Issuu on Google+

Monday

Battle lines are drawn

Showers called for as system departs B10

Seahawks to face 49ers for NFC championship B1

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

January 13, 2014 | 75¢

46 flu cases crop up in area

Seahawks rise in rap

Officials expect more to come BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Rodney Just, a grocery worker who moonlights as a hip-hop performer, has produced a rap-based tribute to the Seattle Seahawks.g

PT man’s lyrics honor team The two-minute 23-second approached Queensryche slow groove is not a fight song guitarist Parker Lundgren, and would not be appropriate who also hails from Port stadium music fare, and there Townsend. are no plans by the team for its Lundgren in turn conuse, said Just, a grocery team tacted Pemberton who then leader at the Food Co-op. recruited local musician/pro“I sent it to a few radio staducer Pete Lack to create the BY CHARLIE BERMANT tions, but it’s not really going beat-heavy “We Are the MarPENINSULA DAILY NEWS anywhere at this point,” said iners,” which will be played Pemberton Just, 33. as background for in-staPORT TOWNSEND — A North “But I put it on my website dium highlight reels during Olympic Peninsula man has recorded a so people could hear it.” the 2014 season, Pemberton said Frirap song commemorating the Seattle Just is the second Port Townsend day. Seahawks. resident to write and record a tribute The song was previewed at a Dec. 20 Unlike fellow Port Townsend musisong for a Seattle team. event in Port Townsend, which also feacian Brett Pemberton’s “We Are the tured a performance by Just. Mariners,” Rodney Just’s “12th Man Theme song After some final remixing, the song Stand” won’t be heard at CenturyLink will be delivered to Mariners’ manageField. Pemberton, who is both a musician ment by the end of January, Pemberton But it is available online at http:// and a model, became involved in creatsaid. tinyurl.com/PDN-Seahawks-Rap, where ing a Seattle Mariners’ theme song it is tentatively titled “Seahawks Song.” when the team’s management TURN TO RAP/A6

Just is 2nd resident to craft a tune for a Seattle sports team

PORT ANGELES — Health officials have confirmed 46 influenza cases, and figure many more exist, on the North Olympic Peninsula as flu season roars into full form. “We’re definitely in this rapid upswing in the flu outbreak,” Dr. Tom Locke, public health officer for Clallam and Jefferson counties, said Friday. “We’re in a stage where it’s going to get worse because it gets better.” The good news is this year’s vaccine matches cir- Locke culating strains, and there’s plenty to go around. Flu shots are available at pharmacies, doctors’ offices and other locations across the Peninsula. Locke said that there were 39 laboratoryconfirmed flu cases in Clallam County as of Friday — up from four cases the week prior.

H1N1 in positive samples All of those positive samples were H1N1 swine flu, which caused a pandemic in 2009. H1N1 tends to affect more young people than last year’s predominate H3N2 strain, Locke said. Jefferson County had seven lab-confirmed flu cases as of last check Monday, Locke said. Those tests did not distinguish between the strains. TURN

TO

FLU/A6

Less time in Olympia Mobilisa to hire Lawmakers start 2014 session BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

OLYMPIA — North Olympic Peninsula legislators are looking forward to spending less time in Olympia than they did in 2013 as the 2014 session of the state Legislature opens today. The 24th Legislative District’s three voices in the state capitol are gearing up for a session they all hope will be considerably shorter than last year’s. “The atmosphere in Olympia is to go in there and get done and move on,” said House Majority Whip Kevin Van De Wege, a Democrat from Sequim. “We spent too much time in there last year.” The 2013 marathon had a

regular session from January to April and two special sessions that extended into June, called to pass a 2013-2015 biennium state budget. The 2014 session is slated to run from today to March 13.

‘Busy two months’ “It will be a busy two months and not a long four months,” said State Rep. Steve Tharinger, also a Sequim Democrat, who has been newly appointed this year to the House General Appropriations Committee. Sen. Jim Hargrove, the ranking Democrat on the budget-writing Senate Ways and Means Committee, expects work to begin in earnest quickly, with

ALSO . . . ■ Both chambers to tackle 2014 appropriations/A08

committees likely starting to hear bills this week. “I think everyone’s No. 1 priority is to be done on time, after last year spending six months over there,” said Hargrove, a Democrat from Hoquiam. The 24th Legislative District is composed of Clallam and Jefferson counties and a portion of Grays Harbor County. Tharinger said he expects to keep busy in the next week or so learning the ins and outs of the House General Appropriations Committee, the main budget writing committee for the House. TURN

TO

TIME/A6

10 more staffers Plans come after public stock sale makes millions PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Intellicheck Mobilisa Inc. plans to hire 10 sales people after a public stock offering last week grossed about $4 million before fees are deducted. The Port Townsend-based company — which sells wireless technology and identity systems to government, military and commercial markets — offered 7,780,000 shares of its common stock to the public at $0.45 per share through

$

Offer ends at 11am • M-F.

BlackBearDiner.com

TO

HIRES/A6

98th year, 11th issue — 2 sections, 20 pages

Free Peninsula Daily News with your entrée!

Facebook.com/BlackBearDinerSequim

41954916

1471 E Washington St. • Sequim • (360) 504-2950

9.99

TURN

INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Good News Breakfast Special Even our cooks can’t believe this good news. A half pound NY steak, eggs, potatoes and choice of biscuit or toast for just

Aegis Capital Corp. of New York City. “It sold quickly,” said Nelson Ludlow, CEO of Intellicheck Mobilisa. “We sold those offers on Ludlow Thursday.” Proceeds will go toward hiring more sales staff both for the Olympic Peninsula and the New York office of the company, he said. “We just don’t have enough sales people. We have about five, and we want to go to 15.”

CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPE MOVIES NATION PENINSULA POLL PUZZLES/GAMES

B5 B4 A7 B4 B4 B10 A3 A2 B6

*PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

SUDOKU SPORTS WEATHER WORLD

A2 B1 B10 A3


A2

UpFront

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2014, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3540 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 75 cents daily, $1.50 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, ext. 5052 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2014, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

Audit Bureau of Circulations

The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Pre-awards show gala aids Haiti WHILE MANY STARS are awash in the gifts and parties of Golden Globes weekend, a few used their privilege to benefit the people of Haiti — and they were rewarded with an intimate performance by U2. Bette Midler, Michael Douglas, Gwyneth Paltrow, Charlize Theron, Piers Mor- Penn gan, Chelsea Handler, Sarah Silverman, Idris Elba and Kathryn Bigelow were among the guests Saturday at Sean Penn’s third annual Help Haiti Home benefit, which raised nearly $6 million for the J/P Haitian Relief Organization. The dinner party at the Montage Hotel included a surprise performance by U2. The J/P Haitian Relief Organization has been working since the 2010 earthquake to provide emergency care and sustainable shelter and education to the people of Haiti. But Penn said he hopes his

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

From left, The Edge, Larry Mullen Jr., Bono and Adam Clayton of U2 are seen after their performance on stage at the third annual Sean Penn & Friends Help Haiti Home Gala on Saturday at the Montage Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif. organization is obsolete within 10 years. He said progress in the Caribbean nation has been miraculous despite corruption and “inaccurate, bad journalism.” He expects all of the people displaced by the earthquake to find permanent housing within the next two years. Nearly 2 million have already moved out of the camps and into homes. Besides lending his time and fame, Penn also gave his vintage El Camino to benefit his organization. It sold for $100,000 at auction Saturday. U2’s three-song performance followed a tender, acoustic performance earlier in the evening with Bono, guitarist The Edge and Haitian singer Anaelle Jean-Pierre.

Cassidy arrest David Cassidy, the 1970s heartthrob, has been arrested in Southern California on suspicion of drunken driving. The California Highway Patrol said the 63-year-old Cassidy was pulled over Friday near Los Angeles Cassidy International Airport after an officer spotted him making an illegal right turn against a red light. He was arrested after the officer smelled alcohol in the rental car. Cassidy was released Saturday on $15,000 bail and is scheduled to appear in court Feb. 5.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL FRIDAY/SATURDAY QUESTION: Which one of these three do you think is the most threatening to the future of the United States? Big government

61.8%

Big business

31.6%

Big labor

4.0%

Undecided 2.7% Total votes cast: 1,543 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Passings By The Associated Press

FRANKLIN MCCAIN, 73, who helped spark a movement of nonviolent sit-in protests across the South by occupying a segregated Woolworth’s lunch counter in 1960, has died, his son said Friday. Mr. McCain died of respiratory complications late Thursday, Frank McCain of Mr. McCain Greensboro, in 2010 N.C., said. Mr. McCain was one of four freshmen students from North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro who sat down at the local “whites only” lunch counter Feb. 1, 1960. “The best feeling of my life,” Mr. McCain said in a 2010 interview with The Associated Press, was “sitting on that dumb stool.” Mr. McCain, Joseph McNeil, David Richmond and Ezell Blair Jr. planned their surprise action carefully. They bought school supplies and toiletries so that their receipts would offer proof that the lunch counter was the only part of the store where racial segregation still ruled. The young men stayed until the store closed, but returned the next day and

Setting it Straight subsequent days. They were joined by more protesters, whose numbers built to at least 1,000 by the fifth day. Within weeks, sit-ins launched in more than 50 cities in nine states. The Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro was desegregated within six months. The sit-in led to the formation in Raleigh of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, which became the cutting edge of the student direct-action civil rights movement. The demonstrations between 1960 and 1965 helped pass the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

________ SCOTT LEWIS, 53, U.S. stage hypnotist, has plunged to his death from the balcony of a Sydney apartment, Australian police said Sunday. Mr. Lewis was in Sydney performing his hypnosis act along with six other performers in the show “The Illusionists 2.0,”

Laugh Lines A MAN WITH a beer belly has his best years ahead of him. Your Monologue

which opened at the Sydney Opera House on Thursday. A police spokeswoman said Mr. Lewis officers were called to an apartment building in downtown Pyrmont at 9:40 a.m. Saturday to find his body lying on a balcony. Media reports said Mr. Lewis had fallen from an 11th floor balcony to the fourth floor. Mr. Lewis was staying with other performers at the building, a short drive from the opera house. Police had yet to determine whether Mr. Lewis’s fall was the result of “misadventure or self-harm,” she said.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

FOUR LARGE NORTHERN flickers in a southeast Port Angeles yard, searching for insects in the grass. One of them does some fancy dance steps but is totally ignored by the others . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladailynews. com.

Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1939 (75 years ago) Tomorrow will be bath day for Harry Lawton of Seattle, state commander of the American Legion, and that bath will be in Lake Crescent at LaPoel, according to local legionnaires. Lawton will make his official visit to the Forks American Legion post tonight along with District Commander Phil Davaney of Bremerton and other Legion dignitaries. Then tomorrow, he will be piloted as far as LaPoel by members of the Forks post and turned over to a delegation from Port Angeles. The two groups will see to it that Lawton takes his bath in the lake, then they will hustle him to a warm cabin to be dressed and brought to Port Angeles in time for an evening session of the American Legion.

1964 (50 years ago) The Port of Port Angeles shipped the largest volume of forest products in its history in 1963. Log shipments totaled 73.9 million logs, compared

with 22.9 million in 1962, the next largest year. Lumber shipments in 1963 totaled 42.2 million board feet, compared with 35.9 million board feet in 1962. Log shipment prospects for 1964 seem fairly stable, and the lumber volume is contingent on available shipping space, said Port Manager Jack P. Hogan in a report to port commissioners.

1989 (25 years ago) Small amounts of oil have washed up on the 364-acre Protection Island, the centerpiece of the Protection Island National Wildlife Refuge. The oil might be part of a discharge from an oil barge that was ruptured off the coast of Grays Harbor County on Dec. 22. In addition to Protection Island, small amounts of oil have been found on Dungeness Spit and Ediz Hook. “The big question is whether this is related to that other spill,” a Coast Guard inspector said.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS MONDAY, Jan. 13, the 13th day of 2014. There are 352 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Jan. 13, 1864, American songwriter Stephen Foster, who wrote “Swanee River,” ‘‘Oh! Susanna,” ‘‘Camptown Races,” ‘‘My Old Kentucky Home” and “Beautiful Dreamer,” died in poverty in a New York hospital at age 37. On this date: ■ In 1733, James Oglethorpe and some 120 English colonists arrived at Charleston, S.C., while en route to settle in present-day Georgia. ■ In 1794, President George Washington approved a measure adding two stars and two stripes

to the American flag, following the admission of Vermont and Kentucky to the Union. The number of stripes was later reduced to the original 13. ■ In 1898, Emile Zola’s famous defense of Capt. Alfred Dreyfus, “J’accuse,” was published in Paris. ■ In 1941, a new law went into effect granting Puerto Ricans U.S. birthright citizenship. ■ In 1945, during World War II, Soviet forces began a huge, successful offensive against the Germans in Eastern Europe. ■ In 1964, Roman Catholic Bishop Karol Wojtyla, the future Pope John Paul II, was appointed Archbishop of Krakow, Poland, by Pope Paul VI.

■ In 1966, Robert C. Weaver was named Secretary of Housing and Urban Development by President Lyndon B. Johnson; he became the first black Cabinet member. ■ In 1982, an Air Florida 737 crashed into the 14th Street Bridge in Washington, D.C., and fell into the Potomac River after taking off during a snowstorm, killing a total of 78 people; four passengers and a flight attendant survived. ■ In 1990, L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia became the nation’s first elected black governor as he took the oath of office in Richmond. ■ In 2012, the Italian luxury liner Costa Concordia ran aground off the Tuscan island of Giglio and flipped onto its side; 32 people

were killed. ■ Ten years ago: Hostile fire brought down a U.S. Army Apache attack helicopter in Iraq, but the two crew members escaped injury. ■ Five years ago: U.S. Marshals apprehended Marcus Schrenker, 38, in North Florida days after the businessman and amateur daredevil pilot apparently tried to fake his own death in a plane crash. ■ One year ago: A Cairo appeals court overturned Hosni Mubarak’s life sentence and ordered a retrial of the former Egyptian president for failing to prevent the killing of hundreds of protesters during the 2011 uprising that toppled his regime.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, January 13, 2014 P A G E

A3 Briefly: Nation Partisans stand divided over traffic scandal TRENTON, N.J. — Prominent Republicans leapt to Republican Gov. Chris Christie’s defense Sunday, insisting that an ongoing traffic scandal wouldn’t ruin any presidential ambitions, while Democrats said it’s difficult to believe such a hands-on manager knew nothing about a plan by a top aide to close lanes at a bridge into New York City. Politicians from both sides of the aisle took to the Sunday talk shows to debate the fallout from the traffic jams near the Priebus George Washington Bridge in September and any role Christie may have played. Documents show Christie’s aides appeared to engineer lane closures at the heavily traveled bridge to punish a Democratic mayor who failed to endorse his re-election bid. Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus told NBC’s “Meet the Press” Christie could move past the scandal and still win support from primary voters in the 2016 presidential race.

Space station delivery CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — The six space station astronauts finally got their Christmas pres-

ents Sunday with the arrival of a privately launched supply ship that took an extra month to soar. The spacemen opened the capsule a day early and started removing items, as soon as the Orbital Sciences Corp. vessel was moored safely at the International Space Station. Packed inside were 3,000 pounds of groceries, equipment and experiments, as well as eagerly awaited Christmas gifts from their families back home and some fresh fruit courtesy of NASA.

Desegregation aid LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — An agreement awaiting a federal judge’s final approval soon could end one of the nation’s most historic desegregation efforts following decades of court battles and $1 billion of special aid to Little Rock-area schools. Lawyers and patrons this week will pick apart details of a proposed settlement among three school districts, state lawyers and others involved in the case to determine if it is fair. Unless U.S. District Judge Price Marshall finds fault with the deal, for the first time in more than a quarter century the state no longer will be required to make extra payments to help fund racial integration of schools. In November, Marshall gave tentative approval to a plan that would end the state’s payments within four years. However, he will hear formal arguments today and Tuesday on whether to officially end the dispute that has roots in the Central High School desegregation fight 56 years ago. The Associated Press

Court weighs recess appointment powers Obama took office in 2009. Senate Republicans’ refusal to allow votes for nominees to the National Labor Relations Board and the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau led Obama to make the temporary, or recess, appointments in January 2012. Three federal appeals courts BY MARK SHERMAN have said Obama overstepped his THE ASSOCIATED PRESS authority because the Senate was WASHINGTON — The not in recess when he acted. Supreme Court is refereeing a politically charged dispute Company, union conflict between President Barack Obama The Supreme Court case and Senate Republicans over the involves a dispute between a president’s power to temporarily Washington state bottling comfill high-level positions. pany and a local Teamsters union The case being argued at the in which the NLRB sided with the high court today is the first in the union. nation’s history to consider the The U.S. Court of Appeals for meaning of the provision of the the District of Columbia Circuit Constitution that allows the overturned the board’s ruling. president to make temporary Hundreds more NLRB rulings appointments to positions that could be voided if the Supreme otherwise require Senate confir- Court upholds the appeals court mation, but only when the Sen- decision. ate is in recess. More broadly, if the justices The court battle is an out- ratify the lower court ruling, it growth of increasing partisanship would make it nearly impossible and the political stalemate that’s for a president to use the recess been a hallmark of Washington power. Under such a ruling, presidenfor years, and especially since

Obama, GOP at odds over filled posts

tial nominees could be blocked indefinitely when the president’s party does not control the Senate. Three federal appeals Obama courts have upheld recess appointments in previous administrations. Senate Republicans also are taking part in the case, in support of the company, Noel Canning. The impasse over confirming nominees to the NLRB and the CFPB was resolved last summer, and majority Democrats have since changed Senate rules to limit the ability of the minority party to block most presidential nominees.

Vote is fast to follow A few hours after the court hears the case today, the Senate is scheduled to vote on the nomination of Robert Wilkins, currently a federal trial judge, to serve on the federal appeals court in the District of Columbia.

Briefly: World National Coalition is weighing whether to attend the Jan. 22 talks in Switzerland NUEVA ITALIA, Mexico — after being Gunfire erupted Sunday in west- criticized for ern Mexico as hundreds of viginot fully repKerry lantes pressed their fight over resenting dozterritory with a drug cartel, and ens of opposition groups that Mexico’s top security officials seek to oust Syrian President prepared to make yet another Bashar Assad from power. effort to try to stop the violence. Kerry was among envoys Members of so-called selffrom 11 nations Sunday who defense groups entered the town urged coalition President of Nueva Italia on a campaign Ahmad al-Jarba to ensure that they said is designed to liberate his group will be at the talks. towns from the control of the Knights Templar cartel. Vote on charter Opponents and critics said CAIRO — With a presidenthe vigilantes are backed by a tial run by Egypt’s powerful milrival cartel, something the itary chief seeming more likely groups vehemently deny. Hundreds of vigilantes arrived by the day, this week’s constitution referendum, to be held in Nueva Italia late Sunday amid a massive security force morning in a caravan of large trucks, surrounding the City Hall deployment, is widely seen as a vote of confidence in the regime and disarming local police. But firefights broke out almost he installed last summer. Drafted by a 50-member immediately in and around the panel of mostly secular-leaning center square. politicians, the charter criminalOnly one injury was reported izes discrimination, enshrines by mid-day. gender equality and guarantees a raft of freedoms and rights. Syria peace talks And crucially, the Jan. 14-15 PARIS — U.S. Secretary of vote provides the country’s State John Kerry said a meeting increasingly popular military next week on peace for Syria is chief, Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, a credibility test for necessary with a first electoral test since participants who are threatenhe ousted Morsi in a military ing to skip it. coup July 3. The fractured Syrian The Associated Press

Vigilantes in firefight with drug cartels

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TUMULTUOUS

TIMES IN

THAILAND

Thai anti-government protesters shout and cheer during a rally at the Democracy Monument in Bangkok on Sunday. Anti-government demonstrators were preparing Sunday to occupy major intersections of Thailand’s congested capital in what they say is an effort to shut down Bangkok, a plan that has raised fears of violence that could trigger a military coup.

Iran, 6 world powers settled on nuclear agreement terms firmed elsewhere, starts a six- power reactors. The deal also commits Iran to month clock for a final deal to be struck over the Islamic Republic’s stop producing 20 percent TEHRAN, Iran — Iran and six enriched uranium — which is contested nuclear program. world powers have agreed on how only a technical step away from to implement a nuclear deal Enrichment restricted weapons-grade material — and to struck in November, with its neutralize its 20 percent stockUnder the November agree- pile. terms starting from Jan. 20, offiment, Iran agreed to limit its cials announced Sunday. In exchange, economic sancThe announcement, made first uranium enrichment to 5 percent tions Iran faces would be eased by Iranian officials and later con- — the grade commonly used to for a period of six months. BY NASSER KARIMI

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Quick Read

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: One killed when 4th-floor balcony collapses

Nation: ‘Lone Survivor’ is in top position at box office

World: Police report bones stolen from mausoleums

World: Australian wildfire kills one, takes 27 houses

A FOURTH-FLOOR BALCONY collapsed during a birthday party at a Philadelphia apartment, killing a young man and injuring two women, police said Sunday. The 22-year-old man, who suffered severe head and neck injuries in the fall late Saturday, was pronounced dead at a hospital early Sunday. The man and two women had been attending a party in the tony Rittenhouse Square neighborhood and had stepped out onto the balcony to smoke cigarettes when the collapse occurred, authorities said. The two women are in their 20s and suffered broken bones in their backs.

“LONE SURVIVOR” TRIUMPHED at the weekend box office. The patriotic Navy SEAL drama starring Mark Wahlberg, Taylor Kitsch, Emile Hirsch and Ben Foster smashed expectations to earn $38.5 million domestically in its first weekend in wide release, according to studio estimates Sunday. In its eighth weekend, Disney’s icy animated tale “Frozen” stayed cool in the No. 2 spot, earning $15 million and bringing its domestic total to $317 million, passing Disney Animation’s $312 million record set by “The Lion King” in 1994. “Frozen” also topped the international box office with $27.8 million from 50 international markets.

POLICE IN PUERTO RICO said graveyard vandals have stolen bones from at least four mausoleums at a cemetery. In a Sunday statement, police said entire skeletons were taken from two mausoleums and parts of corpses were removed from two other tombs at the cemetery in the southern city of Ponce. Cemetery caretaker Harold Normandia told police that a total of six tombs had been broken into and desecrated. Last year, bones from at least 40 bodies went missing from a cemetery in the Puerto Rican mountain town of Gurabo.

A MAN HAS died fighting a wildfire that razed wooded hills near Australia’s west coast city of Perth, destroying at least 27 houses. Flames prevented paramedics from reaching the man who collapsed on the roof of his home in suburban Hovea on Perth’s eastern fringe Sunday. The ambulance service said he died at the scene while attempting to protect his house. It was not immediately clear if the house was destroyed. The state fire service said in a statement that 27 homes had been confirmed destroyed.


A4

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014

Wanted

Miracle-Ear Hearing Centers are looking for TXDOL¿HGSHRSOHWRWHVWWKHLUODWHVWSURGXFW WKH0LUDFOH(DU®2SHQIRUFREE*! +HUH¶VWKHFDWFK<RXPXVWKDYHGLI¿FXOW\ KHDULQJDQGXQGHUVWDQGLQJLQEDFNJURXQG QRLVHDQG\RXUKHDULQJPXVWIDOOLQWKH UDQJHRIWKHKHDULQJDLG3HRSOHWKDW DUHVHOHFWHGZLOOHYDOXDWH0LUDFOH (DU¶VODWHVWDGYDQFHGGLJLWDOKHDULQJ VROXWLRQWKH0LUDFOH(DU2SHQ You will be able to walk in to our RI¿FHDQGZDONRXWKHDULQJâ&#x20AC; ! &DQGLGDWHVZLOOEHDVNHGWRHYDOXDWH RXULQVWUXPHQWVIRUGD\V ULVNIUHH*  $WWKHHQGRIWKHGD\VLI\RXDUH VDWLV¿HGZLWKWKHLPSURYHPHQWLQ\RXU KHDULQJDQGZLVKWRNHHSWKHLQVWUXPHQW \RXPD\GRVRDWWUHPHQGRXVVDYLQJV %XWWKLVRQO\IRUDOLPLWHGWLPH <RXPXVWVFKHGXOH\RXUDSSRLQWPHQW EHIRUH-DQXDU\WK 'RQ¶WZDLW MIRACLE-EAR HEARING AID CENTERS ARE NOW OFFERING HEARING AIDS AT NO COST TO FEDERAL WORKERS AND RETIREES! 7KDW¶V5LJKW1R&R3D\1R([DP)HH1R$GMXVWPHQW)HH %OXH&URVV%OXH6KLHOG)HGHUDO(PSOR\HH3URJUDPSD\VWKHWRWDOFRVWRI0LUDFOH(DU$XGLRWRQH3URVHULHVDLGV0RVWIHGHUDO JRYHUQPHQWHPSOR\HHVDQGUHWLUHHVDUHHOLJLEOH<RXPD\HYHQEHHOLJLEOHLI\RXKDYHRWKHUQRQIHGHUDOLQVXUDQFHFRYHUDJH 6SHFLDOIDFWRU\SULFLQJLVDYDLODEOHIRUQRQTXDOL¿HUV

CALL TOLL FREE

1-888-387-3068

FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT!

NOW - JAN. 17th 2014 Sequim

Silverdale

Miracle Ear Hearing Aid Center

675 N Fifth Ave Suite A

Miracle Ear Hearing Aid Center Silverdale Plaza Shopping Center

Visit us online at

2950 NW Bucklin Hill Rd

miracle-ear-sequim.com

Visit us online at

miracle-ear-silverdale.com 41965735

CODE: NK1MCK * Risk free offer, the aids must be returned within 30 days of delivery if not completely satisfied and 100% of purchase price will be refunded. â&#x20AC;  Supplies may vary per office. Hearing aids do not restore natural hearing. Individual experiences vary depending on severity of loss, accuracy of evaluation, proper fit and ability to adapt to amplification. ©2013 Hearing Services, LLC. Blue Cross Blue Shield, The Blue Cross, The Blue Shield, BCBS and Federal Employee Program are registered trademarks of Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. Blue Cross Blue Shield Association and its independent licensees are not affiliated with nor do they endorse or sponsor the contents of this advertisement. . Trademarks referring to specific providers are used by Miracle Ear for nominative purposes only: to truthfully identify the source of the services about which information is provided. Such trademarks are solely the property of their respective owners.


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014

A5

Sequim man’s Step up into King’s arraignment legacy, speaker urges slated Friday

BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ

PORT ANGELES — In a speech honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Eric Davis didn’t linger long on the past. After all, Davis asked, which is bigger: the windshield or the rearview mirror? “We have got to start looking forward,” he told his Peninsula College Little Theater audience during Thursday’s Studium Generale program. “I need you to step up,” into the light of King’s legacy, Davis added. A professor of popular culture and the sociology of sport at Bellevue College, Davis delivered Peninsula College’s annual lecture honoring King, who would have been 85 years old this Wednesday. Before showing a video of hiphop recording artist Lupe Fiasco, he asked his audience — students, college staff and other community members — if they could “handle this.” Hearing an emphatic yes, he started the video, which he called “a deep critique” of hip-hop music.

