.m. New Orleans at Portland, 7 p.m.

Football NFL Standings and Schedule NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Seattle 5 5 0 .500 185 St. Louis 4 6 0 .400 177 Arizona 3 7 0 .300 188 San Francisco 3 7 0 .300 160 East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 7 3 0 .700 284 N.Y. Giants 6 4 0 .600 253 Washington 5 5 0 .500 202 Dallas 3 7 0 .300 229 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 8 2 0 .800 256 New Orleans 7 3 0 .700 235 Tampa Bay 7 3 0 .700 209 Carolina 1 9 0 .100 117 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 7 3 0 .700 191 Green Bay 7 3 0 .700 252 Minnesota 3 7 0 .300 172 Detroit 2 8 0 .200 234 AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 6 4 0 .600 243 Oakland 5 5 0 .500 238 San Diego 5 5 0 .500 274 Denver 3 7 0 .300 217 East W L T Pct PF New England 8 2 0 .800 289 N.Y. Jets 8 2 0 .800 238 Miami 5 5 0 .500 172 Buffalo 2 8 0 .200 213 South W L T Pct PF Indianapolis 6 4 0 .600 268 Jacksonville 6 4 0 .600 220 Tennessee 5 5 0 .500 257 Houston 4 6 0 .400 244 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 7 3 0 .700 233 Pittsburgh 7 3 0 .700 235 Cleveland 3 7 0 .300 192 Cincinnati 2 8 0 .200 215

PA 233 198 292 219 PA 226 220 245 271 PA 192 170 206 252 PA 146 146 226 237

PA 242 177 208 276 PA 216 270 198 287 PA 178 165 206 262

College Rk 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Team Oregon Auburn TCU Boise State LSU Stanford Wisconsin Ohio State Oklahoma State

Michigan State Alabama Arkansas Oklahoma Missouri Nebraska Virginia Tech Texas A&M South Carolina Nevada Utah Arizona Florida State North Carolina State Iowa Mississippi State

10-1 9-2 9-2 9-2 9-2 9-2 9-2 8-3 8-3 10-1 9-2 7-3 8-3 8-3 7-4 7-4

All Times PST Tuesday’s Games Miami (OH) 23, Temple 3 Today’s Games No games scheduled Thursday’s Games No. 17 Texas A&M at Texas, 5 p.m. Friday’s Games Louisville at Rutgers, 8 a.m. Ohio at Kent State, 8 a.m. West Virginia at Pittsburgh, 9 a.m. Northern Illinois at Eastern Michigan, 9 a.m. Southern Methodist at East Carolina, 11 a.m. Western Michigan at Bowling Green, 11 a.m. Buffalo at Akron, 11 a.m. Central Michigan at Toledo, 11 a.m. No. 2 Auburn at No. 11 Alabama, 11:30 a.m. Colorado at No. 15 Nebraska, 12:30 p.m. UCLA at Arizona State, 12:30 p.m. Southern Miss at Tulsa, 3:30 p.m. No. 21 Arizona at No. 1 Oregon, 4 p.m. No. 4 Boise St. at No. 19 Nevada, 7:15 p.m.

Hockey NHL Standings and Schedule

PA 207 223 211 287

All Times PST Thursday’s Games New England at Detroit, 9:30 a.m. New Orleans at Dallas, 1:15 p.m. Cincinnati at N.Y. Jets, 5:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Tennessee at Houston, 10 a.m. Green Bay at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Minnesota at Washington, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Carolina at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Seattle, 1:05 p.m. Miami at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis at Denver, 1:15 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago, 1:15 p.m. Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 1:15 p.m. San Diego at Indianapolis, 5:20 p.m. Monday Night Football San Francisco at Arizona, 5:30 p.m.

BCS STANDINGS

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Record 10-0 11-0 11-0 10-0 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-1

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF Detroit 18 13 3 2 28 66 Columbus 19 13 6 0 26 55 St. Louis 19 11 5 3 25 52 Chicago 23 11 10 2 24 71 Nashville 19 9 7 3 21 47 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF Colorado 20 12 7 1 25 72 Vancouver 20 10 7 3 23 58 Minnesota 19 10 7 2 22 46 Calgary 20 8 11 1 17 59 Edmonton 20 5 11 4 14 49 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF Phoenix 21 11 5 5 27 62 Los Angeles 20 13 7 0 26 61 Anaheim 23 10 10 3 23 57 San Jose 19 9 6 4 22 55 Dallas 19 10 8 1 21 57

GA 48 44 51 67 51 GA 60 56 47 61 82 GA 59 49 69 52 57

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 22 14 6 2 30 78 55 Pittsburgh 22 12 8 2 26 69 59 N.Y. Rangers 22 12 9 1 25 65 60 New Jersey 21 6 13 2 14 41 65 N.Y. Islanders 20 4 12 4 12 41 68 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 21 13 7 1 27 53 42 Boston 19 11 6 2 24 55 38 Ottawa 21 10 10 1 21 52 67 Toronto 20 8 9 3 19 47 55 Buffalo 22 8 11 3 19 58 68 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 22 14 6 2 30 74 64 Tampa Bay 21 12 7 2 26 65 65 Atlanta 21 9 9 3 21 65 70 Carolina 20 9 9 2 20 63 68 Florida 19 9 10 0 18 52 48 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. All Times PST Tuesday’s Games Phoenix 5, Edmonton 0 Today’s Games Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Columbus at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Washington at Carolina, 4 p.m. Detroit at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Dallas at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m.

Calgary at New Jersey, 4:30 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Boston at Florida, 4:30 p.m. St. Louis at Nashville, 5 p.m. Philadelphia at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Colorado at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Chicago at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Colorado at Edmonton, 6 p.m. Friday’s Games Carolina at Boston, 9 a.m. New Jersey at NY Islanders, 10 a.m. Calgary at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Nashville at Minnesota, 11 a.m. Chicago at Anaheim, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Washington, 2 p.m. Detroit at Columbus, 4 p.m. Toronto at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. NY Rangers at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Montreal at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. St. Louis at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. San Jose at Vancouver, 7 p.m.

Racing NASCAR Sprint Cup Series FORD 400 AT HOMESTEAD-MIAMI Driver Laps Money Start Led 1 Edwards 267 $356,823 2 190 2 Johnson 267 $279,503 6 1 3 Harvick 267 $229,151 28 0 4 Almirola 267 $172,840 24 0 5 Allmendinger 267 $160,476 5 0 6 Kahne 267 $148,098 1 10 7 Newman 267 $129,104 23 0 8 Stewart 267 $127,773 31 1 9 Kenseth 267 $122,176 13 1 10 Biffle 267 $86,100 27 0 11 Truex Jr. 267 $79,250 25 62 12 Bowyer 267 $80,425 17 0 13 Keselowski 267 $99,435 18 0 14 Hamlin 267 $88,550 37 0 15 Elliott 267 $68,900 4 0 16 Martin 267 $87,375 8 0 17 Smith 267 $79,175 10 0 18 Ku Busch 267 $112,898 15 0 19 Menard 267 $78,575 16 0 20 Ragan 267 $80,000 9 0 21 McMurray 267 $103,954 3 0 22 Labonte 267 $69,400 32 0 23 Speed 267 $87,673 41 0 24 Hornish Jr. 267 $77,075 26 0 25 Gilliland 267 $86,498 38 0 26 Ambrose 267 $90,998 20 0 27 Earnhardt Jr. 267 $76,125 22 0 28 Sadler 267 $75,825 12 0 29 Lally 266 $68,350 35 0 30 Conway 263 $82,198 42 0 31 Burton 253 $99,190 14 1 32 Ky Busch 242 $112,031 33 0 33 Mears 233 $64,450 34 0 34 Kvapil 231 $63,300 39 0 35 Montoya 231 $98,781 40 0 36 Blaney 203 $81,635 36 0 37 Gordon 99 $110,301 11 0 38 Reutimann 185 $93,156 7 0 39 Logano 166 $98,790 19 0 40 Cassill 35 $62,045 43 0 41 Nemechek 29 $61,830 29 0 42 Yeley 25 $61,535 21 1 43 Bliss 10 $61,858 30 0

Transactions

National Football League Buffalo Bills: Released OT Cornell Green from injured reserve. Signed LB Jammie Kirlew, DL Ko Quaye and WR Paul Hubbard to the practice squad. Placed LB John Russell on the practice squad-injured list. Released WR Montez Billings from the practice squad. Carolina Panthers: Signed S Gerald Alexander. Waived WR Devin Thomas. Signed QB Keith Null to the practice squad. Placed LB Sean Ware on the practice squad injured reserve. Cincinnati Bengals: Signed CB Fred Bennett. Placed DT Tank Johnson on injured reserve. Cleveland Browns: Placed LB Blake Costanzo on injured reserve. Signed LB Eric Alexander. Waived OL Jeff Hansen and RB Martell Mallett from the practice squad. Signed OL John Malecki and RB Quinn Porter to the practice squad. Detroit Lions: Released LB Caleb Campbell. Signed G Donald Thomas. New Orleans Saints: Signed LS Justin Drescher. Waived LS Jake Ingram. New York Giants: Signed WR Michael Clayton. Waived TE Jake Ballard. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Released DT Ryan Sims. Washington Redskins: Signed S Macho Harris. Placed S Anderson Russell on injured reserve. Signed RB Kestahn Moore to the practice squad.

Hockey American Hockey League Carolina Hurricanes: Acquired C Ryan Carter from Anaheim for F Stefan Chaput and F Matt Kennedy. Columbus Blue Jackets: Assigned RW Mike Blunden to Springfield (AHL). Los Angeles Kings: Reassigned D Jake Muzzin to Manchester (AHL). Recalled D Alec Martinez from Manchester. Minnesota Wild: Claimed F Patrick O’Sullivan off waivers from Carolina. New York Islanders: Recalled D Travis Hamonic from Bridgeport (AHL). New York Rangers: Acquired D Stu Bickel from Anaheim for D Nigel Williams. Philadelphia Flyers: Signed LW Michael Ryan to a one-year contract and assigned him to Adirondack (AHL). Phoenix Coyotes: Recalled D Oliver EkmanLarsson from San Antonio (AHL). Placed C Kyle Turris on injured reserve. American Hockey League Bridgeport Sound Tigers: Aassigned F Justin Taylor to Kalamazoo (ECHL). ECHL Elmira Jackals: Announced F Michael Dubuc was returned to the team by Rochester (AHL) and F Ryan Hillier was returned to the team by Syracuse (AHL). Trenton Devils: Signed G Mike Brown. Traded D Gord Burnett to Victoria for future considerations. Victoria Salmon Kings: Signed F Garth Murray to a one-year contract. Central Hockey League Rapid City Rush: Placed G Travis Yonkman on waivers. Tulsa Oilers: Placed F Chris Morehouse on waivers. Announced F Harrison Reed was assigned to the team by Lake Erie (AHL).

Baseball

Lacrosse

American League Baltimore Orioles: Named Willie Randolph bench coach, Mark Connor pitching coach, Jim Presley hitting coach, Rick Adair bullpen coach, John Russell third base coach, Wayne Kirby first base coach, Alan Dunn minor league pitching coordinator and Gary Allenson manager of Norfolk (IL). Texas Rangers: Named Thad Bosley hitting coach. National League New York Mets: Signed manager Terry Collins to a two-year contact. San Francisco Giants: Agreed to terms with 1B Aubrey Huff on a two-year contract. Can-Am League Worcester Tornadoes: Acquired C-1B Josh Banda from River City (Frontier) for a player to be named. Frontier League River City Rascals: Signed OF Caleb Curry and 2B Doug Sanders to contract extensions. Signed RHP Matt Rossman.

National Lacrosse League Buffalo Bandits: Signed F Tracey Kelusky to a one-year contract.

Soccer Women’s Professional Soccer Washington Freedom: Announced the resignation of president and general manager Mark Washo.

College Great American Conference: Announced Arkansas Tech, Harding, Henderson State, Ouachita Baptist, Southern Arkansas, Arkansas-Monticello, East Central, Southeastern Oklahoma State and Southeastern Oklahoma State have agreed to form a conference on the Division II level. The conference will begin competition in the fall of 2011 pending approval from the NCAA.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

B3

Texas’ Hamilton earns AL MVP The Associated Press

The Peninsula College men’s soccer team celebrates winning the NWAACC championship against Highline at Starfire Athletic Complex in Tukwila on Sunday. Players include Patrick Wolverton, Jared Wilson, Jeff Mullen, Dustin Walsh, Alec Risk, Parker Vacura, Adam Skowron, Michel Carbon, Lucas Costa, Brian Holguin, Tyler Hindmarch, Jake Campbell, Jake Hughes, Matt Stefanko, Brent Ricigliano, Cassius Mabitle, Aaron Funderburk, Yan Gioseffi, Muminur Chowdhury, Anthony Aguilar, Miguel Gonzalez, Prince Ash, Samuel Dafala, Jibril Gude, Aaron Oppeltz and David Astudillo.

Title: Peninsula College soccer Continued from B1 “Our athletic staff also did it the right way. They have recruited good students who are focused on academics, good citizenship and being prepared to compete,” Keegan said. The confidence level is what separates these Pirates from other Peninsula teams, Chapman said. “In the past, our teams were happy to be in the Final Four,” he said. “These guys knew they should be there. It was more of a confidence level with them.” One reason the Pirates have jelled so well together is that the players like each other and hang out together

as a team, sophomore midfielder Brent Ricigliano said. “We’re more of a team that way,” he said. One of the keys to success for this team, that went 13-3-4 on the year, is the way the Pirates view leadership roles. Chapman picks different players to be captains for different games. Ricigliano and Mullen, two of the better defenders on the team, were the captains for the championship game. “Everyone pitches in,” Ricigliano said. “Everybody steps up and takes leadership roles,” Chapman said. “Everybody on the team knows what to do [on the

field]. They know how to attack; everyone knows his role.” Gonzalez, a freshman forward who broke the school’s single-year scoring record with 15 goals, is one of many players who has had a leadership role for the team, Chapman said. Gonzalez, who scored the winning goal in the 1-0 semifinal win over No. 1-ranked Columbia Basin on Saturday and scored one of the five shootout penalty shots against Highline in the title game Sunday, broke Ernest Boham’s single-season record of 13 goals in 2007. Boham, a freshman that year, went on to score seven goals his sophomore season to earn the school’s all-time

scoring record of 20 goals. Gonzalez needs to score only six goals next year to break the all-time mark. “I’m looking forward to that,” he said. Peninsula College will hold a school assembly honoring the championship team tentatively for this coming Tuesday. The event originally was planned for Tuesday but was postponed because the college was closed due to the winter-like snow and ice storm the North Olympic Peninsula is having this The Associated Press week.

6-foot-6 sophomore. He had 10 points — all in a 4:40 span — and all of them were big. Three times Marquette scored to get within seven points and each time Arop scored on an offensive rebound to build the lead. Gonzaga had a 3-minute scoreless drought late in the game and Marquette was able to get within 65-63 on a 3-pointer by Butler with 43 seconds to go. Gray was dribbling the ball near midcourt running off some time when he was double-teamed and it looked like it would be at least a jump ball — Gonzaga had the possession arrow — but a foul was called on Darius Johnson-Odom. Gray made one free throw with 12.6 seconds left for the three-point lead. “That one was huge,” Gray said of the free throw. “I just tried to step up and relax and missed it long which is probably a change from years past. “My tendency is to shoot it short and tighten up. I missed the first one and said the second one has to

________ Sports Editor Brad ­LaBrie can be reached at 360-417-3525 or at brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews. com.

drop.” After three timeouts, two by Gonzaga, Marquette was finally able to inbound the ball with 2.5 seconds left. Butler inbounded the ball to Jae Crawford and got it back for the final shot that missed. “I didn’t want to call a timeout because I think it is easier to play against a defense that is in transition as opposed to playing a set defense,” Williams said of the timeout he called as Johnson-Odom was headed toward the basket. “I am not going to call a timeout make or miss and I ended up calling the timeout because I did not think we were getting anything good. “Two-and-a-half seconds left, shot out of bounds, I thought that we would end up getting a better shot than the shot that I knew DJ [Johnson-Odom] was about to shoot.” Gonzaga finished with 17 turnovers but Marquette was only able to get 14 points off them. Johnson-Odom had 13 points and Crowder added 10 for Marquette.

Carman: Update on Johnson Continued from B1 rock with “Hidden Rock” painted on it laying around Each player’s total score the course will receive a free breakfast or lunch is drawn from the best from the new eatery. hole-by-hole score for the Port Townsend’s next four-month gross and net big tourney is the Toys For results. Tots Scramble on Saturday, Play gets underway on Dec. 18. Saturday, Nov. 27 and will They will also hold a run until March 31. The second new tourna- holiday open house but I don’t have a date for that ment is a two-person event quite yet. scramble format match I’ll have more details in play. the coming weeks. Players earn points for For more information on playing the front, back and anything Port Townsend all 18 holes. Port Townsend’s Hidden Golf Club-related, phone 360-385-4547. Rock Cafe has a couple of specials going on through Johnson update November. Customers who eat at Jerry Johnson’s bid to the course this month will qualify for next year’s 2011 receive a small bucket of Champions Tour fell short range balls. recently at Bayonet Golf Those who play a round Course in Seaside, Calif. of golf and find a small You may remember

Johnson as a Port Angeles native, former assistant pro at Sequim’s Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course and a competitor in this year’s 2010 U.S. Senior Open. Johnson finished 24th out of 53 participants in what was ostensibly the Western Regional Qualifier for the final qualifying stage at the TPC at Eagle Trace in sunny and warm Coral Springs, Fl. Doesn’t a town named Coral Springs sound good right now? Anyway, Johnson was playing to have a chance at the final qualifier, where 50 competitors (and six alternates) compete for 12 spots on tour, only five of which are exempt from weekly qualifying. This means that for players 6-12, they will have

addicted to alcohol and cocaine. He didn’t play from 2003-05. “I do reflect. If I didn’t reflect, ‘I’ might start sneaking in there, a little ego might start sneaking in there, and that’s one thing I don’t want to happen,” Hamilton said. “So I do reflect and I think about where I was at my lowest time.” Teammates say his story motivates them. “It’s awesome, everybody makes mistakes in their lives and everybody deserves a second chance,” Rangers teammate David Murphy said before voting was announced. “A lot of people don’t take advantage of that second chance. But he took it and he ran with it.” After voting was concluded, Hamilton was selected MVP of the AL championship series win over the Yankees. Overall, he hit .190 in the postseason with five homers and nine RBIs “There were other guys around the league who had great years, but seeing Josh, what he was able to do, it’s pretty impressive,” teammate Michael Young said. “You don’t see guys go three-month stretches where they hit .400, it’s just too difficult to do.” Hamilton is the sixth Rangers MVP, following Jeff Burroughs (1974), Juan Gonzalez (1996, 1998), Ivan Rodriguez (1999) and Alex Rodriguez (2003).

Cougs hold off Portland 84-68

Zags: Gray sparks Gonzaga Continued from B1 them were on offensive putbacks,” Marquette coach “I thought E [Harris] was Buzz Williams said. “That’s definitely why we terrific tonight,” Few said. “It was a great sign for us got beat in the second half. to get those guys back [Har- In the second half they ris and Arop], getting those scored zero points in transiguys back playing the way tion.” Gray had an off game we want them to play. “He hasn’t had one of against Kansas State, finthose yet for us, so hopefully ishing with 15 points on 6-for-15 shooting, 1 of 5 on he’ll keep it going.” Jimmy Butler, who fin- 3s, and six turnovers. He was better than that ished with 22 points, had a chance to tie the game but in the first half alone against his long 3-pointer as the Marquette, scoring 15 points buzzer sounded was well off on 5-of-8 shooting, including the mark and the Golden 5 of 7 on 3s, without a turnEagles had their second over. Gray said he didn’t notice straight loss after losing 82-77 to No. 1 Duke in the any change in how Marquette covered him over the semifinals. The Golden Eagles fin- final 20 minutes. “Shots just weren’t dropished 21 of 54 from the field (38.9 percent), including ping in the second half,” he going 6 of 21 from 3-point said, then was interrupted by Few. range (28.6 percent). “The coach is playing But what even more than the poor shooting was that him too many minutes [38 Gonzaga finished with a total and all 20 in second 44-28 advantage on the half]. Because the coach boards, including 17-8 on doesn’t feel comfortable the offensive end. without him on the floor.” “In the second half, they Gonzaga led 42-33 at scored 10 baskets and shot halftime but Gray wasn’t 28 percent from the field. Of going to be the man in the those 10 baskets, seven of second, it would be Arop, a

NEW YORK — Josh Hamilton thought back to the days when his career was derailed by drugs and alcohol. “I would say a 99 percent chance that this would never happen,” he said. “I mean, honestly, I Hamilton think a lot of people would agree with that.” In one of baseball’s most inspirational turnarounds, the Texas Rangers outfielder was a runaway winner of the American League’s Most Valuable Player award Tuesday. Hamilton received 22 first-place votes and 358 points from the Baseball Writers’ Association of America. Former Cincinnati Reds teammate Joey Votto was voted the NL MVP a day earlier. Hamilton overcame eight trips to rehabilitation for addiction to lead the major leagues in batting average (.359) and slugging percentage (.633) and help the Rangers reach their first World Series. He had 32 homers and 100 RBIs despite missing time nearly all of September because of two broken ribs. After going on the disabled list in 2001 while in the minors, he became

earned their way through the qualifying stages and a grind-it-out final qualifier to earn the right to grind their way to a qualifying spot in Champions Tour events. That’s a lot of swings, a lot of pressure and stress and a lot of driving from event to event. Too bad Johnson’s efforts “ground to a halt.” You can read my previous articles on Johnson at http://tinyurl. com/23t6con; http:// tinyurl.com/2c8cu9q; and http://tinyurl. com/2andrpv ________ Michael Carman is the golf columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. He can be reached at 360417-3527 or at pdngolf@gmail. com.

SEATTLE — Klay Thompson scored Washington State’s first nine points and 18 of his 35 in the first half, and the Cougars nearly blew all of an early 20-point lead before pulling away from Portland 84-68 on Tuesday night. Playing their annual game at Seattle’s KeyArena, the Cougars (3-0) jumped to a 24-4 lead, then had to fend off a furious rally from the Pilots in the second half. Portland cut the deficit in half before halftime and pulled within 57-56 with 11 minutes left before the Cougars put it out of reach. Washington State scored 23 of the next 27 points to build its lead back to 80-60.

Faisal Aden added 21 points for the Cougars. Jared Stohl led Portland (4-2) with 21 points and Nemanja Mitrovic added 17 for the Pilots. Thompson, the Cougars’ sharp-shooting guard and second-leading scorer, made his first four shots and six of his first seven. He made 13 of 16 shots overall, including a trio of 3-pointers as the Cougars made 11 of 21 from deep. But it certainly didn’t go as easily as Washington State expected after bolting to an early 20-point lead. Following Thompson’s 3-pointer with 14:57 left, Washington State went scoreless for more than three minutes.

Dawgs: Lose Continued from B1 different view, especially after their program had Thomas cut the lead to already lost to Enes Kanter 69-67 with about a minute to the Wildcats. Those who were in Maui left, but Kentucky’s Doron Lamb hit two free throws booed him relentlessly with 36 seconds left, while throughout the game, firing Jones and Darius Miller up the occasional chant of combined to hit 3-of-4 after liar! that to seal the hard-fought win. Superb start A raucous crowd filled Jones has been superb tiny Lahaina Civic Center to the rafters for this Top-15 this season and was domimatchup, the loud-and- nant in the tournament rowdy mass of Kentucky opener against Oklahoma, fans and small-but-vocal getting 29 points, 13 Washington contingent rebounds, four blocked shots making it feel like a post- and three assists. The 6-foot-8 phenom season, not holiday tournaseemed a little extra amped ment. Washington’s fans at the start, missing one pointed much of their ire at shot after another while Jones. seeming to try too hard to He was one of the nation’s make something happen. top recruits coming out of He stayed aggressive, Portland and was set to though, grabbing seven stay in the Pacific North- rebounds and working his west after holding a news way to the free-throw line conference to announce he in the first half, though he was heading to Washing- only made 3-of-6. ton. Another of Kentucky’s He had second thoughts fabulous freshman stole the a few hours later, though, show early on. and called Kentucky coach Knight, a shifty 6-foot-3 John Calipari to say he guard from Florida, hit might have made a mis- jumpers and drove hard to take. the rim, scoring 12 points in Jones also called Wash- the first 7 minutes to help ington coach Lorenzo Romar the Wildcats to a 21-10 and, a month later, had lead. changed his mind comWashington turned up pletely and was headed to the intensity after that iniLexington. tial blow though, using its Romar and Calipari shrugged it off as an defense and ability to get 18-year-old kid being inde- into the lane to work its cisive, saying it was nothing way back. The Huskies held Kenmore than a minor subplot to a matchup of two Top 25 tucky without a field goal for nearly eight minutes to teams. Washington’s fans had a lead 35-34 at halftime.


Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, November 24, 2010 Page

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Business

Politics & Environment

Some U.S. officials exempt from new airport screening By Eileen Sullivan The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Cabinet secretaries, top congressional leaders and an exclusive group of senior U.S. officials are exempt from toughened new airport screening procedures when they fly commercially with government-approved federal security details. Aviation security officials would not name those who can skip the controversial screening. But other officials said those VIPs range from top officials like Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and FBI Director Robert Mueller to congressional leaders like incoming House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, who avoided security before a recent flight from Washington’s Reagan National Airport. The heightened new security procedures by the

Transportation Security Administration, which involve either a scan by a full-body detector or an intimate personal pat-down, have spurred passenger outrage in the lead-up to the Thanksgiving holiday airport crush. Last Friday, the TSA exempted pilots from the new procedures. Flight attendants received the same privilege Tuesday, TSA spokesman Nicholas Kimball confirmed. Both groups must show photo ID and go through metal detectors. If that sets off an alarm, they may still get a patdown in some cases, he said. The rules apply to pilots and flight attendants in uniform when they are traveling. While passengers have no choice but to submit to either the detector or what

some complain is an intrusive pat-down, some senior government officials can opt out if they fly accompanied by government security guards approved by the TSA.

‘Specialized protocol’ “Government officials traveling with federal law enforcement security details are screened at airports under a specialized screening protocol, which includes identity verification,” Kimball said. This allows the officials to skip the airport security checkpoints. The TSA would not explain why it makes these exceptions. But many of the exempted government officials have gone through several levels of security clearances, including FBI background checks. Armed security details

eliminate the need for an additional layer of security at airports. Some members of President Barack Obama’s Cabinet, including Defense Secretary Robert Gates, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, Attorney General Eric Holder and Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, travel almost exclusively on government or military planes. The TSA’s administrator, John Pistole, flies commercial and is treated like any other traveler when he flies. He waits in security lines and walks through X-ray machines, including the full-body imagers, his spokesman said. Senior White House officials David Axelrod, Valerie Jarrett and John Brennan, the president’s homeland security adviser, do the same, officials said.

Lost in a frenzy over searches, fact is, travelers will hit road Their numbers to increase by 12%, AAA says By Cristina Silva

The Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — Michael Sommermeyer’s Thanksgiving plan goes like this: Load his wife and children into their Ford Taurus, hand his teens an iPad stocked with movies and drive 15 hours — from Las Vegas to Texas. Sommermeyer would not have it any other way. Lost in the frenzy over new airport inspections is the fact that 94 percent of holiday travelers will reach their destination by road this year. For some, a snarled freeway and $3-a-gallon gasoline is a welcome respite from the madness of air travel. “The full-body scan, I am worried about it because of the radiation,” he said. “They claim it’s safe, but who knows?” Roughly 39.7 million will travel by road this year, a 12 percent increase from last Thanksgiving, according to a AAA travel survey of 50,000 U.S. households conducted during the week of Oct. 25. With more people traveling for the holiday this year than last, the numbers who chose to fly also went up.

More travelers this year

Gift shop event helps homeless PORT ANGELES — Necessities & Temptations, 217 N. Laurel St., is conducting a “Trade-in Event” to aid the homeless. Customers at the gift store can trade in any clean coat with working zippers and all buttons for $20 toward the purchase of any new coat at the store. Hats, gloves and scarves all have a “tradein” value of $2. The coats and other trade-in items will be donated to the homeless. Shoveling snow during Monday’s blizzard inspired the staff to set up this event. Customers can trade in items until Dec. 10. For more information, phone the store at 360457-6400.

Weather dangers OLYMPIA — With freezing temperatures across Washington and power outages in some areas, the state Health Department is reminding people of the danger of carbon monoxide poisoning. The deadly fumes cannot be seen or smelled. They can be generated from indoor burning — and from generators running in a confined space. The department reminds people to place generators outside and away from doors and windows, to never use charcoal briquets inside for cooking or heating and to never use gas ovens as an indoor heat source.

Air Force fires 2 The Associated Press

A passenger runs through Union Station in Washington on Tuesday ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday travel rush. The family figured on about $100 in gas in their Honda sport utility vehicle — using a grocery chain’s incentive discounts to save on every gallon — for the 1,250-mile round-trip, compared with about $800 for airfare. For his 15-hour roadtrip, Sommermeyer, a 46-yearold foreclosure mediation analyst, planned to start Tuesday night.

Annual trip While his children watch the iPad — and hopefully drift off to sleep — he and his wife can listen to the audiobook Decision Points by former President George W. Bush. They have made the drive to his father-in-law’s northern Texas house every Thanksgiving for the past eight years. Sommermeyer usually faces snow showers on rural roads and a few car accidents, but the economics made sense, especially in

these tough times, he said. “It’s a lot cheaper for us,” he said. “Even if we got a good deal on airfare, it would still be over $200 per person.” Along Interstate 70 in Colorado’s eastern plains, many holiday travelers said they were happy to make 1,000-mile-plus treks to avoid the air — and airport lines on the ground. Eric Flynn, 35, of Salt Lake City was driving to Junction City, Kan., to spend the holiday with family. Flynn, who was traveling with his wife, 4-year-old daughter and the family dog, was stopped at a gas station in rural Watkins, Colo., to fuel up. He said he was happy to be on the road instead of in the air. “It kind of seems like a pain” to fly these days, Flynn said, as he filled up the car’s tank at the gas station on the wind-swept plains, the snowcovered mountains towering on the horizon.

