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Peninsula Daily News Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

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October 17, 2010

‘Nobody saw what happened. They heard Bob yell.’

Hiker killed in national park Ram attacks PA man on Klahhane trail

Park officials knew goat was aggressive

By Diane Urbani and Tom Callis

By Tom Callis

de la

Paz

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — Bob Boardman of Port Angeles, a devoted hiker, diabetes nurse and musician, was killed by a mountain goat on Klahhane Ridge on Saturday afternoon. Boardman, 63, his wife, Susan Chadd, and their friend, Pat Willits, had gone for a day hike on the Switchback Trail to Klahhane Ridge, which is near Hurricane Ridge about 17 miles south of Port Angeles. The three had stopped for lunch at an overlook when a goat appeared and moved toward them, said Jessica Baccus, who arrived on the scene at about 1:20 p.m. Baccus, also out for a day hike with her husband and their children, saw Willits, her longtime friend, coming up the trail. Willits told Baccus that when the goat had begun behaving aggressively, Boardman had urged her and Chadd to leave the scene. Then Boardman, an experienced hiker, tried to carefully shoo the ram away. Willits told Baccus that although Boardman tried also to

Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/Peninsula Daily News

Robert Boardman pauses during a hike in Olympic National Park last year. leave, the goat attacked him, goring him in the thigh. “Nobody saw what actually happened. They heard Bob yell,” Baccus said. The goat stayed, standing over Boardman, who lay on the ground bleeding. Bill Baccus, a park ranger not

on duty but familiar with mountain goat behavior, moved forward with a safety blanket and shook it at the goat, he said. He also pelted it with rocks, and after what seemed like a long time, “it moved away, but it stayed close by,” Jessica Baccus said. Turn

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OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — The mountain goat that killed a 63-year-old Port Angeles man Saturday was no stranger to Olympic National Park rangers. Barb Maynes, park spokeswoman, said the ram was known for its aggressive behavior, including reports of it following people along the trails around Klahhane Ridge. The park had been monitoring the ram for “the last several years,” she said. Bob Boardman, who died after the animal gored him in the leg, was the first person that the park knows of being attacked by the ram or any of the park’s other goats, which number about 300. Maynes said the park had tried hazing the ram — by shooting it with bean bags, throwing rocks and other means to induce it to be frightened of people — but stopped short of any plans to kill it. “We had no reports of any kind of incidents escalating above the point that would warrant [killing the ram],” Maynes said. An animal would be killed, she said, if it had made “physical contact” with someone. Rangers shot and killed the

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

A mountain goat wearing a radio collar grazes at Hurricane Ridge in Olympic National Park in this 2008 photo. Another gored a hiker Saturday. ram, which was about eight or nine years old, about an hour after Saturday’s attack. They identified the animal after seeing blood on it, Maynes said. She said the park had focused on educating trail users about the aggressive ram by posting warnings at trailheads and providing flyers at park buildings. The signs will remain, Maynes said, since it’s possible that other goats have shown aggressive behavior. The park recommends staying 100 feet from all wildlife. Turn

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PT harpist gets return gig when new ferry debuts By Jeff Chew

Also . . .

Peninsula Daily News

■ Related photo/A5

PORT TOWNSEND — Celtic harpist David Michael, who performed for 17 years on the Port Townsend-Coupeville ferry route, will make a return performance at the MV Chetzemoka’s inaugural sailing celebration on Sunday, Nov. 14. But instead of being on board the new 64-car vessel, Michael will pluck his harp strings at the Port Townsend ferry terminal. “I will be playing in the cold November parking lot,” Michael said with a chuckle. “I am still banished from the boat.” Michael, who still feels he was left out in the cold in 2007, said the invitation to perform outdoors at the Chetzemoka’s dedication was nice but somewhat symbolic. For years, he performed during the summer months aboard the ferry Klickitat, which was one of the Steel Electric ferries pulled from the Port Townsend-Whidbey Island route for safety reasons in November 2007. Michael discontinued busking aboard the ferry on Aug. 13, 2007, after passenger complaints led Washington State Ferries officials to require that the Port Townsend

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musician be treated like any other passenger under tightened homeland security requirements. That meant Michael, then 55 and suffering from back trouble, must take his 30-pound harp and pack CDs on and off each of eight departures and arrivals at the Tad Sooter/North Kitsap Herald Port Townsend and Keystone ter- Traffic at right backs up on northbound State Highway 3 in Kitsap County last week minals, as required under the during a Hood Canal Bridge opening for marine traffic. Coast Guard-enforced homeland security policy. He also was no longer allowed to sell his CDs aboard the ferry because such sales are against the state ferries system’s policy without a proper permit.

Hood Canal Bridge delays raise ire on both sides of waterway

Invited to perform David Moseley, state deputy transportation secretary for ferries, invited Michael to perform at the Nov. 14 ceremony. Michael’s wife, Dari Lewis, had written the official asking him if Michael could do so. “David has been given the option to perform on the Port Townsend dock space during the open house period,” ferry system spokeswoman Marta Coursey said. Turn

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By Tad Sooter North Kitsap Herald

PORT GAMBLE — When the Hood Canal Bridge opens to let boats pass, traffic backs up for miles on both sides. Local drivers are trapped in the mix. Residents along Hood Canal ease out of their driveways through gaps in traffic. “There isn’t anyone who lives along this stretch of [state] HighHarpist/A6 way 3 that hasn’t had a close call,”

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resident Gerry Guertin said. Frustration over traffic congestion and bridge noise have spurred Guertin and about 50 of his neighbors to organize the Hood Canal Bridge Alliance this year. The group plans to push state and local representatives to find solutions. Following two community meetings this spring, the group launched a website — www.hood canalbridgealliance.org — to draw more supporters from both sides

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of the spanned waterway. The group wants a bridge holding lane installed on state Highway 3 to allow local residential drivers to get around traffic during bridge openings. There’s already a small traffic pullout on westbound state Highway 104 near Port Gamble. Bridge noise is another complaint for residents who live along the waterfront near the span.

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Business/Politics D1 Classified E1 Clubs/Organizations C8 Commentary/Letters C2 Couples *PW Dear Abby C10 Deaths C13 Movies C10 Nation/World A3 * Peninsula Woman

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UpFront

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2010, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2010, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Hepburn stamps fetch $606,000

Hepburn Children’s Fund, and one-third to UNICEF Germany. Ferrer signed a contract with the German Finance Ministry securing rights to A RARE SHEET of 10 sell the stamp sheet for charity and ensuring the stamps depicting Audrey Hepburn fetched 430,000 government would not be euros ($606,000) at a char- able to sell either of its ity auction in Berlin on sheets until 2040. Saturday, two-thirds of That move helped drive which will go to help eduup the price of the auction, cate children in sub-Sahasaid Mercer Bristow, ran Africa. director of stamp authentiThe cation for the American mint-condiPhilatelic Society. tion sheet “It goes back to supply of 10 and demand. It’s the only stamps feasheet out there people can turing Hepbid on, and she’s still such burn, a coy a popular actress,” he told smile on the AP from Bellefonte, her face Hepburn Penn. and a long, Other items auctioned black cigarette holder dangling from her lips, brought Saturday included a pair of Hepburn’s black ballet slipa profitable outcome to a botched stamp series that pers and a portrait of the should have been destroyed actress. years ago — and evokes “I feel wonderful about Hepburn’s starring role in the fact that something the 1963 thriller “Charade,” that belonged to her today in which the characters can bring focus on children chase a set of rare stamps. in need all over the world,” Sean Ferrer, 50, HepFerrer said. burn’s son with actor and Hepburn was a director Mel Ferrer, and UNICEF ambassador from the chair of the Audrey 1988 until shortly before Hepburn Children’s Fund, her death from colon cansaid he was thrilled that cer in 1993. the sale Saturday brought “My mother always told “focus on children in need” but wished the stamps had me, ‘I didn’t make a perfume or go sell toilet paper. sold for a higher price. Two-thirds of the money I did something good with raised will go to the Audrey my name,’” Ferrer said.

Li cast in 3-D epic Jet Li has been cast in Hong Kong director Tsui Hark’s new 3-D kung fu epic, “Flying Swords of Dragon Gate.” Tsui’s wife, producer Nansun Shi, told The Associated Press in an e-mail that Li will star Li alongside China’s Zhou Xun and Chen Kun and Taiwan’s Kwai Lun-mei and Mavis Fan in the $35 million production scheduled for release in December 2011. She said the story is inspired by Tsui’s 1992 martial arts film “Dragon Inn,” which revolved around the face-off between imperial agents and a warrior couple in a desert inn. China’s Sina.com news website reported earlier that the Hong Kong filmmaker started shooting on Sunday. The project marks Tsui’s reunion with Li after the “Once Upon a Time in China” kung fu franchise in the 1990s. Li then moved onto a career in Hollywood. His most recent credits include “The Expendables” and the Chinese-language drama “Ocean Heaven.”

Passings

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL THURSDAY’S QUESTION: Do you favor or oppose permitting people who are openly gay or lesbian to serve in the military?

Favor 

Oppose 

Undecided 

61.4% 30.2% 8.4%

Total votes cast: 1,202 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

By The Associated Press

BARBARA BILLINGSLEY, 94, who gained the title supermom for her gentle portrayal of June Cleaver, the warm, supportive mother of a pair of precocious boys in “Leave it to Beaver,” has died. Spokeswoman Judy Twersky said Ms. Billingsley died early Saturday at her home in Santa Mon- Ms. ica, Calif. Billingsley in 2007 She had suffered from a rheumatoid disease. She acted in a number of roles in movies from the mid-1940s to the mid1950s, but it wasn’t until “Leave it to Beaver” that she became a star. When the show debuted in 1957, Jerry Mathers, who played Beaver, was 9, and Tony Dow, who portrayed Wally, was 12. Ms. Billingsley’s character, the perfect stay-at-home 1950s mom, was always there to gently but firmly nurture both through the ups and downs of childhood.

quantitatively investigate the notion of roughness. He was interested in both the development and application of fractals, which he also showed could be used elsewhere in nature. For years, he worked for IBM in New York. Later he became Sterling Professor Emeritus of Mathematical Sciences at Yale University. Dr. Mandelbrot also received honorary doctorates and served on boards of scientific journals. He is survived by his wife, two sons and three grandchildren.

_________ GENERAL JOHNSON, 69, who provided the distinctive lead vocal for the Chairmen of the Board’s 1970 Top 10 hit, “Give Me Just a Little More Time,” and went on to become a successful rhythm-and-blues songwriter, died Wednesday in suburban Atlanta. He lived in East Point, Ga. His death was announced on the group’s official website, chairmen oftheboard.com. The cause was complications of lung cancer, his family said. Mr. Johnson, whose first name really was General,

was best known as a singer who won a Grammy in 1971 for his composition “Patches,” a Top 10 hit for Clarence Carter. He also wrote hits for the Honey Cone (“Want Ads,” “StickUp”) and Freda Payne (“Bring the Boys Home”). He first reached the pop charts in 1961 as the lead singer of the Showmen, whose song “It Will Stand,” which he wrote, was a defiant ode to the power of rock ’n’ roll: “Some folks don’t understand it “That’s why they don’t demand it “They’re out tryin’ to ruin “Forgive them for they know not what they’re doin’.”

Did You Win? State lottery results

Friday’s Daily Game: 6-9-8 Friday’s Keno: 03-0612-19-20-22-27-33-35-3940-46-49-52-53-66-68-7475-80 Friday’s Match 4: 03-04-15-22 Friday’s Mega Mil_________ lions: 09-10-13-31-50, Mega Ball: 10 BENOIT MANDELSaturday’s Daily BROT, 85, a well-known Game: 0-3-7 mathematician who was Saturday’s Hit 5: Laugh Lines largely responsible for 12-15-16-23-36 developing the field of fracSaturday’s Keno: I arise in the morntal geometry, has died. 02-07-09-21-23-27-28-3034-38-41-43-44-67-69-71His wife, Aliette, said he ing torn between a desire to improve the world and a 72-73-78-79 died Thursday of pancreSaturday’s Lotto: atic cancer. He had lived in desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan 06-08-11-20-25-36 Cambridge, Mass. the day. Saturday’s Match 4: The Polish-born French — E. B. White, Ameri- 09-10-18-21 mathematician founded the can writer, author of CharSaturday’s Powerball: field of fractal geometry, lotte’s Web and Stuart Little 11-12-15-16-28, Powerball: the first broad attempt to (1899 – 1985). 11, Power Play: 2

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, contact Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-4173530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com..

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1935 (75 years ago) Trial on manslaughter, reckless driving and driving without a license charges against Charles F. Keys of Mount Pleasant began in Clallam County Superior Court, Judge John M. Ralston presiding. Keys was driving a car on Olympic Highway near the Mount Pleasant service station east of Port Angeles on July 3 when the car struck a motorcycle ridden by John Zaccardo of Blyn. Zaccardo was killed and his wife, who was riding on the motorcycle, was injured.

1960 (50 years ago) Superintendent of Public Instruction Lloyd J. Andrews, Republican candidate for governor, told an overflow crowd at Harrington’s Skyroom in Port Angeles that “there is something rotten in Olympia — it is high time public service once again becomes a public trust, not a public trough.” Andrews, who is running against Democrat Albert Rosellini, shared speaking honors with other statewide Republican candidates as well as local GOP hopefuls.

He asked that people vote for “the Republican Party, the responsible party, the party that is supporting the American way of life, the party of Richard M. Nixon, our next president.”

1985 (25 years ago) Parts of Forks High School could collapse in an earthquake or windstorm and the school buildings should not be used until repairs are made, a structural engineer told the Quillayute Valley School Board in a written report. The board took no official action, and classes were in session as usual at the high school. Superintendent Don Krag said the district and School Board will consider their next action Oct. 22. “You don’t want to bring a ’dozer in there when you don’t know what to do with 600 or 700 kids,” said board chairman Rayna Abrahams.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or e-mail news@peninsuladailynews. com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS SUNDAY, Oct. 17, the 290th day of 2010. There are 75 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On Oct. 17, 1910, social reformer and poet Julia Ward Howe, author of “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” died in Portsmouth, R.I., at age 91. On this date: ■  In 1610, French King Louis XIII, age 9, was crowned at Reims, five months after the assassination of his father, Henry IV. ■  In 1777, British forces under Gen. John Burgoyne surrendered

to American troops at Saratoga, N.Y., in a turning point of the Revolutionary War. ■  In 1807, Britain declared it would continue to reclaim Britishborn sailors from American ships and ports regardless of whether they held U.S. citizenship. ■  In 1907, Guglielmo Marconi began offering limited commercial wireless telegraph service between Nova Scotia and Ireland. ■  In 1931, mobster Al Capone was convicted of income tax evasion. Sentenced to 11 years in prison, Capone was released in 1939. ■  In 1933, Albert Einstein

arrived in the United States as a refugee from Nazi Germany. ■  In 1941, the U.S. destroyer Kearny was torpedoed by a German submarine off the coast of Iceland; 11 people died. ■  In 1973, Arab oil-producing nations announced they would begin cutting back oil exports to Western nations and Japan; the result was a total embargo that lasted until March 1974. ■  In 1989, an earthquake measuring 7.1 on the Richter scale struck Northern California, killing 63 people and causing $6 billion worth of damage. ■  In 1990, the Internet Movie

Database was created. ■  Ten years ago: The New York Yankees followed the Mets into the World Series, beating the Seattle Mariners 9-7 and winning the American League championship series four games to two. ■  Five years ago: A two-man Chinese space crew landed in China’s northern grasslands after five days in orbit. ■  One year ago: Songwriter Vic Mizzy, 93, who’d composed the catchy themes for the 1960s sitcoms “The Addams Family” and “Green Acres,” died in Bel-Air, Calif.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 17, 2010

Second Front Page

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Briefly: Nation Iran frees American businessman WASHINGTON — Iran on Saturday set free an American businessman jailed in Tehran for more than two years on suspicion of ties to an allegedly violent opposition group. Reza Taghavi, 71, hadn’t been charged with a crime and denied knowingly supporting the organization, known as Tondar. “He admitted to nothing and he continues to maintain his innocence,” his lawyer, Pierre Prosper, told The Associated Press in a telephone interview from Tehran after his client’s release from Tehran’s Evin prison. Iranian officials are “comfortable that he was in fact used by this organization and comfortable that he does not pose a threat to them and that he can leave and go back to the United States,” Prosper said. Iran had accused Taghavi of passing $200 in cash to an Iranian man tied to Tondar. Taghavi, who regularly visited Iran to conduct business and see family, had received the money from a friend in California with instructions to pass the cash to an Iranian, Prosper said.

Victim turns sleuth CHIPPEWA FALLS, Wis. — A 25-year-old woman’s search for her stolen wedding dress helped solve several other burglaries as well, Wisconsin police said. After a storage unit owner called Alena Gadke of Chippewa Falls on Oct. 8 to tell her of some break-ins, Gadke went

there and noticed her wedding dress was gone. Police assured her they would find the thieves, but Gadke was impatient. That night, she went to Craigslist and found her dress. She said she traded 40 texts and voice messages with the seller, who kept changing the time and location to meet. Gadke alerted police, and the next day, she met the seller in a Chippewa Falls parking lot, where police arrested the 16-year-old girl. That led police to a 17-yearold boy and a 23-year-old man, who confessed to multiple thefts.

Today’s news guests Guest lineup for today’s TV news shows:

■  ABC’s “This Week” — The Delaware Senate nominees, Democrat Chris Coons and Republican Christine O’Donnell; California first lady Maria Shriver. ■  CBS’s “Face the Nation” — Former Democratic National Committee chairman Howard Dean; Republican strategist Liz Cheney; Sen. Lindsey GraFiorina ham, R-S.C. ■  NBC’s “Meet the Press” — Presidential press secretary Robert Gibbs; the Colorado Senate nominees, Democrat Michael Bennet and Republican Ken Buck. ■  CNN’s “State of the Union” — White House senior adviser David Axelrod. ■  “Fox News Sunday” — Sens. John Cornyn, R-Texas, and Claire McCaskill, D-Mo.; Carly Fiorina, Republican Senate nominee in California.

The Associated Press

Briefly: World Strike-hit France protests amid fuel concerns PARIS — Officials have taken the extraordinary step of warning some flights landing at France’s main airport to come with enough fuel to get back home, bracing for a possible fuel shortage after a new round of protests Saturday against plans to raise the retirement age to 62. Police estimated some 825,000 people marched in cities across France to protest President Nicolas Sarkozy’s plan to extend the retirement age to keep pension coffers full. A sixth round of nationwide protests is scheduled for Tuesday, a day before the Senate votes on the retirement reform, which must still return to both houses due to amendments tacked on during debates. “I think the French understand that those who are blocking the country are at the head of the government,” Francois Chereque, head of the moderate CFDT union, said on BFM-TV. He later called on the government to “suspend the parliamentary debate.” Schools, trains, public transport and even garbage collection in Marseille have been blocked by intermittent strikes to pressure Sarkozy to back down. The possibility of a long-term fuel shortage appears to be the most worrisome outcome of the protest movement.

China mine blast YUZHOU, China — Dozens

of anxious relatives and friends of 11 miners trapped underground by an explosion in central China gathered outside the site today while rescuers said they were fighting tons of coal dust to try to reach the workers. The number of miners confirmed dead was 26. China’s crisis happened as the world still was celebrating Chile’s successful rescue of 33 miners trapped for more than two months. Chinese media had detailed coverage as the Chilean men emerged to cheers. Saturday’s blast at the Pingyu Coal & Electric Co. Ltd. mine occurred as workers were drilling a hole to release pressure from a gas buildup to decrease the risk of explosions, the state work safety administration said.

PLO alternatives RAMALLAH, West Bank — The Palestinians will study alternatives to peace talks with Israel in the coming days, a top PLO official said Saturday, after Israel gave the green light to build 238 new houses for Jews on war-won land Palestinians seek for their state. However, it’s unlikely the Palestinians will take any dramatic steps before Nov. 2 midterm elections in the U.S., since Arab leaders have already promised the Obama administration more time — until a few days after the vote — to try to relaunch negotiations. Saturday’s statements seemed intended mainly as a new warning that Washington’s peace efforts are in trouble. The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Bob Slider, left, of Odessa, Texas, a supporter of Nevada Republican Senate candidate Sharron Angle, demonstrates next to Jan Duhaney of Las Vegas, a supporter of incumbent Democratic Senate Majority leader Harry Reid, near Las Vegas last week.

Dems nervous, GOP poised as vote nears By Charles Babington and Liz Sidoti The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Two weeks before Election Day, Democrats fear their grip on the House may be gone, and Republicans are poised to celebrate big gains in the Senate and governors’ mansions as well. Analysts in both parties said all major indicators tilt toward the Republicans. President Barack Obama’s policies are widely unpopular. Congress, run by the Democrats, rates even lower. Fear and anger over unemployment and deep deficits are energizing conservative voters; liberals are demoralized. Private groups are pouring huge sums of money into GOP campaigns. An almost dizzying series of Democratic messages has failed to gain traction, forcing Obama to zigzag in search of a winning formula. With early voting under way in many states, Democrats are trying to minimize the damage by concentrating their resources on a dwindling number of races. “The poll numbers and the enthusiasm on the right versus the lack of the enthusiasm on the left suggest a pretty big Republican night,” said former Nebraska Sen. Bob Kerrey, who once headed the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee. With Democrats in power while the unemployment rate stands at 9.6 percent, “it’s difficult to say, ‘Well it could have been worse,”’ Kerrey said. Polls, campaign finance reports and advisers in both parties indicate that Republicans are in line to seize on a level of voter discontent that rivals 1994, when the GOP gained the House majority for the first time in 40 years. Democrats are embattled at every level.

House: Republicans need to win 40 seats to regain the House majority they lost four years ago. Even some Democratic officials acknowledge that their losses could well exceed that. A GOP takeover would depose Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., as the first female House speaker and force Obama to negotiate with Republicans on every significant legislative issue.

Quick Read

Every day brings fresh evidence of Democratic officials virtually abandoning House members whose re-election bids seem hopeless. Republicans are expanding the field to pursue races that once appeared unattainable. In the coming week, Republicans or GOP-leaning outside groups plan to spend money in 82 House races that they see as competitive or within reach of a last-minute upset. Democrats, desperate to hold their losses to three dozen seats, plan to run TV ads in 59 races in the remaining days. But their chief House campaign committee has recently canceled millions of dollars worth of advertising for struggling Reps. Steve Driehaus and Mary Jo Kilroy of Ohio, Suzanne Kosmas of Florida, Betsy Markey of Colorado and Steve Kagen of Wisconsin. They are shifting some of that money to incumbents once considered safe, such as Arizona Rep. Raul Grijalva. But in a sign of the election’s volatility, they also are helping viable incumbents they had expected to be trailing significantly — South Dakota Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin, for example. The Democrats’ House campaign committee raised almost $16 million in September and has $41.6 million in the bank. That’s a big fundraising advantage over the GOP’s House campaign committee. But the figures are misleading because heavy spending by outside groups, which often hide their donors’ identities, clearly favors Republican candidates.

Senate: To gain the Senate majority, Republicans must hold all 18 of their seats on this year’s ballots while picking up 10 of the 19 Democratic seats. It’s a tough task, but not inconceivable. Democrats trail badly in states where they once held some hope of supplanting Republicans: Missouri, New Hampshire, Ohio and Florida. Kentucky is the only one that’s still close. But Democrats have reduced their spending there, a sign that Republican and tea party favorite Rand Paul is clearly ahead. Among seats now held by Democrats, Republicans are favored to win open races in North Dakota and Indiana and to oust

Sen. Blanche Lincoln in Arkansas. In Pennsylvania, where Republican Pat Toomey had comfortably led Democrat Joe Sestak in polls, the race has tightened in recent weeks, forcing the GOP to spend more than it had planned. The Republican Party also is pouring am additional $2 million into Illinois, where Republican Mark Kirk has slipped somewhat in polls in his race against Democrat Alexi Giannoulias for Obama’s old seat. That said, Democrats said Wisconsin Sen. Russ Feingold is struggling mightily, and Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet is in a tough fight. Races are extremely close in West Virginia and Nevada, where Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is battling tea party-backed Republican Sharron Angle in a bitter and costly campaign. Democrats are anxiously watching Sens. Barbara Boxer in California and Patty Murray in Washington. Private polls show Republicans pulling closer but still trailing. Should Republicans win all the close races and knock off either Boxer or Murray, they may rue the nomination of tea partier Christine O’Donnell, who badly trails Chris Coons in Delaware. That once-promising state could have provided the 10th GOP win needed to take the Senate majority.

Governors: Democrats risk losing a dozen governors’ chairs they now hold, including those in pivotal presidential states such as Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Iowa, Wisconsin, Maine and New Mexico. Also possibly falling into GOP hands are Oklahoma, Kansas, Wyoming, Tennessee, Illinois and perhaps Oregon. Democrats have good chances to pick up GOP-held governorships in four or five states, including California and possibly Florida. The Republican Governors Association’s $31 million haul over the past three months enables the GOP to jump into more races. The Democratic Governors Association raised $10 million in that period.

. . . more news to start your day

Chile: We need privacy, say rescued miners

Nation: Red celery ready to hit stores in December

Nation: Robbery suspect’s checklist tips off police

World: Titanic account auctioned for $32,000

Chile’s freed miners asked the media to respect their privacy as they adjust to life above ground after being trapped a half mile under the earth for more than two months. Juan Illanes said he and the 32 other miners have been overwhelmed by media attention since being hoisted out of the ground last week in Chile’s Atacama Desert. “This has taken on scandalous proportions,” Illanes, flanked by six other freed miners, told journalists at a TV news conference in Copiapo, Chile, near the mine. “Please give us enough space to learn how to confront you all.” The miners plan to write a book about their ordeal.

Red celery will hit selected supermarkets Dec. 1 — in time to add some eye-catching color to holiday tables, said Dan Duda, president of Duda Farm Fresh Foods, which unveiled the new celery at a produce industry trade show in Orlando, Fla., on Saturday. It was nearly 20 years in the making, said Duda, who added that it has the same flavor and crunch of regular green celery. One of the family-owned, Floridabased company’s celery breeders, Larry Pierce, started developing it in 1991, working off a European heritage variety using natural breeding methods.

Rhode Island police trying to stop a string of robberies got a big break when they found a key piece of evidence — an alleged robber’s checklist of targets. Jimmy Honeycutt, 26, and his girlfriend, Stephanie McDole, 27, were arrested Wednesday after Pawtucket police found torn pages from a phone book in Honeycutt’s pocket. Asterisks were marked next to some of the businesses that were robbed this month. Detectives pulled over the pair because their car matched the description of a vehicle wanted in connection with a robbery at an Attleboro Getty gas station.

A first-person account of the sinking of the Titanic fetched $32,000 Saturday in a British auction. The affidavit signed by Laura Francatelli, who got away in a lifeboat, easily topped its pre-sale estimate of $24,000. It was bought by an anonymous collector from eastern Europe. The most expensive item in Saturday’s sale was a poster of the Titanic, which went for $96,000 to an anonymous U.S. collector. Auctioneer Andrew Aldridge of Henry Aldridge & Son said it was the highest price ever paid for a poster of the doomed ship.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

PA mulls $35-$50 business licenses By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The City Council at its Tuesday meeting will once again consider requiring all businesses to pay for a license more than three years after it last tabled the issue. If the measure is approved, Port Angeles would join two other cities on the North Olympic Peninsula — Sequim and Port Townsend — that require every business to be licensed with City Hall. The Port Angeles City Council will meet at 6 p.m. in council chambers at City

Hall, 321 E. Fifth St. The city has a limited business license ordinance now that covers about 150 businesses. Those businesses fall under 18 categories, such as ambulances, dance halls that serve liquor, taxis and pawn shops.

Additional fee Staff said requiring every business to be licensed with City Hall would benefit the city, and anyone interested in setting up shop in Port Angeles, by providing a list of exactly how many businesses there

are and what services they provide. But it also would mean an additional fee, which could range between $35 and $50 the first year, with a smaller renewal rate each year thereafter. The City Council considered a similar proposal in 2007, but decided then that it needed to be studied further. It had been discussed again this year during the council’s budget workshops, said City Manager Kent Myers, and was placed on Tuesday’s agenda at the request of City Council member Cherie Kidd.

In a voice message Friday, Kidd referred to the proposal as an “economic development tool.” “If someone wants to come to Port Angeles and wants to know how many beauty shops we have, storage units — whatever type of business — it’s a way for us to be able to recruit businesses and tell them what we have,” she said.

New fees Kidd added, “My main concern is that we keep the charges very low.” She did not return several phone calls Saturday request-

ing further comment. Craig Johnson, a Port Angeles Business Association board member and past president, said Saturday that he didn’t know enough about the proposal to take a firm position, but he added that it may not be the best time to create new fees. “The economy is hurting, so now is probably not the time to do that,” he said. City Clerk Janessa Hurd, who handles licenses for the city, said the fee is intended to cover the time it takes staff to process an application. Licenses must be approved or denied within

five days, she said. The fee for the city’s current license — which applies to businesses that require additional regulation — is $25. It hasn’t changed since the 1980s, Hurd said. Sequim charges $75 for a business license, while Port Townsend charges $28. Port Townsend and Sequim both contract with the state Department of Licensing for the service.

________ Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. com.

Navy vows no repeat of oyster destruction Peninsula Daily News news sources

BRINNON — Navy officials say they have taken steps to avoid a repeat of an incident linked to the destruction of thousands of oysters on Hood Canal in August. Hood Canal residents blamed the USS Port Royal, a 567-foot guided missile cruiser, for creating a wake that washed oysters high up on their beaches Aug. 11. Some oysters — such as those at Zelatched Point and Scenic Beach State Park — were moved back down to the water by volunteers. But many more on both sides of Hood Canal perished in the heat of the summer sun, said Gary Jackson of Poulsbo, who owns a cabin near Dabob Bay and Vickie Veloni of Miami Beach near Seabeck.

Many factors Jackson organized volunteers in August to save thousands of oysters that washed up on Zelatched Point last month after the oversized wake generated by the Navy vessel that was conducting maneuvers in Dabob Bay. But he said that he feared there more damage to the shoreline of Dabob Bay than had been discovered. Scenic Beach is in a populated area, with “lots of visibility,” Jackson said then. “Most of the Dabob

beaches are uninhabited and are accessible only by water,” he said. Sean Hughes, public affairs officer for Navy Region Northwest, told the Kitsap Sun that a “confluence of factors” apparently came into play, although “we cannot definitely state that the Port Royal caused the incident.” Factors that likely contributed to the problem include the high tide at the time, the high-speed testing of the vessel and the ship’s turning in Hood Canal, he said.

Improvements in place Hughes said officials from Naval Undersea Warfare Center-Keyport wanted area residents to know that they have been testing all kinds of craft in local waters since 1914 and have the highest regard for sensitive environmental conditions. “The local Navy is well aware of not only national security obligations but also local environmental issues,” he said. Since the Dabob training range began testing surface vessels in 1996, six vessels have performed essentially the same operations without incident, he said. The Port Royal, based in Pearl Harbor, underwent testing in Hood Canal following a visit to Seattle for Seafair the week before the incident during testing in Hood Canal. “We recognize that there were some things we could do to make sure this does not happen again,” Hughes said, adding that

“process improvements” have been implemented. He said he could not elaborate for security reasons. “Working with the rest of the Navy, we are confident that the implementation of these improved processes can essentially guarantee that our operation on Dabob Bay can be incident-free,” he said. Jackson could not be reached for comment Saturday. Veloni told the Kitsap Sun that she is pleased the Navy has taken steps to avoid such problems in the future, but she does not agree that the tide was a factor. “It was a fairly optimal time for the tide,” she said. “If that tide had been farther in, they would have ruined bulkheads and caused lawn furniture to wash away. “Waves weren’t crashing on top of the bulkheads, so the damage was done to the beach itself.” Several claims for damages have been filed with the Navy, but Veloni said all she wanted was for the Navy to acknowledge the problem and promise it won’t happen again. The Navy’s statement to the Kitsap Sun is good enough for her, she said. Hughes said anyone who wishes to file a claim should contact Lt. Matt Dursa with the Admiralty and Maritime Law Division of the Judge Advocate General. To reach Dursa, phone 202-685-5995 or e-mail matt.dursa@navy.mil.

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Spinning

a tale

Storyteller Brian Rohr of Port Townsend spins a yarn with a drum accompaniment during an open mic session of the 16th annual Forest Storytelling Festival on Saturday at Peninsula College in Port Angeles. Storytellers from across the United States are taking part in the event. It continues today, with a free storytelling session at 10 a.m. and performances at noon and 12:30 p.m.

Briefly . . . Obama signs oil spill legislation PORT ANGELES — President Barack Obama signed a law Friday that is aimed at better protection for the Strait of Juan de Fuca from an oil spill.

The Coast Guard authorization bill, sponsored by Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Mountlake Terrace, extends Puget Sound’s “high volume port area,” which applies federal requirements for oil-spillresponse equipment, to Cape Flattery. The legislation also reforms a multibillion dol-

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lar Coast Guard contracting program and places more restrictions on what vessels can enter the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary. Approximately 600 oil tankers and 3,000 oil barges travel each year through Puget Sound and carry about 15 billion gallons of oil to Washington refineries, according to Cantwell’s office.

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PORT ANGELES — The city’s 2011 proposed budget will be available for review Nov. 1. Copies of the Port Angeles city budget can be accessed at City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St., and on the city’s website, www.city ofpa.us. No service or staff cuts are proposed. Public hearings on the

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budget will be held at City Council meetings Nov. 2, Nov. 16 and Dec. 7. Each council meeting starts at 6 p.m. and is held in the council chambers at City Hall.

Rossi in Chimacum CHIMACUM — Dino Rossi will bring his campaign for the U.S. Senate to Jefferson County for the second time in three months Saturday. A meet-and-greet gathering is planned from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Peterson’s Pump and Water Treatment, 10712 Rhody Drive (state Highway 19), across from Carl’s Building Supply. Rossi, a Sammamish Republican, seeks to unseat incumbent Sen. Patty Murray, D-Bothell, who seeks her fourth term, in the Nov. 2 general election. Ballots were mailed Wednesday. Rossi visited Port Ludlow and Brinnon — as well as Port Angeles — in August. Peninsula Daily News

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boom truck. The owner of the selected tree will be recognized by special proclamation and will be featured on the city’s website. To offer a tree, contact Corey Delikat, streets and parks superintendent, at 360-417-4566 or cdelikat@ cityofpa.us.

www.peninsuladailynews. com Click on “Photo Gallery”


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Peninsula Daily News

Fall, winter visitor guide premieres on Monday The North Olympic Peninsula’s only visitor guide devoted to the fantastic autumn colors and spectacular winter wonderland of our area will debut with Monday’s editions of the Peninsula Daily News. The 116-page, fall-winter 2010-11 North Olympic Peninsula Newcomers’ & Visitors’ Guide provides information on sightseeing and recreation as well as accommodations, dining, shopping and just about everything that makes the Peninsula special during the inappropriately termed “off-season.” Special attention is given to the Hurricane Ridge winter snowplay area of Olympic National Park and attractions in Forks, LaPush and Port Angeles geared to fans of the Twilight saga of books and movies. Look for the Newcomers’ & Visitors’ Guide with Monday’s editions of the PDN.

Sunday, October 17, 2010

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Gregoire, Dicks tour Hood Canal trouble spots By Phuong Le

The Associated Press

BELFAIR — Gov. Chris Gregoire visited a $40 million wastewater treatment plant in Belfair on Friday to kick off a daylong tour of projects helping to clean up Puget Sound. It was the first destination in a five-stop tour covering Mason, Thurston and Pierce counties. Walking the construction site with U.S. Rep. Norm Dicks and state and local officials, the governor said the amount of money spent to improve the ailing estuary has been unprecedented. About $460 million in federal, state and local funds has been spent since 2008, creating more than 15,000 jobs, she said. Despite those efforts, Gregoire said, problems continue to plague Hood Canal and Puget Sound. Stormwater runoff, development and toxic pollutants threaten the sound’s The Associated Press (2) ecosystem and its orcas, singer’s pants pocket, court salmon and other marine Gov. Chris Gregoire, right, is shown juvenile oyster holding areas during a documents showed. life, along with the quality tour Friday of a Taylor Shellfish oyster nursery by Bill Dewey in Shelton. Port Angeles police said of life for the region. Possinger was standing in because of the recession, within 500 feet of the sys- wants to improve water the street when police 2020 goal Gregoire said. tem will be required to hook quality so acres of tribal arrived at 2025 W. 15th St. “Having said that, today up to it and get off septic shellfish beds can be The governor has made at about 3:30 a.m. is an indication that we’re approved for harvesting, Possinger told police that it a state priority to clean making really good prog- tanks. said John Konovsky, the “Just imagine all that his brother-in-law had up Puget Sound by 2020. ress.” tribe’s environmental prowastewater getting out of She said Friday she’s stickthreatened his life and that In Belfair, at the south- the Union River,” said Tom gram manager. he was concerned for his ing with that goal. ern end of Hood Canal and “We feel like we’re close The state Legislature Dicks’ hometown, officials Moore, the facility’s project sister’s safety. to a tipping point,” he said, manager. The brother-in-law told created the Puget Sound said the wastewater treatAt the Taylor Shellfish adding leaky septic systems police that Possinger Partnership in 2007 to lead ment facility will help comnursery in Shelton, on the and high levels of nutrients pointed a gun at him and the cleanup efforts. The munities phase out septic southern end of Puget in the water remain probthat he could see a laser agency has prioritized a list tanks that have polluted Sound, Gregoire got updates lems. of projects including those the marine waters. light on him. that focus on restoring The plant will have from local officials on efforts Water quality salmon habitat and assistadvanced treatment capa- to upgrade aging sewer Six bombs Later Friday, Gregoire bilities to reclaim water to pipes and study chemicals ing the federal removal of Port Angeles police detec- the Elwha River dams west irrigate golf courses, rock in sediment of Oakland Bay, stopped at the Nisqually tives said the six pipe bombs of Port Angeles. quarries and other uses along with other conserva- Wildlife Refuge, north of Lacey, to tour a restoration were fused with cannon or “We’re not able to do all aside from drinking. Home- tion projects. Taylor’s nursery on Oak- project that removed a firework-type fuses. that we had planned to do” owners and businesses land Bay processes millions farming dike and returned They were charged with of oyster and clam seeds tides to more than 700 acres a black powder substitute each year, and company of historic estuary habitat. and smokeless gun powder, spokesman Bill Dewey said She ended the day with bomb squad members told the company’s business is a boat ride on Tacoma’s police. directly tied to the sound’s Commencement Bay with Port Angeles Deputy health. EPA Northwest Regional Chief of Police Brian Smith Some bays in Puget Administrator Dennis said no new evidence was Sound, such as Oakland McLerran and others. found Friday. Bay, have shown greater Gregoire nodded with The case is being investiimprovements than others, approval as she was told gated jointly by a Port Angehe said. about efforts to reduce les police detective and a Still, Dewey is optimis- stormwater runoff that Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, tic. dumps into the Thea Foss Firearms and Explosives “Never before in my 30 Waterway and a redevelopspecial agent, Smith said. years of working here have ment project taking shape I seen this much funding at the old Asarco aluminum ________ and this much coordination smelter. Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be “You can’t take a recess” in restoring Puget Sound,” reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. from cleaning up Puget he said. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. Gov. Chris Gregoire, left, and Rep. Norm Dicks The Squaxin Island tribe Sound, she said. look over juvenile oysters. com.

Man charged on pipe bomb possession By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A Port Angeles man found with pipe bombs in his truck was charged Friday with six counts of possession of a bomb or explosive device with intent to use for an unlawful purpose. Eric L. Possinger, 28, was arrested early Thursday on investigation of first-degree assault for allegedly pointing a gun at his brother-inlaw. Port Angeles police found a Glock 19 handgun in the bed of the truck and were searching for the magazine when they discovered what appeared to be components for an improvised explosive device, or IED, court records showed. Officers found six pipe bombs along with the magazine. Members of the State Patrol Interagency Bomb Squad detonated the IEDs in a remote location later Thursday.

Arraignment set Possinger is being held on $15,000 bond at the Clallam County jail. His arraignment is set for Oct. 29 in Clallam County Superior Court at 9 a.m. Police found a substance that later tested positive for methamphetamine in Pos-

Briefly: State Wenatchee sewage plant gets face-lift

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Sam McKay of Sequim and his son, Levi, 1, examine a model railroad setup at the 11th annual Train Show and Swap Meet on Saturday at the Sequim Prairie Grange near Carlsborg. The event, hosted by the North Olympic Peninsula Railroaders, features train displays, accessories for sale and trade, and a hands-on train set for children to enjoy. The free event continues today from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Get home delivery. Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

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woman died and four others, including two children, were seriously injured in a car crash Saturday morning in Kent. The Kent Police department said that the 81-yearold woman failed to stop as she approached stopped cars at a traffic light, slamming into the back of a

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SEATTLE — The state’s ferry service said a ferry serving the Mukilteo-Clinton route is out of service until further notice, affecting the popular route. Washington State Ferries says that the vessel Kittitas experienced propulsion issues and is now being repaired. Ferry riders using that Whidbey Island route should expect delays.

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Train

WENATCHEE — A Seattle artist has been hired by the Wenatchee City Council to help add public art to the design of the city’s new sewagetreatment plant. Carolyn Law will earn up to $15,000 for her work through the city’s 1 percent for arts fund. The plant upgrade includes about $72,000 for public art. The art will be visible to the public from the sidewalk in front of the plant. City officials promised the sewage-treatment plant will be 98 percent odor-free to make for more enjoyable art viewing. Law was chosen from among five applicants for the public arts job. She has been involved with a long list of public art works.

Out of service


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 17, 2010 — (J)

Peninsula Daily News

Hiker: Some 300 mountain goats live in park Continued from A1 made it to Klahhane Ridge at 1:51 p.m., Lt. Cmdr. Scott At 1:23 p.m., park rang- Sanborn said. An emergency medical ers called the Coast Guard, while Jessica Baccus began technician was lowered to cardiopulmonary resuscita- administer electric shock in an attempt to revive Boardtion on Boardman. At the same time, her man. He had no pulse, Sanhusband sought to keep the goat from coming closer born said, and was lifted again and kept other hikers into the helicopter. The crew restarted CPR while in the away. air.

Coast Guard rescue

After receiving the call, a four-person Coast Guard helicopter crew from Air Station/Sector Field Office Port Angeles that had been headed for Neah Bay turned around, returned to Port Angeles to pick up a litter in which to lift Boardman and

Goat killed Boardman arrived at Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles at 2:47 p.m., where further efforts to revive him were unsuccessful, OMC nursing supervisor Pattijo Hoskins said. After the helicopter

departed the ridge, park rangers were able to shoot and kill the ram at about 3:15 p.m., park spokeswoman Barb Maynes said. Some 300 mountain goats live in Olympic National Park. Warnings about their aggressiveness have been issued, but Maynes said she knows of no other incident like the one that occurred Saturday. With the helicopter gone, Bill Baccus took his children back home while Jessica Baccus and Willits walked Boardman’s wife, Susan, down the Switchback Trail and then drove her to the hospital. The couple married last December after many years

together. They have taken countless hikes, from Olympic National Park to the Dolomites of Italy. Continued from A1 Boardman, in addition to serving as a diabetes educaMaynes said the park tor at OMC, worked for takes the attack many years as a nurse with “extremely seriously” the North Olympic Peninand will review how it sula’s Native American handled the goat’s communities, including the behavior. Makah and Lower Elwha But she said it’s too Klallam tribes. early to tell if more He was a guitarist and should have been done. mandolin player with the Black Diamond Fiddle Club and helped organize the A skilled woodworker, he monthly community dances transformed the home at the Black Diamond Hall where he and Susan lived south of Port Angeles. near Little River. He was also a writer who ________ worked for a time at The Leader in Port Townsend. Reporter Diane Urbani de la

Goat: ‘Extremely serious’ “It’s way too early to talk about anything like that,” she said. “We just need to learn everything we can about what happened today.”

________ Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladaily news.com.

Paz can be reached at 360-6812391 or at diane.urbani@peninsula dailynews.com. Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. com.

Bridge: Neighbors say noise louder since ’09 Continued from A1 $1.2 million. So far, the message from Some said the bridge has the state Department of become much louder since Transportation to the its reconstruction in 2009, Bridge Alliance group is as vehicles pound over that the state has little expansion joints and steel money for large-scale sound or traffic improvements at grates on the bridge deck. “The bridge noise has the Hood Canal Bridge, risen so much since the Guertin said. The department is makreopening of the bridge it has really become unten- ing a few improvements near the bridge this year. able,” Guertin said. Crews painted stripes in The Bridge Alliance hopes the state can install front of driveways on Highsound suppression devices way 3 and added signs asking drivers not to block on the bridge. entries. The state added sound blocking walls and sound Traffic cameras absorbing concrete to the new Tacoma Narrows This month, a contractor Bridge in 2009, at a cost of is finishing the installation

of nine new traffic cameras on Highways 3 and 104. Travelers will be able to see live traffic views from the cameras on Transportation’s website, www.wsdot. wa.gov/. The cameras may lessen some of the bridge congestion as drivers can check for backups before leaving home and consider delaying their trips or taking alternative routes, according to a Transportation release. The cameras should be up and running by the end of the month, assistant project engineer Andrew Larson said. The bulk of the $470,000 project was paid for with a federal grant, with some

matching money from the state. Hood Canal Bridge Alliance members say they’re skeptical the cameras can alleviate any of the congestion. The only alternative route between Port Gamble and Shine is an hour-and-ahalf drive around the south end of Hood Canal and bridge openings rarely last longer than an hour. Some drivers waiting in traffic during a bridge opening Wednesday said the cameras might be useful. Matt Mattson, owner of Mattson Construction in Suquamish was on his way to pick up materials on the Olympic Peninsula when he

was caught in bridge traffic. Bridge openings often force him to reschedule appointments with clients or lose money if he’s being paid by the job.

Hopes for holding lane

Fisher was waiting for the bridge to close as his afternoon plans crumbled. The Sumner-based truck driver had caught a break in his schedule and decided to run home to Port Townsend and back. This wasn’t the first time his plans have been ruined by bridge backups. “Sometimes I sit here for 15 minutes, sometimes it’s an hour,” Fisher said. He hadn’t heard of the traffic camera project. “That could be handy,” he said.

He hopes the state installs a holding lane. “What really sucks is when you’re going to Port Gamble and get stuck in bridge traffic,” he said. “When you’re not even going over the bridge.” He said the traffic cam________ eras could help, but only if he carried a laptop in his Tad Sooter is the North End truck. reporter for the North Kitsap HerSeveral cars back, Matt ald.

Boards to review transportation plan, tax levies Monday Peninsula Daily News

The three Jefferson County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing and consider approval of the six-year transportation plan Monday. The commissioners’ meeting will begin at 9 a.m. in their meeting room at the county courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St., Port Townsend. The hearing on the transportation plan will begin at 10 a.m. The cost of the improvements in the plan is projected to be $20,151,000 over six years, including emergency repairs and

ongoing mitigations. About 86 percent of this money is expected to come from state and federal sources, with the remainder originating from local road funds. Commissioners also are expected to set a 10 a.m. Nov. 1 public hearing on supplemental budget requests from several county departments.

Port Townsend city The Port Townsend City Council will consider adopting a 1 percent increase in property tax levies along with the voter-approved increase for the emergency

Eye on Jefferson services levy when it meets Monday. The council will meet at 6:30 p.m. in its chambers at 540 Water St. In April, voters approved restoring the city’s emergency medical service levy rate to 50 cents per $1,000 assessed value in the city. The current rate is 28 cents per $1,000. Property tax increases will be reflected in the 2011 property tax statement. The council will consider approving both measures on a first reading. Approval is not finalized until the

second reading of an ordinance. The council also will consider amending the city code for fences, walls, arbors and hedges. Other city committee meetings, which are in conference rooms at 250 Madison St., unless otherwise noted, are: ■  Housing Action Plan Network — 3:30 p.m. Monday, third floor conference room. ■  Library Advisory Board — 4 p.m. Monday, Charles Pink House, 1256 Lawrence St.

■  Public Development Authority — 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, Mountain View Commons, 1925 Blaine St. ■  Historic Preservation Committee — 3 p.m. Tuesday, third floor conference room. ■  East Jefferson FireRescue Joint Oversight Board — 7 p.m. Tuesday, 35 Critter Lane.

Public Utility District The Public Utility District No. 1 of Jefferson County will discuss budget matters on Wednesday. The commissioners will meet at 5 p.m. at 250 Chimacum Road, Port Hadlock.

They will discuss a budget resolution.

Hospital district The Jefferson Healthcare commissioners will consider policy development at a work session Wednesday. The commissioners will meet at 3:30 p.m. in the hospital auditorium, 834 Sheridan Ave., Port Townsend. The work session will begin at 4:30 p.m. Commissioners also are scheduled to heart an update on the executive quality council.

Anti-fluoride groups petition high court to review Sept. 23 ruling By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Two anti-fluoride groups are asking the state Supreme Court to review its September ruling that upheld the city of Port Angeles’ argu-

ment in a four-year-long dispute over water fluoridation. The motion, filed last week, claims that the high court did not properly interpret the law when it concluded in a 5-4 vote Sept. 23

that water fluoridation is an administrative decision and can’t be challenged through voter initiatives, said Gerald Steel, attorney for Our Water-Our Choice! and Protect Our Waters. The groups have sought

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The city buys its fluoride from Lucier Chemical in Wyoming and spends about $10,000 a year on fluoridation, staff members say. The city used a $260,000 grant from the Washington Dental Service Foundation it received in 2003 to help pay for the fluoridation system. In 2005, Port Angeles resident Paul Lamoureux, a member of the anti-fluoride coalition, started a campaign to allow residents to file initiatives with the city. Forks is the only other city on the North Olympic Peninsula that fluoridates its water.

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Independence Act and the Water Additive Safety Act — create new policy because they would, if adopted, prevent the city from adding any medications to drinking water, not just fluoride. “We think that they made a fundamental error,” he said of the court. Steel said it could take a month for the court to decide whether it will grant a review. If if it does, a decision could take up to a year, he said. The city’s water includes 1 part per million of fluoride, city staff members said.

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A7

Prosecutor hopefuls differ on focus EDITOR’S NOTE: This ciation of University Women is the first of a two-part and The Leader, a weekly series on a candidate forum newspaper. Rosekrans, 58, a Demoin Port Townsend last week. crat, said the law is clear about what should be prosBy Charlie Bermant ecuted. Peninsula Daily News “I take an oath to uphold PORT TOWNSEND — the laws and not to ignore Jefferson County prosecut- the ones that I think are ing attorney candidates silly or frivolous,” he said. traded ideas on what crimes “If you don’t like a law, the office should pursue at then go to Olympia and a forum last week. have it changed.” Deputy Criminal ProseWhile Richmond, 49, cuting Attorney Scott would take the same oath if Rosekrans and Port elected, he pledged to run Townsend Attorney Paul more selective prosecuRichmond talked before tions. about 100 people during the “We need a prosecutor forum at the Masonic Hall who can take an objective in Port Townsend. look at the prosecutor’s Two two are seeking the department and how it can $123,572 job in the Nov. 2 best serve the people of this general election. Ballots county,” Richmond said. were mailed Wednesday. “This isn’t about being The forum — which the best one-man band, it’s included Jefferson County about who is the best commissioner candidates orchestra conductor.” Republican Jim Boyer, who Richmond, whose politiis attempting to unseat cal preference is Indepenincumbent John Austin, a dent, said that money is Democrat — was sponsored wasted in the prosecuting by the League of Women attorney’s office in trying Voters, the American Asso- cases that should be negoti-

Paul Richmond Best “conductor”

Scott Rosekrans “Passion” for prosecuting

ated some other way. “I’ve seen cases where the victim says ‘I don’t think this person should be prosecuted’ and the prosecutor will ride that case,” Richmond said.

those that really do.” Rosekrans recalled a time when he was a rookie police officer on a domestic violence call and found himself looking down the barrel of a gun. This began what he called a “passion” for prosecuting domestic violence cases. “I hadn’t been a prosecutor a couple of months when I heard gunfire outside my office door,” he said.

Domestic violence Richmond said the county has “a huge domestic violence grant, and that drives a lot of cases that don’t need to be prosecuted, often to the detriment of

“Some guy didn’t want to spend $86 a month for child support, so he shot his girlfriend four times. “I take that seriously, especially when you are shooting outside my office door.” Rosekrans also talked of prosecuting a case in which a jilted boyfriend killed his girlfriend in a school parking lot in front of school bus drivers, teachers, children and parents. “We have a grant to prosecute domestic violence because it’s a serious problem, in Jefferson County, in the state of Washington and all over the country,” Rosekrans said. “Unfortunately, we are in danger of losing that grant, and when I take office I will need to find ways to get it back.” The $95,000 grant acquired through the American Recovery Act funds one prosecutor dedicated to domestic violence offenses. It expires in November. Richmond said he would like to expand the role of

the prosecutor into more areas, such as attempting recovery of some of the money lost in the banking scandal.