Music’s message In it, Fiasco sings about men and women, boys and girls, all swept up in pop-culture messages about money and sex. Little girls try to be sexy while boys gaze up, wide-eyed, at rappers posing. “I show this video every quarter, four or five times,” Davis said afterward. “It’s terribly disturbing.” This music’s message is that “all you are is what you look like,” said Davis, and a strong black man is one who swaggers around with his pants sagging. That has nothing to do with me, Davis said. “For me, an authentic strong black man is Dr. King,” as well as Davis’ own father, whom he buried

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

DIANE URBANI

DE LA

SEQUIM — A Sequim man accused of assaulting two Clallam County Sheriff’s deputies and damaging a store before being brought under control with an officer’s stun gun is set to be arraigned in Clallam County Superior Court on Friday. Daniel G. G o ck e r e l l , 54, who remained in the Clallam County jail in lieu of $150,000 bail Satur- Gockerell day, was charged Friday with two counts of third-degree assault and one count each of attempting to disarm a police officer, hit and run with property damage, and fourth-degree assaultdomestic violence. “This is very dangerous, completely out of control behavior,” Clallam County Deputy Prosecuting Attorney John Troberg said. Gockerell allegedly ran into the front wall and door of Thomas Building Center at 301 W. Washington St. in a silver minivan at about 6:40 a.m. Tuesday. General manager Tony Steinman estimated the damage at between $10,000 and $12,000.

PAZ/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

In his speech Thursday honoring the memory of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Bellevue College professor Eric Davis urged his Peninsula College Little Theater audience members to find their own ways to change society for the better. in December. “You’ve got to stop buying that stuff,” Davis said of the hip-hop portrayed in the video. “That mess up there” on the screen, “that’s buffoonery.” Each person in this theater, Davis added, can turn away from such messages — and bring about positive change. Yes, there are those who are privileged in our society and those who are at a disadvantage. But people from both groups, throughout history, have stepped up to address a social wrong. Many have been successful in their efforts to right the wrongs; it’s an ongoing process that’s part of King’s legacy, Davis believes. Don’t numb your brain with chemicals or television, he said. “Whatever you take from today, whatever made you think, whatever inspired you to make some changes in society,” Davis said, “go do it.”

At the close of his speech, the professor offered an alternative to the hip-hop artists he sees as harmful to our ears. Michael Franti, the rock-reggaefunk-jazz artist born to a white mother and a black and Native American father, sings often about peace and justice. In his final entreaty about giving of oneself for a better future, Davis quoted his song “Pray for Grace”: So I live to give somethin’ that can live on Like the way you hum a song when the music’s gone Like the warmth of the sand when the sun goes down. With that, Davis stepped down from the stage and took a long drink of water.

Deputy assaults

________ Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5062, or at diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com.

Eating well topic of YMCA series BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — It sounds intense, but “Healthy Eating Boot Camp” is doable, Jennifer Veneklasen believes. Veneklasen, Healthy Lifestyles director at the Olympic Peninsula YMCA, is inviting the public to this new series starting Wednesday at the Y, 302 S. Francis St. Participants must sign up for the whole four-week series, Veneklasen noted. The cost is $20 for YMCA

members and $25 for non-members. D r . Janelle Doolittle, the Port Angeles naturo- Doolittle pathic physician who’ll teach the foursession course, “is passionate about food as medicine,” Veneklasen said. A graduate of Seattle’s Bastyr University, Doolittle “teaches in a totally nonjudgmental, non-intimidating way.” One of the best things

Briefly: State million over 10 years — has been approved. The judge’s ruling could be appealed, but the environmental impact study can go forward.

Partial win in suit over oil terminal VANCOUVER, Wash. — A Clark County judge has given a partial victory to the Port of Vancouver in a lawsuit over a proposed oil terminal. The Columbian reported Superior Court Judge David Gregerson has dismissed a claim by three environmental groups. They groups said the port violated state environmental policy by approving a lease to build an oil terminal before an environmental impact statement was issued. The judge did not agree. The decision means the lease —worth at least $45

Man believed dead SEATTLE — Authorities say a man is presumed dead after he fell from a sailboat in Lake Washington. Police said the boat was about 200 yards off of Seattle’s Magnuson Park when he went overboard Saturday. Marine units from the Seattle Police and Fire Departments were joined in the search by the Coast Guard and King County Sheriff’s office. Even after hours of searching divers hadn’t found the victim, whose

99

12

T-Bone Steak All Day Monday

REGIST ER

NOW

Pre-School and Recreational Gymnastics age 2-14 Performance Cheer age 4-14 Continuous Enrollment with Monthly Tuition Reserve dates now for Birthday Parties and Field Trips!!

3318 Acorn Lane, PA • klahhanegymnastics.org 457-5187 • klahhanegymnastics@gmail.com

Visit our website

www.jimsrx.com 452-4200

424 East 2nd • Open 8 to 7 daily 8 to 5 Sat. • 12 to 4 Sun.

Where you find products you want and the attention you need

41927965

452-3928 • 636 E. Front St. • Port Angeles

He was arrested at his Belfield Avenue home, about a mile away, after driving through his fence, punching Deputy Brandon Stoppani in the head and being subdued with a stun gun, the Sheriff’s Office said. At the Sequim Police Department, Gockerell allegedly struggled with ________ Deputy Matt Murphy for Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can his pistol. be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. Murphy’s hand was cut 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula and required three stitches, dailynews.com.

artificial sweetener use and weight gain. A recent study found that “the risk for metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and coronary heart disease increased with consumption of artificially sweetened beverages”. Consuming sweet-tasting but noncaloric or reduced-calorie food and beverages may interfere with the body’s normal responses that balance glucose and energy.  Try replacing diet drinks with water and a slice of lemon for a refreshing drink that’s actually healthy!

41950039

39864450

Open 7 days a week Lunch & Dinner

Harry Gasnick of Clallam Public Defender requested during the Friday hearing that Gockerell’s bail be reduced and that he be released from jail into a substance abuse program. Clallam County Superior Court Judge Erik Rohrer denied the request. A mental evaluation after his arrest showed that Gockerell has substanceabuse issues, Troberg said. Troberg urged that bail be kept at $150,000 because of the seriousness of what Gockerell is accused of and his criminal history. “The court is not going to reduce the bail amount,” Rohrer said. “When you add [Gockerell’s] history to it, there’s great concern on the court’s part.” Gockerell has a 1994 conviction for first-degree assault out of Kitsap County, Troberg said. Gockerell also pleaded guilty to a hit and run collision with another vehicle along U.S. Highway 101 in Clallam County and was sentenced to nine months in jail, according to Superior Court records.

One killed, another hurt in Moclips crash

$5 registration discount when enrolling in Pre-Gym I or II classes.

Special includes 16 oz. T-Bone Steak, rice, beans, and pico de gallo Sunday Only $ 99 1 Kids Meal

Bail request denied

health and blood sugar. ■ Jan. 29 — “Fats: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly.” ■ Feb. 5 — “Planning for Eating Well” with shopping tips, easy snack recipes and meal planning. “You’ll learn not only the science behind good eating,” Veneklasen said, but also “how to weave more of it Schedule into your daily life.” Topics and dates are: To register, phone 360- PENINSULA DAILY NEWS passenger in the pickup, ■ Wednesday — Whole 452-9244. was injured and taken to TAHOLAH — A Taholah Grays Harbor Community foods eating and digestive ________ man was killed and another Hospital. health. Features Editor Diane Urbani was injured Saturday in a ■ Jan. 22 — “Sweet de la Paz can be reached at 360Hakala was treated for Talk” on types of sweeten- 452-2345, ext. 5062, or at diane. one-car rollover wreck in his injuries and released, said a hospital representaers and their impact on urbani@peninsuladailynews.com. Moclips. Trevis P. Jones, 38, was tive. found deceased on state Hakala was not wearing Highway 109 at Milepost 31 a seat belt at the time of the after he lost control of a wreck, and it was undeter2012 Dodge Ram pickup, mined whether Jones was according to a report by restrained, Rabe said. identity was not immedineither of their shotguns State Patrol Trooper Matt Rabe said the wreck was ately released. had gone off, and the WashRabe. caused by “driving under ington State Patrol crime The pickup left the road the influence” but did not lab determined that fragHunter shot case on the right and rolled onto specify what substance was EVERETT — A curious ments removed from the its top. suspected. No charges are victim’s leg came from a online comment about the Gregory A. Hakala, 47, a pending. bullet fired from a rifle. shooting of a duck hunter Two days later, a reader brought police to the offices commented on a story Health Notes of The Daily Herald newsabout the shooting on the paper in Everett. paper’s website. The Herald reported ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS, The comment said it that detectives served a was an accident, and that WEIGHT GAIN & DIABETES search warrant Thursday the shooter had been lookseeking information about by Kevin Borde, R.Ph. ing through his scope and whoever posted the comdidn’t mean to fire. ment regarding the Jan. 1 The negative impact of consuming Executive Editor Neal shooting to the newspaper’s sugar-sweetened beverages on weight Pattison said the newspawebsite. and other health outcomes has been per declined to turn over The hunter and his increasingly recognized; therefore, information about the post brother were in an alumiwithout a court order, but many people have turned to high-intensity sweeteners num boat in Puget Sound, once police obtained one, it 500 yards off Stanwood, like aspartame, sucralose, and saccharin. However, agreed to do so. when he was hit. several large studies have found a correlation between The Associated Press The pair determined one can do for personal and family health, Doolittle added, is to eat well. “This boot camp will help you,” she said, to choose good foods while modeling healthy eating for your children. Doolittle’s sessions start at 6 p.m. each Wednesday.

+ Voted BEST Mexican Food Since 2003! +

$

the Sheriff’s Office said. Gockerell also had reportedly punched a woman in the head at his home just as law enforcement arrived, according to the Sheriff’s Office. The unidentified woman was taken to Olympic Medical Center for treatment. Deputies said they found a .22-caliber rifle and two loaded magazines in the shed, less than two feet away from where Gockerell was arrested and recovered five rifles from the home’s garage.


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014 — (J)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Flu: Peninsula

Lights back on following hospitals verify Peninsula’s two-day storm up to 46 cases BY ARWYN RICE

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CONTINUED FROM A1 masks around patients if they haven’t had a flu shot. The Peninsula’s 46 known flu cases were con- Timing same firmed at Olympic Medical Locke said the timing of Center and Jefferson this year’s outbreak is Healthcare labs. “almost a mirror image to Samples are tested only last year.” if the patient suffers from “Last year was a bad flu complications and checks year,” he added. into an emergency room or “This year, it’s tracking clinic, suggesting there right around the same. It have been far more than 46 started around Christmas people who have had the flu and peaked in late January already. and early February.” “They’re certainly seeing Last year’s predominant flu-like illnesses in Forks,” H3N2 strain “tends to be Locke said. “They’re seeing more severe” than H1N1, it all over the Peninsula.” The state Department of Locke said, and results Health confirmed 11 flu- higher rates of hospitalizations and death. related deaths statewide. However, H1N1 can also None of those deaths lead to severe complications occurred on the Peninsula. In addition to the flu and tends to affect children, shot, health officials recom- young adults and middlemend good hygiene to slow aged adults more than older people who were exposed to the spread of flu. “Now is the time for peo- a similar virus in the 1950s ple to be extra vigilant,” and ’60s, Locke said. Reports from the East Locke said. “They may be tired of Coast indicate that flu seahearing us say it, but it’s son is peaking there. The ‘stay home when you’re East Coast is typically a sick, wash hands and cover month or so ahead of the West Coast for flu activity, your cough.’” Locke declared the offi- Locke said. ________ cial start of flu season for Clallam and Jefferson counReporter Rob Ollikainen can be ties Jan. 3. The declaration reached at 360-452-2345, ext. triggered a requirement for 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula health care workers to wear dailynews.com.

Hires: Will fill

Power was restored Sunday to the remaining North Olympic Peninsula residents left in the dark after a soaking storm hit the region with two days of strong winds. The system will move out of the area today with only a few showers, and dry, mild weather is expected for the area beginning Tuesday and lasting through the week, said Johnny Burg, a Seattlebased National Weather Service meteorologist. The storm’s highest wind speeds measured in the state were recorded Saturday near the West End community of Sappho, where a National Weather Service station measured a wind gust of 69 miles per hour, according to the National Weather Service. The Sappho weather station is 4 miles northwest of Sappho.

Peninsula wind gusts

DAVID LOGAN/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sean Hintz surveys the damage from a willow tree that blew over early Sunday morning in the yard of the house his family rents at 737 W. Ninth St. in Port Angeles.

Corps Emergency Management Response team working with local contractors placed more than 1,000 tons of large boulders to protect against the breaching of jetties constructed to protect the low-lying towns. No serious damage was reported in either of the coastal communities Sunday afternoon. Trio of bursts Both Clallam and JefThe wind came in three ferson county public utility distinct bursts — Friday districts reported multiple night, Saturday morning power outages. and Saturday evening, Burg said. Lots of tree damage Burg said the Saturday “There has been a lot of morning wind burst was tree damage [to power the most severe. “The coast got the brunt lines],” said Kevin Streett, electrical superintendent of of it,” Burg said. Emergency shoring of Jefferson PUD. A handful of Jefferson jetties at LaPush and Taholah held against waves County residents remained estimated by the National without power early SunWeather Service to be 20 to day afternoon, but electricity was expected to be 30 feet. On Friday, an Army restored before the end of

the day, Streett said. Clallam PUD reported an outage in the Forks area from 7:40 p.m. until 8:40 p.m. Saturday. A tree limb hit power lines, causing a cross arm on a power pole to burn, said Mike Howe, spokesman for Clallam PUD. There were sporadic, smaall outages in Port Angeles and Forks through Saturday night and into early Sunday morning, Howe said. In Port Angeles, a large willow tree was downed at about 5:30 a.m. Sunday on A Street. Port Angeles City Works crews were able to remove the tree by 10 a.m. On Sunday afternoon, a 3-to-4-foot diameter tree blocked Crescent Beach Road, north of Joyce. For rainfall totals for the area, please see the local weather on Page B10.

TOP WIND GUSTS reported by the National Weather Service as of noon Sunday: ■ Sappho: 69 mph at 10 a.m. Saturday ■ Port Townsend: 58 mph at 1:36 p.m. Friday ■ Quillayute Airport: 51 mph at 12:34 a.m. Saturday ■ Brinnon: 49 mph at 2:53 a.m. Saturday ■ LaPush: 47 mph at 10:30 a.m. Saturday ■ Agnew: 41 mph at 2:09 a.m. Saturday ■ Port Angeles: 40 mph at 10:56 p.m. Saturday ■ Port Ludlow: 40 mph at 12:35 p.m. Saturday ■ Clallam Bay: 40 mph at 11:05 p.m. Friday ■ Port Hadlock: 39 mph at 1:05 a.m. Saturday ■ Gardiner: 36 mph at 12:05 a.m. Saturday ■ Neah Bay: 33 mph at 9 p.m. Friday ■ Quilcene: 31 mph at 2:36 p.m. Saturday Peninsula Daily News

most jobs with local workers Time: Supplemental budget CONTINUED FROM A1 will be deducted from the gross. Sales staff hired will Ludlow plans to fill most positions locally, said have to travel, Ludlow said. “We don’t do it by regions. Heather Flanagan, recently hired director of marketing. We do it by sectors, so we’ll “Nelson cares about jobs hire a person just to handle for the Olympic Peninsula,” hotels, someone just to hanshe said. dle retail, someone to hanInterest in the sale was dle military sales, etc.” high, Ludlow said. Ludlow, who grew up in “In fact, it’s what’s tech- Port Townsend, co-founded nically called oversub- Mobilisa in 2001 and built scribed, where we had more readers for identification people wanting shares than cards for military bases. we offered,” he explained. Mobilisa merged with Intellicheck, a company $3.5 million from sale based in New York City, in After the sale of the March 2008. Ludlow, now 52, was stocks offered to the public raised approximately $3.5 made CEO of the combined million, the company sold company and moved the an additional 15 percent of headquarters to Port shares of common stock Townsend. He ran it until 2011 that was oversubscribed, he when he left for other said. An underwriting dis- opportunities, and then count and other expenses took over again in 2012.

KEEP YOUR NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION - A CLEAN DOG

41951084

Self-Service Dog Wash

360-477-2883

Between Sequim and Port Angeles Hwy 101 & Lake Farm Road stinkydogubathe.com OPEN 10-5 Tuesday - Saturday Closed: Sunday/Monday. Boarding by Appointment.

FIRE/SECURITY ALARMS

SECURITY SERVICES 1-800-859-3463

32732490

NORTHWEST, INC.

SSNWHQ.COM

PROTECTED BY

It will address the 2014 supplemental budget, expected to be taken up by both chambers in the capitol this session. The supplemental budget probably will not take the form of a full budget document, Tharinger said, but have relatively small changes to reflect variations in revenue and expenditures not accounted for in the larger 2013-2015 biennium budget. “So all that has to work through, on the House side, the Appropriations Committee,” he said. Tharinger will retain his vice chair position on the House Finance Committee and still serve on the House committees focusing on bills dealing the environment and health care and wellness. Tharinger sits on the

Toxic flame retardants He plans to continue to push for a bill he introduced last year that would ban the sale and manufacture of certain toxic flame retardants in children’s clothes and home furnishings. Though it stalled in Senate committee last year,

LEED standards Hargrove said he plans to introduce legislation that would augment U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Environmental Design, or LEED, standards for the state to include the amount of energy it takes to produce a specific type of building material used in buildings. Currently, LEED standards take into account only the amount of energy a building uses once its been built, Hargrove explained. “We’re working on the draft [bill] right now,” Hargrove said. “We’re gathering information.”

________ Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula dailynews.com.

many popular artists, Just said. “My music is pretty much all positive and uplifting,” he said. “I want to do hip-hop as it once was, to embrace positive changes and be a little more calm and methodical than other artists.” Just said he doesn’t listen to a lot of hip-hop and can’t provide an answer to the inevitable question about his influences the way that people expect. He prefers listening to indie rock but likes to perform and record hiphop because of its lyricism and literacy, along with the challenge of rhyming words and beats.

________ Jefferson County Editor Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or cbermant@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Sat 9am-4pm

When You Donate to Us... It Stays Local Donate... Shop... Volunteer.

728 E. Front St., Port Angeles,WA 360-417-7543 • www.facebook.com/HabitatStoreClallam

Pain-Free Is The Point!© Expert care, compassionately given. Focusing on eliminating pain & improving wellness. 41951849

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

health care and wellness committee with Van De Wege. Van De Wege will remain on the House Rules Committee and those addressing agriculture and natural resources and government operations and elections.

rections and Natural Resources and Parks.

Pat Flood 417-8870 M.S., L. Ac. www.olympicacupuncture.com

32732714

Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

Van De Wege

CONTINUED FROM A1 was in eighth grade and the school team played one quarter of an exhibiJust wrote the rap song in a few tion game in the Kingdome. His first job in high school was as a hours, blending his interests in sports and music, and recorded it himself bag boy at the Port Townsend Safeway. using a computer and rap effects. He left town after graduation and A sample lyric: “We are the best in the West/ go and ask the 12th man explored the country while working at and if you don’t believe them go ask different grocery chains and moving up to management positions. San Fran.” Just has been to all of the home games this year except one, the 17-10 Four albums loss to the Arizona Cardinals on Throughout he has pursued music Dec. 22. as a hobby, releasing four albums on He attended Saturday’s game his website, www.MezziahRecords. against the New Orleans Saints, com, under the name “The Lyrical which the Seahawks won, 23-15. Mezziah.” Just, who graduated from Port The music falls within standard Townsend High School in 1998, was hip-hop parameters for the initiated, bitten by the football bug when he but the message is more positive than Wed-Fri 10am-6pm

Get home delivery.

Hargrove

Van De Wege said the work to educate both constituents and legislators he and Tharinger members of the grassroots Washington Toxics Coalition have done since then will give the bill a fighting chance this session. Van De Wege and coalition executive director Laurie Valeriano spoke to a group of Port Townsend residents about the bill in December. “I concentrated on my district. I know the toxics coalition did a lot of other outreach to legislators and to the public,” Van De Wege said. Hargrove will keep seats on the Senate committees hearing bills concerning Human Services and Cor-

Rap: Written in just few hours

Bring your dog and leave the mess!

Local Monitoring

CONTINUED FROM A1


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, January 13, 2014 PAGE

A7

Hammering the next machine age M

Y FAVORITE STORY IN Erik Brynjolfsson’s and Andrew McAfee’s fascinating new book, The Second Machine Age, is when the Dutch chess grandmaster Jan Hein Donner was asked how he’d prepare for a chess match against a computer, like IBM’s Deep Blue. Donner replied: “I would bring a hammer.” Donner isn’t alone in fantasizing that he’d like Thomas L. to smash some recent Friedman advances in software and automation — think self-driving cars, robotic factories and artificially intelligent reservationists — which are not only replacing blue-collar jobs at a faster rate, but now also white-collar skills. Even grandmasters! Something very, very big happened over the last decade. It is being felt in every job, factory and school. My own shorthand is that the world went from “connected to hyperconnected” and, as a result, average is over, because employers now have so much easier, cheaper access to above-average software, automation and cheap genius from abroad. Brynjolfsson and McAfee, both at MIT, offer a more detailed explanation: We are at the start of the Second Machine Age.

T

HE FIRST MACHINE AGE, they argue, was the Industrial Revolution that was born along with the steam engine in the late 1700s. This period was “all about power systems to augment human muscle,” explained McAfee in an interview, “and each successive invention in that age delivered more and more power. “But they all required humans to make decisions about them.” Therefore, the inventions of this era actually made human control and labor “more valuable and important.” Labor and machines were complementary. In the Second Machine Age, though, argues Brynjolfsson, “we are beginning to automate a lot more cognitive tasks, a lot

replicate what is working on a global scale and instantly improve what isn’t working — whether it is eye surgery techniques, teaching fractions or how best to operate a GE engine at 30,000 feet. Suddenly, the speed and slope of improvement, they argue, gets very fast and steep. Combinatorial advances mean you can take Google Maps and combine them with a smartphone app like Waze, through which drivers automatically transmit traffic conditions on their routes by just carrying their phone in their car, and meld both into a GPS system that not only tells you what the best route is to your destination but what the best route now is because it also sees all the traffic everywhere. Instantly, you’re the smartest driver in town.

P

THE NEW YORK TIMES

more of the control systems that determine what to use that power for. In many cases today, artificially intelligent machines can make better decisions than humans.” So humans and software-driven machines may increasingly be substitutes, not complements. What’s making this possible, the authors argue, are three huge technological advances that just reached their tipping points, advances they describe as “exponential, digital and combinatorial.” To illustrate “exponential” they retell the story of the king who was so impressed with the man who invented chess that he offered him any reward. The inventor suggested rice to feed his family. He asked the king to simply place a grain of rice on the first square of a chessboard and then have each subsequent square receive twice as many grains as the previous. The emperor agreed until he realized that 63 instances of doubling yields a fantastically big number, even starting with one grain — like 18 quintillion grains of rice, once you finish the second half of the

chess board. The authors compare this second half of the chessboard to Moore’s Law about the relentless doubling of digital computing power about every two years. Unlike the steam engine, which was physical and doubled in performance every 70 years, computers “get better, faster than anything else, ever,” says Brynjolfsson.

N

OW THAT WE’RE IN THE second half of the digital chessboard, you see cars that drive themselves in traffic, “Jeopardy!”-champion supercomputers, flexible factory robots and pocket smartphones that are the equivalent of a supercomputer of just a generation ago. Now add the spread of the Internet to both people and things — soon everyone on the planet will have a smartphone, and every cash register, airplane engine, student iPad and thermostat will be broadcasting digital data via the Internet. All this data mean we can instantly discover and analyze patterns, instantly

UT ALL THESE ADVANCES together, say the authors, and you can see that our generation will have more power to improve (or destroy) the world than any before, relying on fewer people and more technology. But it also means that we need to rethink deeply our social contracts, because labor is so important to a person’s identity and dignity and to societal stability. They suggest that we consider lowering taxes on human labor to make it cheaper relative to digital labor, that we reinvent education so more people can “race with machines” not against them, that we do much more to foster the entrepreneurship that invents new industries and jobs, and even consider guaranteeing every American a basic income. We’ve got a lot of rethinking to do, they argue, because we’re not only in a recession-induced employment slump. We’re in technological hurricane reshaping the workplace — and it just keeps doubling.

________ Thomas L. Friedman is a three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. His column appears here every Monday. Email him via nyti.ms/friedmanmail.

Somebody invent ‘The Downton Diet’ SOME ENTERPRISING WRITER must do a book titled The Downton Diet. It would explain how to get and stay slim without moving a muscle, as the aristocratic women in the wildly popular British drama series demonstrate. Furthermore, they Froma appear to eat Harrop three squares a day, plus tea with nibbles. Judging from the bowls of eggs and cream Mrs. Patmore is perpetually beating in the kitchen, the gentry at Downton are not exactly being served Lean Cuisines. Some of the older men may grow portly and the women matronly, but no one is really fat. And the young ones are slim as snakes. There must be a good explanation for the phenomenon, which is not entirely a fantasy. English aristocrats are notoriously thin. Perhaps it’s extreme portion control. One spoonful of trifle here, two forks of roast beef there. I leave the details to whoever writes The Downton Diet. The great thing about eatanything diets is their cheatingof-the-gods quality. We found that in the very successful advice book French Women Don’t Get Fat.

The message was a sound one, but there’s always room for new messages. After all, here we are again in another post-holiday panic, seeking a no-pain means of shedding extra pounds. Which brings us to the federal fraud charges recently slapped against four companies selling phony weight-loss products. One marketed a potion promising the loss of a pound a day by putting two drops under the tongue. I know that the Federal Trade Commission is only doing its job, but you wonder how much the government can do to protect people who buy into such ludicrous claims. Perhaps they don’t buy into the promises as much as use them for a source of hope. Then it’s more like religion than it is science. An accused company selling a powder to put on food advertised, “Get a gym body without going to the gym.” A lawyer might argue that some people at health clubs just sit around drinking smoothies. Couldn’t we refer to their physiques as gym bodies? The FTC said the four companies will pay $34 million in refunds to consumers. The companies neither admitted nor denied guilt in the matter. And so it goes. The company selling that powder, Sensa, charged $59, plus mailing costs, for a one-month supply. A co-owner and inventor of the powder, one Dr. Alan Hirsch,

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS JOHN C. BREWER PUBLISHER AND EDITOR 360-417-3500

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

REX WILSON

STEVE PERRY

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

360-417-3530 rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com

360-417-3540 steve.perry@peninsuladailynews.com

MICHELLE LYNN

SUE STONEMAN

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR

ADVERTISING OPERATIONS MANAGER

360-417-3510 360-417-3555 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

is author of Dr. Hirsch’s Guide to Scentsational Weight Loss. It’s about using smells to suppress appetite. There may be something to that, but note the book’s promo: “The dismal truth is, diets don’t work. What’s more, most people don’t know that their failure to lose weight and keep it off is not their fault.” Golden words for the desperate. Anyhow, Hirsch had already appeared on “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” “Good Morning America” and other big media outlets, selling his expertise. The powder ads noted that. Speaking of gym bodies, no one at “Downton Abbey” — upstairs or downstairs — has ever been caught “working out.” There are some sporting activities. The servants do physical labor. The lords and ladies occasionally take walks to survey their lands. But the higher you are in the hierarchy, the less body movement. There are stairs to climb in a stately manner, but that’s about it. If you are Lady Mary or Lady Grantham, you don’t even lift a hairbrush. The only character getting regular exercise is Isis, the yellow Lab. If mental distress burned fat, that would clear up the question. (But note that Mary was already skinny before her grievous loss.) Dressing down a servant who ruins a favorite frock doesn’t torch many calories.