Real-time stock quotations at

peninsuladailynews.com

Boeing Co. and EADS had received a one-page efficiency analysis of the other’s proposal, but Schwartz said the information did not include proprietary or pricing data. Schwartz called the mistake a “profound disappointment” but said it didn’t give either company an advantage.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Tuesday. Aluminum - $1.0273 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $3.8123 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $3.7010 N.Y. Merc spot Tuesday. Lead - $2225.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9670 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1377.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1377.50 troy oz., NY Merc spot Tuesday. Silver - $27.460 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $27.568 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tuesday. Platinum - $1643.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1657.70 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tuesday.

WASHINGTON — Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz said two people have been fired from the service’s aerial Peninsula Daily News refueling tanker program after confidential informa- and The Associated Press tion was mistakenly sent to competing contractors. The document mix-up Growing pains? was the latest flub in the Andrew May’s garden column. troubled program. Sundays in The Air Force has tried since 2003 to replace its Peninsula Eisenhower-era fleet of Daily News refueling tankers. Competing contractors

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AAA reported. Car rental rates, however, could cost an average of $42 over the holiday weekend, down 4 percent from last year. Marie Johnston, 48, was traveling with her parents from Glens Falls, N.Y., to Columbus, Ohio, where her daughter, a recent college graduate, was hosting Thanksgiving in her new house. She took three days’ vacation and scheduled an overnight stop in Buffalo, N.Y., where her son attends college, to break up the 10-hour trip. Grabbing a cup of coffee at a rest stop just east of Rochester, N.Y., the family agreed that cost and convenience were the most important factors to them. “Partially because of the recession, partially because maybe people feel more secure when they’re in their own vehicle, and they have more liberty on where they’d like to go and if they change plans,” the legal assistant said.

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Notice is hereby given that the Port Commission of the Port of Port Angeles, Washington (the “Port”) will hold an open public hearing during a special meeting of the Port Commission scheduled for December 8, 2010 starting at 11:00 a.m., Pacific Time, or as soon thereafter as possible at the Port’s offices located at 338 West First Street, Port Angeles, Washington 98362, for the purpose of hearing comments from the public on the proposed issuance by the Port of its Limited Tax General Obligation Bonds, 2010 (the “Bonds”) proposed to be issued in the aggregate principal amount of not to exceed $5,000,000. The Bond proceeds will be used to finance the cost of infrastructure and improvements at the Composite Manufacturing Campus located at the Port of Port Angeles Industrial Park. Comments will be heard from all interested parties attending the hearing. Written comments prior to the hearing may be directed to Bill James, Director of Finance/Administration, Port of Port Angeles, 338 West First Street, Port Angeles, Washington 98362.

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Just over 1.62 million holiday travelers are flying the skies, a 3.5 percent increase from last year, AAA said. AAA conducted its travel survey before many groups began organizing protests at airports against additional security procedures, including the body scan machines and a more rigorous, intrusive pat-down process. When they do travel, families are not straying far from home. Those who travel by car will drive roughly 816 miles over the holiday weekend. Today and Sunday are generally the busiest days for air and road travelers. AAA attributes part of the increase in travelers to people feeling more confident about the economy and, in some cases, taking today and Friday off to make the drive. “The economy is being perceived as turning around,” AAA spokesman Michael Geeser said. “They think things are better for themselves, so maybe they are taking an extra day off from work and making it a long weekend.” The average lowest round-trip airfare is expected to cost $176 for the top 40 U.S. air routes,

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Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, November 24, 2010

c

SECTION

Our Peninsula

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, PUZZLES, DEAR ABBY In this section

A giant holiday

THANK YOU!

D

uring the 2009 holiday season, generous readers and supporters in Jefferson and Clallam counties raised a record-breaking $230,806.95 for the Peninsula Daily News’ Peninsula Home Fund. Your donations went to work immediately in 2010 — and have been felt in powerful, meaningful ways in the lives of more than 1,780 households — about 3,600 individuals — on the North Olympic Peninsula. On behalf of our neighbors in need, we thank you. For 21 years, the Home Fund has changed lives through the generous donations of PDN readers like you. Every dollar donated to the Peninsula Home Fund — 100 percent — goes directly

Thank you very much for making a difference in the lives — and futures — of your neighbors: ■ John W. Warrick and Ruth Jenkins, Port Angeles — $120. ■ Rick and Georgellen Haberman, Forks — $100. In memory of Janet and Cassidy Hunter. ■ Gary R. Sieber, Port Hadlock — $300. In honor of Donald Krone. I miss your laughter and your smiles, old friend. — Rusty. ■ Mount Pleasant Homemakers, Port Angeles — $100. ■ Venture Club of P.A. Jet-Set, Port Angeles — $250. To help with those less fortunate families in need. ■ Milo and Terri Walker, Port Angeles — $100. In memory of Elmer Rarity. ■ The Birthday Lunch Bunch, Port Angeles — $50. ■ William L. Plumley and Mark O. Downing, Forks — $100. ■ John Brewer. Port Angeles — $125. In memory of Henry Acevedo, a true gentleman and a fine editor. n Peninsula Bottling Co. Inc. of Port Angeles donated 50 cents from every $7.99 Pepsi/Dr Pepper-brand 24-pack “cube” sold by participating North Olympic Peninsula retailers in early December 2009 This raised $1,353.50 for the Peninsula Home Fund. Our heartfelt thanks to Peninsula Bottling and the participating retailers: Port Angeles — Swain’s General Store, Grandview Grocery and Mount Pleasant IGS. Sequim — Sequim QFC, Hardy’s Market and Carlsborg Station. Forks — Forks Outfitters, Ron’s Food Mart. Clallam Bay — Weel Road Deli. Neah Bay — Washburn’s General Merchandise, Makah Minimart. LaPush — Lonesome Creek. Chimacum — Chimacum Chevron. ■ A benefit show by The Reincarnations of Rock & Roll, a Port Townsendbased group, for the Peninsula Home Fund at 7 Cedar Casino on Sept. 6, 2009, raised $1,760. Our sincere thanks to “Elvis” (James Reynolds of Brinnon); “Janis Joplin” (Kendra, Reynolds’ wife); Raven, a Port Townsend musician, showman and actor who recreated Buddy Holly; Roger Olsen, who recreated Stevie Ray Vaughan; Dale Hubbard, DJ at KMAS 1030 AM radio in Shelton; and the 7 Cedars staff and management. ■ Alaska Invitational Golf Tournament — an 18-hole, two-person best ball team event organized by Bill Engle of Sequim open to anyone with connections to Alaska — was held at the SunLand Golf and Country Club in Sequim on May 2, 2009. It raised $1.925. This was the ninth year in a row that the tournament has raised money for the Peninsula Home Fund. Its sponsors were: Alaska Architectural Lighting, Anchorage. Clark Land Office, Sequim. William and Patty Engle, Sequim. D. Jean Ernst, Sequim. First Federal, Sequim. Michael Murphy, Merrill Lynch, Anchorage. Edward and Ruth Jones, Sequim. 7 Cedars Casino, Blyn. Robert and Thelma Sinnett, Sequim. Wes and Janean Stoecker, Sequim. ■  Dorothea Morgan, internationally known artist and long-time resident of Clallam County, donated four numbered prints of her silverpoint drawing “Love Song” for sale) — the sale of the artwork brought in $325.

to assist those in need in Jefferson and Clallam. No money is diverted for administration or other overhead. On this and the following three pages are contributions received during the 2009 campaign, identified as requested by the donors — name and donation; those who requested that the amount of their donation be kept private; and those who requested anonymity (only their cities and donations are listed). News articles about the Home Fund and who benefits will be published weekly from Thanksgiving through Dec. 30.

■ Angelo and Brenda Spandrio, Sequim and Ojai, Calif. ■ Olympic Springs, Inc., Carlsborg. ■ Wes Ringius, Port Angeles. In honor of Emily Ringius. ■ Mrs. Patti Dutro Forsberg, Port Angeles. In memory of my late husband, Dr. Eugene Dutro, DDS. (By request, this Home Fund donation assigned to dental work). ■ Dan and Esther Darrow, Port Ludlow. ■ Linda and Gary Snow, Carlsborg. ■ Chuck and Karen Russell. Port Hadlock. In memory of two generous, kind people — Irene and Claud Wilcox. ■ Anne G. Dalton, Port Angeles. ■ Port Townsend School of Massage, Port Townsend. ■ Bonnie Hawkins, Aliso Viejo, CA. This small donation is in loving memory of my dear friend Janis Tucker who died in a vehicular accident on Dec. 13, 2008, in Port Angeles. ■ Mel and Helen Williams, Port Townsend. In memory of Jerry Lindsey. ■ Mel and Helen Williams, Port Townsend. In memory of Karen Cays. ■ Laurel Burton, Port Angeles. ■ David and Kimberly Hightower, Seattle. Donation made as a gift to our parents, Ken Gilbertson and Cathy Lear [of Port Angeles]. Happy Holidays and Happy New Year! ■ Bul-Lois Thomas, Sequim. ■ Christine Hemp and Ole Kanestrom, Port Townsend. In honor of Mary Hemp. ■ Edward and Delores Boyle, Sequim. In memory of our son, John Boyle. ■ Iyone Trivich, Port Angeles. ■ James and Lucy Kittrick, Port Angeles. ■ Angela Regan, Sequim. ■ Rupa Snowden, Sequim. ■ Pamela Flettre, Sequim. ■ Shira Zerner, Scottsdale, Ariz. In memory of Janice Tucker. ■ Eugene and June Haugen, Sequim. ■ Park View Villas Residents, Port Angeles. ■ Judy Ware, Port Angeles. ■ Hannah Russell, Port Townsend. ■ Carrie Weisse, Mukilteo. ■ Gerald and Diana Estberg, Port Angeles. ■ Joe Twogood, Port Angeles. ■ Dorothy West, Sequim. In memory of Earl M. West ■ Gene and Lourdes Takagi, San Francisco. In memory of Janice Tucker. ■ David Wood, Sequim. ■ Estes Builders, Sequim. Awarded from Estes Builders as part of our annual contributions to our community. ■ Linda Beasler, Port Angeles. In memory of Bernie Abbott. ■ Linda Beasler, Darcy Beasler and Kathy McFarland, Port Angeles. In memory of Bill Winter. ■ DZ and MZ, Port Angeles. ■ Linda M. Scott, Port Townsend. ■ Ernest W. Sauerland, Port Townsend. ■ ASM Audio Enterprises, Ojai, Calif. ■ Ed and Beatrice Temple, Sequim. Thank you for the good work you do. God bless! ■ Leslye Stewart, Forks. In memory of Dennis Bingham. ■ Port Angeles — $100. In memory of our parents. ■ No city listed — $500. In honor of Anna Gorman. ■ Port Angeles — $50. In honor of the lady who lost a $50 bill. You lost it. I found it. The Home Fund got it. ■ Port Angeles — $1,000. In honor of the Olymic Peninsula Dental Society. ■ Sequim — $100. In memory of Judy Sutherland. ■ Sequim — $250. In honor of the Order of Malta. ■ Port Angeles — $25. Pay It Forward.

■ Sequim — $60.39. Donation made possible by sales done at the Community Christmas Shoppe sponsored by Special Needs Advocacy Parents (SNAP). ■ Sequim — $59.56. Special thanks to Vision Nursery and Special Needs Advocacy Parents (SNAP) for providing an outlet for the sales of charitable art. n James W. Quinn, Port Angeles — $100. In memory of Mary Quinn. n Howard Gipson, Port Angeles — $100. n Weldon and Joan Sharp, Sequim — $100. n Max and Betty Paulk, Sequim — $500. n Xi Iota Beta Sigma Phi, Port Angeles — $150. n Thomas Santos, Sequim — $50. In honor of Ruth Godfrey. n Karen and Ron Bednarski, Port Townsend — $100. n Don and Peggy Whitmire, Sequim — $150. In memory of Ellis R. Clapp. n Theresa Webster, Sequim — $50. n Janine Moore, Forks — $25. n Joan and Richard Sargent, Port Angeles — $20. In memory of daughter Paula Sargent. n Emerald State Environmental, LLC/Brian Economy, owner; Port Angeles — $250. n Carlene Brown, Sequim — $100. In memory of Ron Brown. n Bonnie Robb, Lake Oswego, Ore. — $250. In honor of my Amazing Family. n Quail Hollow Psychotherapy, Sequim — $100. n Drs. Joseph and Judy Price, Sequim — $100. n Fred and Ann Weinmann, Port Townsend. n Marilyn Brunins, Sequim. n Ben and Kay Lonn, Forks. n Ron and Sandy Casscles, Sequim. n Janis Burger, Port Angeles. n Richard L. Hempel, Sequim. In honor of Carolyn Hempel. n Bernice Swanson, Sequim. n Joyce and Vince Zodiaco, Nordland. n Jim and Marci Thomsen, Port Angeles. In memory of Les and Lucille Puffer. n Al and JoAnn Hamilton, Port Angeles. In memory of Dick and Gloria Timm. n Keith and Fran Wollen, Port Angeles. n Hazel Gershowitz, Port Angeles. n Roger and Dianne Ludeman, Port Angeles. n Roland and Vivian Raymond, Port Townsend. n Kathleen Chapman, Port Angeles. n Dorothea B. Coe, Port Angeles. In memory of H.E. Coe. n Dale and Nathalia Doran, Port Angeles. n Ed and Carol Fjerstad, Sequim. In memory of Burnie Fjerstad and Mary C. Nosko. n Mary Howell, Forks. n Judith A. Lindberg, Port Angeles. In memory of Marvin J. Lindberg. My Dad. My Hero. n Homer and Karla Muto, Port Angeles. n Helen Aastrom, Port Angeles. In memory of Eleanor Naddy. n Ginge and Dale Nichols, Carlsborg. In memory of our parents. n Shirley and Mike Berg, Sequim. n Paul and Bobbie Ryan, Sequim. In memory of sister Pat n Dorothea Morgan, Port Angeles. Peninsula Home Fund, the perfect, true Christmas idea! n Phyllis and Dale W. Luther, Port Angeles. n Carol Clark, Port Angeles. n Dick and Dottie Foster, Port Angeles. n Laura J. Horrocks, Port Angeles. n Dale Cushman, Port Angeles. n Jack Munro, Sequim. n Leila Roberts, Port Angeles. In honor of Dan Roberts Sr.

n Ruth M. Lindberg, Port Angeles. In memory of Marvin J. Lindberg. n Inge Magrs, Sequim. In memory of Bill Magrs. n Charlotte Petersen, Port Angeles. n Donald and June Hall, Sequim. n Eleanor Thornton, Forks. n Bob and Carol Philpott, Port Angeles. n Nancy Oman, Port Angeles. In memory of Hank and Jane Burkhardt. n Agnes R. Hansen, Forks. In memory of Larry and Scott. n Monica Mansfield, Sequim. n Yvette N. Polizzi, Sequim. n Jean Coplin, Port Angeles. In memory of William Coplin. n Dr. Roger Eichman, Nordland. n Bill and Linda Rhodes, Port Angeles. n Dr. and Mrs. Edward A. Hopfner, Port Angeles. n Dixielee and Stan Sayles, Port Townsend. In memory of Sandy Wiest and Michael Sayles. n Jean Lodeen, Port Angeles. In memory of Erven Lodeen. n R. Bumgarner, Sequim. n Paula Cunningham, Port Angeles. In loving memory of my mother, Elizabeth Cunningham. n Carolyn Muller, Port Angeles. In loving memory of Willard Muller. n Mark D. McCormick. Sequim. In honor of my loving parents, Trudy and

Jim McCormick. n Lanna and Edward Hammer, Port Angeles. In memory of Rosa Hammer. n Marolyn and Herb Russell, Port Angeles. In memory of Willard Muller. n Ken and Charlotte Patterson, Port Angeles. n Chuck and Jacque Paye, Sequim. n Jim and Linda deBord, Port Angeles. n Just Dolls of Washington, Port Angeles. n PAHS Class of 1954, Port Angeles. n Wallace L. Avery, Sequim. n Bob and Leola Reeve, Sequim. n Rex and Olga Wilson, Port Angeles. In memory of Henry Acevedo. n Ellen and Ted Tsoneff, Port Angeles. In memory of Jane Rowan. n Ralph Lochridge and Dr. Kathy Van Griffen, Irvine, Calif. n Jim and Dona Cloud, Port Angeles. In honor of family and friends. n Betty J. Abbott, Port Angeles. In memory of my supportive family. n Don and Carole Tipton, Sequim. n Gary and Karen Kettel, Port Angeles. In memory of Martin and Amelia Kettel and Carl and Irene Haffurd. n Tony and Daryl Masi, Port Angeles. n Violet L. Embree, Port Angeles. In memory of parents.

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Your gift to our community Since 1989, the Peninsula Daily News has made it a priority to help our North Olympic Peninsula’s most vulnerable members — children, families and seniors — who struggle with hunger, homelessness and neglect. This holiday season we ask you to continue your support for those who are facing times of crisis with a fully IRS taxdeductible contribution to the Peninsula Home Fund. The fund is unique and nonprofit — 100 percent of your donation, every penny — goes to give a “hand up, not a handout” to our neighbors who are facing times of crisis.


C2

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Thanks! Continued from C1 n Ed Curington, Sequim. n Jon and Elizabeth Valentine, Sequim. n Ray and Jane Erickson, Port Townsend. n Douglas McClary, Sequim. In memory of my parents — Jack and Mardelle McClary. n Richard and Karen Grennan, Sequim. In memory of both our dads. n Mr. and Mrs. T.R. Santos, Sequim. n Carol Lee and Robin Moses, Carlsborg. n Bob and Berit Cole, Sequim. n David and Ann Salmon, Sequim. In memory of Ralph Leon and Ethel Salmon. n Pat Vautier, Port Angeles. In memory of Dan Vautier. n Nada Johnson, Port Angeles. n Kathleen Balducci and family, Port Angeles. In memory of Bal and so many loved ones. n Marjorie Faires, Port Angeles. n Sarah Hile, Sequim. n Don and Betty Gray, Port Angeles. In honor of our children, grand and great. n Rita Marston, Port Angeles. In loving memory of Don Marston. n June L. Matriotti, Sequim. In memory of Jo Matriotti Jennings. n Gary and Geri Braun, Port Angeles. n Betty M. Udd, Sequim. n Kerry and Marilyn Perkins, Port Angeles. In memory of Eva Wilson. n Kerry and Marilyn Perkins, Port Angeles. In memory of our families. n James McPherson, Port Angeles. n Doug and Trudy Rittenhouse, Port Angeles. n Nancy H. Toepke, Port Angeles. n Louise Carson, Port Angeles. n Pat Schoen and Connie Engvall, Sequim. n Russ and Sandra Hesselman, Port Angeles. In memory of Scott Hesselman. n Pat and Jim Bias, Sequim. In memory of Herb Quinn. n Sequim — $50. In memory of Doug and Lillian Bacock. n No city listed — $20. In honor of Cheapskate Cards. n Sequim — $100. In memory of Marge Scharschmidt. n Port Townsend — $100. In memory of my husband. n Port Ludlow — $50. In memory of our moms. n Port Angeles — $20. In honor of Capt. Ryan Ashley, USMC, currently serving in Afghanistan. n Port Townsend — $100. In honor of Jerry Thorsen. n Port Angeles — $50. In memory of my daughter Diane. n Port Angeles — $100. In memory of Mathilda Thompson. ■ David and Barbara Allen, Forks — $200. In memory of Barney and Sylvia Murphy. ■ Jack and Jan Forrest, Port Townsend — $25. ■ Barbara Brittingham, Port Angeles — $100. In memory of the 95 transgendered/transsexual people murdered in 2009 just for being who they are. ■ Nancy O’Gorman, Port Angeles — $50. In memory of Ann Brewer, who loved Christmas. ■ Jan McIlroy, Sequim — $100. In memory of Bill and Mike. ■ J.D. and Sam McCraw, Port Townsend — $100. In memory of Frank Swartout. ■ Andrea Alstrup, Sequim — $100. In memory of Kenneth Alstrup. ■ Graysmarsh Farm, Inc., Sequim — $100. ■ Bob and Ann Kennedy, Port Angeles — $100. ■ Nancy McDonald, Port Angeles — $100. In memory of Robert “Mac” McDonald. ■ LaVonne and Bill Mueller, Sequim — $100. ■ Bob and Joni Kennedy, Port Angeles — $100. ■ David Marceau, Sequim — $25. In memory of Chris Marceau. ■ Bob and Gisela Kavanaugh, Joyce — $100. In honor of America’s soldiers. ■ Joyce and Jack Chiasson, Port Angeles — $100. In memory of the parents of Joyce Chaisson, Harold and Beatrice Crombie. ■ Jack and Jan Tatom, Sequim — $100. In memory of Carol Munro. ■ Bill and Carol Peet, Port Angeles — $100. ■ Bruce and Gerri Ferguson, Port Angeles — $100. ■ Renate B. Melvey, Sequim — $50. ■ Karen and Joe Holtrop, Sequim — $100. ■ Jim and Bev Cone, Sequim — $100. ■ John Schuy, Sequim — $100. In memory of Berni. ■ Sam and Martha Baker, Port Angeles — $300. ■ Olympic Peninsula Doll Club, Sequim — $200. ■ Ronald Reinhart, Quilcene — $150. In memory of Jane Reinhart. ■ Larry and Nancy Lang, Port Angeles — $100. ■ Mr. and Mrs. Ray C. Martell, Port Angeles — $25. In honor of Joe Abbott. ■ Randy and Jane Priest, Sequim — $100. ■ Walter and Edith Rowell Centennial, CO — $100. In honor of Ben and Donna Pacheco. A gift for Christmas for our Peninsula family. ■ David and Linda Johnson, Sequim — $200. Remembering generous and loving parents. ■ Mr. and Mrs. Fred W. Sullivan, Walnut Creek, CA — $50. ■ Mary and Gary Underwood, Port Angeles — $100. In memory of Lacy Sturtevant. ■ Barbara Edl and Paul Kalanick, Sequim — $200. ■ Delores Hansen and Warren Sutherland, Port Townsend — $40. In memory of Kurt Hansen. ■ Mary Louise Melly, Port Angeles — $100. In honor of Pen-

insula College EHS, Educare, ECE and FLE staff and teachers. Thanks for another wonderful year of working together caring for young children and families. You’re the best! ■ Karl Martin, Port Angeles — $50. ■ Yvonne Dillon and Daniel Zimm, Port Townsend — $100. ■ Don Case, Port Townsend — $700. ■ Stan and Sally Garlick, Port Angeles — $150. In honor of Lucile Wilcox. ■ Randy and Holly Michulscheck, Port Angeles — $250. In memory of Fred Miehulscheck Sr. ■ Randy and Holly Michulscheck, Port Angeles — $250. In memory of Lorene M. Parks. ■ John and Renee Jones, Sequim. ■ Barbra Baker, Sequim. In honor of Cy Oden. ■ Ruth and Richard Hazelton, Sequim. ■ Mr. and Mrs. Williams Beal, Port Angeles. ■ Joe and Fran Streva, Sequim. ■ Barbara Erler and Mel Perricone, Sequim. ■ Jim and Faith Haynes, Sequim. ■ Richard and Lela Aksamit, Sequim. ■ Beverly Stanley, Port Angeles. ■ Bob and Audrey Kaplan, Port Angeles. ■ Charles and Hazel Blake, Sequim. ■ Tom and Evelyn Campbell, Sequim. ■ Fred and Carol Royce, Port Angeles. ■ Arnold and Debbie Schouten, Port Angeles. ■ Bob and Joanne Bird, Brinnon. ■ Joe and Naomi Denhart, Port Angeles. In memory of our parents and our friends Dusty Westall, Neil Jervis and Larry Choate. ■ Lucille Caughron, Sequim. In memory of Leonard Caughron. ■ Bradley and Kathy Anderson, Port Angeles. ■ Willard and Paula Baker, Sequim. ■ Randi and Heather Hansen, Port Angeles. In memory of Phyllis Arndt. ■ Al and Barbara Deese, Port Angeles. In honor of Ann Holke. ■ Nancy Wilcox, Port Angeles. In memory of Ronald R. Farrington. I miss you so much. You were always there for me and for this I will be forever grateful. Thank you for the wonderful memories. ■ Nancy, Angie, Eric and Ronald Hansen, Port Angeles. In memory of Cliff and Cliffy Hansen. You are always in our thoughts. We love and miss you more than any words can ever say. ■ John, Sue and Jenna Huston and Steve Eikum, Port Angeles. In memory of Tom Duval. ■ John, Sue and Jenna Huston and Steve Eikum, Port Angeles. In memory of Tom Duval. ■ Lee and Irene Wyman, Port Angeles. ■ Sandra and David Marsh, Sequim. ■ Robert and Marinette Howard, Sequim. In honor of Ellen and Jo. ■ Joel and Nancy Magisos, Sequim. ■ Chuck and Marian McGilvra, Port Angeles. In memory of Jean Snyder. ■ Kathleen Young, Port Townsend. ■ Pam Catlin, Port Angeles. In honor of The Party Girls. ■ Steve and Weezie Conner, Port Townsend. ■ Jack and Sue Spears, Port Angeles. ■ Maura and Roger Oakes, Port Angeles. In memory of Roberta and Merrill Oakes. ■ Deb and Tom Cox, Sequim. ■ Ella Sandvig, Port Townsend. ■ Jill Blake, Sequim. ■ Linda Anderson, Sequim. ■ Nydia Levick, Sequim. ■ Fred and Alta Wilson, Port Angeles. ■ Ed Chadd, Port Angeles. ■ William and Sharon Bugg, Sequim. ■ Paul and Pam Cunningham, Port Angeles. ■ Judy Munro, Port Angeles. In loving memory of my parents, Tom and Sally Munro. ■ Lorraine Schouten, Port Angeles. In memory of Riley Blake. ■ Rich and Claudia Fox, Sequim. In memory of Dan Holmquist. ■ Ronald, June and Bruce Coleman, Sequim. In honor of all who need assistance. ■ Peter and Karen Bulkeley, Sequim. ■ Dave and Kath Gronning, Port Angeles. In honor of “The Eighties” and Finley. ■ Dave and Kath Gronning, Port Angeles. In memory of Kathy, Agnes, Randy and Stan. ■ Barry and Ellen Lerich, Nordland. ■ Joanna L. Baker, Port Angeles. In memory of Harrison Baker Jr. ■ David and Cynthia Martin, Sequim. ■ Bill and Sandy Bloor, Port Angeles. ■ N. J. Hafner, Port Townsend. In memory of Kenneth. ■ Bill and Millie Lawson, Sequim. ■ Sue and C.V. Tondreau, Sequim. ■ Gene and Lois Brown, Sequim. In memory of Greg Brown. ■ Candace and Mike Shale, Sequim. ■ Olympic Electric Co., Inc., Port Angeles. In honor of Henry and Jane Burkhardt. ■ Daphne Raymond, Port Angeles. In memory of Leo and Brian Raymond. ■ George and Shirley Williams, Port Townsend. In honor of Keith and Manine. ■ Kathy Grissom, Port Angeles. ■ Charles and Corrine Horton, Sequim. In memory of our

PeninsulaHome Fund

Donate ONLINE! YOU CAN DONATE to the Peninsula Home Fund on the Peninsula Daily News’ web site, www. peninsuladailynews.com, as well as by mailing in the coupon on Page C1 today with your donation. The easy-to-use online form allows you to donate by check or money order — or by Visa, MasterCard or Discover card. Look IN THE PDN on Thanksgiving Day for the first in a series of articles on how the Home Fund operates and who benefits from your generosity.

parents. ■ Bob and Sue Erzen, Sequim. ■ Alice B. Watkins, Port Angeles. ■ Hazel Vail, Port Angeles. In memory of Carol Chapman. ■ Mary and Guy Brum, San Diego, Calif. ■ Everwarm Hearth and Home, Port Angeles. ■ John and Rosemary Forster, Port Angeles. ■ Helen Kushman, Port Angeles. In memory of Randy Kushman, Parents Hilman and Lillian Aal. To honor daughter and sonin-law Kath and Dave Gronning for all their thoughtfulness. ■ Sharon B. Hollatz, Port Angeles. In honor of my parents Joe and Belle. ■ Jean and E.C. Gockerell, Sequim. ■ John and Nancy Jost, Sequim. ■ Bill and Joan Riedel, Sekiu. In memory of Riedel family. ■ Mr. and Mrs. Michael Moore, Sequim. ■ Donald Naddy, Port Angeles. In memory of Eleanor Naddy. ■ Peninsula College Education Staff: Susan, Ginny, Sandra, Angela, Anna, Pam, Mary Lou, Diane, Crisie, Port Angeles. ■ Violet Grall, Port Angeles. In memory of my 3 brothers — Emery, Sherman, Harold — and sister Gloria. I still miss you. ■ Steve and Linda Bailey, Carlsborg. ■ Leland and Cheryl Coulter, Sequim. ■ Jackie M. Herring, Sequim. ■ Gene and Jean Spargo, Sequim. ■ George and Bertha Norris, Port Angeles. In memory of our son Steven and daughter Patricia. ■ Ingrid Lehrer, Sequim. ■ Dorothy C. Melly, Port Angeles. ■ James and Mary Jane Moore, Sequim. In honor of brothers and sisters. ■ Dan and Patricia Nellis, Sequim. ■ Grant and Patsy Simpson, Sequim. ■ Bill and Beth VerSteeg, Sequim. In honor of our Fallen Four. ■ Dennis and Diane Isaac, Sequim. ■ Pat Bartlett and Margaret Lawrence, Port Angeles. ■ Brett and Susan Oemichen, Port Ludlow. ■ Steve and Gloria Ricketts, Port Hadlock. ■ Robert and Sheila Becker, Port Angeles. ■ Ann Chang, Port Angeles. In memory of Lucy Ordona. As always, I miss you and your wit and wisdom. You were a special lady. ■ Ann Chang, Port Angeles. In memory of Todd MdGarvie. You are always missed. Your memory lives on in your beautiful children. ■ Ann Chang, Port Angeles. In memory of Mary Wyman and Theodin Nelson. Your combined loss has left a huge void in this community. Your memories are treasured. ■ Ann Chang, Port Angeles. In memory of Hana Cannon. I miss your smile, your sense of humor and your way with words.. ■ Ann Chang, Port Angeles. In honor of my family. Thank you all for just being you. You are the best. ■ Donald and Barbara Reidel, Port Angeles. In memory of our parents, Max and Sylvia Reidel and Arthur and Armada Dixon. ■ Chris and Joan Antolock, Port Angeles. In honor of B. Ralston. ■ Chris and Joan Antolock, Port Angeles. In memory of Ernest and Agda Johnson. ■ Bill and Sharon Alton, Port Angeles. ■ John and Patricia Cleall, Port Angeles. ■ Larry and Lynn Gosser, Port Angeles. ■ Larry and Kathie Karst, Port Angeles. ■ Lois and John Silver, Port Angeles. In memory of our parents. ■ Ron and Marjorie Dotson, Port Angeles. ■ Edna and James Kridler, Sequim. ■ James H. Symes, Sequim. ■ Dana and Sally Dolloff, Jacksonville, Fla. ■ The Toggery, Port Angeles. ■ Dr. Edward J. Zoble, Port Angeles. ■ Larry and Marilynn Elliott, Sequim. ■ Ruth and Robert Worley, Port Angeles. ■ Sara Harvey, Port Angeles. In memory of George Harvey. ■ Diane Kaufman and Jim Walters, Port Angeles. ■ Grace Wanrow, Sequim. In memory of Michael Wanrow. ■ Bob’s Electric, Port Angeles. ■ Sharon and Bob Gavin, Port Angeles. ■ David and Mary Hostvedt, Port Angeles. ■ R. Kane, Port Angeles. In honor of Midge Bader. ■ April Kilgore and Monroe Stringham, Port Angeles. ■ Bob and Mary Brodhun, Port Angeles.