Expand the role “This office can do amazing things to help the county more than locking up bad guys,” he said. “When I get into office, I will keep my opponent around for that role.” That is one campaign pledge Richmond would be unable to fulfill. “I appreciate the offer,” Rosekrans said after the forum. “But our philosophies are too far apart, and I don’t think my working for him would be a good fit.” Monday: Jefferson County commissioners talk of issues at forum.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com.

Harpist: About 300 guests expected for trip Continued from A1 vice between Port Townsend and the Coupeville terminal “I believe he is working on Monday, Nov. 15, and will out the logistics details with assume the same 20 daily event staff to ensure he will sailings as the Steilacoom II, which now plies the route, be able to do this.” Klallam tribal members beginning with a 6:15 a.m. from Port from across the North departure Olympic Peninsula, the Townsend and a 9:15 p.m. Navy Band and the Salty departure from Coupeville. The new boat — which Sailors singing group also cost $76.5 million for conwill perform at the celebrations in Port Townsend and struction, contingency and construction management on Whidbey Island that will — is named for the wellmark the launch of the first respected Klallam chief ferry built by the state since Chetzemoka, who was bur1999. ied in Port Townsend. Gov. Chris Gregoire, legThe Chetzemoka will be islators, state and local offi- first permanent ferry on the cials and an estimated 300 Port Townsend-Coupeville invited guests from commu- route in nearly three years. nities on both sides of AdmiThe 50-car Steilacoom II, ralty Inlet will board the which the state leases from Chetzemoka at the Whidbey Pierce County, has been the Island Coupeville terminal solo ferry between the two for the new ferry’s first sail- Admiralty Inlet docks since ing. state Transportation SecreGuests will take an hour- tary Paula Hammond pulled long cruise from Whidbey the three 80-year-old Steel Island to Port Townsend. Electric ferries from service In Port Townsend, the because their hulls were 750-passenger ferry will be pitted and corroded. available for public viewProfessional buskers ing. have been prohibited from The new ferry will begin performing on state ferries its regularly scheduled ser- until a proposal meets the

approval of the Coast Guard. “It’s up to the ferry system, and [Michael] as well, if they want to put together something they can do that,” said John Dwyer, U.S. Coast Guard chief of inspections. Amateur musicians can still play on the ferries so long as they don’t sell anything and disembark after each run. Michael said key to making it worthwhile for many buskers to perform on ferries is the ability to sell their CDs or downloads on board, and that the $200 a day “tabletop” business permit fee allowing such sales was too expensive. “Nothing has changed,” said Michael, who added that he has offered to advise ferry system officials on a busking policy but nothing has come of it. He now spends his summers busking in downtown Winthrop, over the Cascade Mountains in eastern Washington, and makes occasional appearances during special events in downtown Harpist David Michael will perform at the debut of the MV Chetzemoka. Port Townsend.

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SPOKANE — A pastor was arrested by Spokane Valley police after they caught him taking pain medications from a parishioner’s home. Greg Scott Glover, 35, was booked into the Spokane County Jail last week

on two counts of possession of hydrocodone. Police were alerted by an elderly woman who said she suspected the pastor of ConnectPoint Church had been taking her pain medications for about six months. She set up a video camera in her bedroom to gather evidence. A police detective was in the home the next time the pastor visited. The Associated Press

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under construction. Joshua Stacy, 22, was convicted last week of one count of second-degree arson and two counts of second-degree burglary. Stacy was arrested after Olympia police were informed by the state Department of Corrections that a Global Positioning Device he wore showed he was at the city hall site when the arson took place on July 8. Stacy had been released

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BREMERTON — The Coast Guard has hired a contractor to deal with a creosote leak into the Port Washington Narrows. The Coast Guard said a pipe has been leaking unknown amounts of heavy tar-like creosote into the narrows since at least Aug. 20, when a sheen was first spotted. The Kitsap Sun reported the pipe is below the old Bremerton Gasworks property. The site operated as a coal-gasification plant from the 1930s into the 1950s. Recently, the Environmental Protection Agency has been investigating the property for a possible cleanup.

The EPA has been working with the Coast Guard on a plan to excavate the pipe. Ballard Diving and Salvage has been hired to work on stopping the leak.

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MUKILTEO — A twoalarm fire destroyed a Mormon church building in Mukilteo early Saturday morning, leaving a congregation looking for a new home. The Herald of Everett reported that the twoalarm fire was reported shortly before 3 a.m. Saturday. Firefighters responded within minutes but the fire had spread, and with the roof collapsing, they concentrated on keeping the fire in check. Firefighters said the building was built before fire sprinklers were mandated and thus didn’t have such protection. Jeff Lee, president of the Lynnwood Stake of the

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

★★★★★★★★★ Memo

outlines reasons for ouster of police chief

We Need A West End Commissioner

By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

★★★★★★★★★

★★★★★★★★★ W est End community leaders support Robin Poole for County Commissioner. Robin Poole is a breath of fresh air, one of the appealing alternatives to tired old politicians who have been in office so long they believe their job is to represent the government to the people, instead of the other way around. hile there is certain solidarity among West End leaders in favor of Robin Poole, folks in Port Angeles and Sequim who are fed up with over regulation and “do nothing” professional politicians should take a good look at this refreshing candidate. Why continue to elect politicians who spend your tax dollars on everything but what might provide growth and jobs for people? obin Poole is a working man, a Viet Nam war veteran, who is finally fed up with the stifling government encroachment on private property and personal rights. No fat cat is he. Robin Poole is running to restore justice to the people of Clallam County. If elected Robin intends to retire from his job as a UPS Driver and devote full time to the people of the County. obin Poole knows much less about the details of the regulatory bureaucracy than his opponent because he has spent his whole life working hard to make an honest living. Even while busy working every day, Robin Poole, like his neighbors, can’t help but notice the relentless subordination of the working guy to almost everything else; land zoning to prevent development of property, a building permit quagmire that stifles ordinary building and repair, water use restrictions based on a “one size fits all” regulation that make no sense in most of the County and spending millions of dollars for environmental protection and other regulations of questionable value but are easily recognized as anti-human in their effect. omewhere in county government there needs to be a voice from a regular working guy who knows injustice when he sees it and will fight for policies that help people. Robin Poole is the guy.

W

R

R

SEQUIM ­— City Manager Steve Burkett outlined to elected city leaders his specific reasons for asking former Police Chief Bob Spinks to find another job, saying it was necessary to change the police department’s direction, organizational culture and financial management. The Peninsula Daily News obtained the July 19 memo last week. “Although there has been some negative reaction and questions by citizens, the reaction and feedback to me from employees in the department has been Spinks p o si t iv e,” Burkett said in the memo. “I am very comfortable with this decision and confident that I will be able Burkett to appoint a new chief that will be able to develop an environment of trust, productivity and cost-effective provision of public services . . . While we wish Bob well in his future endeavors, I believe that in the best interest of Sequim, a change was needed.” Burkett had urged Spinks to find a new job by May 31, or resign in any case by Dec. 31. Spinks unsuccessfully sought positions with the police forces of Lebanon, Ore., Pullman and West Richland. His last day was July 2, after he signed a severance and non-disparagement agreement with the city of Sequim. He was paid $31,044.52 on departure, including severance, unused vacation and sick time. Spinks continues to live in the Sequim area and has a radio show on KSQM-FM. “The reason I asked the chief to search for a new job is because I came to the conclusion that the city needed a change in approach, style, direction and results in our police department,” Burkett wrote. Burkett saw that potential for change in new Police Chief Bill Dickinson, 60,

who started in early September. Burkett last week said he did not want to comment beyond what he has said in the memo. Sequim Mayor Ken Hays said neither he nor any other City Council member had anything to do with the decision about Spinks.

Mayor responds That was left up to Burkett, who as city manager is responsible for hiring and firing department heads. “I thought those were sound reasons to make a change,” Hays said, referring to the memo. In the memo, Burkett said he was responding to questions from citizens at council meetings and news media accounts about Spinks’ departure. “The former chief has also been quoted in the news media that the reason for his termination was that I wanted my own team and he was unaware of any other reasons for my decision,” Burkett wrote. “Although developing an effective management team is an important part of my responsibility, the desire for my own team is hardly a substantive reason for crucial personnel decisions such as replacing the police chief. Burkett said his overall goal was to allow Spinks “the ability to make a smooth transition to a new bigger and better police chief job.” “Unfortunately my lack of comments on the reasons for Bob’s termination has resulted in a perception that he has perpetuated in the media that my decision was somewhat arbitrary or without substantial management and operational justification.” Based on his experience with several different chiefs and a history of recruitment and the selection process, Burkett said, “I have a clear understanding of the requirements of the position and the standards that we should expect for the position here in Sequim. “After serious thought and consideration, I came to the conclusion that Chief Spinks did not meet my expectations.” Burkett said that, in addition to the technical requirements, he expected the chief to possess excellent leadership and management

Employee concerns “Recently I conducted an employee survey that indicated some concerns about the organizational culture and environment from the perspective of the employees of the department,” Burkett told the council. “While the police staff has continued to provide excellent service to the city, the level of communication and trust in the department illustrated by the survey are not acceptable.” Burkett said he and the new chief would develop an environment inside the department that improves the employee satisfaction levels. “I will be selecting the chief that can help me build a department where there is mutual respect, consistently and fairly applied discipline, an organization that uses taxpayers’ money wisely and cost effectively,” Burkett said in the memo. Burkett said he expected his new chief to provide new direction in the management “of our scarce financial resources.” He said the city of Sequim currently has an estimated population of 5, 830 with an annual police department operating budget of $2.4 million. This represents a cost per capita for the department of $411, far higher than most Washington state cities of comparable size. He shared with the council comparisons that ranged from Sammamish at $101 annual cost per capita to Lynnwood at $383. Port Angeles, he reported, provides police services for $228 annually per capita.

“As you can see, Sequim is the most expensive police department measured by the cost per capita in these comparisons,” Burkett stated. “I’ve yet to find a city in the state that has a higher cost per capita.” Calling the workload “very moderated,” Burkett said “The trend of the increasing cost for our department is inconsistent with other similar cities and unsustainable. “Since 2004, the cost per capita for our department has increased by 42 percent. This is inconsistent with my approach to financial management.”

Expanded HQ Burkett also cited Spinks’ proposal as interim city manager to remodel and lease additional space to expand police headquarters in the Sequim Village shopping center. The city leased the space in 2008, never using it, at a cost of about $76,000 in $3,800-a-month rent to building owner, McNish Family LLC. In 2008, Burkett said, Spinks and the public works staff told the City Council that the work could be accomplished within a $320,000 budget. New Public Works Director Paul Haines, hired by Burkett this year, estimated the cost of the project at $660,000. Because the estimate more than doubled, Burkett has recommended to the council that the city not proceed with the project, concluding it was not cost-effective to the taxpayers. The council backed Burkett’s position and settled with the contractor, Hannah Construction of Port Angeles, for $34,100 for planning work to remodel the additional space for a police briefing room, office space, an armory and physical fitness area. Calling the project “poorly managed,” Burkett said he talked to police officers after he came on board nine months ago. “I heard from them almost unanimously that it was a big waste of money,” Burkett said.

________

Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Jeff Chew can be reached at 360681-2391 or at jeff.chew@peninsula dailynews.com.

Memo ‘factually inaccurate,’ Spinks responds in a letter Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Former Sequim Police Chief Bob Spinks said that he felt City Manager City Manager Steve Burkett’s memo to the City Council was “factually inaccurate.” Spinks responded Friday in writing to the memo Burkett gave the council in July. “In reviewing the memo, it is factually inaccurate

and my personnel file has always been clean with positive evaluations and I received no direction from the new city manager, until March 10, 2010, when he told me it was time to look for greener pastures,” Spinks said. “I can only conclude that the point of writing such an inaccurate and lopsided memo some four months after he first told me that I

should move on and began negotiating my departure, is that maybe he felt he needed some semblance of justification substantially after the fact to feel better,” he added. “I only worked for the new city manager for roughly 60 work days, received no evaluation nor direction, and thus can only speak to the reasoning that the city manager had previously stated in public forums,” Spinks said.

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skills and values. “It’s important that the chief develop and maintain the trust and respect of the employees in the department, establish excellent customer service expectations, demonstrate effective teamwork with the city manager, department heads, council and the community,” Burkett wrote. “The chief also must be an effective financial manager and be able to provide high quality customer service for good value and at a reasonable price.” Burkett cited the need for more effective communication and trust inside of the department.

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Spinks said that the police department budget “grew as the community and workload grew,” and added that “budgets are approved by the City Council, not by a department head.” The former chief, terming the listing of comparable cities “incomplete,” said that if Burkett reduced funding for the police department to “less than $200 per capita in Sequim, then he’s suggesting somewhere in the neighborhood of a $750,000 to $1 million cut in funding. “I don’t see that happening,” Spinks said. “In fact, the 2011 police budget request, I believe, maintains staffing at its current level.” Spinks said that the remodelling project “was a public works project that we at the police department had been waiting for. Public works managed that.” He said that the employee survey Burkett

referred to “was not scientific, nor even specific and received little discussion by the city manager other than he wanted to see higher numbers in almost all areas from all departments. “But again, old news,” Spinks said.

Management of city “I am no longer employed by the city, but as a city resident I am very concerned about the management of the city. “As a city resident, I’m more concerned about the deficit that the city is facing, which is roughly equal to the costs of removing seven city employees, paying severance and then recruiting replacements and new positions at generally higher costs. “I had heard promises for greater customer service and have not yet seen those results or reporting. “And I am wondering as we approach the city manager’s first anniversary what the City Council has established as quantitative as well as quantitative evaluation criteria for the city manager and if that would entail a 360-degree evaluation from the staff. “I would conclude that my evaluation of the city manager is the same as he has publicly stated about me,” Spinks concluded. “Maybe he was a good city manager somewhere, but he may no longer be a good match for Sequim’s needs.”


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 17, 2010

A9

Undersea NEPTUNE network complete By Jeff Bell

etary theme, it has a smaller, coast-oriented sister project named VENUS — Victoria VICTORIA — After Experimental Network almost a decade of planning Under the Sea. and installation, the planets have finally aligned for Final link completed the NEPTUNE Canada The final link in the project. Billed as the world’s NEPTUNE chain was comlargest undersea cabled pleted last week at Endeavobservatory, NEPTUNE our Ridge, a volcanically consists of five main data- active area of undersea collection sites off the west mountains about 185 miles from land. coast of Vancouver Island. The node there has been They are spread over an expanse of the ocean floor outfitted with instruments and connected by a 500- and the final lengths of mile loop of fiber-optic cable have been laid, essentially completing the data cable. The project is being co- network. But although that was a ordinated at the University milestone, the work of of Victoria. Its name is an acronym NEPTUNE has really just for North-East Pacific Time- begun, said Mairi Best, a Series Underwater Net- project spokesperson. “This is sort of the end of worked Experiments, denoting both its location and its the beginning. It’s going to goal of providing 25 years of be constantly evolving and continuous information growing over the next from beneath the ocean’s 25 years.” surface. The fully intact network In keeping with the plan- bodes well for the larger Victoria Times Colonist

scientific community, Best said. “It really has shown that we can get data flowing from all of these really difficult areas that have been very inaccessible. It’s very encouraging, for us and for everyone involved with this kind of process around the world,” Best said.

Hardest part Completing work at Endeavour Ridge and placing the last of the cable was especially challenging because of the unique subsurface topography, said NEPTUNE Canada’s Lucie Pautet. Pautet, who joined Best and others on the installation team that has just returned from a month at sea, said a high-definition survey of the ridge bottom located a route after none had seemed apparent. “That was a really big technological achievement,” Pautet said.

The process revolved around the use of a remotely operated underwater vehicle supplied by the Canadian Scientific Submersible Facility, located at the Marine Technology Centre in North Saanich, a Victoria suburb. NEPTUNE Canada is now poised to bring in more than 60 terabytes of data in the next quarter-century — about the equivalent of the text contained in 60 million books — yielding information about biological, chemical and geological processes, and more, that can be applied to all manner of research.

Earthquake research Best said the application of the data collected could include insight into earthquakes, since NEPTUNE’s area of coverage includes the Juan de Fuca plate. “Obviously, things that tell us more about earthquake risks and tsunami

Victoria Times Colonist

risks are hugely valuable, also things like understanding how gas-hydrates work,” Best said. Pollution and climate change are other key areas of study that could benefit from subsea data, Best said. NEPTUNE Canada has been created with more than $100 million in funding from the federal and provincial governments. Canadian federal contributions have come through

the Canadian Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, and Canada’s Advanced Research and Innovation Network. Provincial money has been provided through the B.C. Knowledge Development Fund.

_________ The Times Colonist is a news partner of the Peninsula Daily News. It can be reached at local news@tc.canwest.com.

500,000 could lose drug coverage in state OLYMPIA — Some 500,000 Washington adults whose prescriptions are covered by Medicaid could soon lose that benefit unless lawmakers provide special funding when they reconvene in January. Medicaid’s adult drug program, which provides medication to the state’s poorest individuals through a combination of state and federal funding, will be eliminated in March if the Legislature can’t come up with $40 million before Feb. 1, according to the Department of Social and Health Services. Washington would be the only state to eliminate the program, according to Pharmaceutical Researchers and Manufacturers of America, an industry group in Washington, D.C. For Doug Porter, the state’s Medicaid director, losing the program would be “beyond painful.”

6.3 percent cuts

‘Everything’ on table

Mentally ill The risks are greater for people with mental illnesses, officials said. Though Washington would be the first state to eliminate adult coverage, other states have cut coverage. In the mid-1980s, when New Hampshire limited each Medicaid client to three prescriptions at any one time, the state’s drug-coverage costs decreased 35 percent, but nursing-home admissions increased 60 percent, according to The New England Journal of Medicine. The state’s costs could increase even more for patients who don’t find other methods to get drugs, said Marjorie Powell, who studies public policy at Pharmaceutical Researchers and Manufacturers of America. And mentally ill people who stop their meds could end up in the hospital or in custody, said Gordon Bopp, chairman of the Public Policy Committee at the Washington chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. “They’ll have psychotic episodes, and they’ll wind up getting arrested and put in jail,” said Bopp, who has two daughters who suffer from mental illnesses and are covered by Medicaid. “That wouldn’t save the state anything at all.” McCary, the Kennewick woman, said she knows what will happen to her without Medicaid coverage: “I would be hospitalized.”

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State Representative

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For other legislators, no program is safe from cuts, given the state’s budgetary woes. “Everything’s going to have to be on the table, but obviously we’re going to have to look at the core priorities and make sure the most vulnerable are protected,” said state Sen. Rodney Tom, D-Bellevue. For Charlie McCary, 48, a Kennewick woman, losing Medicaid drug coverage would end the stability she’s attained since she was diagnosed with several forms of mental illness seven years ago. She said she takes more than a dozen Medicaid-covered drugs to treat posttraumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder and depression. Without medication, her life would fall apart, she said, and maintaining jobs, friendships and sanity would be impossible. “One year, I got fired five times before I was on the right medication,” said McCary, who has successfully worked part-time secretarial jobs since starting treatment. Campbell said part of the solution could be making the eligibility standards more selective. Washington’s standards are more generous than the federal minimum. Porter suggested the state might take money from other agencies, such as the Health Care Authority, which administers healthcare coverage for state employees and some lowincome residents. It has a budget surplus, said Porter, who heads that agency along with the state’s Medicaid programs. State officials and industry experts share a concern that eliminating the adult pharmaceutical program might end up costing the state more money than it

saves. Some Medicaid clients, for instance, may turn to hospital emergency rooms or move into nursing homes to obtain prescription coverage, which would cost the state more than a Medicaidcovered prescription would, they said. Other Medicaid clients might stop taking their meds, worsening their conditions and possibly leading to costly emergency-room visits.

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In September, Gov. Chris Gregoire ordered a 6.3 percent cut in all state services to cope with an expected $1.4 billion budget shortfall. To meet this mandate, DSHS said it will need to trim $280 million from its budget, including about $110 million from the Medicaid programs it administers. The adult-prescriptions program cannot be protected in the DSHS cuts because federal law requires states to maintain many other Medicaid benefits, Porter said. Those federally required benefits include pharmaceutical coverage for children and prescriptions dispensed in health-care facilities such as hospitals and nursing homes. Porter said the department has to eliminate every optional service to meet the governor’s order. Gregoire had no choice but to issue the across-theboard reduction because legislators refused to hold a special session this year to make targeted cuts, said Karina Shagren, a spokeswoman for the governor. Consequently, lawmakers will have three weeks after they return to arrange special funding and save certain projects from the chopping block. “She’s asking them to tackle a supplemental budget as soon as they return,” Shagren said. “So rather than forcing Medicaid programs to take the same cut as, say, our tourism program, she’s asking them to take a look at what needs to be saved.” State Rep. Tom Campbell, R-Roy, a chiropractor and member of the House Health and Wellness Committee, said he is determined to ensure the program survives but cannot guarantee it in the current political and economic environment. “This is seriously playing with fire,” said Campbell,

who supported a special session that would have prevented the governor’s categorical cuts. “We’re going to have to work very hard to undo this stuff as quick as possibly.”

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Sunday, October 17, 2010 — (J)

Peninsula Daily News

Fishers on their own Orphaned kits rejoin the wild By Leah Leach

Peninsula Daily News

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — Two orphaned fisher kits, who had thrived in foster care after they were rescued from their den, are now taking care of themselves after being released near Hurricane Ridge. The two fisher brothers, who were 10 weeks old when biologists rescued them in mid-June, were released into Olympic National Park near Hurricane Ridge on Friday, said Barb Maynes, park spokeswoman. The kits were raised at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, near Tacoma, until they were old enough to hunt for themselves and survive on their own, said Whitney DalBalcon, spokeswoman for the wildlife park. “They went from ounces to pounds” while in the wildlife park’s care, said Dave Ellis, deputy director of Northwest Trek. He didn’t know exactly how much the male fishers, which can reach 8 to 11 pounds, weighed when they arrived or left. The fishers’ mother was pregnant when she was moved from British Columbia to Olympic National Park in a reintroduction effort that has brought 90 fishers into the park from Canada to re-establish the

These two orphaned fishers were released into Olympic National Park on Friday. species on the North Olympic Peninsula. The weasel-like animals — which are related to minks, otters and martens — are native to the forests of Washington state, including those of the Peninsula. They became extinct on the Peninsula about 70 years ago because of overhunting and trapping. Park and state biologists, who track the animals with radio signals from collars placed on them before they are released, said that the fishers have traveled as far as Ocean Shores and Neah Bay. About 20 of the transplanted animals have not survived. They’ve been hit by cars on U.S. Highway 101, eaten as prey or died from other causes. About 70 fishers have survived out of those released.

Fishers’ mother died

When biologists deduced from her radio signal that she had died, her orphaned kits were rescued from the den on state Department of Natural Resources land and were moved to their temporary home at Northwest Trek. “These would be the first wild [fisher] babies that have been raised in the park,” Ellis said. The wildlife park has bred fishers in captivity. It was because of its experience that the state Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists asked that Northwest Trek take the fishers, Ellis said. “And it’s also because we expressed interest in helping in any recovery efforts” of native animals, he added. With 723-acres, Northwest Trek exhibits more than 200 animals, representing more than 35 species native to North America.

“I’m sure the keepers have a name for them,” he said, “but we don’t name animals to keep from thinking of them as pets.” They were taking solid food at 10 weeks and so were fed a pureed carnivore diet. Fishers eat small and mid-sized mammals such as snowshoe hares, squirrels, mountain beavers, mice and birds. They also eat insects, fruit and fungi. In Canada, they preyed on porcupine, but that will be missing from their diet in the Olympic Mountains, which is not porcupine territory. “We provided a den box for them to be in together, as they would have been in natal den,” Ellis said, adding that shavings provided insulation and warmth. The kits received physical exams, vaccinations and radio-collars Thursday, DalBalcon said. Fishers were listed as a state-endangered species in 1998 by the state Fish and Wildlife Commission and were designated as a candidate for federal listing in 2004 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under the Endangered Species Act. State and federal recovery efforts began in early 2008 with the reintroduction of fishers from British Columbia to the park. Along with the park and state Fish and Wildlife Department, partners in the recovery effort include the U.S. Geological Survey, Olympic National Forest and DNR. ________

The Canadian fisher No names that gave birth to two kits Managing Editor/News Leah was one of the casualties. If their handlers gave Leach can be reached at 360-417She reportedly fell prey the two fishers names, Ellis 3531 or leah.leach@peninsula to a bobcat. wasn’t aware of them. dailynews.com.

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

The Clallam County Courthouse in Port Angeles, shown Saturday, will receive new trim paint and maintenance to the tower clock.

Courthouse work begins Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The hourly clanging of the Clallam County Courthouse clock will be silenced this week as work begins on restoration of the historic building. The clock in the tower of the courthouse at 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles, will be disabled during the work, which is expected to be finished by Christmas. Advanced Construction Inc. of Mulkiteo will upgrade the main floor of the west wing of the courthouse, which was built in 1914. The county commissioners awarded the company a $324,500 contract in September. The project is funded with a 50-50 matching grant from the state Depart-

Newborn orca calf seen in pod The Associated Press

Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News

Homecoming

royalty

Port Townsend High School seniors Caroline Dawdle and Topaz Putra smile Friday as they are presented as the queen and king during the halftime of a game against the Cascade Christian Cougars played at Memorial Field. Putra is an exchange student from Indonesia.

ment of Archaeology and Historic Preservation. The county budgeted its share of the cost in the 2010 capital projects fund to finish the decade-old project. The second floor of the historic courthouse was renovated about 10 years ago. During restoration, the bell tower containing the clock will be stabilized, the brick exterior will be resurfaced and the front entrance steps, and railing will be replaced. Carpets and floors will be replaced, ceilings will be adjusted, and new lighting will be added. For more information, phone Clallam County Parks, Fair and Facilities Department Director Joel Winborn at 360-417-2429.

FRIDAY HARBOR — A new killer whale calf has been born into L pod, one of the three groups of orcas that frequent Puget Sound, San Juan Islands and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The birth was reported by observers with the Center for Whale Research in Friday Harbor, who spotted the baby Wednesday off the south end of San Juan Island. The newborn has been designated L-116, the next available number for L pod. The calf is believed to be the first offspring of L-82, born in 1990. The newborn appears to be less than a week old, and researchers said the calf appears healthy. This is the third calf born into L pod this year. The first, L-114, did not survive more than a few days. The second, L-115, was

born in August and still appears healthy. Both L-115 and L-116 and their mothers are in the same subgroup that has been traveling together. The new calf brings the total for the three Southern Resident pods to 90. Meanwhile, a large number of killer whales was reported Thursday traveling through Puget Sound. They were seen from the Kingston-Edmonds and Bremerton ferries as well as from Blake Island and West Seattle. They were identified as Southern Residents. At this time of year, orcas are seen more frequently in central and south Puget Sound as they switch from foraging for chinook salmon, their primary prey in the San Juan Islands, to the more abundant chum salmon coming back to streams throughout Puget Sound.

How’s the fishing? Matt Schubert reports. Fridays in

Peninsula Daily News

Background/ Education Community Service

Job Creation Budget Environment/ Quality of Life 0A5100618


(J)

Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 17, 2010

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

Prep Notes

PT loses more than tilt THE PORT TOWNSEND Redskins didn’t just lose a game Friday night against top-ranked Cascade Christian. With alleverything play- Matt maker Mel Schubert Thornton suffering a possible season-ending injury at the end of the fourth quarter, they also lost a major team leader. “That’s a huge blow to our team,” Port Townsend coach Tom Webster said. “He’s one of our very best players on both sides of the ball.” That was easy to see on Friday night. The sophomore led the team in passings yards (89) and rushing yards (33) while also catching four passes and recovering a fumble on special teams. He’s lined up all over the field for the Redskins this season, taking snaps at quarterback, receiver, running back, defensive back and on kick coverage. “It’s very unfortunate for him, because he really loves football,” Webster said. “You can tell. He plays with a lot of passion out there.” Indeed, Thornton competes with a purpose that flies in the face of his relatively diminutive size (5-foot-10, 175 pounds). He has no problem running north-south and taking on tacklers, as well as delivering hits on defense. And as his fumble recovery in the first quarter illustrated, he has a nose for the ball. The sophomore shook off one particularly vicious hit — two Cougar defenders converged to tackle him at once on a sweep — in the first half like it was a bug bite. The collision was audible throughout Memorial Field. Yet there was Thornton immediately popping up and howling at his teammates to let them know it was no big deal. Unfortunately, his hard-nosed running also may have led to his injury in the fourth: a possible broken collar bone sustained on another tough run. “We’ll just have to make some adjustments [without him],” said Webster, who still has rival Chimacum on the schedule. “We’ve got some other guys who will have to come in and step up and get a chance to play. “[Thornton] likes to play, and he’s only a sophomore, so there’s a lot of good things for him in the future.”

Home or away? Sometimes, home teams travel too. Such will be the case for the Sequim and Port Angeles football teams in the first week of November. Both earned the right to “host” Class 2A preliminary playoff games after clinching top-two Olympic League finishes Friday. Yet because of the West Central District’s insistence that all postseason games be played on artificial turf, both must play that game at North Kitsap’s field in Poulsbo. “It’s a playoff game, and it needs to be on a turf field,” Port Angeles School District athletic director Dwayne Johnson said. “The bottom line is they don’t want the field to have an affect on the game.” One could argue — I’ll volunteer to be that guy — that administrators have already altered the game to some extent. A “home” game on the Kitsap Peninsula? That’s hardly a just reward for a pair of North Olympic Peninsula teams that will finish 1-2 in their league. There’s a reason Puget Sound teams rarely come to the North Olympic Peninsula for nonleague games: They don’t like making the long drive. It’s a big advantage for Peninsula teams; one you’d think the Roughriders and Wolves earned given their regular season performance. Instead, they will face teams that finished third or fourth in their own leagues at a neutral site an hour’s drive away from home. In years past, Sequim hosted preliminary playoff games on its grass field after winning league titles. Turn

to

Schubert/B3

SCOREBOARD Page B2

Dammed up UW shuts down Beavers’ 2-point attempt for victory The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Jake Locker threw a career-high five touchdown passes, two in overtime to Jermaine Kearse, and Oregon State’s 2-point conversion attempt in the second overtime fell incomplete as the Huskies beat the No. 24 Beavers 35-34 on Saturday night. A wild and Also . . . chilly night along ■ Cougars the edge of Lake get run over Washington ended in 24-7 in the Huskies’ home loss to favor, but only Arizona/B4 after Washington blew an early 21-0 lead and celebrated a bit prematurely in overtime.

At the end, Washington (3-3, 2-1 Pac-10) kept its bowl hopes alive with a victory it absolutely needed with a gauntlet of Arizona, Stanford and Oregon awaiting the next three weeks. Meanwhile, Oregon State (3-3, 2-1) was stopped short in its attempt to begin conference play 3-0 for the first time in 42 years. Locker was a big reason why. He was nearly flawless for the first 20 minutes when Washington jumped to a 21-0 lead. Oregon State rallied to pull even on Jacquizz Rodgers’ touchdown run on the first possession of the second half and it stayed that way through regulation. Turn

to

Dawgs/B4

The Associated Press

Washington’s Jake Locker passes against Oregon State in the first half of Saturday’s game in Seattle.

Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News

Port Townsend quarterback Mel Thornton runs for daylight and extra yardage during Port Townsend’s homecoming game against the Cascade Christian Cougars on Friday night at Memorial Field.

Hard homecoming Top-ranked Cascade drops Redskins 48-8 By Matt Schubert

Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Tom Webster loves everything about his Port Townsend football team . . . except for the results on Friday nights. The first-year head coach came away with a handful of positives from the Redskins homecoming matchup with Nisqually League powerhouse Cascade Christian.

Unfortunately, none of those were the final score. The top-ranked Cougars dropped the Redskins 48-8 in front of the Memorial Field faithful Friday night, triggering the 45-point mercy rule midway through the third quarter. “A lot of people might not believe this, but this is a really fun group to coach,” said Webster, who’s still looking for his first win at 0-5 in league and 0-7 overall.

“There’s a lot of positives on this thing. I asked our kids [after the game], ‘How many kids had fun out there tonight?’ Every one of them raised their hand. That’s encouraging.” Cascade Christian out-gained the Redskins 478 yards to 151 on the game and scored on four of its first five possessions to take a 28-0 halftime lead that was never challenged. Cougar runners accounted for 294 yards, with elusive runner Tyler Walrath juking and spinning for 166 yards and two touchdowns on six carries. Compounding the difficulty of the loss for the Redskins was a possible season-ending injury to two-way star Mel Thornton.

Also . . .

■ Quilcene falls to Lummi after rough first half/B3

The sophomore wide receiver/ quarterback/defensive back broke his collar bone at the end of a run on the Redskins’ final drive of the game (See Prep Notes). “That’s a huge blow to our team,” Webster said. “He’s one of our very best players on both sides of the ball.” Thornton was the Redskins’ biggest playmaker Friday, accounting for 125 yards of offense and a fumble recovery before getting knocked out of the game. Turn

to

Redskins/B3

Wedge a rising star? Cowboys

Prep Football

Potential Seattle manager has pedigree, experience

keeping hope alive

ALTHOUGH HE WAS the American League Manager of the Year in 2007 and a highly-sought candidate of most of the teams seeking a new skipGreg per this offseason, Johns Eric Wedge won’t bring a big name to Seattle when he’s officially named manager early next week. But he will bring some serious cache in the baseball world and the reputation as an intense and tireless worker who came within one game of guiding the Cleveland Indians to the World Series just three years ago. Wedge, 42, sat out this past season after being fired by the Indians with six games remaining in 2009.

Peninsula Daily News

But he’s been a much-pursued man in the current market, interviewing with Baltimore, Toronto, Pittsburgh and the Chicago Cubs in recent weeks in addition to the Mariners. That competition — with the Pirates reportedly eying Wedge as their prime choice — is presumably why Seattle general manager Jack Zduriencik pushed ahead sooner than expected and selected him from among five candidates interviewed this week. Though the Mariners haven’t confirmed Wedge’s selection, word leaked out Friday ­— first broken by Jon Heyman of SI.com. Turn

to

Johns/B4

The Associated Press

Former Cleveland Indians manager Eric Wedge is expected to be named the Mariners’ new leading man on Monday.

SEQUIM — The Sequim football team attacked the Olympic Trojans right from the beginning in an Olympic League football game Friday night. Sequim allowed only one touchdown while destroying the Trojans 63-8 to clinch its seventh straight postseason berth under head coach Erik Wiker. Sequim (5-0 in league, 6-1 overall) has just one game left, at home against North Kitsap next Friday, before facing off with unbeaten Port Angeles in a de facto Olympic League championship game Oct. 29. A win there would give Wiker six league titles in seven years. Turn

to

Football/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Today’s Area Sports

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Oct. 16 Men’s Club Throw Out Three Worst Gross: John Tweter, 59; Gary Thorne, 59; Mel Triggs, 60; Mark Leffers, 60. Net: Leo Greenawalt, 47; Dave Henderson, 50; Gary McLaughlin, 50; Dick Goodman, 50; Tom Lowe, 51; Steve Schlaffman, 52. Team Event Gross: John Tweter and Paul Stutesman, 67; John Tweter and Gene Ketchum, 70; Gary Thorne and Kevin Russell, 70. Net: Gary McLaughlin and Leo Greenawalt, 58; Dave Henderson and Kit Metcalf, 61; Dave Henderson and Tom Lowe, 62; Mike Sorenson and Dwayne Dean, 63; Bernie Anselmo and Gary McLaughlin, 63; Bernie Anselmo and Leo Greenawalt, 63; Dick Streeter and Jack Morley, 63; Jerry Sparks and Frank Randall, 63.

Preps Football Friday’s Games Adna 41, Winlock 14 Anacortes 14, Burlington-Edison 10 Archbishop Murphy 62, Coupeville 0 Auburn Riverside 20, Tahoma 17 Bellarmine Prep 35, Shelton 21 Bellevue 56, Sammamish 7 Bethel 30, Puyallup 26 Blaine 35, Bellingham 34 Brewster 42, Pateros 6 Camas 34, Heritage 15 Capital 38, Wilson, Woodrow 7 Cascade (Leavenworth) 42, Okanogan 19 Cedarcrest 31, South Whidbey 20 Central Kitsap 49, Stadium 21 Central Valley 45, Shadle Park 7 Centralia 60, Aberdeen 23 Chelan 42, Cashmere 35 Chiawana 28, Davis 6 Cle Elum/Roslyn 42, Granger 14 Clover Park 50, Washington 24 Colfax 32, Lind-Ritzville 9 Columbia River 14, Fort Vancouver 12 Colville 40, Freeman 14 Concrete 35, Tacoma Baptist 28 Connell 62, Wahluke 14 Curtis 52, Emerald Ridge 0 Cusick 55, Republic 0 Darrington 46, Rainier Christian 0 Deer Park 42, West Valley (Spokane) 21 DeSales 70, Asotin 30 East Valley (Spokane) 27, Cheney 6 Eastlake 34, Issaquah 33 Eastmont 42, Hanford 19 Edmonds-Woodway 41, Cascade (Everett) 0 Ellensburg 56, Quincy 13 Everett 16, Meadowdale 10 Ferndale 28, Sedro-Woolley 18 Ferris 21, Mead 20 Franklin 56, Cleveland 6 Franklin Pierce 35, White River 6 Garfield-Palouse 16, Pomeroy 12 Glacier Peak 38, Mount Vernon 21 Goldendale 26, Columbia (Burbank) 7 Gonzaga Prep 48, North Central 7

Southwest

Ark.-Pine Bluff 21, Alabama A&M 14 Fla. International 34, North Texas 10 Missouri 30, Texas A&M 9 Nicholls St. 47, Texas St. 45, 4OT Oklahoma 52, Iowa St. 0 Oklahoma St. 34, Texas Tech 17 Prairie View 45, Lincoln, Mo. 12 Rice 34, Houston 31 Sam Houston St. 57, SE Louisiana 7 South Alabama 26, Lamar 0 Stephen F.Austin 30, Cent. Arkansas 7 TCU 31, BYU 3 Tulsa 52, Tulane 24

Midwest

Dayton 33, Butler 13 E. Michigan 41, Ball St. 38, OT Illinois St. 34, N. Dakota St. 24 Indiana 36, Arkansas St. 34 Indiana St. 38, Missouri St. 35, OT

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

The Associated Press

Bucky

bucks

Buckeyes

Wisconsin wide receiver David Gilreath (85) returns a kickoff for a touchdown as Ohio State defensive back Dominic Clarke (28) trails during the first half of Saturday’s game in Madison, Wis. Wisconsin upset No.1 Ohio State 31-18 as three top 10 teams fell Saturday. Grandview 30, Ephrata 24 Hazen 34, Foster 28 Highland 21, Naches Valley 7 Inglemoor 35, Woodinville 7 Juanita 18, Mount Si 17 Kalama 56, Columbia (White Salmon) 27 Kennedy 43, Lindbergh 32 Kennewick 35, West Valley (Yakima) 6 Kentwood 34, Kent Meridian 19 King’s 42, Granite Falls 21 Kiona-Benton 58, Mabton 6 Kittitas 47, Warden 20 LaConner 43, Chief Leschi 21 LaCrosse/Washtucna 52, Touchet 32 Lake City, Idaho 46, Wenatchee 18 Lake Roosevelt 48, Waterville 15 Lake Washington 34, Interlake 13 Lakes 38, Enumclaw 31 Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls) 8, Jenkins (Chewelah) 6 Lakewood 57, Sultan 0 Liberty (Renton) 28, Mercer Island 11 Liberty Christian 44, Colton 40 Lynden 35, Mount Baker 21 Lynnwood 48, Lakeside (Seattle) 13 Manson 28, Liberty Bell 6 Mariner 21, Kamiak 14 Mary Walker 14, Kettle Falls 7 Marysville-Pilchuck 38, Lake Stevens 21 Meridian 54, Lynden Christian 7 Monroe 24, Arlington 21 Moses Lake 16, Eisenhower 7 Mossyrock 49, North Beach 6 Mountain View 28, Kelso 7 Mountlake Terrace 35, Shorewood 0 Mt. Spokane 34, Lewis and Clark 14 Napavine 36, Wahkiakum 6 Naselle 24, Northwest Christian (Lacey) 21 Nathan Hale 52, Chief Sealth 34 Newport 45, Liberty (Spangle) 19 Newport (Bellevue) 48, Redmond 20 Nooksack Valley 41, Friday Harbor 7 O’Dea 56, Bainbridge 20 Olympia 32, Gig Harbor 12 Omak 49, Tonasket 20 Oroville 62, Entiat 0 Othello 48, Wapato 8 Peninsula 48, Auburn Mountainview 14 Port Angeles 34, North Kitsap 7 Prairie 27, Hudson’s Bay 21 Prosser 48, Selah 0 Pullman 21, Clarkston 18 R.A. Long 36, Hockinson 0 Reardan 40, Davenport 7 Renton 44, Evergreen (Seattle) 16 Richland 34, Walla Walla 7 Ridgefield 31, Castle Rock 14 Riverside 59, St. Maries, Idaho 7 Rogers (Puyallup) 42, Federal Way 28 Roosevelt 21, Ballard 0 Royal 37, River View 23 Seattle Prep 12, Rainier Beach 6 Selkirk 50, Curlew 30 Sequim 63, Olympic 8 Shorecrest 28, Oak Harbor 21, OT Skyline 56, Jackson 3 Skyview 42, Evergreen (Vancouver) 3 South Bend 46, Raymond 0 South Kitsap 35, Mount Tahoma 22 Southridge 48, Pasco 19 Squalicum 40, Sehome 7 St. John-Endicott 74, Sunnyside Christian 26 Stanwood 20, Snohomish 15 Steilacoom 24, Fife 17 Stevenson 20, LaCenter 14 Sumner 25, Eatonville 14 Tekoa-Oakesdale/Rosalia 37, Dayton 6 Timberline 43, Lincoln 20

College Football Arizona 24, Washington St. 7 Baylor 31, Colorado 25 Boise St. 48, San Jose St. 0 Colorado St. 43, UNLV 10 E. Washington 35, N. Colorado 28 Montana 23, Portland St. 21 N. Arizona 34, Montana St. 7 San Diego St. 27, Air Force 25 Southern Cal 48, California 14 Utah 30, Wyoming 6 Weber St. 16, Idaho St. 13

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

SPORTS SHOT

Bowling LAUREL LANES 7 Cedars Oct. 15 Men’s high game: Sam Bugge, 285; men’s high series: James Paulsen, 673. Women’s high game: Louise Demetriff, 207; women’s high series: Louise Demetriff, 538. Leading team: Team 12 9 Pin No Tap @ 10 a.m. Oct. 14 Men’s high game: Pete Centeno, 230; men’s high series: Cliff Silliman, 627. Women’s high game: Lynda Everett, 210; women’s high series: Ginny Bowling, 592. Mix & Match BBrett Allen, 226; men’s high series: Brett Allen, 672. Women’s high game: Rita Berson, 204; women’s high series: Rita Berson, 566. SEQUIM OLYMPIC LANES First Federal Senior Snipers Oct. 13 Men’s high game: Jim Getchman, 219; men’s high series: Jim Getchman, 540. Women’s high game: Marilyn Hooser, 178; women’s high series: Marilyn Hooser, 482. Leading team: Muzzel Loaders and Remingtons are tied. Les Schwab Mixed Oct. 13 Men’s high game: Mike Elkhart, 193; men’s high series: Mike Elkhart, 573. Women’s high game: Linda Centeno; women’s high series: Linda Centeno. Leading team: “Irritable Bowl Syndrome” and SOL are tied. Wall Street Journal Oct. 12 Men’s high game: Jace Martinez, 179; men’s high series: George Kennedy, 465. Women’s high game: Joan Wright, 205; women’s high series: Joan Wright, 560. Leading team: Wastebaskets and First Edition are tied. Sunlanders Oct. 12 Men’s high game: Jim Coulter, 192; men’s high series: Jim Coulter, 542. Women’s high game: Cheryl Coulter, 178; women’s high series: Cheryl Coulter, 504. Leading team: The Strikers.

Iowa 38, Michigan 28 Jacksonville 86, Valparaiso 7 Miami (Ohio) 27, Cent. Michigan 20 Michigan St. 26, Illinois 6 N. Illinois 45, Buffalo 14 N. Iowa 19, South Dakota 14 Notre Dame 44, W. Michigan 20 Ohio 38, Akron 10 Purdue 28, Minnesota 17 S. Dakota St. 31, S. Illinois 10 Texas 20, Nebraska 13 Toledo 34, Kent St. 21 W. Illinois 40, Youngstown St. 38 Wisconsin 31, Ohio St. 18

South

Appalachian St. 39, The Citadel 10 Auburn 65, Arkansas 43 Bethune-Cookman 14, S. Carolina St. 0 Chattanooga 35, Georgia Southern 27 Clemson 31, Maryland 7 Coastal Carolina 35, Presbyterian 7 Davidson 17, Morehead St. 10 Delaware St. 31, N. Carolina A&T 26 Drake 14, Campbell 12 East Carolina 33, N.C. State 27, OT Florida A&M 31, Savannah St. 0 Florida St. 24, Boston College 19 Furman 27, Samford 10 Gardner-Webb 35, Ch. Southern 25 Georgia 43, Vanderbilt 0 Georgia St. 20, N.C. Central 17, OT Georgia Tech 42, Mid. Tennessee 14 Grambling St. 38, Alcorn St. 28 Hampton 7, Norfolk St. 6

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Far West

Peninsula Daily News

Jackson St. 49, Southern U. 45 Jacksonville St. 24, Tennessee St. 0 Kentucky 31, South Carolina 28 LSU 32, McNeese St. 10 Liberty 41, VMI 7 Louisiana Tech 48, Idaho 35 Louisiana-Monroe 35, W. Kentucky 30 Miami 28, Duke 13 Mississippi St. 10, Florida 7 N. Hampshire 28, James Madison 14 North Carolina 44, Virginia 10 SE Missouri 41, Austin Peay 24 Southern Miss. 41, Memphis 19

East

Brown 17, Princeton 13 Bucknell 24, Georgetown, D.C. 21 Colgate 44, Cornell 3 Dartmouth 27, Holy Cross 19 Delaware 24, Rhode Island 17 Duquesne 37, Sacred Heart 17 Lafayette 28, Stony Brook 21 Lehigh 21, Harvard 19 Monmouth, N.J. 21, Bryant 12 Navy 28, SMU 21 Penn 27, Columbia 13 Pittsburgh 45, Syracuse 14 Richmond 11, Massachusetts 10 Robert Morris 38, Albany, N.Y. 0 Rutgers 23, Army 20, OT San Diego 14, Marist 10 Temple 28, Bowling Green 27 Villanova 48, Maine 18 Wagner 22, St. Francis, Pa. 14 Yale 7, Fordham 6

Todd Beamer 59, Graham-Kapowsin 45 Toledo 54, Ilwaco 0 Toppenish 52, East Valley (Yakima) 35 Tumwater 49, River Ridge 6 Union 56, Battle Ground 3 Vancouver Christian 20, Pe Ell 16 W. F. West 42, Mark Morris 18 Waitsburg-Prescott 28, Tri-Cities Prep 7 Washougal 26, Woodland 21 Wellpinit 34, Northport 30 West Seattle 28, Ingraham 0 White Pass/Morton 34, Toutle Lake 0 White Swan 16, Soap Lake-Wilson Creek 6 Wilbur-Creston 20, Odessa-Harrington 18 Willapa Valley 55, Ocosta 15 Yelm 34, Foss 0 Zillah 28, LaSalle 13

Baseball MLB Playoffs All Times PDT LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES American League Friday, Oct. 15 New York 6, Texas 5 Saturday, Oct. 16 Texas 7, New York 2, series tied 1-1 Monday, Oct. 18 Texas (Lee 12-9) at New York (Pettitte 11-3), 5:07 p.m Tuesday, Oct. 19 Texas (Hunter 13-4) at New York (Burnett 10-15), 5:07 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 20 Texas at New York, 1:07 p.m. Friday, Oct. 22 New York at Texas, 5:07 p.m., if necessary Saturday, Oct. 23 New York at Texas, 5:07 p.m., if necessary National League Saturday, Oct. 16 San Francisco 4, Philadelphia 3, San Francisco leads series 1-0 Sunday, Oct. 17 San Francisco (Sanchez 13-9) at Philadelphia (Oswalt 13-13), 5:19 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 19 Philadelphia (Hamels 12-11) at San Francisco (Cain 13-11), 1:19 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 20 Philadelphia at San Francisco, 4:57 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 21 Philadelphia at San Francisco, 4:57 p.m., if necessary Saturday, Oct. 23 San Francisco at Philadelphia, 12:57 p.m. or 4:57 p.m., if necessary Sunday, Oct. 24 San Francisco at Philadelphia, 4:57 p.m., if necessary

Basketball NBA Preseason Friday’s Games Indiana 101, New Orleans 98 Boston 117, Toronto 112 Minnesota 99, Detroit 88 Dallas 109, Chicago 105, OT Saturday’s Games Houston 95, New Jersey 85 Charlotte 97, Detroit 94 Orlando 105, Chicago 67 Utah 103, L.A. Clippers 91

Boston 97, New York 84 Memphis 91, Milwaukee 77 Atlanta 84, New Orleans 74 Golden State at Portland, late Denver at L.A. Lakers, late Today’s Games Phoenix at Toronto, 10 a.m. Washington at New York, 3 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Minnesota at Sioux Falls, SD, 5 p.m.

Football NFL Glance All Times PDT NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Arizona 3 2 0 .600 88 Seattle 2 2 0 .500 75 St. Louis 2 3 0 .400 83 San Francisco 0 5 0 .000 76 East W L T Pct PF Washington 3 2 0 .600 89 N.Y. Giants 3 2 0 .600 106 Philadelphia 3 2 0 .600 122 Dallas 1 3 0 .250 81 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 4 1 0 .800 113 Tampa Bay 3 1 0 .750 74 New Orleans 3 2 0 .600 99 Carolina 0 5 0 .000 52 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 4 1 0 .800 92 Green Bay 3 2 0 .600 119 Minnesota 1 3 0 .250 63 Detroit 1 4 0 .200 126 AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 3 1 0 .750 77 Oakland 2 3 0 .400 111 Denver 2 3 0 .400 104 San Diego 2 3 0 .400 140 East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Jets 4 1 0 .800 135 New England 3 1 0 .750 131 Miami 2 2 0 .500 66 Buffalo 0 5 0 .000 87 South W L T Pct PF Houston 3 2 0 .600 118 Jacksonville 3 2 0 .600 107 Tennessee 3 2 0 .600 132 Indianapolis 3 2 0 .600 136 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 4 1 0 .800 92 Pittsburgh 3 1 0 .750 86 Cincinnati 2 3 0 .400 100 Cleveland 1 4 0 .200 78 Today’s Games Seattle at Chicago, 10 a.m. Miami at Green Bay, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Houston, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. San Diego at St. Louis, 10 a.m. Detroit at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. Baltimore at New England, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Denver, 1:05 p.m.