PBS

The fictional Crawley girls from “Downton Abbey”: Jessica Brown-Findlay, left, Laura Carmichael and, seated, Michelle Dockery. Her column appears every Monday. Contact her at fharrop@gmail. ________ com or in care of Creators Froma Harrop is a columnist Syndicate Inc., 737 Third St., for the Providence (R.I.) Journal. Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. Someone has to write the book.

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MICHAEL FOSTER, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mfoster@peninsuladailynews.com ■ LEE HORTON, sports editor; 360-417-3525; lhorton@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim news office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend news office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014

PA man ordered into program for drug treatment

Both chambers to tackle 2014 appropriations bill PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Purse-snatcher will also pay restitution BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A Port Angeles man must complete a drug treatment program through the state Department of Corrections after an attempted purse-snatching in the Port Angeles Walmart that left a woman injured in October. Michael Thomas Riley, 25, was sentenced Thursday in Clallam County Superior Court to the drug treatment program, expected to last between three and six months, and 24 months of community custody. The 25-year-old also must pay restitution, the amount to be determined at a March 28 hearing. Riley, who was not listed on the Clallam County jail roster Saturday, pleaded guilty to one count each of firstdegree theft, seconddegree theft, hit and run injury accident, forgery and trafficking in stolen property. Clallam County Sheriff’s deputies sought Riley for two days starting Oct. 13

after he took a 30-yearold’s woman purse from her shopping cart while she was loading groceries into her car in the east Port Angeles Walmart parking lot at about 8 p.m.

Woman chased him He ran to a pickup. The unidentified woman chased after him and tried to slam his arm in the door of the truck, the Sheriff’s Office said. Riley drove away with the woman still hanging onto the truck’s steering wheel, the deputies said. She fell to the ground and got up with cuts and bruises. Riley left the parking lot and turned west on U.S. Highway 101, according to the Sheriff’s Office. Investigators ultimately identified Riley by finding the truck and after Riley allegedly tried to pass a check taken from the woman’s purse at a Port Angeles convenience store, deputies said. Riley turned himself in to deputies at the Clallam County Courthouse the evening of Oct. 15 after they and Port Angeles police failed to catch him during a foot chase through a Port Angeles neighborhood the night before.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

WASHINGTON — This week, the House will take up fiscal 2014 appropriations, while the Senate will debate 2014 appropriations, unemployment compensation and possibly a bill to delay premium increases for federally sponsored flood insurance.

Contact legislators (clip and save) “Eye on Congress” is published in the Peninsula Daily News every Monday when Congress is in session about activities, roll call votes and legislation in the House and Senate. The North Olympic Peninsula’s legislators in Washington, D.C., are Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Mountlake Terrace), Sen. Patty Murray (D-Bothell) and Rep. Derek Kilmer (D-Gig Harbor). Contact information — The address for Cantwell and Murray is U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20510; Kilmer, U.S. House, Washington, D.C. 20515. Phone Cantwell at 202224-3441 (fax, 202-2280514); Murray, 202-2242621 (fax, 202-224-0238); Kilmer, 202-225-5916. Email via their websites: cantwell.senate.gov; murray. senate.gov; kilmer.house.gov. Kilmer’s North Olympic Peninsula is located at 332 E. Fifth St. in Port Angeles. Hours are 9 a.m. to noon on Tuesday, and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday. It is staffed by

This bill also curbs solidwaste provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, or RCRA, which is the Superfund’s parent statute and the main federal law for regulating the disposal of solid and hazardous wastes. A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate, where it is expected to die. Kilmer voted no.

Eye on Congress

NEWS SERVICES

Ju d i t h Morris, who may be contacted at judith. morris@ mail.house. gov or 360Murray 797-3623.

Cantwell

State legislators Jefferson and Clallam counties are represented in the part-time state Legislature by Rep. Kevin Van De Wege, D-Sequim, the House majority whip; Rep. Steve Tharinger, D-Sequim; and Sen. Jim Hargrove, D-Hoquiam. Write Van De Wege and Tharinger at P.O. Box 40600 (Hargrove at P.O. Box 40424), Olympia, WA 98504; email them at vandewege. kevin@leg.wa.gov; tharinger. steve@leg.wa.gov; hargrove. jim@leg.wa.gov. Or you can call the Legislative Hotline, 800-5626000, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday (closed on holidays and from noon to 1 p.m.) and leave a detailed message, which will be emailed to Van De Wege, Tharinger or Hargrove, or to all three. Links to other state officials: secstate.wa.gov/ elections/elected_officialsaspx.

Kilmer

■ Followthemoney. org — Campaign donors by industry, ZIP code and more ■ Vote-Smart.org — How special interest groups rate legislators on the issues.

■ GOP CHANGES TO SUPERFUND LAW: Voting 225 for and 188 against, the House on Thursday passed a GOP bill (HR 2279) to scale back the federal Superfund law by shifting some of its enforcement authority to states and easing requirements on companies to obtain insurance to pay for cleaning up their own toxic waste. The Superfund was enacted in 1980 to give the government resources for cleansing abandoned industrial landfills and averting such sites in the future. The law has restored more than 300 toxic sites for development, with Love Canal in Niagara Falls, N.Y., one of its most publicized projects. The Environmental ProLearn more tection Agency has more Websites following state than 1,000 additional sites and national legislators: on its priority list.

ONE DAY SALE ALSO SHOP TUESDAY, JANUARY 14 FROM 1OAM-1OPM HOURS MAY VARY BY STORE TUES & 9AM-1PM WED, DOORBUSTERS 1OAM-1PM GREAT ITEMS! GREAT PRICES!

19.99

DOORBUSTER

DOORBUSTER

LAUREN SUIT SEPARATES Jacket. Doorbuster $160. Reg. $400, after 1pm: 209.99. Pants. Doorbuster $60. Reg. $150, after 1pm: $90. +WebID 627348.

CLEARANCE Doorbuster 17.25-42.25. Orig.* $69-$168, after 1pm: 24.15-58.88. Dresses from favorite makers. Misses & petites.

60% OFF

DRESS SHIRTS OR TIES Reg. 49.50, after 1pm: 27.99. Only at Macy’s. From Club Room and Alfani. +WebID 930869.

75% OFF

DOORBUSTER

69.99

WARM COATS Reg./Orig.* $195, after 1pm: $78. Only at Macy’s. Wool-blend & down selections from Nine West and more. Misses.

2O% OFF

REGULAR & SALE PRICES ON SELECT ITEMS FOR HER, HIM & KIDS

DOORBUSTER DOORBUSTER

65% OFF

OUTERWEAR Doorbuster 68.25-103.25. Reg. $195-$295, after 1pm: 97.50-147.50. From a famous maker, Perry Ellis Portfolio, London Fog®, Nautica, more. +WebID 877811.

DOORBUSTER

EXTRA 20% OFF

FASHION ATHLETIC SHOES FOR HER Doorbuster 27.99-158.40. Reg. $40-$198, select styles after 1pm:34.99-189.99. Easy Spirit, Keds (+WebID 564801), G by GUESS (+837255), more.

DOORBUSTER

DOORBUSTER

DIAMOND EARRINGS Reg. $200, after 1pm: $75. 1/2 ct. t.w.‡ rose-cut in sterling silver (+WebID 1057517) or 18k gold over sterling silver (+ 1057518) by Victoria Townsend.

FRESHWATER PEARLS Reg. $300, after 1pm: 127.50. 9.5-10.5mm 2-row with sterling silver clasp by Belle de Mer™. +WebID 425489.

49.99

DOORBUSTER

DOORBUSTER

CLEARANCE ACCESSORIES Doorbuster $3-159.60 + 1 free. Orig.* $12-$228 ea., after 1pm: $3-159.60 ea. Scarves, hats, belts & more for her.

BRAS Reg. $32-$38 ea., after 1pm: buy 1, get 75% off 2nd. Maidenform®, Bali®, Warner’s® & Playtex®. Shown: Maidenform® One Fabulous Fit. +WebID 574131.

BUY 1, GET 1 FREE

DOORBUSTER

BLENDERS & FOOD PROCESSORS Doorbuster 23.99257.99. Reg. 39.99429.99, after 1pm: 29.99-299.99. From left: Cuisinart, #DLC2007 & EuroPro Ninja, #NJ600.

COFFEE, TEA & ESPRESSO MAKERS Doorbuster 17.99-767.99. Reg. 29.99-1279.99, after 1pm: 19.99-899.99. From left: Cuisinart #DCC1200, Black & Decker #KE2000SD & Nespresso #D121-US -BK-NE1.

40% OFF

DOORBUSTER

DOORBUSTER

DOORBUSTER

Doorbuster 15.99-319.99. Reg. $40$800, after 1pm: 19.99-479.99. Pillows & mattress toppers by our Martha Stewart Collection™, SensorGel & more. +WebID 139387.

BED ENSEMBLES Reg. $100, after 1pm: 59.99. Only at Macy’s. By Fairfield Square Collection. Full-king. Shown: Davenport. +WebID 616362. Twin also available.

Reg. $80, after 1pm: 49.99. Service for 8 from International Silver. From top: Capri Frost (+WebID 402325) & American Bead (+ 244574).

60% OFF MEMORY FOAM

39.99 ALL 8-PC.

2 FOR 24.99

DOORBUSTER

$89 CULTURED

29.99 53-PC. FLATWARE SET

40% OFF

DOORBUSTER

99.99

5-PC. SET Reg. $300, after 1pm: 149.99. Only at Macy’s. Tag Coranado spinner luggage. +WebID 325390.

FREE SHIPPING AT MACYS.COM WITH $99 ONLINE PURCHASE. NO PROMO CODE NEEDED; EXCLUSIONS APPLY. 41966711

Fine jewelry doorbusters are only available at stores that carry fine jewelry. Free item must be of equal or lesser value than purchased item; returns must include purchased and free items. ³REG. & ORIG. PRICES ARE OFFERING PRICES AND SAVINGS MAY NOT BE BASED ON ACTUAL SALES. SOME ORIG. PRICES NOT IN EFFECT DURING THE PAST 90 DAYS. ONE DAY SALE PRICES IN EFFECT 1/14 & 1/15/2014, EXCEPT AS NOTED. *Intermediate price reductions may have been taken. ‡All carat weights (ct. t.w.) are approximate; variance may be .05 carat. Jewelry photos may be enlarged or enhanced to show detail. Fine jewelry at select stores; log on to macys.com for locations. Almost all gemstones have been treated to enhance their beauty & require special care, log on to macys.com/gemstones or ask your sales professional. Extra savings are taken off already-reduced prices; “doorbuster” prices reflect extra savings. Doorbusters are available while supplies last. Advertised merchandise may not be carried at your local Macy’s and selection may vary by store. Prices and merchandise may differ at macys.com. Luggage & electric items shown carry warranties; to see a mfr’s warranty at no charge before purchasing, visit a store or write to: Macy’s Warranty Dept., PO Box 1026, Maryland Heights, MO 63043, attn: Consumer Warranties. N3120010. + Enter the WebID in the search box at macys.com to order. OPEN A MACY’S ACCOUNT FOR EXTRA 20% SAVINGS THE FIRST 2 DAYS, UP TO $100, WITH MORE REWARDS TO COME. Macy’s credit card is available subject to credit approval; new account savings valid the day your account is opened and the next day; excludes services, selected licensed departments, gift cards, restaurants, gourmet food & wine. The new account savings are limited to a total of $100; application must qualify for immediate approval to receive extra savings; employees not eligible.

■ H E A LT H C A R E WEBSITE SECURITY: Voting 291 for and 122 against, the House on Friday passed a bill (HR 3811) requiring that the Department of Health and Human Services notify individuals within 48 hours if any of their personal information has been stolen by hackers into the Affordable Care Act enrollment website. A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate, where it is expected to die. Kilmer voted yes. ■ EXTENDED JOBLESS BENEFITS: Voting 60 for and 37 against, the Senate on Tuesday reached a three-fifths majority needed to advance a bill (S 1845) providing three additional months of checks for 1.3 million of the long-term jobless whose eligibility for extended unemployment benefits expired Dec. 28. The Senate then turned to the issue of how to pay the bill’s $6 billion cost without raising the deficit. The bill extends the federal Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) program, which kicks in after recipients have exhausted 26 weeks of statefunded jobless benefits. EUC benefits can run for up to 47 weeks on top of state allotments. They are available in all states except North Carolina, which was excluded from the program last year because of reductions it made in state-provided jobless benefits. A yes vote was to advance the bill. Cantwell and Murray voted yes.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15 SHOP 9AM-1OPM (IT’S A SALE TOO BIG TO FIT IN A DAY!)

DOORBUSTER

■ D E M O C R AT I C SUPERFUND MEASURE: Voting 188 for and 225 against, the House on Thursday defeated a Democratic bid to prevent HR 2279 (above) from taking effect if it would result in the long-term exposure of vulnerable populations within 5 miles of waste sites to substances that contaminate drinking water or cause ailments “such as respiratory disease, cancer or reproductive disorders.” A yes vote backed the Democratic motion. Kilmer voted yes.

■ JANET YELLEN CONFIRMATION: The Senate on Monday confirmed, 56 for and 26 against, Janet L. Yellen, 67, as the 15th chair of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the first woman to lead the Fed in its 100-year history. Yellen had been the central bank’s vice chair, and before that, she was president of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, chair of the White House Council of Economic Advisers under President Bill Clinton and a professor at the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley. The Fed’s main duties are to conduct U.S. monetary policy, provide financial services to depository institutions and the Treasury and regulate financial institutions with an eye to containing risk. Established Dec. 23, 1913, the agency operates independently of Congress and the White House. A yes vote was to confirm Yellen to a four-year term as Fed chair, starting Feb. 1. Cantwell and Murray voted yes.


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

A9

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014

Inspiring storytelling to be shared Tuesday examples from my experiences made things come alive for them,â&#x20AC;? Seaman recalled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From that beginning, I moved on to tell personal stories â&#x20AC;&#x201D; coming of age, high school in nine different schools, foreign travel, nonwar military experience â&#x20AC;&#x201D; among a small group of friends.â&#x20AC;?

BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Richard Seamanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s storytelling began unexpectedly. As an early volunteer with the American Red Crossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Disaster Mental Health Service, Seaman, a therapist, responded to catastrophes around the country. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As new mental health professionals came on board, some would ask, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;What do you actually do after a fire or at a flood scene?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I found that telling

Richard Seaman Story Swap presenter

1

Propane by:

Featured teller Now a well-known member of the Story People of Clallam County, Seaman will be the featured teller at Tuesday nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Story Swap

2

Sewer & Drains by:

James W. Paulsen Owner

WINDOW REPLACEMENT STORE FRONTS ENTRANCE DOORS

Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360452-2345, ext. 5062, or at diane. urbani@peninsuladailynews.com.

CHIMNEY CLEANING REPAIRING SAFETY INSPECTIONS

#SOOTS169ME

Quality You Can Trust )URP1RUWK$PHULFD¡V/DUJHVW 5RRĂ&#x20AC;QJ0DQXIDFWXUHU

12

Heat Pumps by:

AIR FLO HEATING

39865126

SERVICE Fast Professional Service 100% Satisfaction Guarantee

NEW INSTALLATIONS Air Source Heat Pumps â&#x20AC;˘ Geothermal Heating Systems â&#x20AC;˘ Propane & Electric Furnaces â&#x20AC;˘ Duct Cleaning

is a full service lumber yard, offering GAF roofing. 901 Ness Corner Rd. Port Hadlock

Dealer

sequimsewingcenter.com

360-681-0820 609 W.Washington St., Sequim

Licensed and Bonded Contractor # GEORGE D098NR

11

Roofing by:

21570419

Quilting Fabrics & Supplies Authorized

(360) 683-8332

21570409

ABSOLUTELY NO MESS Pellet Stove Service

32739685

(OOKER2Ds3EQUIM WWW!LLFORM7ELDINGCOM

6

Chimney Cleaning by:

TM

Karenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Quilt Shop

32739684

Quality Work â&#x20AC;&#x201C; All at Competitive Prices!

r

10

Quilting by:

360-681-0584

21570412

21570410

360-681-2442 â&#x20AC;˘ 220 Carlsborg Rd.

Land Clearing â&#x20AC;˘ Septic All Utilities â&#x20AC;˘ Roads

s r

_________

683-6415 452-1051

24 HR. EMERGENCY SERVICE

1-800-843-5277

Call us for all your custom gate needs

"Residential & Commercial"

"Excavating & General Contracting"

117 N. LINCOLN ST. 457-6906

teller and therapist, and his daughter-in-law, Rosie Sharpe, a musician and teacher, and their young children. The Story Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Story Swaps, now held the second Tuesday night of the month, are always open to the public. For more information, visit www.ClallamStory People.org or phone 360452-8092.

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED STATE CONTR. REG. #MA-TH-EG244JT

GEORGE E. DICKINSON CONSTRUCTION, INC.

819 EAST 1ST ST. Port Angeles, WA

457-5277

by

9

Custom Gates by

-/4/2#9#,%3s15!$3 #!23s3563s425#+3

MIRRORS TUB & SHOWER ENCLOSURES WOOD & STEEL DOORS

Courteous Friendly Service

SEQUIM PORT ANGELES Sequim Village Ctr. 603 E. Front 683-7988 457-1144

8

Site Work by:

5 Minute Approvals!

21570403

7

Screens by:

Auto Sales by:

GLASS 21570400

360-385-5797 â&#x20AC;˘ 360-683-4010 10853 Rhody Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ Port Hadlock

5 MATHEWSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; We Finance EVERYONE!

Professional Care With Personal Service



21570392

contr#sunshp*077QP

683-6535 â&#x20AC;˘ 452-5326 888-331-4477 Clallam & Jefferson Counties

4

Serving Port Angeles, Sequim & Peninsula Since 1952

Insurance, Inc.

Employee Owned â&#x20AC;˘ Full Service

Call us for safe reliable code compliant propane heating systems.

Seamanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s set, titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Power of Bearing Witness,â&#x20AC;? will include his stories of two men he met in his Red Cross work. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One possessed a rare spiritual quality; the other

Windows by:

MM Fryer & Sons

Quality Heating Service Since 1980

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Bearing Witnessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

saved the life of his young son,â&#x20AC;? Seaman noted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Telling each manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story is my way of honoring them.â&#x20AC;? Seaman volunteered with the Red Cross from 1992 through â&#x20AC;&#x2122;99. One of the worst disasters he responded to was the 1993 flooding of the Midwest. He was also a therapist in private practice from 1980 through 2000 in his home state of Massachusetts. In 2002 after retiring, Seaman moved to Port Angeles to be near his son, Erran Sharpe, also a story-

21570407

Sunshine Propane

3

Insurance by:

at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. Admission is free to the swap, which will start with Seamanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stories at 7 p.m. After a refreshment break comes the open-mic section for others to share their tales. The evening will wrap by 9 p.m.

1-360-385-1771

St. Con. Reg. #AI-RF-LI-206DG

Toll Free: 1-800-750-1771

221 W. Cedar St., Sequim 683-3901

6 11 24

19 17

10

25

41966045

14

16

7

1

4 8

22

5

9

Painting by:

13

Garage Doors by:

18

21

14

2

23

3

19

13

15

20

Remodeling by:

15

16

Frames by:

17

Paint by:

MP

FULL PREPARATION FOR A QUALITY FINISH

License# ARTISCR89N3

Dog Services by:

20

360.385.3809 w w w. f r a m e w o r ks N W. c o m

21

Recycling by:

22

452-7278 or 385-6612

360-681-0722

Banking by:

Lic. #SERVIOP965R7

23

Local Lenders .QECN&GEKUKQPUĹ?.QECN(QEWU

Learn more >Apply Online > ourfirstfed.com 800.800.1577 Member FDIC

Drywall Supply by

24

The Pacific Northwest Experts in Drywall Products

360-452-4161 301 Business Park Loop Sequim, WA 98382

36812691

Ask for our best deals

35789927

360-477-2883 Between Sequim & Port Angeles on Hwy 101 and Lake Farm Road

32739687

31729977

3B922713

HOURLY KENNEL OPTIONS

all your recycling needs!

SERVICEMASTER OF THE OLYMPIC PENINSULA

36810293

PENINSULA Tlympic DispTsal Waste Connections DAILY DM Disposal NEWS Call us for Order Home Delivery 800-826-7714 452-4507

$5 DOLLARS OFF Per Gallon EXP. 2-1-14

211 Taylor Street, Suite B5, PT

Murreyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

STINKYDOGUBATHE.COM

A Self-Service Dog Wash

Daily News by:

& art gallery

now UNDERTOWN Port Townsend

39865139

Come see us for all your traction tires & chains this winter

802 E. Washington Sequim

502 1/2 W. 8TH â&#x20AC;˘ Port Angeles Cont #MP-OV-EG D062MA

19

683-7261

frameshop

360-457-8828 800-371-8828

41966074

Traction Tires by:

21570420

Casepp*962JG

315 DECATUR ST. PORT TOWNSEND

21570421

INTERIOR | EXTERIOR

457-8209

18

360-379-8025

UNDERTOWN

Competitive Rates

Cleaning Services by:

35789930

AND

Patrick Case, Owner

12

Working Together for Our Community


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, January 13, 2014 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, WEATHER In this section

B Seahawks

Defense chasing legend status THE SEAHAWKS DEFENSE has been a statistical marvel, leading the NFL in most of the important categories, already establishing itself as one of the best in recent seasons. But it’s all different come Dave January, when the stage is big- Boling ger, lights are brighter, and such displays of excellence can lead to their passing around a shiny platinum trophy. This is the point, with games like Saturday’s 23-15 win over New Orleans, when even a great defense can take another step. Here, let cornerback Richard Sherman explain what happens once you reach the post-season: “That’s when you become legendary, like the Pittsburgh Steelers’ defenses, the ’85 Bears, the Buccaneers that year.”

Neah Bay tops Lummi Red Devils win battle of top-5 ranked 1B teams

Preps (3-9) tonight. Neah Bay 56, Lummi 53

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

BELLINGHAM — Fourthranked Neah Bay earned a big road win over second-ranked Lummi in nonleague boys basketball action. The Red Devils outscored the Blackhawks 16-9 in the fourth quarter to win 56-53 and hand Lummi its first loss of the season.

Ryan Moss led Neah Bay with 23 points in Saturday’s game. Zeke Greene added 16 and Abraham Venske chipped in eight points. Free-throw shooting played a key roll in the matchup of rivals. The Red Devils made 19 of 24 free throws, while Lummi made only 8 of 24 tries. Neah Bay (5-1) hosts Forks

Neah Bay Lummi

18 15 7 16— 56 18 14 12 9— 53 Individual scoring

Neah Bay (5-1) Claplanho 2, J. Greene 5, Z. Greene 16, Venske 8, Moss 23, McCaulley 2. Lummi (9-1) Charlie Wilson 16, Leo Scarborough 5, Logan Toby 7, Austin Brockie 1, Trazil Lane 18, Kavarez Lane 6.

Crescent 51, Skykomish 21

Martin Waldrip scored in double figures to lead the Loggers to a blowout win over the Rockets. Walker finished with a teamhigh 15 points and Waldrip scored 10. Crescent also received eight points apiece from Kaleb Dodson and Neal Peppard. Crescent 51, Skykomish 21 Skykomish Crescent

4 4 4 9— 21 18 11 10 12— 51 Individual scoring

Crescent (51) Travis Walker 15, Zach Fletcher 6, Martin Waldrip 10, Dane Kjerulf 4, Kaleb Dodson 8, Neil Peppard 8.

JOYCE — Travis Walker and

TURN

TO

PREPS/B3

Defense ‘disappointed’ A late Saints rally amid a Pacific vortex storm at CenturyLink Field left the Hawks disappointed with the New Orleans point and yardage totals. But the win gives them another chance in next week’s NFC championship game to edge toward “legendary.” “I think we’re going to be disappointed with our performance today, with some of the plays we left out there, with some of those turnovers we left out there,” said Sherman, an All-Pro who led the NFL in interceptions. “That’s uncharacteristic of our defense. At the end of the day, we want to be one of the best.” The Seahawks safeties played up to that level again Saturday. Earl Thomas and Kam Chancellor combined for 25 tackles and four passes defensed. Those are stunning statistics. Both are All-Pros and Pro Bowlers, and with Thomas only 24 and Chancellor 25, the potential is there to become one of the all-time safety duos. Now is when they prove it. A problem is they end up bashing one another in their single-minded quest for interceptions. Against the Saints, three secondary guys shook one another up when converging for a tipped ball. And late in Saturday’s game, Chancellor and Thomas collided going for an interception, and Thomas came away a soprano. “He hit me in the men’s section,” Thomas lamented in the locker room. Thomas wasn’t referring to a department at Nordstrom.

Providing pressure The defense collected just one sack of Saints quarterback Drew Brees, but it was appropriately split between Cliff Avril and Michael Bennett, who have supplied timely pressure all season. “I feel he’s an All-Pro caliber,” defensive end Red Bryant said of Bennett, who forced two fumbles and recovered one. “We’re a better football team when he’s on the field and everybody can see that.” Bennett’s thought on his performance? Meh. He was as unimpressed as Sherman was. “We coulda played a way better game,” Bennett said. “We could have played a lot better and we know that. That’s great, we know we can improve, and that’s good.” He was disappointed with some missed tackles, and certainly hated to see several potential interceptions fall to the turf. Here’s where you sometimes enter dangerous territory while interviewing defenders: When you try to get them to laud specific individuals. TURN

TO

BOLING/B5

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

New Orleans running back Khiry Robinson (29) is stopped by Seattle Seahawks strong safety Kam Chancellor, right, and cornerback Richard Sherman, back, as linebacker Bobby Wagner closes in during Saturday’s game.

Hawks, 49ers set to meet again S.F. advances by beating Panthers BY DENNIS WASZAK JR. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Well, well. We meet again. The San Francisco 49ers and Seattle Seahawks are all set for an NFC championship showdown in the latest chapter in one of the NFL’s budding — and bitter — rivalries. Colin Kaepernick threw a touchdown pass and ran for another score as the 49ers defeated the Carolina Panthers 23-10 on Sunday to advance to the NFC championship game for the third straight season. They’ll travel to Seattle next Sunday looking for a return trip to the Super Bowl. And lots of hard hits and plenty of jawing can be expected. Perhaps even from the coaches. “I think we’re the two teams everyone was looking at from

the beginning,” Kaepernick said. “ I t ’ s Next Game going to be a knockdown, Sunday drag-out vs. 49ers game.” at CenturyLink T h e Time: 3:30 p.m. 49ers, who On TV: Ch. 13 a r e 3½-point underdogs for the NFC title game, have committed seven turnovers and been outscored 71-16 in their last two trips to Seattle, including a 29-3 Week 2 loss in September. “We’re a different team than we were the first time we played them up there,” Kaepernick insisted. The 49ers (14-4) will get a chance to prove that next weekend after Kaepernick completed 15 of 28 passes for 196 yards against Carolina on Sunday.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Running back Frank Gore (21) and the San Francisco TURN TO HAWKS/B5 49ers beat Carolina 23-10 to reach the NFC title game.

Knowles scores 27, but Pirates fall PC men, women swept by Cards PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MOUNT VERNON — Alison Knowles set her career high for the second consecutive game, but it wasn’t enough of the Peninsula College women’s basketball team to grab a road win from Skagit Valley. In the men’s game, the Peninsula Pirates were routed 73-52 Saturday to fall to 0-3 in NWAACC North Division play. Knowles scored 27 points and made 7 of 15 3-pointers for the Peninsula women. On Wednesday, the former Port Angeles High School stand-

College Basketball out scored 25 points in the Pirates’ win over Edmonds. Peninsula stumbled through the first half and trailed 48-31 at the intermission.