■ Riley and Ann Bigler, Sequim. ■ Mike and Prue Nathan, Port Angeles. ■ Richard and Sally Ruud, Port Angeles. In memory of Joan Gould. ■ Pam and John Clise, Port Townsend. Thank you all! ■ Lorna J. Wells, Port Angeles. ■ Kathleen Melton, Port Angeles. In memory of Joseph Melton. ■ R. and D. Croteau, Port Angeles. ■ Fay and Argyle Baukol, Sequim. In memory of Ken Baukol ■ Margaret Levitan, Sequim. In memory of Seymour (Sy) Levitan, M.D. — Always with us in our hearts and minds. Gone but not forgotten. ■ Gale and Shelley Peterson, Port Townsend. In memory of Sally Garcea. ■ Marilyn Bruning, Sequim. In honor of Fritz Bruning. ■ Wayne Favre and Christina Hellurch, Nordland. In honor of Art and Julie. ■ William and Jean Rucker, Sequim. ■ Donald and Colleen Daley, Port Angeles. In memory of Russell Ryckman. 12-16-57 — 10-3099. Gone but not forgotten. ■ Gary and Dianne Salyer, Sequim. ■ Doris L. Cromwell, Sequim. In memory of Mark Cromwell. ■ Rose Crumb, Port Angeles. In memory of “Red” Crumb. ■ Larry and Darla Kalsbeek, Sequim. In memory of Kim Kalsbeek. ■ David and Marion Harrison, Sequim. ■ Voneda Stiewe, Chimacum. In memory of Grandson Rob Larsen. ■ Marlynn Langford, Port Angeles. In memory of Calvin Langford. ■ Nancy and Ed Grier, Port Angeles. ■ M. Bader, Port Angeles. In honor of no sand! ■ Dixie Romadka, Port Townsend. ■ Bill and Beverlee Benbow, Sequim. ■ Jane Glass, Sequim. ■ Polly and Ray Gilkeson, Sequim. ■ Hazel Staudenraus, Port Angeles. ■ Mrs. E. W. Richardson, Port Angeles. In memory of Elwood Richardson. ■ Lillian McVay, Sequim. ■ Monte Rivett, Port Angeles. In honor of June Rivett. ■ Dianna Cross, Port Angeles. In memory of E.R. Cross. ■ Frank Meek, Sequim. ■ Mt. View Rebekah Lodge, No. 34, Port Angeles. ■ Carolyn Ramey, Port Townsend. ■ Glee Hubbard, Port Ludlow. In memory of Jessica Phelps. ■ Mrs. E. A. Hixson, Port Angeles. In memory of Ed Hixson. ■ Dianna Cross, Port Angeles. In memory of Candy Piccolotti. ■ Quilcene — $15. In memory of Pat Casad. ■ Port Angeles — $150. In honor of Valerie. ■ Sequim — $100. In memory of my husband. ■ Sequim — $100. In memory of Roger and Arline. ■ Port Angeles — $100. In honor of Grandpa Jack, from his five grandchildren. ■ Port Angeles — $150. In honor of E. Patterson and T. Ebert. ■ Port Angeles — $125. In memory of Jack Partridge. ■ Forks — $150. In memory of Kris Fairbanks. ■ Port Angeles — $25. In memory of family and friends. ■ Anonymous — $80. In memory of Tom Duvall. ■ Port Hadlock — $100. In honor of Chris. ■ Sequim — $100. In memory of our parents. ■ Port Townsend— $100. In memory of Dr. Nancy Baden. ■  Gayle and Dick Larson, Sequim — $50. ■  Ray Weinmann, Port Angeles — $250. ■  Margie Movius, Port Angeles — $113. In memory of my nephew, Patrick W. (Pat) Rose. ■  Margie Movius, Port Angeles — $113. In memory of my daughter, Beverly J. Rice. ■  Margie Movius, Port Angeles — $113. In memory of my son, Paul J. Raber. ■  Margie Movius, Port Angeles — $113. In honor of Dr. Phillip Downer, M.D., of Orthopedic Specialists of Seattle. Dr. Downer is one of only a few physicians in the Pacific Northwest who performs hip replacement surgery using the Anterior Approach. This new procedure offers patients quicker steps to recovery and makes smallincision surgery an option for more patients. ■  Margie Movius, Port Angeles — $25. In honor of Rose Crumb and the Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County. ■  Chul and Kay You, Port Angeles — $200. ■  Jan Knudson, Seattle — $125. In honor of my family’s best efforts. ■  Janet and Bernie Bruening, Sequim — $100.

Peninsula Daily News ■  Hoch Construction, Port Angeles — $1,000. ■  Jim and Laurine Drennan, Port Angeles — $100. ■  Wayne and Charlotte Duchow, Port Angeles — $100. ■  Betty J. Nicholson, Port Angeles — $100. ■  Theodore and Anna Rixon, Port Angeles — $25. ■  Bill and Barb Pearl, Port Angeles — $100. ■  Bob and Margaret Mitchell, Port Angeles — $100. In memory of Ernie and Helen Brannon. ■  Van Maxwell and Rennie Shannon, Port Angeles — $50 ■  Denzel and Lisa Schoenfeldt, Port Angeles — $50. ■  Jerry and Arlene Weed, Sequim — $100. ■  Naomi Marcus, Port Townsend — $200. ■  Jerry and Margaret King, Forks — $1,000. In memory of Janice King. ■  Carol Simon and Paul Willems, Port Townsend — $100. ■  Myra W. Ward, Sequim — $100. In memory of my husband, John C. Ward. ■  Mike and Freda Tallmadge, Port Angeles — $100. In memory of Edna, Helen, Liz, Owen, Fred and Phyllis. ■  Bernard and Mercedita Del Valle, Port Townsend — $150. ■  Patricia A. Donlin, Port Angeles — $100. ■  Donna Brown, Port Angeles. ■  Olympic Suites Inn, Forks. ■  Jean and Everett Tozier, Port Angeles ■  David Miller, Port Angeles ■  Don and Marilyn Thomas, Sequim. We believe in your Fund and the concept of giving a hand up, not a handout.... ■  Kathy and Jim Wesley, Port Angeles. ■  Chris and Valerie Mohr, Sekiu. ■  Denise Pare-Muirhead, Danville, Calif. In memory of Tom Duval. ■  Gabe and Robin Ornelas, Port Townsend. In memory of Catherine and Bill Groshelle. ■  Ed Bowlby and Mary Sue Brancato, Sequim. ■  Lew and Nora Polizzi, Sequim. ■  Sherrie and James Schouten, Port Angeles. ■  Alitya Florence, Port Townsend. ■  Florence Chamberlain, Port Angeles. ■  Juanita Weissenfels, Forks. In memory of Liz Brown and Kris Fairbanks. ■  David and Loretta Bryant, Sequim. In memory of Bacchus. ■  Paul Blake and Martha Ellul, Sekiu. ■  Paula and Paul Slyh, Sequim. In memory of loved ones. ■  Shirley and Bob Widdicombe, Sequim. ■  Ann and Gene Trelstad, Port Angeles. ■  Darold and Kay Seed, Port Angeles. ■  Marie Botnen, Sequim. In memory of Nadene Botnen. ■  A.L. and Beth McGuffin, Sequim. ■  Terry and Phyllis McMahon, Sequim. ■  Dick and Gloria Atkins, Port Townsend. ■  Joe and Claudia Girard, Port Angeles. ■  Joan Keegan, Port Angeles. ■  Ernest Sauerland, Port Townsend. ■  Joseph and Renee Bleile, Sequim. In memory of Riley Blake. ■  Aaron and Carrie Hogan, Chicago, Ill. ■  Rachel Hogan and Leif Allen, Seattle. ■  Tony and Sandra Lier, Port Angeles. ■  Francis and Patricia Lassak, Sequim. In honor of Frank Lassak. ■  Paul Schwabe, Carlsborg. In honor of Christmas: Eriko, David, Joann, Kathy, Steve & Beth. ■  K. Monsen, Seattle. In memory of Vivienne and Bob Jackson, Port Townsend. ■  Betty Gordon and Michael Moss, Sequim. ■  Cezanne and Bob Alexander, Beaver. ■  Merala Heins-Tobias, Port Angeles. In memory of Martha Heins. ■  John and Mary Wegmann, Port Angeles. ■  I. Paniaqua—Stevens, Port Angeles. In memory of Joyce Gallagher. ■  M. Ralph and Harriet Angulo, Port Angeles. ■  Teckah, Aaron, Forrest and Becky Acevedo, Port Angeles. In honor of all of Henry’s friends at the PDN. We know you miss him as much as we do. The Henry Acevedo family. ■  Ron and Luann Kennedy, Port Angeles. ■  Diane Wheeler, Port Angeles. ■  Wallace Peterson, Port Angeles. In memory of Nancy Peterson. ■  Rosemarie Jack, Sequim. In honor of Charles Jack. ■  Robert and Hayes Wasilewski, Port Angeles. In memory of our parents. ■  Helen Kushman, Port Angeles. In memory of Kathy and of Stan. To honor all of my Family. Thank you. ■  Russ and Janet Holt, Sequim. ■  Jack and Millie Lyon, Port Angeles. ■  George and Joanie Oakes, Port Angeles. ■  Phil and Janie Hill, Port Angeles. In memory of Fran Sanford and Pat Woodcock. ■  Bill and Dorothy Caldwell, Sequim. ■  Kathryn M. Monds, Port Angeles. In memory of Hal and Marion King. ■  Bruce and Twila Springer, Port Angeles. ■  Glenn and Betty Armstrong, Sequim. ■  Richard and Elizabeth Geddes, Port Angeles. ■  Al and Jane Bloomquist, Port Angeles. In honor of Al and Anna Bloomquist. ■  Robert and Martha C. Van Etten, Nordland.

■  Eileen Gardoff, Sequim. ■  Dorothy M. Rasmussen, Port Angeles. In memory of Walter Rasmussen. ■  Mrs. James M. Nolan, Sequim. ■  Lanna Hammer, Port Angeles. In memory of Rosa Hammer. ■  Mr. and Mrs. James Kittrick, Port Angeles. ■  Richard and Jeanine Moore, Sequim. In honor of the one who gave himself for us as we celebrate his birthday, Jesus our Lord. ■  Helen Weismeyer, Port Ludlow. ■  Rosemarie and Harry Downing, Port Townsend. ■  Selma Cole, Port Angeles. ■  Nik and Judy Dolmatoff, Port Angeles. ■  Dottie Hopkins, Port Angeles. In memory of Cindy Lou. ■  Paul and Anne Weisel, Sequim. In memory of the four Lakewood officers. ■  David and Francie Louden, Port Angeles. In honor of Maureen. ■  Joan Walker, Sequim. In memory of all my loved ones. ■  Robert and Ann McCartney, Port Angeles. In memory of Kevin McCartney. ■  Erwin and Diane Jones, Sequim. ■  Bob Boardman and Susan Chadd, Port Angeles. ■  Kirit and Judith Bhansali, Port Townsend. In memory of Justin Kirit Bhansali. ■  Kathi and Bob Pressley, Port Angeles. In honor of Florence Swanson. ■  Anita Matthay, Sequim. In memory of Norma Davidson. ■  Rudy and April Hiener, Port Angeles. In memory of Ken and Charlotte Bradford. ■  Robert Springfield and Velma (Winters) Springfield, Port Angeles. In Loving Memory of Lee O. Springfield and Harold J. Winters. ■  Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Klein, Sequim. ■  John and Merelene Helpenstell, Port Angeles. In honor of Jen and Steve. ■  Pat Nix, Sequim. ■  Rick and Wendy Oak, Port Angeles. ■  Vera M. Klock, Sekiu. ■  Heather Peters, Chimacum. In memory of Jack Phillips. For my Grampy, in remembrance of a million little kindnesses. Your family will never forget you and the blessing you were to all of us. ■  Mary R. Thayne, Sequim. ■  Al and Carla Angevine, Port Angeles. ■  John and Lois Camealy, Galena, Ohio. In memory of our mother, Nan Anthony. ■  Loren and Vera Glica, Port Angeles. ■  Dart and Margie Whitmore, Sequim. In honor of our children. ■  Ron and Michele Fraker, Port Angeles. ■  Sandy and Nancy Goldstien, Sequim. ■  Carolynn Moody, Port Townsend ■  Bill and Lora Carswell, Port Angeles. ■  Del and Kris Cadwallader, Port Angeles. In memory of Russ Cordery, Don Deterding. In honor of our military. God bless. ■  Joan Gloor, Port Angeles. ■  Lucy Martin, Sequim. In memory of Carol Curcio. ■  Duane Heier and Anne Anderson, Auburn. In memory of Marge Reynolds. ■  Karen and James Pate, Port Townsend. ■  Curt and Lesa Oppelt, Port Angeles. In memory of Laurel N. Oppelt. ■  Merrie and T.R. Schroeder, Port Angeles. ■  Gary and Linda Reidel, Port Angeles. In honor of our dear friends Mike Sorenson & Mary Brelsford — first wedding anniversary and Christmas wishes. Also in memory of Lottie Brelsford. ■  Gary and Linda Reidel, Port Angeles. In loving memory of our parents: Harry & Myrtle Weed and Max and Sylvia Reidel. ■  Carl and Jan Nyberg, Port Angeles. In memory of Carl and Dorothy Nyberg and Ray Miller. ■  Cynthia Spawn, Port Angeles. ■  Joanne Peterson, Port Townsend. ■  Bryce Fish, Sequim. ■  Peninsula Floors and Furnishings, Port Townsend. ■  Donna Baldwin, Port Angeles. ■  Elaine C. Goodwin, Port Townsend. In memory of Alan. ■  Dee McHenry, Port Angeles. In memory of Oma and Granny. ■  John and Marta Trowbridge, Sequim. ■  Ray and Sandy Thomas, Carlsborg. ■  Shirley Clark, Makawao, Hawaii. In honor of Fred Stolz. ■  Mr. and Mrs. Richard Jepson, Sequim. ■  Harry and Pam Grandstrom, Sequim. In memory of our wonderful parents. ■  M.J. Klay, Sequim. ■  Bill and Virginia Kinney, Sequim. ■  K.M. McClurken, Sequim. In memory of Chuck and Al. ■  Jerry and Ann Rasler, Port Angeles. In memory of Sue Lea. ■  Bert and Patty Hendricks, Sequim. In honor of Jerry and Betty Hendricks at Christmas. ■  Bob and Verna Edwards, Port Angeles. ■  David J. and Kay T. Goetz, Port Townsend. ■  Shirley Peterson, Sequim. ■  Mary K. Otto, Port Angeles. ■  Ben and Irene Palzer, Port Angeles. ■  James and Rachael Graham, Port Angeles. ■  Richard E. Rian, Port Angeles. ■  Park View Villas Residents’ Council, Port Angeles. ■  Gleynda Brownfield, Sequim. In honor of Holly Brownfield. ■  Roy F. and Elisabeth N. Wilson, Sequim. ■  Tom and Sandi Shields, Sequim.

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Thanks/C3


PeninsulaHome Fund

Peninsula Daily News

Thanks! Continued from C2 ■  Linda Whitehouse, Port Angeles. In memory of William A. Whitehouse. ■  Gerald and Hollan DeLoach, Clarksdale, Miss. In honor of the first wedding anniversary of Jonathan & Brandi Keywood from Gerald & Hollan DeLoach. ■  Ann Waldron and Enza McCormick, Sequim. ■  Dianne and Sylvia Durrwachter, Port Angeles. In memory of Ruth Durrwahter & Gladys Johnson. ■  Dan Burdick, Port Angeles. In memory of Virginia Hamerquist. ■  Florence Ninke, Port Angeles. In memory of Mother & Father, 5 brothers and 7 sisters. ■  Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival, Port Angeles. ■  Newcomers of North Olympic Peninsula, Port Angeles. ■  Bill and Nina Thomas, Joyce. In memory of our loved ones: Bill K. Thomas Sr., and Bun and Elizabeth Barnes. ■  Cynthia M. Knudson, Port Townsend. In memory of Robert A. Knudson. ■  Susan Rose, Port Angeles. In honor of Maxine Clark. ■  Olympic Springs, Inc., Carlsborg. ■  Kathleen and Ed Thomas, Chimacum. ■  Dorothy DeLand, Port Angeles. In memory of Robert DeLand. ■  Ginger and Dale Nichols, Carlsborg. In memory of our parents. ■  Sequim — $1,000. In honor of former mayor Walt Schubert for his hard work, vision and integrity. Best wishes for your future public services. ■  Sequim — $25. In memory of John & Family. ■  Syracuse, Utah — $200. In memory of Craig Baughman. ■  Sequim — $300. In honor of Matt Newell in appreciation for Sequim Fire Station #3 — 4th Saturday cert training sessions. ■  Sequim — $100. In memory of Larry and Jerry. ■  Port Angeles — $100. To celebrate all our great neighbors at 9th and E. The KTZs. ■  Port Angeles — $200. In memory of Dorothy R. and Lillian K. ■  Port Angeles — $20. In memory of Ann Brewer, 19492005. She loved Christmas. Rest in peace, sweet Ann. ■  Port Townsend — $25. In honor of OlyCAP Volunteers. ■  Sequim — $50. In honor of Jesus. ■  Sequim — $100. In memory of Neil Meagaer. ■  Port Angeles — $109. In honor of my grandkids. ■  Port Angeles — $110. In memory of Rachel Corrie. ■ Joy McQueen, Sequim — $100. ■ Steve and Lucy Nordwell, Port Angeles — $100. ■ Andrew F. and Jeanne B. Jubb, Carlsborg — $100. ■ Sandra J. Louch, Port Angeles — $100. In memory of Charles D. Louch. ■ Sons of Norway, Port Angeles — $100. ■ Darlene Schanfald, Sequim — $100. ■ Chris Duff, Port Angeles — $100. ■ Eleanor and Andy Geiger, Port Angeles — $250. ■ Potpourri Doll Club, Port Angeles — $50. ■ Olympic National Park Employees’ Association, Port Angeles — $200. ■ Brian and Diane Hammer, Sequim — $100. ■ Elizabeth J. Burritt, Port Angeles — $25. In honor of the many area residents who reside in our local retirement communities; it takes courage and much strength to deal with the many challenges and trials this particular lifestyle represents. Being inundated with “corporate rules and regulations” can be quite challenging!! ■ Steve and Philomena Brown, Port Angeles — $100. ■ Edith Snelgrove, Port Angeles — $100. In memory of David. ■ Patricia Gilbert, Port Angeles — $100. In memory of Dottie Jensen and Virginia Gilbert. ■ Karen and Steve Hanan, Port Angeles — $100. ■ Betty Robinson, Sequim — $150. In honor of my caregivers. ■ Heien Family, Sequim — $110. In memory of Rita and Irene. ■ United Methodist Women Community Mission, Port Angeles — $250. ■ 7 Cedars Casino, Sequim — $5,000. ■ Diamond Divide Ranch Inc., Port Angeles — $200. In memory of Dennis M. Shore. ■ Olympic Medical Home Health, Port Angeles — $500. From the staff at Olympic Medical Home Health. In honor and memory of all our patients. ■ Tri-Area Garden Club, Port Townsend — $367. ■ Jim and Jan Kirschner, Port Angeles. In memory of Erv Lodeen. ■ Dorothy Munkeby, Port Angeles. In memory of parents Julia and Albert Haller. ■ Bette Kerrigan, Port Angeles. IN MEMORY OF . . . My loving brother, Jim Beasler. I miss you very much. Always in my heart and thoughts. Leone Sands. Always my friend, never forgotten. Anne (Grammie) Sistek. Jane (Janie Dear) Sparhawk. IN HONOR OF MY FAMILY ... My mom, Betsy Jacobs. At 91, I’m glad to still have you. My son, Master Sgt. Jason Kerrigan, daughter-in-law Heather Kerrigan. My grandson R. Josten Kerrigan, A SUPER GREAT KID. Darcy and Linda Beasler. The McFarlands, Kathy Kaye, Travis and our sailor boy Josh

McFarland. Joe McFarland and special, dear friend, Bob Haugstad. IN HONOR OF . . . Friday lunch bunch. We’ve met each week for lunch for over 20 years, Verna, Norma, Darlene and Bette. IN HONOR OF DEAR FRIENDS . . . Georgia Reynolds, Marilyn Eaton, Rick and Karen Sistek, Jerry and Louise Sampont, Glenn and Lee Miller, Dan and Judy Berson, Betty Austin. ■ Gwen Lovett, Port Townsend. ■ Lucille M. Peet, Port Angeles. ■ Jodi O’Neill, Port Angeles. In memory of F. M. O’Neill. ■ Marie Eikum, Port Angeles. In loving memory of my brother, Tom Duval. ■ Mel and Vicci Rudin, Port Angeles. ■ May Y. Carrell, Port Angeles. ■ Deborah Willis, Port Angeles. In memory of Mom, Dad and Derek. ■ Randy, Kim, Christopher and Courtney Lemon, Port Angeles. In loving memory of Danny Holmquist. ■ Ann and Bruce Candioto, Port Townsend. In memory of our parents. ■ Mr. and Mrs. Jerry L. Conover, Port Ludlow. ■ Eldora Pederson, Port Angeles. ■ Joe and Cheryl Winney, Port Angeles. ■ Douglas Atterbury, Port Angeles. In memory of Michael O’Connor. ■ Eugene and Lois Larsen, Port Angeles. In memory of Pauline Volkmann. ■ Zoe Bayton, Port Angeles. In memory of Ron Bayton. ■ Bill and Kathie Hennessey, Port Angeles. ■ Phyllis Sprinkle, Port Angeles. In honor of our children. ■ Judy and Richard Owen, Port Angeles. To honor the Quilting ladies: Phyllis, Nita and Margaret . . . your generosity keeps our community’s children warm; and Venture Jet-Set, I’m proud to be a Venturist! ■ Victor Jr. and Mimi DeLeon, Port Angeles. In honor of Peninsula Bottling Family. ■ Victor Jr. and Mimi DeLeon, Port Angeles. In honor of the DeLeon aunts and uncles. We love you! Have a very Merry Christmas and a new year filled with health and joy. ■ Glen and LaVeta Edmonson, Carlsborg. ■ John and Katherine Fletcher, Quilcene. In memory of Edith W. Swanson. ■ Eduardo and Roberta Galvan, Sequim. ■ Eduardo and Roberta Galvan, Sequim. In honor of Ted and Janet Dewing. ■ Carolyn Gill, Sequim. In honor of Kathleen and Michael Smith and Barbara and Jim Money. ■ David and Diane Horton, Port Angeles. In memory of Molly. ■ Dave and Sally Elllefson, Port Angeles. ■ Walter Classman, Sequim. ■ John Austin, Port Ludlow. ■ Mr. and Mrs. Peter Horvitz, Kirkland. ■ Cliff Schadler, Sequim. In honor of Elizabeth Price. ■ Cliff Schadler, Sequim. In honor of Lee and Janet Squier. ■ Freia Palmer, Port Angeles. ■ Dorothea Morgan, Port Angeles. Happy Christmas to all Donors to the Fund. ■ George and Corlyss Hamlin, Port Angeles. ■ Dick and Connie Thorson, Port Angeles. ■ Dick and Vicki VanCalcar, Port Angeles. ■ Gary and Ann Colley, Port Angeles. ■ Don and Andi Taylor, Sequim. ■ Jack and Sandra Crook, Port Angeles. ■ Daniel and Barbara Hart, Port Angeles. In memory of Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Hart and Mr. and Mrs. G. Belcher, our parents. ■ Gene and Norma Turner, Port Angeles. In memory of Dave Brewer. ■ Barbara Hughes, Sequim. ■ Gisela Taber, Sequim. In memory of Gerald Wilkins. ■ Paul and Betty Cornaby, Port Angeles. ■ Joelene Wittenborn, Forks. ■ Elisabeth E. Johnson, Port Angeles. ■ Ren and Barbara Garypie, Livington, Texas. ■ Carlyn Kaiser Stark, Port Townsend. ■ Gary and Lynn Anderson, Sequim. ■ John and Anne Polich, Sequim. ■ Phil Edin and Margie Huetter, Port Angeles. ■ Jim and Linda Aldrich, Sequim. In memory of Edith Aldrich. ■ Joe and Dee Blanchard, Sequim. ■ Don and Vicki Hinrichsen, Port Angeles. ■ David and Jeanne Oldenkamp, Port Angeles. ■ Jean Tyson, Port Angeles. ■ Patsy Busby, Port Angeles. In memory of Wes Gooding. ■ Frank and Karen Jahns, Port Angeles. ■ Renee Castleberry and friends, Port Angeles. In memory of Anne Holke and Don Burns. ■ Renee Castleberry and family, Port Angeles. In memory of Mary Nichols “Baba” and in honor of family. ■ Joe and Sue Twogood, Port Angeles. ■ John and Diana Anderson, Sequim. ■ Dale and Judy Burke, Sequim. ■ Paul and Mara Mowery, Port Angeles. In memory of Gerry Mowery. ■ Jack and Phyllis Little, Sequim. ■ Mark and Patty Hannah, Port Angeles. ■ Mike and Marlene McMillen, Port Angeles. In memory of our son Keith M. ■ Chuck and Shirley Leh-

man, Sequim. In memory of Mike Kottler. ■ Verna Rogers, Port Angeles. ■ Lucy E. Willis, Sequim. ■ Jay’s Laminate Specialties, Port Angeles. ■ Jackie Searight, Brinnon. ■ Kevin and Sue Ryan, Port Ludlow. ■ Dave Dau, Port Angeles. In honor of the working poor. ■ Barb and Mack Boelling, Port Townsend. In memory of Norma Davidson. ■ Jack and Janet Real, Sequim. ■ Irma Schneider, Port Angeles. In honor of Carol and Dan Di Guilio. ■ Rita and Tom Thatcher, Sequim. In honor and memory of our heros on flight 93 of 9-11-01, especially Todd Beamer, Mark Bingham, Tom Burnett and Jeremy Glick. ■ John Bodger and Selden McKee, Port Townsend. ■ Connie Kinyon and Steve Torgesen, Sequim. ■ Judie Sharpe, Port Angeles. ■ Stanley and Mary Lou Johann, Sequim. ■ Jeff and Diane Ralston, Port Angeles. ■ Ron Hayes and Melinda Bryden, Port Townsend. In memory of Capt. Robert S. Hayes. ■ Richard Serkes and Theresa Killgore, Port Angeles. ■ Jay and Alicia Crawford, Sequim. ■ Pacfic Mist Books, Sequim. ■ Gary and Jeanne Johnson, Port Angeles. ■ Emery and Lila Winters, Port Angeles. In memory of our parents, Maxine Willis and Emery and Nancy Winters. ■ Monty and Gerry Crouch, Carlsborg. In memory of our parents. ■ Mark Schrader, Port Angeles. ■ John and Darlene Mjoen, Port Ludlow. ■ Janet and Leo Dodge, Port Angeles. ■ Paul and Donna Downes, Port Angeles. ■ Danna Owens, Port Townsend. In memory of Rose Reisman ■ Jack Dunham, Sequim. In memory of Molli Dunham. ■ Mr. and Mrs. Andrew, Port Angeles. In memory of Cleta Andrew and Ed Tucker. ■ John and Kim McBride, Sequim. In loving memory of Anthony and Anna Godde. ■ Ellen Gage, Port Angeles. ■ Florence E. Calzacorta, Sequim. In honor of Don Verstrate. ■ Dan and Rita Addison, Port Angeles. In memory of George Addison. ■ Beverly G. Welch, Sequim. ■ Mary M. Blackwood, Port Angeles. The PDN Home Fund “defines good.” Thanks for helping us remember good. ■ Rod and Liz Heisler, Port Angeles. ■ Pat and Patti Fogard, Sequim. ■ Phyllis Bentley, Sequim. ■ Gary and Carol Zellmer, Sequim. ■ Leonard and Carmen Wiley, Port Angeles. In memory of Barb Williams. ■ Chrystina S. Westcott, Port Angeles. ■ Kathryn Hofer, Port Angeles. In memory of Dale Hofer. ■ Nye Nelson, Sequim. ■ Fred and Nancy Bedford, Sequim. ■ Jon Purnell and Sherrie Rogers, Port Angeles. ■ Lois Barner, Port Angeles. ■ Layton and Marsha Carr, Sequim. ■ Donna and Eric Miner, Sequim. To honor all single-parent dads. ■ Merrill Jefferson, Sequim. In memory of Berniece Jefferson. ■ Finch Family, Sequim. In memory of Ellen Binns. ■ Randy and Cindy Mesenbrink, Forks. ■ Gretchen Dabel, Orinda, Calif. ■ Joanne Hughes, Port Angeles. ■ Cindy Johnson, Port Angeles. ■ Velma Trosin, Sequim. In memory of Trish Trosin. ■ Mary Weidner, Port Townsend. ■ Patti and Mike Brandt, Sequim. In memory of Mildred Brame. ■ Jim and Deb Lindgren, Sequim. ■ Terry Gross, Sequim. In memory of Jack Gross. ■ Margaret Wallace, Sequim. ■ Sequim — $100. In memory of sister. ■ Forks — $100. In memory of Kristine Fairbanks. ■ Port Angeles — $200. In memory of my mom and uncle, generosity personified: Dolores Masullo and Michael A. Masullo. ■ Port Townsend — $100. In memory of Deryl Johnson. ■ Sequim — $150. In memory of Patricia Sugiura. ■ Port Angeles — $25. In memory of Ruth and Merle Westmoreland. ■ Port Angeles — $250. In the name of Christ. ■ Port Townsend — $100. To honor anyone in Port Townsend. ■ Port Angeles — $113. In memory and honor of Paul J. Raber and Beverly Raber Rice. “Gone but not forgotten.” ■ Port Angeles — $50. In