PA 138 77 96 130 PA 92 98 103 87 PA 70 80 102 110 PA 74 89 67 112

PA 57 134 116 106 PA 81 96 92 161 PA 136 137 95 101 PA 72 50 102 97

7 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA Golf, Portugal Masters at Victoria Club de Golfe in Vilamoura, Portugal. 10 a.m. (2) CBUT AHL Hockey, Binghamton Senators at Toronto Marlies. 10 a.m. (13) KCPQ NFL Football, Seattle Seahawks at Chicago Bears. 10:30 a.m. (47) GOLF NWT Golf, Miccosukee Championship at Miccosukee Golf and Country Club in Miami, Fla. Noon (7) KIRO PBR Bull Riding, Road to Vegas in New York City, N.Y. 1 p.m. (5) KING Dew Tour, Championship in Las Vegas, Nev. 1 p.m. (7) KIRO NFL Football, New York Jets at Denver Broncos. 1 p.m. (10) CITY (13) KCPQ NFL Football, Dallas Cowboys at Minnesota Vikings. 1 p.m. (47) GOLF PGA Golf, Frys.com Open at CordeValley Golf Club in San Martin, Calif. 5 p.m. (5) KING NFL Football, Indianapolis Colts at Washington Redskins. 5 p.m. (13) KCPQ MLB Baseball, San Francisco Giants at Philadelphia Phillies in NLCS Game 2. Oakland at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 1:15 p.m. Indianapolis at Washington, 5:20 p.m. Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Arizona, Carolina

College Football Top 25 Fared Saturday No. 1 Ohio State (6-1) lost to No. 18 Wisconsin 31-18. Next: vs. Purdue, Saturday. No. 2 Oregon (6-0) did not play. Next: vs. UCLA, Thursday. No. 3 Boise State (6-0) beat San Jose State 48-0. Next: vs. Louisiana Tech, Tuesday, Oct. 26. No. 4 TCU (7-0) beat BYU 31-3. Next: vs. No. 23 Air Force, Saturday. No. 5 Nebraska (5-1) lost to Texas 20-13. Next: at No. 20 Oklahoma State, Saturday. No. 6 Oklahoma (6-0) beat Iowa State 52-0. Next: at No. 21 Missouri, Saturday. No. 7 Auburn (7-0) beat No. 12 Arkansas 65-43. Next: vs. No. 9 LSU, Saturday. No. 8 Alabama (5-1) vs. Mississippi. Next: at Tennessee, Saturday. No. 9 LSU (7-0) beat McNeese State 32-10. Next: at No. 7 Auburn, Saturday. No. 10 South Carolina (4-2) lost to Kentucky 31-28. Next: at Vanderbilt, Saturday. No. 11 Utah (6-0) beat Wyoming 30-6. Next: vs. Colorado State, Saturday. No. 12 Arkansas (4-2) lost to No. 7 Auburn 65-43. Next: vs. Mississippi, Saturday. No. 13 Michigan State (7-0) beat Illinois 26-6. Next: at Northwestern, Saturday. No. 14 Stanford (5-1) did not play. Next: vs. Washington State, Saturday. No. 15 Iowa (5-1) beat Michigan 38-28. Next: vs. No. 18 Wisconsin, Saturday. No. 16 Florida State (6-1) beat Boston College 24-19. Next: at N.C. State, Thursday, Oct. 28. No. 17 Arizona (5-1) beat Washington State 24-7. Next: vs. Washington, Saturday. No. 18 Wisconsin (6-1) beat No. 1 Ohio State 31-18. Next: at No. 15 Iowa, Saturday. No. 19 Nevada (6-0) at Hawaii. Next: vs. Utah State, Saturday, Oct. 30. No. 20 Oklahoma State (6-0) beat Texas Tech 34-17. Next: vs. No. 5 Nebraska, Saturday. No. 21 Missouri (6-0) beat Texas A&M 30-9. Next: vs. No. 6 Oklahoma, Saturday. No. 22 Florida (4-3) lost to Mississippi State 10-7. Next: vs. Georgia at Jacksonville, Fla., Saturday, Oct. 30. No. 23 Air Force (5-2) lost to San Diego State 27-25. Next: at No. 4 TCU, Saturday. No. 24 Oregon State (3-2) at Washington. Next: vs. California, Saturday, Oct. 30. No. 25 West Virginia (5-1) beat South Florida 20-6, Thursday. Next: vs. Syracuse, Saturday.

Nascar Bank of America 500 Results 1 Jamie McMurray 2 Kyle Busch 3 Jimmie Johnson 4 Denny Hamlin 5 Greg Biffle 6 Matt Kenseth 7 Joey Logano 8 Kevin Harvick 9 David Reutimann 10 David Ragan 11 Juan Pablo Montoya 12 Carl Edwards 13 Regan Smith 14 Mark Martin 15 Martin Truex Jr. 16 Marcos Ambrose 17 Clint Bowyer 18 Reed Sorenson

Rangers even up ALCS 1-1 One day after blowing five-run lead, Texas rips N.Y. Yankees

all year. That’s how we got to this point,” manager Ron Washington said. “Last night, we didn’t get it done. We The Associated Press away against the New didn’t make any excuses York Yankees. ARLINGTON, Texas about it. We took the A night after a bull— There were no pep whipping, we took a pen debacle, Elvis talks, no extended disshower.” Andrus got the Rangers cussions after a meltNew York got only one off to a running start as down by the Texas Rang- they bolted out to hit over 3 1/3 scoreless ers’ bullpen. innings against the bullanother big lead, Colby Just quick redemption Lewis pitched effectively pen this time. and the Rangers’ first The best-of-seven into the sixth inning and postseason victory at series now switches to five relievers made it home in the franchise’s Yankee Stadium for stand in a 7-2 victory 50 seasons. over the Yankees. The AL Game 3 on Monday Neftali Feliz fired a night, when Texas will championship series is final fastball and it was have hired ace lefteven at a game each. over. This was a lead hander Cliff Lee on the “That’s what they mound. have been doing for us Texas did not let slip

NLCS San Francisco 4, Philadelphia 3 PHILADELPHIA — Tim Lincecum outdueled Roy Halladay, Cody Ross hit a pair of solo homers and the San Francisco Giants beat the Philadelphia Phillies 4-3 in Game 1 of the NL championship series Saturday. In a mega-hyped matchup between marquee pitchers, neither starter came close to matching his sensational postseason debut last week. Both gave up homers to the No. 8 hitters.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Preps Football Standings As of Oct. 9 Olympic League Conf. Overall x-Port Angeles 5-0 7-0 x-Sequim 5-0 6-1 Kingston 3-2 4-3 North Mason 3-2 4-3 Bremerton(3A) 2-3 3-4 North Kitsap 1-4 1-6 Olympic 1-4 1-6 Klahowya 0-5 0-7 x- Clinched playoff berth Friday’s Games Port Angeles 34, North Kitsap 7 Sequim 63, Olympic 8 North Mason 37, Klahowya 0 Kingston 42, Bremerton 27 Oct. 22 Klahowya at Port Angeles, 7 p.m North Kitsap at Sequim, 7 p.m. Kingston at North Mason, 7 p.m. Bremerton at Olympic, 7 p.m. 1A/2B Nisqually League Conf. Overall x-Cascade Christ. 5-0 7-0 Orting 4-1 4-3 Cedar Park Christ. 3-2 5-2 Life Christian 3-2 4-3 Chimacum 2-3 3-4 Charles Wright 2-3 3-3 Vashon Island 1-4 2-5 Port Townsend 0-5 0-7 x- Clinched playoff berth Friday’s Games Cascade Christian 48, Port Townsend 8 Chimacum 38, Charles Wright 7 Cedar Park Christian 22, Orting 20 Life Christian 42, Vashon Island 27 Oct. 22 Games Port Townsend at Orting, 7 p.m. Cedar Park Christian at Chimacum, 7 p.m. Charles Wright at Vashon Island, 7 p.m. Oct. 23 Game Cascade Christian at Life Christian, 7 p.m. Southwest Washington League Evergreen Division Conf. Overall x-Montesano 5-0 7-0 Onalaska 4-1 6-1 Elma 3-2 4-3 Hoquiam 3-2 4-3 Rainier 3-2 4-3 Tenino 1-4 2-5 Rochester 1-4 1-6 Forks 0-5 0-7 x- Clinched playoff berth Friday’s Games Rainier 29, Forks 7 Montesano 23, Elma 7 Tenino 15, Rochester 14 Onalaska 14, Hoquiam 7 Oct. 22 Games Forks at Tenino, 7 p.m. Rainier at Montesano, 7 p.m. Rochester at Onalaska, 7 p.m. Hoquiam at Elma, 7 p.m.

B3

Football: Forks Continued from B1 Daryl Settlemire caught a touchdown and ran for another while Dylan BrownBishop had a fumble recovery for a score to help the Cowboys win for the second consecutive week. “We can possibly set ourselves up to win out,” Meacham said. “But it’s homecoming [this week], so hopefully we can fight off the distractions.” The team’s ability to run the ball Friday allowed the Cowboys to control the clock and gain 16 first downs. Devin Manix accounted for a few of those, rushing for 120 yards on 19 carries. “We’ve got to keep this momentum against another tough opponent next week,” Meacham said. The homecoming game starts at 7 p.m. on Friday. Chimacum 38, C. Wright 7 Chimacum 20 8 10 0— 38 Charles Wright 0 0 7 0— 7 First Quarter C—Settlemire 17 pass (kick failed) C—Brown-Bishop fumble recovery (kick failed) C—Settlemire 6 run (Manix run) Second Quarter C—Moug 2 run (Manix run) Third Quarter C—Brown-Bishop 37 FG W—Hawkins 95 kick return (Dennis kick) C—Manix 23 run (Brown-Bishop kick) Individual Stats Rushing— C: Manix 19-120. Passing—C: Moug 7-8-0, 75.

Sequim 63, Olympic 8

SEQUIM — Sequim attacked the Olympic Trojans right from the beginning in an Olympic League football game Friday night. The Wolves (5-0, 6-1) allowed only one touchdown while destroying the Trojans (1-4, 1-6) to clinch their seventh straight playoff berth. “We had an excellent week of practice,” Sequim coach Erik Wiker said. “All the hard work paid off.” Senior running back Isaac Yamamoto had a big impact on the game, rushing Northwest Football League for 167 yards on 17 carries 8-man Conf. Overall and leading the team with Neah Bay 4-0 5-1 four touchdowns. Lummi 2-0 4-1 Quarterback Drew RickQuilcene 2-1 3-2 erson threw for two touchCrescent 2-1 2-1 downs and rushed for Evergreen Lutheran 3-2 3-2 another while completing 26 Muckleshoot 1-2 1-2 of 27 passes for 216 yards. Clallam Bay 1-4 1-4 Highland Christian 0-5 0-5 “We executed our gameFriday’s Games plan well and our defense Lummi 56, Quilcene 22 shut down a good offense,” Neah Bay 46, Highland Christian 0 Wiker said. Saturday’s Game Sequim stays home this Evergreen Lutheran 94, Clallam Bay 48 week against North Kitsap Oct. 19 Game on Friday at 7 p.m. Lummi vs. Crescent at Sequim High School, 5 p.m. Oct. 22 Games Muckleshoot at Clallam Bay, 7 p.m. Lummi at Highland Christian, 7 p.m. Oct. 23 Game Neah Bay at Quilcene, 1 p.m. Evergreen Lutheran at Crescent, 1 p.m.

(j) — Sunday, October 17, 2010

Sequim 63, Olympic 8 Olympic Sequim

8 0 0 0— 8 20 22 14 7— 63 First Quarter S—Yamamoto 1 run (Koonz kick) S—Yamamoto 30 run (kick failed) S—Rickerson 3 run (Koonz kick) O—Brown 37 run (two-point conversion good)

Redskins: Fall Continued from B1 [in the first quarter] that we were hanging in there,” WebThe 14-yard run on which ster said. “And then they can he was injured — preceded just gash you in a hurry.” by his 42-yard halfback pass Indeed, Cascade Christo Austin Graham — set up tian had a few problems of the Redskins’ lone touch- its own early on, fumbling down. the opening punt and stallWhile Thornton was ing on its first drive into Port being attended to on the Townsend territory. sideline, Graham found ConThe Cougar attack hit on akry Coggins in the end zone all cylinders after that, howon another halfback pass ever, scoring on its next four from 12 yards out. possessions. Kyle Kelly completed a That included a pair of pass to Robert Ristick for the touchdown runs from Colton two-point conversion. Faverty (6 carries, 50 yards) “I’m really proud of our and a 43-yard pass play from kids,” said Webster, who quarterback Kyle Stennes to started three freshmen in Josh Shreffler. the team’s second home Three straight touchdown game of the season. “We drives to begin the second didn’t quit. half gave the Cougars a 48-0 “I don’t think there is lead, putting the running anybody in the state of Wash- clock mercy rule into effect. ington at the 1A level who “For a team that hadn’t would have picked these won a game, they came out guys for homecoming. We with a purpose,” Cougars just happened to get them. head coach Randy Davis “So our fans got to see a said. really good football team, “That’s all you can ask as and they got to see our guys a coach is to play hard, and compete. And we did com- they did.” pete for 48 minutes.” Up until that scoring C. Christian 48, P. Townsend 8 drive, the Redskins managed Cascade Christian 14 14 20 0— 48 0 0 0 8— 8 just six first downs while Port Townsend First Quarter turning the ball over three CC—Faverty 3 run (Zepernick kick) times against a Cascade CC—Shreffler 43 pass from Stennes (Zepernick Christian defense that’s kick) Second Quarter given up just 87 points in CC—Faverty 11 run (Zepernick kick) CC—Walrath 11 run (Zepernick kick) seven games. Third Quarter Quarterback Kyle Kelly CC—Walrath 59 run (Zepernick kick) CC—Archer 52 punt return (Zepernick kick) completed 7-of -8 throws for failed) 31 yards and two intercep- CC—Brar 3 run (kick Fourth Quarter tions. PT—Coggins 12 pass from Graham (Ristick pass Thornton threw for 89 from Kelly) Individual Stats yards on 8-of-13 passing and Rushing— PT: Thornton 17-33, Coggins 2-9, ran for 33 yards on 17 car- Noeldechen 1-(minus 1), Ristick 1-(minus 6), Kelly 4-(minus 11). CC: Walrath 6-166, Faverty 6-50, Cole ries. 2-18, Stennes 1-16, Bostwick 5-16, Johnson 1-7, He was also one of just Milton 1-7, Stevenson 1-7, Thompson 2-7, Tracy 1-5, two runners who managed Brar 1-3, Roosendaal 1-3, Archer 1-(minus 11). Thornton 8-13-0, 89; Kelly 7-18-2, positive yardage against the 31;Passing—PT: Graham 1-1-0, 12. CC: Stennes 3-6-0, 103; Brar Cougars, who surrendered 6-11-0, 81. only 19 yards on the ground. Receiving—PT: Graham 2-48, Juran 5-31, Cog2-29, Ristick 2-14, Thornton 4-3. CC: Archer “It looked like for about gins 2-60, Shreffler 1-43, Bramell 1-34, Zepernick 3-27, three or four minutes there Wood 2-20.

Second Quarter S—Yamamoto 2 run (two-point conversion good) S—Mills 12 yard fumble return for TD (Koonz kick) S—Hall 35 pass from Rickerson (Koonz kick) Third Quarter S—Ballard 2 pass from Rickerson (Koonz kick) S—Yamamoto 8 run (Koonz kick) Fourth Quarter S—Wiker 10 run (Koonz kick) Individual Stats Rushing— S: Yamamoto 17-167. O: Brown 23-129, Grier 5-36. Passing—S: Rickerson 26-27-0, 216. O: Kudera 16-28-2, 168. Receiving—S: Hall 7-123. O: Gesicki 6-54, Fullilove 5-48.

Rainier 29, Forks 0 FORKS — The Spartans fell short once again in SWLEvergreen Division action, this time against the Mountaineers on Friday night. “They controlled the line of scrimmage on us,” Forks coach Andrew Peterson said. “But we battled hard and played tough.” The Spartans were able to put together a 60-yard drive in the second quarter with Alexis Ayala punching it in for the score to make it a close 14-7 at halftime. Rainier, however, scored some points off of two interceptions and a blocked punt Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News throughout the game. “We are still getting bet- Sequim quarterback Drew Rickerson, right, fades back to pass as ter week by week,” Peterson teammate Isaac Yamamoto prepares to block during the first quarter of said. “But we’re still young Friday night’s game against Olympic in Sequim. and it’s been a long season.” Forks (0-5, 0-7) travels to Second Quarter E. Lutheran 94, Cl. Bay 48 Cody Sullivan had a Tenino this Friday for more Q—Steele 10 pass from Bancroft (conv. good) Clallam Bay 46 22 20 6— 48 14-yard touchdown run and L—Robinson 53 pass from Jameson (conv. good) 1A SWL-Evergreen play. Evergreen Luth. 22 12 14 0— 94 L—Williams 53 pass from Jameson (conv. failed) caught a pass from Keenan First Quarter Individual Stats E—Touchdown (conversion good) Walker for two scores in the Rushing— Q: Thompson 4-45, Bancroft 6-40, Lummi 56, E—Touchdown (conversion good) VanBerkom 3-(-2). L: Robinson 2-68, Williams 2-47, game. E—Touchdown (conversion good) Hoskins 1-19, Jameson 2-13. Quilcene 22 Walker led the team with E—Touchdown (conversion good) Passing—Q: Bancroft 4-15-1-74. L: Jameson 6-8C—Willis 23 pass from James (conversion good) 133 yards rushing on 17 BELLINGHAM — It was 1-207, Robinson 0-1-0-0. E—Touchdown (Conversion good) Receiving—Q: Pleines 2-44, VanBerkom 1-20, carries, while Nathan Crisa short one in Lummi terri- Steele C—Willis 65 pass from James (conversion good) 1-10. L: Williams 3-116, Robinson 2-76, E—Touchdown (conversion failed) tion added 104 yards on tory as Quilcene coach Alan Rivera 1-15. C—Teachout 65 run (conversion good) nine carries. Reimann asked the officials Second Quarter Teammate Rickie Porter to stop the game with about Evergreen Luth. 94, C—Willis 23 pass from James (conversion good) E—Touchdown (conversion good) had a 94-yard kickoff return seven minutes to go before C—Teachout 7 pass from James (conversion Clallam Bay 48 that helped create some halftime in B-8 Northwest failed) DES MOINES — The E—Touchdown (conversion good) Football League play Friday. energy for the Riders, who 60 run (conversion failed) After Lummi returned Bruins played hard but C—Teachout clinched a playoff berth for E—Touchdown (conversion failed) Third Quarter the opening kickoff for a couldn’t match up with the the first time since 2006. (conversion good) touchdown, Quilcene’s Troy Eagles, who flew to an easy E—Touchdown “We are excited to be in C—Wonderly 37 run (conversion failed) Thompson answered right Northwest Football League E—Touchdown (conversion failed) the postseason,” Wahl said. C—C. Ritter 28 pass from James (conversion back by returning the next victory Saturday. “We’ve practiced and worked “It was a pretty rough good) kickoff 95 yards for a touchhard and it’s paying off.” E—Touchdown (conversion failed) half,” Clallam Bay coach down. Fourth Quarter It is beginning to look attempt, game over) Lummi then scored four Cal Ritter said. “The penal- E—Touchdown (noIndividual like Port Angeles and Stats straight touchdowns to take ties killed us and we kept Rushing— C: Teachout 16-210, Wonderly 9-115, Sequim will decide the a 35-6 lead before Quilcene’s giving the ball right back.” James 10-44. league title on the final Quarterback Emmitt Passing—C: James 10-18-1, 232. Brandon Bancroft found Receiving—C: Willis 6-184, C. Ritter 2-32. week of the season on Oct. James played well for the Jake Pleines in the back 29 at Civic Field. right corner of the end zone Bruins, completing 10 of 18 Port Angeles 34, Port Angeles (5-0, 7-0) passes for 232 yards and for a touchdown. By that next will host winless KlaNorth Kitsap 7 time, the Blackhawks had five touchdowns. howya on Friday. Three of James’ touchPOULSBO — The full control of the game. Quilcene (4-1, 4-2) hosts down passes were to Ryan Roughriders continued to be Port Angeles 34, N. Kitsap 7 Neah Bay on Saturday at 1 Willis, who caught six balls the team to beat in the 2A Port Angeles 0 21 7 6— 34 for 184 yards. Olympic League as they ran North Kitsap 0 7 0 0— 7 p.m. John Teachout had 16 past the Vikings and moved Second Quarter carries for 210 yards with to 7-0 for the first time since P—Sullivan 14 run (Hanson kick)) Lummi 56, Quilcene 22 N—Hadden 5 run (Gracey kick) two rushing scores and a 1967 on Friday night. P—Porter 94 kickoff return (kick failed) Quilcene 14 8 0 0— 22 conversion) catch for another TD. Lummi 42 14 0 0— 56 “We need to increase our P—Walker 4 run (Walker Third Quarter First Quarter “We can take some good commitment to be more P—Cristion 5 run (Haskins kick) L—Robinson 70 kick return (Robinson kick) things away from this and competitive at the next Fourth Quarter Q—Thompson 95 kick return (conv. failed) L—Robinson 45 run (Robinson kick) work towards next week,” level,” Port Angeles coach P—Sullivan 25 pass from Walker (kick failed) Individual Stats L—Williams 41 run (Robinson kick) Ritter said. Tom Wahl said. Rushing— P: Walker 17-133, Cristion 9-104. L—Rivera 15 pass from Jameson (Robinson kick) Passing—P: Walker 4-11-1, 60. N: Milyard 9-28-2, Clallam Bay (1-4, 1-4) L—Robinson 23 pass from Jameson (Robinson “We have been brushing 176. kick) hosts Muckleshoot on Friup on everything and pickReceiving—P: Sullivan 1-25, Porter 2-20. N: NetQ—Pleines 10 pass from Bancroft (conv. good) day. ing up our intensity.” tleson 6-62, Nguyen 6-60. L—Williams 6 run (Robinson kick)

Pirates swept at Civic Bellevue tops men, women Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Peninsula College men’s soccer team’s hold on the NWAACC West Division got a little more tenuous Saturday night. The Pirates dropped a critical showdown 3-2 to division rival Bellevue under the Civic Field lights. The loss, Peninsula’s second in three matches following an eight-game win streak, drops the topranked Pirates to 6-2-1 in league and 8-2-3 overall. Bellevue (6-2-0, 9-2-1) now lurks just one point behind in the standings with one game in hand. “We just didn’t do a good job of taking care of the ball,” Pirates coach Andrew Chapman said. “We didn’t do a very good job of clearing the ball out, so we brought a lot of stuff down to their feet. Unfortunately, it caught up to us.”

Dave Logan/for Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula College’s Tyler Hindmarch is shielded from the ball by Bellevue’s Ipotitas Dunaravich (1) during Saturday’s match at Civic Field. Bellevue outshot Peninsula 16-7 on the game, with the two teams exchanging goals in the first and second half. The Bulldogs then scored the go-ahead goal in the 78th minute.

The Pirate women were held scoreless for the second time in three games as they lost 1-0 to Bellevue. Peninsula is now winless in its last six matches (0-3-3) after moving to 3-3-3 in league and 4-5-4 overall.

(Men) Bellevue 3, Peninsula 2 Bellevue Peninsula

1 2 — 2 1 1 — 3 Scoring Summary First half: 1, Bellevue, 7th minute; 1, Peninsula, Walsh (Holguin). Second Half: 2, Bellevue, 55th minute; 2, Peninsula Hindmarch (Oppeltz), 62nd minute; 3, Bellevue 78th minute.

Schubert: Playing on the road Continued from B1 games for some time, just not the preliminary round.) Johnson chose to take The big change this time the high road on the issue. around? District voting at “I wish Sequim had field the 2A level is now skewed turf. I wish we had field considerably toward the turf,” he said. “That’s the other side of the water. industry standard right Hence, the new ruling now.” that 2A preliminary playCertainly, it cannot be offs games must be on turf. (Side note: This rule has argued that grass fields on applied to state playoff the rainy North Olympic

Peninsula often turn into mud patches by the end of the season. And that could play a considerable role in affecting a game’s outcome. But so, too, could a blustery rainstorm like the one Sequim played Lynden in last fall’s 2A state playoffs. Does that mean we need to have every game in the Tacoma Dome?

At some point, the regular season has to count for something. And not just for communities that happen to have turf fields.

________

Matt Schubert is the outdoors and sports columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. His column regularly appears on Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at matt. schubert@peninsuladailynews.com.


B4

Sunday, October 17, 2010

SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Thomas may be real deal Hawks safety having strong rookie season

The Associated Press

Arizona wide receiver David Douglas, right, goes flying after Washington State safety Deone Buccannon (10) tripped him up during the first quarter of Saturday’s game in Pullman.

Cougs lose cat fight Arizona uses run game in 24-7 win over WSU The Associated Press

PULLMAN — With quarterback Nick Foles knocked out of the game with a knee injury, No. 17 Arizona turned to running backs Keola Antolin and Nic Grigsby for offense. Antolin ran for 92 yards and two touchdowns, and Grigsby added 66 yards and another score as the Wildcats beat Washington State 24-7 Saturday to remain in contention for the Pac-10 title. Foles, the league’s leading passer, will be out at least two weeks with a sprained knee, coach Mike Stoops said. Backup Matt Scott played nearly three quarters against the Cougars. “You always have two quarterbacks ready,” Stoops said. “Matt was OK, a little rusty.” Arizona (5-1, 2-1 Pac-10) ran 47 times for 142 yards, far above the averages for the league’s top passing team.

“We wanted to come out and establish the run game, and that’s what we did,” said Antolin, who had his best outing of the season. Despite the win, Stoops was unhappy with inconsistent offensive play that allowed Washington State (1-6, 0-4) to remain within striking distance much of the game. “We have to play better than we did tonight,” Stoops said. Arizona managed only 352 yards of offense and 24 points against a defense that was giving up more than 500 yards and 42 per game. The Cougars recorded six sacks. On the flip side, Washington State had just 297 offensive yards and failed to reach double digits in scoring for the first time this season. “Missed opportunities and points left on the field,” offensive lineman B.J. Guerra said. “We’ve got to put it together,” defensive end Travis Long added.

Foles was injured with 14:07 left in the second quarter when Long was tripped and rolled into his right leg, knocking him to the ground after a completed pass. Foles limped off the field, supported between two Arizona officials. Scott completed 14 of 20 passes for 139 yards, but was intercepted once and sacked five times. Washington State has lost 12 straight Pac-10 games dating to 2008, and has beaten only Montana State this season. But its passing attack continued to improve, with quarterback Jeff Tuel completing 18 of 32 passes for 257 yards, despite being sacked seven times. Marquess Wilson caught six passes for 131 yards. Antolin scored on a 9-yard run late in the first for a 7-0 Arizona lead. Foles had started the first eight plays of their second scoring drive when he was injured. Scott directed the team over the final 37 yards, with Antolin running up the middle from the 1-yard line for a 14-0 lead. The Wildcats got a break early in the third when

Pac-10 Standings Conf. Overall Oregon 3-0 6-0 Stanford 2-1 5-1 Arizona 2-1 5-1 Oregon State 2-1 3-3 Washington 2-1 3-3 USC 2-2 5-2 Arizona State 1-2 3-3 California 1-2 3-3 UCLA 1-2 3-3 Washington State 0-4 1-6 Saturday’s Games Washington 35, No. 24 OSU 34 (2OT) No. 17 Arizona 24, Washington St. 7 Southern Cal 48, California 14

Washington State punter Reid Forrest fumbled the snap deep in his own territory. Khyri Knowles dove on the ball at the 7 and, on the first play, Grigsby ran in for a 21-0 lead. Washington State got on the scoreboard when Tuel hit Wilson with a 23-yard touchdown strike late in the third. But the Cougars blew a chance to tighten the game after they stopped Antolin on fourth-and-1 on the first play of the fourth quarter. Running back James Montgomery took a handoff and then threw a backward pass that was deflected by Arizona’s Brooks Reed and recovered by D’Aundre Reed.

Dawgs: Hold on for OT win Continued from B1 The teams exchanged touchdowns in the first overtime, with Rodgers scoring on a 10-yard pass from Ryan Katz, and Locker answering with a 17-yard strike to Kearse. In the second overtime, Washington went first and Locker found Kearse open on a corner route for a 21-yard TD stroke on secondand-17. Katz tried to rally the Beavers.

After getting sacked by Hau’oli Jamora for a 7-yard loss and a false start penalty, Katz hit Jordan Bishop for 23 yards on third-and-20. Then on fourth-and-1 at the 3, Katz’s pass for John Reese feel incomplete but a late flag from back judge Johnny Jenkins led to a pass-interference call against Desmond Trufant that gave Oregon State a first down. Rodgers scored from the 2 on the next play to pull Oregon State to 35-34, just moments after celebrating Washington players were

shoved off the field. Beavers coach Mike Riley decided to end it there. But Katz’s throw fell out of Halahuni’s hands and Washington’s celebration was on again. Locker finished 21-of-35 for 286 yards and ran for another 60 yards. Chris Polk rushed for 105 yards for Washington, while Kearse had nine catches for 146 yards and four touchdowns. Kearse had TD catches of 16 and 45 yards in the first half.

Rodgers ran for 140 yards on 32 carries and three touchdowns. He also caught four passes for 49 yards as the Beavers played their first game since Rodgers’ brother, James, was lost for the season because of a serious knee injury. Katz was 17-of-31 for 206 yards, but threw three interceptions, including once in the end zone by Washington freshman Sean Parker in the third quarter when the Beavers appeared ready to take the lead.

Johns: Wedge has experience Continued from B1

The Indians traded Bradley shortly thereafter. Previous Mariners manager Don Wakamatsu had a similar situation with Bradley leaving the clubhouse after being taken out of a regular-season game last year, only the Mariners wound up helping Bradley get into a treatment program. Two very different responses indeed. Now Bradley has one year remaining on his contract with Seattle, while Wedge is just beginning what is hoped will be the beginning of a long tenure with the M’s. If so, that too will be different for a Mariners franchise that will be bringing in its seventh manager since Lou Piniella left in 2002. While the talent of the players he’s given will loom large for Wedge’s success or failure, it’s clear that a little continuity in the Mariners’ managerial office wouldn’t hurt either.

Time/TV: Today, 10 a.m., Ch. 13 Opening Line: Bears by 6 1/2. Series Record: Seahawks lead 7-5 Last Meeting: Bears beat Seahawks, 25-19, Sept. 27, 2009 Seahawks rankings: Overall offense (28), Rush (29), Pass (23); Overall defense (26), Rush (2), Pass (31). Bears rankings: Overall offense (27), Rush (23), Pass (24); Overall defense (6), Rush (3), Pass (17). Seahawks streaks, stats and notes: First game for Seahawks after several deals. Traded Deion Branch, former Super Bowl MVP WR with Patriots, back to New England, acquired RB Marshawn Lynch from Buffalo and released RB Julius Jones. Seahawks have made 217 transactions under new coach Pete Carroll and GM John Schneider. DE Chris Clemons leads team with four sacks and 11 quarterback hits. Kicker Olindo Mare has made last 25 field goal attempts dating to last year’s game against Chicago. Bears streaks, stats and notes: Bears’ 218 yards rushing last week were most for them since 223 yards at Phoenix on Oct. 28, 1990. Chicago tied for league lead in takeaways (14) with Detroit. RB Matt Forte rushed for career-high 166 yards with two TDs last week, including personal-best 68-yard scoring run; also had 151 yards receiving in opener against Detroit. Brian Urlacher has 18 career interceptions, tied with Hall of Famer Bill George for third most by Bears linebacker behind Doug Buffone (24) and Dick Butkus (22). DE Julius Peppers has forced three turnovers, including interception last week and two sacks in which he stripped the ball from the quarterback. DE Israel Idonije had careerhigh three sacks last week and leads team with four — all in last two games.

2. New York Jets (4-1) — You have to give the devil his due (I’m no Rex Ryan fan). They are finding ways to win. 3. Atlanta Falcons (4-1) — I’m getting a little more impressed with them every week. 4. Chicago Bears (4-1) — The only other 4-1 team in the league, but I’m not a believer yet. 5. New England Patriots (3-1) — They have Tom Brady. And the Seachickens have, well, never mind. 6. Pittsburgh Steelers (3-1) — Can they continue to win with the creep, aka Ben Roethlisberger, finally starting for them after a four-week suspension for being, well, a creep.

Bottom Six

Top Six

27. Minnesota Vikings (1-3) — This was a tough decision between the Vikes and the hated Dallas Cowboys, but Minnesota wins out because of Brett “Interception” Favre. 28. Detroit Lions (1-4) — Imagine how badly they could beat the Seachickens. They beat the Rams 44-6, and the Rams slapped the Seachickens 20-3. 29. Cleveland Browns (1-4) — Their quarterback situation is so unsettled they may begin to slip even more. 30. Carolina Panthers (0-5) — Oh, the woe. Talk about quarterback problems. 31. San Francisco 49ers (0-5) — Imagine being a Niners fan. Step away from the ledge, please. 32. Buffalo Bills (0-5) — Talk about woe.

1. Baltimore Ravens (4-1) — Quarterback Joe Flacco seems to be calming down and they ripped Denver 31-14 last week.

Sports Editor Brad ­LaBrie can be reached at 360-417-3525 or at brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews. com.

________

Ferrets: (2) Large cage, toys, gadgets. All for $90 to loving home.

________ Greg Johns was a regular PDN sports columnist from 19992008, and he now writes for seattlepi.com, where this piece first appeared.

Jill at 477-1312 035074779

Heyman says the selection will be announced Monday. While Major League Baseball doesn’t like teams making major announcements during the World Series, there is no such prohibition against doing so during the league championship series that are currently underway. Wedge is an Indiana native who played on a state championship team at Northrop High in Fort Wayne and then helped Wichita State win the College World Series in 1989. He was drafted as a catcher by the Red Sox and spent most of his pro career in the minor leagues, though he played parts of four seasons with Boston and Colorado from 1991-94, hitting .233 in 86 at-bats with five home runs. After retiring as a player in 1997, he immediately was hired by the Indians to manage a Class A club at age 30. He was a quick success in the minors, named the Carolina League Manager of the Year in his second season.

Lee had an outstanding 22-3 season. A year later, Lee was shipped away at the trading deadline and Wedge was told he wouldn’t be rehired with six games left in the 2009 season. He said he’d stay with the team the rest of the year anyway and the Indians finished 65-97. At the time of his dismissal, only four managers — Bobby Cox, Tony LaRussa, Mike Scioscia and Ron Gardenhire — had been with their clubs longer. “It’s been a long run, as 7 seasons in Cleveland managers go,’’ Wedge said He lasted seven seasons when he was fired. “I have with the Indians and had a a great deal of respect for pretty strong run if you take the Dolans, Mark Shapiro, away the first (68-94) and the city of Cleveland and last (65-97) seasons. Tribe fans all over the In between, Cleveland place. went 428-382, including a “I’m a big believer in 96-66 mark in 2007 when being accountable for what the Indians wound up losing you do. I take responsibility in Game 7 of the ALCS to for this.’’ the Red Sox after beating Those who played for the Yankees in the first him mention his intensity round. and drive. But the Indians weren’t He had a dispute with able to pay for all their bud- Milton Bradley in 2004 ding talent and slipped to when the mercurial out81-81 the following season fielder failed to run out a while trading ace CC pop fly during a preseason Sabathia in midseason as game and left the clubhouse he was approaching free and went home after being agency, even though Cliff pulled from the game. Two years later he was the International League Manager of the Year and Baseball America’s Triple-A Manager of the Year for the Buffalo Bisons, then won Sporting News Minor League Manager of the Year honors a year later for the Bisons. That got Wedge a quick ticket to the big leagues and he took over the Cleveland Indians in 2003, at that time the youngest manager in the big leagues since 1985 at age 35.

THIS IS AN old and dumb joke but here it goes: At least the Seattle Seahawks (2-2) didn’t lose last week. For those not paying Brad attention — LaBrie And who could blame you? — the Seachickens had their bye last Sunday. But now, for good or bad, they will play every week from here on out. At least until the playoffs hit. Will they be sitting on the sidelines when that happens? Probably. As they have shown against the Broncos (2-3) and the Rams (2-3), they can lose any week. As for the two teams they have beaten, the Chargers (2-3) also have shown they can lose any week while the 49ers (0-5), well, let’s just say they can and do lose every week. The only thing the Seachickens have going for them is that the NFC West Division could be the worst NFL division in the history of the universe (probably even before the Big Bang). The leader, Arizona (3-2), has an undrafted rookie (Max Hall of BYU) starting at quarterback and lost 41-10 to the struggling Chargers on Oct. 3. The one really bright spot for Seattle this year is the play of rookie safety Earl Thomas. If he keeps up his level of play, I think he needs to be considered for rookie defensive player of the year honors. Right now it looks like a three-way race between Thomas, Detroit defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh and Philadelphia’s surprising safety Nate Allen, who was drafted in the second round. Suh has the pedigree and very high draft number (two overall), and he is proving he deserves that number with 18 total tackles (15 solo), three sacks, one interception, one pass defensed and two tackles for losses, including a quarterback hit in five games. Not a bad start for a rookie. Allen also has impressive numbers with 18 tackles (all solo), three interceptions, a sack and six passes defensed in five games. Thomas is right in the hunt with 23 tackles (19 solo), five tackles for a loss, three interceptions and three passes defensed in four games. All-world safety Eric Berry of Kansas City isn’t far behind with 22 tackles (17 solo) with five tackles for a loss but no interceptions or passes defensed in four games. I also have my eye on former Oregon Duck T.J. Ward, a Cleveland safety who has been a tackling machine with 43 (34 solo) with two tackles for a loss, one forced fumble, a block and one pass defensed in five games. Now, on to this week’s rankings:

Seahawks (2-2) at Bears (4-1)


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 17, 2010

SECTION

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Our Peninsula

COMMENTARY, LETTERS, DEAR ABBY, OBITUARIES In this section

Down on the farm Sequim compound sees rise in visitors By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — An aggressive marketing and advertising campaign is paying off for Olympic Game Farm, which is seeing dramatic increases in visitors and profits at a time when the economy is flagging, said the Beebe family’s thirdgeneration game farm president. “I really don’t want to get all that big,” said Robert “Bob” Beebe, who retired as a Navy chief petty officer and joined the family business in 2007 as president and general manager.

Keith Thorpe (6)/Peninsula Daily News

Rise in visitors

Olympic Game Farm manager Bob Beebe tries But the game farm, to teach Tug, a juvenile brown bear, how to clap tucked away down Ward its paws. Road and open to the public since 1972, saw about 77,000 visitors last year and is set to surpass that number this year, Beebe said, looking over a map that pinpoints visitors coming from every corner of the globe.

Among the animals on display are lions, tigers and bears, as well as elk, zebras, prairie dogs, llamas, yaks, a rhinoceros, bison, deer, cougars, lynx, wolves and coyotes.

“A lot of the Japanese visitors are coming for Twilight,” Beebe said, adding that they choose to swing by the game farm on their way to Port Angeles and Forks to see the communities plot-

Nalla, an African lion at the Olympic Game Farm, gives a mighty yawn. ted in the popular novel and movie series. The farm, which is open daily all year but for two holidays, employs nine year-round workers — two of whom have been there more than 25 years — and up to 14 during the peak summer months.

Running the farm Beebe, 41, said he and his uncle, Ken Beebe, game farm vice president, run the operation. Beebe’s father and former game farm president, Melvin Lloyd Beebe, died of cancer at 59 in 2002. Ken and Alice Beebe filled the game farm’s business leadership before Bob

Beebe took over. The present game farm president said he also is watching over his grandparents, game farm founders Lloyd and Catherine Beebe, who are 94 and 88, respectively, and living in their home overlooking the 82-acre farm.

Upgrades The main task at hand, Bob Beebe said, is to upgrade the existing game farm facilities, which he sees as a major challenge. Already remodeled and expanded is the gift shop, which he said was “a little ghetto” and in need of improvement and brightening. Kennels are being

expanded and upgraded, and fences improved. Even the refrigerator that keeps meat fresh for the lions and tigers has been recently repaired. A picnic area with a plush, green lawn has been added for families to enjoy. It’s adjacent to the popular studio barn, an oldgrowth wood structure that dates back to 1862 and contains classic movie sets used by Disney Studios and others. Lloyd Beebe purchased the former dairy farm in 1942 and later became a wildlife cinematographer after he put his car up for collateral for a bank loan to purchase his first camera. Turn

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Game farm visitors look at a herd of Roosevelt elk along the route of the drive-through farm tour. Solo, a full-grown cougar, looks out through the fence around his enclosure.

Olympic Game Farm worker Kreg Gallauher coaxes Kodiak bears Tina, left, and Patches to hold their paws up — with the reward of a sugar doughnut.

Simba, an African lion, looks out at passers-by from his enclosure at the Olympic Game Farm.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 17, 2010

Commentary

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Add marinating to ‘Bucket List’ ARE YOU MARINATING your meat? Hmm . . . that question Mark came out sounding dirtBazer ier than I intended. Please accept my apologies, and let’s get on with the reason we are all here. Which, again, is marinating your meat. I realize that half of you are already doing this, and have been for a long time. As my friend Dave, one of the world’s great lovers of food,

commented when I told him I was marinating: “Glad you joined the ’80s-’90s. Now you should join the ’00s (brining) and then the ’10s (adding pig’s ear).” So, if marinating is old hat for you, feel free to turn the page or click to more important news. I believe there’s a special pullout section today on Taylor Swift forgiving Kanye West. Or think back, if you can, to the first time you put meat in a bag of homemade marinade, let it soak overnight, grilled it the next day for dinner, had that eureka “I never knew the meat I cooked could taste like this” moment, and then kept the magic going by bathing in the leftover marinade. That was me last night. I wish this column could come

Speaking Out

with a piece of my marinated skirt steak attached to it. Back before the Great Recession, newspapers were flush with cash and included pieces of meat with their columns all the time. Now, though, you’ll have to take my word for it. My steak was tender and juicy and flavorful, and even the E. coli in the undercooked parts tasted just right. Heck, I could excel at work, could receive a raise or a promotion, or a nice smile from an exec who received a raise and a promotion, but none of that would bring me the same sense of fulfillment, the sense that I was doing my job as a human being, as the marinated skirt steak did. Without getting too much into

the macho grilling thing, I felt like a man . . . a man who buys meat at a supermarket, puts the meat on a gas grill and then takes the meat off the gas grill six minutes later. So, again, the question: Are you marinating your meat? If you’re not, you need to do so tonight. Get some meat, make some marinade (I used Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, garlic, red-wine vinegar, salt, pepper, sugar and a splash of Glenn Beck’s tears) and go to bed knowing your life is about to change. When I’m on my deathbed, looking back at my years on this planet or, more likely, just groaning a lot, I fear I’ll spend most of the time regretting that I waited

36 years before I marinated. I fear I’ll grab my youngest great-grandchild, pull him or her close with what strength I have left, and scream “Marinate!” so loudly he or she runs out of the room crying. Don’t let that happen to you. And if you have any good marinades, send them my way. ________ Mark Bazer is a humorist who hosts “The Interview Show,” a Chicago-based talk show available at www.huffingtonpost.com. He is one of the four columnists who appear here every Sunday. Contact him at mebazer@ gmail.com or at Tribune Media Services, Attn: Mark Bazer, 435 N. Michigan Ave. Suite 1500, Chicago, IL 60611.

What are your thoughts on the upcoming local and statewide elections?

Tatum Harris

Larry Southwick

Gail Dahlman

Dave Maxey

Vickie Larson

Lee Roys

Nancy Bargar

Ken Leonard

Caregiver Sequim

Retired public works engineer Cape George

Hair stylist Port Townsend

Retired Coast Guardsman Port Angeles

Bank teller Port Angeles

Retired flight engineer Forks

Certified public accountant Port Angeles

Fork lift driver Port Angeles

“Throw the rascals out. They talk about change. Where is it? We now have ‘Obamacare,’ or is it ‘Pelosicare’? We need to change, even locally. Democrats are too far to the left.”

“I hope a lot of incumbents get voted out, except for [Clallam County Prosecutor] Deb Kelly. I’m tired of all the excuses and negative words I’m hearing. I’m tired of it all.”

“I think it will be interesting to see what happens. I think the Republicans will be taking over. A few Democrats will remain, though. I anticipate big changes.”

“They’re all over the place. This is a significant time in our governance, and you have to separate and look at each issue individually before decisions can be made.”

“The issues are presented in confusing ways when a yes vote means no. It takes a real study of the voter pamphlet to determine which initiatives you want to pass.”

“It’s been crazy, all the mudslinging, like Patty’s and Dino’s ads. No matter who we elect, it’ll be the same policies. Nothing’s going to really change. But, drop the tax on food.”

“Not very happy with all the negative campaigns that are out there. I do plan to vote, though. But I haven’t enjoyed this election. We need to see positive ads.”

Interviews

Peninsula Voices More letters!

mind or hearing intact. Oh, and did I forget the We’ve expanded Peninteenage drivers who are texsula Voices today to include ting as they barrel down the numerous letters we’ve on highway? the Nov. 2 general election And what about the logand other topics of the day. ging trucks? Our extra letters are on They are in such a hurry Pages C3 and C4. to unload and collect a payAlso, here’s a correction: check that one must pull Information contained in over and let them pass in an Oct. 13 letter to the ediorder to avoid being rear tor, “No on I-1098,” was ended at high speeds. incorrect. I have chronic ovarian The letter wrongly cancer and take chemotherimplied that the terms of apy every two weeks. the Nov. 2 initiative, which Smoking pot for a few would impose an income tax days after my treatment on high-income earners, can allows me to relax and get be overturned only by a vote out from under the effects of of the people. poisonous drugs that make In fact, voter-approved me sick to my stomach and initiatives can be amended give me colossal headaches. by the state Legislature I can’t load up on Advil without the approval of the or Tylenol due to the fact people after two years, that I have to take according to the state Secre- extremely strong laxatives tary of State’s office. in order to combat the horPaul Gottlieb, rendous constipation caused Weekend Commentary by the chemo drugs. editor My stomach can’t take that much abuse. My only Pot relieves pain relief is a little marijuana. Usually, on these days, The writer of the Oct. 14 letter, “Pot dangerous, “ says I’m too fatigued or sick to drive anywhere. he is against medical mariMost cancer patients are juana because it “endangers laid out flat after treatment. all automobile drivers and Driving oneself around is passengers.” not an option. Well so does alcohol, but However, if I had to, I’d it’s legal. take someone smoking pot And so do people on ceron the road with me any day tain prescription medicacompared to the rest of the tions, and people who are population out there. just plain oblivious to other Accidents will always cars on the road and, I happen. might point out, so do the Would you have me very elderly who still drive labeled a criminal to relieve with only half their sight,

Peninsula Daily News John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

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Our readers’ letters, faxes

‘Backdoor gun ban’? GUN COLLECTORS ARE blasting the administration for putting a last-minute kibosh on a plan to bring nearly 1 million American-made World War II-vintage rifles back to the U.S. from South Korea, where they have been stored since the end of the conflict. Lower-level State officials reportedly had cut a deal with South Korea to allow the M1 Garand and M1 carbine rifles to be sold to U.S. customers. But at the last moment, higher-ups blocked the agreement, saying the rifles could be “exploited” by individuals who would use the weapons to commit crimes. To the gun enthusiasts — along with 118 congressmen and senators who are vowing to overturn the ban — State’s argument amounts to little more than a “backdoor gun ban” of weapons that are essentially historic curios that otherwise are entirely legal to purchase and possess. In fact, hundreds of thousands of the rifles already are in the U.S., including ones sold by the federal government to civilians for decades through the Civilian Marksmanship Program, Rep. John Boozman, R-Ark., and 65 other House members wrote in a letter to Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. Peninsula Daily News sources my suffering on those sick days? That’s not fair. Judie Rich, Port Angeles

either offered or solicited, ultimately lead to pair-wise bonds: Always has, always will. And this is specifically what military units — units Gays in military that depend on coherent, Homosexuals should con- unit-wise bonds — must tinue to be banned from mil- avoid. Don’t believe it? A little itary service, and for a very rational thought says so. good reason — pair-wise Think about it: The conbonding vs. unit-wise bondsistently manpower-starved ing. Specifically, sexual favors, military needs all the enlist-

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Julie C. McCormick, contributing reporter, 360-382-4645; juliemccormick10@gmail.com

by

Dave Logan

“I hope that the people who are running are truthful and honest. That they’re open and fair and that they represent us and not just their pockets. Wow, lots of campaigning going on.”

and

Steve Mullensky

and e-mail

ees it can get, regardless of sexual orientation. You’d otherwise think that they’d seek all the manpower they can get, regardless of sexual orientation. However, and as experience has shown over the millennia, sex in the ranks, either heterosexual or homosexual, can become so corrosive within the ranks that unit cohesion is destroyed. This is why military commanders need to keep sex — and thence homosexuality — out of the ranks. Simply said, you want someone to throw themselves on a grenade to protect his buddies in the unit — and not his lover alone. The buddies die, otherwise. Sexual prejudice? No way. Experience, commonsense leadership, and the need to save lives while winning wars makes it so. My 24 years of military service coupled with my Ph.D. in Defense Policy Analysis from the Rand Corporation bolster my observation. Gerald J. Stiles, Sequim Stiles is a retired Air Force major.

Net fishing I was not surprised to read that the Quilcene National Fish Hatchery does not have enough coho to

make its quota. The large majority of coho were netted in Quilcene Bay before they had a chance to enter the river. There are very few spawned-out fish in the river at a time when the river should be full of them. Where are the protected chum? Not in the river spawning, that’s for sure. What about the eagles, bears and other wildlife that depend on these fish for survival? By law, sports fishermen cannot put a chum in a net if they hook one. It must be released without doing any damage to it. But the coho netters are trapping the chum in their nets 5 feet away from you and have been seen knocking the chum’s heads against their boats before throwing them back in the bay. There is absolutely zero law enforcement in Quil Bay when the tribal netters are out there. No one is keeping track of what is happening to the chum or counting how many coho are being taken. If it is illegal for these fish to be put in a net, why are there nets even allowed in Quil Bay? It is just a matter of time before the coho and the chum follow the path of the chinook and steelhead, which used to return to the Big Quil River until they were wiped out by nets. Turn

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Have Your Say ■ Paul Gottlieb, weekend commentary editor, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints

Peninsula Voices Fundamentalism is doing irreparable damage Someone needs to step to much of the human up to the plate and declare psyche and culture. nets illegal in Quil Bay Around the world, relibefore it is too late. gion has become a most Cindy Pollard, powerful tool of the politiQuilcene cally corrupt, who are ethically and intellectually We asked for a response challenged. from Mike Cenci, deputy ■ A group of U.S. Air chief of enforcement for the Force Academy cadets state state Department of Fish that evangelical Christians and Wildlife. control the Air Force AcadHere it is: emy. I assume the writer is ■ The Military Relireferring to the tribal net gious Freedom Foundation season. has stated that the ChrisTribal officers are obli- tian conservative fanatics gated to monitor this fish- are overrunning our miliery. tary forces. We also do some moniReligion is intolerable toring but have jurisdicwhen not controlled by reational constraints related son and healthy governto treaty salmon fishery ment, neither of which we enforcement due to federal currently have. Republicourt rulings. cans and tea party loons have seen to that. Religion has inferred its ‘The religious right’ way into government to the The single greatest threat to church-state sep- extent that fundamentalist belief denies basic civil libaration in America is the erties to men and women movement known as the everywhere. religious right, peopled by Women are losing conour neighbors. trol of their reproductive Organizations and leadrights because of centuriesers representing this reliold irrelevant biblical law gio-political crusade seek to and moral certainty. impose a fundamentalist ■ Rev. Barry W. Lynn, Christian viewpoint on all Americans United for the Americans through governSeparation of Church and ment action. State, seems like a creditThe religious right represents organized groups of able resource for religious people who do not want to ideologues working to inject outdated Biblical law destroy our Constitution. Bill Lowman, into our constitutional govSequim ernment. Fundamentalist religion Dosewallips hike is the antithesis of reason and intellect. Recently, I hiked up The sociopathic Inquisi- Dosewallips Road to reach tions, the Crusades, old the Dosewallips campwars and current wars are ground and the trails the product of fundamenbeyond. talist moral certainty. Fortunately, for an Continued from C3

Our readers’ letters, faxes

almost 58-year-old, I am relatively fit and was able to reach the Dose Forks camp area 1.4 miles beyond the main campground. Unfortunately, for most people these areas are out of reach, and after a 13-mile round trip, I was peaked out. The point is, the road beyond the original washout is deteriorating extremely, with several large slides. Numerous large rocks are on the road, and at times, that span of the road has dwindled to trail width. Realistically, it appears doubtful our government will ever restore access to what for many would be wonderful recreational opportunities. Seems like another case of being walled off from the wilderness, as was indicated in the Oct. 5 PDN Commentary page column by Ted Stroll, “Should the Wilderness be Safe, Too?” John Swearngin, Sequim

Seven-tenths of one percent. Not a lot, but probably in line with our terrible economy. McEntire is a phony. He has been pretending since first declaring for the state Legislature that he is a conservative and has an “excellent record in fiscal discipline.” I never believed it, and he’s shown his true colors with Harbor-Works and now with that imprudent 5 percent, $5,000 raise to management. He’s never been in private business and is used to living on the backs of taxpayers, first as a federal employee, now as a federal retiree. What’s next, a bailout by McEntire for AIG while the rest of us struggle? Are we now all stupid enough to elect Jim McEntire to the state Legislature? Robert C.W. Moore, Port Angeles

Sunday, October 17, 2010

C3

and e-mail

voters to encourage development of renewable energy sources can have the effect of forcing utilities such as the Bonneville Power Authority to buy this green power when there is no demand on the grid. In other words, the electricity is not needed at the time. A biomass generator can produce a consistent supply of electricity when it is needed, using a local renewable resource. Modern high-tech equipment can ensure it does this very cleanly as well. An electrical grid that includes smaller local generation facilities is also more efficient, not to mention more apt to stay up in the event of a natural disaster. A co-generation plant has an added bonus where the leftover heat energy that was not used to produce electricity is used to produce a product. In the case of Nippon Paper Industries’ biomass generator project, the leftover energy would be used to make paper and recycle old phone books and newspapers. This country badly needs both local renewable energy and the jobs it creates. Bruce Raymond Port Angeles

a week, plus holidays, dogs chase and shotguns blast the brains out of cageraised pheasants who stare at the approaching “hunters” with a deer-in-theheadlights gaze. Great “sport,” eh? Thanks to our county parks for proposing a new three-year agreement with state Fish and Wildlife to allow this and, even though they could have disapproved it, our commissioners for recently authorizing it again. I am sure that the 99.9 percent of county residences who are denied the use of our tax-supported recreation area during four months each year understand and wish the local good-old-boys hunt club good luck in their blood sport. Tom Cox, Sequim

Lauds hunter

I had the opportunity to spend time with a friend and his brother this year during muzzle-loader elk season. Biomass versatile We had some really neat experiences together. I believe there are some One especially comes to misconceptions about McEntire ‘phony’ mind. Has anyone ever had renewable energy sources someone else claim their First Jim McEntire and the way they supply harvest? championed Harbor-Works the electrical grid. There were a lot of to the tune of more than Solar cell and wind genquestions about whose ani$1 million, which, my felerators supply energy on mal it was. low taxpayers, is now all Mother Nature’s schedule. My friend offered to split g-o-n-e. Obviously, solar cells the animal with this other Last week Jim McEnonly output energy during person, but that didn’t tire championed a 5 perdaylight, and their output Raymond is an electrician seem to be good enough. cent raise for the Port of varies according to the This group of people had at Nippon Paper. Port Angeles’ new execuintensity of sunlight they radios and the voice of the tive director. are receiving. person who wasn’t there. ‘Blood sport’ Five percent would have A wind generator’s outYou could tell by the been excessive in a good put also varies. Ah yes, how pleasant tone of his voice that he economy. We do not at this time the start of that annual fall wouldn’t have a problem But in this economy? have a method to store ritual of slaughter at the causing a negative situaAnd, folks, guess what such energy for use when it Dungeness Recreation tion. kind of raise the port rank is needed. Area when at exactly the Turn to Voices/C4 Current laws passed by stroke of 8 a.m. three days and file is getting?