Better after halftime In the second half, the Pirates did much better, outscoring the Cardinals 44-34. Madison Pilster added 13 points and eight rebounds, while Gabi Fenumiai scored 11 points and pulled down 10 boards. Freshman guard Marissa Schwimmer scored eight points for the Pirates, shooting a per-

fect 3 for 3 from the field (2-2 from 3-point range). Schwimmer also dished out five assists, which tied for the team lead with Olivia Henderson, who had seven points. As a team, Peninsula assisted on 19 of its 22 field goals. The Pirates (1-2 in the North Division, 4-9 overall) host Everett (2-1, 5-11) on Wednesday and Olympic (1-2, 4-9) on Saturday night. Port Angeles graduates Mariah Frazier and Macy Walker helped Olympic defeated Shorelines 85-81 in double-overtime Saturday. Frazier scored 15 points and had 10 rebounds, four assists and three steals. Walker had 12 points, five assists and five steals.

Skagit Valley 82, Peninsula 75 Peninsula Skagit Valley

31 44— 75 48 34— 82 Individual scoring Peninsula (1-2, 4-9) Henderson 7, Schwimmer 8, Pilster 13, Fenumiai 11, Knowles 27, Schmillen 5, Brumbaugh 3, Flinn 1. Skagit Valley (2-1, 10-5) Turrieta 1, Wood 4, Duncan 2, S. Brown 28, Kelleigh 16, Graham 4, W. Brown 6, Poradun 2, Wilson 8, Boyd 9, Stadt 2.

Men’s Game Skagit Valley 73, Peninsula 52 MOUNT VERNON — The Pirates lost their fifth straight game and their lack of height showed in the Cardinals’ 39-23 rebounding advantage. Xavier Bazile and Tyler McKinney paced Peninsula with 15 points each. TURN

TO

PIRATES/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS PIC OF THE DAY

Today Boys Basketball: Port Townsend at Port Angeles, 7 p.m.; Sequim at Bremerton, 7 p.m.; Northwest Yeshiva at Quilcene, 7 p.m.; Forks at Neah Bay, 8 p.m. Girls Basketball: Northwest Yeshiva at Quilcene, 5:30 p.m.; Forks at Neah Bay, 6:30 p.m.; Port Angeles at Port Townsend, 7 p.m.; Bremerton at Sequim, 7 p.m.

Tuesday Boys Basketball: Seattle Christian at Chimacum, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball: Seattle Christian at Chimacum, 5:15 p.m. Wrestling: Port Townsend, Sequim at Port Angeles, 6 p.m. Girls Bowling: Sequim at Bremerton, 2:45 p.m. Boys Swimming: Klahowya at Port Angeles (rescheduled from Jan. 9), 3:30 p.m.

Wednesday Boys Basketball: Sequim at Port Townsend, 7 p.m.; Port Angeles at Olympic, 7 p.m.; Forks at Clallam Bay, 7 p.m.; Neah Bay at Crescent, 7:15 p.m. Girls Basketball: Neah Bay at Crescent, 5:45 p.m.; Sequim at Port Townsend, 5:15 p.m.; Olympic at Port Angeles, 7 p.m. Wrestling: Hoquiam and Rochester at Forks, 6 p.m. Men’s Basketball: Everett at Peninsula College, 7 p.m. Women’s Basketball: Everett at Peninsula College, 5 p.m.

Preps Boys Basketball Saturday’s Scores Auburn Adventist Academy 64, Shorewood Christian 61 Brewster 67, Reardan 55 Chiawana 67, Pasco 52 Clarkston 78, Colville 48 Colton 62, St. John-Endicott 18 Columbia (Burbank) 59, Royal 43 Connell 58, Warden 20 Coupeville 50, Mount Vernon Christian 47 Crescent 51, Skykomish 21 Cusick 64, Columbia (Hunters) 14 Davis 68, Sunnyside 65 East Valley (Spokane) 57, Deer Park 33 East Valley (Yakima) 63, Toppenish 40 Eastmont 51, Eisenhower 42 Edmonds-Woodway 69, Mariner 48 Federal Way 78, Bethel 53 Freeman 49, Chewelah 38 Garfield-Palouse 72, LaCrosse/Washtucna 30 Grandview 72, Prosser 70 Granger 70, Goldendale 26 Jackson 77, Monroe 41 Kamiakin 56, Hanford 52 Kennewick 61, Southridge 54 Kentwood 73, Mt. Rainier 63 Kittitas 47, Oroville 23 La Salle 44, Highland 42 LaConner 62, Nooksack Valley 53 Lake Roosevelt 59, Entiat 51 Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls) 88, Medical Lake 49 Lakewood 80, Bush 43 Liberty (Spangle) 61, Davenport 34 Lind-Ritzville/Sprague 44, Colfax 30 Lynden 66, White River 51 Morton/White Pass 84, Winlock 36 Naches Valley 69, Mabton 54 Naselle 58, South Bend 52 Neah Bay 56, Lummi 53 North Beach 66, Ocosta 59 Northwest Christian (Lacey) 65, Orting 48 Northwest Yeshiva 38, Shoreline Christian 30 Peninsula 50, Capital 43 Pomeroy 46, Rosalia 42 Prairie 67, Heritage 44 Pullman 62, Cheney 35 Quincy 55, Omak 50 Rainier Beach 103, Cleveland 67 Republic 59, Northport 18 Richland 84, Walla Walla 62 Riverside 65, Newport 60 Riverside Christian 57, Liberty Bell 48 Selah 63, Othello 56 Selkirk 67, Inchelium 54 Soap Lake 50, Lyle-Wishram 24 Sunnyside Christian 60, Liberty Christian 57 Todd Beamer 62, Curtis 55 Touchet 64, Tekoa-Oakesdale 41 Toutle Lake 61, Wahkiakum 47 Tri-Cities Prep 67, DeSales 47 University Prep 51, Friday Harbor 46 Valley Christian 54, Odessa-Harrington 37 Wahluke 67, Kiona-Benton 59 Waitsburg-Prescott 55, Dayton 40 Walla Walla Academy 59, Asotin 55 Wapato 70, White Swan 43 Wellpinit 53, Almira/Coulee-Hartline 52 Wenatchee 71, Moses Lake 58 West Valley (Yakima) 51, Ellensburg 46 Wilbur-Creston 59, Curlew 41 Willapa Valley 42, Raymond 33 Yakama Tribal 81, Taholah 72 Zillah 78, Cle Elum/Roslyn 37

Girls Basketball Saturday’s Scores Aberdeen 42, North Thurston 34 Black Hills 64, Timberline 54 Brewster 69, Reardan 23 Cashmere 54, Okanogan 48 Centralia 61, Tumwater 56 Charles Wright Academy 40, Tacoma Baptist 24 Chiawana 64, Pasco 27 Clarkston 50, Colville 45 Cleveland 77, Rainier Beach 6 Colton 71, St. John-Endicott 24 Crescent 39, Skykomish 24 Davenport 40, Liberty (Spangle) 32 Davis 50, Sunnyside 48 East Valley (Spokane) 65, Deer Park 16 Eisenhower 51, Eastmont 45 Freeman 52, Chewelah 48 Garfield-Palouse 40, LaCrosse/Washtucna 30 Granger 70, Goldendale 24 Kamiakin 61, Hanford 46 Kennewick 45, Southridge 41 La Salle 50, Highland 13 Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls) 57, Medical Lake 16 Liberty Bell 43, Riverside Christian 33 Lind-Ritzville/Sprague 44, Colfax 43 Lynden 49, White River 32 Mabton 53, Naches Valley 45

DEGREE

OF DIFFICULTY

Port Angeles High School gymnast Elizabeth DeFrang jumps during her routine on the balance beam at the WOWI Invitational and Sehome High School in Bellingham. See story on Page B3. Morton/White Pass 60, Winlock 23 Moses Lake 51, Wenatchee 38 Mount Vernon Christian 38, Coupeville 36 Mt. Rainier 76, Kentwood 58 Neah Bay 64, Lummi 19 Newport 44, Riverside 25 Northwest Christian (Lacey) 36, Orting 17 Northwest Yeshiva 49, Shoreline Christian 25 Odessa-Harrington 51, Valley Christian 23 Omak 51, Quincy 25 Pomeroy 47, Rosalia 42 Pullman 51, Cheney 41 Republic 70, Northport 7 Selah 66, Othello 16 Selkirk 44, Inchelium 22 Sunnyside Christian 61, Liberty Christian 21 Tekoa-Oakesdale 60, Touchet 33 Toppenish 61, East Valley (Yakima) 59 Toutle Lake 51, Wahkiakum 43 Tri-Cities Prep 41, DeSales 37 Walla Walla 60, Richland 50 Washougal 61, Mountain View 40 Wellpinit 53, Almira/Coulee-Hartline 52 West Valley (Yakima) 59, Ellensburg 44 White Swan 63, Wapato 48 Wilbur-Creston 74, Curlew 25 Yakama Tribal 55, Taholah 38 Zillah 61, Cle Elum/Roslyn 40

NWAACC Men’s Basketball Saturday Columbia Basin 88, Blue Mountain 60 Spokane 93, Yakima Valley 77 Big Bend 111, Wenatchee Valley 81 Bellevue 77, Everett 73 Whatcom 95, Edmonds 80 Olympic 78, Shoreline 77 Skagit Valley 73, Peninsula 52 Chemeketa 104, Umpqua 74 Mt. Hood 76, Lane 63 Portland 92, Linn-Benton 64 SW Oregon 85, Clackamas 68 Tacoma 63, S. Puget Sound 51 Lower Columbia 74, Green River 57 Highline 84, Grays Harbor 63 Clark 69, Pierce 66

Women’s Basketball Saturday Yakima Valley 58, Spokane 57 Columbia Basin 87, Blue Mountain 83 Big Bend 48, Wenatchee Valley 46 Bellevue 66, Everett 61 Olympic 85, Shoreline 81 2OT Whatcom 60, Edmonds 51 Skagit Valley 82, Peninsula 75 George Fox JV 71, Portland 69 Clackamas 70, SW Oregon 50 Lane 87, Mt. Hood 44 Umpqua 80, Chemeketa 75 Clark 87, Pierce 53 Tacoma 67, S. Puget Sound 58 Lower Columbia 73, Green River 55 Highline 70, Grays Harbor 58

Football NFL Playoff Glance Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 4 Indianapolis 45, Kansas City 44 New Orleans 26, Philadelphia 24 Sunday, Jan. 5 San Diego 27, Cincinnati 10 San Francisco 23, Green Bay 20 Divisional Playoffs Saturday Seattle 23, New Orleans 15 New England 43, Indianapolis 22 Sunday San Francisco at Carolina, late. San Diego at Denver, late. Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 19 New England vs. San Diego-Denver winner, noon (CBS) San Francisco-Carolina winner at Seattle, 3:30 p.m. (FOX)

Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 26 At Honolulu TBD, 4:30 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 2 At East Rutherford, N.J.AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 3:30 p.m. (FOX)

Basketball National Basketball Association WESTERN CONFERENCE Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City 28 9 .757 Portland 28 9 .757 Denver 19 17 .528 Minnesota 18 18 .500 Utah 12 26 .316 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Clippers 26 13 .667 Golden State 25 14 .641 Phoenix 21 15 .583 L.A. Lakers 14 23 .378 Sacramento 12 22 .353 Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 28 8 .778 Houston 24 14 .632 Dallas 22 16 .579 Memphis 16 19 .457 New Orleans 15 21 .417 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Toronto 18 17 .514 Brooklyn 15 22 .405 New York 14 22 .389 Boston 13 25 .342 Philadelphia 12 25 .324 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami 27 10 .730 Atlanta 20 17 .541 Washington 16 19 .457 Charlotte 15 23 .395 Orlando 10 27 .270 Central Division W L Pct Indiana 29 7 .806 Chicago 17 18 .486 Detroit 16 22 .421 Cleveland 13 23 .361 Milwaukee 7 29 .194

GB — — 8½ 9½ 16½ GB — 1 3½ 11 11½ GB — 5 7 11½ 13 GB — 4 4½ 6½ 7 GB — 7 10 12½ 17 GB — 11½ 14 16 22

Saturday’s Games Houston 114, Washington 107 Toronto 96, Brooklyn 80 New York 102, Philadelphia 92 Detroit 110, Phoenix 108 Chicago 103, Charlotte 97 Oklahoma City 101, Milwaukee 85 Dallas 110, New Orleans 107 Denver 120, Orlando 94 Portland 112, Boston 104 Sunday’s Games Cleveland at Sacramento, late. Atlanta at Memphis, late. Minnesota at San Antonio, late. Today’s Games Milwaukee at Toronto, 4 p.m. Houston at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Phoenix at New York, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Chicago, 5 p.m. San Antonio at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Orlando at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Denver at Utah, 6 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Sacramento at Indiana, 4 p.m. New York at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Oklahoma City at Memphis, 5 p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.

Hockey National Hockey League WESTERN CONFERENCE Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 47 34 8 5 73 160 119

San Jose Los Angeles Vancouver Phoenix Calgary Edmonton

46 28 12 6 62 148 116 46 27 14 5 59 119 96 46 24 13 9 57 123 114 44 21 14 9 51 133 136 45 15 24 6 36 101 144 47 15 27 5 35 123 164 Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 47 29 8 10 68 170 129 St. Louis 44 31 8 5 67 161 99 Colorado 45 28 12 5 61 132 115 Minnesota 47 24 18 5 53 114 119 Dallas 44 20 17 7 47 125 135 Nashville 46 19 20 7 45 109 137 Winnipeg 47 19 23 5 43 128 145 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 45 29 14 2 60 129 98 Tampa Bay 45 27 14 4 58 132 109 Montreal 46 26 15 5 57 117 107 Detroit 45 20 15 10 50 118 126 Ottawa 46 20 18 8 48 131 146 Toronto 46 21 20 5 47 125 141 Florida 45 17 21 7 41 105 139 Buffalo 43 12 26 5 29 75 120 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 47 33 12 2 68 152 112 Washington 44 22 16 6 50 135 133 Philadelphia 45 23 18 4 50 120 125 N.Y. Rangers 46 23 20 3 49 114 123 Carolina 45 19 17 9 47 111 128 New Jersey 46 19 18 9 47 106 114 Columbus 45 21 20 4 46 126 129 N.Y. Islanders 46 17 22 7 41 126 150 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Saturday’s Games Ottawa 2, Nashville 1, SO Tampa Bay 6, Philadelphia 3 Montreal 2, Chicago 1, OT New Jersey 2, Florida 1, OT Columbus 6, Winnipeg 3 Colorado 4, Minnesota 2 Anaheim 5, Phoenix 3 Pittsburgh 2, Calgary 1 Detroit 3, Los Angeles 1 Boston 1, San Jose 0 Sunday’s Games Buffalo at Washington, late. N.Y. Islanders at Dallas, late. New Jersey at Toronto, late. Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, late. Edmonton at Chicago, late. Minnesota at Nashville, late. Detroit at Anaheim, late. Today’s Games Calgary at Carolina, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at Columbus, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Winnipeg, 5 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Toronto at Boston, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. San Jose at Washington, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. New Jersey at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Colorado at Chicago, 5 p.m. Phoenix at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Calgary at Nashville, 5 p.m. Ottawa at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Edmonton at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.

College Basketball Men’s Major Scores Saturday FAR WEST BYU 91, Loyola Marymount 68 CS Northridge 79, Hawaii 78 Cal Poly 72, UC Santa Barbara 64 California 88, Oregon St. 83 Colorado St. 76, Fresno St. 57 E. Washington 77, Montana St. 72 Long Beach St. 99, UC Davis 74 N. Colorado 82, Idaho St. 75 Nevada 62, Utah St. 54 New Mexico 69, San Jose St. 65 New Mexico St. 78, Idaho 54 Pacific 80, Santa Clara 68

SPORTS ON TV

Monday Noon NBCSN Soccer EPL, Arsenal vs. Aston Villa (Live) 4 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Virginia vs. Duke (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Women’s Basketball NCAA, Connecticut vs. Baylor (Live) 4 p.m. NBCSN Basketball NCAA, Charleston vs. Northeastern (Live) 6 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Kansas vs. Iowa State (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis ITF, Australian Open, First Round, Site: Melbourne Park - Melbourne, Australia (Live) 7 p.m. PAC-12 NET Gymnastics, Minnesota vs. Washington (Live) Midnight (27) ESPN2 Tennis ITF, Australian Open, First Round, Site: Melbourne Park - Melbourne, Australia (Live) Pepperdine 69, San Diego 65 Portland St. 81, Montana 78, 3OT Sacramento St. 77, S. Utah 49 Saint Mary’s (Cal) 88, San Francisco 73 UC Irvine 72, UC Riverside 52 Utah Valley 65, Grand Canyon 58 Wyoming 52, Boise St. 50 SOUTHWEST Arkansas St. 72, South Alabama 60 Baylor 88, TCU 62 FAU 73, Rice 68 Florida 84, Arkansas 82, OT Houston Baptist 98, Northwestern St. 97 McNeese St. 74, Lamar 59 Oklahoma 87, Iowa St. 82 Oral Roberts 93, Cent. Arkansas 80 Sam Houston St. 88, Nicholls St. 61 Seattle 64, Texas-Pan American 46 Stephen F. Austin 80, Texas A&M-CC 70 Texas 67, Texas Tech 64 Texas Southern 87, Prairie View 83, 3OT Troy 75, UALR 62 Tulane 73, North Texas 62 UTEP 66, Marshall 56 UTSA 85, Charlotte 77 MIDWEST Chicago St. 68, UMKC 66 Cincinnati 71, Rutgers 51 Evansville 75, S. Illinois 69 Georgetown 70, Butler 67, OT IPFW 82, S. Dakota St. 75 Illinois St. 59, Loyola of Chicago 50 Indiana St. 62, Bradley 59 Kansas 86, Kansas St. 60 Kent St. 86, Ball St. 74 Marquette 67, Seton Hall 66 Michigan St. 87, Minnesota 75, OT N. Dakota St. 87, IUPUI 64 N. Iowa 76, Drake 66 Oakland 77, Detroit 69 SE Missouri 102, Tennessee St. 94 Saint Louis 67, Dayton 59 South Dakota 59, Denver 54 Toledo 86, Cent. Michigan 71 W. Illinois 79, Nebraska-Omaha 72, OT W. Michigan 78, Miami (Ohio) 77, OT Weber St. 72, North Dakota 60 Wichita St. 72, Missouri St. 69, OT EAST American U. 69, Colgate 62 Army 60, Navy 55 Boston U. 89, Lafayette 78 Brown 91, Daniel Webster 50 Bucknell 61, Holy Cross 57 Buffalo 76, E. Michigan 66 Columbia 104, Cent. Pennsylvania 78 Cornell 77, Oberlin 55 Drexel 93, Northeastern 88, 2OT George Washington 69, Rhode Island 56 Harvard 61, Dartmouth 45 Hofstra 75, Coll. of Charleston 71 Indiana 79, Penn St. 76 Loyola (Md.) 72, Lehigh 68 Mass.-Lowell 71, Binghamton 59 Memphis 79, Temple 69 Mount St. Mary’s 88, St. Francis (NY) 82 Oklahoma St. 73, West Virginia 72 Penn 77, Princeton 74 Pittsburgh 80, Wake Forest 65 Richmond 77, Fordham 74, OT Robert Morris 71, Bryant 67 Sacred Heart 71, Fairleigh Dickinson 67 St. Francis (Pa.) 75, CCSU 67 Syracuse 57, North Carolina 45 Towson 60, UNC Wilmington 53 UConn 84, UCF 61 UMBC 79, Maine 76 UMass 73, St. Bonaventure 68 Vermont 68, Albany (NY) 38 Villanova 74, St. John’s 67 Wagner 84, LIU Brooklyn 70 Yale 88, Baruch 49 SOUTH Abilene Christian 85, SE Louisiana 77, OT Alabama St. 93, MVSU 62 Alcorn St. 64, Jackson St. 51 Ark.-Pine Bluff 72, Alabama A&M 64 Belmont 87, UT-Martin 72 Boston College 62, Virginia Tech 59 Campbell 75, Longwood 67 Chattanooga 70, Wofford 69 Clemson 72, Duke 59 Coastal Carolina 81, Gardner-Webb 69 Davidson 78, Appalachian St. 66 Delaware 78, James Madison 74 E. Illinois 56, Jacksonville St. 48 E. Kentucky 76, Morehead St. 65 ETSU 74, N. Kentucky 65 Elon 74, The Citadel 65 Florida A&M 63, NC Central 60 Georgia 66, Alabama 58 Georgia Tech 74, Notre Dame 69 Hampton 73, Delaware St. 60 Incarnate Word 78, New Orleans 55 Jacksonville 76, Florida Gulf Coast 69 Kentucky 71, Vanderbilt 62 LSU 71, South Carolina 68 Liberty 85, VMI 80 Louisiana Tech 85, FIU 51 Louisiana-Lafayette 90, Texas-Arlington 70 Middle Tennessee 89, UAB 84, OT Mississippi St. 76, Mississippi 72 Missouri 70, Auburn 68 Morgan St. 73, SC State 56 Murray St. 89, Austin Peay 67 NC A&T 70, Bethune-Cookman 67 Norfolk St. 66, Md.-Eastern Shore 62 North Florida 74, Stetson 60 Old Dominion 81, East Carolina 70


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014

B3

Wilcox leads UW past No. 15 Colorado Pirates BY TIM BOOTH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Washington coach Lorenzo Romar has seen this before from C.J. Wilcox. One 3-pointer starts to drop, then another and suddenly Wilcox is hitting everything. Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sharpshooting guard put on another display Sunday that ended the Huskiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lengthy losing streak against ranked opponents. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When he gets in a zone heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty special that way,â&#x20AC;? Romar said. Wilcox set career highs with seven 3-pointers and 31 points, including 21 in the second half, and Washington ran away from No. 15 Colorado for a 71-54 victory. Wilcox topped his previous high of 30 points set earlier this season against Boston College. But the surprising part wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Wilcox getting hot or the improving Huskies knocking off a ranked opponent playing short-handed after Colorado star Spencer Dinwiddie went down with a knee injury in the first half. The shock was the length in time since the Huskies had beaten a ranked opponent. It was Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first win over a ranked team since Isaiah Thomasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; jumper beat then-No. 16 Arizona in the 2011 Pac-10 Conference tournament championship game. Washington (11-6, 3-1

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Coloradoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wesley Gordon, right, knocks away a shot by Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Perris Blackwell in the first half of Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game. Pac-12) had lost 12 straight against ranked teams. The last time Washington beat a ranked team in the regular season was a home win over Texas A&M in December 2009. Andrew Andrews added 14 points and Nigel Williams-Goss had 12 as the Huskies continued to improve. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you are rewarded with a win it continues to increase that attitude and that belief,â&#x20AC;? Romar said. Dinwiddie crumpled to the court after taking an awkward step on a fast break and his left knee buckled. He was on the court for a

few minutes while trainers and coach Tad Boyle came on to his side. Dinwiddie was helped to his feet but had to be assisted off the court with his arms around teammates. Dinwiddie, who had seven points in 15 minutes, was chastised by Boyle after scoring a disappointing six points in 38 minutes on Wednesday night. He left the arena with a large brace on his left knee and was expected to be examined on Monday in Boulder. The Huskies outscored the Buffaloes 49-29 after Dinwiddieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s injury. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My gut is not good. But weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see. If heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

out,â&#x20AC;? Boyle said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just feel so bad for the kid because heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worked so hard.â&#x20AC;? Josh Scott led Colorado (14-3, 3-1) with 15 points, but the Buffaloesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; struggles went beyond not having Dinwiddie around in the second half. Askia Booker, the reigning Pac-12 player of the week, was 0 for 9 from the field and went scoreless for just the second time in his college career. The last time Booker failed to score was late in his freshman season against Arizona. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When Spencer went down he really tried to force

things and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not good when he forcing things,â&#x20AC;? Boyle said of Booker. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t show patience, we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t show composure on the offensive end and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how you turn it over 20 times.â&#x20AC;? The loss of Dinwiddie also impacted the Buffaloes defense. He was no longer available to chase Wilcox around and he took advantage of the clean looks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know they were trying to key on me and having him not leaving me as much as he normally would,â&#x20AC;? Wilcox said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an athlete. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tough to score on athletes. When he went down, we as a team, but me as well, just had to take advantage of that.â&#x20AC;? Washington started the second half on a 12-5 run thanks to three 3-pointers from Wilcox. The complexion of the second half could have changed when Perris Blackwell, the Huskiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; only true inside presence, picked up his fourth foul with 15:52 remaining. Scott tried to stem the run with five straight points for the Buffaloes but Wilcox continued to knock down shots. He hit another 3 when Williams-Goss broke the Colorado press and found him open in front of the Washington bench. He scored off a steal with a lefthanded layup and hit another stand-still 3 for a 51-39 lead, his sixth straight make to start the second half.

CONTINUED FROM B1 Juwan Flowers contributed 14 points, and shot 6 for 9 from the field.

Ball security As a team, the Pirates shot only 23 percent from the field, while only turning the ball over nine times. Markus Rawls led Peninsula with eight rebounds. For Skagit Valley, Elijah Smith narrowly missed a triple-doubling, finishing with 12 points, 10 rebounds and nine assist. He also had four steals. Greg Cox led the Cardinals with 17 points, including 5 for 5 from 3-point range. Peninsula has two home games this week. First up is Everett (2-1, 11-6) on Wednesday, followed by Olympic (1-2, 1-12) on Saturday evening.

Brocklesby shines Olympic picked up its first win of the year thanks to former Sequim star Jayson Brocklesby, who scored 24 points in the Rangersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 78-77 win over Shoreline. Brocklesby has played in two games for Olympic, averaging a team-high 19.5 points and eight rebounds per game. Skagit Valley 73, Peninsula 52 Peninsula 24 28â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 52 Skagit Valley 31 42â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 73 Individual scoring Peninsula (0-3, 6-6) Bazile 15, Horsley 1, McKinney 15, Flowers 14, Rawls 5, Hechanova 2. Skagit Valley (3-0, 9-6) Smith 12, Jordan 3, Payne 15, Garcia 7, Cox 17, Diggs 2, Billingsly 4, Barnes 6, Ladines 7.

Preps: Forksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Morales a champ at Gut Check CONTINUED FROM B1

Girls Basketball Neah Bay 64, Lummi 19 BELLINGHAM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Red Devils jumped out to an 18-2 lead after the first quarter and never looked back to improve to 6-1 on the season. Cierra Moss scored 23 points to lead Neah Bay, and Gina McCaulley added 16, including four 3-pointers. The Red Devils forced 34 turnovers against the young Blackhawks, who were led by Treena Humphreysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 15 points. Neah Bay plays at home against Forks (4-7) tonight. Neah Bay 64, Lummi 19 Neah Bay Lummi

18 16 18 12â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 64 2 7 5 7â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 19 Individual scoring

Neah Bay (6-1) Haily Greene 3, Vonte Aguirre 2, Holly Greene 8, J. Greene 8, McCaulley 16, Moss 23, Hill 4. Lummi (0-8) Issabella James 4, Treena Humphreys 15.