honor of family members instead of gifts. ■ Port Angeles — $50. Olympic Peninsula has given us trees, water, flora and fauna, which enables us one and all with great scenery and food to soothe our souls. ■ Port Angeles — $50. In honor of Nancy Logan. ■ Port Angeles — $150. In honor of Betty Robinson. ■ Nordland — $100. In honor of John Mueller. ■  Al and Lori Althoff, Sequim — $125. ■  Richard and Susan Cox, Sequim — $100. ■  Julius and Betty Gregory, Sequim — $100. In memory of loved ones who have passed. ■  P.A. & Co. Hair Salon, Port Angeles — $100. ■  Dale Robirts, Sequim — $100. ■  Glenn and Darlene Knight, Joyce — $100. ■  Barbara Brittingham, Port Angeles — $200. To honor the police officers who serve and protect us. Also, the firefighters, paramedics, nurses and doctors who are there when we need them. Thank you. ■  Estate of Harry Stone, Bainbridge Island — $15,000. ■  Alfred B. Charles Sr., Port Angeles — $25. In honor of Derek for his courage. ■  Bobbie McMahon and Jerry Spieckerman, Port Townsend — $100. ■  Grace Covenant Fellowship, Sequim — $300. Thank you for all that you do! ■  Sons of Norway — Bldg. Assoc., Port Angeles — $100. ■  Mark and Diana Schildknecht, Sequim — $200. In loving memory of our brother-in-law Fred Balser, a 33-year member of the Port Angeles Police Department. ■  Lounette Templeton, Port Angeles — $100. ■  Marie C. Cauvel, Port Angeles — $250. In memory of Eleanor Naddy, teacher. ■  Aview, Clallam Bay — $700. $50 each in honor of Tonya, Christian, Melissa, Ty, Ella, Douglas, Adam, John, Grace, Kamera, Marty, Bob, Sean and Heather. ■  Margaret Levitan, Sequim — $30. In honor of Meg Bolton, Josh Bolton and Robby Bolton. ■  Mr. Jarvis and Mrs. Pat Schumacher, Sequim — $200. In God we trust. You and the Home Fund deserve every good thing this year! Merry Christmas and Happy New Year 2010. Each year your project gets better and better. The Home Fund is the best I have ever seen in that all the funds go to the folks who need it most. God Bless you and your staff. ■  Genevieve Gorski, Port Townsend — $100. In honor of Bob, Kathy and Eric. ■  Naomi and Randy Riggins, Sequim — $1,000. In honor of our community. ■  Ron and Merine Allen, Sequim — $500. In memory of Bill and Norma Allen. ■  Ron, Kathy and Kelsey Hansen, Boulder City, Nev. — $300. In honor of Hansens, Slacks, Meeks. ■  Dan and Soozie Darrow, Port Ludlow — $300. In memory of Dr. William R. Collins. ■  Florence and Evan Evanoff, Sequim — $100. In honor of most needed. ■  Julie and David McCulloch, Port Townsend — $100. ■  Barbara Sepersky, Port Townsend — $100. ■  Grace’s Bounty Fund via Fidelity Charitable Gift Funds, Cincinnati, Ohio — $300. ■  Scott Younkin and Gail Hebrank, Port Angeles. In memory of “Joker,” Scott’s beloved service dog. ■  Kelly and Randy Raymond, Port Angeles. In memory of, and in honor of, Gerald (Jerry) Martin Page Sr. and his kind, generous ways. Thanks for everything, Jerry. We love you, and we’ll never forget. ■  Fred and Corinne Spicer, Forks. ■  Nicolaas and Linda Holt, Port Angeles. ■  The Wolfer Family, Port Angeles. In memory of Lowell Wolfer. ■  Dee and Garry Kispert, Sequim. ■  Jerry and Judy Mann, Sequim. ■  Bud and Ginny Bowling, Sequim. ■  Charles and Linda Faires, Port Angeles. ■  Penny Brewer, Sequim. In loving memory of David Brewer. ■  Penny Burdick, Sequim. In honor of Gordon and Aural Burdick. ■  Ethel Butler, Port Angeles. In memory of Harold Butler. ■  Larry and Janis Bane, Port Angeles. ■  Parry Construction Co., Sequim. ■  Nicholas and Sally Parry, Sequim. ■  Bob and Janice Crist, Sequim. ■  R.C. and Berta Olson, Sequim. ■  Ken and Charlotte Patterson, Port Angeles. In memory of Betty Grunwald. ■  Viki Kocha, Sequim. ■  Len and Joanne Tyler, Port Townsend. In honor of Sherry

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Grover. ■  Fred and Georgia Forsell, Port Angeles. ■  Velma Johnson, Port Angeles. In memory of Corky Johnson. ■  Catherine Hawkins Hoffman and Roger Hoffman, Port Angeles. ■  Marc Reinertson, Port Angeles. ■  Roy and Pat Jones, Port Angeles. ■  Steve and Gwyn Callis, Port Angeles. ■  Mel and Helen Williams, Port Townsend. ■  Robert and Anita Knapp, Sequim. ■  Kathy Snyder and Ed Dougherty, Port Angeles. In memory of our parents. ■  Oscar and Marcia Heydorn, Sequim. In memory of Aunt Mae and Uncle Bud. ■  Gloria Virak and Gene Zimmerman, Sequim. ■  Ron and Phyllis Stecker, Sequim. ■  Richard and Elizabeth Dorrell, Port Angeles. ■  Ken Monds, Port Angeles. In memory of Jim and Mabel Monds. ■  Carl and Katie Phillips, Port Angeles. ■  Kris Slack, Port Angeles. ■  Rudolph Meyer, Port Angeles. ■  Bob A. Massey, Sequim. In memory of my wife — Margaret Massey. ■  Dora Hall, Sequim. ■  Donald and Ferne Leslie, Sequim. ■  Linda and Steve Short, Port Angeles. In memory of Lu Petersen. ■  Reba and Estill Cornett, Port Angeles. In memory of his and her parents. ■  Linda and James Beasler, Port Angeles. In memory of Jim (Papa) Beasler and Ellen (Nana) Ranta. We all miss you so much. Love to you both Linda and Darcy Beasler; Kathy, Travis and Josh McFarland. In honor to Darcy Beasler, Kathy, Travis, and Josh McFarland. Joe McFarland. Love you all from Linda Beasler. ■  Josephine Soltis, Sequim. In memory of Linda Henricksen ■  Jeff and Donna Green, Sequim. In memory of our mom, Helen C. Barnes. ■  Mrs. Willard Muller, Port Angeles. In memory of Willard C. Muller. ■  Cathy Claney, Port Angeles. ■  Milton and Roberta Mickey, Sequim. ■  Larry and Sandy Davidson, Sequim. ■  Thomas, Lucy and Seamus Hanley, Port Angeles. ■  Thelma Hetrick, Port Angeles. ■  Suzanne Hadley, Forks. In memory of Mary Hazelbaker. ■  Mike and Marline Lesh, Port Angeles. ■  Bettylou and Earl Burgett, Port Townsend. In honor of our six children and spouses, 17 grandchildren and “three precious greats.” ■  Harold and Shirley Van Riper, Sequim. ■  Elsie MacDougall, Sequim. ■  Ed and Mary Telenick, Sequim. ■  Nichola M. Russell, Port Townsend. In honor of Hannah Russell. ■  Scott Gremel and Sanny Lustig, Port Angeles. ■  Dorothea Morgan, Port Angeles. ■  Yvonne Krieger, Port Angeles. ■  Katie Howe, Port Angeles. In memory of Sonya Lane. ■  Larry and Nancy Fox, Port Angeles. In honor of all those deserving help. ■  Wayne and Tracy Fitzwater, Port Angeles. ■  Ron and Marilyn Carlson, Sequim. ■  Bob and Lucille Schmitt, Port Angeles. ■  Joe and Karen Zook, Sequim. ■  Carol Anne Modena, Port Townsend. In honor of my husband Dana Roberts, who died in November. He was a shining example of “thinking globally and acting locally.” ■  Ted and Beverly Sullivan, Port Angeles. In memory of Carl and Isabel Hansen. ■  Rick Willis and Lizbeth Harper, Sequim. In memory of Randy and Don Willis ■  Sue Priddy and Allen Herlyck, Port Townsend. ■  Pat Beltz and Don Claussen, Sequim. ■  Jackson L. and Elizabeth Ann Williams, Sequim. ■  Ake and Siv Almgren, Sequim. ■  Beverly and Glenn Dawson, Port Angeles. ■  Darryl Huddleston, Sequim. In memory of C. Challenger. ■  Delmarie and Gordon True, Sequim. ■  Paul and Anna Chasman, Port Angeles. ■  Wilma and Richard Williams, Sequim. ■  Bob Nuffer, Sequim. ■  Burris Family, Sequim. ■  Bill and Robin Bains, Port Angeles. In honor of Nancy Peterson. ■  Raymond and Janet Morgan, Port Angeles. ■  D Bellamente, Port Ange-

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les. In honor of my parents. ■  Fred and Karen Hall, Sequim. ■  James and Eleanor Forsyth, Sequim. ■  Rex T. Averill, Port Angeles. ■  D. Roderick, Port Angeles. ■  Jan Peterson, Port Angeles. In memory of Lex and Elnor Dilling and Cliff Peterson. ■  Jan Peterson, Port Angeles. In memory of Fred Balser. ■  Pat and Nancy Nagle, Sequim. In honor of Nelson Briceno. ■  Mark A. Stehly, Sequim. ■  Port Angeles — $100. In honor of Mary Neil Hawkins. ■  Port Angeles — $250. In honor of our Lord, Jesus Christ. We have been blessed this year, so may this donation bless others, too! ■  Sequim — $500. In honor of Mike and Sherrie. ■  Port Angeles — $300. In memory of Joan Lien, Dirk Millici. ■  Port Angeles — $25. In memory of Ruth Mantooth. ■  Port Angeles — (Amount kept private) — Merry Christmas to our families we love so much — Sonny Chaussee, Nancy White, Betty White. ■  Port Angeles — $200. In honor of Mr. And Mrs. O.M. Jaeger. ■  Port Angeles — $100. In memory of Rod Orr. ■  Port Angeles — $500. In honor of Local Union 46 Electricians. ■  Port Angeles — $100. In honor of Robert A Rasmussen. ■  Port Angeles — $25. A great community sharing. ■  Port Angeles — $50. In honor of Dorothy Melly. Merry Christmas. ■  Glencoe, Ill. — $200. In memory of Del and Polly Price. ■  Port Angeles — $50. In the Spirit of Christmas. ■  Port Angeles — $25. In honor of Nina Rumore. ■  Sequim — $100. In honor of Peace on Earth. ■  Sequim — $500. In memory of Mike Sheehan. ■  Sequim — $50. In honor of all law enforcement officers. ■  Port Townsend — $300. In loving memory of Don and Eileen Garling. ■  Port Hadlock — $300. In memory of Donald Krone. ■  Port Angeles — $100. In honor of Tutti Laabs. ■  Port Angeles — $400. In honor of those serving others. ■  Sequim — $100. In honor of Julie, Susie and Katie. ■  Port Angeles — $100. In honor of Bob and Grandpa Louie. ■  Port Angeles — $200. In memory of Jim Curtis. ■  Sequim — $62. In memory of Jim Roddick for often reminding, “Take care of yourself!” ■  Chapel Hill, N.C. — $200. In memory of Earl and Bernice Parke ($100). In memory of Bob and Peggy Reith ($100). ■  Elaine and Gary Smith, Sequim — $100. In memory of Captain John MacArthur. ■  Diane Pirner, Sequim — $500. In honor of Conrad Pirner. ■  Bobbie Rhoads and John Magee, Sequim — $125. ■  Peninsula Daily News employees, Port Angeles, Sequim, Port Townsend — $490. From a PDN staff Peninsula Home Fund silent auction. ■  The Baker Family, Sequim — $50. In honor of Mathew Platt. ■  Lynn and Jenifer Taylor, Port Townsend — $500. ■  Elsbeth and George Switzer, Sequim — $200. In memory of Alioto family members. ■  Tom and Carol Sinton, Port Angeles — $500. In memory of Mary Sinton. ■  Charles and Suzette Williams, Port Angeles — $25. ■  George and Heather Irwin, Port Angeles — $500. In memory of Christin Stock. ■  Paul and Sharon Martin, Port Angeles — $100. In honor of Helen Martin. ■  Patti and Thomas Marzullo, Port Angeles — $100. In memory of Helen Marzullo. ■  Bob and Judy Ware, Port Angeles — $100. ■  Carol A. Baker, Port Hadlock — $100. In memory of Ivan W. Hope. ■  John and Ann Newport, Port Townsend — $50. ■  Carl Strunk, Port Angeles — $75. In memory of Caiden. ■  Tina, Pat and Trisha O’Hara, Port Angeles — $100. In memory of Daniel Holmquist. ■  Jerry and Jackie Schwagler, Port Angeles — $250. ■  Chris Walvatne, Port Townsend — $25. In memory of our parents: Anna and Casper Walvatne and Clarence and Betty Brown, from Warren and Chris. ■  Dean and Michele Mangiantini, Port Angeles — $60. From our chickens. ■  J&J Construction, Port Angeles — $250. In honor of J&J Construction employees. ■  John A. Schostak and Shelley Dorfman-Schostak, Port Angeles — $40. (Contribution not counted earlier as part of The Reincarnations of Rock & Roll show Sept. 6 at 7 Cedars Casino.) ■  Joseph Pullara and Laura Bullen, Port Angeles. ■  David C. Brewer, Port Angeles. ■  Peggy Rhodes, Sequim. In memory of Robert Rhodes. ■  “Tom & Joyce, newbies from Reno, Nev.” ■  Dee and Bob Darst, Port Angeles. ■  Lane LaMure, New York, N.Y. In honor of Tom and Joyce LaMure. ■  Gerald Carlson and Beverly Hooker, Sequim. ■  Sandy Frankfurth, Sequim. ■  Tom and Jacque Schaafsma, Sequim. In memory of Owen Sumerwell. ■  Larry and Pat Ledbetter, Port Angeles. In honor of family and friends. ■  Tom Bihn Inc., Port Angeles.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Things to Do Today and Thursday, Nov. 24-25, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Today Dance lessons by appointment — Phone Carol Hathaway at 360-460-3836 or e-mail carolha@olypen.com.

Bingo — Eagles Club Auxiliary, 110 S. Penn St., 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Lunch available. Open to the public. Phone 360-4523344. First Step drop-in center — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Free clothing and equipment closet, information and referrals, play area, emergency supplies, access to phones, computers, fax and copier. Phone 360-457-8355.

Museum at the Carnegie — Featured exhibit, “Strong People: The Faces of Clallam County.” Miniatures exhibit. German conversation — Second and Lincoln streets, 1 All ages invited to German chat p.m. to 4 p.m. Children welgroup. Must speak and under- come. Elevator, ADA access stand German. Discussion top- and parking at rear of building. ics include current events, Phone 360-452-6779. music, food and other topics. Women’s belly dancing Phone 360-457-0614 or 360exercise class — Focus on 808-1522. toning upper arms, chest, waist Biz Builders — August and hips. Port Angeles Senior Glass office building, 312 E. Center, 328 E. Seventh St., Fifth St., 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Open 2:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. Cost: to business representatives. $45 for six weeks or $8.50 per class. Drop-ins welcome. Phone 360-460-0313. Phone 360-457-7035. Advanced Watercolor Braille training — Vision class — With artist Roxanne Grinstad. Holy Trinity Lutheran Loss Center, 228 W. First St., Church, 301 E. Lopez St., 9:30 Suite N, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Phone 360-457-1383, e-mail info@ a.m. to 11 a.m. $40 for four- visionlossservices.org or visit week session. Drop-ins wel- www.visionlossservices.org. come. Phone 360-452-6334 or e-mail rcgrinstad@hotmail. The Answer for Youth — com. Drop-in outreach center for youth and young adults, providWalk-in vision clinic — ing essentials like clothes, food, Information for visually impaired Narcotics and Alcoholics Anonand blind people, including ymous meetings, etc. 711 E. accessible technology display, Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. library, Braille training and various magnification aids. Vision Domestic violence supLoss Center, Armory Square port group — Healthy Families Mall, 228 W. First St., Suite N. of Clallam County, 1210 E. Phone for an appointment 360- Front St., Suite C, 3:30 p.m. to 457-1383 or visit www.vision 4:30 p.m. Free. Free child care. lossservices.org/vision. Phone 360-452-3811. Art classes — Between Port Angeles and Sequim. 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. For directions and costs, phone Susan Spar 360-457-6994.

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Get in on the Things to Do The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Bethany Pentecostal Church, visit www.sequimyoga.com. 508 S. Francis St., 5:30 p.m. Overeaters Anonymous — Phone 360-457-8395. Men’s meeting, St. Luke’s EpisBingo — Masonic Lodge, copal Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave., 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. 7 a.m. Phone 360-582-9549. Doors open at 4 p.m. Food, Walk aerobics — First Bapdrinks and pull tabs available. tist Church of Sequim, 1323 Phone 360-457-7377. Sequim-Dungeness Way, 8 Double-deck pinochle — a.m. Free. Phone 360-683Couples and singles. 6:30 p.m. 2114. Phone Brenda Holton at 360Bird walk — Dungeness 452-5754 for location and more River Audubon Center, Railinformation. road Bridge Park, 2151 W. Celebrate Recovery — Hendrickson Road, 8:30 a.m. Christ-centered program to 10:30 a.m. Phone the Auduaddressing all hurts, hang-ups bon at 360-681-4076 or e-mail and habits. Olympic Vineyard rivercenter@olympus.net. Christian Fellowship, 3415 S. Cardio-step exercise class Peabody St., 6:30 p.m. to 8 — Sequim Community Church, p.m. Phone 360-460-3786. 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. $5 a person. Phone Al-Anon — St. Columbine Shelley Haupt at 360-477-2409 Room, Queen of Angels or e-mail jhaupt6@wavecable. Church, 209 W. 11th St., 7:30 com. p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Line dance class — PioLive music — Good Medi- neer Park, 387 E. Washington cine Band, The Junction, St., Sequim, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. 242701 U.S. Highway 101. 6:30 Beginning, intermediate and Mental health drop-in cen- p.m. No cover. advanced classes. $5 per class. ter — The Horizon Center, 205 Phone 360-681-2987. E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Thursday For those with mental disorFree blood pressure Queen of Angels’ commu- checks — Cardiac Services ders and looking for a place to socialize, something to do or a nity Thanksgiving dinner — Department, Olympic Medical hot meal. For more information, Queen of Angels gym, 209 W. Center medical services buildphone Rebecca Brown at 360- 11th St., noon. Phone Reath ing, 840 N. Fifth Ave., 9 a.m. to Ellefson at 360-477-0044. 457-0431. noon.

Acupuncture sessions — Licensed acupuncturist Jim Fox. Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 10 a.m. $20 members, $25 NonmemSenior meal — Nutrition bers. Walk-ins are welcome. program, Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., Guided walking tour — 4:30 p.m. Donation $3 to $5 per Historic downtown buildings, meal. Reservations recoman old brothel and “Under- mended. Phone 360-457ground Port Angeles.” Cham- 8921. ber of Commerce, 121 E. Railroad Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 Ballet and modern dance p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 classes — Mixed-level for stusenior citizens and students, dents ages 16 and older. Adults $6 ages 6 to 12. Children welcome. Sons of Norway younger than 6, free. Reserva- Building, 131 W. Fifth St. Ballet, tions, phone 360-452-2363, 4:45 p.m. to 6 p.m. Modern, ext. 0. 6:15 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. $8 to $10 per class. Student rates and Port Angeles Fine Arts reduced class cards available. Center — “Future Relics of the Phone Kayla Oakes 360-477Elwha Dam.” 1203 E. Laurid- 2050. sen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Overeaters Anonymous — Free. Phone 360-457-3532.

Serenity House community Thanksgiving dinner — Community invited to share and enjoy meal. Volunteers welcome to help with meal preparation, serving and cleanup. Serenity House’s Single Adult Shelter, 2321 W. 18th St., 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, phone 360-4527221.

Sequim and the Dungeness Valley Today Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Jane Lane, 6 a.m., 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. Phone 206-321-1718 or

RECLINER SALE! Quality • Price • Selection

50

$

O F F

Sequim Museum & Arts Center — “Autumn on the Olympic Peninsula.” 175 W. Cedar St., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. Phone 360-683-8110.

Hardy’s Market community Thanksgiving dinner — Hardy’s Market, 10200 Old Olympic Highway, 11 a.m. until supplies run out. VFW Thanksgiving dinner — For veterans, their families, widows and widowers and general public. VFW Hall, 169 E. Washington St., 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Port Townsend and Jefferson County

Thursday Community Thanksgiving dinner — Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, noon. Free. Brinnon community Thanksgiving dinner — Brinnon Community Center, 3 p.m. Free. Participants should bring a side dish.

Forks and the West End Thursday

Today Port Townsend Aero Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Airport Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages 7-12. Free for children younger than 6. Features vintage aircraft and aviation art.

Forks Thanksgiving Dinner — Feeding The Five Thousand hosts. Forks Senior Center, 90 Maple Ave., 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Clallam Bay-Sekiu Thanksgiving — Sekiu Community Center, 42 Rice St., 2 p.m. Free. Attendees should bring a side dish. Seniors phone 360Puget Sound Coast Artil- 640-0586 or 360-963-2668.

Now Showing

Kids crafts — First Teacher, 220 W. Alder St., 10:30 a.m. n Deer Park Cinema, Phone 360-582-3428.

Port Angeles (360-452— 7176)

Intuition workshop “Introduction to Intuitive Development,” Center of Infinite “Harry Potter and the Reflections, 144 Tripp Road, 11 Deathly Hallows: Part 1” (PGa.m. to 1 p.m. Kristine Walsh, 13) metaphysician and facilitator. “Love & Other Drugs” (PGPhone at 360-582-0083. 13) “Morning Glory” (PG-13) Sequim Open Aire Market “Red” (PG-13) — Sequim Avenue and Wash“Tangled” (PG) ington Street, noon to 4 p.m. “Burlesque” (PG-13) E-mail manager@sequim market.com or phone 360-460- n Lincoln Theater, Port 2668. Angeles (360-457-7997) “Due Date” (R) “Megamind 3D” (PG)

“The Next Three Days” (PG13) “Unstoppable” (PG-13)

n The Rose Theatre,

Port Townsend (360385-1089) “Burlesque” (PG-13) “Tangled” (PG)

n Uptown Theater, Port Townsend (360-3853883) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1” (PG13)

Your source for…

0B5104491

Mon-Sat 9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. • Sun 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. www.pabargainwarehouse.net

Free karate lessons — Ideal for people fighting cancer encouraged by medical providers to seek physical activity. Kathrin J. Sumpter at Sequim Martial Arts, 452 Riverview Drive, 10 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Space limited. For reservations, phone 360-683-4799.

Prairie St., 2 p.m. 360-681- lery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 0226. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for Creative living workshop children 6 to 12; free for chil— “Who Are You Now? Creat- dren 5 and younger. Exhibits ing the Life You Always Intended interpret the Harbor Defenses Puget Sound and the Strait to Live!” Center of Infinite of of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360Reflections, 144 Tripp Road, 2 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ p.m. to 4 p.m. Kristine Walsh, olypen.com. metaphysician and facilitator. For preregistration, phone 360Jefferson County Historical Museum and shop — 540 582-0083. Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Good News Club — For Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for students 5 to 12 years. Grey- children 3 to 12; free to historiwolf Elementary room 136, 171 cal society members. Exhibits Carlsborg Road, 3 p.m. to 4:30 include “Jefferson County’s Maritime Heritage,” “James p.m. Phone 360-683-9176 or Swan and the Native Amerivisit www.cefop.us. cans” and “The Chinese in Early Port Townsend.” Phone Open mic — Kelly Thomas 360-385-1003 or visit www. and Victor Reventlow host. The jchsmuseum.org. Buzz Cafe, 128 N. Sequim Ave., 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Kiwanis Club of Port Music, comedy, poetry and Townsend — Manresa Castle, dance. Phone 360-681-5455. Seventh and Sheridan streets, noon. For more information, Double-deck pinochle — phone Ken Brink at 360-385Couples and singles. 6:30 p.m. 1327. Phone Brenda Holton at 360Chess — Dennis McGuire, 452-5754 for location and more Port Townsend Public Library, information. 1220 Lawrence St., 2 p.m. to 4 Juan de Fuca Freethinkers p.m. Learn to play or improve — Sequim Library, 630 N. skills. Open to all ages. Phone Sequim Ave., 7 p.m. Phone 360-385-3181. 360-683-5648. Northwest Maritime Center tour — Free tour of new headquarters. Meet docent in Thursday chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 Thanksgiving yoga and p.m. Elevators available, chilguided meditation — 92 Plain dren welcome and pets not Jane Lane, 9 a.m. Visit www. allowed inside building. Phone sequimyoga.com or phone 360-385-3628, ext. 102, or 206-321-1718. $5-10. e-mail sue@nwmaritime.org.

Italian class — Prairie Springs Assisted Living, 680 W.

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0A5099159

Thanksgiving Day Menu Salad

Autumn Greens with Pear Vinaigrette Dressing

Soup

Winter Squash Bisque

Entrées Traditional Roast Turkey or Baked Ham - $17.95 Served with sausage stuffing mashed potatoes, gravy and fresh cranberry sauce. Children 10-5 years $9.95 Seniors $23.95 OR

PORT OF PORT ANGELES FACILITY SIGNAGE PROJECT REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

Grilled Ribeye - $22.95

A 10 oz. cut with black pepper and garlic, served with creamy horseradish, demi glaze, and roasted Yukon gold potatoes. OR

Stuffed Salmon - $24.95

A baked stuffed salmon with Northwest crabmeat stuffing, served with wild rice and a rosemary beurre blanc. Entrees are served with Winter Vegetables and Artisan bread.

Choice of Dessert Pumpkin Pie with Whipped Cream Pecan Walnut Pie with Bourbon Sauce Home Style Apple Pie with Caramel Sauce

0B5104784

(last seating at 7:00 pm) 221 N. Lincoln St. • Port Angeles, WA 98362

0B5104515

Reservations (360) 457-0424

The Port of Port Angeles is requesting proposals for the Port Facility Signage Project. The Port is seeking an experienced sign designer/maker to submit a proposal for the creation and mounting of sign lettering and logos. Interested parties may obtain an information packet by calling the Port at (360) 417-3454. Only hard copy proposals will be accepted until 5 pm (PST) December 17, 2010. Please mail completed proposals to the Port of Port Angeles, PO Box 1350, Port Angeles, WA 98362.


Peninsula Daily News

Fun ’n’ Advice

Tundra • “Cathy” has been retired; we’re auditioning this comic. Share your thoughts: comics@peninsuladailynews.com.

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Woman may stay single forever DEAR ABBY: I am a 38-year-old woman with an outgoing personality. However, when I first meet a man, I move slowly. If I agree to a date, I meet him at a public place. After a few dates, I’ll share my e-mail address so we can communicate more easily. And, Abby, that’s when the trouble starts. Over the past few years, several men have e-mailed me nude photos of themselves after I gave them my contact information. I’m not a prude, but I feel it was disrespectful. I broke up with each of them and deleted their photos from my computer. Please lend me some advice and insight here. Until then, I’m considering remaining single forever. Seen It All in San Antonio

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Dear Seen It All: I’m surprised you didn’t sign yourself “Seen Too Much.” Where are you meeting these creepy individuals? Before the Internet, they used to be called “flashers.” Because this has happened to you more than once in the past few years, it’s time to ask yourself if somehow you may have given the impression that you would be receptive to this kind of contact. In other words, think about the signals you may be sending after a few dates.

Frank & Ernest

Dear Abby: With the holidays coming, I know I’ll be spending time with my boyfriend’s family. Every time I see his father (who is a poor excuse for a dad), he asks when I’m going to give him grandbabies. This has gone on for five years. I am not even married to his son, and I don’t plan on having any children. He makes me feel like I don’t deserve his son if I don’t have children. (My boyfriend already has a son

Garfield

Momma

dear abby from a previous relationship.) Van Buren I have tried to answer him nicely. I have even tried to be rude, but he just doesn’t get it! I would like to know how to respond to him. I certainly do not want it to affect his family’s Christmas, but I feel I should stick up for myself. Please help. Wants No Babies in New York

Abigail

Dear Wants No Babies: Smile and tell the nervy gentleman he can expect you to give him grandbabies after you start feeling maternal, and when you begin to feel maternal, he’ll be the first to know. Do not pick a fight with him, and don’t spend much time with him. Apparently, your boyfriend got his brains from his mother. And now, Dear Readers: I am pleased to offer the traditional Thanksgiving Prayer that was penned by my dear mother, Pauline Phillips. No Thanksgiving would be complete for me without it. Oh, Heavenly Father, We thank Thee for food and remember the hungry. We thank Thee for health and remember the sick. We thank Thee for freedom and remember the enslaved. May these remembrances stir us to service, That Thy gifts to us may be used for others. Amen. Have a safe and happy Thanksgiving, everyone! Love, Abby ––––––––

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via e-mail by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology By Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21-April 19): An added burden will cause you to rethink your plans. A financial gain is possible if you make a move that will lower your overhead. A love relationship will be strained if you cannot agree. Lay your plans out plainly. 2 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Don’t be afraid to present your case or to be imaginative and innovative. A money matter or settlement is likely to take an unexpected turn. Counting on a promise will lead to worry, stress and loss. 4 stars

Rose is Rose

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You can’t allow someone to push you in a direction that doesn’t feel right. Love is in the stars and a little romance late in the evening will restore the confidence you lost during the day and help you reconfigure your approach to obtaining your goals. 3 stars

Elderberries

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Emotions will be hard to control. Make sure you think before you speak. Stick to whatever task you have planned for the day without complaining. Apply for a new position or consider something you might not normally do. 3 stars

Dennis the Menace

C5

Doonesbury

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The less you reveal to others about what you are doing or thinking, the further ahead you will get. Someone is likely to pull out or decline an offer you have made. Don’t let this deter you from moving ahead. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You will find it much easier to deal with the people in your life if you maintain comfortable surroundings and compatibility between yourself and the ones you love. Aggressive behavior will work against you. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Helping people who can offer favors in return is your best bet. Troubles at home could cost you. Avoid any settlements or legal or financial matters with the potential to stunt your personal growth potential. 4 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Dealing with emotional issues that entail added responsibilities may not be your choice but you need to do so if you are going to be treated fairly. Make it clear that, although you are willing to do your share, you expect help. Take a position and stick to it. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Take on a challenge or take part in an activity that utilizes your quick mind and competitive attitude. Emotions will be close to the surface and it won’t take much to start an argument or be drawn into one. Travel plans are not likely to run smoothly. 2 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You may question your past decisions, but looking back or having regrets doesn’t bring you any closer to reaching your current goals. Making a couple of changes will bring what you are trying to do into the forefront for all to see. 5 stars

The Family Circus

Now you can shop at www.peninsuladailynews.com!