Peninsula Daily News Rants & Raves Compiled By Lee Zurcher

Rave of the Week A THANKFUL RAVE to the doctors and staff of Olympic Veterinary Clinic (Port Angeles) for the prompt attention they gave to our sweet Cubbie, our 6-month-old Labrador, after her tail got shut in the car door. Thank you for saving her tail and all the help you gave to us in our time of struggle with my husband having cancer. Bless you.

. . . and other Raves RAVES TO THE lady who turned in our First Federal checkbook in Sequim. We’re sorry we can’t thank you in person, but you have our eternal gratitude. Also, big rave to the bank personnel who let us know they were in possession of the checkbook. We’re so fortunate to live in such a great area. RAVES, PURRS AND happy National Feral Cat Day (Saturday, Oct. 16) to all the rescue groups and shelters in Clallam and Jefferson counties who help cats, especially by providing spay/neuter assistance and trap, neuter, and return for feral cats. Thank you for all your hard work and dedication to saving cats’ lives. ANOTHER CLEANUP RAVE for the lovely lady with

the black dog cleaning up our Diamond Point Road (Sequim) just this past week. Another community angel. Incredibly, she had filled two bags already. Please, people, why do you throw trash on the roadway? INCREDIBLE RAVES FOR Port Angeles’ best yet Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival (Oct. 15--18). Now, if they could only get permission for an exclusive screening of “Attack of the Crab Monsters” for next year. CHEERS TO POLITICIANS, physicians, cooks, hairdressers and entertainers whose long experience shows they know well their clients’ concerns. Time takes the others.

repaired a gushing water pipe that was eroding our dirt road, filling our pond with silt and diminishing the water table. They not only repaired the leak but then filled in the craters in the road. I’d cheerfully pay twice the rates for such service. A RAVE FOR the employees at the Port Angeles Albertsons last Friday who let some young high school students perform a song in the produce section. One student started playing an acoustic guitar, and a singer with a great voice just joined in. The music was great, and the customers loved it. No one in Albertsons tried to break it up. It was just good fun for everyone.

Virginia Mason in Seattle said that without the quick care and transport there, my husband I would not have survived this tragic incident. We were able to spend another anniversary together. God bless you all.

food in retirement communities is always below par, not good at all. People pay big bucks to live in these places, so they are entitled to decent food that many restaurants would be proud and honored to serve to their customers.

RAVE TO THE young man who noticed me washing my hands with water and offered me a hand wipe instead. It restored my faith in young people.

IS THERE ANOTHER town where one Port Angeles man can be the entire neighborhood’s obsession? He buys a new white truck, then they all start to buy white, etc., then pretend they have no infatuation. Is the old lady and all those people going to help you pay the thousand dollars, or was that another teachable moment?

Rant of the Week A HUGE RANT to the neighborhood bully who continually harasses those who have a right to walk down our private road in peace. A beautiful day should not be interrupted by their vile anger. Seek out an anger management class. Maybe you’ll feel better about the unpleasant world you create for yourself.

A HUGE RAVE for the Key City Public Theater’s terrific production of “Here’s To The Ladies” (Port Townsend). It is a beautifully done show, performed by three splendid singers, all of whom document the significant historical fact that Tin Pan Alley’s music, i.e., America’s music, wasn’t strictly a maledominated affair. Audience response has been enthusiastic, and an extra performance has now been scheduled. Go and see it. EDITOR’S NOTE: Performances continue through Oct. 24. Call 360-385-7396 for more information.

FURTHER RAVES FOR the red, white and blue neighborhood on Lewis Road. Last week’s raves defined the term neighborhood. This same group maintained his property, supported his family and were there whenever needed. . . . and other Rants As an outside observer, I can attest to the fact that this is not only a reflection of their characWOMAN SEEN ATTEMPTter, but his, also. ING to make a left turn on to Lauridsen Boulevard from LauBIG RAVE TO Dr. Dirk rel Street (at Albertsons) (Port Gouge (Port Angeles) and his Angeles) talking on her cell assistant, Dr. Larsen. phone while smoking a cigarette. Great job on my surgery. Go figure.

RAVE TO THE weekend crew from Clallam County Public Utility District who came to our lane on Sunday morning and efficiently and cheerfully

I WOULD LIKE to thank Olympic Medical Center’s emergency and airlift team for the quick response and care of my husband, Mark.

IF OUR LOCAL hospitals can serve good food to their patients and visitors, then why can’t retirement communities? As many of you are aware, the

________ (CLIP AND SAVE) To participate, call our Rants & Raves hotline at 360-417-3506 (works 24 hours a day), e-mail us at letters@peninsuladailynews.com or drop us a postcard, 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Keep comments brief — 50 words or less. And, please, no libel, no responses to letters to the editor or news stories; no personal attacks on individuals or on businesses identified by name; no thank you notes to your favorite restaurant, dry-cleaner, grandchild (we simply don’t have enough room for those); no inaccurate information or unverified rumors; no calls for boycotts; no political endorsements; no charity fund appeals; no commercial pitches. Also, only one rant or rave per writer. Don’t forget to tell us where things happen — Port Angeles, Chimacum, Sequim, etc.


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Sunday, October 17, 2010

CommentaryViewpoints Peninsula Voices

Continued from C3 10 years and has brought broadband to Jefferson My friend decided to County, which is up give up the elk instead of and running. having a serious outcome They worked with happen. Bonneville and NoaNet, He showed real sportsnot the county, to make manship in his decision. this happen. I’m honored to call him ■ “Gibbs Lake”: His vote my friend. I wish I had denied needed timber more like him. funds for the county. I’ve had my own bad Now he wants tax experiences during huntincreases. ing, which made me change Schools and other local the way I hunt, who I governments also didn’t get share information with and needed money because he who I spend time with. prevented the timber sale. This situation was noth■ “Sewer in Brinnon ing but greed and being and Port Hadlock”: Hasn’t opportunistic. happened and doesn’t It’s funny how many Dr. appear likely any time Jekyll(s)/Mr. Hyde(s) come soon. out during hunting season. It’s not even shovelYou made the right call. ready for stimulus funds. Good job, Rob. ■ “Shoreline Master Mark Vanderziel, Program and airport Port Angeles rezone”: His Shoreline Master Program created 150-foot buffers away from Barkhuis skilled I have been an attorney water, making some property valueless. in Clallam County for 29 Damaged or destroyed years. property may not be able to I have known Selinda be rebuilt. Barkhuis since 1996. The city saw fit to have I have had ample oppora reasonable 50-foot tunity over the years to setback. observe her practicing law. The airport rezone he Selinda consistently seems to be taking credit impresses me with her pro- for merely consisted of a fessional demeanor, her vote to accept the planning dedication to the difficult commission’s recommendawork she does and her tion. The Port of Port work habits. Townsend did all the She is extremely skillful rezone work. at organization and the Austin’s comparison ad management of complex completely misstates the tasks. position of his opponent, She possesses great Jim Boyer, on the environintellect and approaches all ment and other issues. her projects with keen Austin takes sole credit attention to detail. for saving local state parks Selinda always stressed while closing county recreethics in her dealings with ation facilities. the courts and her clients. Austin’s wife publicly Her integrity was questioned Boyer’s integapparent to all who worked rity at the Oct. 14 forum, either alongside her in insinuating that Boyer was court or as opponents in running for commissioner the many types of cases purely for personal finanshe handled. cial gain. As for his leadership Clallam County would claims, Austin’s fellow combe well served with Ms. missioners didn’t elect him Barkhuis as its treasurer. chairman of the board of She is extremely wellcounty commissioners. qualified for the office. He is satisfied to be a Patricia L. Jackson, Port Angeles follower, but we need a leader like Jim Boyer. Vote Boyer. Freedman honest Bob Sokol, I am a local business Port Townsend person and former schools superintendent in Port Roark Miller critic Angeles. I support John Miller I have lived here for 23 for Clallam County director years. of community development I am voting for Larry in the upcoming election Freedman for Clallam because he is experienced, County prosecuting attorliked by his staff and ney. I know he is the right understands the big picperson for the office. ture of what is involved in Freedman’s experience overseeing a $34.4 million and track record speak for budget with a staff of 32 themselves. employees. His integrity can be I am disturbed by chalseen clearly in the camlenger Sheila Roark Millpaign he has run and the er’s campaign slogan, “balcommitment he has made anced stewardship.” to the Clallam County comI wonder if that is like munity. the Fox news channel’s I am very disturbed by idea of “fair and balanced”? the behavior of our incumClearly, in Sheila’s case, bent prosecuting attorney, the balance is not on the Deborah Kelly, both in car- side of streams or the fish rying out the duties of her that live in them, and she office and in her re-election is obviously at odds with campaign. the Department of Ecology, Massive turnover, which tries to protect the delayed cases, charges of watershed. prosecutorial misconduct This doesn’t bode well and judicial fines all attest for the fish, the citizens to failing management and who want the watershed poor leadership. protected or for people with The PDN’s coverage of shallow wells, for that Kelly’s alleged failure to matter. declare campaign contribuWhy vote for someone tions [“Cranes for Camwhose idea of “balance” is. I paign Signs Rapped. Com- believe, to fight a state plaint filed with State agency that’s been working Agency,” Oct. 6 PDN] collaboratively with local reflects poorly on the residents for 10 years on a incumbents’ ethics. watershed protection plan? She appears to have Why elect someone like Sheila without qualificaaccepted contributions far tions or experience to this in excess of those allowed high-paying, responsible by law. She plastered the coun- position as director of DCD of Clallam County? tryside with campaign Think it over carefully. signs, apparently assuming Patricia MacRobbie, that the only important Sequim campaign issue is name recognition. This is a blatant insult For Roark Miller to all voters. I have been watching I have confidence that with interest the debates voters will think for them- between Sheila Roark selves and will study this Miller and the incumbent, race. John Miller, for director of The conclusion will be the Clallam County clear: Vote for Larry Freed- Department of Community man for prosecuting attorDevelopment. ney. With the exception of John Pope, John Miller’s lack of accesPort Angeles sibility to the public, it all boils down to big government regulating our lives. Critical of Austin Currently, mandates go Jefferson County comto the extreme. missioner candidate John One cannot construct a Austin’s advertisements simple handicap ramp, are filled with exaggerated storage shed or pole barn and meaningless words. without the county’s ridicu■ “Broadband”: The lous demand to go through public utility district has the permit process and colworked hard for the past lection of fees — all policies

John Miller supports and his challenger does not. My vote will definitely go to Sheila Roark Miller. Her experience goes well beyond her permitcounter duties. She has been with the department for more than 20 years and became the first female building inspector in the county. She is a certified code compliance officer, building code official and deputy fire marshal. Roark Miller is more than qualified to take on the responsibilities of the department when elected. Recently, in a discussion concerning building permit requirements for diminutive storage sheds, John Miller defended the requisite. His concern was that strict adherence to the building codes are essential because in the future, a person may attempt to set up living quarters in the structures. I guess he is right. The more government takes over our every move, increases our taxes and continues down the road of imperious fees, the possibility of me moving into my wood shed becomes more of a possibility. Regardless, Sheila Roark Miller is my choice for DCD director. Ted Bedford, Sequim

Miller performs Here’s why I support John Miller for Clallam County department of community development director: He’s refreshingly honest. At candidate forums, John answers questions forthrightly and is willing to say things that some may not want to hear. He’s respectful and accessible. At the follow-up building permit advisory board meeting about whether to keep the 400-square-foot outbuilding exemption (which I attended as one of two members of the public), John and his DCD division managers clearly heard the message that the abuse of the exemption is the problem, not the exemption itself. In a positive dialogue with building-industry representatives, he agreed to support increasing education and enforcement rather than changing the code. He has a vision for Clallam County’s future. John understands the importance of issues such as alternative energy development, wise management of our natural resources, smart growth and water and farmland conservation. His opponent’s message focuses on permits, but DCD’s clients are all of us who live here, not just those who appear at the permit counter. He’s a good manager. I work in DCD and find John to be a respectful and caring manager who listens to, empowers and supports his employees, taking a keen interest in the operations of the office. His opponent has been a DCD employee for 20 years, yet I do not know of a single DCD colleague who supports her election. We are lucky to have an elected DCD director with such skills and sense of public service. Let’s keep John working for us. Ed Chadd, Port Angeles Chadd is a Clallam County DCD associate planner.

Miller well-rounded John Miller is a proven successful director of the Clallam County Department of Community Development (DCD). This is not the “Department of Building Permits.” Permits are one of a wide range of very important functions the department has to ensure the well-being and future of our community, including such things as code enforcement (keeping your neighbor’s septic system from poisoning your well), compliance with state and

Our readers’ letters, faxes federal laws (keeping us out of expensive court battles) flood protection and envisioning future challenges before they get out of hand. Everywhere else in the country, the DCD director would be a professional civil service position requiring advanced credentials and a proven track record. If the county were seeking to fill this position in the normal way, John Miller would be an excellent candidate. His opponent, Sheila Roark Miller, would probably not even be qualified for an interview. John has years of administrative and policy experience behind him, and I have seen him put that experience to good use at community meetings and on committees I have served on with him. John performs his essential job functions extremely well. Sheila’s one claim, according to her campaign flier, is “contributing to policy decisions.” I am sure she could be a good building inspector, but she is not the right person to direct the whole department with its numerous responsibilities. We are lucky to have one so qualified as John Miller running for re-election as DCD director. Don’t miss this opportunity to vote for him. Lyn Muench, Port Angeles Muench is a retired economic and land-use planner.

Urges Miller vote I urge you to retain John Miller as director of the Clallam County Department of Community Development. As director, John Miller oversees a wide range of diverse programs including comprehensive planning, development and building permit processing, code enforcement and county fire protection. Each of these divisions is staffed by qualified professionals with unique specialties. That the overall department functions so highly across so many domains is a tribute to John Miller’s extraordinary management skills. John is a highly educated, experienced and talented man with great intelligence, intuition and insight. John Miller is not unlike a great coach or conductor. With the team or the orchestra doing so well, why change the coach or conductor? Harry A. Jackson, Port Angeles

Miller eases path Since John Miller has been the director of the Clallam County Department of Community Development, applying for a building permit is a much easier process than it once was. Now, you are met at the counter by someone who will help you through the process instead of making it a more difficult process. I have the utmost respect for John’s honest and fair approach to his job and his dedication to the people of Clallam County. I believe re-electing John Miller, with his many years as a proven leader, is a much better choice than electing someone who is not a proven leader, is lacking experience and will say whatever it takes get elected to a job they are not nearly as qualified for. Wayne Spires, Port Angeles

Vote for Rosekrans The prosecuting attorney heads up law enforcement in Jefferson County. That person must work closely and cooperatively with the police and sheriff’s departments to enforce the law so we can all live in a safe community. The vote you cast for this office may be the most important one on your ballot. Scott Rosekrans, the Democratic candidate, has spent most of his lengthy and successful career in law enforcement. Opponent Paul Richmond’s career has focused on tracking and videotap-

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ing alleged police misconduct, organizing protests and denouncing the United States as a “fascist police state.” Given his background, it is unlikely that Richmond could work effectively with our local police and sheriff’s departments. Nor is he likely to deliver on his promise to reduce government spending. We will still incur the fixed expense of maintaining our police and sheriff’s departments and our jail regardless of the number of cases that are brought, settled or tried. Richmond admittedly has scant trial experience and has never worked in law enforcement. Richmond has “doubts” about the conviction in the Michael Pierce case, yet appears to lack the advocacy skills to have tried that case himself. Or perhaps he would have settled it. Rosekrans, on the other hand, tried that case to a successful conclusion. Please join me in voting for Scott Rosekrans for prosecuting attorney. We require nothing less than verified experience and competence in this office. Charles MacNab, Port Townsend

other task that to travel the district, keeping in touch with businesses, civic groups, individual citizens, and each local and tribal government; listening, learning, trying my best to help solve problems; and holding our state’s executive branch accountable.” Clearly, I don’t want to pay two salaries (with benefits) for Mr. Tharinger to be in two places at one time and/or try to do justice to two full-time positions. I am voting for Jim McEntire. Lee H. Moench, Sequim EDITOR’S NOTE: We asked Tharinger if the writer’s account of Tharinger missing the meeting was accurate. Tharinger said he could not remember how late he was and said it may have been due to having to chair a meeting.

For Rossi, Cloud

Thirty-four years. Yes, 34 years. Norm Dicks has been in Washington, D.C., for 34 years. That makes him a professional politician and an elitist. It is time for the voters to retire him. Patty Murray has been in Washington, D.C., for 18 years. Rosekrans the one If we re-elect her, she I am writing to encourwill be there for 24 years. age the support of Mr. Scott That, too, makes her a Rosekrans for prosecuting professional politician and attorney for Jefferson an elitist. County. It is time the voters In order to succeed in retire her. such a job, we need someThese two professional one who will look at the politicians have been taxentire picture: the reason ing and spending with no for the action, the conseregard to the common peoquences of the action and ple for long enough. the appropriate resolution They are rubber stamps that benefits the safety and for Obama and all of his well being of our commutax-and-spend issues. nity within the boundaries We have two excellent of the laws we must live by. candidates ready to replace I believe that Mr. both Dicks and Murray, Rosekrans is the person for and I urge you to support this job. both Doug Cloud and Dino He understands that if Rossi on Nov. 2. you do wrong, you must Cloud and Rossi stand stand before your commufor common-sense governnity and pay the cost of ment with less government that wrongdoing. and less spending of our He understands there hard-earned tax dollars. are some who need help Lynne Kott, with addictions to stop the Port Angeles criminal activity. He understands that Dems socialists? victims need to be heard, Do you value the core need support. principles that built AmerMr. Rosekrans is truly a ica into the most producman of integrity and hontive and prosperous society esty. in the history of mankind, He will listen, ask for principles such as a strong advice and consider your work ethic, personal thoughts and opinions. responsibility, a lightly regI urge you to vote for ulated free-market econScott Rosekrans. omy, rule of law and a Terri McQuillen, small, limited government, Port Townsend to name a few? Today’s big-brother Good campaigns nanny-state is so far from I am so proud of 24th these core principles that Legislative District Posiit’s hard to even recognize tion 1 candidates Dan Gase the country that once was. and Kevin Van De Wege So, what happened? running issue-oriented Over many decades, campaigns instead of the Fabian socialists, progresdisgusting, personal, mudsives and liberals have slinging campaigns of U.S. slowly, step by step, taken Senate candidates Patty over positions of power, Murray and Dino Rossi. mainly through the DemoI no longer pay attencrat Party. tion to their ads, as I have The emblem of the Fabinot heard even one that ans is a wolf in sheep’s addresses what their platclothing. What could be forms are. more telling? Their ads are a waste of These people will never money and my time. come out and openly admit Nancy Prince-Fox, their real intentions, Port Angeles because they know Americans would never accept McEntire: Full-time them. But their actions say it Several weeks ago I all — a non-stop barrage of attended a forum in big government programs, Sequim to listen to Jim takeovers, controls, regulaMcEntire and Steve Thartions, corruption and inger, candidates for State increasing taxes and Representative, 24th Legiswealth confiscation/redislative District, Position 2. tribution. Mr. Tharinger missed It’s also part of the the first 40-plus minutes of Cloward-Piven strategy to that meeting, for which he overwhelm the system, apologized saying he was cause its collapse and put late due to a county meetin its place an imagined ing he had to attend as socialist utopia that’s in chairman. total conflict with human His website states he is nature. involved with 21 local, This is not the Demoregional and state entities, crat Party of old. chairing four of them. Rather, it has been comIf elected in November, pletely taken over at its he plans to keep his job as highest levels by radical county commissioner, but I socialists who are aggreswonder: sively implementing their How can he possibly anti-American agenda. attend important county Obama, Reid, Pelosi and meetings as commissioner our own Murray and Dicks when the state Legislature clearly fit this mold, all a is in session in Olympia? deadly cancer on America. Alternatively, Mr. McEnIt’s time to exit this tire has said he will resign deadwood. as port commissioner if Please, fellow Amerielected in November. cans, wake up, vote wisely. He said, according to his Greg Carroll, website, www.jimmcentire. Sequim com, “I will have no divided loyalties, and I will have no Turn to Voices/C5


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints Peninsula Voices

Continued from C4 in Olympia. Remember, if you vote Why I’m for Murray yes on this, you have voted for a state income tax for As an independent, I yourself, too, not just the generally look at both so-called high-income sides. earners. This year, I was particuDick Sutterlin, larly interested in what the Sequim tea partiers had to say. Sadly, it’s just meanI-1098 is fair spirited and shortsighted. Initiative 1098 is about Tea partiers and Republicans alike seem to have a tax fairness — it is not class warfare. philosophy roughly the The promoter of I-1098 equivalent of “I got mine, is Bill Gates Sr., a wealthy screw you.” So I’m voting man who cares about tax for Patty Murray. She does right by Wash- fairness. Washington state has ington, whether it’s fightone of the most regressive ing for jobs in the private tax systems in the nation sector, grants for research This simply means the into chronic pain and clean energy (more jobs), training poor and middle class carry a larger tax burden than for health care workers or the rich. For example, those our own local veterans’ earning $20,000 or less pay clinic. She wants to help build almost four times more of what they earn in taxes a better life for all of us, than individuals earning unlike her opponent, Dino Rossi, whose ideas focus on $500,000. I-1098 will reduce the what he can cut (such as business and occupation the minimum wage). She’s not responsible for tax on 80 percent of small the mess we’re in — greedy businesses. Historically, small businesses are the bankers are. biggest job creators. The TV ads running That’s why the Main against her are so manipuStreet Alliance, 2,000 small lative and slimy. I want to go take a shower after I’ve businesses across the state, and the Greater Seattle seen them. Business Association There’s another thing endorse I-1098 I’ve noticed about today’s I-1098 will reduce the conservatives: They don’t state portion of everyone’s care how much suffering property taxes. their policies cause. Check out how much They don’t care how long you’ve paid into Social you would save at www. yeson1098.com/calculator. Security, unemployment html.” insurance or a pension. I-1098 will impose a Eliminate it, they yell. When you ask why, they 5 percent tax on those earning $200,000 or give vague answers that amount to no answer at all $400,000 for couple — their total will still be less than (Nevada Senate candidate the 11 percent currently Sharron Angle). The government is here, paid by the lower income wage earners. in part, to “promote the There is even a biblical general welfare” of the peobasis for I-1098. ple. Funny, they never Jesus commands the quote that part of the Conwealthy “not to be arrogant stitution. Kate Laney, nor to put their hope in Port Angeles wealth,” but rather “to be generous and willing to share” (1 Timothy 6). Don’t fear I-1098 I-1098 is endorsed by Gov. Gregoire has come almost 200 organizations, out swinging for Initiative including labor councils, 1098, which requires our the state League of Women state’s wealthiest citizens Voters and religious orgato pay a graduated state nizations. income tax. I urge you to vote yes on During a recent stateI-1098 and create greater wide call-in broadcast, the tax fairness in Washington governor revealed that she state. will be voting for I-1098 Norma Turner, because it is the only way Port Angeles to save the public education and state health care Don’t need I-1098 systems which, in turn, are A strange thing recently the keys to Washington’s happened to me. ability to survive in a I was checking the conhighly competitive, worlddition of my tent and found wide market. a camel’s nose inside, with Several callers a sign hanging from the expressed concern to Grenose that said, “Initiative goire about the “slippery slope” problem, fearing that 1098.” Pushing the camel into the state Legislature could my tent was the father of intervene in two years to apply any state income tax one of the world’s richest to lower income citizens as men, Bill Gates Sr. I-1098 wants to impose well. an excise tax on joint In response, the governor said it would be “politi- incomes in excess of cal suicide” and “politically $400,000 a year in exchange for which the stupid” for the Legislature state will reduce state to expand the income tax, property taxes by 20 peradding that she would not expect such a bill to arrive cent. Interesting. An excise tax is noron her desk. mally thought of as a tax The governor did not on gasoline, tobacco, alcohol say she would veto such a or other specific products. bill, but certainly the govIn other words, a tax on ernor has such power, and a specific product or Gregoire will be in office for at least two more years. license. In this case, we are talking about a tax on While the governor income. thinks I-1098 is good for This tax will be “collectbusiness, I would add only ible in 2012 and thereafthat I-1098 would help ter”; i.e. forever. reform a state tax system But you say you don’t that is the most regressive come close to $400,000 a in the nation, one that year in income? places the most burden of What makes us think supporting state services on that once the Legislature’s those who are the poorest and the lightest burden on appetite for an income tax has been whetted, that the those who are the richest. This makes for a system $400,000 ceiling will not inexorably drop and the 20 that is not only unfair but percent property-tax break also unstable and unpreslowly disappear into the dictable when hard times fog? come, as the current ecoThe “income tax”’ is only nomic chaos makes amply targeted to improve educaclear. Charles Strickland, tion and health services. In the meantime, we are Port Angeles laying off safety services, such as policemen and fireI-1098 dangerous men, because of the budget With regards to Initiadeficit. tive 1098, this is only the Note that only the first step to enable the poli- money, in excess, of the cost ticians to get everybody to of the property tax pay a state income tax. decrease will be used for Anyone who has lived in the stated purposes. this state for any amount Nice try, Mr. Gates, but of time and has not been take your camel out of my under a rock should know tent. very well that if this I don’t need a state passes, not only will every- income tax. body be paying a state Besides, have you heard income tax, but the tax the phrase this year: Jobs, rate will be raised every not taxes? time the politicians get Richard Michels, Sequim together in the marble zoo

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life or will surely destroy it if elected. Our 16th president, in I’m appalled to learn, if his famous Gettysburg I believe the television Address, summed it up advertisements, that the best in regard to our incumbents have personunique political system ally created “gazillions” of with the words “governdollars of debt and live ment of the people, by the only to eliminate my job people, for the people.” while taking my last dime Each American has a in taxes. voice in the decisions of our The challengers apparelected officials within the ently don’t care anything parameters of the Constiabout me and only want to tution. drive America into a “MidSo if we, as a nation, are dle Ages” feudal system, to keep alive what our with us being penniless founding fathers have serfs while they become established, we all need to lords of the land. be involved in the political According to the ads, the process, and at the very only candidates to choose least, we should all cast a from are evil, despicable vote on each Election Day. creatures. Voter apathy is not an And the issues. If I vote option for any true Amerifor them, I contribute to can. the destruction of life as we Your vote, though one, is know it, and if I vote a powerful thing. against them, same result. It identifies you are havI love my country and ing faith in our governmenwant to vote, but it seems tal system and places you I’m ruining America no shoulder to shoulder with matter who or what I all of your fellow countrychoose to vote for. men. I recently got a flu shot. John F. Kennedy once It gives me some peace said, “Ask not what your of mind for my health. country can do for you — Is there a vaccination ask what you can do for for voter anxiety? your country.” Les Carnahan, At no time in recent Port Angeles memory have Americans been polarized politically. ‘They dug us out’ Should we continue on To Americans who plan our present course or to vote Republican this fall, choose another compass I have nothing to say. bearing? The best economists It has been said that all have not convinced you it takes for our nation to that President Obama’s collapse is for good people stimulus plan saved our to do nothing. economy from historic So please, do cast your catastrophe, nor have they vote this Election Day, trusting that God will take persuaded you that the jobless numbers would be far care of the results. Duane Miles, higher if not for the presiBeaver dent’s bold measures. No amount of evidence Ripe for third party will change your negative opinion toward our presiColumnist Thomas dent’s health care plan, Friedman’s quotes from even when it benefits you Larry Diamond, political and your children. scientist from Stanford, No amount of climatic really resonated with me chaos, no amount of con[“Third party rising on sensus among scientists 2012 horizon?” Oct. 4 worldwide will convince PDN]: you that climate change is “We basically have two real, that human activity bankrupt parties bankruptcontributes to it, and we’d ing our country.” better act fast to mitigate Friedman said, “We simthe damage. ply will not be able to do So I speak to Democrats the things we need to do as and independents when I a country to move forward,” say there is a difference and Diamond adds, “with between Democrats and all the vested interests that Republicans. have accrued around these When we remember the two parties.” disastrous George W. Bush Finally, and most importantly, Diamond said, “They years, the incompetent, unpaid-for wars, the plumcannot think about the overall public good and the met from record surpluses to record deficits, the violalonger term anymore tions of human rights, we because both parties are are reminded what a Hertrapped in the short-term, culean task it has been for zero-sum calculations,” Obama and the Democrats where, Freedman added, to dig the car out of the “each one’s gains are seen ditch. as the other’s losses.” Add to that the meanUntil we as average Americans decide to no lon- spirited obstruction by Republicans to every Demger allow lobbying, corpoocratic remedy, and we are rate greed, and manipulaleft with Democrats trying tion of the system by life to dig the car out of the time politicians who funcditch with one hand tied tion like aristocracy, our country will continue down behind their backs. Democrats and indepenthe whirlpool of selfdents, don’t sit this one out! destruction. A Republican victory That being said, I totally will finish the disaster that agree with Mr. Friedman about our need for a legiti- George W. Bush started. mate third party when he A Democratic victory says: will continue our hope for “These two parties are positive change we believed lying to you. They can’t tell in just two years ago. you the truth because they Paul Chasman, are each trapped in Port Angeles decades of special interests. “I am not going to tell Vote, regardless you what you want to hear. We are in the midst of a I am going to tell you what dandy political season. you need to hear if we My thought is that often want to be the world’s leadwe are displeased with all ers, not the new Romans.” options, and so we decide Until we change the not to vote. things with our system I would suggest a differthat are broken, mostly ent path — “waste” your those based on special interests, we are doomed to vote by voting for anyone who isn’t a Democrat or failure. Republican. It’s time to shake ourAll votes are counted. selves out of our apathy Think about it. and take action, take back What do you think our country for the good of would happen if more votes the majority. Jim Bourget, were “tossed” than placed Port Angeles for the major parties? My own thought is, that a message that needs to be Voter anxiety’ sent would be sent. Wow, do I feel like an Not voting, on the other idiot. hand, denotes complete For decades now, when indifference about those an election year comes who would rule and tell around, I studiously watch you how to live your life, the television ads, read tax you, etc. mailers and campaign litIf you don’t care enough erature to make what I’ve to vote, then why should always thought was an anybody? educated decision on who John White, and what to vote for. Port Angeles After all, it’s my duty as an American. Vote imbalance? But for the last few years, and especially this Every four years, we all year, it appears that every get excited about the numcandidate I can vote for or ber of electoral votes we have voted for is personally count for a president. responsible for the destrucBut did anybody ever tion of our American way of tell you that not every elec-

Sunday, October 17, 2010

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and e-mail

toral vote weighs the same? In fact, if there were a weights-and-measures cop, many of those votes would be tagged as underweight. The dirty secret is that a significant number of those 538 votes are not the same. No electoral vote can be overweight, as the maximum is always one 538th of all the votes cast. In 2008, actually 197 of the 538 electoral votes were underweight. The reason is simple: There are many more voters now than when citizen voting began in 1824, when a single electoral vote was worth 1,925 voters. In 2008, there were 244,011 voters, a difference of more than 126 times, yet the number of electoral votes has grown from 261 electoral votes to 538, a difference of only two times. Our state has constantly been “underweight,” and in fact, we have actually been deprived of our legitimate number of votes for 100 years, since there are not enough votes available because of those states with fewer voters. Idaho, for example, does not have full electoral votes, and states like ours, with a larger population, are going begging for electoral votes that are literally being wasted because we have too few electoral votes. This is a scandal that needs to be exposed. We are being cheated royally every four years. Now, do you understand why I rail against the Electoral College? Clint Jones, Sequim

into our politics come TV ads promoting lies in the image of truth, many halftruths and distortions. These appear on both sides, but I happen to believe that most Americans want the truth and can sort through some of the phony rhetoric. I object to the Supreme Court’s ruling, because I do not believe that any corporation has or should have the same rights that I have or any other American citizen. As a nation, we are at a crossroads, and big money appears to be winning. Big money is buying our democracy. The chasm between the wealthiest and poorest is widening more each year. In order to be heard, we can demand election reform. A bipartisan-action starting point can be found in the Fair Elections Now Act, http://fairelectionsnow.org/about-bill (S.B. 752 and H.R. 1826). And, most importantly, vote. Nancy Lang, Port Angeles,

Driving habits

Being a transplant from the East Coast about seven-plus years ago, I have one very vivid thing that is different, and it is the pulling out in front of one while driving your car or truck on the road. Why the big hurry? All they do is go a block and turn or go slow once they get out in front of you. Why? Maybe they need a refresher course on calculating distance and the speed of the oncoming vehicle. Along with road knowledge, how about the bikes Campaign money on the road? As the election draws From what I have near, two things become observed, I would say that clear: not only does the vehicle ■ Unprecedented operator need to know the amounts of money will be rules and regulations, but spent this election cycle, the bike rider needs to primarily due to the know, also. Supreme Court decision It couldn’t hurt. last January in favor of Last but not least, what corporations happened to the enforce■ Nobody, as usual, will ment of the hands-free have the highest numbers operation of the cell phone at the polls. while driving? In the best mid-term I must have been asleep, election year, less than half or maybe it isn’t being of the people vote, and enforced. barely half of those will Joe Pursell, actually choose the winners Sequim who will be our next representatives. Valiant rescue try In other words, 75 perTraveling along Marine cent will not truly be repreDrive in Sequim is a serene sented by anyone they supand scenic experience that port. I have always enjoyed. Once again, nobody While on a business wins. matter, on Thursday, Oct. 6, As for money, since the normal peace and quiet there is no paper trail (do in that area was shattered you remember 2004?), airwhen a van, apparently waves, posters and media traveling north on Cays can be immersed in Road, with a lone female amounts unfathomable, driver, failed to turn right heretofore relying on the premise that a large major- onto Marine Drive and motored off the cliff to a ity of Americans are point about a hundred “dumbed down” enough to vote with a knee-jerk men- yards into the bay [“Driver Dies in Van Plunge. ‘She tality from name recogniLaunched Herself About tion only. It’s been estimated that 100 Yards . . .”, Oct. 8-9 PDN. $4 billion will be spent to A lone Border Patrol convince a lot of people agent jumped into the that these candidates are chilly waters and, with the viable. aid of two area neighbors, If the candidate was tried vainly to extricate the really that good, why do they spend so much money woman from the vehicle. The agent remained to get elected? with the woman, who was It should be obvious still alive, and he held her from their credentials, if the electorate just took the head above the chilly water, but sometime later, time to find out. So, if you think the per- she expired. After witnessing the son with the most media event and hearing of blitz is the best-qualified numerous other Border and is going to represent Patrol assists, I reflected on you, think about how they got there and what they’re the rallies reported in the PDN against the buildup of going to represent you the Border Patrol in this when they get elected. And don’t be surprised if area. What can I say? Del Gott, once again, you feel like Sequim nobody. Now, don’t you feel like Sequim Rehab a winner? Brian Juel, My praise to Sequim Sequim Health and Rehab, particularly to the administrator, Corporate cash Ed Ebling. His attitude and caring The benefit of the January ruling by the Supreme is reflected by his outstanding staff, doctors, registered Court on Case No. 08-205, Citizens United vs. Federal nurses, aides and physical and occupational theraElection Commission, is pists. showing up loud and clear I had the good fortune with the mid-term elections. to be the recipient of their Corporations, including professional and caring the U.S. Chamber of Comtreatment and restoring merce and other patrioticgood health. I was able to sounding political action give up a wheelchair, committees, are having a walker and cane. free-for-all with vast I am now support-free. amounts of money given by We are fortunate to mostly unknown donors. have this facility available. Along with obscene Honey Davis, amounts of dollars filtering Port Angeles


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

No execution in Afghan killings case Army announces intent if soldier is convicted By Gene Johnson

The Associated Press

JOINT BASE LEWISMCCHORD — A soldier who told investigators in horrifying detail that he and other members of his unit executed three civilians in Afghanistan for sport will not face the death penalty if convicted, the Army said Friday. Spc. Jeremy Morlock of Wasilla, Alaska, is one of five defendants charged with murder and conspiracy in the deaths this year. Much of the Army’s case is based on extensive statements Morlock gave describing the killings. Last month, an investigating officer at Joint Base Lewis-McChord near Tacoma held a preliminary hearing in Morlock’s case and recommended it proceed to a court-martial. The Army announced Friday that a court-martial would be scheduled, though no time frame was given, and that Morlock would face a maximum penalty of life in prison if convicted.

Last execution in’ 61 Neither announcement was a surprise. The military hasn’t executed anyone since 1961, according to the Death Penalty Information Center. Morlock, 22, cooperated with investigators, and his lawyer said he suffered from repeat concussions from explosions in Afghanistan — both factors that

“There’s a lot of reasons they wouldn’t seek the death penalty, especially when you have someone who has physical injuries from a combat zone.”

Michael Waddington attorney for accused soldier Spc. Jeremy Morlock

could weigh against seeking execution, though the Army didn’t detail its reasons. “There’s a lot of reasons they wouldn’t seek the death penalty, especially when you have someone who has physical injuries from a combat zone,” said Morlock’s attorney, Michael Waddington.

Suppress statements He said Morlock will fight the allegations at the trial and will seek to have his statements suppressed on the grounds that they were made under the influence of muscle relaxants and other drugs prescribed for possible traumatic brain injury. No decision has been made on whether to send the other four defendants to trial or to seek the death penalty, Lewis-McChord spokeswoman Maj. Kathleen Turner said. The allegations are some of the most serious to emerge from the

The Associated Press

In this courtroom sketch, Spc. Jeremy Morlock of Wasilla, Alaska, center, is shown with his attorney, Michael Waddington, left, and Col. Thomas Molloy, the investigating officer, during a hearing last month to consider evidence against Morlock. Afghan war. In interviews with Army investigators, Morlock described a plot led by Staff Sgt. Calvin Gibbs to randomly kill civilians while on patrol in Kandahar Province. Gibbs denies the charges and insists all of the killings were appropriate engagements, his lawyer said. Prosecutors have also alleged that members of the platoon mutilated and

posed with Afghan corpses and even collected fingers and other body parts. Morlock talked about how they threw a grenade at one civilian to “wax him.” The killings occurred in January, February and May. In each, prosecutors said, Morlock and Gibbs enlisted one other soldier to be involved. Lawyers for those three said they either deny

involvement or that their participation was unwitting. The case raised serious questions about the Army’s handling of it.

Troubling messages Spc. Adam Winfield, who is charged in the final killing, sent troubling Facebook messages home to his parents in Florida after the first killing. He wrote that he was

being threatened to keep his mouth shut about it and that he didn’t know what to do. His father made nearly half a dozen calls to military officials that day, and he said he warned them about the ongoing plot and the threats against his son. But no arrests were made until May, when a witness in a drug case in the unit alerted investigators to what he considered unjustified killings.

Questions raised about accused soldiers’ officers The New York Times

JOINT BASE LEWISMCCHORD — Soldiers in an Army platoon accused of murdering Afghan civilians for sport said they

took orders from a ringleader who collected body parts as war trophies, were threatened with death if they spoke up and smoked hashish on their

base almost daily. Now family members and the military are asking a central question: How could their commanders not know what was going on?

“I just don’t understand how this went so far,” said Christopher Winfield, the father of Spc. Adam C. Winfield, one of the platoon members charged with murder. “I’ve been in management for 20 years; you know what your people are doing.” But interviews in recent days and hundreds of pages of documents in the case offer a portrait of an isolated, out-of-control unit that operated in Kandahar Province in southern Afghanistan with limited supervision and little oversight from senior commanders.

Officers not charged There are indications of missed warnings among Army officers who saw trouble with some platoon leaders but did not dig deeper — let alone suspect the extent of the problem — until investigators began asking questions in early May, nearly four months after prosecutors said the first of three murders of Afghan civilians occurred. The documents, which have not been made public, include sworn statements from soldiers and some of

their officers. So far, neither the leaders of the 30-man platoon nor more senior officers in the 5th Stryker Combat Brigade have been charged or disciplined in one of the most gruesome war crimes cases to come out of nearly a decade of conflict in Afghanistan. It is unclear whether action will be taken against them in the future. Five platoon members of lower ranks have been charged with murder, and all have said they are not guilty. Seven more were charged with lesser offenses. Drug tests were conducted regularly on most of the platoon and its larger brigade before the group left Joint Base LewisMcChord, near Tacoma, for the war, and 1,207 tests were done while the 3,800-member brigade was in Afghanistan. Drug tests are required for entire units in the United States but are conducted at commanders’ discretion during deployments. “I cannot totally discount the fact that a platoon someplace was never tested and was on drugs,” Gen.

Peter W. Chiarelli, the vice chief of staff of the Army, acknowledged in an interview last week. Soldiers in the platoon gave no indication that illicit drug use was the reason for the alleged crimes. Lawyers interviewed said it was symptomatic of larger trouble.

Drug use common Still, illicit drug use was already common in the platoon as it prepared to leave Lewis-McChord for Afghanistan in spring 2009, at least according to the sworn testimony from one of its members, Pfc. Justin A. Stoner. While at the base, “my platoon was not exactly straightforward with substance abuse,” Stoner told Army investigators. He said members of the platoon “would blatantly smoke” what they said was marijuana and that another platoon member, Spc. Jeremy N. Morlock, had gone AWOL for a week to avoid a final drug test before deployment. Morlock, one of those charged with murder, was referred on Friday for courtmartial proceedings.

Transients trigger city camping ban The Associated Press

LONGVIEW — The Longview City Council voted to ban camping on public property — parks,

sidewalks and parking lots. The council acted Thursday in response to complaints from business owners that transients were using streets and alleys as

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Sunday, October 17, 2010

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Full-body scan coming to Sea-Tac 14 units to be put in within coming week Peninsula Daily News new services

SEATTLE — Traveling through Seattle-Tacoma Airport soon? Be prepared to remove your wallet, take off your watch and belt, empty your pockets and stand with your hands over your head while an X-ray machine scans for anything hidden under your clothing. Fourteen full-body scanners will be installed at Sea-Tac security checkpoints with some fully operational within the next week, Transportation Security Administration officials said Friday. The machines, called “backscatter” devices, allow agents to see through clothes by scattering lowdose X-rays at a passenger’s front and back. The X-rays produce a chalky, nude image that detects hidden metallic and nonmetallic items alike, such as plastic weapons and explosives. To quell privacy concerns, TSA is making the screening optional — travelers can opt for a physical pat down and a walk through a metal detector instead. Agents also might use explosive-tracing devices (cotton swabs) or hand

“My suspender clips got me a quick wanding. The same person who was watching the X-ray unit had to stop everything to wand my suspenders, and that slowed up the whole line.”

Leroy McVay of Poulsbo, who went through a body scanner in Tulsa, Okla.

wands to check for suspect items.

Images will be erased For those who go through the scanners, TSA says the machines are set up to erase the images immediately, and the pictures will be viewed by a screener stationed in a spot where he or she can’t see the passenger in person. But critics charge that congressional leaders, desperate to do something after the failed Christmas Day attack by the so-called “underwear bomber,” who hid powdered explosives in his pants, rushed to OK the new system without scrutinizing the pitfalls. Critics point out that

Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times

Brandi Roberson, training instructor for TSA, looks at a scanned image of an anonymous volunteer on her computer at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport on Friday. scanners won’t detect objects hidden in body cavities, and they cite not only privacy concerns but worries about health risks due to low-level radiation exposure, a point that is in much debate. “Of all the inconveniences we’ve had to go through, I think many people feel like this one crosses the line,” said Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center in Washington, D.C. His organization has filed a lawsuit aimed at suspending the program. “Even though some steps have been taken to obscure images when the operators views them, that doesn’t solve the underlying problem that these are basically digital cameras that take pictures of people undressed,” he said.

Longer wait times?

E.B. Rice, assistant federal screening director at Sea-Tac, demonstrates the new machine at security checkpoint Friday.

Another concern is that wait times in security lines will get longer. TSA says it doesn’t expect that to happen once people get used to the process, but some travelers report slowdowns at airports where the scanners are in use. “My suspender clips got me a quick wanding,” said Leroy McVay, of Poulsbo, who went through a body scanner in Tulsa, Okla. “The same person who was watching the X-ray unit had to stop everything to wand my suspenders, and that slowed up the whole line.” The biggest change will be that “everything has to come out of your pockets,”

Leader of snowshoe drug smuggling run sentenced The Associated Press

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TSA insists that the backscatter machines are safe, saying the radiation exposure is no more than a passenger would experience flying for two minutes at 30,000 feet. But with some frequent fliers raising concerns, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, has called for an independent review of the health effects for travelers, TSA employ-

are getting the less-controversial “millimeter wave” scanners, which still produce a body image but don’t use X-rays. Thirty-three airports, including Sea-Tac, are getting the backscatters. At Sea-Tac, agents are currently testing scanners at a checkpoint in the south terminal, used mainly by international passengers. Five of the 14 machines will be installed there. The North Security Checkpoint, closest to the Alaska Airlines/Horizon Air and United Airlines ticket counters, will close today for about two weeks while TSA installs scanners there. All four checkpoints at Sea-Tac will have the new machines, but with 35 security lanes and only 14 fullbody scanners, TSA agents will continue to direct many passengers through the old metal detectors.

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ees and airline personnel. TSA cites positive evaluations by the Food and Drug Administration, the National Institute for Standards and Technology and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. The New York Times, however, reports that those tests looked only at whether the amount of radiation levels met guidelines set up by the American National Standards Institute, a group whose members include representatives from the companies that make the machines and the Department of Homeland Security. TSA plans to have 450 full-body scanners installed at more than 50 U.S. airports this year at a cost of $130,000 to $170,000 each, paid for with federal stimulus funds. Twenty-seven airports

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SEATTLE — A Canadian man has been sentenced to 30 months in federal prison after being convicted of leading a snowshoe smuggling ring that attempted to bring marijuana from British Columbia to Washington state on treacherous mountain trails Richard Bafaro, 45, tearfully apologized in court Friday, saying that he had been forced to pay $70,000 to drug suppliers after he lost a prior load of the potent marijuana B.C. Bud in the wilderness, leading him to smuggle more of the drug. Bafaro said that in one of the trips to the wilderness to try to find the load, one of his friends was badly injured and had to be airlifted out of the Canadian forest.

Bafaro was charged with Five men were arrested with links to Bafaro’s opera- conspiracy to distribute tion and were sentenced to marijuana. He was arrested in prison terms of eight months April. to one year.

said Dwayne Baird, TSA’s media officer. “That means plastic combs, wallets, watches and extensive jewelry.” TSA estimates the whole process should take an average of about 20 seconds, including the time it takes for carry-on belongings to pass through on the conveyor belt. The image-scanning itself takes five to seven seconds.


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Sunday, October 17, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

For better lawn, go with rye, fescue Well, I found out that having two boys in separate traveling soccer teams and having two Japanese high school exchange students from Port Angeles’ sister city, Mutsu, resulted in my promised “last in the series” article on lawns to be postponed from last week until today. I am so sorry. But hopefully, this allowed all concerned, interested and motivated people to get their soil samples in and tested because you have learned in my past two columns: 1. You must get your soil tested. 2. You must mow the lawn tall (3.25 inches to 3.75 inches) 3. You must go organic in all phases of your lawn. 4. You must buy the highest quality seed available. 5. You must overseed twice a year for the great results you want. Today, we find out why we should use rye grasses and tall or fine fescues as our preferred choices. First up, fescues. They are

This new avenue of plant breeding has made fall fescues optimum for many lawns, even at divided into 100 percent, especially because Andrew two categories: they are drought-tolerant, shadeMay fine and tall. tolerant and like well-drained Fine fescues soils. have very thin However, fine fescues grow or fine blades even better in shade. (leaves), while Tall fescues also produce less the tall fescues thatch, and both fall and fine fesare broader cues are good choices for lower and coarse in maintenance lawns, particularly their appearif you do not want to water or ance. fertilize as often. Rye grasses, Fescues, especially the talls, which we will are slow to germinate and estabidentify in a moment, lie in lish themselves; hence the reason between the two in their texture. for overseeding twice a year forever. Fescues Remember: This is not a disadvantage because weeds can Fine fescues are not wellonly get a foothold on bare spots, suited for heavy traffic or sport and continuous overseeding play, so one should not go heavy plugs the holes. with this type of grass in your Many varieties and cultivars seed blend if your child plays soc- of both tall and fine fescues as cer in the backyard or you if have well as perennial rye grasses an agility course for your dogs on have fungus living inside them the lawn. and are known as endophytes. Tall fescues are now available These endophytic types of in many new, very dark green, grasses have a high tolerance to turf-type varieties. many environmentally induced

A growing concern

stresses, so they perform well in low-maintenance yards and poorer soils, which most of us have on our property. Next up are the rye grasses, both perennial and annual.

Rye grasses Perennial rye grasses are fast to germinate and protect soil. But if they are used in percentages higher than 20 in your mix, they can easily overwhelm the other varieties. So stay below 20 percent of perennial rye grasses in your selected blends. However, perennial rye is great to use as an overseed because it establishes itself extremely well and, as an overseed, would be less than 20 percent. Perennial ryes are very heattolerant and wear-resistant but they do not stand up well in shade. Annual rye grasses are perfect for the fall and winter overseed because they have a wonderful green effect. They plug the bare spots and hold the space for the more permanent perennial fes-

cues and ryes to grow in as they die off. And remember that your clippings from the mower should be left on the lawn to decompose along with the annual rye grasses because they add much needed nutrient to the soil. So as you can see, a blend or mix of ryes and fescues is the ideal solution because each grass type will colonize the area perfectly for their needed conditions and yet — as a mix — will comingle and thicken up the entire lawn. Now is the time you need to go out to farm and feed stores or co-ops and find blends with these recommended grasses for a far, far better, easier lawn next year!! Good luck!

________ Andrew May is an ornamental horticulturist who dreams of having Clallam and Jefferson counties nationally recognized as “Flower Peninsula USA.” Send him questions c/o Peninsula Daily news, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or e-mail news@peninsuladailynews.com (subject line: Andrew May).

Clubs and Organizations Port Angeles

For information, phone Suzanne Barber at 360477-4156.

Sons of Italy Sons of Italy invites participants to join with others of Italian descent to share an afternoon of companionship and potluck on the third Sunday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Elks Naval Lodge 131 E. First St. Social members of nonItalian descent who have an interest in the Italian culture are welcome to attend. For more information, phone Pat Restaino at 360452-1222.