Gymnastics Roughriders at WOWI Invite BELLINGHAM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Port Angeles competed in the second session of the WOWI Invitational at Sehome High School on Saturday, facing off against Shorewood, Shorecrest and Columbia River. The meet did not have all-around and team winners, instead each event had its own division. Port Angeles seniors Madylan Coventon and Shay-Lyn Gracey both had second-place finishes at the meet. Coventon was second on

The Port Angeles gymnastics team wore Seahawks shirts during the march in of their meet in Bellingham. The team is, back row from left, assistant coach Jackie Mangano, Shay-Lyn Gracey, Lexi Hefton, Nikaila Price, Sierra Jewell, Elizabeth DeFrang, Madylan Coventon, Katie Gibson and head coach Megan Hoover; second row from left, Emily Basden, Rozzi Piper and Laurel Gieseke; and front row, Brytnee Gardner. the bars and the vault, as well as sixth on the floor. Gracey also took second on the bars. She also placed seventh on the vault. Freshman Sierra Jewell earned her first-ever medal with an eighth-place showing on the beam. Katie Gibson took fourth on the vault and fifth in both the floor and the bars. Other medalists for the Roughriders: Rozzi Piper finished fifth on the vault, Lexi Hefton was sixth on the bars, Elizabeth DeFrang was ninth on the beam and eighth on the bars, and Nikaila Price placed 10th on the floor. Warm-up for the meet

tans placed seventh among 26 teams at the inaugural Gut Check Invitational at Olympia High School. Forksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Miguel Morales took first in the 285-pound class by beating Trent Nivala of Puyallup, who is ranked No. 1 in Class 4A, in the finals. The event was organized by the Washington Wrestling Foundation, which is working to get college wrestling back into four-year schools in Washington. It featured 12 teams Wrestling across all classifications Forks seventh who entered complete team at Gut Check rosters, including all-star OLYMPIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Spar- teams from British Colum-

was at 1 p.m. and the march in was at 2:30 p.m., which conflicted with the Seattle Seahawks game. Port Angeles head coach Megan Hoover being an avid Seahawks fan, came up with the idea of having the Riders wear Seahawks gear for the march in. Port Angeles is at North Kitsap on Friday before holding a home meet Monday, Jan. 20, Klahhane Gymnastics.

are you fully

Protected?

FOUND:

security is only a call away

HOME & COMMERCIAL SECURITY SYSTEMS

31551571

E L E C T R O N I C S, I N C . 723 E. Front St. PA â&#x20AC;˘ 452-2727

www.gotohitech.com

s&OR.EW#OMPUTER 3ET UPOR4UNE UP s(OMEOR"USINESS ,OCATION

s&AST #OMPETENT 3ERVICE

30 Years Experience

33755946

month

37815980

452-2727

360-374-6769

2299

call DAVE, the Computer Doctor

s2EASONABLE2ATES

24-hour monitoring as low as

$

Computer Bogging You Down?

s)#OMETO9OUÂ&#x2C6; .O(AULING

we sell & install

Wedding band, Forks Coffee Shop, gold, engraved.

bia and Oregon. Another 14 teams entered wild-card participants, who were all past state placers or state participants. The tournament was run as a 16-man bracket with pig-tails, since many of the weight classes had more than 16 wrestlers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They did an excellent job putting together a tournament which was proba-

bly the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most difficult one-day tournament in any school classification,â&#x20AC;? Forks coach Bob Wheeler said. The Spartans finished with 81 points. The tournamentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other Class 1A school, Granger, came in 10th with 65 points. Moses Lake won the Invite with 142 points, Union was second with 120 points, and the British Columbia All-Stars took third with 97 points. Along with Morales, other Forks placers were Sebastian Barragan, who took fourth in the 126pound class; Joel Ward, fourth at 220 pounds; Ricky Barragan, fifth at 138; Javier Contreras, fifth at 145; and Jake Claussen, fifth at 285. Wheeler said he entered the Spartans in the Gut Check Invitational as a learning experience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We did perform fairly well as a team, but I definitely believe that we are capable of much more. We had several placers, but we also had several wrestlers who lost close matches, just missing the placing round,â&#x20AC;? Wheeler said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope that this tournament showed us that we have the capability of being at the top in the state. â&#x20AC;&#x153;However, I think they were shown that it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just going to happen. They will need to buckle down work hard in this, the last month before postseason.â&#x20AC;?

Dave Grainger, CNE Â&#x2021;(cell)


B4

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014

Dilbert

Doonesbury

DEAR ABBY: You said in your column on bullying that you hadn’t received a single letter from anyone who had bullied others. Well, I was a bully. As a young girl, I’d tease and taunt, and when I was older, I used sarcasm as a way to bully. I was involved in an abusive relationship in my 20s. With support and counseling, I was able to stop being abused and being abusive. I learned the feelings I had repressed — shame, fear and low self-worth from a childhood of sexual and physical abuse — were misdirected at the people around me instead of at my abuser, my father, as they should have been. I’m not saying this is an excuse for the hurt I inflicted on others, but for me, there was a correlation. I’m now in a loving and supportive relationship. We have raised our children to be kind, thoughtful and confident individuals. I’m involved with an organization supporting nonprofit programs in our community that empower abused children, reach out to the sexually exploited and help women experiencing domestic violence. Because of the life I lead now, I have been able to let go of the negativity and shame of being abused, but the shame of being abusive stays with me. I hope the people I hurt have forgiven me and have been able to move forward. But I will never know for sure. Thank you for allowing me to share my story. Even if it doesn’t get printed, writing it has lifted a little bit of the weight that I still carry from my bullying days. Redeeming Myself Out West

by Lynn Johnston

by Garry Trudeau

Frank & Ernest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Bully confesses to her bad deeds

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

Fun ’n’ Advice

by Bob and Tom Thaves

DEAR ABBY Abigail Van Buren

last a lifetime. Dear Abby: I recently lost a niece. She had struggled with substance abuse and was away at college when she died. I believed in what a wonderful person she was and could be and often sent her cards of encouragement. When my sister and her husband went to retrieve her belongings, they mentioned that she had my cards around her room. I had hoped that her parents would give them to me, but three months later, they have not. Would it be wrong for me to ask for them? Loving Aunt in the South Dear Loving Aunt: Please accept my sympathy for your family’s loss. The cards may not have been offered because your sister and her husband are experiencing the depths of grief. While it would not be “wrong” to ask if you can have them, don’t be surprised if they refuse to let them go — at least for the time being. Having the possessions their daughter surrounded herself with may be important to them right now as a way of feeling closer to her.

Dear Redeeming: Confession is good for the soul, and if getting this off your chest has been helpful, I’m glad. Obviously, you have grown since the days when you were an abuser, and your focus on helping vulnerable people in your community is laudable. I hope you will continue the work that you’re doing because there

by Jim Davis

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ Red and Rover

Rose is Rose

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Fight for what you want. Turn your ideas into reality, even if someone criticizes your choices. Engage in what interests you the most. As long as you don’t make a big deal out of things, you’ll reach your goals. 4 stars

by Brian Basset

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Keep moving forward even if changes are going on all around you. Focus on where you want to go and what you want to achieve. Don’t look back when you should be looking forward. Romance is in the stars. 3 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Choose communication and explanation over pushy, aggressive behavior. You will achieve far more if you can spell out exactly what you want and what you expect. Your vision will lead to positive action. Don’t hem and haw when decisiveness is required. 3 stars

by Hank Ketcham

by Eugenia Last

mix and you will capture the attention of someone who has something to contribute. Don’t let domestic responsibilities hold you back when you should be interacting with peers and colleagues who can help you advance. 4 stars

and don’t let anyone cause a disruption that can stand between you and completing a task that’s expected of you. A business partnership or job offer appears to be a blessing in disguise. Look at all the angles before you accept. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Get in step and don’t miss a beat. Your timing must be impeccable if you want to reach your destination. Your ability to be entertaining and productive will help you establish your position amongst your peers. Love is on the rise. 4 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Choose the most responsible route you can take and follow through, regardless of the controversy you face. It’s important to stand behind your beliefs and your traditions. Protect your assets, your emotions and your physical wellbeing. Avoid excessive behavior. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t back down if something needs to be said. Voice your opinion and make whatever adjustments are necessary to get past any setback or inconvenience you face. Emotional upset and anger must not be allowed to interfere with your plans. 2 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Travel or dealing with financial matters, authority figures or institutions will pose a problem. Concentrate on your talent and what you have to offer socially and professionally, SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. and you will find a way to CANCER (June 21-July 21): You can offer help, but make improvements to your don’t let anyone take advan- everyday routine. 5 stars 22): A personal makeover will help you start the year tage of your generosity. ProPISCES (Feb. 19-March tect what you have worked 20): Look at any situation out on the right foot. Consider the changes that will hard to achieve and be that isn’t stable. Emotional make you happy and confi- ready to counter any infor- matters at home, as well as dent. What you do to build mation that may affect your with peers and outsiders, reputation. Stand tall, be your confidence and gain can disrupt your long-term strong and show who is respect will also improve plans. Prepare to secure boss. 3 stars your relationships. 3 stars your position and massage any situation that has the SAGITTARIUS (Nov. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Add a little excitement to the 22-Dec. 21): Put work first potential to backfire. 2 stars

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Dennis the Menace

is great need for it. If your letter makes just one person stop and think twice about why he or she would deliberately hurt or diminish someone else, it will have been worth the space in my column because sometimes those scars can

Pickles

by Brian Crane

The Family Circus

by Bil and Jeff Keane


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Hawks: Coaches have rivalry CONTINUED FROM B1 opponents in the old Pac-10 conference. In 2009, after HarKaepernick avenged his worst statistical perfor- baugh’s Stanford team ran mance of the season two up the score on Carroll’s months ago against the Southern California squad Panthers, who held him to in a 55-21 rout, the two met 91 yards passing and 16 at midfield and an annoyed yards rushing in the first Carroll barked, “What’s meeting with Carolina, a your deal?” They’ve carried that over 10-9 loss at Candlestick to the NFL — and it might Park. Anquan Boldin had get ramped up again during eight catches for 136 yards the week with a Super Bowl and Frank Gore ran for 84 appearance on the line. “We’re healthy, we’re a yards on 17 carries, having their way against one of the great team and we’re willing to do whatever it takes NFL’s top defenses. to get that ring,” Gore said. On Saturday, Marshawn “We’re playing great Lynch ran for a franchise ball.” playoff-record 140 yards The 49ers held Cam and two touchdowns and Newton in check, interceptSeattle’s defense flustered ing him twice and sacking Drew Brees and New him five times while stopOrleans in a 23-15 victory. ping the Panthers (12-5) The top-seeded twice on the 1-yard line in Seahawks advanced to the the first half. NFC title game for the secIt was a rough playoff ond time, and first since the debut for the former Heis2005 playoffs. man Trophy winner. “We haven’t done anyLinebacker Ahmad thing yet,” quarterback Brooks stopped Newton on Russell Wilson said. a fourth-down sneak early “That’s our goal. We have in the second. Later, Brooks 60 minutes of football left.” vaulted over the line and Against a familiar foe. past Newton — he was Seahawks coach Pete called for offside, but the Carroll and 49ers coach Jim 49ers showed the Panthers Harbaugh have been rivals it wouldn’t be easy. dating to their days as At Seattle, Steven Haus-

chka kicked three field goals in blustery conditions, the Seahawks shut out the Saints (12-6) in the first half, got Lynch’s first 100yard game since Week 10 of the regular season and received a spark from the brief return of Percy Harvin before he left with a concussion. Lynch scored on a 15-yard run in the first half and capped the victory with a 31-yard scoring run with 2:40 left that Carroll celebrated by jumping into offensive line coach Tom Cable’s arms. “It feels awesome,” fullback Michael Robinson said, “but this doesn’t mean anything if we don’t win next week.”

Pats on another run At Foxborough, Mass., LeGarrette Blount carried the Patriots to their third straight AFC title game with four touchdown runs in a 43-22 victory over the Indianapolis Colts on Saturday night. “It’s just a great achievement,” Brady said. “People have counted us out at times this year, but I think we’ve got a locker room full of believers.”

It’s easy to see why after they forced Andrew Luck into throwing four interceptions and ran for six scores against the Colts. Blount joined Ricky Watters, who had five touchdowns for San Francisco on Jan. 15, 1994, as the only players with four or more in a playoff game. The Patriots’ six rushing touchdowns tied the 49ers’ total in that game for second most in playoff history. “We just had to keep our foot on the gas pedal,” Blount said, “and make sure that they didn’t do to us what they did to Kansas City.” Last weekend, the Colts (12-6) pulled off a stunning 45-44 victory over the Chiefs in which they overcame a 38-10 third-quarter deficit in the wild-card game for the second-biggest comeback victory in NFL playoff history. This time, there was no such come-from-behind performance for Luck and the Colts. “It hurts when you can’t go on, but the Patriots deserved to beat us,” Luck said. “They beat us fair and square.”

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014

Manning, Broncos top Chargers to advance to AFC championship BY ARNIE STAPLETON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DENVER — Peyton Manning welcomed Wes Welker back into the lineup with a touchdown toss and the Denver Broncos narrowly avoided a repeat of their playoff slip from last year, advancing to the AFC championship game with a 24-17 win over the San Diego Chargers on Sunday. The Broncos (14-3) controlled the game for 3½ quarters before Philip Rivers capitalized on an injury to cornerback Chris Harris Jr. to stage a comeback reminiscent of Baltimore’s shocking win at Denver exactly a year earlier. This time, however, Manning rescued the Broncos from the brink of another crushing collapse and sent them into the title game for the first time in eight seasons.

Legendary QBs meet

They’ll host the New England Patriots (13-4) on Sunday. Get ready for Brady vs. Manning once more. In the most recent matchup of QBs with Hall of Fame credentials, Tom Brady and the Patriots rallied past Manning and the visiting Broncos 34-31 in this defense? Sherman overtime on Nov. 24. talked about the many “It’s the Broncos versus times during the game that they knew exactly what the the Patriots and certainly Saints were going to run as Tom and I have played against each other a lot,” soon as they got into cerManning said after beating tain formations. San Diego. Thomas was asked if “But when you get to the greatness or legendary staAFC championship, it’s tus is a goal this defense about two good teams that has set. have been through a lot to “There is no goal,” he get there.” said. “Everything is limitManning, in the playoffs less. We don’t want to put for a record 13 seasons as a any kind of ceilings on us.” quarterback, ended a per________ sonal three-game postseason skid in winning for the Dave Boling is a McClatchy first time since leading News Service sports columnist.

Boling: Defense is ‘connected’ CONTINUED FROM B1 tackles in the middle to continue one of his most conspicuously impressive “We need everybody, seasons. everybody works hand in But don’t try to get him hand,” Thomas said. concede that. “When the D-line does “I’m still a nobody,” he great in the run game, we said. “That’s how I look at make [the opponent] one it. It’s about all the guys dimensional in the pass around. game. “It takes everybody on “When they get after the team to do their part the quarterback, they and do their job and we all make our job easier on the come out being successful. back end. This defense is Everybody does that.” very connected and we And Saturday, the know it.” defense needed every bit of Burly defensive tackle it as quarterback Russell Wilson completed just nine Brandon Mebane had five

passes for 103 yards. The savior of the offense was back Marshawn Lynch, who rushed for 140 yards, many of them so punishing to Saints players that he might need to be made an honorary member of the Seahawks defense — a nominal Legionnaire of Boom. The game provided another convincing resume entry for defensive coordinator Dan Quinn, who is being courted by several teams with head coaching vacancies. How well-schooled is

B5

“It’s the Broncos versus the Patriots and certainly Tom and I have played against each other a lot. But when you get to the AFC championship, it’s about two good teams that have been through a lot to get there.” PEYTON MANNING Indianapolis over the Jets 30-17 in the AFC championship game on Jan. 24, 2010.

Manning slowed Manning completed 25 of 36 passes for 230 yards and two TDs, numbers that weren’t quite up to the standards he set during a record-breaking regular season when he established new benchmarks with 55 TD throws and 5,447 yards through the air. But it was windy and the Broncos were intent on establishing the run and controlling the clock after San Diego had Manning and his high-octane offense cooling their cleats on the sideline for more than 38 minutes in both of their meetings during the regular season. After gaining just 18 yards on the ground against San Diego last month, the Broncos ran for 133 yards, including 82 by Knowshon Moreno, whose 3-yard TD run put them ahead 24-7 with 8:12 left. After that, things got interesting. The Chargers got close, but Manning completed a pair of key third-down passes in the final minutes to prevent San Diego from getting a final chance.

Peninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

NOON E N I L D A E D on’t Miss It! D

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsuladailynews.com

Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles s Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

SNEAK A PEEK PENINSULA DAILY NEWS s

s

3010 Announcements

TO DAY ’ S H OT T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

3020 Found FOUND: Dog. Golden r e t r i eve r m i x , bl o n d , long-haired, female, older, on Grauel-Ramapo Rd., 12/31. 928-9716. FOUND: Money. P.A. (360)452-8435

MOTORHOME: Itasca ‘12 Reyo. 25.5’, beautiful, on sprinter chassis, Mercedes-Benz diesel, under 5k miles, loaded with extras, Onan gen., inver ter, drivers, door, moor. $89,500. (360)928-3692

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com

Activity Assistant Part Time. Must be upbeat, energetic, fun and personable. Pickup application at 550 W. Hendrickson Sequim, WA 98382

LOST: Cat. Gray Tabby, male, Monterra area, P.A. (360)565-1228.

COUPLE SEEKING TO ADOPT Loving couple seeking to ADOPT an infant. We can offer your baby a lifetime of opportunity, humor, adventure and financial security. We will provide a happy home, sharing our interests in the outdoors, travel, music, and sports. Let us help support you with your adoption plan. Contact us at direct at 206-920-1376, toll-free at 877-290-0543 or email AndrewCorley@outlook.com You can also contact our attorney at 206-728-5858, ask for Joan file #0376.

3023 Lost LOST: Dog. Grate Dane, black and white, friendly, chain collar, between Beaver and Clallam Bay. (509)846-3225. LOST: Dog. Yorkie/Chihuahua mix, male, Lake Pleasant area. (360)640-4489

4026 Employment General KWA HOMECARE Part/full-time Caregivers. Benefits, Flexible Hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497

ADVOCATE/ CASE MANAGER Bachelor’s Degree in Social or Human Services Apply at employment_fstep@ olypen.com Visit www.firststepfamily.org for a complete job description. No phone calls please.

Executive Director S e q u i m ’s Fr e e C l i n i c seeks part-time experienced leader. Qualified applicant will have good communication skills, experience with development and budget management. For further info see website at sequmfreeclinic.org. No phone calls. Deadline Jan. 30.

LEGAL ASSISTANT Por t Angeles law fir m currently seeking experienced legal assistant. Applicant must be detail oriented, have excellent written and verbal communication skills as well as good inter personal skills and the ability to multi-task. Wor king knowledge of Word, Outlook, and Excel required. BAR MANAGER Full-time with benefits/ Elk’s Naval Lodge Bring resumes to 131 E. salary DOE. Reply to Peninsula Daily News 1st St., P.A. by 1/31/14. PDN#731/Legal CLASS INSTRUCTOR Port Angeles, WA 98362 Fo r c e r t i f i e d f i t n e s s By January 16, 2014. classes at busy gym. Worship Arts Assistant Call (360)457-3200 20-25 hrs. Submit reMEDICAL BILLER sume to sccmusicman@ Small office, part-time. me.com Job description: Bring resumes to 908 www.sequimcommunity Georgiana, P.A. church.org

EXPERIENCED LOGGING SUPERINTENDENT Diverse logging and road building company looking for experienced logger to supervise all logging operations, and a safety training program. Cable logging experience, all types required. Mechanical logging and cutting exp. needed, good communications skills, computer literate, and basic appraisal skills also needed. Based in NW WA, some travel req., some weekend work req. Compensation DOE and incl. health and 401k programs. Submit resume and salary requirements to Peninsula Daily News PDN#657/Logger Port Angeles, WA 98362

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

5000900

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General General

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

B6 MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. DECORATING A NURSERY Solution: 7 letters

M D S S L R I G E L I B O M W By Jeff Stillman

Friday’s Puzzle Solved Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

MECHANIC: Diesel fleet full-time, experie n c e w i t h Fo r d / G M d i e s e l s, c o m p u t e r s, electrical and fabrications a plus. Current WSDL with good 3 yr. abstract required. Salary DOE. Pick up application at 601 W. Hendrickson, Suite A, Sequim or online at: www.olympic ambulance.com No phone calls. Deadline: Jan. 22.

RN-Med/Surg 32 hour week, night shift position now available for RN with 3+ years med/surg experience. We offer great benefits and salaries, with an additional night differential of $4.25 hr and weekend differential of $4.00 hr. Apply online at www.olympic medical.org or nbuckner@ olympicmedical.org. EOE

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

105 Homes for Sale Clallam County

BETTER THAN NEW! Like new condition, barely lived in but fully landscaped. Mountain and salt water views. The landscaping is impeccable with many different species of plant life, hard scape, water feature with fountain and hot tub. The inside is neat as a pin with hardwood floors in the living area and kitchen. Located in the heart of Port Angeles, close to everything. Sit back, relax with a soak in the hot tub while enjoying the views! MLS#272488/572269 $230,000 Eric Hegge (360)460-6470 TOWN & COUNTRY

© 2014 Universal Uclick

B B C L R T S E T O P G T R K

R O C K I N G C H A I R H E C

O O Y M E D A M P L B N E S A

R K E S E R E E U I S E M S T

www.wonderword.com

R S N C P M R R R R B N E S S

I L A E E I T C E E A I S E R

M  S L A T T N M O Y O K S N ‫ګ‬ G ‫ ګ‬O U B ‫ګ‬ R S ‫ګ‬ S K L S R A C N E P

B O R S R A C C A S E S E I A

S A F E H K S P O R T S B R I

R O O D O L L S E T A R I P D

1/13

Join us on Facebook

Animals, Armoire, Basket, Bears, Bins, Books, Boys, Carpet, Cars, Cases, Color, Contemporary, Crib, Decals, Diaper Stackers, Dolls, Door, Dresser, Girls, Glider, Hangers, Hooks, Knobs, Lights, Linen, Mattress, Mementos, Mirror, Mobile, Modern, Mural, Pirates, Princess, Rocker, Rocking Chair, Rugs, Safe, Sports, Stars, Themes, Time, Toys, Trend, Wallpaper Yesterday’s Answer: Vacation

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

NOIPA ©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

PIRGE (c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

37 Relax in a hammock 39 California’s Santa __ 41 ICU drips 44 Poet whose work inspired “Cats” 45 Director Preminger 47 Woman on stage 48 Bok __: Chinese cabbage 51 Consumes avidly

DUNGENESS VALLEY Enjoy nature and quiet from this 3 br., 3 1/2 bath NW contemporary home with hardwood floors and beautiful wood trim finish throughout. Single stor y with daylight basement that could be apar tment or additional living space. 3,354 sf gives you plenty of room. Quality home in a great neighborhood lovely landscaping. 4080 Employment with MLS#272020. $425,000. Wanted Ed Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate A LT E R AT I O N S a n d Sequim - 360-808-1712 Sewing. Alterations, mending, hemming and some heavyweight sewELWHA RIVER ing available to you from FRONTAGE me. Call (360)531-2353 With beautifully restored ask for B.B. craftsman home on 10 acres. This is a must C O M P U T E R C a r e see! Home has newer Sales and Repairs 24+ ever ything, insulation, y e a r s e x p . D e s k - roof, septic, etc. Trantop/Office/Laptop com- q u i l , t h o u g h t f u l l a n d puters upgraded, free scaping with gorgeous estimates in Sequim. paths, fire pit, picnic taVirus/Malware remov- bles, chicken coop, gara l . D i s c o u n t s ava i l , den and of course the r i ve r. M a n y a r t i s t i c drop offs welcome. touches throughout the chet@olypen.com home and land. (360)808-9596 MLS#271896 $499,000. MLS 271895 adjacent HOUSE CLEANING 15 acres with livable yurt 30+ yrs. exp., references also for sale or purchase Mary (360)640-0111 both for $750,000 MLS#271897 RUSSELL Brooke Nelson ANYTHING (360)417-2812 775-4570 or 681-8582 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY SECONDARY Princip a l N e a h B ay H i g h School WA Admin Cert required First Review Deadline 2/14/2014 Application and information at www.capeflattery. wednet.edu or Contact Evelyn Wonderly at (360)963-2249.

B O G E R R O L O C O L H T E

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

1/13/14

52 Take a stand against 53 Series of links 54 Lacks 59 Word before five or ten 60 __-steven 61 State known for its caucuses 62 Business bigwig 63 Gunpowder holders 65 “__ Doubtfire”

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Momma General General Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Facilities Maintenance Electrician The Port of Port Angeles is seeking qualified applicants for the position of Facilities Maintenance Electrician. Applicants mu s t h ave a t l e a s t 5 years of experience as a l i c e n s e d j o u r n ey m a n commercial electrician. Must be a team player who also has skills and experience in HVAC, fire alarm, marine structure, air por t infrastr ucture, and/or building and grounds maintenance. Construction, estimating and material procurement, computer skills are preferred. The starting hourly rate range is $26.67 to $28.70 DOE, plus an outstanding benefit package. Applications & job descriptions may be obtained at the Por t Admin Office, 338 West 1st St., PA between 8am-5pm M-F & also online at www.portofpa.com . Applications will be accepted until 5 p m Fr i d ay, Ja n u a r y 24th. Drug testing is required. Other testing may be required.

R I D E A N I M A L S K L T R

LIMYAF

FIMDEF

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

DOWN 1 Log cutters 2 Condo division 3 “Inside” facts, briefly 4 Meditative exercise regimen 5 Teardrop-shaped nutlike snacks 6 Answering machine cue 7 Part of MIT: Abbr. 8 South Seas getaway 9 Substitute (for) 10 “To thine __ self be true” 11 Ohio city 12 Work on dough 13 Titillating cellphone messages 21 Green Hornet’s sidekick 22 Extremely 27 Male deer 28 Game on horseback 29 Valid 30 Christmas toymaker 31 Gadget used on an apple 32 “__ the fields we go” 36 PC alternative

1/13/14

C O N T E M P O R A R Y S A S

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

-

ACROSS 1 Business attire 5 Somewhat 9 Punches hard 14 Tolstoy’s “__ Karenina” 15 Jazz singer Horne 16 Packing rope 17 Hot spot connection 18 What gears do 19 Addition to a school, say 20 Noncash executive compensation 23 Siamese or Abyssinian 24 Solo in “Star Wars” 25 Seminary deg. 26 Dog tags, for instance 27 Close boxing match outcome 33 Part of a foot 34 Norway’s capital 35 Low soccer score 38 Aquatic plant 40 Work wk. end for many 42 “__ Lama Ding Dong”: doo-wop hit 43 Enter 46 Hurricane rescue op 49 Omnivorous Looney Tunes devil, familiarly 50 Folgers competitor 53 Greek letter between phi and psi 55 Airline approx. 56 Tee or blouse 57 Sandwich meat 58 Randomly determined NBA draft choice 64 “Me, too” 66 Use a piggy bank 67 Overflow with, as charm 68 Prelude, for short 69 Hawaiian strings 70 Thief’s haul 71 Explosive experiment 72 Felt tips and ballpoints 73 Dumbo’s wings

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Print your answer here: Yesterday's

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: POISE DODGE PANTRY SHRINK Answer: Hoping to fill the seat of the disgraced councilman, he was — DIS-APPOINTED

by Mell Lazarus

JUST LISTED 3 BD. 3 BA. HOME WITH 2 KITCHENS Just listed 3 br., 3 bath home with 2 kitchens and family room in Solmar. Access to Olympic Discovery Trail, private lake and small park. MLS#280008. $197,000. Harriet Reyenga (360)457-0456 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

RECENTLY UPDATED Beautiful 1,502 sf., manufactured home in Hendr ickson’s Mobile Home Park. The home features new stainless steel kitchen appliances, new sinks, faucets, and counter tops in the kitchen and baths, new wood flooring in the living area s, Fr e n c h d o o r a n d high end window coverings. MLS#280026. $120,000. Tom Blore JUST LISTED! (360)683-4116 Lovely cedar home with PETER BLACK 3 beds , 2 baths on a REAL ESTATE beautifully landscaped acre. Very private and SUNNY EXPOSURE quiet country setting, yet Sunland close to town and shop- E n j o y amenities, perfect starter ping. or investment, adjacent MLS#280019. $225,000. to greenbelt, 2 car garPam Church age with workbench, pri452-3333 vate patio off master, 2 PORT ANGELES bedrooms, 2 baths. REALTY MLS#550815/272169 $179,000 MOUNTAIN AND Deb Kahle WATER VIEWS! 1-800-359-8823 Check out this 2-story WINDERMERE home and proper ty loSUNLAND cated in a very desirable SUPER HOME ON 2 neighborhood on over a SEPARATE LOTS 1/3 of an acre with a buildable lot. The great Built in 2003, 2,036 sf, views will justify some s i n g l e s t o r y, 4 b e d updates you might make r o o m s, 2 b a t h s, h e a t t o t h i s 3 b r. , 2 b a t h pump, family rm, living rm, open concept, spahome. MLS#270662. $225,000. cious kitchen, formal dining, RV parking, fenced Kathy Brown back yard, extra lot can (360)417-2785 be sold separately COLDWELL BANKER MLS#272377 $269,000 UPTOWN REALTY Team Thomsen (360)808-0979 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

MOUNTAIN VIEW 3 BR, 2 bath, 1395 SF, handicap access, laundry room, walk in tub, heat pump furnace w/central air. Amazing yard: Gazebo & garden boxes! $159,500. 681-2604.