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Dealing with children or people requiring your assistance will be emotional. Say what’s on your mind, ensuring that whoever you are dealing with understands what you are willing to do. Enhance a romantic relationship with a commitment. 3 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Speak up and don’t be afraid to deal with people who oppose you. Your strength will come from handling those who are trying to make you look inadequate. Stand up for your rights, beliefs and ideas and you will gain respect and help. 5 stars


C6

Classified

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE IN PRINT & ONLINE PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB: Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video Office Hours Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 Monday - Friday IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY 8AM - 5PM

31

SNEAK A PEEK •

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

23

You won’t believe how fast the items lying around your basement, attic or garage can be turned into cold hard cash with a garage sale promoted in the Peninsula Classified!

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

22

Call us today to schedule your garage sale ad! Turn your trash into treasure!

4C235417

360-452-8435 • 1-800-826-7714

Community Notes

Adult care home in Sequim has a private room available. Best care at best rates. Call Wild Rose at 360-683-9194 I love you. I’m sorry. Please forgive me. Thank you.

23 Peninsula Classified is here to lend a helping hand. Computers, vehicles, jobs, real estate, pets… you name it! 4C235382

We’re here to meet your everyday needs!

And you can sell your car in the Peninsula Classifieds even if you’re selling your Chevy and your name is Chase.

FOUND: Small boat. Dabbob Bay, Quilcene. Call to identify. 765-4494. LOST: 2 dogs. Yellow Labs, Olympic Hot Springs Rd., west P.A. 460-0986.

LOST: Cat. Indooronly cat lost in No. Beach, P.T., neighborhood. “Sister” short-hair, black and white tuxedo, very agile, has microchip. If you see or are able to catch her please call or email. Thank you! 360-385-9757 jwoodbri@uoregon.ed u LOST: Dog. 7 mo. old Black Lab, male, Hooker Rd., Sequim. 681-3809

6A113352

classified@peninsuladailynews.com

LOST: Wedding ring. Wide gold band with one diamond, 70th anniversary in June ‘11. Beauty and the Beach, Dr. Scott Van Dyken’s office, Lincoln St. Safeway, P.A. REWARD. 928-3321

Personals

Lost and Found

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

Harrison Sold His Ford In The Peninsula Classifieds.

LOST: Glasses, clearpinkish frames. 360-809-3349

25

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

31

Help Wanted

Adult care home in Sequim needs a caregiver on weekends. (4) different shifts. Call 683-9194. AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. Bank CSR positions. midsound.hr@washin gtonfederal.com

ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840

Lost and Found

LOST: Dog. Light yellow female lab wearing faded pink plaid collar, extremely friendly, Blue Mountain Road area, P.A. 670-1054, 477-1176

Is your junk in a funk?

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

SANTA’S GIFT Santa is still trying to find that special country lady, close to height/weight proportionate who wants that life full of love, togetherness, being best friends and a partner that she has never had before. What is inside is what counts. No smoking, no drugs. Santa has that special gift that has been waiting for the right lady for sometime and he will keep looking until that special lady comes into his life. White male, 60, 6’, height/weight proportionate, nonsmoker, brown hair, hazel eyes, beard, excellent health, who is very affectionate, romantic, caring, giving from the heart, down to earth, loves the outdoors and animals, home life, sense of humor. Honesty and respect is very important also. Santa has that special gift just waiting to be unwrapped by that right country lady that wants a life full of love that will grow every day. santa@olypen.com

LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. LOCAL LOGGING COMPANY Looking for log truck driver, experienced only, paid on percentage. Available now. 360-460-7292. Port Angeles CPA firm is seeking a CPA or other experienced tax preparer to join our team of professionals. At least three years of accounting and tax experience required. Collaborative working environment and competitive salary and benefits. Submit resume and cover letter by email to daveh@pacpas.com or mail to Dave at Garnero Smith Hurd & Miller, PO Box 2013, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

CAREGIVERS Due to growth, new positions available. 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discovery-mc.com COOK: Experienced. Apply Shirley’s Cafe, 612 S. Lincoln, P.A. DRAFTS PERSON. Skilled in mechanical, structural and electrical 2D and 3D drafting using AutoCad and/or Solidworks with 5 years relevant experience. Working knowledge of mechanical engineering. Full-time position with benefits for manufacturer of industrial refrigeration systems. Email resume to info@imspacific.com or fax 360385-3410. LEGAL ASSISTANT FOR LAW FIRM Word processing and paralegal responsibilities plus some bookkeeping. Requires 65+ wpm with accuracy in Word, excellent client service skills. Must be detail-oriented and able to multi-task. Includes benefits. Send cover letter, resume, and references to Greenaway, Gay & Tulloch

Nippon Paper Industries is currently looking to fill the following positions: •Multi-craft Mechanic: Journeyman status is required. Candidates must be willing to work rotating shifts. •E & I Technician Journeyman status is required. Candidates must be willing to work rotating shifts. •Extra Board: Must be 18 years of age or older. Candidates must be able to work rotating 12 hour shifts and adapt to ever changing shift patterns, holding multiple positions within a week including nights and weekends. To apply, contact WorkSource at: 228 W. 1st Street, Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 360-457-2103 www.go2worksource .com AA/EOE

TAX PREPARER CPA or EA with active license for Tax Season. Sequim. Call Kathryn at 681-2325 TAXI DRIVER: Parttime, nights. Must be at least 25, clean driving record. Call 360-681-4090 or 253-377-0582 WANTED: Front office person for busy solo family practice. Insurance and coding exp. preferable. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#184/Front Office Pt Angeles, WA 98362

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Work Wanted

ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding and mowing. 452-2034 CDL Driver looking to move back home. TWIC/Triples. 18+ months experience with most rigs. 360-477-9470 Hannah’s helping hands. Great worker, reliable, efficient, and timely. Will clean your home for the holidays and help to hang decorations too. Working in Joyce, Port Angeles, and Sequim. Please call Hannah Hope at 360-775-1258 HOLIDAY HELPER Lights, decor, gifts, etc. 360-797-4597. House Cleaning- Professional cleaning service, owner for over 10 years. $20/hr *See my online ad with photo* Excellent local references. 360-797-1261 home. 360-820-3845 cell. Ask for Julie. In-home care available for your loved ones. Experienced caring RN available, flexible hours, salary negotiable. Call Rae at 360-681-4271. Jack of all trades, 24 years in the making, honest wages. 808-5292

Sewing. I Sew 4U Hemming, curtains, alterations, any project. Don't wait! Call me today! Patti Kuth, 360-417-5576 isew4u.goods.officeliv e.com I'm Sew Happy! VHS to DVD copying services. Call Nancy 360-774-0971 Winterize lawns, rake leaves, etc. 797-3023

Write ads that get RESULTS Description Description Description Let your potential buyer get a mental picture of your item OR add a picture to your ad! Classified customers are smart consumers. The ones with If you re looking for the best home for your lifestyle, turn to the best source money call the for real estate information —Peninsula Classified. It only takes MINUTES good ads first!

find a home that s just what you want.

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 452-8435

www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

1940’s classic on 3 city lots! What a charmer! 3 Br., 1.5 bath with Large sunny kitchen, beautiful wood floors, partially finished basement plus good water and mountain views. Detached double car garage. $250,000. ML252231/145681 Harriet Reyenga 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. BEAUTIFUL CONTEMPORARY CUSTOM HOME Super private location, just minutes from Port Angeles. Very light and bright with wall of picture windows facing Olympic Mountain range. Vaulted ceilings, massive kitchen with Bleimeister cabinets and new appliances. 3,818 sf. Finished downstairs suitable for mother-in-law apt. 3 car garage plus 2,500 sf RV/shop. Great for car enthusiastic. Large pond, 8 raised garden beds. Flowers for all seasons. $499,900. ML252124. Vivian Landvik 417-2795 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Beautiful, century old home, with an amazing view of the P.A. harbor. Also enjoy an unstoppable view of the Olympics from your backyard. Hardwood throughout the home, although most of the home is currently carpeted. Many updates still needed, but allows the opportunity to make this your home. $325,000. ML252095/138514 Shawnee Hathaway Ochs 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. CAPE COD SYLE Light and airy Cape Cod-style, with open floorplan, wide doorways, no halls, and hard-surface floors for easy mobility. Ramp available for entry. Built with nontoxic materials and finishes, special water treatment system. Lovingly cultivated organic garden includes roses, pie cherries, and apples. Close to the spit or relax in the sun on the deck. $269,000. ML251240 Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

FREE GARAGE SALE KIT 41 Business Opportunities 42 Mortgages/Contracts 43 Money Loaned/Wanted

43

Money Loaned/ Wanted

Money Desired: Borrow $75,000 on 5 acres zoned heavy industrial with access to City sewer & water line with existing lease. Will pay 10% per annum per mo. Secured with first deed of trust. Will pay closing costs. 360-457-1417 or 360-670-1378.

With your

2 DAY

Peninsula Daily News Garage Sale Ad!

4 Signs Prices Stickers And More!

VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

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Homes

CHIP TO THE GREEN Fairway living in this recently remodeled 2 Br., 2 bath courseside house that backs on to the 18th hole on Sunland Golf Course. The course is your huge backyard that you don’t have to mow. Golf ‘til your’re tired and then watch the late finishers from your spacious deck. Or kick back by the fireplace and calculate your handicap. Don’t golf? There is also tennis, swimming at beach and pool and fun in the clubhouse. $264,900. ML252363 Dan Blevins Carroll Realty 457-1111 CLASSIC WITH STUNNING WATER VIEW Bamboo floors, vaulted ceiling, large windows. Cooks will delight in this kitchen complete w stainless appliances and butler pantry. Large master, guest quarters/media room down. Beautifully landscaped. Located midway between Sequim and Port Angeles. $360,000. ML251495 Cathy Reed and Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East ENJOY THE AMENITIES OF PARKWOOD 2 Br., 2 bath spacious doublewide. Newer appliances include ceramic cooktop. Home also has freestanding wood stove and wet bar. Relax on the Trex deck and enjoy the privacy of the lush gardens. Low maintenance landscaped front yard. $59,000. ML252343/153831 Roland Miller 461-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY ENTERTAINER’S DELIGHT 360° views, stunning Mediterranean style 2 story, 3 Br., 2.5 bath located close to desirable Cline Spit and 2 public golf courses. Gourmet kitchen, spacious living and family rooms. Spectacular sunroom, portico and courtyard. Huge 2,000 sf shop with bonus room, .5 bath, boat and RV parking. Lavender farm potential! $595,000. ML251088 Dianna Erickson 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East GOOD BONES Open flowing floor plan, approximately 1,976 sf of living space, 800 sf 2 car garage with ample storage areas, backs up to a green belt, located a short 1 mile from Jamestown Beach, all major systems replaced in 2004 and 2006. $278,000. ML114788/251696 Cath Mich 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

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Homes

GREAT FOR ENTERTAINING 3 Br., 2 bath, over 1,900 sf, granite counters and stainless appliances, beautifully landscaped with mountain views, great patios and beautiful water feature. $365,000 ML75847/251106 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY Main house has 2,332 sf of living space and custom features. Custom landscaping, koi pond with waterfall. Large greenhouse and garden area. Laminate wood floors, builtins, great sunroom, too. Includes two outbuildings for extra investment opportunities. $479,000. ML241656 Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East GREAT VALUE Charming 3 Br. home with expansive saltwater view. Tastefully remodeled in 2010. Vinyl windows and wood floors. Garage and workshop area. Nice deck and partially fenced yard. Attractively priced. $159,000. ML251938. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY HAPPY SPACE Inside find a super clean 3 Br., 2 bath home with huge, sunny country kitchen complete with fireplace. Outside find 3.17 acres with irrigation, fruit trees, workshop, and plenty of room to have animals, gardens, or whatever adds to your happiness. $279,900. ML251626 Jane Manzer 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

"In-Town" Mini-Farm. 4 bedroom, 1+ bath home on 1.08 acres. Fenced pasture, mt. view, greenhouse, chicken coop, detached garage. Carport. 8x24 deck. Mature fruit trees. Appliances convey. New roofs/heat pump and MUCH more! $210,000. Contact Dave at 360-670-8260 or weissguy60@yahoo.c om JUST LIKE NEW Cute 2 Br., 1.5 bath condo, completely updated throughout, new kitchen with new appliances, new heating system and roof, close to medical facilities. $149,500 ML129757/251967 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

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5000900

ACCORDION: 19” DRAFTS PERSON. MISC: Singer featherkeyboard, 120 base, weight 221 sewing Skilled in mechanielectric. Excellent machine with case, cal, structural and condition. Buy a excellent condition, electrical 2D and $3,000 accordion for $400. Exercise sys3D drafting using $500. 683-7375. tem, Weider Flex AutoCad and/or CTX, $125. Bike, Solidworks with 5 BATH CHAIR: Goes Turner, recumbent, years relevant down into water, lifts $500. 683-0146. experience. Workup out of water. ing knowledge of P.A.: Furnished 2 or 3 $650. 360-681-0942. mechanical engiBr. Weekly or monthHOLIDAY BAZAAR neering. Full-time ly. 360-417-1277. Sat., Nov. 27th position with benewww.pacr.biz 9-4 p.m. fits for manufacturMasonic Lodge SEASONED er of industrial 622 S. Lincoln St. FIREWOOD refrigeration sys$185 cord. tems. Email resume Lovingly restored 360-670-1163 to info@imspacifCherry Hill Victorian. ic.com or fax 3603 Br., 2 bath + cozy Weaner pigs, nice 385-3410. guest cottage and Duroc cross, winter shop. $238,000. price $55. Also 360-457-6845 P.A.: 2 room for rent. young large blue Organic farm. $375 butt boar, $150/obo. www.peninsula ea, utili. 452-4021. 775-6552 dailynews.com

Help Wanted

Homes

FORECLOSURE 3 Br., 2 bath. Built in 2006, propane fireplace, open kitchen. Large utility room, oversized garage with alley entrance. $169,290 ML144212/252202Te Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND LAKE SUTHERLAND DUPLEX 2 units each with 3 Br., 1 bath right on the lake at Mallard Cove. Keep one for summer fun and rent the other; would also make excellent vacation rentals! $325,000. ML252080. Alan Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. LARGE CRAFTSMAN Vintage home centrally located with dual views, close to parks, downtown, shopping, college pretty much everything! 4 Br., 2 bath 2,776 sf home with enough room for everyone. Warm finishes, large bright kitchen with breakfast nook. Enclosed sunroom adjacent to deck a beautiful treat for visiting and entertaining. $218,000. ML251246 Brooke Nelson 417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Lovingly restored Cherry Hill Victorian. 3 Br., 2 bath + cozy guest cottage and shop. $238,000. 360-457-6845 NO-BANK WATERFRONT Featuring commanding views of the Straits, San Juan Islands, Mt. Baker and the Olympic Range. This 3 Br., 4 bath northwest contemporary has been extensively remodeled in impressive detail throughout. The floor-plan is open and airy. $795,000 ML252341/153782 Dan Tash 461-2872 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY OWNER WILL CARRY Close tot own, quiet and peaceful, enclosed patio off master, amenities include pool, clubhouse, golf course, and wonderful community. $319,000. ML251727/116759 Tom Cantwell 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND P.A.: Cute home, 2 Br., 1.75 ba, wood stove, big garage, ramp, nice yard. $95,000. 360-452-2758, 360-775-7129 PANORAMIC WATER VIEWS Panoramic water and island views for this contemporary style home on one acre. Exceptional potential in this nearly 2,000 sf home. Expansive deck allows you to look out over the Sequim Valley and Straits of Juan de Fuca. Soaring windows fill this home with soft light and allow exceptional viewing of the ships as they pass by. $239,995 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146

91190150

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

DOWN 1 Dull pain 2 Be overly sweet 3 Golfer’s need, at times

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Homes

SAVOR STUNNING VIEWS Of the Straits, Olympics and Mount Baker while listening to wave’s crash on the beach below. Watch eagles soar, whales play, or lights of Victoria. Sit back and enjoy parades of cruise ships passing in the summer. Water or mountain views from nearly every Anderson window. Just minutes from Port Angeles or Sequim. $420,000. ML252118 Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East SELLER FINANCING! Let the seller help you buy this beautifully remodeled 3 Br. home on Cherry Hill. You can’t judge this book by its cover— come in or take the virtual tour to get a taste of just how great a buy this one is. Fabulous kitchen with granite counter tops. Fireplace in the living room and wood stove in the great room. $229,000. ML251726. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Solid built A-frame home, warm and cozy 3 Br., 2 bath with spacious living area. Sitting on 2.45 acres with a bit of a water view. $189,900 ML251842/122178 Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. SPACIOUS OPEN FLOOR PLAN 2 master suites and 2.5 baths, 3 car garage, open floor plan, large kitchen and formal dining room, overlooking 8th green. $339,000 ML136212/252066 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SPLIT LEVEL HOME Enjoy a leisurely stroll through neighborhood and wooded areas. 3 Br., 2.25 bath, multi story, recently painted exterior and reroofed in 2008. Open style kitchen with island bar. Dining area and master Br. have access to wood deck. Living room wired for surround sound and has wood stove for cozy winter evenings. $267,500. ML252072 Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. TOMORROW IS AMERICA’S THANKSGIVING

S Y A D I L O H K R O W E T S By Gareth Bain

4 Poetic preposition 5 Execute a high jump? 6 “Lethal Weapon” costar 7 Valley girl word 8 Microsoft customer 9 Kentucky Derby time 10 Maestro Toscanini 11 “Now!” 12 Pro shop bagful 13 __ a soul 18 Small opening 22 Island country since 1970 23 Swarm’s home 24 Standard 25 Functional 26 Avoiding off-topic posting, say 27 Path to ruin, with “the” 28 Dazzle 29 Low point 30 You, in a classic E.B. Browning poem 31 Sing like Satchmo 35 Metric weight, for short 36 Grazing field 37 Jazz sessions 39 Aniston’s ex Homes

SUNLAND HILLTOP CONDO 2 Br., 2 baths, nice sunroof, propane stove, murphy bed, shoji screen. $185,000 ML145314/252226 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND TOWNHOUSE Like new townhouse, great location in downtown Sequim, within short distance of Carrie Blake Park. This six year old, 1,796 sf unit offers a large open living area with high quality kitchen, master suite, den/office, private concrete patio and fenced in back yard. Other features include laminate flooring, heat pump, all appliances are included, low homeowners association dues. $240,000. ML252205 Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 TWO FOR ONE Two homes on one lot. Site built home with 2 Br., 1 bath, 1,276 sf plus manufactured home with 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,348 sf plus detached garage/ shop - all on 1.51 acres close to town. In city limits, zoned R-III. $279,000. ML252346. Mike Fuller Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900, 477-9189 You’ll love this 3 Br., 2 bath, one level home. Updated kitchen with newer countertops, pull outs, breakfast bar and a new stove. Skylights and newer countertops in both bathrooms. The roof is approx. 2 years old. Fenced in area for your pets. All appliances included. 2 car attached garage and plenty of parking in the back. $179,500 ML252096/138720 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. YOU’LL BE COUNTING YOUR BLESSINGS If you like to fish or hike, you’ll love this Freshwater Bay neighborhood. Just a few miles out of town, this home is on 2.4 acres. Besides the 3 Br. home, there’s an outbuilding with 3 rooms. Park your boat or camper on the cement pad under cover. $235,000. ML251945 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY EMAIL US AT classified@peninsula dailynews.com

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11/24/10

S R O X A L E R E P P U S D E

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I G C E L E B R A T E S G I R

D T N R R L G L A Z E M N T R

E A E I A U A R E R E Y I I I

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O B S T A S B L T W E I P N S

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R R P R U R E E U O V M M S E

A A O A U M A L R C O A U E R

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11/24

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THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

BLAYK ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

LUFAW (c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

40 Like the Cheshire Cat 42 Remove from its box 43 Chicken __ 44 Help to perpetrate 47 “Show Boat” author Ferber 48 Synonym for the ends of 17-, 25-, 41- and 55-Across 49 __ and now

Homes

Manufactured Homes

SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 bath, single wide, 55+ park, owner may carry contract. $22,500/obo. 683-5120

54

H A O S A U C E U C E B R A B

Agriculture, Apples, Autumn, Barbecue, Berries, Blessings, Boat, Brunch, Carrots, Casserole, Celebrate, Cheer, Cook, Corn, Cranberry, Crops, Decorate, Dishes, Dumplings, Family, Football, Glaze, Gravy, Grow, Holiday, Meat, Oven, Parade, Range, Relax, Rhubarb, Rotisserie, Salad, Sauce, Squares, Stew, Stuffing, Supper, Tradition, Turkey, Work Yesterday’s Answer: Clogging

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

WATER VIEW Energy efficient home. Heat pump, Energy Star appliances and lights, low E windows. Custom home with 3 Br., 3 bath, 3 car garage, 3,010 sf, walkout basement and organic gardens. $245,000. ML242001. Cathy Reed and Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

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E V K G E I R E S S I T O R C

Solution: 6 letters

Lots/ Acreage

A beautiful property in Port Angeles. For sale $168,000. Located just minutes from town off of Mt Angeles Road. The 4.77 acre parcel is surrounded by mountains, nice homes and the natural beauty of Port Angeles. Septic installed, electric hook up pd, city water. www.portangelesprop.com or 360-460-0572 Beautiful 5+ acre parcel in a very private area. Wonderful view of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Vancouver Island, Salt Creek, Crescent Bay and Tongue Point. $299,000. ML241755. Nason Beckett 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. BREATHTAKINGLY BEAUTIFUL! Gated entry leads to wonderfully situated custom luxury view home on acreage. Formal living areas and gourmet chef’s kitchen. Dog kennel and landscaped. $585,000. ML152107. Bryan Diehl 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow Buildable corner lot on dead end in Paradise Bay, Port Ludlow, 1 block from community private boat ramp on private beach. Cash or contract. $24,000. 360-437-9389 GREAT FUTURE HOMESITE Nice level lot with all utilities in at road. CC&Rs to protect your investment. Priced to sell. $55,000. ML251879. Quint Boe 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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Lots/ Acreage

Lake Sutherland 3+ acres with beach rights with dock, Hwy 101 frontage. electrical close by. Subdividable, zoned R1. 360-460-4589. SEQUIM LAND WANTED Must support 2 horses. 505-281-1591.

55

Farms/ Ranches

BEAUTIFUL 32 ACRE RANCH New driveway off Hidden Highlands allows for even more privacy. Mtn views, two ponds and a 2,880 sf barn, tack room and storage. Fenced and partially fenced. Possible uses include horse or livestock ranch, vineyard, corporate retreat, wildlife lookout and more. $795,000. ML250670. Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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Commercial

COMMERCIALLY ZONED PROPERTY Could be office or home or both. Beautifully refurbished. $185,000. ML252171. Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY SEQUIM OFFICE BUILDING! This twelve suite, 7,632 sf office complex is located on Sequim’s main street. Excellent rental history and investment potential. Paved parking, EFA with heat pumps for each unit, long-term tenants! $850,000. ML252351 Mark N. McHugh REAL ESTATE 683-0660

11/24/10

50 “The Good Earth” heroine 51 Shortly following 52 Suffix with slug 53 Breakfast tip components, usually 55 Brit’s pea-souper 56 “Lenore” poet

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., 1,200 sf. $650. 457-8438 P.A.: 2 Br. quiet, clean. No smoke/pets $675 mo., dep. 457-0928. P.A.: 2 Br., W/D, no pets/smoke. $675, 1st, last, dep. Available Dec. 417-5137. P.A.: Quiet and clean. Water view. 1 Br. $575. 206-200-7244 P.A.: Really large 1 Br., 1 ba., $625, 1st, last. No pets. 452-1234. SEQUIM: Beautiful 1 Br., in quiet 8-plex. $600. 460-2113.

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Duplexes

Clean 1 Br., 1 bath water view w/washer/dryer, $600/dep water/sewer paid. No smoking/pets. 360-808-5054 P.A.: Clean 2 Br., garage. $725 month, deposit. 452-1016. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba. $725, dep and credit check 360-385-5857

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Houses

1 Br. cabin with loft. Upper Palo Alto Rd. $700. 477-9678 CENTRAL P.A. , 3 Br. study, no smoke/ pets $875. 775-8047 CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, 606 S. Laurel, references required. $700. 457-6600. CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., garage, no smoke/ pets. $800, 1st, last, dep. Avail. Dec. 1st. 360-461-2438 Clean, furnished 1 Br. trailer with tip out, near beach, util. incl. $650. 928-3006. EAST P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, 5 acres, mtn./ water view. Horses ? $1,200. 477-0747.

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent ref req. $700. 452-3540.

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES IN P.A. 1 br 1 ba......$500 1 br 1 ba......$525 2 br 1 ba......$650 2 br 2 ba......$800 3 br 2 ba......$950 3 br 1.5 ba..$1100 HOUSES IN SEQUIM 2 br 2 ba......$925 2+ br 2 ba....$950 3 br 2 ba....$1100 3 br 2 ba....$1250

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

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TEPPIC

SUMOFA Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: A

(Answers tomorrow) JOKER GUZZLE STODGY Jumbles: PROBE Answer: What the bookkeeper did when he was hired by the circus — JUGGLED THE BOOKS

Yesterday’s

Houses

EAST P.A.: Small 2 Br. mobile. $500. 457-9844/460-4968

68

Commercial Space

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

FORKS: 2 Br., 1 ba mobile, rent to own. $350. 360-780-0100. P.A.: 1 Br., no pets. $575 incl. util. Credit check. 460-0575. P.A.: 3 Br. + office, views, 1.5 ba, wood fireplace, new carpet, deck, garage, great views. $995. 360-775-7129 360-452-2758

P.A.: 4 Br., 1 bath. Remodeled. $895, 1st, last. 452-1234.

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

P.A.: By college, view, 3 Br., 2 ba. $1,150, lease. 457-4966.

71

P.A.: Furnished 2 or 3 Br. Weekly or monthly. 360-417-1277. www.pacr.biz

MISC: Washer/dryer, Kenmore, heavy duty, front load, energy savers, $400/ obo. Dishwasher, Frigidaire, $75/obo. 452-6456

P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, nice area, $950. 452-1395.

P.A.: Lovely historic home, fully remodeled, immaculate, 3 Br., 2 ba. $1,100 mo. 417-9776 P.A.: Newer 3 bd., 3 bath. Neighborhood, location, garage, yard, weatherized. No smoking/pets $900 mo. 452-9458.

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

Appliances

ADD A PHOTO TO YOUR AD FOR ONLY $10! www.peninsula dailynews.com

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Furniture

BED: Adj electric extra long twin bed w/memory foam mattress and wireless remote (programmable preset positions and vibramassage). Great cond/steel mechanism by Motion Bedding. Owner manuals. $600. 681-8967. BEDROOM SET Solid oak. Large chest, $200. Dresser with mirror, $200. King headboard, $100. 2 pier cabinets with mirror, $300. Take all, $700. Must see to appreciate. 360-565-6038 BEDROOM: Black lacquer dresser, armoire, king headboard, mirror. $200/ obo. 797-7311

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Furniture

COFFEE TABLES: 2 matching, 1 large, $50/obo and 1 small, $40/obo. 681-4429 or 417-7685. DINING TABLE: With 4 chairs, blonde finish nice set. $150/ obo. 681-4429 or 417-7685. ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Large, very sturdy, light colored oak. Plenty of room for a large television with two big storage drawers underneath, plus a side cabinet with three shelves and glass-front door. $175/obo. 360-775-8746 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Pine armoire style. Priced reduced. $75. 808-1767. Glass Table Cover 67 5/8” x 47 5/8”, 1/4”, oval race track cut, $225/obo. You transport. 457-0773 Monterra. MATTRESS SET Beauty Rest, queen, firm, like new. $525. 360-681-4134

P.A.: Water view 3 Br., 2 bath, 2 car garage. $1150/mo. 452-1016 PORT HADLOCK Newly remodeled, 3 Br., 2 ba, W/D, fridge? $1,250 mo, cleaning and security dep. 360-531-3997 Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: 2 Br. 1 ba, in town, W/S/G incl., W/D, security system, year lease, dep. $650. 460-8978. SEQUIM: Idle Wheels Park on 5th Ave. 1 Br., 1 ba. single wide, $495. 683-3335.