Submit your club news

TOPS 1493 Taking Off Pounds Sensibly 1493 meets each Wednesday at Jace the Real Estate Co., 933 E. First St. Weigh-in is from 9:15 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. with a meeting following at 10 a.m. At the group’s Oct. 6 meeting, the members who lost the most weight for September were recognized. Best weight loser was Sara Barrett. Others recognized were Irene Metcalf, Patsy Cooper and Louann Yager. Also honored were Keeping Off Pounds Sensibly members Dorothy Thompson and Charm Dunscomb. For more information, phone Pat Ferris at 360477-2180.

The weekly Clubs and Organizations listing focuses on groups across the North Olympic Peninsula. There is no cost to have your club included. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the club’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. To submit your club’s news: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521 ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

day of the month from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist FellowMonday Musicale will ship Hall, 73 Howe Road in meet Monday at noon in Agnew (between Sequim Queen of Angels Church and Port Angeles). hall, 209 W. 11th St. A donation of $5 per Entertainment at 1 p.m. meeting is requested to will be provided by the help pay for facility rental Marmalade Quartet, a clarand speaker honorarium. inet group. The focus of the group is on community, education School retirees and developing natural Car club meets intuitive and psychic abiliThe Clallam County ties. Meetings offer a variSchool Retirees Association Northwest Olympic will meet at the Port Ange- Mustangs and Cougars Car ety of guest speakers. For more information, les CrabHouse Restaurant, Club meets the third phone Marie-Claire Ber221 N. Lincoln St., at Wednesday of each month nards at 360-681-4411. 11 a.m. Tuesday. at 7 p.m. at Joshua’s ResLocal legislative canditaurant, 113 DelGuzzi dates will participate in a Mental illness Drive. question-and-answer sesThe meeting is open to The local affiliate of the sion. all owners of Ford MusNational Alliance of AdvoLunch will follow at tangs and Mercury Coucates for the Mentally Ill noon with a program, gars manufactured from will meet on Thursday “Safety for Seniors,” by 1964 to the present. from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. in Lorraine Shore of the ClalFor more information, the basement of Olympic lam County Sheriff’s Office. phone Marv Fowler at 360- Medical Center, 939 CaroFor more information, 683-1329 or visit to www. line St. phone 360-457-3948 or northolympicmustangs. NAMI, a volunteer orgae-mail ggleason@olypen. com. nization that offers support com. for families, friends and individuals suffering from MOPS meets Grange meeting Mothers of Preschoolers any mental illness, meets on the third Thursday of The Mount Pleasant (MOPS) meets Thursday the month. Grange, corner of Mount from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Pleasant and Draper roads, at Fairview Bible Church, will meet at 6:30 p.m. OPEN meets 385 O’Brien Road. Tuesday. Refreshments and child The Olympic Peninsula Election of officers will Entrepreneurs Network care will be provided. be held. will meet on Thursday For more information, Following the regular from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. phone 360-457-5905. session, there will be a at the Coldwell Banker meeting regarding the Uptown Realty office, Intuitive Circle Pomona Region of the 1115 E. Front St. The Intuitive Circle Washington State Grange OPEN meetings are at 7 p.m. meets on the third Thursintended to bring together inventors, innovators and entrepreneurs of all ages Does your child need help with math? from around the Peninsula

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promptly at 7 p.m. in Blue Sky Real Estate, 190 Priest Road. Attendees are asked to arrive at 6:50 p.m. Guests are welcome. The president and chairman can be contacted at 360-808-2088.

Stockhounds meet

who share common interests and passions for inventing. Providers of supporttype services are also invited. Members can share resources, feedback and talent. For more information, phone Tim Riley at 360460-4655.

Stockhounds Investment Club meets every third Tuesday of the month to share knowledge, do research on prospective stocks and evaluate the current portfolio. Members hail from Port Angeles to Port Townsend. For more information, phone Merlyn Wursher at 360-379-5412 in Port Townsend or Mike Zuspan at 360-582-1345 in Sequim.

TCF meets

The North Olympic Peninsula Chapter of The Compassionate Friends meets on the third Tuesday of each month, except December, at 6 p.m. at St. Green Party meets Luke’s Episcopal Church, The Green Party of Clal- 525 N. Fifth Ave. TCF is a nonprofit selflam County meets on the help support organization third Thursday of the that helps bereaved famimonth at 6:30 p.m. lies in their grief journey The public is invited to come and help bring about after the death of a child. change. For more information, The location of meeting phone 360-457-7395 or place changes from month 360-417-1885. to month. For more information Olympic Minds and for the meeting place, Olympic Minds, The phone 360-683-0867 or Institute of Noetic Sciences 360-683-8407. community group for Sequim and Port Angeles, Eagles Club meets on the first three The Eagles Club will Thursdays of each month dance to the music of Final at 1 p.m. in the conference Approach on Friday from room of The Lodge at Sher7 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the wood Village, 660 Everclubhouse, 110 S. Penn St. green Farm Way. Guests are welcome. The meetings are free Admission is $5. and open to the public. For more information, For more information, phone 360-452-3344. phone 360-681-8677.

Sequim and the Dungeness Valley Car club meets The Sequim Valley Car Club meets on the third Monday of every month at 6 p.m. at the Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road. For more information, phone 360-681-0413.

Poetry reading The Poetry Alliance hosts a poetry reading on the third Monday of each month from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Sequim Senior Service Center, 921 E. Hammond St. The event is free.

Toastmasters SKWIM Toastmasters meets the first and third Tuesday of the month

The meeting begins with an open discussion and participants may bring questions, tips, tricks or whatever pertains to Linux. For more information, visit the website at http:// NOPLUG.us. The meeting is open to the public.

Sail squadron The Point Wilson Sail and Power Squadron will meet Tuesday with a potluck at 6 p.m. followed by a presentation at 7:15 p.m. at the Port Townsend Yacht Club, 2503 Washington St. Kees Prins and Chelcie Liu will discuss the design and building of the Townsend Tem, a 23-foot sailboat recently finished at the Northwest Maritime Center. The Point Wilson Sail and Power Squadron is an informal group of sailors, rowers, fishermen and cruisers dedicated to improving boating skills. For more information, phone Albert Foster at 360554-0468.

Soroptimists meet Soroptimist International of Port Townsend/ Jefferson County, a professional businesswomen club, meets the first three Thursdays of the month at noon at Discovery View Retirement Apartments, 1051 Hancock St., Port Townsend. For information on joining the organization, visit the website at www. soroptimistpt.org.

Garden club meets

The Quilcene-Brinnon Garden Club will meet at the Quilcene Community Center, 294952 U.S. Highway 101, at 1 p.m. Thursday. Caitlin Moore will presPulmonary support The Pulmonary Support ent a program on seed savGroup, for people who have ing. Hostesses are Linda trouble breathing and/or Herzog and Peggy Siscoe. their caregivers meets the New members and visifourth Saturday of every month at 11:30 a.m. at the tors are invited. For more information, Mariner Cafe, 707 E. Washphone Cass Brotherton at ington St. 360-765-0901. All are welcome. For more information, Submarine vets phone 360-452-1473. The Olympic Peninsula Base of the United States Port Townsend and Submarine Veterans Inc. Jefferson County will hold its monthly meeting on Thursday at 7 p.m. at VFW Post 7489, 31 Linux users Matheson St., Port Hadlock. North Olympic Peninsula Linux Users Group All submarine veterans meets Monday at 7 p.m. in are invited to attend. the Madrona Room at the For more information, Washington State Univerphone 360-437-1143 or sity Learning Center, 201 360-681-7247. W. Patison St., Port HadTurn to Clubs/C9 lock.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 17, 2010

C9

Antimicrobial feeder put to the test ACTIVITY AROUND THE feeders has increased recently. Birds that nested elsewhere have returned to our yards for the winter. A sure sign of this is the growing number of juncos and the sudden appearance of golden-crowned sparrows. This action is a reminder to take a look at the feeder inventory. Some may need repairs and others should be replaced. The never-ending chore of keeping them clean always needs tending to. There is news on the feeder front, and it involves a new line known as EcoClean, which is available exclusively at Wild Birds Unlimited stores. The concept is exciting for anyone who feeds birds and worries about keeping feeders clean and birds healthy. Wild Birds Unlimited has teamed up with Agion Technologies to incorporate the antimicrobial agent Agion into the EcoClean feeders. The agent Agion is registered with the Environ-

Bird Watch Joan

Carson

mental Protection Agency, Food and Drug Administration and Department of Agriculture for a broad

range of uses. Based on naturally occurring silver, it already is used extensively in health care and consumer products including cell phones, shoes, keyboards, water filters, medical catheters and ice machines. This is the first time the antimicrobial feature has been used in backyard bird-feeding products. EcoClean feeders use Agion to inhibit the surface growth of damaging microbes. I’ve had the opportunity to examine several of the new items and look forward to putting them to

North Olympic Peninsula teenage girls are eligible to apply for the Soroptimist Violet Richardson Award offered through Soroptimist International of Port Angeles and Port Angeles — Jet Set. The Violet Richardson Award recognizes young women who make the community and world a better place through volunteer efforts. Applicants for this award must be 14 to 17 years of age as of Dec. 1, which is the deadline to apply for the $500 scholarship. Applications are available in the guidance offices of Port Angeles High School and Crescent High School, or by phoning Wendy Shea at 360-4524045 or Jill Oakes at 360417-3012.

of the month at the Golden Crafts Shop, 112 S. Lincoln St., Suite C. The 92-year-old Jacobs has been making items to sell at the store for many years. Some of the items she crafts are Raggedy Ann and Andy dolls, refrigerator towels, zip-back baby sweaters, sock monkeys, baby burping bibs, embroidered pillow cases, pillows, dishcloths and dolls. For more information on the Golden Crafts Shop, phone 360-457-0509.

PAHS grad update

SEATTLE — Elizabeth (McKee) Zherka, a 2004 Port Angeles High School graduate, recently began work on a master’s degree in international studies at the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. Her focus is the Balkan Peninsula, with emphasis Drum circle meets on the work of nongovPORT ANGELES — The community drum circle ernmental organizaZherka that meets at the Penintions and sula College Longhouse, the role of women in the 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., former Yugoslavia. will celebrate two years of Zherka is studying the drumming at that location from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tues- Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian languages, and also day. Singers, dancers, drum- will teach a third-year undergraduate course, mers and anyone who just “Europe Today.” wants to sit and enjoy the She plans to pursue a “celebration of unity and healing” are welcome, with doctorate. or without a drum or perZherka graduated cum cussion instrument, accord- laude from Washington ing to the event announce- with a Bachelor of Arts in ment. European studies in 2008. For more information, She lives in Redmond phone Beatriz Giraldo at with her husband, Leart. 360-461-5188 or e-mail She is the daughter of nobleamiga@yahoo.com. John and Sue McKee of Port Angeles.

Raffle winners

dropped seeds. These feeders and their accessories have been fieldtested for about a year in selected parts of the country. The reviews are very favorable. Now they are available for the general public, and that will be the real test. Prices range from $29.99 to $115.99.

It won’t be long before holiday shopping begins, so consider this my first helpful suggestion.

________

Joan Carson’s column appears every Sunday. Contact her at P.O. Box 532, Poulsbo, WA 98370, with a self-addressed, stamped envelope for a reply. E-mail: joanpcarson@comcast.net.

Comedy night PORT TOWNSEND — Comedian Dwight Slade will perform in a benefit show for the Key City Public Theatre at the Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St., at 8 p.m. Thursday. Slade is a past winner of the Boston Comedy Festival. General admission is $15; VIP tickets, for $25, include two free drinks and priority seating. Tickets are available at www.keycitypublictheatre. org or at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St. For more information, visit www.keycitypublic theatre.org. Peninsula Daily News

Get home delivery. Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews. com

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Seattle folk, jazz and pop musician Jonathan Kingham will give a free concert on the Pirate Union Building’s performance stage at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., at noon Wednesday. Kingham has shared the stage with national acts such as Shawn Colvin, Michael McDonald, Doug Stone, Vanessa Carlton, Jonathan Brooke and David Wilcox. Recently, he has toured with Julio Iglesias Jr. and Glen Phillips of Toad the Wet Sprocket. Kingham also earned first place in the National Telluride Troubadour Songwriting Contest and Unisong International Song Contest, placed in the top five of the John Lennon Songwriting contest two years in a row and won both the Overall Grand Prize

Jonathan Kingham will perform a concert of folk, jazz and pop at Peninsula College’s Pirate Union Building at noon Wednesday. and first place in the folk category in the USA Songwriting Competition, which draws more than 30,000 entries from around the world. His singing has been fea-

tured in films, soap operas and the former WB network show “Felicity,” and a development deal with Universal South Records led to collaborations with some of the top writers and players

in Nashville. In addition to his music, Kingham usually comes to his concerts with a huge tub of Red Vines, which he gives out to the audience.

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C8 studied cherry farming worldwide, will speak about growing cherries, pruning Fall Fruit Show techniques, the best varietThe North Olympic ies for this area and how to Fruit Club will have a Fall deal with canker. Fruit Show on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Fiddlers play the Jefferson County Fair Washington Old Time Grounds, 4907 Landes St., Fiddlers play music SaturPort Townsend. day at the Tri-Area ComAll are invited to taste munity Center, 10 West apples, talk to fruit growers, Valley Road, Chimacum, enter an apple pie contest, with an all-players jam have a mystery apple identi- from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. fied, buy fruit trees. followed by a performance There will be informafrom 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. tion on growing fruit in The event is free and containers or on acreage. open to the public. At 10:30 a.m., Kai SawDonations support fidyer, an intern at the Bullock dler scholarships. Farm on Orcas Island, will For further information, speak about permaculture. phone Hershel Lester at At 1 p.m., Lynn Long, an 360-417-6950, or e-mail extension agent who has handrlester@olypen.com.

Adopt a Youth Zerihun Zerihun is sweet young 9-year-old boy. He gets along well with the house mothers and his playmates. He likes group games and watching movies but does not like horror films. He plays soccer and is in the third grade, where he is learning English. He would make a great addition to a patient and loving family. For details on Zerihun, phone Adoption Advocates International at 350-4524777. Families interested in adoption must be approved by a licensed agency. If adoption is not an option for you, but you would like to support the

sponsorship programs, contact Linda@adoption advocates.org.

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Marriage Dissolutions Clallam County Michelle B. and Ronald D. Davis. Michael James and Raegina Lynn Hoagland. James Christopher and Teresa Marie Iversen. Elaine Claire and Frederick E. Antonelli; woman’s name changed to O’Brien.

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL ECONOMY!

Benjamin Rodney and Stacy Jo Flores. Amanda Jatam and Dennis Ray Fisher. David Coville and Michele Rodnite Winsor. Elizabeth I. and Michael Paul Rosendahl. Jeffrey and Vicki Shamp.

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A house finch feeds from an EcoClean feeder, which uses Agion to inhibit the surface growth of damaging microbes.

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SEQUIM — The Olympic Driftwood Sculptors have released the winners of the raffle held at the close of the club’s second anniversary show at the Dungeness River Festival. Steph Ellyas was the winner of “Calla Lily,” made by stained-glass artist Luther Bullock. Janet Bruening was the winner of “Landscape Print of Rialto Beach,” by photographer Kenneth Timm. The club meets from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the first Wednesday of every month at the Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road. For information about upcoming driftwood sculpture classes taught by certified LuRon instructor Tuttie Peetz, phone 360683-6860. For more information about the club, visit www. olympicdriftwoodsculptors. org, phone 360-681-2535 or e-mail info@olympicdrift woodsculptors.org.

Paul Carson

Musician-writer in free concert

Briefly . . . Volunteering key to award for teen girls

the test. Large numbers of birds mean some sick birds will appear at the feeders, and the bacteria is easily spread to others. The feeder I purchased will be filled with black sunflower seeds or bits and pieces of shelled sunflower seeds. Not only does this feeder use the new technology, but it has other features I like. It is sturdy and wellbuilt. Not only does the top lift off for cleaning but, more importantly, the bottom just snaps out, making it easy to clean. My Seed Tube Feeder’s label states that it will “inhibit the growth of damaging bacteria, mold, mildew, fungus and other microbes.” In addition to several feeder types, the line includes perch covers. You can slip these Agion-incorporated covers over the perches on your other feeders. Catch trays are also in the EcoClean line. They

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C10

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Difference between obsession, love DEAR ABBY: I’m a 25-year-old woman who is involved in a serious relationship with a wonderful man. We’ve been together for about three months, and we’re very much in love. My problem: I think I’m obsessed with him. I am happy only when we spend time together. When we’re not, I feel sad and alone. I spend my time following his activities on social networking sites and constantly checking my cell phone, hoping he sends me a message. This is my first serious relationship. I know he loves me as much as I love him because he has mentioned marriage and having kids together someday. Is what I am experienc-

dear abby Abigail

Van Buren

ing normal? Lovestruck in New York

Dear Lovestruck: It’s not unusual for a first relationship, but you’re right to be concerned. Take a step back and look at what you’re doing. We cannot depend on someone else to make us happy or make us whole. When a woman spends all her time tracking what her boyfriend is doing when he’s not with her and waiting for the phone to

ring, it makes her a less interesting person to be around than she could be. And that kind of dependency can drive a man away. It is important that you create a balance between what’s going on in the relationship and continuing to develop yourself as an individual. Your boyfriend seems to have no problem doing this. Dear Abby: I have a hard time empathizing with people who are sick. My mother suffered from all sorts of medical issues, and it affected me greatly. My husband, “Glen,” and I are in our 50s. He’s nearing 60, and as we age, I expect our health will decline.

he’ll keep his conditions from me and think I don’t want to be there for him. How can I increase my “caring gene”? I have had therapy for other issues. What can I do? Nursing a Flaw in Texas

Glen already takes medications for several conditions. I, on the other hand, have always enjoyed excellent health. I find myself becoming impatient when Glen is sick. It’s not that I think he’s faking; I just think he needs to “get over it” and not let it affect him. I hide my feelings pretty well. I take care of him, make chicken soup, let him rest, pick up his medicine or whatever. But I’m afraid if he were to become seriously ill that I wouldn’t take good care of him. I love him dearly, but I don’t seem to be able to work up sympathy when he (or anyone) is sick. I’m afraid to tell this to Glen because I’m afraid

Tolerating the complaints that go along with being ill isn’t always easy, but if you visualize how you would want to be treated if the situation were reversed, it might help you be less impatient. I’m sorry you weren’t more forthcoming about Dear Nursing: Lack of the issues that sent you empathy is the inability to into therapy. relate to the feelings of othIf you really feel you ers. might be emotionally Some individuals have absent when the chips are such an overabundance of down, contact your theraempathy that they become pist and start working on it literally paralyzed by the now. pain of another person. Be _________ glad you aren’t one of Dear Abby is written by Abigail those. When a spouse becomes Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her sick and dependent, it can mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters be a challenge. can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. You can minimize or Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA ignore it, or you can choose 90069 or via e-mail by logging to be solicitous and helpful. onto www.dearabby.com.

The church is seeking apple donations for the event. For more information, phone 360-457-8888 or 360775-5889.

Spanish. Admission is $5 per person; free for 2 and younger. Proceeds will be used to support Sunfield educational programs. No pets, except service animals, are allowed. For more information, phone Sunfield at 360-3853658.

Briefly . . . Fall fruit show set for Saturday PORT TOWNSEND — The North Olympic Fruit Club will hold its Fall Fruit Show in the Oscar Erickson building at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds, 4907 Landes St., from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Attendees will be able to taste apples, talk to fruit growers, enter an apple pie in the pie contest, have mystery apples identified and buy fruit trees — many unusual varieties will be available. Visitors also can get information on growing fruit in home gardens, in a container or on acreage. Admission is $3 per person or $5 for a family. Kai Sawyer, an intern at Bullock Farm on Orcas Island, will discuss permaculture (sustainable landuse design) at 10:30 a.m. Lynn Long will speak about growing cherries at 1 p.m. Long will discuss pruning techniques, the best varieties for this area and how to deal with canker. Long is an extension agent who has studied cherry farming worldwide. For more information, phone Melissa Denny at 360-437-7917.

A spaghetti dinner, 50/50 drawing and silent auction featuring the music of Big Fine Daddies and Andy Maupin will be held at the Port Angeles Eagles Aerie, 210 S. Penn St., from 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. Friday, Oct. 29. Admission is by donation. Donations also are being accepted at the Port Angeles Wells Fargo Bank branch, 901 E. Front St.

Call for artists PORT TOWNSEND — Northwind Arts Alliance is seeking artists to submit works for Small Expressions 9, an annual juried art show. The show will run from Dec. 3 to Jan. 3. This is a small-format show of all media. Delivery date is Nov. 28. Artists’ prospectives are available online at north windarts.org or at the Northwind Arts Center, 2409 Jefferson St., from noon to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. For more information, phone 360-379-1086.

Vendors wanted

PORT ANGELES — The Fraternal Order of Eagles Ladies Auxiliary will host a benefit crafts fair and flea market at the Eagles Aerie, 110 S. Penn St., from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 6. Help Zink-Holloway Proceeds from the fair will go toward scholarships PORT ANGELES — Two benefits to support can- for graduating high school cer victim Brenda Zink-Hol- seniors. The event will include loway will be held this holiday decorations, gifts, month. snacks and raffles. The first benefit, a bake sale, will be held at Swain’s Vendor space is availGeneral Store, 602 E. First able. St., from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more information, Saturday. phone 360-683-6450.

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4-6 pm and 8-10 pm Daily

Starting Wed., Oct. 20th Martini Monday - 20 to choose from - $5 Tequila Tuesday - Everything Margarita - $5 Whiner Wednesday - All House Pour Wines - $5 Thirsty Thursday - $2 off all alcohol drinks in the bar Friday & Saturday - $2 off all alcohol drinks in the bar Sunday - Bloody Marys - $5

Autumn Arbor Day PORT TOWNSEND — The city of Port Townsend Parks, Recreation and Trees Advisory Board will host a tree-planting event from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturday. The board and volunteers will plant 12 trees along San Juan Avenue, between 22nd and 24th streets. The event is open to the public. Attendees will learn proper planting techniques. Though such activities are traditional for national Arbor Day in April, the board also believes it is important to promote them in the fall, when planting conditions are optimal. The advisory board members are Daniel Collins, Barbara Smith, Rosemary Sikes, Forest Shomer and Matthew Berberich. For more information, phone Collins at 360-5310447 or e-mail dcollins@pnt. org.

Biker Toy Run set PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County Mother’s Club will hold its 19th annual Biker Toy Run benefit from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Participants will meet at 7 Cedars Casino, 270756 U.S. Highway 101, at 2 p.m. and will depart for the Port Angeles Eagles lodge, 110 S. Penn St., at 3 p.m. Riders are requested to bring an unwrapped toy to donate. After riders arrive at the Eagles, a $10 buffet dinner supplied by the Salvation Army will be served. The dinner is open to the public. Unwrapped gift items also will be accepted from nonriders at the lodge. Classic rock and blues band Gravel and the Quarry will perform after the meal. Proceeds from the event will go to the Salvation Army, which distribute donations to underprivileged children. For more information, phone 360-460-5259 or 360461-7509.

Family fun fest PORT ANGELES — New Life Open Bible Church, 600 S. Peabody St., will hold a Family Fun Fest and Apple Press from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 30. The free event will include games and activities for children, the chance to compare the efforts of a 100-year-old apple press against a modern press, spiced cider and prizes. Attendees can take home cider.

NFL Specials in the lounge with 3 large screens to watch the games on. Live Music on Wednesday Nights!

Weather class PORT TOWNSEND — Point Wilson Sail & Power Squadron will offer a class on weather to the public as well as its members starting Thursday, Nov. 4. The class will meet on 10 Thursdays except on Thanksgiving and during Christmas week. Topics will include weather basics and local weather patterns and how they affect boating. Cost to nonmembers is $55 plus a membership fee. A textbook is included. Members pay $55, plus $10 for another household member to share a text. The classes will be held at the Skookum Building, 385 Benedict St. For more information, including about the membership fee, phone Linda Newland at 360-437-9350.

MBA earned PORT ANGELES — Daniel Peterson recently earned a master’s in business administration from Western Governors University, an online school headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah. He also received a master of business administration certification from the International Certification Institute. Peterson is the director of operations for Country Aire Natural Foods and the director of human resources and finance for Michael’s Seafood & Steakhouse. Both businesses are located in downtown Port Angeles.

Pumpkin patch PORT HADLOCK — Sunfield Land for Learning, 111 Sunfield Lane off Rhody Drive, will host its Magical Pumpkin Patch from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 24. Visitors will be able to roam the pumpkin field and choose from a range of pumpkin types and gourds, listen to music and see farm animals like goats and chickens. There will be baked goods, storytelling and seasonal crafts. On Oct. 23, Sunfield Waldorf School’s Spanish instructor, Monica Van Loon, a native of Mexico, will host a Mexican Dia De Los Muertos celebration. Activities include sugarskull decorating and storytelling with key words in

Clallam County Elections has organized a multimedia competition to ask you, the citizens of Clallam County:

What’s Your Civic Duty? Sept. 1 Through Nov, 1 , 2010 st

Your secret rendezvous for great food & fine dining 452-9292

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For more information, and voter regristration visit our website at www. clallam.net

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Plato once said “ This City is what it is because our citizens are who they are.” How do you work to make your town what it is? Do you volunteer? Do you vote, or have you been inspired to run for public office? This is your chance to inspire others. We want to know. Great prizes and public recognition await you!

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We invite you to submit your original essays, short films, songs, poems or works of art between

Haunted tunes SEQUIM — The Sequim City Band will conclude its season with “Tunes That Go Bump in the Night, a Halloween show, at the Sequim High School Performing Arts Center, 601 N. Sequim Ave., at 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 24. Band members will dress in costume as they perform “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice,” “Phantom of the Opera,” “Pirates of the Caribbean” and other ghoulish numbers. There also will be a costume contest for the audience and a costume parade for children. Prizes will be awarded for the best, cutest and most creative costumes. Membership in the Sequim City Band is open to all musicians on approval of director Sanfor Feibus. For more information, visit www.sequimcityband. org or phone Feibus at 360683-2546.

Health care talk SEQUIM — Retired cardiac surgeon Dr. Roger Stark will speak at a meeting of Concerned Citizens of Clallam County (FourC) at the Sequim Boys & Girls Club, 400 W. Fir St., at 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 25. Stark serves as a health care analyst for the Washington Policy Center in Seattle. He will discuss the problems with health care in the United States, what caused the problems and the impact of national health care reform. Attendees will have an opportunity to comment and to ask questions of Stark. Later, the audience will be able to discuss concerns in open forum. Local, state and federal candidates have been invited to attend, giving them another opportunity to visit with voters one-onone. FourC is “a nonpartisan group dedicated to preserving our freedoms and liberties through education and involvement in local, state and national issues,” the event announcement said. Meetings, are open to the public, are held the fourth Monday of each month at the Sequim Boys & Girls Club. For more information about the meeting or the group, e-mail fourc.info@ yahoo.com or visit www. newsocialcontract.com.

4-H Club meets PORT ANGELES — Pure Country 4-H Club will welcome new and returning members at a club meeting at Fairview Bible Church, 385 O’Brien Road, at 5 p.m. Monday, Oct. 25. A club Christmas party and caroling at the Olympic Rehab Center in

Sequim are upcoming club activities that will be discussed at the meeting. The club offers project groups for beef, dairy, swine, poultry, rabbits, dogs, home arts projects like sewing, riflery and archery. Club fees are $10 before Dec. 1 and $20 after that. Some projects have additional costs and fees. The club meets at Fairview Bible Church at 5 p.m. on the last Monday of each month, except in December. For more information on the club, e-mail club leader Julie Mowbray at sheep herder101@yahoo.com, phone 360-457-5403 or visit www.purecountry4h club.com. Peninsula Daily News

Now Showing n Deer Park Cinema,

Port Angeles (360-4527176) “Jackass 3-D” (R) “Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole” (PG) “Red” (PG-13) “Secretariat” (PG) “The Social Network” (PG13) “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps” (PG-13)

n Lincoln Theater, Port

Angeles (360-457-7997) “Easy A” (PG-13) “Life As We Know It (PG13) “My Soul To Take” (R) “The Town” (R)

n The Rose Theatre,

Port Townsend (360385-1089) “Secretariat” (PG) “The Social Network” (PG13)

n Uptown Theater, Port Townsend (360-3853883) “Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole” (PG)

Peninsula Births Olympic Medical Center

Jason and Delairia Crabb, Port Angeles, a daughter, Selah Lucille, 9 pounds 4 ounces, 4:28 p.m. Sept. 19. Chelsea Williams and Randy Eastman Jr., Port Angeles, a son, Landon Wayne, 9 pounds 5 ounces, 9:54 a.m. Sept. 30. April and Benjamin Garcia, Sequim, a daughter, Maggie Lynn, 7 pounds 7 ounces, 6:31 p.m. Oct. 3. Jason Micheal Schmidt and Jamie Faith ScottSchmidt, a daughter, Madison Grace, 7 pounds 1 ounce, 11:08 a.m. Oct. 4.

Forks Community Hospital Amber and Chance Brumley, Forks, a daughter, Emrie Grey, 7 pounds 2.9 ounces, 10:46 a.m. Oct. 4. Lona Moore, Neah Bay, a daughter, Rosemarie E’Ziah Carol Lee, 6 pounds 4 ounces, 8:30 a.m. Oct. 7.

Phone information about athome or out-of-town births to 360417-3527 or 800-826-7714.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Things to Do Today and Monday, Nov. 17-18, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Today PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360-4525973 or Ken Foster at 360-6830141 for information including time of day and location. Forest Storytelling Festival — Peninsula College Little Theater, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Individual events range from $12 to $20. For information, visit www.dancingleaves. com/storypeople/index.html.

of Angels Church, 109 W. 11th St. Noon. Phone 360-4574585. First Step drop-in center — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Free clothing and equipment closet, information and referrals, play area, emergency supplies, access to phones, computers, fax and copier. Phone 360-457-8355. Blood drive — Vern Burton Community Center, 308 E. Fourth St. 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. General discussion group — Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. No specified topic. Open to public.

The Answer for Youth — Drop-in outreach center for youths and young adults, providing essentials like clothes, food, Narcotics and Alcoholics Olympic Outdoor Club Anonymous meetings, etc. hike — Hurricane Hill Trail, a 711 E. Second St., 3 p.m. to moderately easy hike of three 7 p.m. miles round trip with an elevaMental health drop-in cention gain of 650 feet and a high point at 5,757 feet. Quimper ter — The Horizon Center, Peninsula hikers meet at 8 a.m. 205 E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to at Quimper Credit Union in 6:30 p.m. For those with mental Hadlock. Hikers from Sequim disorders and looking for a will rendezvous with the place to socialize, something to Quimper hikers at 8:45 a.m. in do or a hot meal. For more the southeast corner of the information, phone Rebecca Walmart parking lot in Sequim. Brown at 360-457-0431. Those and Port Angeles hikers Senior meal — Nutrition meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Clallam County Courthouse. E-mail program, Port Angeles Senior olympic.outdoors@yahoo.com. Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 4:30 p.m. Donation of $3 to $5 Olympic Coast Discovery per meal. Reservations recomCenter — Second floor, The mended. Phone 360-457Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad 8921. Ave., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Bingo — Masonic Lodge, Feiro Marine Life Center 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. — City Pier, noon to 4 p.m. Doors at 4 p.m. Food, drinks Admission by donation. Phone and pull tabs available. Phone 360-417-6254. 360-457-7377. Port Angeles Fine Arts Center — “Future Relics of the Elwha Dam.” 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Open Wednesday through Sunday through Nov. 28. Phone 360-457-3532.

Port Angeles Toastmasters Club 25 — Clallam Transit Business Office, 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd., 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Open to public. Phone Bill Thomas at 360-460-4510 or Leilani Wood 360-683-2655.

The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

582-3143.

Monday Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Jane Lane, 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. Phone 206-321-1718 or visit www.sequimyoga.com. Walk aerobics — First Baptist Church of Sequim, 1323 Sequim-Dungeness Way, 8 a.m. Free. Phone 360-6832114.

Port Townsend and Jefferson County Today

“Windows on the World” watercolors exhibit — Sandra Smith-Poling. Art Mine Gallery at the Inn at Port Hadlock, Exercise classes — Sequim 310 Hadlock Bay Road. Community Church, 1000 N. Through November. Fifth Ave. Cardio-step, 9 a.m. to Olympic Outdoor Club 10:15 a.m. Strength and toning class, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. hike — Hurricane Hill Trail, a Cost: $5 a person. Phone Shel- moderately easy hike of three ley Haupt at 360-477-2409 or miles round trip with an elevae-mail jhaupt6@wavecable. tion gain of 650 feet and a high point at 5,757 feet. Quimper com. Peninsula hikers meet at 8 a.m. Free blood pressure at Quimper Credit Union in screening — Faith Lutheran Hadlock. Hikers from Sequim Church, 382 W. Cedar St., will rendezvous with the 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone 360- Quimper hikers at 8:45 a.m. in the southeast corner of the 683-4803. Walmart parking lot in Sequim. Sequim Duplicate Bridge Those and Port Angeles hikers — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth meet at 9:30 a.m. at the ClalAve., 12:30 p.m. All players lam County Courthouse. E-mail olympic.outdoors@yahoo.com. welcome. Phone 360-681-4308 or partnership 360-582-1289. Port Townsend Aero Museum — Jefferson County Women’s weight loss sup- International Airport, 195 Airport group — Dr. Leslie Van port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Romer’s office, 415 N. Sequim Admission: $10 for adults, $9 Ave. for seniors, $6 for children ages 7-12. Free for children younger Family Caregivers support than 6. Features vintage airgroup — Trinity United Meth- craft and aviation art. odist Church, 100 Blake Ave., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone Carolyn Chimacum Grange FarmLindley, 360-417-8554. ers Market — 9572 Rhody Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to German class — Sequim 2 p.m. Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave., 2 p.m. Phone 360-681Puget Sound Coast Artil0226. lery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Women’s cancer support Admission: $3 for adults, $1 for group — Look Good Feel Bet- children 6 to 12, free for chilter Program for women diag- dren 5 and younger. Exhibits nosed with cancer. Olympic interpret the Harbor Defenses Medical Cancer Center, 844 N. of Puget Sound and the Strait Fifth Ave., 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360Learn hairstyling and makeup 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ application tips. Sponsored by olypen.com. Olympic Medical Cancer Center and American Cancer SociRothschild House — ety. Registration required. Franklin and Taylor streets, Phone 360-582-2845 or 360- 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 582-5675. for adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; free to Jefferson County Health clinic — Free medi- Historical Society members. cal services for uninsured or Phone 360-385-1003 or visit under-insured. Dungeness Val- www.jchsmuseum.org. ley Health & Wellness Clinic, 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, Jefferson County Histori5 p.m. Phone 360-582-0218. cal Museum and shop — 540 Water St., Port Townsend, Trivia night — The Islander 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 Pizza & Pasta Shack, 380 E. for adults; $1 for children 3 to Washington St., 5:30 p.m. Free. 12; free to historical society Prizes awarded. Must be 21. members. Exhibits include “JefPhone 360-683-9999. ferson County’s Maritime Heri-

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Rothschild House — Franklin and Taylor streets, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; free to Jefferson County Historical Society members. Port Townsend Marine Sci- Phone 360-385-1003 or visit ence Center — Fort Worden www.jchsmuseum.org. State Park. Natural history and marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. Jefferson County HistoriAdmission: $5 for adults; $3 for cal Museum and shop — youth (6-17); free for science 540 Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. center members. “Whales in Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for Our Midst” till Dec. 31. Phone children 3 to 12; free to histori360-385-5582, e-mail info@ cal society members. Exhibits ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc. include “Jefferson County’s org. Maritime Heritage,” “James Swan and the Native AmeriQuilcene Historical cans” and “The Chinese in Museum — 151 E. Columbia Early Port Townsend.” Phone St., by appointment. Artifacts, 360-385-1003 or visit www. documents, family histories jchsmuseum.org. and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New Commanding Officer’s exhibits on Brinnon, military, Quarters museum tour — millinery and Quilcene High Fort Worden State Park, School’s 100th anniversary. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. $4 adults, free Phone 360-765-0688, 360- for children. Phone 360-385765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or 1003. e-mail quilcenemuseum@ olypen.com or quilcene Quilcene Historical museum@embarqmail.com. Museum — 151 E. Columbia St., by appointment. Artifacts, Free bike clinic — documents, family histories Chauncey Tudhope-Locklear and photos of Quilcene and offers “Port Townsend ReCy- surrounding communities. New clery,” Food Co-op, 414 Kear- exhibits on Brinnon, military, ney St., 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Phone millinery and Quilcene High 360-643-1755. School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360“Here’s to the Ladies! The 765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or Women of Tin Pan Alley” — e-mail quilcenemuseum@ Key City Public Theatre, Key olypen.com or quilcene City Playhouse, 419 Washing- museum@embarqmail.com. ton St., 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. General admission $15 and Silent war and violence students $10. Advance tickets protest — Women In Black, online or at Quimper Sound, Adams and Water streets, 230 Taylor St. For more infor- 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. mation, call 360-385-7396 or visit keycitypublictheatre.org. Overeaters Anonymous — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, English dance and potluck 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. — RoseWind Common House, Phone 360-385-6854. 3131 Haines St., 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Free. Facility is fraDiscussion — Quimper grance-free facility. No street Grange, 1219 Corona St., Port shoes are allowed. For more Townsend, 7 p.m. For monthly information, phone Dan Post at topics, phone 360-379-2536. 360-554-0417 or e-mail dan. post@frandango.org. North Olympic Exchange currency group— Orientation Monday to explain how this trading system works for skills, services “Windows on the World” and goods. 7 p.m. Dundee watercolors exhibit — Sandra Center, 32nd and Hancock Smith-Poling. Art Mine Gallery streets, Port Townsend. Phone at the Inn at Port Hadlock, Mike Dobkevich, 379-2627, or 310 Hadlock Bay Road. e-mail dobkevich1@msn.com. Through November. Cabin Fever Quilters — TriArea Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, Chimacum, 10 a.m. Open to public. Phone Laura Gipson, 360385-0441. TOPS Open House — Free, 10:40 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., at the Beach Club, 121 Marina Drive, Port Ludlow. Featuring nutritional low-calorie snacks, and members will be available to answer questions regarding the Port Ludlow Chapter. For more information, phone Fran Bodman at 360-437-5110 or Kathy Traci 360-437-7874. Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for

Achievement and success on the North Olympic Peninsula.

Peninsula Woman Every Sunday in Peninsula Daily News

At Port Angeles Vern Burton Community Center Located at 308 East 4th Street in Port Angeles Tickets on sale for $10 at the Port Angeles Senior Center, Park View Villas and Crestwood Convalescent Center., & at the door.

Raffle Basket & Door Prizes All Proceeds go to the Port Angeles Senior Center. For more inf information nfformation fo fo call Park View Villas aat 360-452-7222 360-452 52 5 2 72 2-7 7222

Delicious Menu Featuring: Squash Soup Green beans Eggplant Parmesan Pork Tenderloin w/ Apple Chutney Sauerkraut Baby Red Potatoes & Carrots Fresh Baked Bread Bourbon Apple Pie Pumpkin Cheesecake 0A5099347

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children 6 to 12; free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ olypen.com.

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Commanding Officer’s Quarters museum tour — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. $4 adults, free for children. Phone 360-3851003.

Road. Until Oct. 25. Visit www. villageheartbeat.com. Phone 360-681-5407 or e-mail vhb@ villageheartbeat.com.

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tage,” “James Swan and the Native Americans” and “The Chinese in Early Port Townsend.” Phone 360-3851003 or visit www.jchsmuseum. org.

Get in on the Things to Do

0A5099332

Monday Musicale — Queen

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. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Port Angeles Community Sequim and the Market — The Gateway, First and Lincoln streets, 11 a.m. to Dungeness Valley 3 p.m. Phone 360-417-0486 or e-mail mimi@portangeles Today market.com. Olympic Outdoor Club Dance — Sons of Norway hike — Hurricane Hill Trail, a Hall, 131 W. Fifth St., 6:30 p.m. moderately easy hike of three with 30 minutes of instruction, miles round trip with an elevafollowed by folk and ballroom tion gain of 650 feet and a high dance. $2 members, $3 non- point at 5,757 feet. Quimper members. Refreshments at Peninsula hikers meet at 8 a.m. 9 p.m. Phone 360-457-4081. at Quimper Credit Union in Monday Hadlock. Hikers from Sequim Overeaters Anonymous — will rendezvous with the St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Quimper hikers at 8:45 a.m. in 510 E. Park Ave., 9 a.m. Phone the southeast corner of the Walmart parking lot in Sequim. 360-477-1858. Those and Port Angeles hikers Clallam-WSU Master Gar- meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Claldeners plant clinic — WSU lam County Courthouse. E-mail Extension Office, Clallam olympic.outdoors@yahoo.com. County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. VFW breakfast — 169 E. Free. Open to the public. Bring Washington St., 9:30 a.m. to samples of plants for identifica- 1 p.m. Cost: $5 a person. tion. Phone Muriel Nesbitt, program coordinator, at 360-565Pittsburgh Steelers Fan 2679. Club — Watch the team with other black and gold fans at Walk-in vision clinic — Stymies Bar & Grill at Cedars Information for visually impaired at Dungeness Golf Course, and blind people, including 1965 Woodcock Road, 10 a.m. accessible technology display, Phone 360-775-8663. library, Braille training and various magnification aids. Vision Wild mushroom show — Loss Center, 228 W. First St., Suite N, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Olympic Peninsula MycoPhone 360-457-1383 or click logical Society will hold a free Women’s barbershop choon www.visionlossservices.org/ wild mushroom show at the Sequim Elk’s Lodge, 143 Port rus — Singers sought for vision. Williams Road, from noon to Grand Olympics Chorus of Olympic Coast Discovery 4 p.m. For more information, Sweet Adelines. Sequim Bible Center — Second floor, The visit www.olymushrooms.org. Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave., Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad 6:30 p.m. Phone Wendy Foster Adult Scrabble — The at 360-683-0141. Ave., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., Guided walking tour — 1 p.m. Phone 360-681-2619. Whole Person Drumming Historic downtown buildings, drum series — Beginners an old brothel and “UnderTrivia night — Oasis Sports Mind with Zorina Wolf. ground Port Angeles.” Cham- Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washing- 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Center of ber of Commerce, 121 E. Rail- ton St., 5:30 p.m. Phone 360- Infinite Reflection, 144 Tripp road Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 senior citizens and students, $1000 Brow Wax with with any hair service in Oct! $6 ages 6 to 12. Children Come see what younger than 6, free. Reservawe have for tions, phone 360-452-2363, your dance and ext. 0. Volunteers in Medicine of the Olympics health clinic — 909 Georgiana St., noon to 5 p.m. Free for patients with no insurance or access to health care. For appointments, phone 360-457-4431.

Sunday, October 17, 2010


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Sunday, October 17, 2010

PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Food drive begins its 25th year Churches accepting donations Peninsula Daily News

Sequim Walmart employees, front row from left, Susan Dwyer, Tracey Barnes and Jason Bessey, present a ceremonial check for $1,000 to Sequim Middle School teachers. Educators are, standing, from left, Michael Galligan, Todd Beuke, Sue Brown, Bill Isenberg, Diana Piersoll, Principal Brian Jones and Judy Nix.

Wal-Mart helps Sequim teachers Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Wal-Mart is helping 10 teachers at Sequim Middle School purchase much-needed classroom supplies this back-toschool season as part of its Teacher Rewards program.

Nationally, Wal-Mart and Sam’s Club locations are awarding more than 45,000 educators with $100 each. Wal-Mart estimates that educators spend approximately $500 out of their

own pockets each year for classroom supplies, including snacks for students who may not have regular access to food. “Wal-Mart is committed to supporting the local community and addressing

unmet needs,” said Jason Bessey, the electronics department supervisor at the Sequim store. “We know teachers are on tight budgets to provide supplies for their classrooms.”

Briefly . . . New member joins Sequim Rotary Club

Little Theater to showcase foreign films

SEQUIM — The Sequim Noon Rotary Club recently inducted McCrorie Carpets interior designer Andrea Gilles. Gilles is a lifelong friend of Rotarian Rochelle McHugh, who sponsored her for membership. She is a native of Sequim and the wife of Realtor Ron Gilles, president of Sequim Sunrise Rotary.

Movies from Peru, Algeria can be seen

Poet reads at PC PORT ANGELES — Carlos Reyes, a poet, writer and translator and the publisher-editor of Trask House Books Inc., will read from his collected works at Peninsula College’s Foothills Writers Series on Tuesday, Oct. 26. The free 50-minute reading will be held in the Little Theater, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., at 12:35 p.m. Reyes lives in Portland, Ore., but travels often to Ireland and is a frequent visitor to Spain and Ecuador. His latest book of poetry, The Book of Shadows; New and Selected Poems, was published last year. Other books include At the Edge of the Western Wave and A Suitcase Full of Crows, which was a Bluestem Prize winner and finalist for the 1996 Oregon Book Awards. His newest translation of Ignacio Ruiz-Pérez’s La Señal del Cuervo/The Sign of the Crow is due out in the spring. In 2007, Reyes was awarded a Heinrich Boll Fellowship to write on Achill Island, Ireland, and in 2008 was awarded the Ethel Fortner Award from St. Andrew’s College in North Carolina. He was recently the poet in residence at Joshua Tree National Park in California. For more information on the Foothills Writers Series, visit www.pencol. edu.

Historical reading PORT HADLOCK — Author and historical researcher Jack Nisbet will present the story of David Douglas, the premier botanical explorer in the Pacific Northwest, at the Jefferson County Library, 620 Cedar Ave., 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 27. Nisbet will read passages from his book The Collector at the event. Douglas’ discoveries

PORT TOWNSEND — The What a Valuable Experience (WAVE) Food Drive to stock the shelves of the Jefferson County Food Bank has started, and something new is being tried for its silver anniversary. For 24 years, helpers have gone door to door accepting donations. Each year, between 8,500 and 12,000 pounds of food have been collected and $2,500 to $5,000 donated. During the 25th anniversary drive this fall, organizers are trying a different approach. Community members are asked to donate by bringing food to local churches or QFC locations in Port Townsend and Port Hadlock by Saturday, Oct. 23. WAVE collection bags, donated by Port Townsend QFC and Port Hadlock

QFC, will be circulated with the Wednesday issue of The Port Townsend Leader. Monetary gifts also are accepted and can be given to a staff person at participating churches. The drive will benefit the food banks that serve Port Townsend, the TriArea, Brinnon and Quilcene. This year’s volunteers include the Youth Corps, a service group of Port Townsend High School students, helping with organization at the food bank warehouse. Also volunteering are Grant Street Elementary School students in Jason Lynch’s fourth-grade class and Virgil Rondeau’s fifthgrade class and children of St. Mary’s Star of the Sea Catholic Church, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church and First Presbyterian Church. They are folding the bags that will be inserted into the newspaper. For more information, phone Kim Hammers at 360-531-0971 or Tyler Johnson at 360-385-6188.

Peninsula Daily News

Brown Maloney

Sequim Noon Rotary Club has inducted Andrea Gilles, center, whose membership was sponsored by Rochelle McHugh, right. At left is club President Sara Maloney. include hundreds of western plants — most notably the Douglas fir. From 1825 to Nisbet 1828, he tromped through forests, slogged through marshes, crossed desserts, climbed mountains and paddled rivers, traveling 7,000 miles throughout the Northwest. Nisbet not only provides a context for Douglas’ adventures but also a sense of Washington’s natural and human landscapes not long after the initial contact of European fur traders. His presentation will include period drawings, lithographs and paintings, made from Douglas collections. The Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association named The Collector one of its 2010 Books of the Year. A related museum exhibit with original Douglas specimen papers and material will open in Spokane in fall 2012 and move to Tacoma’s Washington State History Museum in 2013. For more information, visit www.jacknisbet.com. Copies of Nisbet’s books will be available for purchase. For more information, phone 360-385-6544 or visit www.jclibrary.info.

Harry Potter Party PORT ANGELES — In celebration of the first installment of the “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows” movie, the Port

Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., will throw a Harry Potter Party for all ages at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 27. Attendees can test their wits at Harry Potter trivia and compete in a costume contest. Prizes will be awarded. Refreshments worthy of Hogwarts will be served. For more information, phone 360-417-8502 or e-mail kids@nols.org.

Halloween carnival NORDLAND — Friends of Fort Flagler will hold their second annual Family Friendly Halloween Carnival at Fort Flagler State Park from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 29, and Saturday, Oct. 30. The gathering will include games, a photo booth, hay rides, a trick or treat street and “The Powerhouse of Peril.” Admission is $3 per person or $10 for a family. A canned food donation will earn $1 off admission. For more information, phone 360-385-3701 or visit www.flaglerflashes. blogspot.com.

Trunk or Treat SEQUIM — Eastern Hills Community Church, 91 Savannah Lane, will be hold its annual Trunk or Treat from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 31. The free community event provides a safe place for kids to trick or treat. Trunk or Treat will include bounce houses, a bonfire, hot dogs and candy distributed from decorated cars. For more information, phone 360-681-4367.

Gardens for health PORT ANGELES — Sissi Bruch, Lower Elwha Klallam tribe community garden coordinator, will present “Gardening for Health” at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., at noon Tuesday, Oct. 26. Bruch will discuss tribal members’ struggle to maintain cultural traditions and Bruch their current effort to bring back traditional plants to their way of life. She will share how a grant from the Washington Health Foundation’s Healthiest State in the Nation Campaign helped set up gardens for the tribe, teaching about gardening and composting and involving the community in gardening. Bruch also will provide a brief history of the Lower Elwha tribe, its view on plants and the clinic, day care and education gardens. Bruch is a registered landscape architect, urban planner and Washington State University Clallam County Extension master gardener. This presentation is part of the free “Green Thumbs Garden Tips” brown bag series sponsored by the WSU Clallam County Master Gardeners on the second and fourth Tuesday of every month in Port Angeles. For more information, phone 360-417-2279. Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Award-winning films from Peru and Algeria will be showcased in the Peninsula College Little Theater, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. Friday. “Gods,” which screens at 4 p.m., provides a glimpse into the lifestyle of the Peruvian upper class. Algeria’s official entry for the 2009 Academy Awards, “Masquerades,” will be shown at 7 p.m. In “Gods,” Elisa, the soon-to-be-wife of a wealthy industrialist, is eager to shed her working-class background in favor of the opulence of her fiance’s elite lifestyle. To her dismay, she soon realizes her hopes to slip into magazine-ready images of domestic splendor must also include her future stepchildren: Diego, who is

hounded by his overbearing father and reluctantly preparing to enter the family business, and Andrea, Diego’s party-girl sister and the object of both his desire and disgust. “Masquerades” depicts the life of a family in a remote area in the Algerian countryside. Filmgoers tag along on a journey into family traditions and learn about the many restrictions imposed by society. The film’s depiction of women in Algerian society show that although men dominate in public life, women are the real leaders at home. Admission is $5. Peninsula College and area high school students will be admitted free with a current student ID. The showings are part of the Global Lens Series sponsored by Peninsula College and the Port Townsend Film Festival. For more information on the series, e-mail Bruce Hattendorf at bhattendorf@ pencol.edu.