F O R S A L E : M o ve - i n ready. 2,300 sf, 3 bed/2 bath plus a large bonus room. Large living area, dining room, kitchen with island. Mountain view, 1.01 landscaped acres, close to Discovery Trail. MT. PLEASANT AREA Covered front porch and RAMBLER ON 1.39 large rear deck. 1,008 sf ACRES detached garage with Mt. Pleasant area Ramworkshop. $229,000. bler on 1.39 acres. (360)582-9782 Country kitchen with breakfast bar, extensive FSBO: 2001 manufac- o r c h a r d , b e r r i e s a n d t u r e d h o m e o n 1 . 2 fe n c e d g a r d e n . Po n d acres, 3 Br., 2 bath, well with waterfall and lots of house, mountain view, flowers. 28’ x 28’ atrium Agnew area. $135,000. fo r f u n a n d h o b b i e s . (360)457-8912 Small workshop off garage. All private yet close in. MLS#270626. $229,900. Paul Beck (360)461-0644 BRING THE HORSES WINDERMERE 3 Br., 2 ba mobile on PORT ANGELES 5.36 acres, barn, carpor t, tool shed, wood shed, well house, fenced Visit our website at backyard for pets. Propwww.peninsula erty has marketable tim- F S B O : C a nyo n E d g e dailynews.com ber and borders DNR Rd., P.A. 4 Br., 2 bath Or email us at land, located near Salt home on large lot, great classified@ C r e e k R e c r e a t i o n a l neighborhood above peninsula high school. $165,000. area, set up for horses. dailynews.com (360)477-3849 $139,000 (360)797-3326

WHAT A GREAT HOUSE! Nice cottage feel. Large circular drive, plenty of parking. Home has new carpet, laminate flooring & fresh paint. Kitchen offers Lg bay window looking out to beautiful priva t e b a ck ya r d . N i c e m a s t e r s u i t e. Fr e n c h Doors that open up to private 850 sf deck with hot tub. Out bldg./barn, Lg3 bay gar/shop, plenty room for R/V or Boat & a Green House. $229,000 MLS#272398/566600 Jeff Biles Cell: 360-477-6706 TOWN & COUNTRY

308 For Sale Lots & Acreage WELL CARED FOR ONE OWNER HOME! Lovely one owner 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath home with unfinished basement. Fireplace in living room, nice landscaping, and detached garage with work benches. Beautifully cared for and move-in ready. 919 W 12th St. MLS#271993. $162,500. Patti Morris 360.461.9008 JACE The Real Estate Company

505 Rental Houses 505 Rental Houses Clallam County Clallam County 3 Br., 2 bath with garage, wood floors, stainless appliances, separate family, living room. Gold Star energy saving award. $990. (360)477-0710.

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, car- P.A.: 1 Br. Storage, no por t, lg. deck, laundry pets/smoking. $485 mo., room. $550, 1st, last. No $450 dep (360)809-9979 pets. (360)457-0181. P. A . : 2 B r. , n o p e t s. P.A.: 3 Br., 1 ba, water $675 mo., 1st, last, dep. view. $1,100. (360)670-9418 (360)452-1641 P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, gar. $1,100 mo. $1,100 security. (360)417-0153. P.A.: West side, 2 Br., W / D, n o p e t s / s m o ke, $595, $550 dep. (360)809-9979.

Attractive spacious 3Br., 1.5 ba home with great mtn. view. 2,100 s f. N i c e r e s i d e n t i a l e a s t P. A . n e i g h b o r h o o d . Fe n c e d ya r d , patio, deck, 2-car garage. Great Rm with gas fireplace. Large Kitchen with newer appliances, Laundr y R m w i t h W / D. R e c Rm. Unfurnished. Lots of storage. $1,100 mo. 1-yr lease. Pets negotiable. Ask about our special! Photos and details at www.housepa.net (360)808-3549 CENTRAL P.A.: Cute 2 Br., 1 ba, workshop, garage, bonus room. $825 mo. (360)460-4924. DISCO BAY: Waterfront, newly renovated 3 Br., 2 ba, 20 min. to Seq./P.T. $900. (360)460-2330.

605 Apartments Clallam County

665 Rental Duplex/Multiplexes CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, no pet/smoke. $790, W/S/G incl. 683-2655.

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

P.A.: Cheerful dplx 1 Br. $595 plus dep. Avail. now. (360)460-4089. www.mchughrents.com

SEQUIM: 1 Br., 1 ba, W / D, h o r s e p a s t u r e . $675 first/dep. 460-4294

683 Rooms to Rent Roomshares

SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1.5 ba, HOUSE Share: Room no smoking/pets. $900 with bath, walk in closet, mo. (360)808-7090. W / D, g a r d e n s p a c e , quiet. References needWEST P.A.: 1,000 sf, ed, stable, cat must ap2 Br., 1 bath, laundry prove you. $450/month room, car por t, view. + utilities. (360)582-3189 1st, last mo. rent, no leave msg. smoking, refs. $750 mo. (360)417-5063. 1163 Commercial

605 Apartments Clallam County 1ST Month Rent Free! EVERGREEN COURT APTS (360)4.52-6996 • Nice, family environment with plenty of room for your children to play. • 1, 2, 3 Br. units avail. • Must income qualify 2202 West 16th, P.A.

Rentals

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

6010 Appliances ESPRESSO MACHINE 4 group espresso cappuccino machine, La Marzocco. Used, from Ty l e r S t . C o f f e e House. Priced at $4,500. (360)385-0773

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. (360)417-2810 HOUSES/APT IN P.A. H 1 br 1 ba ...............$475 A 1 br 1 ba ...............$500 H 1 br 1 ba ...............$575 Managed by Sparrow H 2 br 1 ba ..............$600 Management, Inc. A 2 br 2 ba ...............$750 6035 Cemetery Plots A Studio furnished ...$800 CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, A 2 br lux condo .....$1100 quiet, 2 Br., excellent HOUSES/APTS IN P.A. references required. BURIAL SITE: In Mt. $700. (360)452-3540. H 1 br 1 ba ...............$680 Angeles Memorial Park, Garden of Devotion. A 2 br 1.5 ba ............$850 $1,999. (360)452-9611. H 2 br 2 ba ...............$850 Complete List at: 1111 Caroline St., P.A.

6045 Farm Fencing & Equipment

P.A.: 1 Br., centrally located, pets allowed. $550. (360)809-0432 PA : 2 . 5 b e d , fe n c e d y a r d , d e t a c h e d g a r. , mountain view. $800. (360)582-7241

CENTRAL P.A.: Conve n i e n t 2 b r. , 1 s t f l r. $589 incl. util! Clean, roomy, NO SMOKE/pet maybe. 504-2668.

TRACTOR: Mahindra 28 hp, hydrostatic transmission with attachments, approx 175 hrs., excellent condition. $10,500/ obo. (760)594-7441.

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

HAND GUN: S&W 629-1, 44 mag., 8 and 3/8” stainless steel barrel. $900 or trade. (360)457-0814 RIFLE: AK-47. Extra clips, ammo. $1,500. (360)670-3053

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com FIREWOOD (360)477-8832

FIREWOOD: You haul. $60 per standard pickup load. (360)621-5194. WO O D S TOV E : 1 9 9 7 med. size Quadra-Fire, like new. $700. (360)683-4742

6075 Heavy Equipment EQUIPMENT TRAILER 24’, 3 axle with ramps. $3,200/obo (360)683-3215

GMC: ‘98 C7500 series truck, propane new Jasper engine under warranty, flat bed, lumber racks and tool boxes, Allison tranny. $10,200/ obo. (360)683-3215.

HYSTER: ‘79 tilt-bed trailer. 25’ long, 20 ton. $8,800/obo. Tom, (360)640-1770 SEMI END-DUMP TRAILER: High lift-gate, ex. cond. $15,000/obo. (360)417-0153

SEMI Trailer: 53’ 1992 make: TRLMO. 53’ Semi Box Van low pro 24.5 -75% rubber spare, wheel $7,999 inspected road worthy! Moving out of state! Pack at your speed sell when you get to your destination! Do the logistic-cost-it works save $$ (909)224-9600


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 6075 Heavy Equipment

6080 Home Furnishings

6100 Misc. Merchandise

6100 Misc. Merchandise

TRUCK/TRACTOR: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;56 Kenworth , new batteries, excellent r unning condition. $6,500/obo. (360)683-3215

MISC: Flexsteel full-size s l e e p e r s o fa , c u s t o m navy blue and white floral upholstr y with teal stripe, excellent cond. $500. Chair, custom uph o l s t r y, m e d . g r e e n , from 1920s, ex. cond, $300. (360)477-1362.

ESTATE SALE: Recliner, $75. BowFlex exerciser, everything with it, weights, etc., $450. TV enter tainment stand, $10. Twin bed, $25. Gas fireplace, $450. Stackable washer/dryer works good, $200. (360)457-7009

MOUNTING PRESS Seal 210M dr y mount press, near mint. $395. (360)457-5604

6080 Home Furnishings

6 PIECE BEDROOM SET ~ BRAND NEW! Mako Symphony Collection. Mercury Black finish w/ brushed silver hardware. SOLID WOOD! 10 Drawer D r e s s e r w / M i r r o r, Chest, 2 Night Stands & Ar moire. $2,000 FIRM cash only. Buyer moves. (360)4616374. BEDROOM SET: Ashley queen size sleigh bed, vanity mirror, armoire, beautiful Italian inlay, 5 yrs. old, paid $4,700. Sacrifice for $2,000/obo. (360)681-5332

ROLL-TOP DESK: Oak in like new condition. 32 W x 24 D x 45 H. $225. M I S C : 4 To y o t i r e s , (360)681-2136 P225 60 R16, like new, $450. Refrigerator, $300 SECTIONAL SOFA: 4 Enter tainment center, piece, foam green, like solid wood, $75. 2 office new, includes 2 reclin- desk chairs, very good ers, plus pillows. $400. c o n d i t i o n , l e a t h e r, 1 (360)681-0943 black, 1 brown, $40 ea. S O FA : I k e a , g r e e n Washer, $100. Dr yer, leather, 7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; x 3â&#x20AC;&#x2122;. $300. $50. Dining table, drop Call for more info and leaf, dark brown, ver y good condition, $100. photos! (360)582-3025. (360)670-9199

6100 Misc. Merchandise CAMERA: Hasselblad 500C outfit. VG to EX. 3 lenses and many accessories. $1,600-$2,000. (360)457-5604 VACUUM: Kirby Sentria 2. Never used! 4 months o l d , a l l a t t a c h m e n t s, video instructions. Paid $2,100. Asking $600/ obo. (360)683-9804.

6105 Musical Instruments

WEDDING rental business for sale in Sequim (niche market). This is the opportunity of a lifetime for someone to buy all event inventory (from the ground up) for $27,500. Inventor y: dance floor, 20â&#x20AC;&#x2122; x 30â&#x20AC;&#x2122; tent, tables, chairs, decor, chocolate fountain, dinnerware, beverage containers, rolling beverage car ts, 5 industrial size bakers rack. Too much too list. Begin renting this equipment for this yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; wedding events. We are the only rental service in Clallam C o u n t y. O n l y s e r i o u s cash buyers call (360)808-6160

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014 B7

6140 Wanted & Trades

DIGITAL PIANO: Yama- WANTED: Wood chipha Portable Grand Digi- per, 4â&#x20AC;? or 6â&#x20AC;?. t a l P i a n o. D G X - 5 3 0 (360)460-4970 YPG-535. Weighted Keys. Includes keyboard 6135 Yard & stand, foot pedal, manual and disk. Still in box. Garden Never used. Purchased 12/2013. $495/obo. TOOLS (360)683-3816 BACK BLADE: 48â&#x20AC;?, 3 point. $100/obo. PIANO: 1940â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ken- LATHE: Shopsmith, with dall mahogany Baby 6 cutting tools. $100. (360)460-4970 Grand, needs a special home. Must see to appreciate. Fits snugly into cor ner. $2,700/ 7025 Farm Animals obo. (360)477-5588 or & Livestock (360)460-8610. COWS/CALVES: 2 Watusi cows with calves. 6115 Sporting $3,500 all. Goods (360)452-2615 BUYING FIREARMS Any and All - Top $ Paid. One or Entire Collection Including Estates. Call (360)477-9659

MISC: Elk hide rug, professionally tanned, excellent condition, ver y 6105 Musical large Roosevelt, $500. Instruments Refrigerator, new Kenmore, lg. freezer compartment, excellent con- PIANO: Wurlitzer Petite dition, $500. B a by G ra n d P i a n o. 6140 Wanted (360)681-4834 Good condition, regular & Trades tunings, dark mahogany color, bench included. MOBILITY SCOOTER WANTED: Reloading, $600/obo. Pace Saver. $400. hunting, fishing, old tools (360)457-2842 or (360)683-4761 misc. (360)457-0814. (360)477-2968

Scottish Highland Cow Plus 1 mo. free hay. $600. (360)683-2546.

7030 Horses FREE: Draft horse, Morgan and Appaloosa gelding. 31 years old bu t ve r y d e p e n d a bl e. Owners leaving and must re-home horse. (390)683-7297

7035 General Pets

7045 Tack, Feed & 9820 Motorhomes Supplies

HAY: Good quality grass CARIN TERRIER (Toto) A K C, 9 w k . o l d m a l e hay. $6 bale. (360)670-3788 pup. Breeding Carins for 28 yrs., for health, love, in-home companionship, athletic, not for show, to 9820 Motorhomes a p p r ove d h o m e o n l y, shots, wormed, chipped. $775. (360)928-9427. CAT: Aggressive 4 yr. old neutered male, black a n d w h i t e, n e e d s h i s own home. $1. (360)683-5460 MOTORHOME: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03 38â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dutch Star. 20,230 mi., tr iple slide-out, new fridge, micro., gas oven, queen bed, sm freezer, many extras, Cat 3808, 6 sp. Allison Trans. Book $127,000. Asking $80,000. (360)457-3718 or (360)565-6408.

PUPPIES: Black, yellow and white purebred AKC LABRADOR Retr iever puppies $500. Male & Female avail. Dewclaws removed, vet checked. Bor n 12/2, ready late Januar y. Will hold for $250 non-refundable deposit. (360)681-2034. MOTORHOME: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 24â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Itasca. Class C, 30K low mi., two queen beds. PUPPIES: Mini-Dachs- $43,950. (360)683-3212. hund puppies. One beautiful black and tan MOTORHOME: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;89 Toysmooth coat male and ota Dolphin. Sleeps 4+, one adorable chocolate low mi., clean, strong, and white smooth coat reliable, economical. male. 1st shot and $4,495/obo wormed. Ready now. (425)231-2576 or $550. (360)452-3016. (425)879-5283

MOTORHOME: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;94 32â&#x20AC;&#x2122; F l e e t wo o d C o r o n a d a . Only 67K mi., good condition, too much to list, call for info. $11,000. (360)457-4896

MOTOR HOME: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;99 25â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Allegro by Fleetwood. Class A, 85K mi., hydraulic power levelers, new fridge, rear queen bed, 2 solar panels and inverter, suited for on or off grid camping. $8,500. (360)460-7534

M OTO R H O M E : Fo u r Winds â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;98, Class C, 22â&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Gas and electric fridge, good cond., trailer hitch, 98,330 miles. $7,200. (360)582-9769

MOTORHOME: Holiday Rambler 2000 Endeavor, 38â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, (2) slide-outs, 330 HP Cat, Allison Tr a n s , 7 9 k , s i x - w a y leather pilot and co-pilot seats, 4 dr. fridge with ice maker, hyd. leveling jacks, 7.5 diesel gen., rear vision sys., combo washer/dryer, solar panel, 25â&#x20AC;&#x2122; side awning, satellite dish, (2) color TVs, many other extras! Asking $59,000. In Sequim, (360)301-2484

D â&#x20AC;˘I â&#x20AC;˘R â&#x20AC;˘E â&#x20AC;˘C â&#x20AC;˘T â&#x20AC;˘O â&#x20AC;˘R â&#x20AC;˘Y

FENCING

TRACTOR

Lund Fencing

No job too small!

PAINTING

LAWN CARE

PAINTING

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

REPAIR/REMODEL

FOX PAINTING

Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Home Maintenance

A Finished Touch

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Columbus Construction

Painting & Pressure Washing

(360)

457-6582 808-0439

Grounds Maintenance Specialist â&#x20AC;˘ Mowing â&#x20AC;˘ Trimming â&#x20AC;˘ Pruning â&#x20AC;˘ Tractor Work â&#x20AC;˘ Landscaping â&#x20AC;˘ Sprinkler Installation and Repair

32743866

(360)

Licensed Cont#FOXPAPC871D7

23595179

www.LundFencing.com

22588179

RDDARDD889JT

TREE SERVICE

Appliances

3 6 0 - 4 52 - 3 7 0 6 â&#x20AC;˘ w w w . n w h g . n e t

â&#x20AC;˘ Tree Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Tree Trimming â&#x20AC;˘ Wind Sailing of Trees

<($56(;3(5,(1&(

6HHSKRWRV# ZZZ2O\3HQ5HPRGHOFRP

(360) 582-9382

GENERAL CONST. ARNETT

â&#x20AC;&#x153;AFFORDABLE HOME IMPROVEMENTSâ&#x20AC;? Remodels Interior & Exterior Kitchen, Baths, Decks, Fences, Laminate and Hardwood Flooring

360-477-1935DONARAG875DL â&#x20AC;˘ constructiontilepro.com

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

CLEANING

TREE SERVICE

#

86$50<9(7(5$1

TILE & STONE

TREE SERVICE â&#x20AC;˘ Fully Insured â&#x20AC;˘ Licensed â&#x20AC;˘ FREE Estimates â&#x20AC;˘ Senior Discount

ANTHONYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SERVICE Lic. # ANTOS*938K5

DesperateHousewivess Licensed & Bonded

14 Years Experience

References Available

, LLC

(360) 808-2317

REPAIR/REMODEL

General Contractors Water/Fire Damage Expertise Complete Home and Business Repair

360-681-0722 Lic # SERVIOP965R7

39881502

41965956

Flooring

23597511

Cabinets

We go that extra mile for your tree care

360-683-4881

41965957

Licensed, Bonded & Insured

/PSUIXFTU&MFDUSPOJDT

39867319

Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

/,&(16(.,7&+%'%6 /,&(16('%21'(',1685('

LAWNCARE

34769373

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE

-$%t1MBTNBt1SPKFDUJPOt$35 7JOUBHF"VEJP&RVJQNFOU

24614371

S. Eunice St. .,7&+(16%$7+6'DQGPRUH 2256 APPLIANCE 914 Port Angeles  SERVICE INC. 457-9875     &DOO7LP 

TV Repair

Contractor # GEORGED098NR Mfd. Installer Certified: #M100DICK1ge991KA

Strait View Window Cleaning LLC Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

41954623

AA

582-0384

KITCHEN/BATH REMODEL %$7+5220 5(02'(/6 .,7&+(1 5(02'(/6 7,/( */$66 %/2&. ),1,6+ &$53(175<

116 Barnes Rd., Sequim, WA Visit our website: www.dickinsonexcavation.com Locally Operated for since 1985

24608159

APPLIANCES

TV REPAIR

WINDOW/GUTTER CLEANING

UNDER NEW MGMT! Guaranteed Call-backs No Job Too Small

â&#x20AC;˘ Fences â&#x20AC;˘ Decks â&#x20AC;˘ Small Jobs ok â&#x20AC;˘ Quick, Reliable

COLUMC*955KD

Call (360) 683-8332

(360) 460-3319

41965970

360-452-2054

26636738

Port Angeles Sequim Glen Spear Port Townsend Owner Lic#DONERRH943NA

22588145

If itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not right, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not Done Right!

â&#x153;&#x201C; Senior Discount â&#x153;&#x201C; Yard Service â&#x153;&#x201C; Hedges/Trees â&#x153;&#x201C; Roof/Gutter Cleaning

â&#x20AC;˘ Doors/Windows â&#x20AC;˘ Concrete Work â&#x20AC;˘ Drywall Repair

360-775-6678 â&#x20AC;˘ 360-452-9684

Complete Lawn Care Hauling Garbage Runs Free Estimates BIG DISCOUNT for Seniors

Serving Jefferson & Clallam County

Driveways - Utilities - Site Prep - Demolition Concrete Removal - Tree & Stump Removal Drainage & Storm Water Specialist Engineering Available - Rock Walls Lawn Restoration - Hydroseeding Top Soil - Compost - Bark

Decks & Fences Windows & Doors Concrete Roofs Tile

â&#x20AC;˘ Raods/Driveways â&#x20AC;˘ Grading â&#x20AC;˘ Utilities â&#x20AC;˘ Landscaping, Field Mowing & Rotilling â&#x20AC;˘ Snow Removal

EARLY BIRD LAWN CARE

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE Contr#KENNER1951P8

360-460-6176

Excavation and General Contracting â&#x20AC;˘ All Site Prep - includes Manufactured Homes â&#x20AC;˘ Land Clearing and Grubbing â&#x20AC;˘ Septic Systems â&#x20AC;˘ Rock Walls & Rockeries

Quality Work

29667464

Jamiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Done Right Home Repair Remodels Appliances Handicap Access Painting Interior/Exterior

(360) 477-1805

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING MAINTENANCE

No Job Too Small

From Curb To Roof

Reg#FINIST*932D0

Every Home Needs â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Finished Touchâ&#x20AC;?