RUN A FREE AD FOR ITEMS PRICED $200 AND UNDER • 2ADS PER HOUSEHOLD PER • Bargain BoxAds will run as WEEK space permits Mondays & • Private parties only Tuesdays • 4 lines,2 days • No firewood or lumber • No pets or livestock • No Garage Sales

Ad 1 SEQUIM: Newer 2 bdr mfd homes. W/S/G, W/D incl. Recent upgrades. $645 & $685. 360 582-1862

Ad 2

WEST P.A.: 4 Br, 2 ba, no smoking. $1,000, $1,000 sec. 417-0153

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

CARLSBORG: 1 Br. $300, internet, W/D. 206-227-9738 P.A.: 2 room for rent. Organic farm. $375 ea, utili. 452-4021. SEQUIM: Lg. unfurnished room. $350 incl. util. 457-6779. SEQUIM: Room for rent - Shared living space and kitchen. Country setting. No smokers, no pets. Background check. $400 per month plus utilities. 681-2184.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Commercial Printing Services 417-3520

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C7

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

ACROSS 1 Lots of plots 6 Blue 10 Memo abbr. 14 Lewis’s partner 15 “Mona __ Smile”: 2003 film 16 Actress Perlman 17 Song involving body parts 19 One of several on some wedding cakes 20 View 21 English Channel port 22 Particular 23 Staff addition 24 Business 25 Driveshaft component 31 McQueen or Martin 32 “The Bridge on the River __”: 1957 Best Picture 33 “Rather not!” 34 Quote 35 __ light: moviemaker’s tool 37 Hardy’s “obscure” stonemason 38 Husband of Fatima 39 Mottled 40 “Gymnopédies” composer 41 Gulped-down Mexican cocktail 45 “For __ us a child is born” 46 Spoonbill’s kin 47 Leave the cockpit suddenly 49 Fawlty Towers, for one 51 Tabloid craft, briefly 54 Sports page info, e.g. 55 Marker 57 Quibbles 58 Like some hygiene 59 Lasso feature 60 Sheltered, on a ship 61 Hereditary unit 62 Ladies’ men

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010


C8

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010

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Furniture

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MISC: (2) twin electric beds, $200 and $300. Dining room set, oak, 6 chairs on casters, $400. Oak poster bed, queen set, 2 piece armoire, $500. All obo. 360-683-4401 MISC: Leather sofa, white, $375. Oak table with chairs, $300. Oak entertainment center, $75. Computer table, $75. Air conditioner with remote, $50. Water cooler, $45. Recp. saw/rotozip, $75 each. Drill bits/chisels, $40 each. 360-452-8297, Cell 256-318-9599. RECLINER: Small rocker/recliner, dark burgundy fabric, great shape, will deliver. $100/obo. 681-3299 Rocker/Recliners Almost new, 2 matching, gray-blue. $300 ea. 681-2282.

General Merchandise

CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563

Christmas quilts for sale. Christmas and everyday quilts, queen/king size. $300 each. Homemade, hand quilted, machine washable. Phone 683-6901. COMFORTER SET Barney twin, with sheets, good shape. $15. 452-9693, eves. CREDIT CARD MACHINE Like new. Paid $600. Asking $400. 681-3838 CUSTOM SHED Beautiful 8x8 custom built shed. Asking for only materials no time or labor. $800 firm, you haul. Call to explain why. 457-2780

SOFA: Leather sectional with chaise lounge, 68x100x132, 5 matching pillows, sage green microfiber, stain guard build-in, perfect sofa for lg. family, bought new $2,600, sell for $800. Must see to appreciate. 461-4622

DRESSES: 3 nice prom dresses size small, like new worn once, call for description. $30 each. 452-9693 or 360-417-3504

SOFA: Mini sectional, red, less than a year old. $300/obo. 417-2047

LEAF/LAWN MULCHER VACUUM Craftsman professional, tow behind riding mower, 1/3 off, like new. $725. 681-3522

TABLE: Wrought iron Italian table with double beveled glass top, made in Italy, 4 chairs with new cushions, good condition, appraised at $600. Sell for $500. 457-3005 or 4617478.

73

General Merchandise

$800 buys a cheap Charlie pellet stove with outside vent and electric start. Ken at 928-9410 AIR COMPRESSOR Brand new Speedaire, 3 phase, 60 gal. tank. $900/obo. 417-5583. AWESOME SALE! Old trunk, $35. Vac, 6 hp, $35. Toaster ovens, new, $20, used, $15. 360-683-2743 BATH CHAIR: Goes down into water, lifts up out of water. $650. 360-681-0942. BBQ GRILL: Large propane, with side burner, works good. $20. 681-4429 eves or 417-7685 weekdays.

GENERATOR: Winco 3 KW, 1,800 rpm, well built. $450/obo. 417-5583

LUMBER: Rough cut cedar. 1x4 fence boards. $1 ea. 460-5686 MISC: Antique piano, good shape, $800. Blue sofa, good shape, $150. Twin bed with headboard, $25. Hutch, $75. 2 dining room chairs, $10 ea. Desk with chair, $25. 452-5876 MISC: Desk, $50. Office chair, $25. Copy machine, $25. Printer, $25. Fax, $20. 5th wheel hitch, $75. Massage machine, $60. Flagpole, $50. Coffee table, $20. 457-6174 MISC: Singer featherweight 221 sewing machine with case, excellent condition, $400. Exercise system, Weider Flex CTX, $125. Bike, Turner, recumbent, $500. 683-0146. MOVING BOXES Used, cardboard, different sizes, incl. wardrobe, good condition. Blue Mountain Road. $200 all. 360-928-3467

Classified

73

General Merchandise

NECKLACE: Amber and turquoise, from jeweler, unique, casual or dress, never worn, in box. $325. 477-4733. Office Equipment and Kiln. Canon i9900, hi-end printer, lightly used, $192/obo. 15 ink carts for above, new, $8 ea. Xerox XC1045 copier, used, $199/obo. Olympic Kiln, model 1818H, never used, $397/obo. 360-683-5216 RARE CHANCE: Original oil painting by local artist, the late Tim Quinn. 1’x2.5’. Discovery Bay scene. $4,800/obo. 683-9426, 477-2249 SEASONED FIREWOOD $185 cord. 360-670-1163 SERGER: Like new, sews and cuts at same time. $200. 457-9782 SEWING MACHINE Brother, DB2-B757-3, Commercial, heavy duty. $295. Rrobert169@ Qwest.net 360-683-3385 SINGER: Sewing machine. Featherweight with case and book. Just serviced. Sews perfectly. $425. 477-1576. TABLE SAW. JET JWTS-10, 2 fences, router wing w/Bosch insert, blade guard, dust containment box, 2 inserts. $375.00. 681-2524

75

Musical

Give the gift of music. Guitar instruction by Brian Douglas. 360-531-3468 Ludwig drum set complete with extras. Silver sparkle. $325. 360-683-1180

75

Musical

ACCORDION: 19” keyboard, 120 base, electric. Excellent condition. Buy a $3,000 accordion for $500. 683-7375. CELLO: 3/4 size Kohr, bow, soft case, stand good condition. $350. 457-3666.

Wanted To Buy

WANTED: 22 cal. rifle. Call 683-1413 WANTED: Lucky Louie, Guptill and Supreme lures/ plugs. 683-4791.

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92

Pets

TOY POODLES: 8 wk. old black male, 1 6 mo female tri-color phantom. $550 ea. 477-8349

83

Farm Animals

Marshall JCM TSL 2000 & 4 twelve cab. good condition works great. $1,800. 360-460-0864

CALL DUCKS: $25 each pair. 683-3914.

PIANO: Older Shondorfl upright cabinet grand. Good sound. $475. 452-7114.

NUBIAN: Goats, $125 ea. 1 Wether, $75. Age 5+ mo. 360-385-6327

VIOLIN: 3/4, nice shape. $150. 452-6439

76

Sporting Goods

GENERATOR: Honda 1,000 watt. $450. 360-385-7728 GUN: Custom Arisaka 300 Savage sporter. $300. 452-2029. GUNS: Colt Python 357 mag., $1,000. Smith & Wesson model 66, 357 mag., $600. Marlin model 39, $450. 683-9899. RECUMBENT BICYCLE Easy Racer Goldrush. Large. $2,500. 360-452-3495

77

Bargain Box

P E T S TA I R S : L i k e new, plastic with carpeted steps. $25. 683-0146 ROASTER: Double. Revere stainless steel. New in box. $50. 683-0146.

WANTED! Your Consignments!!! Artisan Creative Consignment is wanting your handcrafted Art, household and clothing!!! Reasonable consignment! Call for details! Michele at 360-461-4799, Heather at 360-775-4283, or business line at 360-681-7655

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

HOLIDAY BAZAAR Sat., Nov. 27th 9-4 p.m. Masonic Lodge 622 S. Lincoln St.

79

Wanted To Buy

1ST AT BUYING FIREARMS Cash for the Holidays. Old or new, rifles, shotguns, and pistols. 1 or whole collection. Please call, I will bring cash today. WA State Firearms Transfer paperwork available. 681-4218. BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 Costco shed parts, recycle for cash. 417-5336 evenings.

HAY: Alf/grass. $5.00 bale. Grass, $4.00. In barn. 683-5817.

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

82

Pets

AKC Chocolate Lab Puppies. Ready Dec. 6. 3 females. $500 ea 452-2833, 460-2782

Albino Parakeet Hen. Gorgeous 'keet hen pure white with dark red eyes, very healthy, $50. With cage, or FREE (just hen no cage) to home with aviary/ large cage, other 'keets, and considerate owner. 360-457-8385 CAGES: (2) large wire cages for birds, rabbits or ? $10 each. You haul or we will haul with gas money included. 681-4429 eves or 417-7685 weekdays. Chihuahua puppies. 3 very cute, happy, friendly, healthy purebred Chihuahua puppies. 2 females 1 male. 7 weeks old. $250-400 360-670-3906 DACHSHUND Mini puppies. 8 weeks old. $300 each. 360-796-3290 FREE: Kittens. (2) 4 mo. old brothers, one long hair, one short, black, very friendly, abandoned by neighbors. Please help! 683-0050. PUPPIES: Ready for Christmas! Shih-Tzu, 2 males, $300/obo ea. Shots, vet checked. 582-9382 or 460-3319. PUPPY: Chihuahua female, to loving home. $200. 808-1242

Weaner pigs, nice Duroc cross, winter price $55. Also young large blue butt boar, $150/obo. 775-6552

84

Horses/ Tack

MARE: 6 yr old quarter horse mare. Been there, done that! Performance, rodeo, equestrian team, been hauled everywhere. Flashy. Very sweet, no vices. $6,000 negotiable to good home. 360-477-1536 msg.

85

Farm Equipment

BOX SCRAPER Rankin 72”, blade and 6 shanks, for 3 point hitch. Model BBG72J. Never used. $600. 360-301-2690

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 Western Star. 3406E, 500 hp, does not use oil, no leaks, good Dyno report, cruise, air, jakes, air ride cab, power mirrors/ windows, new 16’ box and wet kit, and hitch for pup, exc. inside/out, all new brakes. $42,000/ trade. 460-8325.

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

GMC: ‘91 Top Kick. GVWR 26,180 lbs, 19,466 mi., 16’ bed, dump-through lift gate, Fuller 10 spd. $19,995. 683-2383. SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153. TRACK LOADER 125E, I-H Dresser, 1,900 hrs. $11,000. 683-3843

93

93

93

Marine

APOLLO: ‘77 20’. Must see! Very clean in and out. Rebuilt 302 IB OMC OB. Fresh water cooled, hydraulic trim tabs, head, galley. Priced to sell. $3,800/obo. 681-0411 BAYLINER: With 70 hp Evinrude. Fully equipped with EZ Loader trailer, lots of extras. $4,000. 683-4698

Marine

BAYLINER: ‘02 2452 Classic with ‘05 EZ Loader Trailer. 250HP, Bravo 2 outdrive, micro, stove, refrigerator, marine head, masserator, heated cabin, radar, fish finder, VHF radio, GPS, (2) Scotty electric down riggers, Yamaha 8T kicker motor, all safety equip., trim tabs, hot water, cruising canvas, fresh water cooling. $28,500/obo. 360-683-3887 BOSTON WHALER Offshore 27 (1991), well equipped for ocean fishing, dual 225 hp Optimax engines (400-500 hrs.), 12” Raymarine chart plotter displaying radar, GPS, digital fish finder; Yamaha electric start and tilt kicker, dual electric downriggers, aluminum trailer, moored Neah Bay last 3 yrs., now stored West Bay Boat Sequim. $27,500. Garry at 683-7176

GLASTRON: ‘08 GT 185 Bowrider $16,500. Must see. Like brand new. 67hrs of fresh water only use on Vortec V6 with Volvo Penta outdrive. Excellent package. Stereo and depth finder. Will throw in lots of extras so ready for tubing and skiing. Great family package. 360-461-0813. The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

Job loss forces bottom price. Must sell to pay loan. 1979 Fiberform 26' Baja Flybridge Galvanized EZ-Loader trailer (1999 dual axle) Chevy 350 engine with rebuilt Rochester Quadrajet 280 Volvo outdrive. $2,500. 360-504-2298 PST In Port Angeles.

Marine

RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711.

94

Motorcycles

BMW: ‘94 K1100RS. Exceptionally clean bike, 41,000 miles, ABS brakes, 4 cylinder engine, stainless steel exhaust, Corbin seat, saddlebags, no road-rash, blue paint. For information call Ed. 360-681-2334 HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘02 883 Hugger. 6K, like new, maroon. $4,800. 457-4020. Harley Davidson 1993 Wideglide, custom wheels, lots of extras. $15,000. 477-3670

LIVINGSTON: Model 12-T Resort. Seats, 2 motors, console, galvanized trailer. $6,800. 681-8761. MALIBU: ‘96 Response. 514 hrs., heater, shower, custom Bimini top. $11,500/ obo. 928-9461. OLYMPIC: ‘94 22’ Resorter. Alaska bulkhead, ‘06 225 Merc Optimax. ‘07 9.9 4 cycle Merc Bigfoot. Large fishing deck, solid and fast. 84 gal. fuel. $14,500/ obo. 683-4062 or 530-412-0854 RARE PANGA 26’ BOAT FISHERMAN’S DREAM Magic Tilt Trailer & essentials for this beautiful ride. New floor & engines overhauled. 2 bimini tops, custom boat cover, gps, radio, etc. In Sequim. $18,500/obo. 707-277-0480 SAIL BOAT: 1932 42’ Frank Prothero fishing scooner, 50 hp Isuzu diesel, Paragon gear, solid construction, needs TLC. $3,000. 360-468-2052 SAIL BOAT: 1940 34’ Rhodes 6 meter cruising sloop, heavy construction. $2,500. 360-468-2052 SANGER: ‘76 Super Jet. Built 455 Olds, Hardin in water exhaust, seats 5, upholstery good, dog house fair, turnkey ready. $2,500/obo. 681-3838

HARLEY DAVIDSON 2000 "FATBOY" 4100 original miles, black, nice and lots of chrome. Call Bill Schlichting at 360565-2333 or 360457-8511.

WILDER TOYOTA HARLEY: ‘05 Soft Tail Deluxe. Glacier white, vivid black, 2,000 mi. 1450 ST1 EFI, bags, chrome foot boards, sport rack, back rest, lots of chrome, much gear included garaged. $17,500. 460-0895.

HD: ‘05 Electra Glide Ultra Classic. Black cherry/black pearl, 10,850 miles. One owner, garage kept. Screamin' Eagle and Tall Boy package. never down or in rain. Excellent condition! $15,900. 360-461-4222 HD: ‘06 1200 Sportster. 7K miles, mint, extras. $7,900. 452-6677 HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153.

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914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875 YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

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Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

94

Motorcycles

HONDA: ‘79 CB750K. Complete bike, rusty, for parts or restoration. $400/obo. 360-457-6174 HONDA: ‘99 XR400. All stock, low hrs., good tires, new graphics. $1,700. 461-1202 KAWASAKI: ‘03 KX125. 2 stroke, exc. cond., hardly ridden, must go. $2,200/ obo. 452-5290. KAWASAKI: ‘00 Vulcan 800. Mustang seat, also has stock seat, K&N air filter, new chain and rear sprocket, 29K miles. $2,000. 206-913-7906

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95

Motorcycles

SCOOTER: Aero Honda 80, runs well. $450. Ken at 928-9410 TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bonaville. 1,000 mi., extras. $5,500. 460-6780 URAL: ‘03 Wolfe. 1,000 mi. $3,200. 460-0895

YAMAHA: ‘03 YZ85. Runs great, son outgrown, $800. 360-457-0913 or 360-461-9054

95

Recreational Vehicles

KAWASAKI: ‘03 KLX 400. Very clean. Low miles. $2,500/obo. 461-7210

QAUD: ‘05 POLARIS PHEONIX 200. Red, automatic, approx. 5-10 riding hours, Like new $2,300. 360-460-5982 QUAD: ‘06 Eton 150. Low hrs. good condition. Daughter’s quad. $1,800/obo. 461-7210 QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki Quad Sport Z250. Like new. $2,600 firm. 360-452-3213.

‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40’, 3 slides, 6 speed Allison Trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner cooktop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sony AM/FM/CD, VCR, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/dryer hookup, 6 kw generator, leveling system, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k), gently used, non smokers. $117,000. 360-683-3887

RHINO: ‘09 Yamaha 700. Fuel injected. Great condition. Low miles. $9,500/obo. 417-3177

SUZUKI: ‘05 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, well maintained. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. Garage stored. $3,500/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com SUZUKI: ‘98 Maurder. 800cc, 1 owner, FMC, D&H pipes, custom seat, cruise, sissy bar, billett mirrors, 15K. Great entry cruiser. $2,500. 360-457-6510

5TH WHEEL: '01 36' Cardinal by Forrest River. Fully equipped home. 3 slides, 3 axles, 2 AC, Trailaire pin box, hydraulic brakes, Alum rims. Retail $35,000 asking $26,000 w/ or w/o tow vehicle. 582-0803 5TH WHEEL: ‘88 25’ Alpenlite. $7,000. 457-4914 HERE’S THE DEAL Buy my 29’ Pace Arrow with 57K miles on it, general power pack, Monroe shocks, stabilizers, hydraulic levelers, air conditioning, 16’ awning. Price $3,500 then trade on new bus for about $8,000 Ken at 928-9410.

Recreational Vehicles

MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Winnebago Journey 39K. 27,000 mi., loaded, 3-sides, 350 Cat diesel, 6.5 Onan generator. $115,000. 460-0895 MOTOR HOME: ‘89 21’ Winnebago Warrior. New tires and refrigerator. $8,000. 360-681-7614 MOTOR HOME: ‘92 23’ Itasca. 30K, good condition. $11,500. 452-2162. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 37’ Infinity. Beautiful country coach. Home on wheels. Immaculate inside and out. Great home for snow birds or for travel. Has all the bells and whistles. Must see to appreciate. $40,000/obo. 460-1071 MOTOR HOME: ‘93 30’ Monterey. Loaded $9,500. 797-1625 MOTOR HOME: ‘94 28’ Minnie Winnie. Class C, good shape. $10,000. 457-8912, 670-3970

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 26’ Tioga Class C. Gen., A/C, kept in garage, V10. $15,500. 457-7097. MOTOR HOME: ‘98 30’ class C, Itaska Spirit. Ford V10, 35K miles, 14’ slide, sleeps 6, alum frame, new brakes/tires, mech. perfect, serviced, ready to roll. $20,500. 452-2148. TENT TRAILER: ‘07 8’ Rockwood. Very clean. $5,000. 360-452-5512 TRAILER: ‘06 26’ Jayco. Excellent condition, extras. Reduced price. $13,000. 477-3695. TRAILER: ‘72 Sportsmaster 20’ living space and tongue. Good condition. $3,000/obo. 775-7504 TRAILER: ‘05 Tahoe Transport Toy Hauler. 24’. Good condition. 4K Onan generator. $17,000. 417-3177.

95

97

Recreational Vehicles

CAMPER: 8’. $200/ obo. 683-2426.

96

Parts/ Accessories

CAR TRAILER: 16’ enclosed. Tandem axles, winch, electric brakes, side door, rear clam shell doors with ramps, equalizer hitch, battery, inside dimension: 80” tall, 74” wide. Ideal for Model A or Model T Ford or similar. Bargain at $2,250. 360-683-8133 PARTING OUT: ‘89 Toyota Celica automatic. $5-$500. 683-7516 STUDDED TIRES: (4), Cooper 215/60 R16, nearly new. $200. 683-8833 TIRES/WHEELS: (4) Michelin all season (snow/mud) low miles, one season, 225/60/18, Dodge Charger wheels, 18” caps, lug nuts, polished. $1,000 for all, will separate. 683-7789 TOOL BOX + Craftsman 3 piece, 16 drawer tool box, great shape, $100. S-10 2” dropped spindles, $75. Firestone Wilderness LT 265/70 R16, $350. and Firestone FR710 235/55 R17, $250. All like new. 360-452-9876 WHEELS: (4) 16”, 8 hole Chev truck. $60. 683-8833

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘06 TRAILBLAZER LS 4X4 Just in time for winter, 6 cylinder, auto, air, tilt, cruise, power windows, locks, and mirrors, AM/FM CD, roof rack, alloy wheels, tow package and more! “0” down financing available with rates as low as 3.85% O.A.C. One week clearance special! $6,000 under Kelley Blue Book! Expires 11-27-2010. $8,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

97

4 Wheel Drive

BUICK: ‘04 Rainier. V8, AWD, leather, 87K, premium sound, wheels, all power. $12,800. 460-3037 CHEV: ‘02 Trailblazer LTZ. Low mi., all power, air, leather, new tires/brakes, Bose audio & more. Low book. $9,250. 460-4765 CHEV: ‘97 1/2 ton extended cab, 3 doors, short bed, 80K mi. $5,000. 406-381-9362 CHEV: ‘02 Club Cab. Long bed. 4WD. Loaded. 44,000 mi., $15,500. 452-8713. CHEV: ‘70 3/4 Ton. $850. 360-434-4056. CHEV: ‘86 Suburban. Good condition. 3rd seat, extra full set wheels. Nice white paint exterior, tan interior. $2,500/ obo. 360-374-6409. CHEV: ‘88 S-10 4x4. As is. $1,000. 457-9292

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010

97

4 Wheel Drive

FORD ‘02 F250 SUPER CAB LONG BED LARIAT 4X4 7.3 liter powerstroke diesel, auto, alloy wheels, running boards, spray-in bedliner, tow package, airbags, trailer brake controller, BD exhaust brake, 4” ATS exhaust, winch bumper with brushguard, 12,000 lb warn winch, diamond plate toolbox, driving lights, keyless entry, power windows, locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, leather heated seats, adjustable pedals, CB radio, 6 CD stacker stereo, information center, cruise, tilt, air, dual front airbags. Only 64,000 miles! Immaculate condition! Loaded with all the options and lots of accessories! None nicer! $21,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD: ‘09 F150 4x4. XLT super cab, 15K mi. $26,500. 360-765-4599 FORD: ‘85 Bronco. Sat. radio, 33” tires. $1,300. 640-8996.

CHEV: ‘90 Suburban 4 WD 2500. Low miles, auto, good tires, straight body 4WD, V8, clean inter, no rips, tow pkg runs great. Heavy bumper w/winch. $3,500. Forks 360-374-9512. DODGE ‘03 DAKOTA SLT 4 DOOR QUAD CAB 4.7 liter V8, auto, 4x4, air, cruise, tile, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, slier, privacy glass, matching canopy, spray on bedliner, tow package, running boards, alloy wheels, fog lamps, privacy glass, very clean and reliable local trade, nonsmoker. $7,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com DODGE: ‘02 Ram 1500. 85K miles, lifted, canopy, 5.9 V8, new tires. $12,000. 477-5556

FORD: ‘06 Expedition XLT. This expedition is in nearly new condition and has only 60,000 miles with lots of options. $16,500. Please call Sunday through Thursday. 360-460-6213 FORD: ‘97 F150. 5.4, new tires, trans, batt. Clean. $6,500/obo. 360-681-2643 GMC ‘99 DENALI V-8 4x4, 128K, tow ready. Power locks, windows, seats, mirrors, gray leather. The Other Guys Auto and Truck setting the standards in buy here pay here! Lowest in house financing rates! $8,995. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788

97

4 Wheel Drive

GET READY FOR WINTER All WD, great in snow, ‘99 Oldsmobile Bravada. Leather, loaded, 129K, exc. cond. $6,299. 928-2181, 461-6273 HONDA ‘07 CR-V ALL WD SPORT UTILITY 2.4 liter i-VTEC 4 cylinder, auto, keyless entry, power windows, locks, mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, MP3, CD stereo, dual front, side impact, and side curtain airbags, Kelley Blue Book value of $19,750! Only 43,000 miles! Immaculate condition inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today and save! $14,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

HONDA: ‘01 Passport. 79K mi., V6, auto, tinted windows, cd/am/fm, ac, airbags, runs well, good cond., new trans. from Midway, silver. $5,400/obo. 360477-1072 msg. or email: sjones.interest@gma il.com. ISUZU: ‘91 Trooper. Runs good, new tires. $1,500/obo. 670-6041 ISUZU: ‘98 Rodeo. 4x4, leather seats, sunroof, new trans., new tires. $4,000. 457-7766 or 452-2602 ext 2. TOYOTA ‘00 TUNDRA SR5 4 DOOR ACCESS CAB TRD off road package, 4.7 liter V8, auto, 4x4, air, cruise, tilt, power windows and locks, AM/FM CD/cassette, slider, privacy glass, matching canopy, tow package, spray on bedliner, step bars, alloy wheels, fog lamps, very clean local trade, 1 owner non-smoker. $7,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

98

4 Wheel Drive

FORD: ‘88 F250 111K mi., 4x4. $3,000/obo. 808-5605 NISSAN: ‘08 Frontier King Cab. V6 4x4, 24K mi., silver ext. matching canopy, bedliner, auto windows-locks, remote ent, cruise, CD, oversize tires, below KBB val of $20,425. Records avail., no accidents. Very clean. $18,600. Call 360-670-1400 TOYOTA ‘01 SEQUOIA SR5 V-8 automatic, 4x4. Third row seating, gray cloth. Nice, nice, nice! The Other Guys Auto and Truck serving the community since 1996! Military discounts! Lowest buy here pay here interest rates! $12,995. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 TOYOTA: ‘96 4-Runner, SR5, loa-ded, gold and wood package, sunroof, Pioneer sound, 12disc changer, 154k miles, $7,000/obo. 360-417-0223

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘89 1/2 ton. ‘350’ V8, auto, nice. $2,000. 681-7632.

C9

Pickups/Vans

FORD: ‘90 F250. Ext. cab, long box, 48,660 mi., new HD service brakes, set up for 5th wheel, excellent condition. $5,500. 796-4929. FORD: ‘95 F150 XLE Ext cab, 8’ bed w/lockable lid, 66k, auto w/o/d, full power, 351 Winsor tow pkg, always garaged, very very clean, below book @ $6,000. 683-8133. FORD: ‘95 Windstar. 7 pass, excellent, 127K. $2,400. 681-7418

FORD: Step Van. One of a Kind, Endless Possibilities, Solid. 40k on a thrifty Cummins diesel; great tires; new battery; no rust. Food truck? Contractor? RV conversion? Only $4,000/obo. 360-820-2157 GM: ’92 Gladiator conversion van. 350, auto, 140K, runs/ looks good! $3,500. 452-5522

CHEV: ‘38 Pickup. All original, garaged, needs rear end. $15,000. Only serious buyers please. 457-3990, 775-1139 CHEV: ‘47 pickup. 5 window, 80% restored. Illness forces sale. $7,000/obo. 457-7097 CHEV: ‘84 S10 pickup. Excel. rebuilt motor. Good body. Needs paint job. $1,845. 360-6835682, 541-980-5210. FORD: ‘70 heavy duty 3/4 ton. Runs great, new tow pkg. $900/ obo. 417-3959. FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844 FORD: ‘79 Flatbed. Runs good. $2,000/ obo. 683-0940.

MAGIC RAINBOW HAPPY BUS 1973 Volkswagon Transporter $1,500/obo Not Camper Style Runs, Some Rust. Call: 360-797-3951 MAZDA: ‘86 B2000, 5 sp, canopy, bed liner. $700/obo. 460-7974. PLUMBING VAN: ‘02 Ford, job site ready, plus extra plumbing parts, 28K orginial mi. $20,000/obo. 360-385-2773 TOYOTA: ‘03 Tundra, 93,000 miles, V8, 4x4, access cab, leer canopy, great condition, $14,000/obo. Call 360-448-1440 for more details.

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REMODELING

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Pickups/Vans

MAZDA: ‘88 B2200. Runs good. $1,000/ obo. 582-7486.

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Classified

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010

Cars

ANOTHER AWESOME CAR FOR SALE! FORD: ‘56 2 door post. Close to original, excellent condition, 2 tone paint green and white, Manual 3 speed, 6 cyl. $8,500/obo. Call Joe. 360-6833408 or 360-4611619. BMW: ‘96 328i. 180K mi., new tranny, runs great, needs some body work. $2,700/ obo. 206-272-0220. BUICK: ‘97 LaSabre. Excellent codntion, 1 owner. $4,700. 683-6051 after 4 p.m. BUICK: ‘99 Regal. Leather interior, moon roof, good condition. $2,800. 457-9038 CADILLAC: ’92 Sedan Deville. 144K, 4.9L, auto, runs/ looks good. $2,750/ obo. 452-5522. CADILLAC: ‘92 SeVille. Exc. shape, good mpg, new tires. $3,000/obo. 452-5406 CADILLAC: ‘66 Sedan Deville. All original, 63K mi. $3,800. 360-775-5327 CHEV ‘08 COBALT LT COUPE Very economical 2.2 liter 4 cylinder, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, side airbags, rear spoiler, only 40,000 miles, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report, balance of factory 5/100 warranty, just reduced! $9,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

CHEV: ‘78 Corvette Silver Anniversary Edition. Fully restored interior and exterior. Silver twotone paint with sport striping. L48 automatic. Runs excellent. $18,500. 425-888-4306 or 425-941-4246

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Cars

CADILLAC: ‘85 Eldorado Commemorative Edition. Excellent condition, spoke wheels, loaded, no rust, always garaged, beautiful blue, 30K miles on new motor; 112K total miles. $2,900. 360-477-4817 CADILLAC: ‘91 Sedan Deville. Good condition, loaded. $900/obo. 457-3425. CHEV: ‘84 Corvette. Silver, 5.7 liter V8. $5,800. 437-7649. CHEV: ‘00 Camaro. V6, red, T-tops. $6,500/obo. 775-1821 CHEV: ’70 Chevelle. Big block wagon, new paint, tires, more. $5,500/obo. No reasonable offer refused. 417-1896. CHEV: ‘72 Vega GT 350 4-bolt main, 335 hp, 350 trans, B&M built, 25K since mods, ‘71 Vega wagon parts car too. $7,500/obo. 774-0915 CHEV: ‘75 Corvette Stingray. Must sell, 350, matching #s, 149k original miles, rebuilt turbo, 400 tran, rebuilt rear end, all new suspension, front and rear sway bar, turbo hood and stock hood. $6,500 or make offer. 670-1440 CHEV: ‘76 Suburban. 454, 143K, runs good. $800/obo. 360-681-2427 CHEV: ‘88 Camaro. Project car, running, licensed, with ‘90 Camaro parts car. $1,200/obo. 928-3863 CHEV: ‘90 Cavalier. Auto, 2 door coupe. $900. 683-8249. CHRYSLER ‘06 PACIFICA ALL WD WAGON 3.5 liter V6, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seats, keyless entry, privacy glass, alloy wheels, only 39,000 miles, very, very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. $13,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

Classic Olds. 78' Olds Cutlass Supreme Brougham. 86,000 miles, V8, sunroof, garage kept. few minor parking lot dings. Excellent condition. Runs well. 1 owner. interior in excellent condition. $11,000/obo. 360-683-9770

97315731

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Legals Clallam Co.