Club now accepting award applications Soroptimists do support women Peninsula Daily News

North Olympic Peninsula Soroptimist clubs are now accepting applications for the Women’s Opportunity Award, a program of Soroptimist International of the Americas. The Women’s Opportunity Award is for women with primary responsibility for supporting their family who attend or have been accepted by a vocational/skills training program or an undergraduate degree program. The deadline for submitting the application is Dec. 15. Application forms are available at the Peninsula College financial aid office in Port Angeles, the Peninsula College extensions in Forks and Port Townsend

or at www.pc.ctc.edu/ financialresources/ default.asp. The $1,000 cash award may be used to offset any costs associated with efforts to attain higher education, including books, child care and transportation. For more information on the Women’s Opportunity Award: ■  In Port Angeles, phone Wendy Shea at 360452-4045 or Jill Oakes at 360-417-3012 or visit www. sijetset.com. ■  In Forks, phone Debbie Scannell at 360-3743223. ■  In Sequim, phone Betty Osborn at 360-6837649 or e-mail woa@ sisequim.org. ■  In Port Townsend, phone Pat Durbin at 360379-4956 or visit www. soroptimistpt.org.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 17, 2010

C13

Supreme Court hopefuls offer distinct differences By Rachel La Corte The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — State Supreme Court Justice Richard Sanders’ penchant for dissent is unques­ tionable. Of the approximately 600 opin­ ions he has authored in his five years on the state’s highest court, more than 370 of them were written in opposition to majority rulings. As he seeks re-election to his fourth term, Sanders finds himself defending his often contrary role on the court — and some of the controversy he has been involved in both on and off of it — as he faces a competitive race against former Court of Appeals judge and Bainbridge Island attorney Char­ lie Wiggins. Sanders, who was first elected to the court in 1995, doesn’t apolo­ gize for his “unique independentminded perspective.” “I’ll sign or write a dissent when I strongly believe the major­ ity is wrong,” he wrote in an e-mail. “I do not go along to get along.” Wiggins has attacked Sanders on several fronts. He points to cases where Sand­ ers stood alone in his dissents, including a 2003 case where Sand­ ers wrote that the act of indecent exposure alone isn’t a crime against a person, and a 2007 rul­ ing where he recommended sus­ pending, instead of disbarring, a lawyer who sexually molested an 11-year-old boy who had been one of his clients. “I certainly agree judges see things differently and interpret

Voter guide now available ELECTION GUIDES FOR Clallam and Jefferson counties — including state­ wide races and measures — are now available for free at Peninsula Daily News offices in Port Ange­ les, Port Townsend and Sequim (addresses on Page A2). Limited numbers are also available at libraries, courthouses, city halls and other public contact points. They are also online at peninsuladailynews.com. Peninsula Daily News

ions, and said that his role is to follow “the letter of the law” when deciding a case. “It’s the job of the judge to make sure individual rights are upheld, even when it’s not popular,” he said. “The brave judge is the one who’s going to do that in the face of opposition.” Sanders, a self-described liber­ tarian, says one of his proudest moments on the bench was when he was the lone dissenter in a 1997 8-1 ruling in which the Supreme Court upheld the state’s ban on the medical use of marijuana, rejecting a plea from a cancerstricken lawyer, Ralph Seeley. Sanders wrote: “I wonder how many minutes of Seeley’s agony the Legislature and/or the major­ ity of this court would endure before seeing the light.” Medical marijuana was legal­ ized through the voter initiative process a year later.

things differently,” Wiggins said. “But the thing with Sanders is he is off in a field by himself with Same-sex marriage extreme interpretations like this But he has received criticism on and it happens over and over other stances, including his part in again.” the 2006 ruling against same-sex marriage. Opinions defended He was in the majority 5-4 rul­ ing, but instead of signing on to the Sanders ruled with the major­ majority opinion or writing his ity 70 percent of the time last year, own concurrence, he signed on to but still had the lowest rate of an opinion authored by Justice majority votes compared with the Jim Johnson that more actively other eight justices, according to opposed same-sex marriage, citing Mike Reitz, who tracks the votes “the unique and binary biological and opinions of each justice for the nature of marriage and its exclu­ Supreme Court of Washington sive link with procreation and blog. responsible child rearing.” Sanders defends all of his opin­ He has faced also criticism for

Richard Sanders First elected in 1995

Charlie Wiggins Ex-appellate judge

some of his actions off the court that Wiggins says “raises integrity issues,” including touring Wash­ ington’s sex predator commitment center at McNeil Island while resi­ dents had appeals pending. Sanders was given an admon­ ishment by the state Judicial Con­ duct Commission in 2005 for that visit. He insists he did nothing wrong, saying, “It’s the role of the judge to go out and visit institutions around the state.”

ruling after the losing party, King County, complained that Sanders had a conflict of interest because he didn’t disclose that the ruling affected a public-disclosure lawsuit he filed in Thurston County in 2005 against the state attorney general. Wiggins, who has been an attor­ ney for more than 30 years, briefly served on the state Court of Appeals in Tacoma in 1995 after being appointed to the seat, but lost the seat in an election that year. He’s also served as a substitute judge in King and Jefferson coun­ ties, handling criminal and civil cases, and helped oversee bar-dis­ ciplinary cases. Wiggins has raised about $199,000 and secured the endorse­ ments of many prosecuting attor­ neys, the state Democratic Party, and the Washington Council of Police & Sheriffs. Sanders has raised more than $250,000 and has the support of the Building Industry Association of Washington, the state Republi­ can and Libertarian parties, and business groups.

Yelled ‘tyrant!’ In 2008, he stood up and yelled “tyrant!” at then-U.S. Attorney General Michael Mukasey at black-tie dinner in Washington, D.C., for The Federalist Society, a conservative legal group. Sanders later released a state­ ment saying he was speaking his conscience, and he cited inade­ quate access to the legal system for detainees at Guantanamo Bay and the importance of the Geneva Conventions. And last year, the state Supreme Court withdrew a public-records

Typo mars plaque for revered artist Death and Memorial Notice Victoria Times Colonist

VICTORIA — It’s only one little letter, but it is bringing Emily Carr fans and curiosity seekers alike to the bronze statue of the acclaimed artist just installed at Belleville and Government streets. Yes, they want to see Carr, but they also caught word of the typo on the

bronze “book” listing major donors to the $400,000 cause that gave “Our Emily” a home­ town monument. The typo drops the letter “n’’ from the word “known” in a phrase that should read: “Dedicated to honour Victo­ ria’s best known citizen.” “We came both to see the statue and to see the error,” said Jean McBean of Oak Bay, B.C.

Victoria Times Colonist

A missing letter on a new memorial to Canadian artist Emily Carr will send the plaque back to its originator. The monument is on the Fairmont Empress hotel grounds, two blocks from the landings of ferries from Port Angeles.

“I think the statue is wonderful — it’s quite unbe­ lievable that [the error] wasn’t caught at some stage.” Ann Geddes, president of the Parks and Recreation Foundation of Victoria, which spearheaded fund­ raising, said she did not know how the error happened but it would be fixed quickly. Geddes did not say how long it would take or cost, but said the book would have to be shipped back to Edmonton, Alberta, where it was cast. After that, there will be an unveiling of the corrected version. Geddes noticed the error herself Wednesday while reading the plaque after hundreds of people had attended the installation celebration at the Fairmont Empress hotel grounds. The error was not con­ tained in the original proof, but there were many steps along the way, she said. “I don’t want to assign where the fault lay,” said Geddes.

Death and Memorial Notice Peter W. Adolphsen July 2, 1930 October 9, 2010 Peter Adolphsen, 80, of Port Angeles passed away October 9, 2010, of leukemia. He was born July 2, 1930, to Martin W. and Elsie (Brant) Adolphsen in Centralia, Washington. The family moved to the North Olympic Peninsula in 1936, and Pete graduated from Roosevelt High School in Port Angeles. He served with the United States Army from 1950-1952. He resided in Port Angeles from 1953, working at Nailor Lumber as a contractor, as well as

farming until retiring from the Clallam Co-Op. Mr. Adolphsen married Verna Heller on September 19, 1953, in Port Angeles. He enjoyed reading anything and woodworking. He loved the land and crops, and kept his own weather records since 1981. He was a member of Helpful Neighbors Club and Agnew Irrigation District, and was a Volunteer Firefighter. Mr. Adolphsen is survived by his wife, Verna; sons and daughters-inlaw, Keith and Sharon Adolphsen of Richland, Washington, Gene and Shirley Adolphsen of Sequim and Eric and Karalynn Adolphsen of Sequim; daughter and

son-in-law, Linda and Randy Frick of Port Angeles; brothers and sistersin-law, Glenn and Marilyn Adolphsen and David and Mary Adolphsen, all of Port Angeles; nine grandchildren and five greatgrandchildren. Memorial services will be held Saturday, October 23, 2010, at 1 p.m. at Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel, 105 West Fourth Street, Port Angeles. The Rev. Ted Mattie will officiate. An open house will follow the services at the Adolphsen homestead. Memorial contributions may be made to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or your favorite charity.

Remembering a Lifetime downloading at www.peninsuladaily news.com under “Obituary Forms.”

Death Notices Milton ‘Ed’ Hartley Sept. 13, 1926 — Oct. 14, 2010

Former Quilcene resi­ dent Milton “Ed” Hartley died in Mount Vernon. He was 84. His obituary and service arrangements will be pub­ lished later. Hawthorne Funeral Home, Mount Ver­ non, is in charge of arrange­ ments.

Clinton Neal Radke February 13, 1939 October 13, 2010 Clinton Neal Radke, son of Helen and Fred A. Radke, was born in Seattle and died suddenly in Port Angeles. He grew up in Port Angeles, graduating from Port Angeles High School in 1957. He earned Bachelor of Science degrees in Chemical Engineering in 1962, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Industrial Engineering years later, both at the University of Washington in Seattle. Prior to military service, he worked as an engineer in the oil industry. After enlisting in the U.S. Army and attending Officer Candidate School, he served overseas with the rank of Captain in Korea, Italy and Vietnam, where he was honored with the

Mr. Radke Bronze Star for combat valor. He is survived by his sister, Carol Radke Pope of Port Angeles, and his brother, Dr. Lawrence Radke of Saunderstown, Rhode Island; three nephews and one niece. An avid fisherman, hiker, and gardener who loved the outdoors, he will be greatly missed by family and friends.

Death and Memorial Notice William ‘Bill’ Brummer January 22, 1925 October 9, 2010 William J. Brummer died peacefully at home of age-related illness with his wife and other family members at his side on October 9, 2010. He was preceded in death by brothers Ted, Joe and Dick. Born in Westmore, Montana, to Jessie and Theodore Brummer, he grew up on the family farm, joining the Navy in 1941. After World War II, he finally settled in Port Angeles, where he worked for Sandison Bakery.

Mr. Brummer In 1967, he moved to Seattle to work for the King County Sanitation Department until he retired in 1995, at which time he and his wife

moved back to Port Angeles. He enjoyed fishing and building unique birdhouses. His survivors include his wife of 43 years, Wendy; his daughters and sons-in-law, Myrna and John Cooter, Billie Jean and Daniel Cottrell, and Cherie and Bill Wilson; six grandsons; four granddaughters and three great-grandsons. He is also survived by brother and sister-in-law, Kenneth and Mary Brummer; sisters and brotherin-law, Kathryn Allman, Dorothy Harris, and Carol and Kenneth Grant; and sisters-in-law Lorry, Bonnie and Georgia Brummer; along with numerous nieces and nephews.

HELP OUR TROOPS CALL HOME DONATE YOUR OLD CELL PHONES

More than 150,000 troops are serving overseas. Cell Phones for Soldiers is calling on all Americans to support the troops by donating old cell phones. LOCAL DROP OFF CENTER:

■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

Drennan & Ford

Funeral Home and Crematory 260 Monroe Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 457-1210 • 683-4020 • 374-5678 www.drennanford.com www.veteransfuneralhomes.com PROUDLY SERVING THOSE WHO HAVE PROUDLY SERVEDSM

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■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by

Geddes was relieved the error was not on the page detailing Carr’s life or in a sponsor’s name. The donor page calls Carr a “pre-eminent painter and awarded writer.” Is that an awkward way to refer to a woman who won the 1941 Governor-General’s Prize for literature? Three writers and editors reviewed the use of the word “awarded” and found it acceptable given the space concerns on the bronze page, Geddes said.


C14

WeatherNorthwest

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Monday

Tuesday

Yesterday

Wednesday

Thursday

High 53

Low 37

54/39

54/40

57/42

55/42

Mostly sunny.

Partly cloudy and chilly.

Times of clouds and sun.

Partly sunny and pleasant.

Mostly sunny.

Sun and some clouds.

The Peninsula High pressure building off the Pacific Northwest coast will provide a mostly sunny sky across the region today with chilly temperatures. Many places will have afternoon temperatures topping out in the lower 50s, which is about 5 degrees below normal for Neah Bay Port this time of the year. Tonight will be partly cloudy and chilly. 53/44 Townsend High pressure will provide another dry day Monday with Port Angeles 53/42 times of clouds and sunshine. Tuesday will be partly 53/37 sunny. Wednesday will be a seasonable day with sunSequim shine and patchy clouds.

Victoria 57/39

55/40

Forks 58/39

Olympia 57/31

Spokane 58/29

Marine Forecast

Partly sunny today. Wind from the west at 4-8 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility clear. Partly cloudy tonight. Wind light and variable. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility clear. Clouds and sun tomorrow. Wind light and variable. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility clear. Tuesday: Mostly sunny and pleasant. Wind from the east at 3-6 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility clear.

LaPush

Today

Tomorrow

Low Tide

Ht

9:21 a.m. 6.6’ 2:42 a.m. 1.5’ COme see the 9:13 p.m. 6.3’ 3:20 p.m. 2.7’

BEST OF the BEST

Port Angeles

12:37 p.m. ----Port Townsend 12:04 a.m. 2:22 p.m. Sequim Bay* 1:43 p.m. -----

6.7’ 4.8’ 5.6’ 8.1’ 7.6’ ---

5:13 a.m. 7:21 p.m. 6:27 a.m. 8:35 p.m. 6:20 a.m. 8:28 p.m.

1.5’ 3.0’ 2.0’ 3.9’ 1.9’ 3.7’

Minneapolis 56/40

San Francisco 65/52

New

High Tide Ht 10:04 a.m. 10:10 p.m. 12:01 a.m. 1:00 p.m. 1:46 a.m. 2:45 p.m. 1:07 a.m. 2:06 p.m.

7.0’ 6.6’ 6.6’ --5.8’ 8.0’ 5.5’ 7.5’

Tuesday

Low Tide Ht 3:35 a.m. 4:14 p.m. 6:08 a.m. 7:44 p.m. 7:22 a.m. 8:58 p.m. 7:15 a.m. 8:51 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

1.5’ 2.1’ 2.0’ 2.4’ 2.6’ 3.1’ 2.4’ 2.9’

10:42 a.m. 11:00 p.m. 1:16 a.m. 1:16 p.m. 3:01 a.m. 3:01 p.m. 2:22 a.m. 2:22 p.m.

Low Tide Ht

7.4’ 7.0’ 5.1’ 6.6’ 6.2’ 7.9’ 5.8’ 7.4’

4:21 a.m. 5:00 p.m. 6:56 a.m. 8:03 p.m. 8:10 a.m. 9:17 p.m. 8:03 a.m. 9:10 p.m.

1.5’ 1.4’ 2.5’ 1.8’ 3.2’ 2.3’ 3.0’ 2.2’

Best Auto Deale r

Nov 5

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

First

Nov 13

City Hi Lo W Athens 77 67 pc Baghdad 100 65 s Beijing 52 43 pc Brussels 46 33 pc Cairo 93 75 pc Calgary 48 27 s Edmonton 52 29 pc Hong Kong 85 76 pc Jerusalem 84 63 s Johannesburg 73 51 s Kabul 89 43 s London 55 43 s Mexico City 74 45 s Montreal 54 36 pc Moscow 38 26 s New Delhi 93 65 s Paris 49 39 s Rio de Janeiro 80 65 pc Rome 64 50 c Stockholm 46 36 s Sydney 69 55 s Tokyo 73 61 c Toronto 58 39 pc Vancouver 56 40 pc Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Bes Auto R t ep Finali air st

Kansas City 74/50

New York 67/48 Washington 70/47

Atlanta 80/52

0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Houston 85/60

Fronts Cold Warm

Miami 82/70

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi 74 46 59 80 66 70 62 60 55 66 62 56 80 70 64 72 55 65 87 76 66 63 60 28 56 85 85 45

Lo W 49 pc 37 c 37 s 52 s 44 s 45 s 27 s 33 r 31 c 41 c 42 s 40 pc 51 s 36 pc 46 s 44 s 26 s 34 s 63 pc 40 pc 43 s 42 s 31 s 15 pc 27 c 70 s 60 pc 40 r

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 74 86 82 72 82 60 56 80 83 67 84 70 82 89 70 90 63 78 65 72 76 64 84 68 65 60 62 70

Lo W 50 s 64 pc 54 s 60 sh 70 s 45 s 40 pc 50 s 59 s 48 s 55 s 46 pc 58 s 62 pc 48 s 68 pc 37 s 48 s 43 sh 49 c 55 s 43 c 63 pc 62 sh 52 c 38 pc 37 c 47 s

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 97 at Needles, CA

Low: 16 at Libby, MT

Be salesp st e Fin rson ellen D alist earinge r

Be salesp st erson Bil schlin l gting

Bes Oil Ch t an Finali ge st

0A5099129

Thank You!

High Tide Ht

Oct 30

Detroit 63/42

El Paso 82/55

Moon Phases Last

Denver 76/40

Chicago 64/46

Los Angeles 72/60

Sunset today ................... 6:22 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:38 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 4:02 p.m. Moonset today ................. 2:10 a.m.

World Cities Today

Yakima Kennewick 58/25 61/26

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2010

Ht

Billings 60/33

Sun & Moon

Oct 22

Everett 56/40

Seattle 54/38

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Seattle 54/38

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Statistics are for the 48-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 55 35 0.00 7.84 Forks 57 31 0.13 88.17 Seattle 57 42 0.08 30.20 Sequim 58 39 0.00 8.36 Hoquiam 56 35 0.13 46.48 Victoria 56 34 0.00 23.52 P. Townsend* 56 43 0.01 11.03 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Full

Port Ludlow 55/40 Bellingham 54/32

Aberdeen 60/40

Peninsula Daily News

wilder

Auto Center You Can Count on us!

97 Deer Park Road • Port Angeles • 1-800-927-9395 • 360-452-3888 • www.wilderauto.com

Farm: Kennels, fences

to receive renovations Continued from C1 employees, licensing, feed, utilities, repairs and other After making a film expenses associated with starring his son, Melvin, caring for the animals. and a few orphaned and He has focused advertistrained wild animals, the ing on major cable TV chanBeebes struck up a business nels and in newspapers and relationship with Disney magazines, along with broStudios that lasted into the chures on the ferries. early 1970s. “One of several things I To help subsidize feed did first was increase the expenses, Beebe said, the advertising,” he said. farm accepts donations of The game farm’s online meat, and he has saved presence also has improved, money by harvesting hay and it has expanded to yearfrom fields people want round hours. mowed. “We are starting to get “We need at least 5,000 tours and tour buses back,” bales at 50 pounds each to Beebe said. “We’re just tryfeed the animals over the ing to breathe new life back winter,” Beebe said. into it.” The game farm is at Profits rising 1423 Ward Road. Fall hours are from The farm saw a 15 percent increase in gross prof- 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through its the first year after Beebe Nov. 24. Winter hours from Nov. 26 through Feb. 21 are took over, he said. The second year saw an from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The game farm is closed increase of 10 percent, and when the family raised the Thanksgiving and Christrates last year, they saw a mas. 30 percent increase in gross Mini-tours are not availprofits, he said. able during the fall and Beebe stressed that winter. entry fees to the game farm Drive tour rates, which are still cheaper than the are per person, are $11 for Seattle and Tacoma zoos. those 15 and older, and $10 “We get enough profit to for children 6 to 14 and for get through the winter pay- seniors 55 and older. Chilroll,” he said. “It’s going dren 5 and younger are right back into the farm.” admitted free. This includes costs for Active military person-

nel and AAA members receive $1 off if they have valid cards. Discounted rates are available for tour buses and groups of 10 or more. For more information, phone 360-683-4295 or visit www.olygamefarm.com.

________ Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Jeff Chew can be reached at 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Affordable Comfort Food

By Bushwhacker Bob Fall brings us inside. Fall brings Bushwhacker’s affordable comfort food to the table. Imagine yourself wrapped in the warmth of Colleen’s smile as she asks, “Welcome, my name is Colleen. Our soup maker Chad has come up with a new daily special. Homemade hot soup in a sourdough fresh baked bread bowl. Yum for the tum!”

Sunday Breakfast Buffet $10.99 (Seniors & Under 12 $6.99)

All You Can Eat Spaghetti after 4pm

Peninsula Daily News

CASH FOR GOLD & SILVER

Top Prices Paid For

10K - 14K - 24K - Dental - Scrap Gold Coins - Sterling Silver

11:30– Close

Buy A Salad Bar Get One 1/2 Price Tuesday – All You Can Eat Fish & Chips $13.99 11:30–Close

Wednesday 5 Appetizers for $5 Meals so good your wool socks will roll up & down!

Paying 1100% of Face Value.

Dimes - paying $1.10 each and up Quarters - paying $2.75 each and up Half Dollars - paying $5.50 each and up Half Dollars 1965-1970 - paying $1.75 each and up Silver Dollars before 1936 - paying $12.00 each and up

Buying U.S. Paper Money

$1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, $100, $500, $1,000 bills dated before 1964 and all Star Notes.

Sterling Silver Flatware - Our Favorite!

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Sequim Stamp & Coin Show Masonic Hall, 700 S. 5th Ave. Sequim, WA 98382

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Saturday, October 23, 2010 9:30am - 5:00pm

Monday – All Day

Animal handler Kreg Gallauher pets Ricky the rhinoceros, one of the the more exotic animals at Olympic Game Farm.

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I invite you to be wrapped in the warmth of my restaurant.

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 17, 2010

Business

SECTION

D

Politics and Environment

 $ Briefly . . . PA chamber sets hopefuls for Olympia PORT ANGELES — A candidates forum for Kevin Van De Wege and Dan Gase, the two men sparring over the 24th District Position 1 seat in the state House, is scheduled at this week’s Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce luncheon meeting on Monday. Van De Wege, D-Sequim, is seeking a third term in the House. Gase, a RepubliVan De Wege can, is a real estate broker from Port Angeles and past chamber president. Their appearance before the chamber luncheon audience follows by one week a similar forum with the Position 2 candidates, Steve Tharinger, Democrat, and Jim McEntire, Republican. Balloting in the all-mail election is under way and ends Nov. 2. Open to the public, Gase Monday’s chamber lunch­eon begins at noon in the secondfloor meeting room of the Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St. Luncheon tickets are $13 and can be purchased from the meeting room cashier.

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Chris Tucker, Peninsula Daily News

Jackson Smart and his Port Angeles welcome sign/mural across from the MV Coho ferry terminal. starts with no-host lunch at noon Wednesday at JT’s Sweet Stuffs, 80 N. Forks Ave. Lunch costs $8; a bowl of soup, $4.75; and a cup of soup, $4. Phone Bingham at 360374-2531 for further information.

Business students

PA sign man gets national kudos Smart painted a huge welcome sign (shown above) in 2009 on the PORT ANGELES — Jackson north wall of the Black Ball Ferry Smart, proprietor of Jackson’s Building. ­SignArt Studio in Port Angeles, It greets travelers arriving in was applauded in the October issue Port Angeles from Victoria on the of Signs of the Times, a magazine MV Coho ferry. for the sign industry since 1906. The 10-by-20-foot sign is also a “Port Angeles has benefited mural, depicting the arrival of the from Jackson Smart’s appreciation first European ship, the San Carlos of the area’s history and his sigfrom Spain, in Port Angeles Harbor nage for many years . . . [he] has in 1791. created many signs that celebrate It is shown being greeted by the history and natural wealth of members of the Klallam tribe in his home base,” the magazine said their canoes. Smart also did a series of interin an article about Smart’s work. Peninsula Daily News

pretive signs mounted on pedestals along the Port Angeles waterfront. The greeting and interpretive signs cost $11,175, paid to Smart from city lodging tax revenues and business and personal donations. He also made a welcome sign in 2004 for the eastern entrance to Port Angeles on U.S. Highway 101 as part of a Port Angeles Rotary Club project. Smart is now working on another welcome sign for the west entrance to Port Angeles on Highway 101.

PORT ANGELES — An overview on Business Week, the statewide program for high school business students, will be given to this week’s Port Angeles Business Association breakfast meeting by a Port Angeles High School teacher on Tuesday. Lora Brabant, marketing teacher and adviser to the oncampus business Prop. 1 talk slated club known Brabant PORT TOWNSEND — as DECA — formerly payment last fall, but the proposal By Stephen Ohlemacher Jefferson County Adminis- known as Distributive failed in the Senate when a dozen The Associated Press trator Philip Morley will Education Clubs of AmerDemocrats joined Republicans on a discuss the election ballot’s ica — will describe BusiWASHINGTON — Another year procedural vote to block it. ness Week, the weeklong Proposition 1 before this without an increase in Social Security Senate Majority Leader Harry teen summer camp offered week’s Chamber of Comretirement and disability benefits is Reid, D-Nev., said Friday that in the on college campuses merce luncheon meeting creating a political backlash that has post-election session “I will be workBy Rachel La Corte across Washington state on Monday. President Barack Obama and DemoThe Associated Press ing hard to gain Senate passage for a since 1976. The crats pushing to give a $250 bonus to proposal that ensures that America’s Scheduled to join Bracountywide OLYMPIA — The state’s each of the program’s 58 million recip- seniors are treated fairly.” bant are two Port Angeles proposition minimum wage will increase ients. participants of last sumwould raise by 12 cents to $8.67 on Jan. 1. The Social Security Administra- After campaign season mer’s Business Week. the sales The state Department of tion said Friday inflation has been too Tuesday’s PABA meettax in JefLabor and Industries’ decision Michael Steel, a spokesman for low since the last increase in 2009 to ing, open to the public, ferson to increase the wage came FriHouse Republican leader John Boehwarrant a raise for 2011. begins at 7:30 a.m. at County by day after a three-week delay The announcement marks only the ner of Ohio, said that if Democrats Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 0.3 cent caused by conflicting legal opinwere serious about a bonus, they would Morley second year without an increase since DelGuzzi Drive, Port per $1 of ions raised by the state attorAngeles. automatic adjustments for inflation have voted on it before lawmakers retail sales. ney general and the authors of went home to campaign for re-election. There is a $2.16 miniwere adopted in 1975. The revenues collected the 1998 voter initiative that Barbara Kennelly, a former DemoThis year was the first. would help to offset a pro- mum charge by Joshua’s ties the minimum wage to the cratic congresswoman from Connectifor those who do not order House Speaker Nancy Pelosi promjected $620,000 county Consumer Price Index. ised to schedule a vote after the Nov. 2 cut, applauded Pelosi’s promise to government shortfall, plus breakfast. This year was the first year vote on the payments. provide revenue to the city election on a bill to provide one-time that the state wage didn’t go But, she said, she doesn’t underBusiness events of Port Townsend. $250 payments to Social Security up since the initiative passed. stand why Congress didn’t vote on the SEQUIM — The Balloting in the allrecipients. This was because inflation, bill before recessing for an election in mail election is under way Sequim-Dungeness Valley Obama endorsed the payment, as measured by the price index, which Democrats are in danger of losChamber of Commerce and ends Nov. 2. which would be similar to one included fell last year. ing their majorities in both the House will be busy with two Open to the public, in his economic recovery package last and Senate. events on Tuesday. Monday’s luncheon of the Turn to Wage/D2 year. Jefferson County Chamber Obama had pushed for a second Turn to Recipients/D2 Turn to Briefly/D5 of Commerce, which was formerly the Port Townsend Chamber of Commerce before it comof the bined with the Tri-Area and Port Ludlow chambers, begins at noon at the Port Townsend Elks paid advertisement Lodge, 555 Otto St. Lunch costs $12 for a An interview with Dr. George Lawrence of Q: Chiropractic neurology. What is it? full meal, $9 for soup/salad Pro Active Chiropractic Clinic in Port Angeles A: Chiropractic neurology combines the or $5 for dessert/beverage. biomechanics of chiropractic with techPrices include tax, beverQ: What got you interested in chiropractic? niques for assessing and rehabilitating the age and dessert. A: When I was in junior high school I injured central nervous system. Muscle spindles my shoulder long jumping. As a result, I comprise the largest input to your brain. ‘Get to Know’ had chronic dislocations and eventually By using the bones as a lever to stretch the FORKS — An update was scheduled for surgery. I was ready to muscle spindles of the vertebral column on the activities and benego through with it until I saw someone in and/or the extremities, changes in brain fits of the Forks Chamber an upper body cast who had had shoulder function occur, resulting in improved of Commerce will be given surgery. I did not want to be immobilized physical performance. to chamber members at like that, so I canceled my operation and Dr. George Lawrence their luncheon meeting on saw a chiropractor. He helped me with my Q: What conditions do you treat? Wednesday. shoulder and more. Because of that experi- A: All conditions normally seen by chiropracence I decided to become a chiropractor. Marcia tors, like pain from lifting, sports injuries, activities, physical exercises, breathing Bingham, falls and auto accidents plus learning and exercises, and nutritional modification. Q: Where did you study chiropractic? attention disorders, vertigo, developmental chamber A: I graduated from Life Chiropractic College disorders, head injuries and strokes, spinal Q: Why choose a chiropractic neurologist? director, West in California in 1991. cord and nerve injuries, movement dis- A: As a chiropractic neurologist I am a qualiand Mike orders, cold hands and feet, blood pressure fied specialist in the brain and nervous Gurling, Q: Do you have any areas of specialization? disorders, and more. system. I offer effective treatment options visitor cenA: Yes. I am a certified chiropractic extremthat do not involve medications or surgery. ter manity practitioner and a certified chiropractic Q: What treatment methods do you use? If you have a condition related in any way ager, will Bingham sports physician. In 1997 I completed the A: I use specific chiropractic adjustments to to the brain or nervous system, chiropractic discuss chiropractic neurology program through the spine and/or extremities, tissue work, neurology provides a new avenue of hope “Get to the Carrick Institute. Because so much has eye exercises, balance and coordination for successful treatment. Know Your changed since 1997, I am taking it again. Chamber I have been traveling to Portland since May of Comto attend classes. Each class is 15 hours. merce.” It will take me two years to complete the The program and following that, I will sit for chamber the chiropractic neurology board exam. meeting, open to the public, Gurling

A flat $250 for spurned Social Security recipients? Minimum wage rising to $8.67

Business

week

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Sunday, October 17, 2010

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Guess who shares ancestry Common thread among Palin, Limbaugh and Obama

FDA OKs Botox for migranes By Matthew Perrone

Katz, director of neurology products, in a statement. WASHINGTON — The FDA approved Federal health officials the new use based on approved the wrinkletwo company studies of smoothing injection more than 1,300 Botox for migraine head- patients who received aches on Friday, giving either a Botox injection drugmaker Allergan or a dummy injection. clearance to begin marPatients who received keting its drug to Botox reported slightly patients with a serious fewer “headache days” history of the condition. than patients given the The Food and Drug sham treatment. Administration In the more signifiapproved the drug for cant of the two studies, patients who experience patients on Botox 15 or more days of reported about two migraine headaches per fewer headache days month. Allergan, which than patients who did specializes in beauty not receive the drug. and eye-care drugs, said Botox, which was roughly 3.2 million peo- introduced in 1989, is ple in the U.S. have one of Allergan’s top chronic migraines. drugs, accounting or For the new use, doc- more than $1.3 billion of the company’s $4.4 biltors are directed to lion sales in 2009. inject patients in the The drug is most neck or head every 12 famous for its ability to weeks to dull future smooth frown lines on headaches. Doctors currently use aging foreheads, but it is also approved to treat a wide variety of medineck spasms, eye muscle cations to treat migraines, ranging from disorders and excessive underarm sweating. over-the-counter painThe drug won killers like Advil to preapproval earlier this scription narcotics like year to treat spasms in codeine. the elbows, wrists and Many patients also fingers. respond to changes in But it is also widely diet or lifestyle, such as used off-label to treat reducing caffeine or broader movement disstress. orders such as cerebral “This condition can palsy. greatly affect family, Botox works by blockwork and social life, so it ing the connections is important to have a variety of effective treat- between nerves and ment options available,” muscle, temporarily paralyzing the muscle. said FDA’s Dr. Russell The Associated Press

Peninsula Daily News news services

WASHINGTON — Rush Limbaugh calls President Obama “imam,” even though he knows the president isn’t a Muslim. Sarah Palin has openly doubted the president’s “cojones.” Turns out these two conservative firebrands have been dissin’ their own cousin. The online genealogy service Ancestry.com reports that Obama and Palin are 10th cousins, and Obama and Limbaugh are 10th cousins once removed. In both cases, the ties date to the 1600s. Obama’s distant family ties to former President George W. Bush and former Vice President Dick Cheney surfaced during his presidential campaign. Obama also is a distant cousin of billionaire investor Warren Buffett and actor Brad Pitt, according to Ancestry.com. Anastasia Tyler, the lead genealogist on the latest project, said in an interview: “It just shows how all of these politicians, they’re on different sides of the political spectrum, but in the end they’re all part of what makes America great, and they all go back to deep American roots.”

Peninsula Daily News

The Associated Press

President Obama’s father, also named Barack Obama, and his mother, Stanley Ann Dunham, are shown in this undated photo. Genealogical ties run through the president’s mother’s side.

Barack Obama

Obama’s Kenyan father’s background is harder to document as far back, and likely would have fewer connections to early American settlers. Genealogists say it is typically harder for AfricanAmericans and many minority populations in the U.S. to trace their roots because of a lack of written historical documentation. Palin’s tie to Obama is through early Massachusetts settler John Smith, a Protestant pastor in the 1670s who opposed the persecution of Quakers. Smith’s wife was the sister of one of the first governors of the Plymouth Bay colony, Thomas Hinckley. Hinckley’s father, Samuel, it so happens, is the familial link between Obama and Bush. Obama’s and Limbaugh’s common ancestor is RichMother’s side mond Terrell, who settled in The ties run through Virginia around 1656 and Obama’s white, Kansas-born acquired a large amount of mother’s side of the family. land.

Sarah Palin

Rush Limbaugh

One might argue that everyone’s related if you go back far enough, but Tyler said that 350 years isn’t nearly far enough to connect most Americans to one another. Ancestry.com says it has 1.3 million paying subscribers who have built 19 million family trees over the years. The company has publicized many of the celebrity connections it finds.

When Tyler’s team began this latest research on Obama about six months ago, researchers were looking for links among political foes in this polarized era of tea-party protests and false assertions about Obama’s birthplace and religion. They found that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat, is distantly related to conservative author Ann Coulter, as well as to Palin.

Recipients: Inflation numbers doubted Continued from D1 “I just don’t understand it,” said Kennelly, now president and CEO of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare. “I don’t care, Republican or Democrat, they say they care about the senior vote. They could’ve done it.” Annual cost-of-living adjustments, or COLAs, are automatically set each year by an inflation measure that was adopted by Congress in the 1970s. Friday’s announcement was triggered by the Labor in energy prices to above $4 Department’s release of a gallon in the summer of inflation numbers for Sep- 2008. tember. When the price of gasoline later fell — to below $2 Big 2009 increase a gallon — so did the overThe report showed that all inflation rate. Seniors, consumer prices are still however, kept their increase lower than they were two in benefits. “They received a nearly years ago, when the last 6 percent COLA for inflaCOLA was awarded. The increase for 2009 tion that no longer really was 5.8 percent, the largest in 27 years. It was triggered by a sharp but short-lived spike

consumer prices as a whole rise above what they were in the summer of 2008. The trustees who oversee Social Security project that will happen next year. They predict the increase at the start of 2012 will be 1.2 percent. A little more than 58.7 million retirees, disabled Americans and surviving spouses and minor children of enrollees receive Social Security or Supplemental Security Income. Social Security was the primary source of income for 64 percent of retirees existed,” said Andrew Biggs, who got benefits in 2008. a former deputy commissioner at the Social Security Average $1,072 Administration and now a The average Social Securesident scholar at the rity benefit is $1,072 a American Enterprise Insti- month. tute. Social Security is sup“It looks bad, but they’re ported by a 6.2 percent payactually not being treated roll tax — paid by both unfairly.” workers and employers — By law, the next increase on wages up to $106,800. in benefits won’t come until Because there is no

COLA, that amount will remain unchanged for 2011. The absence of inflation will be of small comfort to many older Americans whose savings and home values haven’t recovered from the recession. “They are absolutely livid that Congress has bailed out banks, bailed out Wall Street, bailed out big car manufacturers and they didn’t get a COLA,” said Mary Johnson, a policy analyst for the Senior Citizens League. “Their costs are going up, and they cannot understand the government’s measure of inflation. “They feel it’s rigged.” Betty Dizik, a retired tax preparer and social worker from Tamarac, Fla., said an increase in benefits would help her pay for medicine she can no longer afford to treat her kidney disease. At 83, her only source of income is a $1,200 monthly

payment from Social Security. “I think seniors are going to be upset because gas has gone up, food has gone up, things in the store are expensive to buy,” Dizik said. “Let’s face it, prices are rising and I don’t know how they do the cost of living.” Claire Edelman of Monroe Township, N.J., said she was so hard up that at the age of 83 she applied for a temporary job as a census taker for the 2010 Census. She didn’t get the job, so she gets by on a small pension from her job with the state and a monthly Social Security payment of $1,060. “I can’t understand why the Congress hasn’t seen that there’s been an increase in everything,” Edelman said. “They say that nothing went up last year?” she added. “What’s the matter with them?”

Wage: Raise to minimum first in 2 years

No ‘On the Waterfront’ Columnist David G. Sellars is taking time off from his maritime column.

Continued from D1 mum wage if the price index increases to less than the It is now growing again, level the current wage is based upon. but at a slower rate. McKenna said no, but Recent federal numbers showed an overall increase the Washington State Labor in the index, though it’s still Council, the group behind lower than the last time the Initiative 688, opposed state minimum wage McKenna’s interpretation. In a statement issued increased in January 2009. The state agency had Friday, McKenna said he asked Attorney General believed that “our interpreRob McKenna if the state tation of the law harmocould increase the mini- nizes the intent behind the

NOTICE

initiative with the language of the law.” Labor and Industries spokeswoman Kim Contris said that the state ultimately made the decision to raise the rate “based on how we believe a court would interpret the law.” “We really wanted to correctly implement the law,” she said. “We recognize there could be confusion and addi-

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tional cost if we made a Chris Gregoire earlier this mistake and the court over- month, the Association of turned the decision.” Washington Business argued for not raising WashLabor happy ington state’s wage, saying that struggling businesses Rick Bender, president of the Washington state Labor will need to find other ways Council, lauded the deci- to reduce costs. sion. “This will impact several Sees negative impact hundred thousand of our “Raising the minimum lowest-paid workers,” he wage will lead to further said. declines in jobs, benefits or “It will help them make work hours,” the group ends meet.” wrote. While Washington state’s Grant Nelson, governcurrent rate of $8.55 an ment affairs director for the hour is the already the association, said Friday’s highest state minimum decision will “make it more wage in the nation, a few difficult to do business in cities, like San Francisco the state of Washington.” and Santa Fe, N.M., have Nelson said the group their own laws and have was weighing several higher rates. San Francisco’s current options, including legislarate of $9.79 will increase to tive and legal. In an e-mailed state$9.92 next year. The federal ment, Gregoire said that minimum wage is $7.25. Oregon, which also has the wage increase “follows an initiative-based mini- the direction of the voters mum wage law, announced that enacted the law.” Other states with adjustlast month that its minimum wage was going up by able minimum wages are 10 cents to $8.50 an hour Arizona, Florida, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, Ohio, next year. Colorado’s minimum Oregon, and Vermont. Most states that tie the wage dropped slightly this year, from $7.28 to the fed- wage to inflation make no eral level of $7.25, because provision for lowering the of the drop in inflation, but amount, including Washthere is a proposal there to ington, so the minimum wage stays flat if the price raise it to $7.36 on Jan. 1. In a letter sent to Gov. index falls.


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 17, 2010

D3

Recession? We’re still getting married Marriage and divorce rates are remarkably immune to ups and downs of business By Justin Wolfers WASHINGTON — The recession has taken a toll on the institution of marriage, we keep hearing. Last month, for instance, when it was reported that the proportion of Americans aged 25 to 34 who are married fell below the proportion who have never married, it was quickly attributed to the economic downturn. Young adults, according to this narrative, have less money to spend on a wedding and are less eager to enter into a lifetime commitment during times of uncertainty. Again last week, when a report from the Pew Research Center noted that, for the first time, college-educated 30-year-olds were more likely to have been married than were people the same age without a college degree, the news was interpreted as another side effect of the recent recession.

Numbers don’t support talk After all, the downturn has been especially hard on young men with no college degree. But if you look at marriage in the United States over the past century, this interpretation doesn’t stand up. Marriage and divorce rates have remained remarkably immune to the ups and downs of the business cycle. Unfortunately, the marriage statistics are easy to misread. It is misleading to count the wedding rings among people in their 20s and early 30s, because the median age at first marriage in the United States has risen to 28 for men (from 23 in 1970) and 26 for women (from 21 in 1970). The fact that these folks aren’t married now doesn’t mean they won’t marry — many of them just aren’t there yet.

Look instead at 40-year-olds, and you see that 81 percent have married at least once. Yes, this number used to be higher — it peaked at 93 percent in 1980 — but, clearly, marriage remains a part of most people’s lives. These statistics are not a perfect barometer either, however, because they reflect weddings that were celebrated years earlier. To most accurately track marriage rates, you need to focus on the number of wedding certificates issued. In 2009, the latest year for which we have data, there were about 2.1 million marriages in the United States. That does represent a slight decline since the recession began. But it’s the same rate of decline that existed during the preceding economic boom, the previous bust and both the boom and the bust before that. Indeed, the recent modest decline in marriage continues a 30-year trend. And even as the number of marriages falls, divorce is also becoming less prevalent. So a greater proportion of today’s marriages will likely persist 30 years into the future.

Big shifts in roles This is not to say that marriage looks the same today as it always did — over the past several decades, there has been a tremendous shift in married life. It used to be that a typical marriage involved specialized roles for the husband and wife. Usually he was in the marketplace, and she was in the home, and this arrangement led to maximum productivity.

OLYMPIA — Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler has ordered Regence BlueShield to stop denying coverage for families that only want to insure their children. “Regence is in clear violation of state law that prohibits insurers from denying insurance to people on the basis of age,” Kreidler said in a statement Friday. “I was shocked and deeply disappointed when Regence announced its decision last week to stop selling insurance to kids.” Regence spokeswoman Rachelle Cunningham said the company was surprised by Kreidler’s order that the company must resume child-only health insurance. She said Regence discussed the pending change with Kreidler’s office several times, and that regulators never mentioned that dropping child-only policies might violate state law. Regence BlueShield, the largest health insurer in the individual market, notified Kreidler that starting Oct. 1, the insurance provider would no longer sell individual health insurance policies to children. Regence currently has about 2,500 child-only policies. The federal Affordable Care Act requires all health plans to cover children with pre-existing conditions. However, to accommodate fears from the insurance industry that families would enroll their children only when they became sick, the federal government is allowing states to create a special open enrollment period. Washington’s special enrollment period is from Nov. 1 through Dec. 15, when anyone looking for an individual health plan for their families or just their children can enroll their kids without having to undergo health screening.

But today, when families have easy access to prepared foods, inexpensive off-the-rack clothing and labor-saving technology from the washing machine to the robot vacuum cleaner, there’s much less benefit from either spouse specializing in homemaking. Women, now better educated and with greater control over their fertility, are in the marketplace, too, and married couples have more money, more leisure time and longer lives to spend together.

Peninsula Daily News news services

SEATTLE — Investors suing Washington Mutual Inc., the former owner of the biggest U.S. bank to fail, won certification as a classaction case of their suit alleging shoddy lending practices. Shareholders who lost money on stock purchased from October 2005 to July 2008 can proceed with claims under a single lawsuit, U.S. District Judge Marsha Pechman in Seattle ruled Tuesday, according to court documents.

Modern marriages are based not on the economic benefits of playing specialized roles but on shared passions. This new model of “hedonic marriage” has had an effect on who marries, and when — as research I have conducted with my better half, the economist Betsey Stevenson, has documented. In the old days, opposites attracted; an aspiring executive groom would pair up with a lesseducated bride.

This is not to say that the economic downturn has had no effect at all on domestic life. Census data show that the number of unwed couples living together rose sharply last year. With rents high and jobs hard to come by, it’s no surprise that people are doubling up. Still, given that the marriage rate remains on trend, the rise in cohabitation isn’t coming at the expense of marriage. Instead, many young couples who might otherwise merely be dating are moving in together. Some of them, no doubt, will eventually marry. Truly, the recession has not torn young couples apart; it has pushed them closer together.

_________

Justin Wolfers, a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution, is an assistant professor of business and public policy at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

The judge appointed the New York-based law firm Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann to lead the plaintiffs’ case. The lawsuit consolidates more than 20 cases filed against Washington Mutual that claim the bank secretly lowered lending standards, artificially inflated homeprice appraisals and failed to disclose its deteriorating financial condition when the loans began to fail. The named plaintiffs in the case include Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan Board, the largest singleprofession pension plan in Canada, and four other pension groups, according to court documents. They seek to represent tens of thousands of shareholders who lost money on

three types of preferred stock purchased between October 2005 and July 2008 and certain securities offered by the bank in 2006 and 2007. The shareholders argued the case should be granted class-action status because their claims are typical of what other investors experienced and are based on common legal issues. Seattle-based Washington Mutual Bank filed for bankruptcy Sept. 26, 2008, the day after its banking unit was taken over by regulators and sold to JPMorgan Chase for $1.9 billion. Before it failed, the bank had more than 2,200 branches and $188 billion in deposits. Pechman ruled Sept. 28 that a separate federal

shareholder lawsuit in Seattle claiming the bank misled purchasers of $10.8 billion in mortgage-backed securities could proceed.

IRS refund Separately, Washington Mutual said Wednesday the Internal Revenue Service has paid it $4.77 billion of an expected tax refund of up to $5.8 billion. A proposed agreement on dividing that money between Washington Mutual, JPMorgan Chase and the FDIC requires approval by various parties to WaMu’s bankruptcy case. In papers filed with the SEC, the closed thrift said it expects the balance of the $5.2 billion figure to be paid in the near future.

Registration opens for PT organic farming conclave Peninsula Daily News

Lyons, Neb., which strives to better family farms, small business and rural communities through policy, research and strategic services. Hassebrook was instrumental in the passage of Initiative 300, Nebraska’s anti-corporate farming amendment. The conference includes 28 workshops for novice and seasoned farmers, ranging from pollination and pest management to agricultural policy, marketing and farmland preservation. Special events include a

PORT TOWNSEND — Registration is open for Tilth Producers of Washington’s annual organic farming conference to be held at Fort Worden State Park from Nov. 12-14. The Tilth Producers conference is an opportunity for organic farmers and agricultural professionals to network and share knowledge. Keynote speaker for the event is Chuck Hassebrook, pect it will play out later executive director of the than we’re accustomed to.” Center for Rural Affairs in Eckert made the comments as Mattel said its third-quarter net income rose 23 percent, helped by strong sales gains for dolls including Barbie and Disney Princesses and a tax benefit. But its revenue, although it rose 2 percent to $1.83 24 HOUR NO DELIVERY billion, fell well short of Propane is a "GREEN" EMERGENCY FEE analyst predictions, sunk by NO HAZMAT SERVICE Alternative Fuel! FEE weakness in the company’s Fisher-Price and Hot Propane Fueled Appliances Leave A Smaller Wheels division. Carbon Footprint than their Electric Counterparts

Retailers cautious about yule NEW YORK — Retailers are being cautious on ordering toys ahead of the holidays, Mattel’s CEO said Friday, which could make hot toys scarce this year. “Retailers remain guarded with inventory and several are betting on a late holiday season this year,” CEO Bob Eckert said Friday in a call with analysts. “Yes, there will be a Christmas. That said, I sus-

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arriage and divorce rates have remained remarkably immune to the ups and downs of the business cycle.

Court allows group action against WaMu

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The Associated Press

Living together

Investors step to head of class

State tells insurer to cover kids Peninsula Daily News

And they would wed before the stork visited and before the couple made the costly investment of putting the husband through business school. But today, that same young executive would more likely be half of a power couple, married to a college-educated woman who shares his taste in books, hobbies, travel and so on. Indeed, marriage rates for college-educated women rose sharply through the 1950s and ’60s, and have remained remarkably stable since. These women tend to marry after they have finished college and started their careers. The decline in marriage, it turns out, is concentrated entirely among women with less education — those who likely have the least to gain from modern hedonic marriage.

News Analysis

The New York Times

trade show, organic wine tasting, silent auction and live entertainment from Jangle Bones, a mountain blues and country music band from Sequim. Eurotop Setto TheQueen conference is open the public. Registration information, including a full schedule and sponsorship information is

available at www.tilth producers.org. The deadline to register without a late fee is Friday, Oct. 23. Discounted registration is available for all Tilth Producers of Washington members. For more information, e-mail Nancy Allen at nancy@tilthproducers.org.

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D4

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

No remorse shown at court-martial Witnesses tell of shootings at Fort Hood Peninsula Daily News news services

FORT HOOD, Texas — Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan sits in a wheelchair every day and listens while, one by one, the wounded and traumatized offer their accounts of 10 minutes of terror. Some weep. Some glower. Hasan stares straight at the witnesses as they describe how he stalked the room on Nov. 5, 2009, the laser sight of his pistol tracing red across their eyes before they felt the shot, smelled the blood, heard the cries. He didn’t show remorse on that day, the witnesses say. He doesn’t show any remorse now. Sometimes, over three days of testimony last week at a hearing to determine whether there is enough evidence to proceed with a court-martial, Hasan carefully twists the cap off a bottle of water and takes a sip. He writes notes occasionally in neat script, or doodles. Rarely in court does he speak to his three attorneys. He never turns to glance at the widow who sits taking notes, nor to see the Army wives who wipe their eyes as their husbands recite their stories, recounting how Hasan allegedly killed 13 people and wounded 32 others that day: “And then I just fell. . . . I knew my lung was filling up with blood. . . . He slumped over and I couldn’t get to him in time.”

Boots and blanket When Hasan is cold, he pulls his green fleece cap lower over his ears and fiddles with a green blanket draped around his neck. His desert combat boots are laced up over his useless feet. Hasan was shot three times and is paralyzed from the chest down. Several of those who have testified were shot several times. They all remain active soldiers according to the impartial Army guidelines. That is where their similarity ends. While Hasan, 40, has remained implacable — “low affect,” his psychiatric colleagues might note — his accusers have been expressive. Spc. Megan Martin kept her hands folded in front of her, as she testified via video link from Kandahar, Afghanistan, on Friday. Asked to recount the nature of the fusillade of bullets that day, she made a tight fist and pounded the

The Associated Press

Maj. Nidal Hasan attends court-martial hearings in a wheelchair. table. She said she dropped to the floor as soon as she realized the pop-pop-pop was not a drill, yet remained mesmerized as Hasan sprayed the room with bullets, quickly slipped out his magazine and reloaded. “Sir, I couldn’t look away. I laid absolutely still as I could because he was shooting everything that moved,” she said. “I couldn’t stop watching. It was a nightmare that reoccurs every day.” Capt. Melissa Kale began to sob as she described how she tried but couldn’t save the life of her friend Sgt. Amy Krueger. “I tried to pull Sgt. Krueger with me,” Kale said, also via video from Kandahar. “She didn’t move. I had to leave her there.” Kale and Martin are members of the combat stress-control team that Hasan was assigned to join. Hasan, a psychiatrist, told acquaintances he didn’t want to deploy to Afghanistan, where he was to treat soldiers for the stress of combat, and in the days before the shooting, he gave away most of his possessions. On the day of the shooting, he was scheduled to get his final immunizations and paperwork to deploy, as were nearly all of those who were killed and wounded. Hasan stood up near a counter, witnesses have testified, shouted “Allahu akbar!” and fired into a bank of 45 chairs, all filled by soldiers. Several witnesses seem to have been waiting nearly a year to say, firmly, “Yes, sir,” when the prosecutor poses a, by now, routine question: “Do you see the shooter in the courtroom today?” Sgt. Logan Burnett, a mental-health specialist who was headed to Iraq and was shot twice more after he had gone down, stood up from the witness table and slowly extended his right arm poker-straight, finger pointed. “Nidal Hasan, right there,” Burnett said. He glared, hard, and remained standing for several seconds. The man in the wheelchair stared back.

…helping people live better

Damian Humphreys, sales and marketing manager of the Holiday Inn Express and Conference Center in Sequim, discusses Sequim sunshine with event planners Kim Hall, left, and Joanna Franco.

Sequim’s sunshine touted in Seattle Damian Humphreys, sales and marketing manager of the new Holiday Inn Express and Conference Center in Sequim, was busy touting Sequim’s abundance of sunny days — and his hotel’s new solar-powered conference center — at the recent Northwest Event Show. Humphreys fielded many inquiries from meeting and event planners from all over the region who

Analysts see cost of gas falling for fall By Sandy Shore

The Associated Press

There was good news and bad news in energy prices last week. While drivers paid more to fill their tanks than they did a year ago, some analysts think it shouldn’t be long before gas is cheaper again. Also, the government said many Americans won’t see big spikes in their winter heating bills. The national average for a gallon of regular gasoline was $2.833 on Friday. On the North Olympic Peninsula, the average price was $3.07 per gallon. That’s about a nickel more than a week ago and up nearly 35 cents from a year ago, according to AAA, Wright Express and the Oil

Peninsula Daily News news services

WASHINGTON — Hearing half a dialogue can be more distracting than hearing both sides Have you noticed that it’s hard to ignore a cellphone conversation going on near you? You’re hearing only half the conversation, but, according to a group of researchers, that’s precisely why it may be hard for you to concentrate on your own tasks.