LARRYHM016J8

HOME REPAIR

Free Estimates Senior Discounts Licensed Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ Insured

â&#x20AC;˘ Tile â&#x20AC;˘ Kitchen & Bath â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Woodwork â&#x20AC;˘ Water Damage/Rot

23590152

Larry Muckley

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

21572250

Chad Lund

#LUNDFF*962K7

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

In s id e , O u ts id e , A ny s id e

23590413

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

452-0755 775-6473

41935701 1-12

SERVICE

360-460-0518

360-461-7180 360-912-2061

flawktreeservice@yahoo.com We offer Senior Discounts Lic.#FLAWKTS873OE

CALL NOW To Advertise

360-452-8435 OR 1-800-826-7714

4B235383

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714 â&#x20AC;˘ www.peninsuladailynews.com


Classified

B8 MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014

9742 Tires & Wheels

ANTIQUE: Beautiful Jar- ENGINE: Dodge engine K E Y B OA R D : Ya m a h a SIGN: Neon sign, Seadiniere with dragon mo- and 4 speed trans., 6 key b o a r d , w i t h s t a n d hawks logo. $175. (360)670-2946 tif, mahogany stand. cyl., complete, runs well. and bench. $45. (360)775-3649 $200. (985)290-5769. $200. (360)928-9699. SHEET MUSIC: World ART: Koa Wood car v- E N T. C E N T E R : O a k , La-Z-Boy Recliner: $25. War I and II, Hollywood, ing, two dolphins, beauti- with 36” TV. 55.5” x 61”. Broadway. $200. Couch: $25.00. ful. $85. (360)681-7579. $200. (360)437-7706. (360)452-7721 (360)683-4742. AU TO G R A P H : O p ra h E N T. C E N T E R : S o l i d M I T E R S AW : C r a f t s Winfrey, 8” x 10”, black oak, 40” x 75”, incl. 32” man, 7.5”, like new. $35. and white, pur ple ink, Sony TV. $175. (360)460-5762 scarce. $200. 681-2968. (360)477-5772 MODEL: Radio control AU TO G R A P H : Pe t e r EXERCISE: Total Gym battle tank, 1/20 scale Fa l k , 8 ” x 1 0 ” , p h o t o Ultra by Chuck Norris, M 1 A 1 A b r a m s , n e w. signed. $150. 681-2968. like new. $200/obo. $50/obo. (360)683-7435. (360)928-2223 BA B Y S T U F F : E d d i e MODELS: (7) unbuilt, EXERSAUCER: $20. Bauer front pack, $25. (6) plastic, (1) balsa, (360)681-5137 Boppy nursing pillow, cars, planes, ship. $120. $10. (360)681-5137. (360)452-6842 FENDER FLARES BANDSAW: Craftsman Bushwacker, purchased MOVING BOXES: You 12” bandsaw. $200. for 2011 GMC 1500, ext. haul. $5-$40 for all. (360)385-1628 cab. $100. 460-5762. (509)325-9237 BA N K S : ( 4 ) d i f fe r e n t FOLDING TABLES: For vintage Mickey Mouse sofa or recliner, new in NINTENDO DS: Pink, banks. $100. box. $15 for one, $25 for with charger and case, ex. cond. $75. (360)452-6842 two. (360)681-0668. (360)457-4654 BED: King bed, mirrored FREE: 8” Hardie Board ORGAN: Spinet, Gulheadboard, with cabi- siding pieces. bransen. $130/obo. nets, drawers. $200. (360)452-3133 (360)681-0668 (360)683-4697 FREE: Automotive rePITCHER: With bowl, BEER STEIN: Sonics pair books, 1980s. set, beige background, ‘79 champs. $55. (360)460-4970 butterflies, beautiful, ex. (360)670-2946 FREE: Sony TV, 48”, re- cond. $30. 531-4186. B O OT S : C o r k b o o t s, pair/parts. 640-4489. Westco, size 9, used 1 PRINT: Crater Lake, in FUEL DRUM: 55 gal., original 1930s “pie crust” month. $200. manual pump. $45. (360)452-3133 frame. $75. (360)732-4311 (360)681-7579 BOOTS: Ladies western r i d i n g b o o t s , A c m e , GOLF BAG: Beautiful P R O J E C TO R : M o v i e Sun Mountain golf bag. brown, size 7, 14” high. projector, 8 mm, Super 8 $20. (360)385-2776. $15. (360)531-4186. with screen. $50. (360)582-1259 CAMERA: Digital Argus GOLF BAGS: (2) Excellent golf bags. $10 and DC 1500. $15. QUAD: Honda 125 cc. $20. (360)385-2776. (360)452-6974 $175. (360)928-9699. CAR RAMP: Jeep, fold- G O L F : S e t t o p f l i g h t RECLINER: La-Z-Boy i r o n s , R e s F l ex , w i t h ing ramp. $50. three Spalding woods, recliner sofa. $20. (985)290-5769 (360)683-4742 bag. $40. (360)457-4878 C H A I N S AW : S e a r s , R E E L : D i awa G a r c i a GOLF: Travel bag, with 18”, $75. Mac 14”, $40. GTC. $10. wheels, good cond. $10. (360)683-1646 (360)461-3724 (360)457-4878 CHAPS: (2) new pair RELOADING PRESSES GRAIN MILL: Attachleather motorcycle $50, $30, and $20. c h a p s , 3 2 ” a n d 3 4 ” m e n t fo r K i t c h e n A i d (360)461-3724 mixer, like new. $65. waist. $25 ea. 681-2779. (360)460-8324 RIMS: (3) Toyota, 15”, CHARGING KIT Solar,15 Watt, new in G U I T A R : R e c o n d i - chrome, 6 lug, from ‘91, tioned, Burswood, built- good cond. $25 for all. box. $75. in speaker, 28”, great. (360)457-0810 (360)582-3840 $95. (360)683-0119. ROCKING CHAIR CLEATS: Nike, like new, H AT: S p o r t k n i t h a t , Bentwood, Rattan, lge. size 6.5, black. $15. Seattle Seahawks, $59. (360)775-0855 (360)928-1177 brand new. $10. CLOTHES: Two sided (360)457-5790 ROD AND REEL: Spin hunter vest, shell holder, r o d a n d r e e l c o m b o, H E AT E R : K e r o s e n e never used. $75. $5. Serape, wool, $5. heater, 22,800 BTU. (360)452-6974 (360)452-8953 $70. (360)582-1259. CLOTHES WASHER ROLLER SKATES Portable clothes washer. HEATER: Portable room K i d s ’ s i z e 4 - 5 , heater, Honeywell, time black/blue. $20. $50. (360)775-3649. and temp controls. $20. (360)928-1177 CRAB POTS: (2). $20 (360)681-3522 each. (360)683-4742. ROTO-ZIP: $100. HUMIDOR: Cigar case, (360)385-1628 DAY BED: Trundle day very nice. $75/obo. bed, double. $100. (360)683-4697

(360)460-2260

SAW: Delta 16” scroll JACK HAMMER: Air 60 saw, variable, like new. $70. (360)808-2629. lb. $200 cash/trade/obo. (360)808-0523 SAW: Small rock saw. JAZZ CD: The Best of $70/obo. (360)808-2629. Miles Davis, John ColSCALE: Flat top dial, trane, Columbia. $8. 100 lbs., heavy duty. (360)457-5790 $55. (360)582-3840. JEANS: (3) Carhar t, SCOOTER: Razor A5 double knee, 30 W, 32 Lux, used once. $45. L. $10 each. (360)582-3840 (360)477-5337

DESK: Computer desk, 2’ x 5’, 5 drawer. $20. (360)565-1453 DESK: L shaped, wood top, keyboard shelf, metal, open frame base. $20. (360)337-0521. DRESSER: 6 drawers, white, great shape. $40. (360)928-9645

JEWELRY: Bag of vin- SCREEN: Chinese folding screen, 6’ tall, 64”. age jewelry. $10. $200 cash/trade/obo. (360)457-5186 (360)808-0523 DV D s : 3 6 a s s o r t e d J O I N T E R : 6 ” TO RO SEWING MACHINE DVDs, excellent condi- 1956, cast iron, original Portable, Kenmore. $40. tion. $3 each. manuals and stand. (360)681-0668 (360)452-8953 $150. (360)452-5652. DRILL PRESS: Five speed. $50. (360)477-2491.

E E E A D SS FFRRE Monday and Tuesdays AD

SILVERWARE: Oneida, silver plate, 8 place setting, extras, in case. $100. (360)452-7721. SINK: Kohler kitchen sink, 33” x 22” 10.625”, four hole, cast iron sink. $50. (360)457-4654. SKI JACKET: Woman’s, down, hooded, blue. $38. (360)775-0855. SKI PANTS: Snow-ski pants, L-M. $7. (360)452-6974 SKYLIGHTS: (3) 2’ x 2’, not in box, in blue plastic covering. $38 ea, $100 all. (360)683-0119. S O FA : C a m e l b a c k , rolled arms, great legs, neutral color, nice. $175. (360)928-3900 SPEAKERS: (2) JBL rear speakers with stands for surround sound. $35. 385-0122. SPEAKERS: Stereo speakers. $100. (360)452-9685 STEREO: Sony Stereo system, ver y nice. $60/obo. (360)460-2260 STETHOSCOPE: New, dual frequency. $7. (360)452-6974 TABLE: Dining table, (6) chairs, solid honey oak, great shape. $200. (360)461-2719 TA P E D E C K : A m p ex reel-to-reel portable tape deck, stereo. $60. (360)732-4311 TIRE: and bud steel rim, 11R-22.5. $75. (360)460-7146 TIRES: (2) Blizzak tires, 205-55R-16. $50. (360)457-4271 TIRES: (4) studded snow tires, 195/60K15. $75. (360)477-2491. TIRES: (4) Studded s n ow t i r e s, m o u n t e d , P-205/75R14. $100. (360)731-8439 TRADING CARDS: 80s and 90s, (5) lots, $10 each, 500-700 per lot. (360)731-8439 TURNTABLE LP to digital, new in box. $75. (360)582-3840. T V: C o l o r, 2 0 ” , V H S, $20. 13”, VHS, $20. (360)452-9685 VINTAGE CHAIR: Kitchen chair, curved bentwood back. $10. (360)457-6431 WALKER: With seat. $35. (360)683-6097. WA L K E R : W i t h s e a t and basket. $45. (360)683-6097 WEDDING GOWN New, 15-16, Bridal Original #2780. $35/obo. (360)683-7435.

Mail to: Bring your ads to: Peninsula Daily News Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 305 West 1st St., PA Port Angeles, WA 98362

• 2 Ads Per Week • 3 Lines • Private Party Only 9820 Motorhomes

• No Pets, Livestock, Garage Sales or Firewood 9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

or FAX to: (360)417-3507 Email: classified@peninsuladailynews.com

NO PHONE CALLS

9802 5th Wheels

5A246724

S D A E E E R E F FR

E E R F

For items $200 and under

9817 Motorcycles

5TH WHEEL: ‘96 Wild- HONDA: ‘82 XL80S. wood. 36’, good cond., $400. (360)683-3490. ever ything works. $2,900/obo. 565-6017.

MOTORHOME: Itasca ‘12 Reyo. 25.5’, beautiful, on sprinter chassis, Mercedes-Benz diesel, under 5k miles, loaded with extras, Onan gen., inver ter, drivers, door, moor. $89,500. (360)928-3692 MOTORHOME: Newmar 2001 Mountainaire for sale, 38’ with 63,100 miles. In very good condition. Asking $31,000. Call Bill, (360)582-0452 to find more info and/or see the unit.

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

9808 Campers & Canopies TRAILER: Rare resealed 1978 Argosy by Airstream. $11,500! All crevices have been resealed for extra protect i o n w / n ew p a i n t t o o. Stored indoors! Weighs 1,000s less but Same Airstream quality. Interior exactly as in 1978 when it came off the factory floor. 28 ft. Comes w i t h l o a d s o f ex t r a s (awning,sway bars) please only serious cash buyers only! Sequim, (360)808-6160.

A I R S T R E A M : ‘ 9 3 3 4 ’ 9802 5th Wheels Excella 1000. 3 axles, nice. $14,500. In Por t Angeles. (206)459-6420. 5TH WHEEL: ‘04 34’ Alpenlite. 2-slides, great TRAILER: ‘03 Kit Com- condition, going south or panion Extreme. Small live in the best park on slide. $4,500. 461-6130. the Peninsula. $19,000. (509)869-7571 TRAILER: ‘13 23’ Visa by Gulfstream. $19,950. (360)681-7601

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

5TH WHEEL: 27’ Alum a s c a p e 2 0 0 2 , 3 p. slides, with Ford F250 460 V8 custom HD trans pull 15K. Interior l i ke n ew, q u e e n b e d . Truck 1992 all power, 85000M. Package ready to go anywhere $19,000/obo. (360)649-4121

C A M P E R : ‘ 0 3 L a n c e. Like new, used two short trips, for short bed pickup, air, queen bed, dinMOTOR SCOOTER ette, shower, toilet, lots Aprilia ‘08 500ie. Beauof storage. $7,850. tiful like new, silver ‘08 (360)681-0172 Aprilia 500cc Scooter. S&S: ‘83 9.5’ camper. <1,000 miles garaged Self-contained, stable lift year round. Great commuter bike with 60+ jack system, new fridge. $3,000. (360)452-9049. miles per gallon! Wond e r f u l fo r s h o r t / l o n g hauls.Includes (2) helmets keys/remotes, 9050 Marine owners manual and new Miscellaneous batter y! ONLY serious cash buyers call. Don’t BAYLINER: 20’ Cabin pay dealers freight and Cruiser. E-Z Load trailer. set up charges. This is a $800/obo. 775-6075. deal at $3,600. (360)808-6160 BELLBOY: ‘72 ‘19 boat, 140 HP Johnson ‘86, TRADE: ‘10 new KawaEvenrude 15 HP kicker, saki Vulcan 900 Classic many extras! Call for de- trike with only 60 miles, tails. $1,995. factoy Lehman trike val(360)683-7297 ued at $20,000 (sell) or trade for older restored FIBERFORM: 17’, 50 pickup truck, will consida n d 6 h p Ya m a h a s . er any make and model. $2,750. (360)460-6647. (360)452-5891 LAVRO: 14’ drift boat, 2 YA M A H A : ‘ 0 3 V- S t a r Classic. Air cooled, Vsets oars, trailer. $1,000. Twin 5 sp, many extras. (360)928-9716 $3,800/obo. 683-9357. LIVINGSTON: 12’ 9.9 hp, 4-stroke, galvanized 9740 Auto Service trailer, $1,650. & Parts (360)681-8761 SATURN: ‘12, 15’, inflatable boat. With ‘12 Nissan 20 hp outboard and hand-held Garman GPS, Hawkeye marine radio, depth finder, 5’ harpoon, 5’ dock hook, 2 life jackets, and many other items. $3,500. (360)582-0191

ENGINE AND TRANS Ford ‘87 302 engine and transmission, 58k. $500 cash. Call from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., (360)683-5434, leave message. PICKUP CAB: Ford ‘31 Model A. Rough, incomplete. $550. 452-9821.

9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others

TIRES: 4 mounted 6 PONTIAC ‘09 VIBE h o l e G M w h e e l s , LT AWD, 4 cyl., auto, A/C, 245/75 R16 10 ply, 800 tilt wheel, cruise, power mi. $750. (360)683-9112 w i n d ow s, l o ck s, a m d m i r r o r s , A M / F M / C D, stability con9180 Automobiles electronic trol, roof rack, remote Classics & Collect. entry and more! Built by Toyota! CHEV: 2000 SS Cama$9,995 ro. Top condition, cherry VIN#405146 red, new wheels/tires, Exp. 1-18-14 recent big tune-up. Dave Barnier $9,500/obo. Auto Sales (360)457-9331. *We Finance In House* 452-6599 CHEV: ‘66 Impala condavebarnier.com ve r t i bl e. R u n s g r e a t , 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA beautiful, collector! $17,000. (360)681-0488. P O R S C H E : ‘ 9 9 9 1 1 . 7 2 K , b e a u t i f u l s i l ve r / CHEV: ‘87 El Camino. black. $20,500. Runs good, good body (360)808-1405 and interior. $2,800/obo. SUBARU ‘08 LEGACY (360)683-6079 2.5I SEDAN C O RVA I R : ‘ 6 3 Tu r b o 2.5L 4 cylinder, automatS p y d e r C o u p e . R e - ic, alloy wheels, sunroof, stored, loaded. $10,500. key l e s s e n t r y, p ow e r (360)683-5871 w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, mirrors, and drivers seat, T R I U M P H : ‘ 7 4 T R 6 cruise control, tilt, air Classic British Spor ts conditioning, MP3 CD Car. Excellent runner, stereo, satellite radio, 8 c o nve r t i bl e w i t h h a r d a i r b a g s. O n l y 3 2 , 0 0 0 top, rare over-drive, lots or iginal miles! Carfax of extra original and new Certified one owner with parts. $19,900. Serious no accidents! Like new inquiries. (360)460-2931 condition inside and out! All Wheel Drive for all perfor mance! 9292 Automobiles weather Experience why these Others are the Northwest’s favorite cars! Come see AUDI: ‘87 5000s. 4 door the Peninsula’s source sedan, new front brakes, of quality used cars for runs well, high milage. over 55 years! Stop by $900. (360)477-1855. Gray Motors today! $15,995 BUICK ‘00 LESABRE GRAY MOTORS LIMITED 457-4901 One owner with only 63k graymotors.com miles. Loaded, 3.8 LTR, V-6, auto, A/C, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, 9434 Pickup Trucks locks, mirrors, dual powOthers er seats, leather interior, power sunroof, electron- CHEV: ‘02 S10 Extendi c t r a c t i o n c o n t r o l , ed Cab. Canopy, tool A M / F M / C D a n d c a s - box, 89K, excellent cond sette, alloy wheels, re- $5,200. (360)640-8155. mote entry and more. $6,995 CHEV: ‘88 1/2 ton. 4x4, VIN#105968 matching shell, clean, Exp. 1-18-14 priced to sell. Dave Barnier $2,395/obo. 775-6681. Auto Sales *We Finance In House* C H E V : ‘ 9 8 E x t . c a b. 452-6599 Camper shell, 125K, 4 davebarnier.com cyl., 5 speed. $2,600. 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA (360)683-9523, 10-8. CHEV: ‘96 Camaro TTop. 115K, runs great, n e e d s t ra n ny. $ 2 , 0 0 0 fir m. Ser ious inquires only. (360)461-2367.

DODGE: ‘01 Ram 2500. 4X4, service box, Cummins turbo diesel, 5 sp., q u a d - c a b, 2 0 0 k , we l l maintained, good tires. $9,000/obo. DODGE: ‘93 Dynasty. (360)775-7703 Fine cond., incl. (4) liken e w s t u d d e d s n o w DODGE: ‘01 Ram XLT. t i r e s / r i m s, 1 1 9 k , n ew 4x4, quad cab, ‘360’, tow battery, great ride. Will pkg., runs great. $5,500. (360)797-3326 go for $800/obo. (360)643-1935 DODGE ‘04 DAKOTA QUAD CAB SLT 4X4 4.7L V8, automatic, alloy wheels, good tires, bedliner, tow package, rear sliding window, privacy glass, keyless entry, 4 full crew cab doors, powHONDA: ‘92 Prelude. er windows, door locks, N o n - V T E C, ( 4 ) ex t r a mirrors, and drivers seat, tires and rims. $2,500 cruise control, tilt, air cash. Call or text any c o n d i t i o n i n g , 6 C D stereo, information centime after 4 p.m., ter, dual front airbags. (360)461-5877 only 80,000 original HYUNDAI: ‘10 Elantra m i l e s ! C l e a n C a r fa x ! Touring. 31K, sunroof, O n e p r ev i o u s ow n e r ! Like new condition invery clean. $12,500/obo. side and out! You don’t (360)681-4809 want to miss this one! JAGUAR: ‘96 XJ6. Well Come see the Peninsukept, low miles. $4,999/ l a ’s t r u ck ex p e r t s fo r over 55 years! Stop by obo. (360)670-1350. Gray Motors today! $12,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

JEEP: ‘78 CJ5. Threespeed, CB, CD, roll bar, winch, oversized tires, cloth top, looks and runs great. $3,700. (360)374-3383

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

DODGE: ‘06 Dakota 4X4. Quad cab, excellent cond, electric seats & windows, grill guard, side steps, bed liner and Tonneau cover, new batt e r y, t i r e s a n d f r o n t b r a ke s, l ow m i l e a g e. $15,500. (360)582-9310.

KIA: ‘01 Sportage 4X4. 190k, very good cond., new tires, 25-32 mpg, runs strong, nice stereo with CD. $2,750/obo. (360)460-1277

DODGE: ‘99 2500 Ser ies. Deisel, ext. cab, utility box, new trans. $9,400. (360)565-6017.

SUBARU: ‘84 GL SW 2x4WD, low mi., new clutch, WP, rad, hose s, s e a l s, m o r e. 5 x stud. $3,000/obo. (360)460-9199

CHECK OUT OUR NEW CLASSIFIED WIZARD AT www.peninsula dailynews.com

FORD: ‘73 1 Ton Pickup. Flat bed, with side KIA: ‘04 Optima. 116k, racks, newly painted, new timing belt, ver y 68K original mi., winch. good condition. $4,500. (360)640-8155. $4,250. 683-9499. FORD ‘94 F-250 LINCOLN ‘98 MARK Extended cab diesel VIII COUPE 4x4, 7.3 LTR turbo die4.6 Liter 32 valve V8, sel, only 93k miles, XLT auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, package, auto, A/C, tilt A M / F M / C A S S / C D wheel, cruise, spray-on changer with JBL audio, bed liner, exhaust brake, power windows, locks tow package and more! and seats, trip computer, Extra sharp and only chrome alloy wheels, $10,995 only 91,000 miles, beauVIN#B31180 tiful local trade in, nonExp. 1-18-14 smoker, spotless AutoDave Barnier check repor t. ImmacuAuto Sales late ivory pearl paint with *We Finance In House* butter leather interior. 452-6599 $4,995 davebarnier.com REID & JOHNSON 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA MOTORS 457-9663 FORD: ‘96 F150 4WD. reidandjohnson.com Eddie Bauer package, MAZDA: ‘04 RX-8. Top All Star bed liner, 132k. condition, 15,000 origi- $5,750. (360)681-4672. nal mi., black, loaded, extra set of tires/wheels, F O R D : ‘ 9 8 R a n g e r . Regular cab, short bed, for winter. $10,000/obo. manual transmission, 2 (360)460-1393 sets tires with rims, MITSUBISHI ‘11 1 9 - 2 4 m p g , b e d l i n e r, ENDEAVOR LS sliding rear window, 2.5L 3.8 liter V6, auto, all 4 cyl, heavy duty shocks wheel drive, A/C, cruise, $2,000/obo. tilt, AM/FM/CD with blue(360)797-7150 tooth, power windows FORD: ‘99 F-250. 4X4, and locks, keyless entry, luggage rack, side air- s e r v i c e b o x , p o w e r bags, privacy glass, al- stroke, 5 sp., quad-cab, loy wheels, only 32,000 155k, well maintained, miles, balance of factory new tires and breaks. warranty, 1-owner, non- $10,000/obo. (360)775-7703 smoker, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle histor y report. Reduce $2,000. MAZDA: ‘03 4X4. Ex$15,995 tra cab, 6 cyl., almost REID & JOHNSON new tires, has lift kit, MOTORS 457-9663 detailed inside and reidandjohnson.com o u t , n o d e n t s, n i c e paint, very good overNISSAN: ‘07 Altima. 4 all condition. $4,500. door, 90k, good cond. (360)457-7009 $5,000/obo. (360)775-0028 GMC: ‘76 GMC 1/2 ton. PONTIAC: ‘03 Vibe SW. 3 5 0 w i t h h e a d e r s . 3 Twin to Toyota Matrix, 4 speed auto new tires. cyl., auto, A/C, new tires, Over $11,000 invested. Asking $3,500/obo 110k. $5,600. 457-9784. (360)531-1681

GMC ‘09 CANYON Extended cab pick-up, one owner with only 28k miles, 2.9 liter 4 cyl., A/C, tilt wheel, cruise, four opening doors, bed liner, tow package, “OnStar” matching canopy and more. $12,995 VIN#114106 Exp. 1-18-14 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

GMC: ‘95 Yukon. Runs we l l , l e a t h e r i n t e r i o r. $2,500/obo. (360)461-6659

JEEP: ‘99 Grand Cherokee 4.0. In-line 6, auto, reg. 4WD, leather int., heated seats, sunroof, privacy glass, roof rack, custom wheels and tires. $5,600. (360)582-0892.

JEEP: ‘02 Wrangler Sierra. White, gray hardtop, straight 6 cyl., auto, m u d a n d s n ow t i r e s, h e av y d u t y bu m p e r s, wired for towing, CB, fog I S U Z U : ‘ 9 4 p i c k u p . lights, 77K. $11,000. (919)616-2567 4WD, good condition. $2,250. (360)460-6647. JEEP ‘10 PATRIOT LIMITED TOYOTA ‘10 SIENNA Econonomical 2.4 liter 4LE MINIVAN 3.5 liter V6, auto, all cyl, auto, all wheel drive, wheel drive, dual a/c, A / C , c r u i s e , t i l t , c r u i s e , t i l t , AM/FM/CD changer AM/FM/CD/MP3, power w/sirius, power windows, windows, locks, seat, locks and seat, full leathand sliding doors, home er, heated seats, fog link, side airbags, trip lamps, traction control, computer, 7-passenger s i d e a i r b a g s , a l l o y with quad seating, half wheels, 45,000 miles, stow and go, luggage balance of factory 5/100 rack, privacy glass, only warranty, beautiful 125,000 miles, bal. of fac- owner corporate lease tory 5/60 warranty. spot- r e t u r n , n o n - s m o k e r, spotless Autocheck reless Autocheck report. port. $21,995 $16,995 REID & JOHNSON REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com reidandjohnson.com

9556 SUVs Others CHEV: ‘01 Tracker 4x4. Set for towing, ex. cond., 2 owner vehicle. $5,950. (360)683-5382

FORD ‘03 EXPEDITION XLT 4X4 5.4L Triton V8, automatic, alloy wheels, new tires, r unning boards, tow package, roof rack, privacy glass, keyless entr y, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and d r i ve r s s e a t , l e a t h e r seats, third row seating, adjustable pedals, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, rear A/C, CD/cassette stereo, dual front airbags. Clean Carfax! Like new condition inside and out! You just won’t find one nicer than this! Stands tall on brand new tires! Come see the Peninsula’s 4X4 experts for over 55 years! Stop by Gray Motors today! $9,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

9935 General Legals

OLDSMOBILE ‘00 BRAVADA AWD SPORT UTILITY 4.3L Vor tec V6, automatic, alloy wheels, new tires, tow package, roof rack, privacy glass, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, power programmable leather seats, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, CD/cassette stereo, dual front a i r b a g s. O n l y 9 7 , 0 0 0 original miles! Clean Carfax! Immaculate condition inside and out! This Oldsmobile offers a l u x u r y t r i m l eve l n o t ava i l a bl e i n a C h ev y Blazer! All Wheel Drive provides positive traction in any weather! Come see the Peninsula’s value leaders for over 55 years! Stop by Gray Motors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com Place your ad at peninsula dailynews.com

9935 General Legals

No. 13-7-00164-5 NOTICE AND SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION (Dependency) SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR GRAYS HARBOR COUNTY JUVENILE DIVISION In re the Welfare of BRODY JAMES MCFARLAND D.O.B. 03-18-2013 Minor Child TO: TEDDY ALAN PETERSON, WILLIAM GARIBAY, JOHN DOE or ANYONE CLAIMING TO BE THE FATHER A Dependency Petition was filed on 03-22-2013 : A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2014 at 10:00 am at the Juvenile Court located at 103 Hagara Street, A b e r d e e n , WA 9 8 5 2 0 . YO U S H O U L D B E PRESENT AT THIS HEARING. THE HEARING WILL DETERMINE IF YOUR CHILD IS DEPENDENT AS DEFINED IN RCW 13.34.050(5). THIS BEGINS A JUDICIAL PROCESS WHICH COULD RESULT IN PERMANENT LOSS OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS. IF YOU D O N OT A P P E A R AT T H E H E A R I N G T H E COURT MAY ENTER A DEPENDENCY ORDER IN YOUR ABSENCE. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS at 360-537-4300. To view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to: www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.aspx . Dated this 19th day of December, 2013 by, CHERYL BROWN, Grays Harbor County Clerk. Pub: Dec. 30, Jan. 6, 13, 2014 Legal No. 534821

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

File No.: 7021.15193 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A. Grantee: Lisa C. Mcaneny, also shown of record as Lisa Carole Mcaneny, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1225741 Tax Parcel ID No.: 033019 509010 Abbreviated Legal: PLC B SP 19/35 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-8944 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On February 14, 2014, at 10:00 AM. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Parcel B of Granum Short Plat recorded on June 28, 1989, in Volume 19 of Short Plats, page 35, under Auditor’s File No. 618570, being a portion of Lots 22, 23 and 24 in Block 7 of the First Plat of The Townsite of Sequim, Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 441 South 2nd Avenue Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 08/07/08, recorded on 08/25/08, under Auditor’s File No. 2008-1225741, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Lisa Mcaneny, as her separate estate, as Grantor, to DSS, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Taylor, Bean & Whitaker Mortgage Corp., its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Bank of America, N.A., Successor by Merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2011-1268835. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 10/11/2013 Monthly Payments $51,457.39 Late Charges $1,954.80 Total Arrearage $53,412.19 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $181.25 Total Costs $181.25 Total Amount Due: $53,593.44 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $233,032.11, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 06/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on February 14, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 02/03/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 02/03/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 02/03/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Lisa Mcaneny aka Lisa Carole Mcaneny 441 South 2nd Avenue Sequim, WA 98382-3799 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Lisa Mcaneny aka Lisa Carole Mcaneny 441 South 2nd Avenue Sequim, WA 98382-3799 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/07/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/08/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/11/2013 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Breanon Miller (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7021.15193) 1002.238969-File No. Pub: Jan. 13, Feb. 3, 2014 Legal No. 537474


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Classified

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014 B9

9730 Vans & Minivans 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Others Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County ‘03 Chevy Astro Cargo REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS Van: Good cond, exclnt tires, 94k miles, $6000 Clallam County is soliciting statements of qualificaobo. (360)477-8591. tions and performance data from Engineering Firms, Surveying Firms, Graphic Design Firms, and Printing Firms for the following work that may be CHEV: ‘95 Cargo Van. needed in the near future: 3/4 ton, runs great, ladder rack, ready to go to SURVEYING: Property lines, road topography, conwork. $2,250. 808-4234 struction staking, section breakdowns, aerial phoor (360)452-5457. tography, mapping, and related professional services. CHEV: ‘97 Mark III Conversion van. 4.3 V6, new ENGINEERING: Road design, bridge design, tires, 65K, great shape, bridge analysis, geotechnical, structural, construcmust see to appreciate! tion engineering, sanitary, solid waste, utilities, small buildings, and related professional services $4,200. (360)683-0146. including graphic design, interpretive panel design, and printing. FORD: ‘93 1/2 ton Conversion Van. High ENVIRONMENTAL: NEPA/SEPA documentation, top, 4 captain’s chairs, archaeological/cultural resources surveys and tribal sofa, 82k actual miles. consultation, wetland delineation and mitigation, biological assessments and evaluations, fisheries $4,500. surveys and studies. (360)808-2594 GMC: ‘99 Safari. New tranny, clean, 172K mi., CD, cruise.$3,300/obo (360)477-9875

9931 Legal Notices Clallam County

Official Notice Quileute Tribe General Council Meeting January 16th 2014: Directors Reports 9:00-3:00 p.m. Open to community members. January 17th 2014: General Council Meeting and Elections 9:00-3:00 p.m. Quileute Tribal Members only. Pub: Jan. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 2014

CR RESOLUTION 02, 2014 INITIATING A COUNTY ROAD PROJECT DESIGNATED AS CRP C1227, CONSTRUCTION PAVEMENT STRIPING IT IS HEREBY RESOLVED THAT improvements to various country roads will include the following: Construction Pavement Striping Logging stripe patterns and making roads for necessary The project is hereby declared to be a public necessity and the county engineer is hereby ordered to report and proceed thereon as provided by law. IT IS FURTHER RESOLVED that an appropriation from the officially adopted road fund budget and based on the county engineer’s estimate is hereby made in the amounts and for the purposes shown:

ACCOUNT PURPOSE TOTAL CODE ESTIMATE 595.11 Engineering $100.00 595.20 Right of way acquisition $0.00 Total (Not subject to RCW 36.77.065) $100.00 595.33 Construction by Day Labor $1,000.00 Total (Subject to RCW 36.77.065) $1,000.00 Total: $1,100.00 Est. Date to Commence Work: Jan-14 Road Dist.: All An informational packet on preparing a proposal Est. Date to Complete Work: Dec-14 Road Type: Acess & Arterial may be obtained Monday through Friday, Signed This 2 Day of January, 2014 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. from: Ross Tyler, P.E. County Engineer Mary Peterson This project is included in the officially adopted annual road program as Item Clallam County Public Works Department No. 1. 223 East 4th Street, Room 130/Suite 6 IT IS FURTHER RESOLVED that the construction is to be accomplished by Port Angeles, WA 98362 county forces in accordance with RCW 36.77.065 and WAC 136-18. Phone: 360.417.2319 Fax: 360.417.2513 Fax ADOPTED THIS 7th DAY OF January, 2014. BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Clallam County hereby notifies all that it will affirmaMichael C. Chapman, Chair tively ensure that in any contract entered into purJim McEntire suant to this advertisement, disadvantaged busiHoward V. Doherty, Jr. ness enterprises as defined in Title VI of the Civil ATTEST: Rights Act of 1964 at 49 CFR Part 23 will be afford- Trish Holden, CMC Clerk of the Board ed full opportunity to submit proposals in response Pub: Jan. 13, 2014 Legal No. 537388 to this invitation and will not be discriminated CR RESOLUTION 01, 2014 against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, or sex in consideration for an award. INITIATING A COUNTY ROAD PROJECT DESIGNATED AS CRP C1226, TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES PASSED THIS seventh day of January 2014 BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS IT IS HEREBY RESOLVED THAT improvements to various county roads will Michael C. Chapman, Chair include the following: Traffic Signing - County Wide ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Installation of new traffic signs along county roads to include regulatory, warnPub: Jan 13, 20, 2014 Legal No. 537372 ing, school, guide, recreation, and road name signs.