Cars

DODGE: ‘95 Intrepid. 4 door, white, less than 36K mi., like new, original owner. $4,000. 452-3591. FORD ‘01 TAURUS SE 4 DOOR Extra clean, V6, auto, air, tilt, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, AM/FM CD, alloy wheels and more! One week special. Expires 11-27-2010. $3,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com FORD ‘06 TAURUS SE 4 DOOR Economical 3.0 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seat, keyless entry, ABS, only 30,000 miles, beautiful 1 owner corporate lease return, nonsmoker, spotless Carfax report. $8,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com FORD: ’62 Thunderbird Coupe. Mostly all restored, approx. $30,000 put into it. $15,900/obo. 460-0401, 582-9597 FORD: 1929 Model “A”. Roadster, 10 footer. $17,500 firm. 681-5403

FORD: ‘90 Tempo. Runs great. 129K miles. 20-25 mpg. $900. 360-775-4854.

FORD: ‘92 Mustang Convertible. Awesome care for sale! White with white top, 85,000 original miles. $3,800/obo. Call Joe at: 360-683-3408 or 360-461-1619. GEO ‘93 PRIZM 4 DOOR 4 cylinder, 5 speed, air, tilt, wheel, AM/FM CD, and more! Expires 11-272010. $3,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

DODGE: 93 Stealth RT. Great condition, only 2 owners, no accidents, 129K mi., AWD, 5 sp., all power, awesome stereo, CD changer and battery. $3,000. Chris 360-732-4514

HYUNDAI ‘04 ELANTRA GLS SEDAN 2.0 liter 16 valve 4 cylinder, auto, power windows, locks, and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, cassette stereo, dual front and side impact airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $6,215! Clean and straight! Great fuel economy! $4,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

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New Medical Office space available in Sequim! 500-3000 SF available. Prices starting at $1.20/SF/month. Call Brody Broker 360.477.9665

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Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. Loan No: 7432407245 APN: 04-30-24-500055 TS No: WA-219665-C I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LSI Title Agency, Inc., the undersigned Trustee will on 12/27/2010, at 10:00 AM at The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, Washington sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 6, PALO VERDE VISTA, AS RECORDED IN VOLUME 7 OF PLATS, PAGE 46, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 921 WEST OAK COURT SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/25/2000, recorded 11/3/2000, under Auditor's File No. 2000 1054779, in Book , Page records of Clallam County, Washington, from JANICE M. PELTIER, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as Grantor(s), to LAND TITLE COMPANY OF KITSAP COUNTY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of LOANCITY.COM, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by LOANCITY.COM to Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas as Trustee for RAMP 2004SL3 BY: RESIDENTIAL FUNDING COMPANY, LLC, FKA RESIDENTIAL FUNDING CORPORATION, AS ITS ATTORNEY-IN-FACT. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PAYMENT INFORMATION FROM 5/1/2010 THRU 6/30/2010 NO.PMT 2 AMOUNT $876.23 TOTAL $1,752.46 FROM 7/1/2010 THRU 9/21/2010 NO.PMT 3 AMOUNT $888.17 TOTAL $2,664.51 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION FROM 5/1/2010 THRU 6/30/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 2 TOTAL $77.34 FROM 7/1/2010 THRU 9/21/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 3 TOTAL $116.01 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 10/25/2000 Note Amount: $132,000.00 Interest Paid To: 4/1/2010 Next Due Date: 5/1/2010 IV. The amount to cure defaulted payments as of the date of this notice is $7,949.20. Payments and late charges may continue to accrue and additional advances to your loan may be made, it is necessary to contact the beneficiary prior to the time you tender the reinstatement amount so that you may be advised of the exact amount you would be required to pay. As of the dated date of this document the required amount to payoff the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $124,525.53 (note: due to interest, late charges and other charges that may vary after the date of this notice, the amount due for actual loan payoff may be greater). The principal sum of $118,153.73, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 12/27/2010. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 12/16/2010, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 12/16/2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier's or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 12/16/2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): JANICE M. PELTIER, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN 921 WEST OAK COURT SEQUIM, WA 98382 JANICE M. PELTIER 921 WEST OAK COURT SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail on 8/17/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: 9/21/2010 LSI Title Agency, Inc. 1111 Main St., #200 Vancouver, WA 98660 Sale Line:: 714-730-2727 Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3746722 11/24/2010, 12/15/2010 Pub.: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010

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Cars

FORD: ‘92 Crown Victoria. Runs and looks great, 83K. $2,800/ obo. 683-2542. HONDA: ‘06 Civic. 67,000 mi., 2 door coupe, clean, white with black/ gray interior. $10,000/obo 460-0845 HONDA: ‘88 Accord. 2 door, auto, $1,800/ obo. 452-8663.

HYUNDAI: ‘86 Excel. 4 door hatchback Only 55,000 miles, new exhaust, excellent gas mileage, runs great, in good shape. Only 2 owners (in family). $2,500/obo. 457-4866 LINCOLN: ‘63 Continental. Partially restored, suicide doors, runs. $2,750. 457-0272 LINCOLN: ‘87 Towncar Signature Series. Leather interior, power doors, windows, sunroof, low miles, grandpa car, excellent condition. $3,300. 452-9693 eves. MAZDA: ‘07 3. 5 sp., low hwy mi., charcoal/black interior, Thule roof rack, GPS, call for questions/test drive. $11,000/obo. 206-375-5204 MERCEDES BENZ ‘97 C230. 122K, executive use only, very clean. $4,500/ obo. 582-1292.

MERCEDES: ‘29 Replica Gazelle. 10K miles, immaculate. $12,500/obo. 681-3339 MERCEDES: ‘99 230 SLK. 70K, blk/blk, compressor, S/C, HT convert. $11,900. 452-6677 MERCEDES: ‘74 280. Runs well. $500. 683-2436

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Cars

MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $8,995. 582-9966 MERCURY: ‘00 Sable LS Wagon. 3rd seat, leather interior, sunroof, alloy wheels, new tires. $4,400. 360-460-0385 MERCURY: ‘07 Mountaineer. AWD, 4L V6, loaded, 7 passenger, tow pkg., excellent condition, 53K, $21,000+ KBB. $18,000. 530-4120854 or 683-4062.

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Cars

MERCURY: ‘91 Pacer. 140K mi., runs, looks good. $795. 681-8828 PONTIAC: ‘’04 Grand Prix. Low mi., 52K, very clean, must see. $8,000/obo. 457-9332

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Cars

PORSCHE: ‘72 914. Good condition, engine rebuilt. $5,800. 683-7965.

MINI COOPER: ‘05. White, 103,000 miles, Runs/drives great, no accidents, has had all scheduled tune-ups & oil changes, very clean interior, 2 new tires, highway miles, GREAT MPG. $9,995. Call Angela. 360-460-4802

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Legals Clallam Co.

NO. 10 4 00304 5 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM In the Matter of the Estate of: CAROL ROSE GARLING, Deceased The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative, or the personal representative’s attorney, at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non probate assets. Date of First Publication: November 10, 2010 Personal Representative: Lane J. Wolfley Address for Mailing or Service: 713 E First St, Port Angeles WA 98362 Dated: Oct. 27, 2010 Lane J. Wolfley, Personal Representative Pub: Nov. 10, 17, 24, 2010

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Pursuant To the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. File No. 2010-72807 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee ReconTrust Company, N.A., on December 3, 2010 at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 State of Washington, (subject to any conditions imposed by the trustee to protect the lender and borrower) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the county(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Tax Parcel ID no.: 1328035101450000 LOT 10 IN BLOCK 1 OF FORD PARK, AS RECORDED IN COLUME 6 OF PLATS, PAGE 18, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. Commonly Known as: 380 PRAIRIE DR, FORKS, WA 983319232 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 02/20/2002, recorded on 02/27/2002, under Auditor's File No. 2002 1080010 and Deed of Trust re-recorded on -, under Auditor's File No. -, records of Clallam County, Washington from GLEN P.C. WORSEY, AND SANDRA R. WORSEY, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to LAND TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY OF CLALLAM COUNTY, INC., as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. to BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1253625. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: A. Monthly Payments $7,913.62 B. Late Charges $204.61 C. Beneficiary Advances $106.00 D. Suspense Balance ($.00) E. Other Fees $400.00 Total Arrears $7,824.23 F. Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $337.50 Title Report $459.62 Statutory Mailings $25.28 Recording Fees $66.00 Publication $0.00 Posting $200.00 Total Costs $1,088.40 Total Amount Due: $8,912.63 Other potential defaults do not involve payment of the Beneficiary. If applicable, each of these defaults must also be cured. Listed below are categories of common defaults, which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action/documentation necessary to cure the default. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any defaults identified by Beneficiary or Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. Other default, Action necessary to cure Nonpayment of Taxes/Assessments Deliver to Trustee written proof that all taxes and assessments against the property are paid current Default under any senior lien Deliver to Trustee written proof that all senior liens are paid current and that no other defaults exist. Failure to insure property against hazard Deliver to Trustee written proof that the property is insured against hazard as required by the Deed of Trust. Waste Cease and desist from committing waste, repair all damage to property and maintain property as required in Deed of Trust. Unauthorized sale of property (Due on Sale) Revert title to permitted vestee. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal Balance of $80,099.10, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 11/01/2009 and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The abovedescribed real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of the sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on 12/03/2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/22/2010 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/22/2010 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/22/2010 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, and Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): GLEN P.C. WORSEY 380 PRARIE DR FORKS, WA 983319232 SANDRA R WORSEY 380 PRAIRIE DR FORKS, WA 98331-9232 GLEN P.C. WORSEY 22 Greenhaven Pl Jacksonville, AR 72076-9230 SANDRA R WORSEY 22 Greenhave Pl Jacksonville, AR 72076-9230 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested, or registered mail on 06/25/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/28/2010 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale of the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the unlawful detainer act, Chapter 59.12 RCW For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060; and/or any applicable Federal Law. DATED: July 29, 2010 ReconTrust Company, N.A. By - Its Assistant Secretary ReconTrust Company, N.A. P.O. Box 10284 Van Nuys, CA 91410-0284 Phone: (800) 281-8219 This firm is attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. The debt set forth on this notice will be assumed to be valid unless you dispute the debt by providing this office with a written notice of your dispute within 30 days of your receipt of this notice, setting forth the basis of your dispute. If you dispute the debt in writing within 30 days, we will obtain and mail verification of the debt to you. If the creditor identified in this notice is different than your original creditor, we will provide you with the name and address of the original creditor if you request this information in writing within 30 days. ASAP# FNMA3707488 11/03/2010, 11/24/2010 Pub.: Nov. 3, 24, 2010

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Cars

OLDS: ‘90. Runs great. Looks great. $1,200. 460-1183.

SAAB: ‘94 900si. Must see. $900/obo. 452-5909

SUBARU: ‘07 Forester. 25,000 mi., perfect condition, under warranty. $16,750. 452-6014

TOYOTA: ‘05 Prius Hybrid. Black, new tires, under, 67K mi. $11,085. 928-9527.

PORSCHE: ‘02 Boxter S. 56K miles, 6 spd, black on black. $21,500. 461-9635.

SUBARU ‘08 LEGACY SPECIAL EDITION ALL WD 4 door, economical 2.5 liter 4 cylinder, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seat, power moonroof, keyless entry, side airbags, alloy wheels, fog lamps, side airbags, only 32,000 miles, balance of factory 3/36 and 5/60 warranty, non-smoker, spotless Carfax. $16,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

Legals Clallam Co.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUBARU: ‘08 Legacy $15,750. Economical 2.5I liter 4-Cyc, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/ CD, Power Windows, Locks, Keyless Entry, Alloy Wheels, 34,250 miles, Balance of 5/60 Factory Warranty, Spotless Carfax Report, Non-Smoker, Spolier and Bug Gard. Great Condition! Call Mike at 360-460-0959 SUZUKI: ‘00 Grand Vitara. Exc. cond., 87K mi., very clean. $3,950. 775-1132. TOYOTA ‘97 COROLLA 4 DOOR 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, AM/FM cassette and more! One week special. Expires 11-27-2010. $3,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

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PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF EQUALIATION MEETING THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF AGNEW IRRIGATION WILL HOLD THEIR ANNUAL EQUALIZATION MEETING ON DEC 1, 2010 AT THE AGNEW HELPFUL NEIGHBOR HALL AT 7:PM TO HEAR ANY AND ALL OBJECTIONS TO THE CURRENT ASSESSMENTS. MYLA REID, SECRETARY OF SAID DISTRICT. Pub: Nov. 24, Dec. 1, 2010

TOYOTA: ‘10 Prius. As new, save $4,000. $20,000. 452-7273.

TOYOTA: ‘03 Camry LE One owner, no accidents, well maintained, 4 cyl, auto trans, 95,000 mi. $7,250. 477-2183. TOYOTA: ‘89 Camry. $1,200. 928-9774. TOYOTA: ‘91 Corolla. 4 dr, 5 speed, good shape, runs good, 30+ mpg. $1,650/obo. 360-452-8788

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VW ‘01 BEETLE GLS TURBO 1.8 liter turbocharged 4 cylinder, 5 speed, alloy wheels, sunroof, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, heated seats, air, tilt, cruise, cassette, 6 CD changer, dual front airbags. Priced way under Kelley Blue Book! Turbocharged with a 5 speed! Sparkling clean! This is one fun little bug! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs good, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $2,995/obo. 775-9648

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SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR CLALLAM COUNTY In re the Estate of Carol M. Polhamus, Deceased. NO. 10-4-00306-1 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative's attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent's probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: November 10, 2010 Personal Representative: Carol J. Pacheco Attorney for Personal Representative: Stephen C. Moriarty, WSBA #18810 Address for mailing or service: PLATT IRWIN LAW FIRM 403 S. Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-3327 Court of Probate Proceedings: Clallam County Superior Court Probate Cause Number: 10-4-00306-1 Pub: Nov. 10, 17, 24, 2010

File No.: 7037.07936 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Chase Home Finance, LLC Grantee: John W. Rickenbacher, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000513905 Abbreviated Legal: LT. 2, BK. 39, K/1 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 27, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 2, Block 39, Norman R. Smith's Subdivision of the Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington, according to plat thereof recorded in Volume K of Plats, Page 1, records of said County; except the East 10 feet of the North half of said Lot 2; also except that portion conveyed to June Price by deed recorded September 9, 1999 under Auditor's File no. 1999-1035736, described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of said Lot 2, said point also being the True Point of Beginning; thence North 33 degrees 22'22" East, along the East line of said Lot 2, a distance of 58.84 feet; thence North 56 degrees 38'00" West, a distance of 10.00 feet; thence South 34 degrees 39'57" West, a distance of 25.11 feet; thence South 32 degrees 14'08" West, a distance of 33.74 feet to the South line of said Lot 2; thence South 56 degrees 38'00" East, along said South line of said Lot 2, a distance of 9.90 feet to the True Point of Beginning; also except that portion conveyed to Bonnie A. Fidler, individually and as Personal Representative of the Estate of Clarence H. Fidler, by deed recorded September 9, 1999, under Clallam County Auditor's File no. 1999-1035737, described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of said Lot 2; thence North 32 degrees 22'22" East along the East line of said Lot 2, a distance of 58.84 feet to the True Point of Beginning; thence continuing North 32 degrees 22'22" East, a distance of 11.15 feet; thence North 56 degrees 38'03" West, a distance of 10.00 feet; thence South 33 degrees 22'22" West, a distance of 11.15 feet; thence South 56 degrees 38'00" East, a distance of 10.00 feet to the True Point of beginning. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 734 GEORGIANA ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/07/08, recorded on 03/11/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1217530, records of Clallam County, Washington, from John W. Rickenbacher, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc solely as nominee for American Mortgage Network, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc to Chase Home Finance, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1254561. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/21/2010 Monthly Payments $6,399.60 Late Charges $277.32 Lender's Fees & Costs $166.00 Total Arrearage $6,842.92 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $603.79 Statutory Mailings $48.24 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,358.53 Total Amount Due: $8,201.45 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $143,020.87, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 27, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS John W. Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John W. Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John W. Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John W. Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John W. Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John W. Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John W. Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John W. Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John W. Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John W. Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/19/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/19/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/21/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.07936) 1002.163454-FEI Pub: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010


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File No.: 7037.17601 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Chase Home Finance LLC Grantee: Lance Kuesener, Jr. and Stacy A. Kusener, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 05-30-10-500126/500154 Abbreviated Legal: LTS 15-17, & 32-34, ALL BLK 1 UNION PACIFIC ADDN 1/67 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 27, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lots 15, 16, 17, inclusive and Lots 32, 33, 34, inclusive in Block 1 of Union Pacific Addition, as recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 67, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 41 Largent Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 02/15/08, recorded on 02/22/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1216561, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Stacy A. Kusener and Lance H. Kusener, Jr, wife and husband, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for American Mortgage Network, Inc., a Delaware Corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Chase Home Finance LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2009-1231028. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/17/2010 Monthly Payments $18,691.34 Late Charges $754.25 Lender's Fees & Costs $1,668.65 Total Arrearage $21,114.24 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $472.50 Recording Costs $62.00 Total Costs $534.50 Total Amount Due: $21,648.74 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $101,444.29, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 08/01/08, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 27, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Stacy A. Kusener 41 Largent Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 Lance H. Kusener, Jr 41 Largent Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/07/09, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/08/09 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/17/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.17601) 1002.107281-FEI Pub: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010 File No.: 7886.22596 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. PNC Bank, National Association sbm National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank Grantee: Janet L. Segel, as her separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 04-30-20-410050 Abbreviated Legal: Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 27, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Parcel "A" of Survey recorded February 24, 1993 in Volume 26 of Surveys on Page 59 under Recording No. 682595, being a portion of the Northwest quarter of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter and of the Northeast quarter of the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter, all in Section 20, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W.M. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. More accurately described as: Parcel "A" of boundary line adjustment survey recorded February 24, 1993 in Volume 26 of surveys, page 59, under Clallam County Recording No. 682595, being a portion of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 20, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Together with an easement for ingress, egress and utilities as disclosed by Clallam County Auditor's File No. 477369. Commonly known as: 203 Some Day Way aka 151 Some Day Way Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/24/07, recorded on 04/30/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007 1200393, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Janet Segle a single person, as Grantor, to Old Republic Title, Ltd., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/15/2010 Monthly Payments $44,805.99 Late Charges $2,122.38 Lender's Fees & Costs $371.00 Total Arrearage $47,299.37 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $475.00 Title Report $947.42 Statutory Mailings $28.68 Recording Costs $15.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,536.10 Total Amount Due: $48,835.47 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $373,062.91, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 27, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Janet Segle 203 Some Day Way SEQUIM, WA 98382 Janet Segle 18 Tripp Road Sequim, WA 98382 Janet Segle 151 Some Day Way SEQUIM, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Janet Segle 203 Some Day Way Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Janet Segle 18 Tripp Road Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Janet Segle 151 Some Day Way SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/10/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/10/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/15/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7886.22596) 1002.166140-FEI Pub: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. APN: 07-30-06-220150 TS #: WA-10-368488-SH I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 12/27/2010, at 10:00 am at THE MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 223 EAST 4TH ST., PORT ANGELES, WA sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF GOVERNMENT LOT 5 AND THE SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF GOVERNMENT LOT 4 IN SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 7 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; EXCEPT THE SOUTH 330 FEET OF THE EAST 396 FEET OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID GOVERNMENT LOT 5; AND THAT PORTION OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTH HALF OF GOVERNMENT LOT 3 IN SAID SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 7 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, LYING WESTERLY OF COUNTY ROAD KNOWN AS FRESHWATER BAY ROAD. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. TAX ID: 073006220150 Commonly known as: 505 FRESHWATER BAY ROAD PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 3/14/2008, recorded 3/24/2008, under Auditor's File No. 20081218152, in Book xxx, Page xxx, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from TAMBER MEYER AND JASON MEYER, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as Grantor(s), to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FRANKLIN AMERICAN MORTGAGE COMPANY A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FRANKLIN AMERICAN MORTGAGE COMPANY A CORPORATION to Wells Fargo Bank, NA.. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $65,534.35 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $406,463.84, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 12/1/2008, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The abovedescribed real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 12/27/2010. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 12/16/2010 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 12/16/2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 12/16/2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): TAMBER MEYER AND JASON MEYER, WIFE AND HUSBAND 505 FRESHWATER BAY ROAD PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail on 7/16/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all of their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS : The purchaser at the trustee's sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. T. S. No.: WA-10-368488-SH Dated: 9/15/2010 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary For Non-Sale, Payoff and Reinstatement info Quality Loan Service Corp of Washington 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com For Service of Process on Trustee: Quality Loan Service Corp., of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 ASAP# FNMA3738481 11/24/2010, 12/15/2010 Pub.: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010

File No.: 7037.07937 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Chase Home Finance, LLC Grantee: John W. Rickenbacher, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000-526584 Abbreviated Legal: Lts. 27 & 28, Bk. 65, PSCC Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 27, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lots 27 and 28, Block 65, Puget Sound Cooperative Colony's Subdivision of Suburban Lot 23 of the Townsite of Port Angeles, as per plat recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 1, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington Commonly known as: 517 E 4TH ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/18/08, recorded on 06/20/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1222877, records of Clallam County, Washington, from John W. Rickenbacher, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc solely as nominee for American Mortgage Network, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc to Chase Home Finance, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1254251. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/21/2010 Monthly Payments $10,658.94 Late Charges $448.38 Lender's Fees & Costs $166.00 Total Arrearage $11,273.32 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $758.80 Statutory Mailings $48.24 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,513.54 Total Amount Due: $12,786.86 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $223,461.92, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 27, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS John Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/15/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/15/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/21/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.07937) 1002.163230-FEI Pub: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

101

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Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7037.07935 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Chase Home Finance, LLC Grantee: John W. Rickenbacher, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: Abbreviated Legal: LT. 8, BK. 91, TPA 1/27 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 27, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 8, Block 91, Townsite of Port Angeles, as per plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 27, records of Clallam County, Washington Commonly known as: 126 W 5TH ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/06/08, recorded on 03/11/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1217531, records of Clallam County, Washington, from John W. Rickenbacher, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc solely as nominee for American Mortgage Network, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc to Chase Home Finance, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1254253. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/21/2010 Monthly Payments $7,161.24 Late Charges $307.20 Lender's Fees & Costs $166.00 Total Arrearage $7,634.44 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $625.46 Statutory Mailings $48.24 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,379.20 Total Amount Due: $9,013.64 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $158,422.89, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 27, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS John Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/15/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/15/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/21/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.07935) 1002.163195-FEI Pub: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7228.22084 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Aurora Loan Services, LLC Grantee: Joshua Easley and Jennifer Easley, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 961200606 Abbreviated Legal: S 1/2 Lt. 10 & 11, Bk. 6, 1/26 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 27, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: The South 1/2 of Lot 10 and all of Lot 11, Block 6, James H. Hussey's Addition to the City of Port Townsend, as per Plat recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 26, Records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 2633 Sherman Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 08/11/06, recorded on 08/16/06, under Auditor's File No. 514478, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Joshua Easley and Jennifer Easley, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Jefferson Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Aurora Loan Services, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 554066. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/15/2010 Monthly Payments $18,608.28 Late Charges $762.63 Lender's Fees & Costs ($1,055.31) Total Arrearage $18,315.60 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $758.80 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,592.36 Total Amount Due: $19,907.96 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $229,501.50, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 27, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Joshua Easley 2633 Sherman Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 Jennifer Easley 2633 Sherman Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/09/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/09/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/15/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7228.22084) 1002.165972-FEI Pub: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010


C12

WeatherNorthwest

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Thursday

Friday

Yesterday

saTurday

sunday

High 34

Low 27

41/36

43/33

42/32

41/32

Mostly cloudy, a snow shower in the p.m..

Mostly cloudy with a bit of snow.

Rain.

Mostly cloudy with a chance of rain.

Cloudy with rain possible; chilly.

Cloudy, chance of a little rain; chilly.

The Peninsula A large, but chilly dome of high pressure will remain in place over the region today. This will produce another unseasonably cold day across the region with plenty of clouds. This dome of high pressure will drift eastward and away from the area during the Neah Bay Port afternoon, which may allow a shower or two to develop as 39/35 Townsend the winds turn more onshore. Dry and chilly weather will Port Angeles 37/32 prevail tonight. The next storm system will approach from 34/27 the northwest for Thanksgiving, spreading rain across Sequim the Peninsula. Rain will likely linger into the weekend.

Victoria 35/30

36/30

Forks 40/32

Olympia 34/24

Seattle 30/25

Spokane 8/-1

Yakima Kennewick 14/7 19/8

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2010

Marine Forecast

Mostly cloudy and chilly today; a snow shower in the afternoon. Wind from the east at 6-12 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Mostly cloudy tonight with a little snow. Wind east-northeast at 6-12 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Chilly tomorrow with rain. Wind east at 8-16 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles.

LaPush Port Angeles Port Townsend Sequim Bay*

2:21 a.m. 1:15 p.m. 5:33 a.m. 2:01 p.m. 7:18 a.m. 3:46 p.m. 6:39 a.m. 3:07 p.m.

Today

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

7.4’ 8.7’ 7.7’ 6.6’ 9.3’ 8.0’ 8.7’ 7.5’

7:41 a.m. 8:23 p.m. 10:28 a.m. 10:19 p.m. 11:42 a.m. 11:33 p.m. 11:35 a.m. 11:26 p.m.

3.1’ -0.7’ 5.6’ -1.5’ 7.3’ -2.0’ 6.9’ -1.9’

High Tide Ht 3:05 a.m. 2:00 p.m. 6:15 a.m. 2:49 p.m. 8:00 a.m. 4:34 p.m. 7:21 a.m. 3:55 p.m.

Seattle 30/25

Billings 3/-5

Los Angeles 62/42

First

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Full

7.3’ 8.5’ 7.7’ 6.2’ 9.3’ 7.5’ 8.7’ 7.1’

Friday

Low Tide Ht 8:27 a.m. 9:07 p.m. 11:28 a.m. 11:06 p.m. 12:42 p.m. ----12:35 p.m. -----

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

3.1’ -0.6’ 5.5’ -1.2’ 7.1’ --6.7’ ---

High Tide Ht 3:50 a.m. 2:52 p.m. 6:57 a.m. 4:01 p.m. 8:42 a.m. 5:46 p.m. 8:03 a.m. 5:07 p.m.

7.3’ 8.0’ 7.7’ 5.7’ 9.3’ 6.9’ 8.7’ 6.5’

Low Tide Ht 9:18 a.m. 9:54 p.m. 12:42 p.m. 11:54 p.m. 12:20 a.m. 1:56 p.m. 12:13 a.m. 1:49 p.m.

3.0’ -0.2’ 5.1’ -0.6’ -1.6’ 6.6’ -1.5’ 6.2’

Dec 5

Dec 13

Dec 21

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 64 55 s Baghdad 76 54 s Beijing 41 23 s Brussels 40 29 i Cairo 76 58 pc Calgary 16 8 pc Edmonton 10 3 s Hong Kong 74 61 s Jerusalem 70 51 pc Johannesburg 71 52 t Kabul 60 26 s London 41 30 pc Mexico City 77 46 s Montreal 36 21 pc Moscow 37 37 sn New Delhi 70 56 sh Paris 43 37 sh Rio de Janeiro 81 72 sh Rome 54 40 sh Stockholm 32 25 sn Sydney 79 63 s Tokyo 56 50 pc Toronto 38 27 pc Vancouver 35 27 c Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

New York 50/35

0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Washington 54/37

Kansas City 60/15 Atlanta 64/52

El Paso 66/37

Moon Phases

Detroit 42/37

Chicago 38/29 Denver 32/2

Sunset today ................... 4:27 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:35 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 7:17 p.m. Moonset today ............... 10:30 a.m. New

Minneapolis 34/11

San Francisco 53/37

Sun & Moon

Nov 28

Everett 33/25

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 4 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 26 15 trace 10.46 Forks 29 16 0.12 108.94 Seattle 25 18 0.01 37.23 Sequim 30 14 0.00 8.81 Hoquiam 29 22 trace 60.10 Victoria 28 20 0.00 27.42 P. Townsend* 30 23 0.00 14.46 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Last

Port Ludlow 35/30 Bellingham 32/22

Aberdeen 42/31

Peninsula Daily News

Houston 83/66

Fronts Cold Warm

Miami 81/71

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi Lo W 46 22 pc 39 30 sn 40 30 c 64 52 pc 51 31 pc 50 34 pc 22 9 s 3 -5 sn 12 -11 sn 9 0s 49 31 pc 40 36 pc 70 56 pc 24 5 c 38 29 r 50 45 r 7 -1 pc 37 27 pc 77 64 sh 32 2 c 43 11 r 42 37 pc 34 28 pc 31 17 sn 0 -12 pc 83 71 pc 83 66 sh 38 33 r

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi Lo W 60 15 r 48 28 s 72 58 t 62 42 s 81 71 s 38 28 sn 34 11 sn 66 58 c 78 67 pc 50 35 pc 70 29 pc 38 11 i 82 61 s 67 43 s 50 35 pc 62 42 pc 34 26 pc 62 39 pc 28 9 s 48 26 s 56 36 r 18 3 pc 78 68 sh 60 46 s 53 37 s 33 -1 sn 2 -12 pc 54 37 pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 90 at Edinburg, TX

Low: -22 at Jordan, MT

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas! With silver bells, shiny balls, garlands, cheery ornaments and surprises. Twinkling, colorful, bright lights for your home, tree and yard (solar too!)