WASHINGTON — The Defense Department on Friday warned gay troops if they disclose their sexual

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Meanwhile, the government’s Short-Term Energy Outlook indicated that most consumers should be able to keep heating bills under control this winter, although heating oil prices will rise. Americans who rely on heating oil are expected to pay about $220, or 12 percent, more this winter. Much of that is due to higher crude prices which have contributed to a 16 percent increase in wholesale heating oil prices from year-ago levels. The EIA forecast a 4 percent increase in heating bills for households using natural gas, which translates to about $27 more for the winter. Supplies of nat-

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attention-requiring tasks while the researchers randomly played a recording of a two-person dialogue, a one-person monologue or a halfalogue. Researchers controlled the volume and told the participants to ignore the sounds and just concentrate on the assignment. At other times, no recording was played and the tasks were done in silence. The researchers found that performance was lowest — as determined by missed responses, incorrect hits and other mistakes — when the halfalogues were being played. In the moving-dot test,

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Unpredictable noises — or silences — tend to distract, and the one-sided conversations of overheard cellphone chats — what the researchers termed “halfalogues” — fall well into that category. To test the effect, researchers from Cornell University selected 24 undergraduates and gave them two tasks. First, they were told to use a computer mouse to track a moving dot on a computer screen; then they were instructed to push a button every time they saw four specific letters flash on the screen. They completed these

The Associated Press

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said the Consumer Price Index — the inflation rate — rose 0.1 percent in September, compared with a 0.3 percent increase in August. Gas prices increased 0.7 percent last month.

ural gas, like oil, remain plentiful. Much of the country relies on natural gas for heating, while heating oil is used mainly in the Northeast. In a research report for clients, Cameron Hanover energy consulting agency said traders see natural gas as the least desirable product in the energy market because of abundant supplies and weak demand in the recovering economy. “The truth is that there is plenty of energy supply out there for the available demand, but oil prices tend to be able to get more from that than natural gas can,” the report said. Oil and other energy contracts fell as the dollar grew stronger and the economic picture remained unclear as banks struggled with the foreclosure crisis. Benchmark oil lost $1.44 to settle Friday at $81.25 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

the students reacted six times faster during the dialogue than during the halfalogue. On average, students did 10 percent worse on the letter-response test when they heard the halfalogue than when they worked in silence or when they heard dialogues or monologues. To ensure that these differences were caused by the halfalogue’s unpredictable and incomplete nature — and not the acoustic characteristics of speech — researchers filtered the onesided conversation so that it sounded muffled, as if the voice were being heard underwater.

Stay silent for now, gay troops warned

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Price Information Service. Even though demand for gasoline has fallen since summer, a weaker dollar has kept crude hovering between $81 and $83 a barrel this month, which is translating into higher prices at the pump. Crude, like most commodities, is priced in dollars. A weaker dollar makes it more attractive for buyers who use foreign currencies. Higher gasoline prices shouldn’t last much longer. There is plenty of oil on hand, while demand continues to wane and consumers don’t seem willing to spend any more than necessary, according to Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst at the Oil Price Information Service. The Energy Information Administration said this week that gasoline consumption in the past four weeks was 1.12 percent less than it was a year ago in the midst of the recession. The Labor Department

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Northwest I know of that can say that.” The Northwest Event Show was held at the Washington State Convention Center and is one of the largest single day conferences specifically for meeting and event planners. Electricity generated from the Holiday Inn and Conference Center’s solar array can be viewed realtime at www.hiesequim.com Peninsula Daily News

Pump prices about to drop?

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Health Care Services

were interested in Sequim as a future venue. “Sunny Sequim was recognized as the place to visit, especially during the upcoming dark winter months,” Humphreys said. There were many who were also interested in his message about solar power. “The 44 solar panels on our hotel roof generate enough electricity to power our conference center. “We are the only hotel in the

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members during a court battle over the “don’t ask, don’t tell” law. The Obama administration is appealing a ruling by a federal judge that struck down the law, which bans openly gay service members. The Defense Department has said it will comply with the court order for now, but it is uncertain what would happen if the court grants the administration’s request for a temporary stay on the ruling. If the court agrees to the stay, it is presumed the military would reinstate the old policy.


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 17, 2010

D5

 $ Briefly . . . Continued from D1 First will be a ribboncutting ceremony for Teva’s Topiaries, 303 Hanley Way, Sequim. The opening is scheduled for 11 a.m. Later in the day, the business community will gather at the law offices of Bell and Davis PLLC for an after-hours mixer from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The event is co-hosted by Vernon Publications, a directory publisher, and Bell and Davis at 433 N. Fifth Ave.

Send us your business news Do you have a business expansion planned, staffing change, new product line or something newsworthy? Are you starting a new business? The Peninsula Daily News is happy to mention news of your business in our daily Business Briefly column. Simply send in the information — including a phone number for us to get additional information, if necessary — to the PDN in any of the following methods: ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521. ■ Mail it to PDN news, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ Bring it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim. ■ E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. For questions, or to get a Business Briefly form faxed or mailed to you, please call 360-417-3527 weekdays.

devices like the iPad to boost revenue from data plans. The announcement may signal that Apple and Verizon have reached an agreement for an iPhone that will work on Verizon’s network, said Maynard Um, an analyst for UBS AG, in a research note. A Verizon iPhone would end AT&T’s exclusive contract to be the carrier for the handset in the United States, a right it has had since the iPhone was introduced in 2007.

attorneys during a status conference Friday that he wanted to give Congress one last chance to approve the settlement to avoid costly litigation. The Senate will reconvene Nov. 15. The House has approved the settlement twice since May.

Safeway profit

Mozilo agreed to repay $45 million in ill-gotten profits and $22.5 million in civil Mozilo penalties. Former Countrywide President David Sambol will repay $5 million in profits and pay $520,000 in civil penalties, and former Chief Financial Officer Eric P. Sieracki will pay $130,000 in civil penalties.

PLEASANTON, Calif. — Safeway Inc., the fourth-largest U.S. supermarket chain by sales, posted third-quarter profit that topped analysts’ proMoney for Makah Best job cities jections as income-tax Deficit $1.3 trillion NEAH BAY — Sen. PASCO — The state’s expenses dropped. WASHINGTON — The Patty Murray, D-Bothell, Kennewick-Richland-Pasco Safeway said that profit, Obama administration said has filed an “earmark” legarea is among U.S. metroexcluding some items, was Friday the federal deficit islative provision that politan areas ranked as the 35 cents per share. hit a near-record $1.3 trildirects $458,000 to the best for creating and susA decline in Safeway’s lion for the just-completed Makah Tribal Council for taining jobs. tax rate helped add 2 cents budget year. use by its Office of Marine The Milken Institute’s in profit. That means the governAffairs. Best Performing Cities Sales dropped less than ment had to borrow 37 In a jus2010 report ranked the 1 percent to $9.4 billion. cents out of every dollar it tification area fifth among the The grocer is increasspent. Tax revenue continaccompanynation’s 200 largest metro ingly vying with discount ing the fedareas. retailers such as Wal-Mart ued to lag while spending on food stamps and unemeral fundAnchorage, Alaska’s Stores Inc. and Costco ployment benefits went up ing request, largest city, ranked 8th. Wholesale for customers. Murray’s Fairbanks was 34th Consumers have sought as joblessness neared double-digit levels in a strugoffice in among smaller cities discounts as they struggle gling economy. Washingranked by the economic to recover from the ecoMurray While expected, the eyeton, D.C., think tank. nomic slump and an unemeninsula aily ews popping deficit numbers said the “Office of Marine Among large urban cen- ployment rate close to a provide Republican critics Affairs will work with fedters, Texas took five of the 26-year high. of President Barack eral and state governtop 10 spots, with the Net income fell to Obama’s fiscal stewardship ments, along with the $122.8 million (33 cents A 15 percent discount at Killeen-Temple-Fort Hood and is a great asset for the shipping industry to area ranked first, followed per share), the Pleasanton- with fresh ammunition less Hartnagel on the purchase agency.” than three weeks ahead of improve the protection of by the Austin-Round Rock based company said. of eight or more windows the midterm congressional our shared marine enviarea in second, the McAlA year earlier, thirdStudents advance will be available to seminar len-Edinburg-Mission area ronment from the effects attendees. quarter profit amounted to elections. PORT ANGELES — The deficit was $122 bilof oil spills. For more information or in fourth, El Paso in ninth $128.8 million (31 cents). Angeles Academy of Hair lion less than last year, a “The protection of the and the Houston-Sugar to reserve a space at the & Nails students Jacy Toll- seminar, phone Donna marine environment and Land-Bayton area in 10th modest improvement. GE profits fall iver and Danielle Mingori its resources represents place. Hoyt at 360-417-8381. NEW YORK — General have recently finished their the protection of the ‘lifeHuntsville, Ala., ranked Oil prices fall required hours and passed KONP talk guests Electric’s return to its roots blood’ to the Makah peothird. NEW YORK — Benchthe state Department of ple. The greater Washington, as an industrial company PORT ANGELES — mark oil lost $1.44 to settle Licensing’s board examinacontinues to proceed “Since 1972, approxiD.C. area was sixth, and Here is this week’s schedat $81.25 a barrel on the unevenly. mately 3 million gallons of tions. North Carolina’s Raleighule for the 1:05 p.m. to 2 New York Mercantile The pair have also The industrial and oil has been spilled on the Cary area was in seventh. p.m. local talk show segtaken jobs at the new financial giant said Friday Exchange. Washington coast. In other Nymex trading, Smart Style salon opening ment on KONP radio at that sales of industrial “It is the belief of the Painting a ferry heating oil fell 5.31 cents to equipment — everything Makah tribe that develop- soon in the new Port Ange- 1450 AM, 102.1 FM and on SEATTLE — The state www.konp.com on the les Walmart. settle at $2.2308 a gallon, from wind turbines to jet ing and incorporating Department of TransportaInternet outside the Port Angeles Academy of gasoline lost 3.27 cents to engines to locomotives — tribal spill capacity into tion said a $1.3 million Angeles area. lagged in the third quarter. settle at $2.1038 a gallon existing federal, state and Hair & Nails, 1222 E. grant from the Federal Station Front St., is now enrolling industry efforts would Revenue of $35.9 billion and natural gas gave up Highway Administration general effectively reduce the costs for new classes. was about $1.7 billion shy 12.2 cents to settle at will fund a new paint coat manager For more information, of responding to an oil of Wall Street estimates $3.535 per 1,000 cubic feet. for one of the state’s ferries. Todd Ortloff e-mail amy@angeles spill.” and investors drove the Natural gas hit a 52-week The department’s ferry hosts the academy.com, phone 360stock down 5 percent. low of $3.520 during the division said ferry vessels GE has been de-empha- session. Free travel seminar 417-0388 or click on www. Monday need to be painted every through angelesacademy.com. In London, Brent crude SEQUIM — Morgan’s seven years to protect them sizing its finance unit, GE Thursday Capital, which accounted dropped $1.75 to $82.45 a Travel Service will host a from corrosive salt water. Rotmark for more than half of GE’s Three classes left segments, barrel on the ICE Futures free travel seminar at The Officials have not and Karen profit in 2006 during a exchange. Lodge at Sherwood Village, decided which of the state’s PORT ANGELES — Hanan hosts “Art Beat” on boom in financial services, 660 W. Evergreen Farm 21 vessels will get the The Peninsula College Fridays. but recorded billions in Way, from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. paint coat. Nonferrous metals Entrepreneur Institute has This week’s scheduled write-offs when the econon Thursday. three classes remaining NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous lineup: omy went into recession. The seminar will prothis fall. Purple octopus metal prices Friday: ■  Monday: Clallam Instead, it’s focusing on vide information on Avalon All classes are held at Aluminum - $1.0893 per lb., County Economic DevelopWALLA WALLA — The making products ranging River Cruises. the Lincoln Center, 905 W. London Metal Exch. city of Walla Walla has ment Council Executive from wind and natural gas There will be giveaways, Ninth St., and begin at Copper - $3.8153 Cathode full notified the owner of a toy Director Linda Rotmark. turbines to sonogram and refreshments will be plate, LME. 5:30 p.m. store he will be fined $100 In the second segment, machines to energy-effiCopper - $3.8090 N.Y. Merc served. The classes: John John LeClerc of Park each day he keeps a large cient appliances. spot Thu. Reservations are ■ Business Financial mural of a purple octopus View Villas, John Mock of Lead - $2401.00 metric ton, required. Tools taught by Mark on the downtown storeCrestwood Convalescent London Metal Exch. For more information or Bowman begins Oct. 25. CEO settles front. Center and D Bellamente Zinc - $1.0877 per lb., London to register for the seminar, ■ Essential Web MarLOS ANGELES — The city has argued that of the Port Angeles Senior Metal Exch. phone Morgan’s at 360keting with Carolyn Coothe mural violates the sign Countrywide Financial Gold - $1367.50 Handy & HarCenter. 582-1690. per begins Nov. 29. Corp. co-founder Angelo code. The Inland Octopus man (only daily quote). Tuesday: Port Ange■  ■ Wordpress OptimiMozilo and two other forGold - $1376.70 troy oz., NY School District Superin- toy store owner maintains Gym bag giveaway zation with Carolyn Coo- les the mural is art. Merc spot Thu. mer executives have agreed tendent Jane Pryne, Execuper begins Nov. 30. Silver - $24.315 Handy & HarPORT ANGELES — A code enforcement offi- to pay tens of millions of tive Director of Business For more information, man (only daily quote). Fast Stop Fitness, 902 E. cer issued the fine notice dollars to avoid a trial on and Operations Jim Silver - $24.417 troy oz., N.Y. First St. Suite C, is holding visit PCEInstitute.com. Thursday, and it will add civil fraud and insider Schwob and School Board Merc spot Thu. its Breast Cancer Awareup each day until the purtrading charges, a federal President Lonnie Linn. Platinum - $1696.00 troy oz., Window seminar ness Gym Bag Giveaway ple octopus situation is judge said in court Friday. In the second segment, N.Y. (contract). this month. resolved. Mozilo and the others PORT ANGELES — Cathy Fotens on family hisPlatinum - $1708.30 troy oz., To enter into the drawwere to face trial on the Hartnagel Building Supply, tory and genealogy. N.Y. Merc spot Thu. ing, Fast Stop members are 3111 E. U.S. Highway 101, Securities and Exchange ■  Wednesday: Candiencouraged to bring a pink will host a free seminar on Commission’s charges next Peninsula Daily News Nation/World date forum for county comitem or a breast cancer week. and The Associated Press replacement windows from munity development direcpink-ribbon item to donate 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on TuesDeadline extended tor between John Miller to the pink gym bag. day. WASHINGTON — A and Sheila Roark Miller. The bag was provided Attendees can learn judge has set Jan. 7 as the Thursday: Clallam ■  by Olympic Medical Center. about the types of light new deadline for Congress At the end of the month, commercial and residential County commissioners. to approve a $3.4 billion ■  Friday: To be one member will win the replacement windows and settlement with hundreds announced. entire bag and its contents. UV coatings that qualify Over 300 New & of thousands of Native The drawing will also be for federal tax credits and Americans. Used Vehicles To Verizon’s iPads open to new members who energy rebates. The Senjoin Fast Stop before Oct. Choose From! SEATTLE — Verizon Bob Kajfasz, commercial ate 29. energy analyst and Weath- Wireless will start selling adjourned Cliff erickson Fast Stop’s joining fee Your Internet Connection! erwise service administra- Apple Inc.’s iPad at more without givwill be waived when signthan 2,000 company stores ing the tor for the city of Port www.wilderauto.com ing up for a six-month pre- Angeles, will explain the on Oct. 28, gaining better Obama email: cliff_erickson@wilderauto.com paid membership and access to a tablet device local energy rebate of $6 administra(360) 565-2375 donating to the gym bag. per square foot for qualify- that rival carrier AT&T tion the For more information, Inc. has provided service ing windows and glass slidauthority to Cobell phone Fast Stop at 360for since its debut. ing doors. settle a 417-6869. 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D6

Sunday, October 17, 2010

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Peninsula Daily News

State curbs adult-homes supervisor Demotion unexpected from DSHS Peninsula Daily News news services

Tim Roylance

Practice Partner Research Network director Dr. Steven Ornstein, left, presents a High Performance Practice award to nurse Ileana Murphy Haggerty and Dr. Stanley Garlick at Family Medicine of Port Angeles.

PA clinic receives High Performance award Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Family Medicine of Port Angeles recently received a High Performance Practice award from the Practice Partner Research Network.

The Practice Partner Research Network is a national primary care practice-based research and quality improvement organization. Family Medicine’s award “signifies excellence in patient care across a broad spectrum of clinical

conditions.” To receive the award, Family Medicine scored in the top 25 percent of all Practice Partner Research Network practices. For more information, phone Family Medicine at 360-452-7891.

U.S. warns on marijuana Federal laws enforced if California legalizes pot Peninsula Daily News news services

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — The Obama administration has joined California’s historic debate over legalizing marijuana, vowing to “vigorously enforce” federal laws against pot even if state voters approve a Nov. 2 initiative legalizing its use for recreational purposes. In a letter to former drug-enforcement administrators made public Friday, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said prosecution of marijuana crimes is a “core priority” of the Department of Justice and would remain so regardless of whether Proposition 19 passes. It was the first time Holder explained the position he would take if the recreational-use initiative becomes state law. “Let me state clearly that the Department of Justice strongly opposes Proposition 19,” Holder said in the letter, dated Wednesday. “If passed, this legislation will greatly complicate federal drug-enforcement efforts to the detriment of our citizens.” Holder also said legalizing recreational marijuana would be a “significant impediment” to the government’s joint efforts with state and local law enforcement to target drug traf-

fickers, who often distribute pot alongside harder drugs. Proponents of Proposition 19 said Holder was posturing. “The reality is that the federal government has neither the resources nor the political will to undertake sole — or even primary — enforcement responsibility for low-level marijuana offenses in California,” said Stephen Gutwillig, California director of the Drug Policy Alliance. “Well over 95 percent of all marijuana arrests in this country are made by state and local law enforcement.”

Medical marijuana California became the first state to authorize medical marijuana with Proposition 215 in 1996; since then, 13 other states, including Washington, and the District of Columbia have followed suit. The Bush and Clinton administrations took enforcement actions against medical-marijuana sellers and users after Proposition 215 passed, and the U.S. Supreme Court in 2005 ruled that federal officials could prosecute medicalmarijuana activities regardless of state legalization. But the Obama administration last year said it would not prosecute medical marijuana in states

Eric Holder In opposition

regulate the commercial sale of marijuana. Supporters have suggested the legalization of recreational marijuana use would bolster cash-strapped governments in California and reduce costs for law enforcement and corrections. Holder issued his memo in response to a letter sent in August by nine former administrators of the Drug Enforcement Agency urging him to take a stance on Proposition 19. The former DEA officials said “it is unlikely that any taxes will be paid, for doing so would admit criminal violation of federal law and expose the seller to federal prosecution.” Amar agreed. He said that until the federal government decides it will not prosecute recreational use, few people would opt to sell openly. “To pay taxes, you have to report the transaction,” Amar said. “By reporting the transaction, you are giving the federal government documentary evidence that you are violating the law.”

where it is legal. Vikram Amar, associate dean for academic affairs at the University of California, Davis School of Law, said the Obama administration clearly wanted to make a statement on recreational use before the November election. “I think [Holder] is really trying to send a message that the earlier policy with respect to medicinal marijuana should not be confused with the policy on recreational marijuana,” Amar said. Proposition 19 would make California the first U.S. state to authorize mar- Only a $100 fine ijuana use for recreational No matter what voters purposes. or Holder do, marijuana use in California these days Tax and regulate appears, for all practical The initiative would purposes, all but legal. allow people 21 or older to G o v. Arnold possess up to 1 ounce of the Schwarzenegger signed legdrug and grow small gar- islation last month that dens on private property. made possession of an ounce It would also allow local of marijuana punishable by governments to tax and a $100 fine.

OLYMPIA — Under fire for failure to protect vulnerable adults, the state Department of Social and Health Services demoted a top administrator who oversees enforcement of a rapidly expanding senior-care option: adult family homes. The unexpected announcement Friday is part of an overhaul by DSHS to more rigorously license and police businesses and caregivers for the elderly, according to state officials and legislators. On Nov. 1, Kathy Leitch’s $122,000-a-year position as assistant secretary of the Aging and Disability Services Administration will be assumed by MaryAnne Lindeblad, DSHS director of health-care services and Medicaid programs. Leitch’s demotion follows calls for change by legislators and senior advocates after a Seattle Times investigation, “Seniors for Sale,” found that hundreds of elderly have been injured or died prematurely from substandard care in the homes, often through neglect by scantly trained caregivers. “I’m glad to see DSHS has gotten the message on the need for change,” said state Rep. Brendan Williams, D-Olympia. At least a dozen legislators said they will sponsor state laws to rein in the growing adult-home industry, including profiteers who openly market the elderly as investments.

Adult home horrors The Times detailed scores of cases in which the elderly were imprisoned in their rooms, roped into their beds at night, strapped to chairs during the day so they wouldn’t wander off, drugged into submission or denied medical treatment for weeks. Leitch, an assistant secretary since 2000, will remain at the agency, working on improving the quality of adult homes and creating a computer system to better track abuse and neglect cases, said DSHS spokeswoman Kathy Spears. Lindeblad, considered

Leitch

Lindeblad

K

athy Leitch, an assistant secretary since 2000, will remain at DSHS, working on improving the quality of adult homes and creating a computer system to better track abuse and neglect cases.

one of the agency’s top Medicaid experts, will help shepherd DSHS through recent federally mandated healthcare changes, Spears said. Lindeblad will also continue the agency’s push to create more long-term care options for seniors. Adult homes are a key component of the state’s strategy to cut costs for lowincome seniors. DSHS has licensed nearly 3,000 to provide board and care for up to six adults. The homes are less regulated and less costly than nursing homes. The Times filed a publicrecords lawsuit against DSHS in August that alleged the agency failed to turn over thousands of public records about its efforts to relocate low-income seniors from nursing homes into adult family homes. The suit is pending. The vast majority of adult homes are well-run and provide personalized care in familiar neighborhood settings, said Cindi Laws, executive director of the Washington State Residential Care Council of Adult Family Homes. She said the trade group welcomes the leadership change and supports efforts to bolster licensing and training standards. DSHS Secretary Susan Dreyfus said in a statement Friday: “Now more than ever we need to be working together so that we can continue to move forward as a department that is committed to our most vulnerable citizens and to ensure that all people live safely.”

Lower Elwha hatchery Sequim Stamp & Coin Show Masonic Hall more than half-finished 700 S. 5th Ave Peninsula Daily News news sources

Sequim, WA

Oct. 23, 2010

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Major stamp and Coin Dealers from the Northwest Buying and Selling stamps, covers, coins, bullion, etc.

FREE Appraisals

0A5096413

www.mikes-bikes.net Specialized

GOT LIGHTS? All New Nite Rider 150 W. Sequim Bay Rd., Sequim 360-681-3868 • M-F 10-6; Sat. 10-5

0A5097704

Get it 24/7. North Olympic Peninsula news, shopping values, classified and more from the Peninsula’s No. 1 website:

www.peninsuladailynews.com

0A5100395

PORT ANGELES — The $16.4 million Lower Elwha Klallam tribal fish hatchery project is now more than 50 percent complete. The tribe is partnering with the National Park Service and Department of Interior and utilizing American Recovery and Reinvestment Act stimulus dollars to construct the hatchery near Stratton Road on the Lower Elwha reservation west of Port Angeles. Startup is set for March 2011. The hatchery is a key component of the National Park Service’s $308 million removal of the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams. Actual dam removal will begin in 2011 and run through 2014. The purpose of the landmark project is to restore the Elwha River to its natural state and bring native salmon and other fish back to the river. Construction of the 105foot Elwha Dam in 1913 and the 210-foot Glines Canyon Dam in 1927 blocked the progress of salmon up the river and

prevented the return of fish to spawn. The new facility replaces an existing hatchery nearby that will operate for about two more years before it is decommissioned. The National Park Service awarded the contract for the fish hatchery to James W. Fowler Co. of Dallas, Ore. The project broke ground in February. Nine local sub-contractors are working on the hatchery’s construction. “At the peak of employment there will be up to 50 employees working on hatchery construction,” said LaTrisha Suggs, assistant director of river restoration for the tribe. In addition to the hatchery, support roads and water facilities are being constructed. “The hatchery is expected to provide a refuge to salmon populations during the actual dam removal period and to help supplement the natural production of coho salmon, steelhead, chum salmon and pink salmon following dam removal,” said Larry Ward, Lower Elwha hatchery manager.


Classified

Peninsula Daily News

FABULOUS VIEWS

STUNNING WATERFRONT PROPERTY

CUSTOM HOME

Sunday, October 17, 2010

E1

IF YOU WANT PRIVACY, D

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0A405264

0A405262

0A405298

0A405288

minutes from town on acreage. Barbecuing and entertaining will be easy with the spacious sunny deck with views. This 2007 built home has 2 BR and a den, all on one level. Master bath has jetted tub and shower. Vaulted ceilings and huge windows provide views out to landscaped yard. 2 garages and space for RV parking. Oak flooring with cherry inserts show the quality throughout. Call Clarice for details. $499,000 MLS#251472/100753

This spacious 3+ BR home has had many upgrades including floor coverings and a new deck. You won’t find this much square footage and this much view at this little price. Possibility of a mother-in-law apt. downstairs. $219,000 ML#251629 Be sure to take a look at the virtual tour at www.PortAngelesViewHome.com Call Pili today at 417-2799

Breathtaking & rare panoramic waterfront property! 5.52Acres just above the beach on stunning highbank waterfront mountain & ocean view is unobstructed on this level & prime lot. Value of the property is undeniable as it is surrounded by luxury homes behind & beside you. Soils registered & septic design already done. Water well site report has been done & registered. Land has been surveyed. Only $399,000 MLS#252153

Call Brody at 360.477.9665

and a large home, this is it! 3,204 SF on two levels. This home has 3 bedrooms plus an office, workshop, den and 2 living rooms. Beautiful wood ceiling and large windows. Circular driveway around a very nicely landscaped, large yard that has fruit trees, flowers, and garden space and a large yard. $375,000 MLS#251348/91363 www.SaveWithDave.com

®

WRE/Port Angeles

UPTOWN REALTY

Brody Broker

CLARICE ARAKAWA

Office: (360) 417-2799 Toll Free 1-800-292-2978

www.welcomehomesequim.com

EXQUISITE QUALITY

LIKE NEW - OPEN FLOOR PLAN

A RARE FIND!!

0A405279

You’ll find an open floor plan in this home with a large living room, 1,292 SF, 3 BR/2 BA with new exterior paint, newer laminate floors and countertops, plus a delightful covered porch and private patio. $54,500 ML#251807 Call Jo at 360-683-3900/360-460-7725

190 Priest Rd. PO Box 1060 Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3900 www.blueskysequim.com

Jo Cummins 360-460-7725

NICE HOME, GREAT PRICE

NO BINOCULARS NEEDED

0A405297

0A405289

0A405301

0A405260

Beautiful duplex style 2 BR/2 BA condo unit with a 1-car garage located just outside the Sequim City limits. Nice open country feel, all appliances are included, low monthly home owners’ fees and easy access to town. $110,000 ML#252092

A 3 bedroom/2.5 bath rambler with rec. room and double garage. Plus a one bedroom, one bath bungalow and a barn. All on 5 acres in Joyce. $219,000 ML#252132

Office: 452-3333 Toll Free: 1-800-453-9157 chuck@portangelesrealty.com www.portangelesrealty.com

AFFORDABLE HOME

Unblockable views of Port Angeles Harbor and Victoria from this one level, 3 BR/2.5 BA home, centrally located. Gourmet kitchen, Cambria countertops, custom cupboards, propane cooktop. Includes beautiful formal dining area and sunken living room. Beautiful ponds, water falls and gorgeous landscaping. You must see this home! $470,000 MLS#252146 www.jeanirvine.com

CHARM ABOUNDS

Chuck Turner

Main Office: 360-683-4844 cell: 360-460-9248 cdodds@olypen.com www.sequimaccess.net

BEYOND THE ORDINARY

Office: (360) 452-7861/Direct: 417-2781 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 BeckyJ@olypen.com Website: www.BeckyJ.com

0A405277

0A405287

0A405263

WRE/Sequim-East

Carolyn & Robert Dodds

477-5582

UPTOWN REALTY Rebecca Jackson, CRS, GRI

TWO FOR ONE ON FIVE

20-acres within Sequim city limits zoned residential w/water view! Potential for future development; horse property or lavender farm. Highland irrigation ditch on property & quite private. Value is in the land; 1967 home has been rental property. Possible owner terms w/substantial down & good credit report. $995,000 ML#252107 Call the DODDS

lynnmoreno@olypen.com

NEW ROOF, NEW PAINT, NEW GRANITE COUNTERS This home is situated on two lots. 4 BR/3 BA, 2,487 SF. Enter on main level, gently sloping lot with entrance to daylight basement that has family room w/wet bar. Would make a great in-law apartment or for guests. Outside water feature, private deck and much more to see. MLS#252056 $334,000 is a great price.

(360) 437-1011 Direct: (360) 301-2929 laura@olypen.com

Office: (360) 417-2800 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 email: dave@isellforu.com

Lynn Moreno

0A405259

David A. Ramey

White picket fence and all. There is no catch to the low price. With a little love and elbow grease this 3 BR/1 BA home could be a doll house, very sweet. It has loads of character with a surprisingly large kitchen. $109,000. ML#251746/118999

3BR/1.75 BA. Living room w/propane fireplace. Kitchen w/breakfast bar & dining area. Spacious master w/dbl closets. Guest bedrooms opposite master for privacy. Laundry room, dbl garage, deck, landscaped yard. MLS#139019 $242,500.

WRE/Port Ludlow Laura Halady

UPTOWN REALTY

PRICED TO SELL

NEW LISTING

0A405265

0A405258

0A405276

NO this is NOT a Misprint. Water Views, Private Dead-end Road, 2 BR/2 BA in this 960 SF double wide. There is also an office or art studio with bath above the garage. A Fabulous BUY at $85,000 MLS#250477 Virtual tour: www.visualtour.com/shownp.asp?T=2077247

www.u-saverealestate.com

477-5542 dstofferahn@olypen.com

email: pili@olypen.com

...MISPRINT...

and Design in this lovely Bell Hill home. Exceptional kitchen with cherry cabinets, Corian counters and a large pantry. Large bay windows, propane fireplace and a beautiful deck that looks out over the parklike yard. Water views. Call Jim $309,900 View at www.U-SAVEREALESTATE.com

Dave Stofferahn

PILI MEYER, ABR, CRS, GRI

761 N. Sequim Ave. Cell: 360-477-9665 email: Brodybroker@olypen.com

(360) 460-4741 (360) 457-0456

Well maintained single level home in desirable Four Seasons Ranch with access to the beach, Discovery Trail, pool, clubhouse, executive golf course and equestrian facilities. Natural light, newer laminate flooring, double pane windows and other upgrades. Newer roof. Only $217,000. ML#252157 Always Call JACE for Land & Homes on Land!

1.84 high bank waterfront acres, ready to build. Also a quarter share of 12 treed acres that can never be developed. Power and phone in at road. CC&Rs to protect your investment. $225,000 MLS#252101 Call Quint

®

UPTOWN REALTY

Jean Irvine, CRS, GRI, ASR

Office: (360) 417-2797 Cell: (360) 460-5601 website: www.JeanIrvine.com

WRE/Port Angeles

TOM BLORE

HILLY HIDEAWAY

www.calljace.com jace@olypen.com

933 East First St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

YOU'LL THINK YOU'RE IN THE COUNTRY!

0A405261

0A405302

Beautiful country setting for this 3 BR/2 BA mobile setting atop a knoll amid 2.5 acres in the Black Diamond foothills. Enjoy the serenity and seclusion of deep country but, at barely two miles from Port Angeles, still enjoy easy access to city amenities. Motivated seller slashes price and wants offers: $219,000 MLS#251384

Lovingly cared for 3 BR/2 BA, 1-story. Newer roof & vinyl windows, private & beautifully landscaped, fenced backyard - a bird watcher’s delight! 800 SF garage w/separate shop. Lots of room for RV & boat parking. 0.32 acre. Only $200,000 ML#250807

Team Thomsen Realtors®

CARROLL REALTY Rita Erdmann

360.565.2020

Office: 457-0456 1-800-786-1456 boeq@olypen.com

360-683-4116 360-683-7814

Office: (360) 457-1111 Cell: (360) 460-1029 rita@olypen.com www.carrollrealtyteam.com

Jace Schmitz, REALTOR®

Quint Boe

tom@sequim.com

UPTOWN REALTY

Marc Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker

Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com


E2

Classified

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Office Hours

Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

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51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

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Homes

A RARE FIND! 20 acres within Sequim city limits zoned residential with water view! Potential for future development; horse property or lavender farm. Highland irrigation ditch on property and quite private. Value is in the land; 1967 home has been rental property. Possible owner terms with substantial down and good credit report. $995,000. ML252107. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

BEYOND THE ORDINARY Unblockable views of Port Angeles Harbor and Victoria from this one level 3 Br., 2.5 bath centrally located home. Gourmet kitchen, Cambria countertops, custom cupboards, propane cook top. Includes beautiful formal dining area and sunken living room. Beautiful ponds, waterfalls, and gorgeous landscaping. You must see this home! $470,000. ML252146. Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

CHARM ABOUNDS You’ll find an open floor plan in this home, with a large living room, 1,292 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath with new exterior paint, newer laminate floors and countertops, plus a delightful covered porch and private patio. $54,500. ML251807. Jo Cummins Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900 Custom home minutes from town on acreage. Barbequing and entertaining will be easy with the spacious sunny deck with views. This 2007 built home has 2 Br., and a den, all on one level. Master bath has jetted tub and shower. Vaulted ceilings and huge windows provide views out to landscaped yard. 2 garages and space for RV parking. Oak flooring with cherry inserts show the quality throughout. $499,000 ML251472/100753 Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

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Homes

CHARMING BUNGALOW This home features hardwood floors, lots of windows, a spacious kitchen, separate laundry room and an updated bathroom. Large back yard with room to build a garage off of the alley. Ready for you to move right in! $109,000. ML251363/92270 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. Custom home minutes from town on acreage. Barbequing and entertaining will be easy with the spacious sunny deck with views. This 2007 built home has 2 Br. and a den, all on one level. Master bath has jetted tub and shower. Vaulted ceilings and huge windows provide views out to landscaped yard. 2 garages and space for RV parking. Oak flooring with cherry inserts show the quality throughout. $499,000 ML251472/100753 Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. We will PRINT and DISTRIBUTE over 17,500 copies of your ad every day! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

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Homes

CUSTOM HOME ON 1.25 ACRES OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE OFFERED AT ONLY 289k. Owner terms are only 10% down, balance at 6% for 30 years, easy qualifying. Possible Lease Option with only 5% down. NO AGENTS. Serious calls only. SEE photos, PDN ONLINE. PLEASE CALL REX @ 360-460-1855 ENTICING LOG HOME On private 5 acres with seasonal pond. Spacious master suite features a jacuzzi tub. 720 sf shop, 2 RV hookups, a fenced garden area with fruit trees and greenhouse. $479,000 ML251838/122205 Helga Filler 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

EXQUISITE QUALITY And design in this lovely Bell Hill home. Exceptional kitchen with cherry cabinets, corian counters and a large pantry. Large bay windows, propane fireplace and a beautiful deck that looks out over the park-like yard. Water views. $309,900 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 FABULOUS OLYMPIC MTN VIEWS Lovely traditional 3 Br., 2 bath home on 1.15 serene acres between Sequim and Port Angeles. Great area for gardening, hiking and bicycling. Great Sequim schools. Lovely kitchen with lots of cabinets and a handy kitchen bar. Family room with high vaulted ceilings and lots of windows facing the Olympics. $279,900. ML251440. Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Peninsula Daily News can print your publication at an affordable price! Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

UPTOWN N REALTY

12:00 pm to 1:00 pm ZY CO

E AG T T CO

917 E. 5th, Port Angeles COZY, CENTRALLY LOCATED COTTAGE WITH BRAND NEW ROOF. Newly tiled bath, new carpet in LR. Large kitchen/family room. Laundry room w/enclosed sunroom. Beautiful fenced back yard with lots of raspberries, blackberries and flowers. Nice seating area to W of the home with privacy. Bonus room added in 1968. $179,000 MLS#251309 JOYCE will greet you!

Directions: From Front St., S. on Race, E. on 5th, home on N. side of 5th.

JOYCE UNDERWOOD

Managing Broker, ABR, CRS Direct: (360) 417-2784 Email: joyce@olypen.com

Homes

Homes

CENTRALLY LOCATED Close to Sequim amenities. Zoned R3, allowing medium density single family or multi-family. 3 Br., 2 bath, 2,188 sf, mountain view. $239,900. ML251646. Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East FABULOUS VIEWS This spacious 3 plus Br. home has had many upgrades including floor coverings and a new deck. You won’t find this much sf and this much view at this little price. Possibility of a mother-in-law apartment downstairs. $219,000. ML251629 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY FOUR SEASONS RANCH A delightful updated home with 3 Br. + den, formal dining room. Nice private area in the backyard. Enjoy all of the amenities of the Ranch including golf, pool, club house and beach. $299,900. ML251604/109356 Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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GREAT HORSE PROPERTY 2,849 sf, 3 Br., 2.5 bath, den and 450 sf bonus room, 8’ and 9’ ceilings with column entry, large master Br. with jacuzzi tub in bath, pole barn with RV opening, fenced pasture. $499,000. ML29072566/241304 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND HILLY HIDEAWAY Beautiful country setting for this 3 Br., 2 bath mobile setting atop a knoll amid 2.5 acres in the Black Diamond foothills. Enjoy the serenity and seclusion of deep country but, at barely two miles from Port Angeles, still enjoy easy access to city amenities. Motivated seller slashes price and wants offers. $219,000. ML251384 Rita Erdmann Carroll Realty 457-1111

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

OPEN HOUSE Sunday, October 17, 2010

1:00 pm to 3:00 pm E IC R P

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1121 E. 5th St., Port Angeles

Directions: S. on Race, L. at 5th to 1121

Office: (360) 417-2790 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 Email: stevel@olypen.com

IF YOU WANT PRIVACY And a large home, this is it. 3,204 sf on two levels. This home has 3 Br., plus an office, workshop, den, and 2 living rooms. Beautiful wood ceiling and large windows. Circular driveway around a very nicely landscaped yard that has fruit trees, flowers, garden space, and a large yard $375,000 ML251348/91363 Dave Stofferahn 477-5542 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY METICULOUSLY MAINTAINED Gracious entry leads into great room with propane fireplace and coved ceiling. Den/office/TV room/ formal dining room accessed by glass doors. Spacious master Br. and bath built-in cabinets with padded seat, two large separate closets with organizers, large tiled shower, double sinks. $395,000. ML251201. Cathy Reed and Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Homes

LIKE NEW OPEN FLOOR PLAN 3 Br., 1.75 bath. Living room with propane fireplace. Kitchen with breakfast bar and dining area. Spacious master with double closets. Guest bedrooms opposite master for privacy. Laundry room, double garage, deck landscaped yard $242,500. ML139019. Laura Halady 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow NEW LISTING New roof, new paint, new granite counters. This home is situated on two lots. 4 Br., 3 baths, 2,487 sf. Enter on main level, gently sloping lot with entrance to daylight basement that has family room with wet bar. Would make a great in-law apartment or for guests. Outside water feature, private deck and much more to see. $334,000 is a great price. ML252056 Becky Jackson 417-2781 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY NICE HOME, GREAT PRICE Well maintained single level home in desirable Four Seasons Ranch with access to the beach, Discovery Trail, pool, club house, executive golf course and equestrian facilities. Natural light, newer laminate flooring, double pane windows and other upgrades. Newer roof. $217,000. ML252157 Jace Schmitz 360-452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

Open House Sunday

Oct. 17 • Noon to 2 pm 1410 W. 10TH ST., PORT ANGELES

1683 Place Rd., Port Angeles WELL MAINTAINED Private, one level, 3 BR/2.5 BA, 1,930 SF home with large vaulted ceilings, excellent natural lighting with windows all along the north side of home to take advantage of views of the Strait and Canada. Large north deck with inset hot tub w/access from dining room and master suite. House features walk-in closets in two of the bedrooms with own baths on each end of home. 1.03 acres $399,000 MLS#251808 DEBRA will greet you!

Directions: Hwy 101, W. on Hwy 112, R. onto Place Rd. about 1 mile, L. at marker 1683.

Steve Landvik

HOOD CANAL SEAMOUNT ESTATES Brinnon: Nice 3 Br., 2 bath, private 1/2 acre, new carpet, paint and huge deck. Wood stove, newer roof. Large private community beach area with access to shellfish, adjacent lot avail. Priced to sell! $89,000. 460-2667.

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1:00 pm to 2:00 pm

! ED C DU RE

SOLID AFFORDABLE HOME This home built in 1956 has approx. 1,000 SF, 3 BR/1 BA. Fireplace insert, hardwood floors in bedrooms, newer vinyl insulated windows, vinyl flooring and a good-sized kitchen. Carport and covered patio, nice yard w/storage outbuilding. $119,000 ML#251444 Steve will greet you.

Homes

DON’T MISS THIS ONE! You’ll love this 3 BR/2 BA, one level home. Updated kitchen with newer countertops, pull-outs, breakfast bar and a new stove. Skylights and newer countertops in both bathrooms. The roof is approx. 2 years old. Fenced-in area for your pets. 2-car attached garage and plenty parking in the back. Only $185,000.

0A405300

AFFORDABLE HOME Beautiful duplex style 2 Br., 2 bath, condo unit with a 1 car garage located just outside the Sequim City limits. Nice open country feel, all appliances are included, low monthly home owners fees and easy access to town. $110,000. ML252092 Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116

Homes

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM

Directions: From Lincoln St., W. on 8th St. across the bridges, S. on C St., W. on 10th St. (home is just west of G St. on 10th).

DEBRA HALLER, Broker Office (360) 417-2793 Debra.Haller@olypen.com

WRE/Port Angeles

Kelly Johnson Cell: 477-5876

kellyjohnson@olypen.com

1:00 pm to 3:00 pm

www.kellyjohnson.mywindermere.com

1:30 pm to 3:30 pm 0

OPEN HOUSE

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, 10

$

Sunday, Oct. 17 - Noon to 2 pm

DU

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160 Hunt Rd., Port Angeles NESTLED IN THE TREES! Beautiful contemporary home west of Port Angeles. You’ll enjoy 2 BR/2.5 BA, spacious living room with wood floors, dining room, open kitchen with island, convenient laundry, storage room, large deck with hot tub, RV parking, fountain all nestled in the trees. NOW $235,000 MLS#251295.

1510 W. 10th St., Port Angeles

JOYCE will greet you!

Vivian will greet you.

This 3 BR/2.5 BA home on .24 AC is situated in a great neighborhood with very well maintained yards and upkeep. The owners have installed new roof and windows. Landscaping is manicured and well groomed with underground sprinkling system. Fenced backyard and patio for your dog and a paved alley access to the attached, oversized garage. ML#251906 $199,000

Directions: W. on Hwy. 101, W. on Hwy 112, N. Directions: 101 W, R. on Hwy 112, R. on Place on Place Rd., E. on Hunt Rd., Home on R. Rd., R. on Hunt Rd.

VIVIAN LANDVIK, GRI

Office: (360) 417-2795 Home: (360) 457-5231 email: vivian@olypen.com

JOYCE UNDERWOOD

Managing Broker, ABR, CRS Direct: (360) 417-2784 Email: joyce@olypen.com

Coldwell Banker Uptown Realty 1115 East Front Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362 360.452.7861 • Toll Free 1.800.292.2978 • www.UptownRealty.com

Directions: W. on 8th across bridges, L. on G St., R. on 10th to 1510 on the L.

0A405296

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

744 Hunt Rd., Port Angeles BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOME - ENJOY THE MAGIC OF THE ELWHA RIVER VALLEY 200’ of river frontage. Fish from your own property. 5 acres of towering trees make this a welcome retreat from the busy world. Built by Kedter Construction. Gorgeous cabinetry, oak flooring, gourmet kitchen, attractive rock fireplace. Vaulted ceilings. Expansive Mt. view, partial water view. GREAT PRICE $499,000 MLS#250294

0A405299

Charming, Vintage 2 Br., 1 bath remodeled Port Angeles home. $137,000 Improvements include: newly painted exterior and interior, new carpet. Bath includes maple vanity, ceramic tile and new fixtures. Updated kitchen with new countertops, flooring and appliances. Slider off master opens to large backyard. 12x12 deck and backyard fence in progress. Open House Saturday, October 9, 10-2 p.m. 628 W. 9th Contact: Susan 206-948-6653.

190 Priest Rd. PO Box 1060 Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3900 www.blueskysequim.com

Mike Fuller 360-477-9189 www.mikefuller.biz


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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51

Homes

MAGICAL SETTING Saltwater views, main house has 2,530 sf, guest apartment is 864 sf plus a 2 car garage. Situated on a private 5 acre parcel, upper and lower pastures, top quality design and materials. $756,000. ML9719/240911 Cath Mich 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND NICE SUNLAND HOME 4 Br., 2.5 bath on culde-sac. Living room with woodstove and separate dining room. Family room has built in bookshelves, woodstove, 2 skylights and sauna. Backyard has green house and wood deck with hot tub. Lovely landscaping with pond in front yard. $279,000. ML252100. Claire Koenigsaecker 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East NO, THIS IS NOT A MISPRINT! Water views, private dead-end road, 2 Br. and 2 baths in this 960 sf double wide. There is also an office or art studio with bath above the garage. $85,000. ML250477 Dave Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY NOT A HOUSE... THIS IS A HOME! Spacious 4 Br. with beautiful water view. Enjoy the deck overlooking the huge sun filled fenced backyard. Oversized 2 car garage with workshop, family room, craft/hobby room and so much more. $249,000. ML250909. Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. PRICED TO SELL White picket fence and all. There is no catch to the low price. With a little love and elbow grease this 3 Br., 1 bath home could be a doll house, very sweet. It has loads of character with a surprisingly large kitchen. $109,000. ML251746/118999 Lynn Moreno 477-5582 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

Homes

PARKWOOD HOME 2 Br., 2 bath, 1,998 sf home. Master Br. with sitting area, oversized 2 car garage with work bench, enclosed patio and landscaped yard, large corner lot. $130,000. ML108036/251593 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND READY AND WAITING For the right owner. Large open home in Parkwood. 1,803 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath. Two living rooms, large master, heat pump and a new roof. Very private fenced back yard. Good home, good price. $85,000. ML251574 Cathy Reed and Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East RECENTLY REDUCED Completely remodeled, ready to sell. 2 Br., 1 bath, separate storage shed, nice quiet setting. $25,000 ML29115823/241972 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SEQUIM: 5 acres, flat land on Dungeness River, with damaged 2 story home on property 100’ from river, perfect view, approved septic plans 1-5 Br., above flood plane, fenced, with pond. $137,500. 582-1292 SIMPLY BEAUTIFUL Beautifully landscaped lot in Sunland, 3 Br., 2.5 bath home plus bonus room, formal living and dining rooms, propane fireplace in family room, private deck for entertaining. $349,500 ML71200/251019 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SPACIOUS SUNLAND HOME Situated on the 13th fairway, saltwater and golf course views, two decks off kitchen/dining, two master suites, separate golf cart storage, enjoy Sunland amenities. $515,000. ML46530/250630 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

51

52

Homes

STRAIT VIEW HOME Views of Mt. Baker, golf course, and Strait, guest area with kitchen and bath, gourmet kitchen, built-in sound system, bar with sink and refrigerator, wraparound deck. $498,800. ML117675/251737 Tom Cantwell 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND TWO FOR ONE ON FIVE A 3 Br., 2.5 bath rambler with rec room and double garage. Plus a 1 Br., 1 bath, bungalow and a barn. $219,000. ML252132 Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY VERY PRIVATE SETTING IN TOWN 3 Br., 3.5 baths, 1920 sf home with a great view of the Olympic Mountains. Circular driveway, 2 car attached garage, lots of exposed wood and stone throughout the home, vaulted ceilings that open to the great view. $249,900 ML251336/90883 Holly Coburn 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. WANT OPEN SPACE? 1.96 cleared acres with small barn/ workshop, 2 garden sheds. House has had some recent updates. There is 111’ of Dungeness River frontage. This property would be a wonderful investment or starter home. $219,900. ML250991 Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East YOU’LL THINK YOU’RE IN THE COUNTRY! Lovingly cared for 3 Br., 2 bath, 1 story. Newer roof and vinyl windows, private and beautifully landscaped, fenced back yard – a bird watchers delight! 800 sf garage with separate shop. Lots of room for RV and boat parking, .32 acre. $200,000. ML250807. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

54

Manufactured Homes

MOBILE HOME: 2 Br., 1 bath, copper wire, newly remodeled. Must be moved. Very clean. $8,000. 360-301-9109 SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 bath, single wide, 55+ park, owner may carry contract. $23,500. 683-5120. USED 1979 24x64 2 Br. 1979 28x66 3 Br. Buy Rite Homes 681-0777

54

Lots/ Acreage

LAKE PLEASANT LAKEFRONT PROPERTY fully loaded 2006 5TH WHEEL w/slideout. carport, deck. DOCK, well maintained SKI BOAT 2 KAWASAKI JET SKIES. fishing. great family vacation spot or use as a nightly rental investment. seller owns local resort and will give overflow of renters. $199,000. 360-374-3118 Lake Sutherland, 3+ acres with beach rights with dock, Hwy 101 frontage. electrical close by. Subdividable, zoned R1. 360-460-4589. NO BINOCULARS NEEDED 1.84 high bank waterfront acres, ready to build. Also a quarter share of 12 treed acres, that can never be developed. Power and phone in at road. CC&R’s to protect your investment $225,000. ML252101. Quint Boe 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. RARE OPPORTUNITY! Nearly 50 acres of Sequim’s finest farmland. Ten separate parcels enjoy stunning mountain views and close proximity to the Discovery Trail. Cleared, level and ready for your ideas. Existing 40x60 pole barn with power. $1,100,000. ML251296 Dianna Erickson 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

64

Lots/ Acreage

STUNNING WATER FRONT PROPERTY Breathtaking and rare panoramic waterfront property! 5.52 acres just above the beach on stunning highbank waterfront mountain and ocean view is unobstructed on this level and prime lot. Value of the property is undeniable as it is surrounded by luxury homes-behind and beside you. Soils registered and septic design already done. Water well site report has been done and registered. Land has been surveyed. $399,000. ML252153. Brody Broker 360-477-9665 JACE The Real Estate Company WATER VIEW 9.5 acres in Clallam Bay. Two identified buildable areas, one on each end. $103,000. ML250406. Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. WEST P.A.: 30 acres, utilities. $138,000 cash. 928-9528.

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

Apartments Unfurnished

Accepting applications for studio and 1 Br. apts. at the Lee Plaza. Rent $400 to $450 mo., plus electric. Income limits apply. 457-7785.

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br., ground floor, excellent refs. req. $700. 360-460-3124

EAST SIDE: 1,200 sf 2 Br., 2 ba., deck, all appl.$725. 452-5572 P.A.: 1 Br. $475. Dwntown, some pets ok. 425-881-7267

P.A.: Lg 1 Br., storage, no smoke/pets. $650. 457-8438. STUDIO: Newer, nice, cozy, fenced, west side, W/D, close to town $650, util. paid. 460-7454 or 670-9329

63

Duplexes

CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath. $600. 813 E. 2nd St. 460-7235. P.A.: 2 Br. duplex, ground floor, carport, lg. extra parking, quiet, clean, near bus. $750. 417-5589 or 460-5358. P.A.: 2 Br., 1.5 ba. No smoke/pets. $750, $700 dep. 457-5206. P.A.: Clean 2 Br., garage. $725 month, deposit. 452-1016.

19

SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba, garage. $685. Mark McHugh 683-0660.

95

64

Up to 90 Days Maximum (Only $4.00 for each additional line).

A

New Medical Office

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PROPERTY

www.peninsuladailynews.com

NEED A RENTAL? Windermere Property Mgmt. 457-0457. olympicpeninsularent als.com LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

Houses

P.A. Near hospital, 3 Br. with study, 1 ba, nice yard, no smoking/pets. $875, 1st, dep. 775-8047.

SEQUIM: 2 Br. 1 bath. Living room, kitchen. $500. $200 dep. Half utilities. 683-2017.

P.A.: 1131 Columbia. 3 Br., 1 bath, W/D. $825. 477-3051.

SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba, no pets/smoke. $800, 1st, last, dep. req. 360-683-4336.