File No.: 7023.106176 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Grantee: Donald C. Jones and Ramona L. Jones, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007 1200886 Tax Parcel ID No.: 053013 410050 Abbreviated Legal: Ptn NE 1/4, SE 1/4, 13-30-5, Clallam Co., WA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800569-4287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On February 14, 2014, at 10:00 AM. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: That portion of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 13, Township 30 North, Range 5 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, described as follows: Beginning at the intersection of the North right of way line of State Road No. 9 and the East right of way line of the County Road, commonly known as Shore Road; thence Northerly along the East line of said Shore Road a distance of 360 feet; thence Easterly parallel with the Northerly right of way line of said State Road No. 9 a distance of 1050 feet to the True Point of Beginning of this description; thence Northerly and parallel with the West line of said Subdivision 300 feet; thence Easterly parallel with the Northerly right of way line of said State Road No. 9 to the East line of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of said Section 13; thence Southerly along said East line 300 feet; thence Westerly parallel with the Northerly right of way line said State Road No. 9 to the True Point of Beginning. Together with an easement for ingress and egress over a private road located on the following described tract: Beginning at a point in the East right of way line of the County Road, known as the Shore Road, 300 feet North of the Northerly right of way line of State Road No. 9; thence Easterly parallel with the Northerly right of way line of State Road No. 9 to the East line of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of said Section 13; thence North along said East line 60 feet; thence Westerly parallel with the Northerly right of way line State Road No. 9 to the East right of way line of said Shore Road; thence South along said East right of way line 60 feet to the Point of Beginning. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 212 Reich Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/23/07, recorded on 05/07/07, under Auditor’s File No. 2007 1200886, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Donald C. Jones and Ramona L. Jones, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Northwest Trustee Services, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 10/09/2013 Monthly Payments $19,490.48 Late Charges $332.96 Lender’s Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $19,823.44 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $300.00 Title Report $829.26 Statutory Mailings $42.16 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,255.42 Total Amount Due: $21,078.86 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $241,463.81, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 12/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on February 14, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 02/03/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 02/03/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 02/03/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Donald C. Jones 212 Reich Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362-8197 Ramona L. Jones 212 Reich Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362-8197 Donald C. Jones PO Box 12071 College Station, TX 77845-2071 Ramona L. Jones PO Box 12071 College Station, TX 77845-2071 Donald C. Jones PO Box 2375 Sequim, WA 983822375 Ramona L. Jones PO Box 2375 Sequim, WA 98382-2375 Donald C. Jones PO Box 3058 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Ramona L. Jones PO Box 3058 Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/03/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/03/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/09/2013 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 5861900. (TS# 7023.106176) 1002.256087-File No. Pub: Jan. 13, Feb. 3, 2014 Legal No. 537473

Get home delivery. Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The project is hereby declared to be a public necessity and the county engineer is hereby ordered to report and proceed thereon as law provided. IT IS FURTHER RESOLVED that an appropriation from the officially adopted road fund budget and based on the county engineer’s estimate is hereby made in the amounts and for the purposes shown: ACCOUNT PURPOSE TOTAL CODE ESTIMATE 595.11 Engineering $1,900.00 595.20 Right of way acquisition $0.00 Total (Not subject to RCW 36.77.065) $1,900.00 595.33 Construction by Day Labor $12,000.00 Total (Subject to RCW 36.77.065) $12,000.00 Total: $13,900.00 Est. Date to Commence Work: Jan-14 Road Dist.: All Est. Date to Complete Work: Dec-14 Road Type: Acess & Arterial Signed This 2 Day of January, 2014 Ross Tyler, P.E. County Engineer This project is included in the officially adopted annual road program as Item No. 1. IT IS FURTHER RESOLVED that the construction is to be accomplished by county forces in accordance with RCW 36.77.065 and WAC 136-18. ADOPTED THIS 7th DAY OF January, 2014. BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Michael C. Chapman, Chair Jim McEntire Howard V. Doherty, Jr. ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC Clerk of the Board Pub: Jan. 13, 2014 Legal No. File No.: 7042.11178 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Green Tree Servicing LLC Grantee: Jeremiah James Butler, who acquired title as Jay J. Butler, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1216576 Tax Parcel ID No.: 043017 5000410000/39009 Abbreviated Legal: LOT 16, OF SOLMAR NO. 1, CLALLAM COUNTY, WA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On January 24, 2014, at 10:00 AM. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 16, of Solmar No. 1, as per Plat thereof recorded in Volume 6 of Plats at Page 24, records of Clallam County, Washington. Commonly known as: 242 McDonald Drive Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 02/11/08, recorded on 02/22/08, under Auditor’s File No. 2008-1216576, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Jeremiah James Butler, and Kimberly Butler, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Title of Washington, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Countrywide Bank, FSB, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Bank of America, N.A. to Green Tree Servicing LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2013-1294700. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 09/18/2013 Monthly Payments $67,787.15 Late Charges $0.00 Lender’s Fees & Costs $2,470.66 Total Arrearage $70,257.81 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $1,000.00 Title Report $712.19 Statutory Mailings $21.08 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,817.27 Total Amount Due: $72,075.08 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $181,932.11, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 24, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/13/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 01/13/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/13/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Jeremiah Butler aka Jeremiah James Butler aka Jay J. Butler aka Jay Butler aka Jay J Butler 242 McDonald Drive Sequim, WA 98382 Jeremiah Butler aka Jeremiah James Butler aka Jay J. Butler aka Jay Butler aka Jay J Butler 1011 Woodcock Drive Sequim, WA 98382 Kimberly Butler aka Kimberly Lynne Butler aka Kimberly Newell 242 McDonald Drive Sequim, WA 98382 Kimberly Butler aka Kimberly Lynne Butler aka Kimberly Newell 1011 Woodcock Drive Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/16/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/16/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/18/2013 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lambert (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7042.11178) 1002.255247-File No. Pub: Dec. 23, 2013, Jan. 13, 2014 Legal No. 533542

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned trustee will on the 24th day of January, 2014, at the hour of 1 p.m., at the Fourth Street entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse in the City of Port Angeles, 223 East Fourth Street, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: SEE EXHIBIT A ATTACHED HERETO Commonly known at 350 Stone Road,Sequim, Washington. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated July 22, 2005, recorded July 22, 205, under Auditor’s File No. 2005 1161198, records of Clallam County, Washington, from ERIC L. OLSON, a married man as his separate estate, as Grantor, to OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of VICTOR L. REVENTLOW, a single man, as Beneficiary. The Beneficiary thereunder as appointed Teresa A. Neudorfer as Successor Trustee. II. No action commenced by the beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: A. Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Delinquent payments of $1,089.37 per month, plus default interest: $54,070.24 Late Charges: $1,400.00 TOTAL $55,470.24 In addition to the above, the Grantor has failed to pay all of the real estate taxes for the years 2011,2012 and the first half of 2013. To date the total amount owing is $7,496.21, plus applicable interest and penalties. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $200,001.60, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from the 5st day of February, 2010, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-descried real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on the 24th day of January, 2014. The default(s) referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by the 13th day of January, 2014 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 13th day of January, 2014, (11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in Paragraph III are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 13th day of January, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale by the Borrower and Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address: 727 E. 1675 S., Lehi, UT 84043, by both first class and certified mail on the 16th day of August, 2013, proof of which is in the possession of the trustee; and written notice of default was posted on the 18th day of September, 2013, in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all of their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the Owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale, the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. DATED October 21, 2013. Teresa A. Neudorfer, WSBA #11915 Successor Trustee 329 S. Third Street. Suite A PO Box 2018 Sequim, WA 98382 Phone No.: 360-683-7295 EXHIBIT A LOT 1 OF SHORT PLAT, RECORDED DECEMBER 3, 1975 IN VOLUME 1 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 52, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 449135, BEING A PORTION O THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 4 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Pub: Dec. 23, 2013, Jan. 13, 2014 Legal No. 532717

FFile No.: 7042.29000 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Green Tree Servicing LLC Grantee: Karen R. Rodriguez, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 20061190648 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000600045 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 7 BLK. 63 Lewis & Masticks Subd., Callam Co., WA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-8944 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On January 24, 2014, at 10:00 AM. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 7 in Block 63 of Lew and Mastick’s Subdivision of Suburban Lot 22, Port Angeles, as recorded in Volume 1 of Plat, page 52, records of Clallam County, Washington. Commonly known as: 710 East 3rd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/27/06, recorded on 11/01/06, under Auditor’s File No. 20061190648, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Karen R. Rodriguez, as her separate estate, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Loan City, a California Corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by GMAC Mortgage, LLC fka GMAC Mortgage Corporation to Green Tree Servicing LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2013-1287369. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 09/19/2013 Monthly Payments $24,579.41 Late Charges $0.00 Lender’s Fees & Costs $2,619.23 Total Arrearage $27,198.64 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $550.00 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $10.54 Recording Costs $30.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $660.54 Total Amount Due: $27,859.18 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $79,000.83, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 05/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 24, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/13/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 01/13/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/13/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Karen R. Rodriguez 710 East 3rd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Karen R. Rodriguez 710 East 3rd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 03/20/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 03/20/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.nor thwesttr ustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/19/2013 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lamber t (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7042.29000) 1002.244867-File No. Pub: Dec. 23, 2013, Jan. 13, 2014 Legal No. 533544


B10

WeatherWatch

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014 Neah Bay 48/42

Bellingham g 46/43

Olympic Peninsula TODAY BREEZY & SHOWERS

Port Townsend 51/43

Port Angeles 51/42 Olympics Snow level: 5,000 feet

Forks 48/41

Sequim 51/43

Port Ludlow 51/42

ZY RS EE WE BR HO S &

➡ TUESDAY

Low 42 Cloudy night skies

48/34 Sun may peek through

FRIDAY

47/34 Sunshine puts up a fight

50/38 Sun may put in appearance

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind to 35 kt becoming SW to 25 kt. Wind waves to 6 ft subsiding to 4 ft. Showers. Tonight, W wind to 20 kt. Wind waves to 3 ft. Ocean: SW wind to 25 kt easing to 20 kt. Wind waves to 5 ft. W swell 13 ft. Showers. Tonight, SW wind 10 to 15 kt. Wind waves 1 to 2 ft. W swell 12 ft at 13 seconds.

CANADA

Seattle 54° | 48° Olympia 52° | 43°

Spokane 45° | 36°

Tacoma 50° | 45° Yakima 50° | 32°

Astoria 52° | 46° © 2014 Wunderground.com

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 10:12 a.m. 9.0’ 4:16 a.m. 3.9’ 11:43 p.m. 7.3’ 5:16 p.m. 0.2’

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 10:54 a.m. 9.1’ 5:03 a.m. 3.8’ 5:53 p.m. 0.0’

2:34 a.m. 7.0’ 11:33 a.m. 6.6’

7:11 a.m. 6.1’ 7:17 p.m. -0.4’

3:10 a.m. 7.2’ 12:16 p.m. 6.5’

7:58 a.m. 6.0’ 7:49 p.m. -0.5’

4:11 a.m. 8.7’ 1:10 p.m. 8.1’

8:24 a.m. 6.8’ 8:30 p.m. -0.4’

4:47 a.m. 8.9’ 1:53 p.m. 8.0’

9:11 a.m. 6.7’ 9:02 p.m. -0.5’

3:17 a.m. 7.8’ 12:16 p.m. 7.3’

7:46 a.m. 6.1’ 7:52 p.m. -0.4’

3:53 a.m. 8.0’ 12:59 p.m. 7.2’

8:33 a.m. 6.0’ 8:24 p.m. -0.5’

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Now Showing ■ Deer Park Cinema,

Port Angeles (360-4527176) “Frozen” (PG; animated) “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” (PG-13) “Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones” (R) “Saving Mr. Banks” (PG-13) “Lone Survivor” (R)

First

Billings 52° | 32°

San Francisco 68° | 46°

Chicago 43° | 39°

Denver 54° | 27°

Washington D.C. 54° | 41°

Los Angeles 79° | 45°

Feb 6

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise today Moonset tomorrow

■ -1 at Alamosa, Colo.

Atlanta 55° | 34°

El Paso 59° | 34° Houston 72° | 59°

Full

Miami 81° | 68°

Cold

Jan 30

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: ■ 86 at Orlando, Fla.

New York 50° | 36°

Detroit 46° | 30°

Fronts

Jan 23

The Lower 48:

Cloudy

Minneapolis 30° | 28°

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Jan 16 4:45 p.m. 8:00 a.m. 3:06 p.m. 6:36 a.m.

-10s

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography © Weather Underground / The Associated Press

Burlington, Vt. 52 Casper 42 Lo Prc Otlk Charleston, S.C. 72 Albany, N.Y. 39 .42 Clr Charleston, W.Va. 60 Albuquerque 32 Clr Charlotte, N.C. 65 Amarillo 41 Clr Cheyenne 50 Anchorage 14 Cldy Chicago 35 Asheville 35 .83 Clr Cincinnati 53 Atlanta 37 1.50 Clr Cleveland 51 Atlantic City 41 .30 Clr Columbia, S.C. 69 Austin 33 PCldy Columbus, Ohio 53 Baltimore 40 .67 PCldy Concord, N.H. 35 Billings 33 Clr Dallas-Ft Worth 69 Birmingham 32 .14 Clr Dayton 50 Bismarck 27 PCldy Denver 57 Boise 38 Cldy Des Moines 34 Boston 43 .51 PCldy Detroit 42 Brownsville 51 .01 Cldy Duluth 28 Buffalo 33 .49 Rain El Paso 65 Evansville 48 Fairbanks -28 WEDNESDAY Fargo 29 55 High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht Flagstaff Grand Rapids 41 12:20 a.m. 7.5’ 5:45 a.m. 3.6’ Great Falls 54 11:34 a.m. 9.1’ 6:28 p.m. -0.1’ Greensboro, N.C. 59 Hartford Spgfld 57 55 3:40 a.m. 7.3’ 8:36 a.m. 5.8’ Helena Honolulu 79 12:58 p.m. 6.4’ 8:22 p.m. -0.5’ Houston 74 Indianapolis 41 5:17 a.m. 9.0’ 9:49 a.m. 6.5’ Jackson, Miss. 65 Jacksonville 81 2:35 p.m. 7.9’ 9:35 p.m. -0.5’ Juneau 32 Kansas City 46 4:23 a.m. 8.1’ 9:11 a.m. 5.8’ Key West 80 1:41 p.m. 7.1’ 8:57 p.m. -0.5’ Las Vegas 62 Little Rock 60 Hi 55 55 63 21 56 65 61 73 57 49 64 32 54 59 84 50

40 .98 Cldy Los Angeles 29 Clr Louisville 49 .40 Clr Lubbock 38 .80 PCldy Memphis 39 1.32 Clr Miami Beach 39 Clr Midland-Odessa 29 Cldy Milwaukee 33 .01 Cldy Mpls-St Paul 34 .08 Cldy Nashville 41 .68 Clr New Orleans 33 .05 Cldy New York City 34 .37 Clr Norfolk, Va. 42 Clr North Platte 32 .04 Cldy Oklahoma City 35 Cldy Omaha 24 Cldy Orlando 33 .09 Cldy Pendleton 21 .01 Cldy Philadelphia 40 Clr Phoenix 29 Clr Pittsburgh -38 Cldy Portland, Maine 21 PCldy Portland, Ore. 27 Cldy Providence 33 .12 Cldy Raleigh-Durham 33 Clr Rapid City 36 1.29 Clr Reno 41 .88 PCldy Richmond 30 .01 Clr Sacramento 67 .09 Rain St Louis 39 Cldy St Petersburg 30 Cldy Salt Lake City 32 Clr San Antonio 45 1.17 Clr San Diego 31 .03 Snow San Francisco 29 PCldy San Juan, P.R. 71 Cldy Santa Fe 45 Clr St Ste Marie 30 Clr Shreveport

73 54 64 54 83 68 35 32 56 74 58 73 54 63 46 86 58 61 71 54 48 50 60 69 53 55 67 58 49 78 50 78 70 58 86 51 35 66

GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

30 23 Cldy 52 PCldy Sioux Falls 55 35 .22 Snow 33 Clr Syracuse 34 Cldy Tampa 76 54 .42 Clr 32 Clr Topeka 50 32 PCldy 71 Cldy Tucson 71 43 PCldy 45 Clr Tulsa 58 38 Clr 26 Cldy Washington, D.C. 55 46 .73 Clr 22 Cldy Wichita 54 33 PCldy 34 Clr Wilkes-Barre 59 37 .51 Cldy 42 .01 Clr Wilmington, Del. 62 39 .65 Clr 44 .42 Cldy ________ 49 .53 Clr 28 Cldy Hi Lo Otlk 36 Clr 69 60 PCldy 28 Cldy Auckland 62 43 PCldy 60 .41 Clr Baghdad 39 19 Clr 40 .10 Clr Beijing Berlin 39 36 Cldy 43 .73 PCldy Brussels 47 38 Rain 46 PCldy 69 53 Cldy 34 .50 Cldy Cairo 34 22 Rain/Snow 41 .46 Clr Calgary 67 34 Clr 44 .67 Rain Guadalajara 64 52 Clr 44 1.32 PCldy Hong Kong 57 46 PCldy 43 .15 Clr Jerusalem 84 58 Clr 38 Clr Johannesburg 43 22 PCldy 35 Clr Kabul 49 38 Sh 43 .66 Clr London 72 47 Clr 36 Clr Mexico City 37 31 Cldy 28 Clr Montreal 34 12 Snow 58 .35 Clr Moscow 67 47 Cldy 35 .14 Snow New Delhi Paris 50 41 Sh 39 Cldy Clr 54 PCldy Rio de Janeiro 95 76 60 46 PCldy 46 Clr Rome 80 66 Clr 74 .13 Rain Sydney 28 PCldy Tokyo 45 32 PCldy 31 .01 Cldy Toronto 40 27 Sh 33 Clr Vancouver 48 41 Sh

Before her death in 2009, Westall expressed the desire to assist in the educational pursuits of Christian students in East Jefferson County. Through her gift, the church established the endowed scholarship fund. Students may reapply annually as long as they maintain good standing in their college/university. The deadline for applications is April 15, and award announcement is expected May 15. For more information, visit fpcpt.org, email first pres@cablespeed.com or phone 360-385-2525.

Wildlife photo talk scheduled

AN INDEPENDENT LIVING RESIDENCE

AFFORDABLE HOUSING WITH ALL THE LUXURIES THESE FEATURES

-Kitchens in all Apartments -Extra Storage in Each Apartment -Delicious Daily Meals -Bi-Weekly Housekeeping -Recreation & Activity Programs -Scheduled Transportation

Schizophrenia film

MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENT

WWW . SUNCRESTSRLIVING . COM 251 S. Fifth Ave., Sequim

suncrestvillage@gres.com

3C935694

360-681-3800 TDD 711

judge for the New England Camera Club competitions. They work as bird reporters providing photographic images to GLOBIO, a children’s educational website. In addition, Denny Van Horn will discuss 300 birds he counted in Clallam County in 2013, and Bob Boekelheide will summarize the group’s 2013 Christmas Bird Count.

FORKS — The Forks version of “The Newlywed Game” is set for the Elks Lodge, 941 Merchants Road, on Saturday, Feb. 15. Organizers tout the event as “great way to cele-

SMUGGLER’S LANDING BREAKFAST SPECIALS $4.99 ••

OF

MONTH

John Edson has been named Sequim Sunrise Rotary’s December Middle School Student of the Month. The son of Jack and Sheri Edson, John holds a 4.0 grade-point average and is a member of the school’s basketball team and select soccer club, and is active as a Boy Scout. He is shown with Rotary member Bret Keehn.

‘Newlywed Game’

Rent is 30% of your adjusted income and includes utilities (except Phone & Cable TV). Income Limits Apply.

You could be enjoying your retirement years, right now!

Pt. Cloudy

Briefly . . .

SEQUIM — Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society members Ken and Mary Campbell will present “Birds and Wildlife — Near and Far” at a society meet■ Lincoln Theater, Port ing at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The group will meet in Angeles (360-457-7997) the Sequim Middle School cafeteria, 301 W. Hendrick“Anchorman 2” (PG-13) “Grudge Match” (PG-13) son Road, because of water “The Hunger Games: damage at the Dungeness “Catching Fire” (PG-13) River Audubon Center. The program is free and ■ The Rose Theatre, open to the public. Port Townsend (360The Campbells travel the globe to photograph 385-1089) and teach about the natu“American Hustle” (R) ral world. “Philomena” (PG-13) Locally, they have taught photography work■ The Starlight Room shops as part of the Olym(21-and-older venue), pic Peninsula BirdFest and Port Townsend (360have been supporters of 385-1089) the Dungeness River Audubon Center. “Her” (R) Mary won the grand prize in the 2009 Washing■ Uptown Theatre, Port ton Trails Association Photo Townsend (360-385-3883) Contest and was a finalist in the 2010 National Park “The Wolf of Wall Street” Service Share the Experience photo contest. Ken has taught photogpeninsuladailynews.com raphy classes and was a

C OMPARE

New

Sunny

Seattle 54° | 48°

Nation/World

Victoria 50° | 41°

ORE.

Dungeness Bay*

Last

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

49/36 Clouds, but little rain

Marine Weather

Port Townsend

Forecast highs for Monday, Jan. 13

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / © Peninsula Daily News

TONIGHT

Port Angeles

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 47 41 0.19 2.81 Forks 50 44 0.91 9.08 Seattle 49 42 0.31 2.42 Sequim 46 41 0.20 1.00 Hoquiam 49 42 0.68 4.78 Victoria 50 38 1.80 3.52 Port Townsend 45 40 *0.08 1.43

Almanac

Brinnon 48/42

Aberdeen rde de 49/42

LaPush

National TODAY forecast Nation

Yesterday

*Rainfall reading taken in Nordland

✼✼✼

Tides

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

brate Valentine’s Day with your sweetie.” The evening includes a three-course prime rib dinner at 6:30 p.m., followed by “The Newlywed Game” at 8 p.m. Tickets are $20 per person. For ticket information, phone Dora Maxfield at 360-640-8473.

PORT ANGELES — New Leash on Life, a Port Angeles-based nonprofit that provides dogs for people with disabilities, is looking for volunteers to work with the dogs. No experience required; just “kindness, patience and a willingness to learn.” For more information, phone Cheryl Bowers at 360-670-5860. Peninsula Daily News

40-hour Basic Mediation Training Trainer Donna Hallock From Grays Harbor DRC

Serving Clallam & Jefferson Counties

Feb 27&28, Mar 1& 6-8 in Port Angeles Thursdays, 4pm - 8pm Fridays & Saturdays, 8:30 am - 5:30 pm 3C933251

Contact Karen Brown to register 41953849

41966671

• Solve family conflicts more peacefully • Build relationships with your neighbors • Improve your work environment • Enhance your professional skills and become a Certified Mediator

$6.99

115 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles • 452-9292 • 6:30am–9pm, every day

Help train canines

Learn Conflict Resolution Skills

Starting at

SMUGGLERSLANDING.COM NORTHWEST SEAFOOD AND CASUAL DINING

Westall funding

PORT TOWNSEND — First Presbyterian Church is accepting applications for the Sarah “Dusty” Audubon program Westall Scholarship. This scholarship is for PORT TOWNSEND — students of East Jefferson Photographer Wendy County who will attend a Feltham will present this Christian college in the month’s program for the Admiralty Audubon Society 2014-15 school year. Preference is given to at the Port Townsend Comstudents participating in munity Center, 620 Tyler the church. St., from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Westall was a longtime Thursday. member of the church and a beloved and skilled primary school teacher in Port Townsend.

••

LUNCH SPECIALS Starting at

Feltham will show photos of travels through the Ecuadorian Andes, where she saw 31 species of hummingbirds. This event is free and open to the public.

PORT ANGELES — A film on schizophrenia will be screened Thursday at a meeting of the Clallam County affiliate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. The meeting will be in the basement of Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline St., at 6:30 p.m. In “Out of Darkness,” a 1994 made-for-television movie, Diana Ross plays the character of Paulie Cooper, a former med student who becomes ill with paranoid schizophrenia and loses 18 years of her life due to the illness. Refreshments will be served. For more information, phone 360-452-4235.

Partner Agency

Karen@pdrc.org • 1-800-452-8024 • www.pdrc.org


PDN20140113J