All the gifts and treasures for your Merry Christmas at Christmas Village

HADLOCK

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Thanks to all who gave to Peninsula Home Fund Continued from C3 ■  Philip and Kathy Giuntoli, Port Angeles. In memory of Larry Page. ■  Sally Milici, Beaver. In memory of Dirk Milici. ■  Dan and Vicki Pierson, Port Angeles. ■  Al and Muriel Main, Port Angeles. ■  Mary Ann Shaffer, Port Townsend. ■  Tom Coville, Port Angeles. ■  Delores Reher and Tommie Schwent, Port Angeles. ■  Mary and Cullen Kelsoe, Port Angeles. In memory of Mary Wyman — a woman who made a difference in the lives of many. [And] In honor of our sisters- and brothers-in-law Bob and Evadne Woodside and Deantha and Mel Ott, whose kindness and generosity of love and spirit make a difference to all who know them. ■  Susan Sorensen, Sequim. ■  Glenn Coxen, Port Hadlock. ■  Colleen Ostrye, Port Angeles. In memory of Dale Hickson. ■  Herb and Berta Pauly, Port Angeles. In memory of Rosemary Campbell. We will miss Rosemary, our dear neighbor and friend.

■  Lauren and Liz PaupByrnes, Port Angeles. In memory of Mr. Molina. ■  Anne and Vincent Murray, Port Angeles. ■  Pat Johnson, Sequim. ■  Mrs. Merle Broderick, Port Angeles. In memory of CA Broderick. ■  Sally and Jim Halvorsen, Port Angeles. In memory of Frank Platt. ■  Iris F. Heston, Port Angeles. In memory of Frank and Grace Finch. ■  M. Schonfield and D.M. Clunis, Port Townsend. ■  John and Denise Kane, Sequim. In honor of our families. ■  Joe Floyd and Barbara Noble, Sequim. ■  Dan and Eve Farrell, Port Angeles. ■  John and Roberta Griset, Sequim. In memory of Frank and Eileen Lowe. ■  Jill Hay, Sequim. In mem-

ory of Ralph Hollywood. ■  C. and F. Kathol, Port Angeles. ■  Vince and Rita Adragna, Sequim. In memory of Salvatore Adragna. ■  Wayne and Vicky Murphy, Port Angeles. ■  Dana D. Casey, Port Angeles. ■  Eileen Z. Romano, Sequim. ■  Rosalba S. Lauritsen, Sequim. ■  David A. Storm, Seattle. ■  Jane and Charlie Kopriva, Port Townsend. ■  Larry and Dixie Parker, Port Angeles. ■  Brenda Mosler, Sequim. ■  Elinor Cutsforth, Sequim. ■  G. Oliver and M. Jamison, Sequim. In memory of Kate Myers. ■  Davis Barrett, Port Townsend. ■  James and Karen Rogers, Port Angeles. ■  John and Sue Miles, Port Angeles. ■  Port Angeles, $25. In memory of Sue Lea. ■  Clallam Bay, $50. In memory of Carol Munro. ■  Port Angeles, $50. In memory of Eleanor Naddy. ■ And . . . 334 other Peninsula Home donors who asked to be listed in the 2009 campaign as anonymous.

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0A5101586

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Briefly . . . Baton team hosts holiday fundraiser

tival of Lights Holiday Gift and Cookie Bazaar at the Port Townsend Masonic Temple, corner of Van Buren and Jefferson streets, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 4. PORT ANGELES — The event will include The Peninsula Baton Team handmade items, gifts for will host a holiday-themed fundraiser at 634 E. Eighth home and garden, cookies by the dozen and more. St. from 10:30 a.m. to Also, entries are being 2:30 p.m. Saturday. Holiday wreaths, Party- accepted in a contest for the public to design a canlite candles, hot cocoa and dle lantern or holder; the treats will be available. A Christmas gift basket first prize is $100. Lanterns and holders featuring a one-hour maswill be exhibited at the fessage-therapy certificate tival. from licensed massage For more information, practitioner Annie Tamvisit www.unitypt.org. burro will be raffled off. The Peninsula Baton Team will perform from Learn at market 10 a.m. and noon at FriPORT ANGELES — day’s Festival of Trees Wreath-making and seed Teddy Bear Tea at the Vern bird-feeder demonstrations Burton Community Center, will be held at the Port 308 E. Fourth St. Angeles Farmers Market at

Festival of Lights PORT TOWNSEND — Unity Church of Port Townsend will host its Fes-

The Gateway, corner of First and Lincoln streets, at 11 a.m. Saturday. Farmers market Manager Cynthia Warne will be

demonstrating “Wreath Making on the Cheap” using locally collected greens, dry grasses and other dried plants to assemble wreaths for the holidays. “These wreaths are quite unusual and not seen for sale at this time of year,” Warne said. “You collect the dry materials in late summer and early fall, then assemble the wreaths with fresh greens at the holidays. Every wreath is different, and there is no limit to your creativity” said Warne. “And the real beauty of these wreaths is you can make them for practically no cost.” Kristina Lawrence will show attendees how to use peanut butter and pine cones to make seed bird feeders. For more information, phone Warne at 360-4600361 or visit www.port angelesfarmersmarket.com. Peninsula Daily News

0B5103482


Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Features

SECTION

D

Food and Family

Worth giving thanks for

Top things off with this custard dish By Jim Romanoff

The Associated Press

The custard for this fresh ginger-infused creme brulee can easily be prepared a day or two ahead and kept covered in the refrigerator.

Then, while some of your helpers clear the table, you sprinkle some sugar on top of the premade custard, throw it under the broiler for a few minutes to create the caramel crust, and you are

ready to serve it topped with fresh raspberries. This dish also can be cooked in individual ramekins using the same technique. The cooking time will be roughly the same.

Fresh Ginger Creme Brulee Makes 8 servings 2 cups half-and-half 4-inch piece unpeeled fresh ginger, coarsely chopped 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk 3 large eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1⁄8 teaspoon salt 2⁄3 cup sugar 1 pint fresh raspberries

________ Heat the oven to 325 degrees. In a medium saucepan over medium-high, heat the half-and-half, stirring constantly, until steaming but not boiling. Remove the pan from the heat and add the ginger. Cover and set aside to steep for 20 minutes. After the half-and-half and ginger have steeped, bring a kettle of water to

a boil. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, whisk together the sweetened condensed milk, eggs, vanilla and salt until slightly frothy. Slowly whisk in the hot half-and-half and ginger mixture. Pour the mixture through a mesh strainer into a shallow 1- or 11⁄2quart baking dish. Discard the solids in the strainer. Set the dish in a larger, shallow roasting pan. Set the pans in the oven, then pour enough boiling water from the kettle into the roasting pan to come halfway up the side of the baking dish. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, or until set around the edges but still slightly wiggly at the center. Remove the custard from the water bath, set

on a rack and let cool to room temperature. Once cooled, cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours. When ready to serve, heat the broiler. Remove the custard from the refrigerator, uncover and blot off any excess moisture from the top with a paper towel. Sprinkle the sugar evenly over the top, making sure the edges are covered. Broil at least 6 inches from the heat source until the sugar is melted and caramelized, 8 to 10 minutes, rotating the dish as needed to ensure even browning. Let cool for a few minutes. Serve immediately (best within 2 hours so the crust remains firm), garnished with the raspberries. The Associated Press (2)

For more Thanksgiving Day sides, see Page D2

Shake things up for Thanksgiving dessert with Fresh Ginger Creme Brulee — the custard can be done a day ahead and the candy coating for the top quickly made as dinner dishes are cleared.

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Have it both ways By J.M. Hirsch

ingredients and dumped them in a bowl without bothering to cook them. Until last year, I was a I was apprehensive; this firm believer that Thankswas a long way from the giving dinner wasn’t worth canned stuff. giving thanks over without But it was delicious, a massive bowl of cooked especially when scooped up cranberry sauce on the with tortilla chips. I ate the table. better part of a large bowl of Then, I sampled a fresh it as an appetizer. cranberry salsa, which is a Still, when dinner fancy way of saying somebody chopped up most of the rolled around, I had a hanclassic cranberry sauce kering for the old school The Associated Press

cooked sauce. So this year, I decided to have it both ways. I created a fresh cranberry salsa that is wonderful as an uncooked starter, but equally good alongside turkey following a brief stint on the stovetop. Depending on how much you plan to eat, you can divide the recipe in half (serving half raw and half cooked), or double it and make full batches each way.

Spicy Cranberry Salsa. Or Sauce. Makes 8 servings In a food processor, combine the red onion, jalapeno peppers and cilantro. Pulse until finely chopped. Add the fresh and dried cranberries, then pulse again until coarsely chopped. Set aside. In a large bowl, whisk together the lime juice, agave syrup or honey, cardamom, cinnamon, salt and black pepper. Add the cranberry mixture, then toss well. If serving as a salsa, the mixture can be

served immediately or refrigerated until needed. If refrigerated, let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes before serving. If serving as a sauce, transfer the entire mixture to a large saucepan over medium-high. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook until the fresh cranberries have broken down, about 10 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and cool, then refrigerate until ready to serve.

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1 small red onion, quartered 1 tablespoon jarred jalapeno pepper slices 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro 12-ounce bag fresh cranberries 1 cup whole dried cranberries 2 tablespoons lime juice 1⁄4 cup agave syrup or honey 1⁄4 teaspoon ground cardamom 1⁄4 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon salt 1⁄4 teaspoon ground black pepper

139


D2

PeninsulaNorthwest

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Bake up bread in no time flat

The Associated Press

Even if you don’t have the time (or know-how) to make bread from scratch, you still can bake up delicious Thanksgiving dinner rolls. This savory monkey bread uses frozen white

bread dough that is shaped into small balls, dunked in butter, herbs and cheese, then mounded into a pan and baked. The result is deliciously easy. So easy, in fact, it’s a good project for the kids while you focus on the bird

and more complicated sides. Just be sure to buy frozen dough, not par-baked bread (which already has been partially cooked). The easiest way to thaw the dough is to leave it in the refrigerator overnight.

Herbed Monkey Bread Makes 12 servings 11⁄2 cups grated Parmesan or pecorino cheese 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1 tablespoon dried parsley 1⁄2 teaspoon ground black pepper 4 tablespoons (1⁄2 stick) butter, melted and cooled 3 pounds purchased frozen white bread dough, thawed

________ The Associated Press (3)

Thanks to using frozen white bread dough, Herbed Monkey Bread can be made by anyone.

Lightly coat a large, smooth Bundt pan or ring cake pan with cook-

ing spray. In a small bowl, mix together the cheese, oregano, thyme, parsley and black pepper. Place the butter in a bowl. Cut the dough into about 60 walnut-sized pieces. Dunk each piece into the melted butter, allowing the excess to drip off, then roll each in the herbed cheese mixture. Place the dough pieces in the prepared pan, arranging them evenly in about 3 layers. The pan should be filled slightly more than halfway.

Avoid overfilling the pan. Excess dough can be arranged in another smaller pan. Cover the pan with plastic wrap and allow to rise for 1 hour, or until risen and puffy. About 15 minutes before the dough has finished rising, heat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake the monkey bread for 30 to 40 minutes, or until golden and cooked through (the internal temperature should be 200 degrees). Allow to cool in the pan for 5 minutes before removing.

Thanksgiving Day sides continued from Page D1

Sweet and savory, Sausage and Sweet Potato Smash will be a new perennial Thanksgiving favorite.

Sausage and Sweet Potato Smash Makes 10 servings

Do away with marshmallows By Alison Ladman

savory and satisfying take on a dish that too often ends up cloying and heavy. Here’s a good excuse to If you’d rather keep the banish marshmallows from meat and the potatoes sepyour Thanksgiving reperarate, consider cooking and toire. mashing the sweet potaWe’ve partnered the toes on their own, then richly sweet taste of spooning them into a shalmashed sweet potatoes low serving dish. The with the savory, salty flavor browned meat and onions of browned sausage and then can be spread over the sweet potatoes. onions. The result is a The Associated Press

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the sweet potatoes and cook until tender, about 25 minutes. In a large skillet over medium-high

Roasting is one of the easiest ways of preparing winter squash — and making Cocoa Roasted Butternut Squash can be one of the most flavorful.

Roast winter squash simply By Alison Ladman The Associated Press

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Roasting is one of the easiest ways of preparing winter squash. It also can be one of the most flavorful. It’s as simple as peeling and seeding the squash,

cutting it into bite-size chunks, then tossing it with oil and whatever seasonings strike your fancy. Then it’s just a matter of spreading the squash chunks over a baking sheet, popping it in the oven and walking away.

Cocoa Roasted Butternut Squash Serves 10 servings 1⁄3

cup cocoa powder 1 tablespoon salt 1⁄4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (more or less, to taste) 1⁄2 teaspoon cinnamon 1 tablespoon sugar 3 medium butternut squash (about 6 pounds total), peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks 1⁄4 cup canola or vegetable oil 3⁄4 cup toasted slivered almonds

________ Heat the oven to 375 degrees. In a small bowl, com-

bine the cocoa powder, salt, cayenne, cinnamon and sugar. Arrange the squash chunks on 2 large baking sheets. Drizzle the oil over the squash and toss to coat evenly. Sprinkle the cocoa mixture over the squash and toss to coat. Roast for 45 to 55 minutes, or until tender. Transfer to a serving dish and sprinkle with the toasted almonds.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

D3

Fashion writer turns silk into art Chimacum woman designs quilt for her church’s raffle Polly Fish was at work one day when she happened to spot it — the most beautiful coat she had ever seen. It was periwinkle blue, she recalled, with lamb’s wool sleeves. Asking if she could be notified when it went into “the closet,” she can still hear the person looking at her in disbelief and replying, “It’s jee-van-shee.” Apparel from big-name designers like Givenchy, it seems, did not go into the closet, where it might be coveted by staff, but was returned to the designer or — horror of horrors — shredded at customs. Polly now lives in Chimacum but used to work for Vogue and New York fashion houses.

port townsend Neighbor

Wis., the then Polly McGraw Jackson went to Barnard College in New York City, then to the Fashion Institute of Technology. Combining writing skills and fashion sense, she became a writer and editor for catalogs and books. In the ’60s, Polly was working for Simplicity on Madison Avenue and 34th Street, a block from her apartment. “I don’t watch ‘Mad Men,’” she New York fashion said. “I lived it.” So it’s not surprising that She also wrote for Vogue and when someone donated a box of for fashion designer Pauline Trigfabric swatches to her church ere, an experience that she said group, Polly knew just what to do mirrored “The Devil Wears with them. Prada.” “They were going to make But after meeting and marrythem into tote bags,” she said. “I ing Bob, the son of family friends, said, ‘I don’t think so.’” Polly left the bright lights of the Instead, Polly took the city. swatches, most of which are silk, To be close to both sets of parand made them into a quilt, ents, they moved to North Carowhich will be raffled at St. Paul lina, choosing Bald Head Island, Episcopal Church’s St. Nicholas off the coast. Faire on Saturday, Dec. 4. It was a compromise between She took on the project Alaska, where Bob had worked despite a lack of quilt-making for the National Forest Service, experience but had something and Polly’s home ground. better — an eye for color and “The fashion editor and the design. forest ranger,” Fish said. “Whatever works.” “I took the squares home and On Bald Head, the couple pinned the squares to a blanket built a house, and Bob had a on the wall,” she said. “I moved charter fishing boat as well as a them around.” sawmill and woodworking shop. Polly works in her studio on Polly continued writing and, the top floor of the three-story on the side, developed a line of house in Chimacum, which she oatmeal cookies, Emmies, and her husband, Bob Fish, inspired by those served at her bought two years ago. favorite restaurant, Mary ElizaBut she used to be a “West Sider.” beth’s, on East 37th Street in After high school in Appleton, New York.

Jennifer

The restaurant closed long ago, but Polly still makes Emmies, actually more of a candy because they have no flour, in her Chimacum kitchen, shipping them to North Carolina to sell. She also bakes them for church coffee hour and the church’s Wednesday soup lunch, volunteers at the Port Townsend Food Bank and writes for the church newsletter, the Bell.

Inspired by fabrics Turning her hand to quilting was inspired by the donation of the fabric squares by Lynn Dunham, who brought them to a meeting last fall, Polly said. When Connie Johnston, who volunteers at the food bank, heard about the project, she donated a piece of red silk, which Polly used as a border and the larger blocks. Many of the donated fabric squares had small motifs — figures, trees and other landscape elements. Polly was especially delighted to find one with the family logo on it, so she incorporated it into the quilt. “There’s a fish in every corner of the border,” she said. There’s also art in every cranny of the house. Bob’s mother, Helen Fish, belonged to the Esther Stephens Brazier Guild, whose members went door-to-door in New England collecting tole patterns used in Colonial America. Before painting the designs on tin, guild members would do trial runs on paper, creating works of art. The couple have many of Helen’s samples stored in the upper floor of Bob’s woodworking shop, where he makes boxes, decorative objects and carvings. Polly’s mother, Dudley Glass McGraw, was also a painter who did rosemaling. The daughter of Atlanta newspaper columnist and critic Dudley Glass, for whom she was named, she had the chance to

Jennifer Jackson/for Peninsula Daily News

Polly Fish works on the quilt she is making from donated fabric in her Chimacum home. On the wall behind her are framed maps of Bermuda, where her husband’s family is from. meet Enrico Caruso, see Anna Pavlova dance “Swan Lake” and stand on the stage with actress Sarah Bernhardt. The great singer Caruso also was a caricaturist who sketched likenesses of people on dinner napkins. Polly’s family lost the one he did of her grandfather but had others, including one of Richard Strauss, which Polly gave to the Metropolitan Opera’s collection. Other mementos: On the living room wall, along with maps of Bermuda, where Bob’s family came from, is a framed remnant from Lord Horatio Nelson’s ship, HMS Foudroyant, the admiral’s flagship from 1799 to 1800. According to Wikipedia, the ship, an 80-gunner, served in the Napoleonic wars, eventually ending up as a tender in the Liverpool, England, docks. In 1897, it broke loose from the dock during a storm and grounded on Blackpool Sands. Carpenters salvaged the timber for furniture and paneling, according to Wikipedia, making it probable that the large splinter of wood that Polly’s aunt bought and gave to Bob, a maritime his-

tory buff, is actually from Foudroyant’s capstan.

Quilt raffle Tickets for the quilt raffle are $1 and will be available from church members or at the St. Nicholas Faire on Saturday, Dec. 4. The event, scheduled to coincide with Gallery Walk, is from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. and is a fundraiser for the church’s outreach fund. It features an art show and sale by the congregation’s artists and handmade crafts, baked goods and jams. Wine and hors d’oeuvres will be available for a donation. A rocking chair donated by Karen Long and decorated by Arlene Nesbitt also will be raffled. For more information about the event, phone 360-385-0185.

________ Jennifer Jackson writes about Port Townsend and Jefferson County every Wednesday. To contact her with items for this column, phone 360-379-5688 or e-mail jjackson@olypen.com.

No cheap, quick shortcuts to equine dentistry “Are you kidding me?” I uttered those words in disbelief three times in three days: On Friday evening, when handed the invoice for equine dental work on my Shetland pony, Snowball Express; afterward, turning on the lights on my truck and trailer to drive home at night in the pouring rain and discovering the trailer lights weren’t working; and again Monday morning, after telling family members the previous night to not drive down our steep driveway if it was snowing. When I awoke, I discovered my mom’s car had slid partially off the drive, potentially blocking any who tried to return.

Frozen horse water

of veterimediGriffiths nary cine and specialist with Performance Equine Dentistry. He gave an informative slide presentation explaining the mechanics of a horse’s mouth and why maintaining teeth is important. The program was hosted by the Jefferson County 4-H Horse Project at the Washington State University Extension office in Port Hadlock. Most horse owners are aware of the need to float, or get rid of sharp points that have grown on the sides of their horses’ teeth.

Karen

Expensive procedure

I asked for an estimate. He couldn’t give me one Tanya Schweitzer, president of the Jefferson while still working on the County 4-H Horse Project, shows equine mouth, so he agreed we veterinarian Richard Vetter of Performance will wait to fill the cavities Equine Dentistry a video of her horse lapping on our next visit (and prior water, a very unusual method for a horse to to his talk, I had no idea drink — after his informative presentation to fillings were put in horse adults and 4-H’ers teeth). Much work was done on Snowball’s teeth. malocclusions (poor meetIt has a double-padded His first visit came to ing of the teeth) are being horse portion in the rear missed and continue to cre- with aluminum stocks that just under $500. An estimate for restoraate performance problems, adjust from mini to draft tion work on his eight caviand then the horse is horses, and the clinic porties for next time is $490 to blamed for misbehaving. tion is in the front. $637. My pony was exhibiting Specialized equipment Ouch! Floating teeth many of the same sympincludes X-ray and a specutoms of a problem mouth lum to keep the mouth When not taken care of, Vetter described, such as open when the horse is the points can cut the excessive head tossing sedated. inside of their cheeks and when wearing a bit. A speculum is an instrucause all sorts of painful I’d had dental work ment with two bite plates problems. done less than a year ago that the front teeth rest on A sprightly little market The idea of floating by my regular veterinarian that is gently ratcheted unlike any you’ve seen teeth without sedation is on my other three, but he open to allow manual and now considered outdated A ustria - Rieder Beer because there isn’t a way to didn’t have time to work on visual access to the mouth. B angkok - Fried Anchovies Snowball. examine the condition of I was feeling the guilt, the incisors or their relaC hina - Groceries No fear for horse so I made arrangements tive importance to molar D ominican Rep. - Naranja Agr. I have to say, Snowball for his last time slot Friday occlusion. E cuador - Gandules Verdes “You wouldn’t go to your afternoon during his clinic walked right up the ramp and into the stocks. F rance - Cig. Papers at the Jefferson County regular doctor to work on He was then sedated Fairgrounds. your teeth,” stated Vetter G eorgia - Pomegranate Juice and experienced no fear or Dr. Vetter has the perin his talk. H olland - Grolsch anxiety the whole time his fect setup. “You’d go to a dentist. I ndonesia - Ginger Candy He works out of a cusmouth was being worked Well, the same should be tomized, 24-foot aluminum on. J apan - Groceries true for your horse.” Turns out, Snowball gooseneck trailer. On his website, www. K orea - Laver perfequinedentistry.com, L atvia - Bread Vetter provides photoexico - Groceries M ONE STOP AUTO SHOP graphs, diagrams and information about the N ew Zealand - Steinlager methods and importance of O MG! equine dentistry. P hilippines - Groceries He said there is no such Q atar - Nope! thing as a “cheaper or quicker” way to shortcut R ussia - Groceries/Beer such an important health S cotland - Black Douglas care practice. T aiwan - Shredded Squid He’s found that many

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________ Karen Griffiths’ column, Peninsula Horseplay, appears every other Wednesday. If you have a horse event, clinic or seminar you would like listed, please e-mail Griffiths at kbg@ olympus.net at least two weeks in advance. You can also write Griffiths at PDN, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

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But thankfully — and no kidding — prior to leaving the fairgrounds, I discovered a loose wire in the trailer, fixed it and was able to drive home safely.

0B5104130

I got to work plowing our 450-foot curved driveway — during a freezing cold snow flurry — so I could dig her out, put chains on her car and get it out of the way. Not prepared for such freezing temperatures, I also hadn’t put deicers in the horse water troughs, so their drinking water had frozen over. I took care of their water needs and then put blankets on the horses who, by then, in spite of having shelters they could stand under, were running around with frozen icicles on their body. By then, I was chilled to the bone and so thankful for the warmth of my wood stove. Please everyone: During freezing temperatures, remember to give extra feed to your animals to help their bodies stay warm, and make sure they have access to clean drinking water. Last Thursday, I attended an equine dental presentation and talk by Richard Vetter, a doctor

was the “one in every 20 patients” Vetter sees who has a mouthful of cavities. Eight to be exact. He used his probe in each cavity to show me the depth. I reacted with, “I see dollar signs here, and I don’t even know how much this session is going to cost me.”

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D4

Peninsula Daily News

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

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Holiday Shop & Stay! Only $129! Package includes:

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It’s a Kitsap Holiday!

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(800) 273-5076

Where To Head For The Holidays... Authentic Italian Cuisine ~2010 Winner in Best of North Kitsap~ -VODIt*UBMJBO'PPEt8JOF4FMFDUJPO t#FFS4FMFDUJPOt1J[[Bt%FTTFSU Open Daily • 18830 Front St. • Downtown Poulsbo 360-697-8466 • www.sogno-di-vino.com

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Community Bakery Handcrafted baked goods from local artisan bakers for all your Holiday Festivities!

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Open Mon-Sat 9-3 25931 Washington Bldv., Kingston

(360) 297-7636

Open 7 days a week

(in the Old Kingston Hotel)

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(360) 598-6973 www.mirracolemorsels.com

www.portgamblegeneralstore.com

Jewelry • Glass • Wall Art Pottery • Gifts

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TOYS ETC

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360.779.3377

Arts & Crafts - Santa - Hay Rides - Carolers Tree Lighting - Toys for Tots - Fireworks

18830-B Front Street • Poulsbo •

Provided by Ferrellgas

portgamble.com - (360) 297-8074 portgamble@orminc.com

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www.PotlatchGallery.com • info@potlatchgallery.com

GLUTEN FREE HOLIDAYS! The

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Dear Santa, I’ve been a very good girl this year....

Come see us in December for your holiday needs! holiday pies • fresh baked bread • pie crusts • stufďŹ ng • holiday cookies • seasonal pastries • gift cards too! Closed for the Thanksgiving holiday - Nov. 25th-29th

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www.yourglutenfreebakery.com • 360.394.4GFF(4433) Check our website or call for directions

All your Holiday pies, cakes & small desserts

Give something special this year!

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Quality Wood Rockers Children’s Chairs

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Contact us for selections & ordering .ZISF1M/8t4JMWFSEBMF *O4FBUUMF-JHIUJOH1MB[B 360-308-8338 XXXBNJTIUPVDIDPN

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BECAUSE SHE’S A LITTLE NAUGHTY.. BECAUSE SHE’S A LITTLE NICE...

Locally owned & operated in Kingston  tinfo@sweetlifecakery.net WWW.SWEETLIFECAKERY.NET

HAND CRAFTED JEWELRY BY LEO FRIED

Visit Us ON

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(360) 297-7412 • an Enterprise of the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe

Shop, Stay, Wrap! Package Includes: Overnight Accommodations for two, breakfast for two and FREE wrapping paper.

BECAUSE SHE DESERVES IT

FUEL • GROCERY • ESPRESSO

Save ! The Date e 80’s Them New Year’s Eve Party!

- Auto Bar Lounge

Black Friday t Entertainmen Fri 11/26

Sat 11/27

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Reggae Night Unified Culture Ohana Night Tropical Sensation

FREEping

Gift Wrap "%JBNPOEPOUIF#FBDI

-

11am - 5pm Nov. 26, 2010


3 FREE

Be Our Guest...

50% OFF

2ND ENTREE OF EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE WITH PURCHASE OF 2 BEVERAGES

BOTTLES

NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFER, OR ON HOLIDAYS. ONE COUPON PER TABLE.

S O 1/2

H a p p y H o u r 4 -6 W e d .-M o n . P ric e B o ttle s o f W in e M o n . & W e d .

0B5104489

AL

360-385-0700 Reservations Suggested

141 HUDSON STREET • PORT TOWNSEND 0B5104494

Buy One

Buy One

BREAKFAST LUNCH

113 DelGuzzi Dr. Get Second One Get Second One Port Angeles equal or lesser value of equal or lesser value 452-6545 withof purchase of 1 beverage with purchase of 1 beverage

1/2 PRICE 1/2 PRICE Not good on Sunday Expires Dec. 07, 2010

Buy One Dinner

wHITE CUP ESPRESSO

Get Second One 1/2 Price

Quality EsprEsso for lEss!

buy 1 espresso drink get 1 free equal or lesser value

of equal or lesser value with purchase of 2 beverages

Not valid on Holidays for dinner

Expires Dec. 07, 2010

*Limit one per customer with this coupon.

Drive-thru at corner of 3rd Ave. & Washington, Sequim

360-683-1232

We serve Coffee!

Expires 12/7/10

0B5104488

Not good on Sunday Expires Dec. 07, 2010

RESTAURANT

0B5104550 1A180041

Some restrictions may apply

www.ts-restaurant.com

Closed on Tues. • Lunch 11 - 3 pm • Dinner: 4pm-Close LIVE MUSIC FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS

holiday CaRPET ClEaNiNG SPECialS

plus tax

plus tax

Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning $9900 WHole HoUse speCial

$2500 per room Steam cleaned & deodorized, 2 rm. minimum

Steam cleaned & deodorized, 4 rm.& free hallway, up to 800 sq.ft. (Heavy soil may require extra charge).

UpHolstery Cleaning

Sofa 7' $5500 Recliner $3500 Love Seat $4500

0B5104557

7

$ 99 each

CARPER*044JA

0B5104554

5

$ 99 each

360-457-6039

One Room Dupont Teflon® with purchase of another

Stop by with this coupon and receive a Valid Mon. - Fri. All Day - Must present coupon. One Coupon per Table - Expires 12-07-10

Three Rooms

~Not good with any other offer~

Expires 12-7-10

Limit one coupon per table.

Tues.-Thurs. 11am-9pm Fri.-Sat. 11am-10pm Sun. 4pm-8pm

2 Off

$ 00

Up to 360 sq. ft.

Includes Stain Protection!

with purchase of $20 or more.

• Professionally Cleaned • Water Damage Restoration • Truck Mounted for Deep Cleaning • Stairs extra

Must present coupon at time of cleaning.

3 Off

$ 00

Not valid w/other offers or on U-Bake Pizzas Expires 12-07-10

0B5104498

0B5104501

Not valid w/other offers or on U-Bake Pizzas Expires 12-07-10

Expires 12-31-10

0B5104546

0B5104548

CARPET CLEANING COUPON SPECIALS

203 E. Front St. DOWNTOWN Port Angeles 360-457-6040

FREE

GET NEW CUSTOMERS! Reach over 40,000 readers with Your Message!

WITH THIS COUPON

Contact Jeanette at Peninsula Daily News Also check out more coupons online @ peninsuladailynews.com

0B5104561

to include a coupon for your business.

0B5104494

417-7685 or 1-800-826-7714


PDN 11/24/2010 C