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, no smoking/pets. $600. 457-4740, eves. P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, newly remodeled, no pets/smoking. $690 mo., $700 deposit. 460-5290 P.A.: 2 Br., 1.5 ba, 1,600 sf, gar. $1,100, deposit. 457-1902. P.A.: 2 story, 3 Br. plus den, 2 ba, garage plus carport, all appliances, built in ‘04, no pets. Dep. and refs. $1,150 mo. 360-808-4476

SEQUIM: 3 bdrm, 2 ba, livng rm, lrg den, cul-de-sac, pets OK. $1,000 mo. 360-460-9917 SEQUIM: 3 Br., 1 bath rambler, large yard above the QFC parking lot. Wood stove, attached garage, nice neighborhood Properties by Landmark, 452-1326. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, clean, quiet, garage, credit ck, no smoking/pets. $1,095 mo, last, dep. 683-0123.

P.A.: 218 W. 8th. 2 Br., W/D, no smoking/ pets. $600. Credit check. 460-5639. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba, lg. covered deck, cathedral ceilings, gas fireplace/heat, no pets/ smoke, credit check. $900. 808-0009. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, nice area, $990. 452-1395.

SEQUIM: Energy efficient 1 Br. Water view. $870 mo. 1st/last/SD, ref rqd. No pets/smoke. 582-0637

P.A.: 5 Br., 2 ba. Cherry Hill, no smoke. $1,250. 457-3137.

P.A.: Charming tudor, 3 Br., 1 ba, lg. yard, deck. $1,050, 6 mo. lease. 221 E. 11th St. 360-457-3137 P.A.: Lg. house, 3 Br., 2 bath, 814 W. 5th St. $1,075 or $1,025 lease. 452-5050. P.A.: Residential or comm’l, 834 W. 8th, 5 Br., 3 ba, garage. $2,000. 683-9626. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

Vintage, completely remodeled 2 Br., 1 bath Port Angeles home. $900. Open House Saturday, October 9, 10-2 p.m. First, last and deposit, credit check. Sorry no smoking or pets. Contact Susan at 206-948-6653 Waterfront Homes Troll Haven Farm, amenity laden properties, secluded luxurious homes, water/mtn. views, lease options, owner financing possible. 360-775-6633

64

Houses

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath, 1800 sf, 5 quiet acres, mtn view. $1,200. 477-0747. WEST P.A.: 4 Br, 2 ba, no smoking. $1,000, $1,000 sec. 417-0153

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

ROOM FOR RENT $400-$500 mo., Sherwood Village in Sequim. For details, call Betty 504-2685. SEQUIM: Master bedroom, private bath, private entry. $575. Charlie at 681-2860.

67

Vacation

WANTED: WINTER SEQUIM AREA VACATION RENTAL We are a retired couple looking to rent in Jan.-Feb. 2011. Local references available, no pets. Can combine house sitting with rental. Would prefer (but not necessary) 2 Br., 1 bath, house or condo completely furnished with linens and fully equipped kitchen, mountain or salt water view, local phone, TV, hispeed internet and laundry. Would return in future years if everything is satisfactory to all. Phone: 641-856-8375 or email benswalnuts@yahoo.com

68

Commercial Space

P.A.: Rent or sale, 1409 E. 1st. 2 lots. 4,400 sf. 457-5678. PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326 SEQUIM: 720 E. Washington, 600-1200 sf. Mark McHugh 683-0660

Clallam County Portac Inc., fire alarm system, 200673 Highway 101, $15,500. Joyce and Anthony Duarte Jr., detached pole building, 352 Diamond Vista Drive, $27,816. Ted Burr, propane tank placement with piping and outdoor gas plumbing, 8961 Old Olympic Highway, $3,500. Warren and Donna Blakeslee, single family dwelling with attached garage, Rainbow Ave., $322,099. Warren and Donna Blakeslee, carport and deck, Rainbow Ave., $14,279. Warren and Donna Blakeslee, plumbing permit for storage building, Rainbow Ave., $3,000. Scott and Diane Thornhill, detached storage pole building, 1346 Ripplebrook Drive, $20,028. Applicant not named, remove three microwave antennae and relocate one, 126 Salmon St., $2,500. Robert A. Snyder, replace deck, 50 Harriette Lane, $1,996.

Port Angeles Andrew D. Gluck, re-pipe, 1602 W. Fifth St., $1,800. Elizabeth A. Slater, re-roof, 1808 E. Fifth St., $7,880. Clallam County, office conversion, 223 E. Fourth St., $9,000. Robbie and Shelly Wetzler, repair decks and sun room floor, 3204 Regent St., $5,000. Lorna M. Konopaski, heat pump, 1228 E. Sixth St., $6,270. Port Angeles Plaza, signs, 1940 E. First St., 154, $4,400. Port Angeles Plaza, signs, 1940 E. First St., 156, $3,330. Helen Jagger, re-roof, 1009 W. Ninth St., $4,014. Clallam County, propane tank set and generator, 111 E. Third St., $5,000. Richard Marshall and C. Swanson, propane stove and dryer, 411 S. Valley St., $1,000. Lillian Berg, heat pump, 704 Georgiana St., $12,818. PA Ten Associates LLC, re-roof, 702 E. First St., $4,890. Christian Evangelical Church, re-roof, 402 E. Sixth St., $3,200. Steven G. Massee, demolition, 222 W. Park Ave., $0. Roderick H. and Elsa E. Johnson, heat pump, 1425 W. Fifth St., $4,020. Jay C. and Deborrah A. Morgan, heat pump, 919 W. Seventh St., $6,385. Michael J. Peabody, heat pump, 1125 W. 16th St., $4,020.

Sequim James and Lori Blake, connect to city water, 171 W. Sequim Bay Road, $0. Interwest Savings Bank, remodel bank branch, 501 W. Washington St., $156,800. Sherwood Assisted Living LLC, door remodel and expanded atrium, 550 W. Hendrickson Road, $30,000. Emerald Seisin, LLC, signs, 205 W. Washington St., $1,500. Applicant not named, new driveway, 550 W. Hendrickson Road, $0. Robert and Judith Pasco, foundation under laundry room, 230 N. Third Ave., $1,000. Edward Sumpter, propane tank, 190 S. Priest Road, $300. Robert Lickar, single family residence with 500-gallon underground propane tank, 82 S. Victory Ave., $150,000. Quilcene School District, fire alarm panel replacement, 294715 U.S. Highway 101, $8,160. Shawn Beggio, new woodstove installation, 292983 U.S. Highway 101, $3,500. Demetrius Katsikapes, remodel Garden Court Apartments (40 units), 61 Garden Court Road, $800,000 State of Washington Department of Natural Resources, remodel office, 11235 Hoh Mainline, $1,200. Port of Port Townsend, remodel lounge and add two bathrooms, Building 8 Airport Road C-1, $6,000. Blue Moon Investments Inc., espresso stand, 21 Shine Road, $17,000. Harole Bohman trustee, demolish single family residence, 473 Dietz Drive, $0. Evergreen Coho Escap Retreat, 100-gallon above-ground propane tank and lines, 2481 Anderson Lake Road #121, $0.

Port Townsend Washington State Parks & Recreation Commission, commercial re-roof, Fort Worden, $6,125. KPTZ Rasio, commercial interior remodel, 1919 Blaine St., $13,300. Lynn M. Stanaback, Stanaback Family Trust, residential re-roof, 806 Fillmore St., $0. Daniel P. and Vicky L. Owen, single family residence, 1042 19th St., $98,000.

Department reports Area building departments report a total of 46 building permits issued from Oct. 4-8 with a total valuation of $1,902,630: Port Angeles, 17 at $199,027; Sequim, 7 at $189,600; Clallam County, 9 at $410,718; Port Townsend, 4 at $117,425; Jefferson County, 9 at $985,860.

0A5099268

space available in Sequim! 500-3000 SF available. Prices starting at $1.20/SF/month. Call Brody Broker 360.477.9665

97315731

*COMMERCIAL VEHICLES NOT INCLUDED IN THIS SPECIAL

02863

Call 452-8435 • classified@peninsuladailynews.com

Lake Front Condo 2 Br., 1.5 bath. $950 mth water/garb included, 6 mth lease. Available now. 360-461-4890

64

Jefferson County

Between P.A. & Sequim. 123 Amarillo Rd. 2 bed, 1 bath with W/D on 1.5 acres. Storage shed. No smoking or pets. $775 mo. 360-452-7721

PeninsulaMARKETPLACE http://marketplace.peninsuladailynews.com/

Houses

2 bedrm 2 bath house For Rent East End Port Angeles. $725 rent, $700 deposit. 360-718-6101 day4@q.com

Call today for the only classified ad you’ll ever need. CALL 452-8435 OR 1-800-826-7714

Houses

E3

BIG, nice apts. $650. Great P.A. location. 417-6638

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, no pets/smoking. $665. 360-670-9418

All for just $

P.A. APTS & HOUSES A Studio 1 ba..$475 A 2 br 1 ba......$550 H 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 2 br 1.5 ba...$750 H 3 br 1 ba......$800 H 3 br 2 ba......$990 H 3 br 2 ba....$1100 H 4 br 2 ba....$1150 SEQ APTS/HOUSES A 2 br 1.5 ba....$875 H 2+ br 2 ba.....$950

64

P.A.: 636 Georgiana, large shop/garage, 4 Br., 2 ba, great location. $1,100, deposit. 460-7516

COLLEGE AREA P.A. 2 Br., W/D, no pets, fireplace, 1226 Craig Ave. $625 mo., $625 dep. 452-3423.

ad. You get a 3 line ad that runs daily until you sell your truck, car, boat or motorcycle.*

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt.

360-417-2810

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1st floor 3 Br. $695, 2 Br. $495, Studio $390 + Util. No smoke/pets. 452-4258

Got a vehicle to sell? Nothing moves it faster than a guaranteed classified

AGNEW: 1 Br., 1 ba, all utilities paid. $600 mo. Small pet neg. 477-2000 CENTRAL P.A.: Country in city, 2 Br., updated, nice house. $800 or $825. References, deposits. Drive by 415 Valley and call 460-7652. Clean, furnished 1 Br. trailer with tip out, near beach, util. incl. $650. 928-3006. DIAMOND PT: 2 Br., 2 bath, skylights. $850. 681-0140. DUNGENESS: Lease purchase. $138,000. Call 928-9528 EAST P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, 5 acres, mtn./ water view. Horses ? $1,200. 477-0747.

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

SEE THE MOST CURRENT REAL ESTATE LISTINGS: www.peninsula dailynews.com

HOW LONG WILL THIS AD RUN?

Houses

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010


E4

Classified

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

SUNLAND

PORT ANGELES

sequimproperty.com/sunland (360) 683-6880 1-800-359-8823

portangeles.com (360) 457-0456 1-800-786-1456

SEQUIM-EAST

PORT LUDLOW

realestate-sequim.com (360) 683-4844 1-800-431-0661

windermereportludlow.com (360) 437-1011 1-800-848-6650

Come See Us For

Or Shop Online at...

The Best in Peninsula Real Estate

FABULOUS OLYMPIC MT. VIEWS

www.sequimandportangeles.com

CENTRALLY LOCATED

1.96 cleared acres w/small barn/workshop, 2 garden sheds. House has had some recent updates. There is 111’ of Dungeness River frontage. This property would be a wonderful investment or starter home. Call LINDA for more information on ML#250991 $219,900

WRE/Sequim-East

Karen Kilgore

Office: 360-683-4844 Cell: 360-271-0891 linulin@olypen.com

NICE SUNLAND HOME

METICULOUSLY MAINTAINED

WRE/Port Angeles Thelma Durham

Dianna Erickson 842 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 Cell: 461-2383 ladydi@olypen.com

Office: 360-683-4844 Cell: 360-460-4903 www.wellcomemat.com/clairek

CHARMING BUNGALOW

NOT A HOUSE

A delightful updated home with 3 BR + den, formal dining room. Nice private area in the backyard. Enjoy all the amenities of the ranch including golf, pool, club house and beach. $299,900. ML#251604/ 109356 Call Thelma

WRE/Sequim-East

Claire Koenigsaecker

Cathy: 460-1800 Sheryl: 460-9363 www.sequimwa.com

0A405290

Nearly 50 acres of Sequim’s finest farmland - Ten separate parcels enjoy stunning mountain views and close proximity to the Discovery Trail. Cleared, level and ready for your ideas. Existing 40x60 pole barn w/power. $1,100,000 ML#251296/ 88202 Call DIANNA

4 BR/2.5 BA on cul-de-sac. Living room with woodstove & separate dining room. Family room has built in bookshelves, woodstove, 2 skylights & sauna. Backyard has greenhouse and wood deck with hot tub. Lovely landscaping with pond in the front yard. $279,000 ML#252100/139066 Call CLAIRE

WRE/Sequim-East

Cathy Reed Sheryl Payseno Burley

FOUR SEASON'S RANCH

0A405286

0A405285

WRE/Sequim-East

Cathy: 460-1800 Sheryl: 460-9363 www.sequimwa.com

RARE OPPORTUNITY!

0A405284

Gracious entry leads into great room w/ propane fireplace & coved ceiling. Den/ office/TV room/formal dining room accessed by glass doors. Spacious MBD & BA - built-in cabinets w/padded seat, two large separate closets w/organizers, large tiled shower, double sinks. $395,000. Call Cathy or Sheryl about ML#251201

Cathy Reed Sheryl Payseno Burley

Linda Ulin

460-0790 842 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382

for the right owner. Large open home in Parkwood. 1,803 SF, 3 BR/2 BA. Two living rooms, large master, heat pump and a new roof. Very private fenced backyard. Good home, good price $85,000. Call Cathy or Sheryl about ML#251574/107251 WRE/Sequim-East

WRE/Sequim-East

Alan Burwell

477-5718 842 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 KarenK@olypen.com

0A405283

WRE/Sequim-East

0A405282

0A405281

0A405280

Close to Sequim amenities. Zoned R3, allowing medium density single family or multi-family. 3 BR/2 BA, 2,188 square feet, Mountain view. Call ALAN $239,900 ML#251646/111490

Lovely traditional 3 BR/2 BA home on 1.15 serene acres between Sequim & Port Angeles. Great area for gardening, hiking & bicycling. Great Sequim schools. Lovely kitchen w/lots of cabinets & a handy kitchen bar. Family room w/ high vaulted ceilings & lots of windows facing the Olympics. $279,900 ML#251440 Call KAREN

READY AND WAITING

WANT OPEN SPACE?

(360) 460-8222 (360) 683-3158 thelma@olypen.com

WATER VIEW

ENTICING LOG HOME

W NE CE! I R P

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 460-4040 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland teamschmidt@olypen.com

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 CELL: (360) 808-0117 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 477-0654 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

GREAT HORSE PROPERTY

www.sequim4sale.com ML#251737/117675 $498,800

WRE/SunLand

Tom Cantwell

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim (360) 683-6880 • 808-4612 1-800-359-8823 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

0A405275

• Views Of Mt. Baker, Golf Course & Strait • Guest Area with Kitchen & Bath • Gourmet Kitchen • Built-In Sound System • Bar with Sink & Refrigerator • Wraparound Deck

WRE/SunLand

Kim Bower

Deb Kahle

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 918-3199 www.listingnumber.com/swt8

0A405274

• Completely Remodeled • Ready to Sell • 2 Bedroom/1 Bath • Separate Storage Shed • Nice Quiet Setting ML#241972/29115823 $25,000 Visit www.kimbower.mywindermere.com

WRE/SunLand

STRAIT VIEW HOME

0A405273

0A405272

Cath Mich, CRS

Brenda Clark

RECENTLY REDUCED

MAGICAL SETTING

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 460-7950 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

WRE/SunLand

Irene Schmidt

0A405271

(360) 457-0456 (360) 461-7633 hcoburn@olypen.com

• 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 1,998 SF Home • Master Bedroom with Sitting Area • Oversized 2-Car Garage with Work Bench • Enclosed Patio and Landscaped Yard • Large Corner Lot ML#108036/251593 $130,000 www.debkahle.mywindermere.com

• Beautifully Landscaped Lot in SunLand • 3 BR/2.5 BA Home + Bonus Room • Formal Living & Dining Rooms • Propane Fireplace in Family Room • Private Deck for Entertaining ML#251019/71200 $349,500 www.brendaclark.mywindermere.com

WRE/SunLand

Holly Coburn

PARKWOOD HOME

0A405270

• Situated on the 13th Fairway • Saltwater & Golf Course Views • Two Decks off Kitchen/Dining • Two Master Suites • Separate Golf Cart Garage • Enjoy SunLand Amenities ML#46530/250630 $515,000 www.sequimlandandhomes.com

WRE/Port Angeles

WRE/SunLand

0A405266

0A405295

In town w/3 BR/3.5 BA, 1,920 SF home with a great view of the Olympic Mts. Circular driveway, 2-car attached garage, lots of exposed wood and stone throughout the home, vaulted ceilings that open to the great view. $249,900 ML#251336/90883. Call Holly

Helga Filler

helga@olypen.com (360) 461-0538

SIMPLY BEAUTIFUL

SPACIOUS SUNLAND HOME

VERY PRIVATE SETTING

WRE/Port Angeles

Cell: 461-0613 Office: 457-0456

Cell: (360) 477-5876 kellyjohnson@olypen.com www.kellyjohnson.mywindermere.com

0A405294

Realtor®, SRS, SFR

(360) 460-3831 (360) 457-0456 Email: jennifer@olypen.com

• Salt Water Views • Main House 2,530 Square Foot • Guest Apt. 864 SF + 2-Car Garage • Sited on Private 5.0 Acre Parcel • Upper & Lower Pastures • Top Quality Design & Materials ML#240911/29049719 $756,000 www.catherinemich.mywindermere.com

WRE/Port Angeles DOC REISS

Kelly Johnson

Jennifer Holcomb

On private 5 acres with seasonal pond. Spacious master suite features a Jacuzzi tub. 720 SF shop, 2 RV hookups, a fenced garden area with fruit trees and greenhouse. $479,000 ML#251838

9.5 acres in Clallam Bay. Two identified buildable areas, one on each end. Contact Doc Reiss for more information. $103,000 ML#250406

WRE/Port Angeles

WRE/Port Angeles

0A405293

0A405292

0A405291

This home features hardwood floors, lots of windows, a spacious kitchen, separate laundry room and an updated bathroom. Large backyard with room to build a garage off the alley. Ready for you to move right in! $109,000 ML#251363/92270

This is a home! Spacious 4 BR with beautiful WATER VIEW. Enjoy the deck overlooking the huge sun-filled fenced backyard. Oversized 2-car garage with workshop, family room, craft/hobby room and so much more. CALL JENNIFER HOLCOMB $249,000 MLS#250909

• 2,840 SF, 3 Bedroom/2.5 Baths • Den and 450 SF Bonus Room • 8 & 9 Foot Ceilings with Column Entry • Large Master BR with Jacuzzi Tub in Bath • Pole Barn with RV Opening • Fenced Pasture ML#29072566/241304 $499,000

WRE/SunLand

Carol, Managing Broker Nelson, Broker Cell: (360) 670-9418

www.sequimteamtopper.com


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010

E5

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Office Hours

Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

SNEAK A PEEK •

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

Are you energetic and willing to work hard? Do you possess any or all of the following skills? • Positive work ethic • Mechanical aptitude • Ability to follow directions • Strong willingness to learn • Ability to show up daily and on time for work

Excellent wage and benefits package. Apply in person through 11/1/10 at Interfor Pacific 243701 Hwy 101 W. Port Angeles, EEO/Drug Free Workplace Employer Are you an experienced Sawmill or Planer Supervisor?

Be a part of our growing success! Join the only locally owned and managed mutual bank on the North Olympic Peninsula. We have the following opportunity: •Personal Banker/Customer Service Rep Please visit our website, www.ourfirstfed.com for an employment application and job description. Qualified applicants are encouraged to submit a completed application, resume, and cover letter to employment@ourfirstfed.co m or First Federal, HR Dept., P.O. Box 351, Port Angeles, WA 98362. EOE.

Do you possess the following experience/skill levels? • Min. 3 yrs. sawmill and/or planer supervisory experience • Excellent communication skills • Ability to direct and teach • Safety program experience • Quality control experience • Mechanical aptitude • Strong attention to detail • Verifiable organizational skills • Strong computer skills (MS Office preferred) • Understanding and ability to use computerized machinery set-up systems

Between P.A. & Sequim. 123 Amarillo Rd. 2 bed, 1 bath with W/D on 1.5 acres. Storage shed. No smoking or pets. $775 mo. 360-452-7721 BOOKCASES: 3 entertainment/bookcases, cherry wood, 32”Wx78”Hx18” D, 1 with two glass doors. $684 for all three. 360-385-9316 COLLEGE AREA P.A. 2 Br., W/D, no pets, fireplace, 1226 Craig Ave. $625 mo., $625 dep. 452-3423. COMPUTERS: Rock solid computers, Rock bottom prices. Guarantee 683-9394

Then we want you to join our Management Team.

FORD: ‘70 heavy duty 3/4 ton. Runs great, new tow pkg. $900/ obo. 417-3959.

Excellent wage and benefits package.

HONDA: ‘93 Accord. 114K, original owner, well maintained, non-smoker, good upholstery and body. $2,700. 460-5241.

Applications & Resumes accepted at Interfor Pacific; 243701 Hwy 101 W; Port Angeles; WA 98363. EEO/Drug Free Workplace Employer. DUNGENESS: Lease purchase. $138,000. Call 928-9528

MISC: Belgian FN Mauser 338 Win mag, Flaig ported barrel, Leupold scope, $500. HK USP 9 mm pistol, 2 mags, holster, $550. 461-3181

Excellence with Compassion and Innovation In the Victorian Seaport of Port Townsend, Washington *Home Health RN/Case Manager 1.0 FTE *Home Health Physical Therapist 0.8 to 1.0 FTE *Home Health Occupational Therapist 0.4 FTE *Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA) 0.6 to 0.8 FTE *Certified Nursing Assistant Per Diem This is the opportunity you have been looking for! Live and work on the beautiful Olympic Peninsula where outdoor activities abound! Just 90 minutes from Seattle. A chance for great quality of life while doing the work you love with an organization that is committed to superior care.

In the beautiful Victorian Seaport of Port Townsend, has the opportunity you have been looking for! Great quality of life while working for an organization that is committed to giving superior care •Home Health Physical Therapist* •Emergency/ICU Director •Home Health Staff RN/Case Manager* •Clinic RN* •Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA) •Home Health Occupational Therapist* •Medical Staff Services Coordinator •Sleep Technician •Patient Account Rep, Temporary •Surgical Services Staff RN*, per diem •Radiology Tech CT/ Mammo per diem •Home Health Aid per diem Up to $4,000 Recruitment Bonus* plus relocation assistance for some positions. Excellent compensation and benefits.

Become an NAC Certified Nursing Assistant Life Care Center of Port Townsend Free NAC classes are beginning soon, but space is limited. Hurry to apply, and take advantage of this exciting career opportunity. Fulltime opportunities may be available after completion of course. Free training opportunity! Contact Rachel Sondie, DON. 360-385-3555 360-385-7409 Fax Rachel_Sondie@ LCCA.com 751 Kearney St. Port Townsend 98368 Visit us online at www.LCCA.com. EOE/M/F/V/D - Job #18859

SARC is now accepting applications for the part time positions of cashier, lifeguard, swim instructor, and eve. and weekend custodian. Please pick up application 610 N. 5th Ave., Sequim.

VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM

The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribal Clinic is seeking a Medical/ Healthcare Assistant. The position is responsible for assisting the Primary Nursing position with all basic clinic nursing procedures and tasks including, but not limited to: being a Healthcare assistant, checking in patients, exam room prep and clean-up, perform lab procedures and Medical Assistant, perform backup support for the Primary Clinic Nurse, basic life support, first aid administer medications. Please call 360-4528471 Ext. 124 for a position description, application or information. WANTED: Silver dollars, $18 and up. Bars. Halves, quarters, dimes, pre 1964. 452-8092.

OR

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

23

22

Community Notes

Making money is easy with a Peninsula Classified garage sale ad. Gather your items, call Peninsula Classified to place your ad, and go!

ARTISANS CREATIVE CONSIGNMENT OPENING SOON IN CARLSBORG. PROUD SPONSORS OF BRIGHTER SMILES! We are looking for talented people who make Jewelry, paint, pottery, quilting, knitting. Any unique artistic talent qualifies!!! Also great consignable items. Clothes, household etc. We are located at 803 Carlsborg Rd. Ste D. Across from the post office. Our consignment days will be on Tues. Oct. 12th 10 am until 5:30 pm. Thurs. Oct. 14th 10 am to 3 pm and Sat. 16th 10am to 2 pm. Call for future dates. We are aiming to be open by November 1st. Our goal is to donate a portion of the proceeds to help children receive dental care. This is such a great need and something I feel passionate about! Your consignment or donation will be greatly appreciated and help create a brighter smile! Please contact Michele at 360461-4799 or Heather 360-7756554. The Business line is activated on Tues the 12th. 360-681-7655

We make it easy to reach thousands of potential shoppers with one simple call. We’ll even give you a garage sale kit complete with everything you need for a successful sale.

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs:

We offer competitive wages and benefits, up to $4,000 Recruitment Bonus, Relocation Assistance, education assistance and more. Call Kirsten at 360 385-2200 Ext 1210 Or email kgolden@jeffersonh ealthcare.org Check our website at www.jeffersonhealth care.org JOBLINE 360 385-2200 ext 2022 Professional medicine, Personal treatment

For other openings Check our website www.jefferson healthcare.org or call our jobline at 360-385-2200 ext. 2022 Jefferson Healthcare Human Resources 834 Sheridan Ave., Port Townsend, WA 98368 360-385-2200 ext. 2085 Fax 360-385-1548 Professional Medicine, Personal Treatment

GARBAGE TRUCK DRIVER JOB FAIR CDL Required. Waste Connections is holding a job fair for Garbage Truck Drivers to work at our Port Angeles site. The job fair will take place between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. on Wed., Oct. 20 at the Clallam County Worksource Center. The address is 228 W. First St., Port Angeles. This is a labor-intensive position.

P.A.: Charming tudor, 3 Br., 1 ba, lg. yard, deck. $1,050, 6 mo. lease. 221 E. 11th St. 360-457-3137

P.A.: 2 Br., 1.5 ba, 1,600 sf, gar. $1,100, deposit. 457-1902.

WEST P.A.: 30 acres, utilities. $138,000 cash. 928-9528.

RECLINER: Hancock, Savanna saddle, leather, over $3,000 at Mason’s in Seattle, large scale, excellent. $575. 681-0151 REFRIGERATOR Kitchen-Aid side-byside, 22 cf, ice and water on door, black, excellent. $395. 681-0151

SOFA: Like new, black leather, paid $1,200 new, near perfect condition. $600 firm. 457-5679 SWIMMING POOL MANAGER City of Port Townsend Responsible for complete operation and administration of City pool facility and programs. Applications, announcement with minimum requirements and a complete job description at www.cityofpt.us or pick up the City Clerk’s Office, 250 Madison St, Suite 2, Port Townsend, WA 98368. 360-3795045 or pkolacy@ cityofpt.us Application review begins Nov. 1, applications submitted after that might not be considered. Applications must be submitted to the City Clerk’s office. The City is a smoke-free workplace and an EOE. Position is FLSA exempt, non-union position. Salary range: $36,920$46,150 annually DOQ.

WASHER/DRYER Kenmore. EnergyStar, extra large capacity, front loading, stackable. $250 for both. 360-477-2322 WE PICK UP Unwanted cars and trucks in area. State licensed and bonded auto wrecker. A&G Import Auto Inc 800-248-5552

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

Say as much as you want* for 2 days

Buying Selling Hiring Trading

Only $19.95 Make easy cash – invest in Peninsula Classified.

Call today! 4B235385

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 360-452-8435 • 1-800-826-7714

*15 line maximum

Lost and Found

FOUND: Cash. Clallam County Courthouse, call with exact details to claim. 360-417-2268

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

WANTED: WINTER SEQUIM AREA VACATION RENTAL We are a retired couple looking to rent in Jan.-Feb. 2011. Local references available, no pets. Can combine house sitting with rental. Would prefer (but not necessary) 2 Br., 1 bath, house or condo completely furnished with linens and fully equipped kitchen, mountain or salt water view, local phone, TV, hispeed internet and laundry. Would return in future years if everything is satisfactory to all. Phone: 641-856-8375 or email benswalnuts@yahoo.com

E-MAIL:

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com

FOUND: Cat. Orange, young, male, Hwy. 112, mile 49, P.A. 928-3447 FOUND: Key. Saturn with fob, and another key. Old Mill area, P.A. 417-8000. FOUND: Keys. Leather monkey, 1st and Francis parking lot, P.A. 452-5034. LOST: Cat. 5 yrs old, peach short hair tom, missing 4 days, end of Craig st., college area, P.A. 417-9170. LOST: Dog. Chihuahua. Gales Addition, P.A. 457-3730 or 461-0478.

Compose your Classified Ad on

www.peninsula dailynews.com

25

5000900

Prior sawmill or production line experience is a plus! All skill levels needed.

BASIC OBEDIENCE CLASSES Starting on Sat. Oct. 23rd at Goin’ to the Dogs. Call for more info. 681-5055

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM

Personals

CAN I GET SOME CHOCOLATE FOR MY MILK? Short, funny, chubby, 25 yr. old white chick looking for a tall, DARK, employed, fun, self-sufficient man who loves Sunday football in our jammies, movies and lots of laughter. Email thickasmolasses@gm ail.com Looking for a woman, 18 and older, white or black. Send response to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#175/Looking Pt Angeles, WA 98362 ROLLER GIRL, petite, 23, looking for her tall and tatted (vegetarian a bonus!) gorilla to share eyeliner with. Must love animals and hot pink. No smoking/no drugs, but casual dining ok. Save the drama fo yo mama, authentic only please. Prefer a goaloriented, takecharge fella to be the Tommy to my Pam, minus the crazy. Send response to: hotpink87@live.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond.

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you.

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CLALLAM CONSERVATION DISTRICT is accepting applications for a half-time Administrative Assistant to perform fullcharge bookkeeping and general office administration. Proficiency in QuickBooks and Excel required. Starting pay DOQ. Excellent benefits. Full description and application materials available at Clallam Conservation District, 1601 E. Front St., Bldg/Ste A, Port Angeles, WA 98362, 360-452-1912 ext. 5 or http://clallam.scc. wa.gov/ Applications due by 10/18/10.

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Commercial Printing Services 417-3520

Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out.

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


E6

Classified

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sunday Crossword

31

31

Help Wanted

115 Tenth: Pref. 116 She played Sasha Monroe on “Third Watch” 117 83-Across console 118 Banned pesticide 119 “Understood” 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Help Wanted

DOWN Gobble (down) Opposite Make blank Pasta order word __ es Salaam Fight (for) Less upbeat Error Like __ out of 79-Down Spam-revealing aid? Deodorant targets, anatomically 1957 Bobbettes hit Great Leap Forward architect Cries of dismay

Do you possess the following experience/skill levels? • Min. 3 yrs. sawmill and/or planer supervisory experience • Excellent communication skills • Ability to direct and teach • Safety program experience • Quality control experience • Mechanical aptitude • Strong attention to detail • Verifiable organizational skills • Strong computer skills (MS Office preferred) • Understanding and ability to use computerized machinery set-up systems

E H E S P L N E T A R O C E D

A E G F E A E E S C W R Y L O

D A D I I N P T S I E E H U S

Y D A A L N K A T A Z T T T T

S S T I L S K C T E E E A D E

G S E S U B H I I E R R I E M

N N O T M E V L T H D I G S W

www.wonderword.com

©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

GEFOB WENITH

YARFER

Ans: A Friday’s

©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Solution on E7

31

Prior sawmill or production line experience is a plus! All skill levels needed. Excellent wage and benefits package. Apply in person through 11/1/10 at Interfor Pacific 243701 Hwy 101 W. Port Angeles, EEO/Drug Free Workplace Employer

31

Help Wanted

*Home Health RN/Case Manager 1.0 FTE *Home Health Physical Therapist 0.8 to 1.0 FTE *Home Health Occupational Therapist 0.4 FTE *Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA) 0.6 to 0.8 FTE *Certified Nursing Assistant Per Diem This is the opportunity you have been looking for! Live and work on the beautiful Olympic Peninsula where outdoor activities abound! Just 90 minutes from Seattle. A chance for great quality of life while doing the work you love with an organization that is committed to superior care. We offer competitive wages and benefits, up to $4,000 Recruitment Bonus, Relocation Assistance, education assistance and more. Call Kirsten at 360 385-2200 Ext 1210 Or email kgolden@jeffersonh ealthcare.org Check our website at www.jeffersonhealth care.org JOBLINE 360 385-2200 ext 2022 Professional medicine, Personal treatment www.peninsula dailynews.com

Health & Rehabilitation NOW HIRING

I R W U I E R E A R T I N I E

K E L G N A S D E E S R S G B

R T S H A L L O W E E N I N B

A T T Y T R A P I E C E S M I

Join us on Facebook

M A S T E R P I E C E L I A N

O P E N I N G S C R A P E S G

10/16

Benefits • Top Wages 650 W. Hemlock, Sequim, WA

360-582-2400

www.extendicareus.com/jobs.aspx

Help Wanted

ASSURED HOSPICE LHC Group RN Forks and West End Seeking motivated individuals to enhance our expanding program. For application call 360-582-3796 CLINIC ADMINISTRATOR Family Medicine of Port Angeles is seeking an experienced full-time clinic administrator. We offer a competitive salary and benefit package. Required Qualifications: 5 yrs. healthcare mgmt. BA degree in a relevant field. Leadership, supervisory, human resources, risk mgmt., accounting, QuickBooks, Excel. CQI or Lean Thinking. Send a cover letter and resume to: Katrina Weller MD, Family Medicine of Port Angeles PLLC, 240 W. Front St., Suite A, Port Angeles, WA 98362. See our website at FMPA.net, or email katrinaweller@ gmail.com. COUNTER HELP Cock-A-Doodle Doughnuts is looking for a reliable and friendly person, Tues.-Fri., approx. 30 hrs. wk. Apply at 105 E. Front St., P.A. with resume or fill out application. DENTAL HYGIENIST Part-time position available for busy family practice in uptown Port Townsend. Send resume to Dr. Clark Sturdivant at 608 Polk St., Port Townsend, WA 98368. FRONT DESK ASSISTANT For digital/dental office, experienced, self-motivated, friendly and customer service oriented person. Must be a team player, helping when needed in other areas. Cross-trained as well as competency in dental software. Send resumes to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#176/Assistant Pt Angeles, WA 98362 FRONT DESK RECEPTIONIST FT, plus benefits, experience required. No calls. Bring resume and fill out application at Peninsula Children’s Clinic, 902 Caroline Street, P.A. CHECK OUT OUR NEW CLASSIFIED WIZARD AT www.peninsula dailynews.com

31

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. GARBAGE TRUCK DRIVER JOB FAIR CDL Required. Waste Connections is holding a job fair for Garbage Truck Drivers to work at our Port Angeles site. The job fair will take place between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. on Wed., Oct. 20 at the Clallam County Worksource Center. The address is 228 W. First St., Port Angeles. This is a labor-intensive position.

In the beautiful Victorian Seaport of Port Townsend, has the opportunity you have been looking for! Great quality of life while working for an organization that is committed to giving superior care •Home Health Physical Therapist* •Emergency/ICU Director •Home Health Staff RN/Case Manager* •Clinic RN* •Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA) •Home Health Occupational Therapist* •Medical Staff Services Coordinator •Sleep Technician •Patient Account Rep, Temporary •Surgical Services Staff RN*, per diem •Radiology Tech CT/ Mammo per diem •Home Health Aid per diem Up to $4,000 Recruitment Bonus* plus relocation assistance for some positions. Excellent compensation and benefits. For other openings Check our website www.jefferson healthcare.org or call our jobline at 360-385-2200 ext. 2022 Jefferson Healthcare Human Resources 834 Sheridan Ave., Port Townsend, WA 98368 360-385-2200 ext. 2085 Fax 360-385-1548

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers Monday) NOOSE RADIAL HAZING Jumbles: DUCHY Answer: When the sculptor copied the prized bust, the police said he was — A “CHISLER”

The Last Word in Astrology BY EUGENIA LAST

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Playful, positive action will attract someone you care for. Put your work aside and focus on personal aspirations. There is plenty of room to make changes that can alter your future and your geographical location. Be creative. 4 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Pushy behavior won’t help you get further ahead. Getting involved in a worthy cause that puts you in contact with people who can utilize your skills will be a worthwhile endeavor. Taking action without being asked will leave a good impression. 2 stars GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Draw the line if someone continually wants something for nothing. You may want everyone to like you but you cannot buy approval or respect. An older or younger person will shed an interesting view on a situation you are currently facing.. 5 stars CANCER (June 21-July 22): Give and take will be required if you want to get ahead or get along. Spending time taking care of your needs will help to boost your confidence and give you a new lease on life. Love and romance are highlighted. 3 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Family matters must take priority and, in the end, can help you avoid a personal situation with someone you aren’t quite sure you want to spend time with. Don’t make a move to do something that can jeopardize your reputation. 3 stars

changes at home or you may get more than you bargained for. The emphasis should be on travel, learning and exploring new avenues that can help you earn more money. Reconnecting with someone from your past is a bad idea. 4 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Focus more on getting as much as you can for as little as possible. Comparison shopping and refraining from impulse purchases will be the key. Profits can be made but only if you are moderate and invest wisely. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): If you need help, say so, instead of falling behind. Take action and make the necessary changes so you have more time for pampering and selfimprovement. It’s time to have some fun. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The sky is the limit if you put your time and effort into something you do well or believe in. Someone from your past will be able to help you find opportunities that are sure to turn into a profitable endeavor. 5 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Interact with people who can give you the information you need to get ahead. Taking on a creative investment or finding a way to put your skills to better use will pay off. Don’t be fooled by an old lover who wants to be part of your life again. 3 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): A creative endeavor you’ve been working on should be launched whether it’s finished or not. The response you get will be overwhelming. Don’t let personal duties stand in your way when you are so close to achieving your goals. 2 stars SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Don’t instigate

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Look at your assets and decide what’s worth keeping and what’s not. Investing in something you believe in or a creative endeavor you can offer as a service will pay off. Don’t overspend initially trying to get it off the ground. 3 stars

Rock ‘N’ Roll. Sell your skates and just about anything else starting at only $16.50. Reach more than 36,000 readers of the Peninsula Daily News every day! Some restrictions apply.

Place your ad today • 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

43220697

MDS Coordinator

0A5099135

Sequim

EOE

T T S E T N O C A N D L E S S

DAFEM

In the Victorian Seaport of Port Townsend, Washington

GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

S U R F A C E D G E S C O O P

Solution: 8 letters

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

• Positive work ethic • Mechanical aptitude • Ability to follow directions • Strong willingness to learn • Ability to show up daily and on time for work

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Sell your Treasures!

PUMPKIN CARVING

by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Excellence with Compassion and Innovation

www.peninsula dailynews.com

NEED EXTRA CASH!

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Then we want you to join our Management Team.

Applications & Resumes accepted at Interfor Pacific; 243701 Hwy 101 W; Port Angeles; WA 98363. EEO/Drug Free Workplace Employer.

79 See 9-Down 80 Villainous look 81 1967 Temptations hit 83 Check 84 Disintegrating 85 Penn. neighbor 86 Lemon add-on 91 PDA entry 93 39-Down’s spouse 94 Leg hiders 95 Designer Cassini 96 Didn’t pass, in bridge 97 Alpine protagonist 98 Siouan tribesmen 99 ’30s V.P. John __ Garner 100 Milk pitcher? 102 River past Thebes 104 Buddhist sect 105 Start to cure? 106 Hijackprevention org. 107 Feel peaked 108 Oslo Accords gp. 110 Furious 111 Partner of about

Angle, Blade, Candles, Contest, Creative, Date, Decorate, Delicate, Design, Edges, Eyes, Grease, Guts, Halloween, Head, Illuminate, Inside, Knife, Lettering, Light, Markings, Masterpiece, Nail, Openings, Outer, Owls, Paper, Party, Pattern, Pieces, Rear, Scoop, Scrape, Seeds, Size, Slits, Star, Steady, Stem, Surface, Teeth, Thickness, Trim, Webbing, Witch Friday’s Answer: Lighthouse

Do you possess any or all of the following skills?

Be a part of our growing success! Join the only locally owned and managed mutual bank on the North Olympic Peninsula. We have the following opportunity: •Personal Banker/Customer Service Rep Please visit our website, www.ourfirstfed.com for an employment application and job description. Qualified applicants are encouraged to submit a completed application, resume, and cover letter to employment@ourfirstfed.co m or First Federal, HR Dept., P.O. Box 351, Port Angeles, WA 98362. EOE.

51 Japanese honorific 55 Game 56 Optical maladies 58 Montmartre’s city 60 Longbow wood 61 Fed. auditor 62 Valencian rice dish 63 Depose 64 Old Catalan coin 67 Former Yankee Boyer 68 Singles promoter? 70 Prickly, plantwise 71 Final purpose, to Aristotle 72 First Hebrew letter: Var. 73 Daimler contemporary 74 Game opener? 75 Survivor of Krypton’s destruction 76 Broker 78 K.J. __, first Korean to win on the PGA Tour

© 2010 Universal Uclick

Are you energetic and willing to work hard?

Are you an experienced Sawmill or Planer Supervisor?

Excellent wage and benefits package.

15 Niggling detail 16 Trattoria menu suffix 17 Thespian’s rep. 20 “__ sure you’ve heard ...” 23 Wondering look 24 Org. with many arms 28 Theater awards 30 No. after a phone no. 31 Alphabet trio 33 Indeed 34 Boneheads 35 Old CIA plane 36 Like times of famine 37 Thrice, in Rx’s 39 Euripides tragedy 41 Sizzling TexMex meat 42 “The Ladies’ Man” author Lipman 43 Watch Fido, say 44 Hemp fiber 46 Filters (through) 47 German donkey 48 Odious 49 Arbored Southwestern walkway

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

82 Key of the overture to Mozart’s “The Magic Flute” 83 Nintendo game ACROSS that involves 1 Hied rescuing a 5 Redbox rental princess 8 Fond du __, 87 “See ya!” Wisconsin 88 Buddy List user 11 NH3 89 Heading under 18 Apple part which cabs are 19 Service station listed offering 90 Yeats’s “__ and 20 “Rubáiyát” the Swan” rhyme scheme 92 “It’s Still Rock 21 Trying to catch and Roll to Me” a break? performer 22 “The Age of 94 Common cell Turbulence” 101 Heart stimulant memoirist brand 25 Speculator’s 103 Romantic reply to cocktail garnish “Where’s all 104 First frat at U.C. your money?” Berkeley 26 Bob Marley, e.g. 109 Conflict, and a 27 Pupil of Plato hint to 29 Still in unraveling the Hollywood puzzle’s circled 32 Event with a letters “six metres 112 Delta follower club” 113 Sacha Baron 38 Vet Cohen character 39 Suvari of “American Pie” 114 __ de Cologne 40 Big name in beauty 41 “The X-Files” extras 45 Treaty of Paris conflict, 1763 50 Dr. Alzheimer 52 Dwells 53 Stretch out using 54 Many of their pieces are nearly identical 57 Sushi bar supplier 58 Homeys 59 Defense strategy that’s not an option in some states 61 Like pheasant 62 Little rat 65 Slave 66 Corrosive fluids 67 What vacationers are without, by choice 68 Batman cocreator 69 It “enables us to find ourselves and lose ourselves at the same time”: Merton 70 Exploded 71 Scandalmongers, often 75 “Charlie’s Angels” angel Munroe 76 Fracas 77 Ball Park Franks maker 78 Links site 80 Bread component? 10/17/10

“I HAVE A WEIRD FEELING ...” By JULIAN LIM

By DAVID OUELLET

Professional Medicine, Personal Treatment Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

Where buyers and sellers meet!


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Classified 31

31

Help Wanted

LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840.

CLERICAL: Excel and Word experience helpful. Fax resume to 360-681-5436

BUSINESS MANAGER For Crescent School District, full-time. Complete job description and application at www.crescent.wednet.edu or contact 360-9283311, ext. 100. Closing date for applications October 27, 2010.

Free NAC classes are beginning soon, but space is limited. Hurry to apply, and take advantage of this exciting career opportunity. Fulltime opportunities may be available after completion of course. Free training opportunity! Contact Rachel Sondie, DON. 360-385-3555 360-385-7409 Fax Rachel_Sondie@ LCCA.com 751 Kearney St. Port Townsend 98368 Visit us online at www.LCCA.com. EOE/M/F/V/D - Job #18859

MENTAL HEALTH Crisis Intervention Specialist for mobile crisis interventions/ assessments/stabilization svcs. Req. Master’s degr. or RN plus 2 yrs mental health exp. Case Manager/Therapist for chronically mentally ill adults. Pref. Master’s w/2 yrs exp. Resume and cvr ltr: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org AA/EOE SWIMMING POOL MANAGER City of Port Townsend Responsible for complete operation and administration of City pool facility and programs. Applications, announcement with minimum requirements and a complete job description at www.cityofpt.us or pick up the City Clerk’s Office, 250 Madison St, Suite 2, Port Townsend, WA 98368. 360-3795045 or pkolacy@ cityofpt.us Application review begins Nov. 1, applications submitted after that might not be considered. Applications must be submitted to the City Clerk’s office. The City is a smoke-free workplace and an EOE. Position is FLSA exempt, non-union position. Salary range: $36,920$46,150 annually DOQ.

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ANSWER TO TODAY’S PUZZLE

Help Wanted

CAREGIVERS: Hiring, P.A., Sequim, P.T. Paid Training. Benefits. 360-457-1644.

Become an NAC Certified Nursing Assistant Life Care Center of Port Townsend

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010

ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 SARC is now accepting applications for the part time positions of cashier, lifeguard, swim instructor, and eve. and weekend custodian. Please pick up application 610 N. 5th Ave., Sequim. The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribal Clinic is seeking a Medical/ Healthcare Assistant. The position is responsible for assisting the Primary Nursing position with all basic clinic nursing procedures and tasks including, but not limited to: being a Healthcare assistant, checking in patients, exam room prep and clean-up, perform lab procedures and Medical Assistant, perform backup support for the Primary Clinic Nurse, basic life support, first aid administer medications. Please call 360-4528471 Ext. 124 for a position description, application or information. UTILITY BILLING LEAD The City of Sequim has an immediate opening for a Utility Billing Lead. Minimum 4 years experience in utilities, billing, collections, and customer service - including serving in a lead or supervisory capacity. This position is also responsible for general accounting work as assigned. Undergraduate degree in Accounting, Business Administration or related field preferred. Excellent communication, people, and organizational skills needed. Must have demonstrated experience working with customers with advanced and complex issues. Union position with benefits. $19.81-$23.55 hr. For application and job description visit http://www.ci. sequim.wa.us/jobs/ Open until filled. EOE

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Work Wanted

Aaron’s Garden. Hand weeding, weedeater, pruning, clean-up, hauling. Whatever your garden needs. 360-808-7276 ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding and mowing. 452-2034 Best Choice Lawn Care. Maintenance and clean up. Free estimates. Sequim/ P.A. 248-230-0450. Hannah’s helping hands. My name is Hannah and I clean houses. I am reliable, no hassles, and very detailed. I will go to Joyce, Port Angeles, or Sequim. Please call me at 775-1258, I would love to clean your home. HAPPYDAY CLEANING. Housecleaning, offices, RV’s, and event/party clean up. No job too small or too big. Move out’s, rentals, foreclosures, or for sale. Call for your free estimate. 360-808-3017 Hedge trim, prune, mow, haul, odd jobs. 452-7249 HOME CLEANING Meticulous and honest. Amie 452-4184. Honest, reliable, housekeeping. $20 hr. Quality service counts. For details, 360-434-2308 Hydraulic wood splitting, big or small, we’ll split them all. 457-9037 Janitorial Services. Honest, reliable and hardworking. Looking for business’s that need cleaning in the evenings and on weekends. Licensed and Bonded. Ready to keep your office clean. Call Bailey. 477-9256

Work Wanted

34

Work Wanted

MOWING, pruning. Honest and Dependable. 582-7142.

VHS to DVD copying services. Call Nancy 360-774-0971

O’Leary General LLC. Local college grad seeks your fall projects. Carports, decks, debris hauling, & much more! No job too big or too small. Highly conscientious & efficient. Over 10 yrs exp! Excellent references. Res. & comm. accts. accepted. Lisc., bonded, insured. Call Bryan today. 360-460-1557 OLEARGL929MH

Welding Services. 25 years experience, local references. Large and small jobs welcome. Call Bob at 457-5749

PROFESSIONAL COMPUTER REPAIR HelperTek.com - We offer courteous, professional computer repair and other IT related services at an affordable price. Visit us at helpertek.com or contact us 775-2525 helpdesk@helpertek.c om

41 Business Opportunities 42 Mortgages/Contracts 43 Money Loaned/Wanted

41

Business Opportunities

SEQUIM: 3 station salon, great opportunity to own your own business. 582-3073.

Purple Cow Cleaning Services. Fast and reliable. Mon.-Fri., Sequim/P.A. References. 797-4906. RENT-A-MAN I can perform many types of labor both inside & out. No job too small! Call & we’ll talk. John 775-5586.

Sewing. I Sew 4U Hemming, curtains, alterations and new projects... Call me today! Appointments in my central Port Angeles home. Patti Kuth, 417-5576. isew4u.goods.officeliv e.com I'm Sew Happy! TUTORING: Certified teacher, all subjects except higher math. 360-609-2927

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Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

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Appliances

REFRIGERATOR Kitchen-Aid side-byside, 22 cf, ice and water on door, black, excellent. $395. 681-0151

The missing piece to your home selling success.

ula s n i Pen sified Clas -8435 452

7C126517

classified@peninsuladailynews.com


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010

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Appliances

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WASHER/DRYER Kenmore. EnergyStar, extra large capacity, front loading, stackable. $250 for both. 360-477-2322

72

Furniture

ANTIQUES: Brass bed, settee, lg. oak rocker. $900 all or $350 each. 670-9264 BED: King Sealy Posturpedic Plush Pillowtop, mattress and box spring, pillow top on both sides, great shape, will deliver. $400/obo. 681-3299 BOOKCASES: 3 entertainment/bookcases, cherry wood, 32”Wx78”Hx18” D, 1 with two glass doors. $684 for all three. 360-385-9316 DESK Medium sized, black, shabbychic. Very cute, vintage piece. $75/obo. 360-775-8746

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

Furniture

DINING ROOM TABLE With 4 chairs. Very nice set. $175/obo. Call 681-4429. ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Large, very sturdy, light colored oak. Plenty of room for a large television with two big storage drawers underneath, plus a side cabinet with three shelves and glass-front door. $175/obo. 360-775-8746

Leather sofa and chair. Beautiful set. Unemployed and must sacrifice. Call Chris 404-423-9629. Pics avail. for email. LIFT CHAIRS: (2) perfect condition, moss green, new $1,600 ea. Will sell for $400 each. 683-5307. LOVE SEAT Blue. $60. 477-7834 or 452-9693 MISC: Bedroom set, hunter green, full bed, 5 drawer chest, bedside stand, $500. Love seat, southwest print, $150. 4 drawer chest, $50. small table and two chairs, $50. Wing arm chairs, rose, $100. brown recliner, $75. 582-0185

Classified 72

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Furniture

MISC: 2 sofas with recliners, beige, with blue and brown, great condition, $200 each. Overstuffed chair with ottoman, soft gold, great condition. $125. 457-5656 MISC: Dinette set, oak table with tile inlay, 4 swivel chairs, $350. 2 matching bar high chairs, $60 ea. 452-4760 MISC: Dining set, very large heirloom quality 4-piece, 6 high back chairs. $1,099/ obo. Sofa, large plush velour fabric living room, very comfortable, light color green-blue, tan & brown, $249/obo. 452-9562 MISC: Hutch, $100. Sewing machine in cabinet, $100. 7 drawer dresser, with mirrored top, $100. All obo. 460-8675. RECLINER: Hancock, Savanna saddle, leather, over $3,000 at Mason’s in Seattle, large scale, excellent. $575. 681-0151 RECLINERS: Leather, swivel rocker, black, $185 ea. or $300 pair. Can deliver for gas. Port Angeles. 808-5636 SOFA: Like new, black leather, paid $1,200 new, near perfect condition. $600 firm. 457-5679

General Merchandise

BRICKS: Round tree. $1 ea. 452-2287. Campground memberships TT/NACO Alliance. $600 plus tfr fee. Coast to Coast Hart Ranch B $900 plus tfr fee. Dues paid both $1,400. 452-6974. CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563 COMFORTER SET Barney twin, with sheets, good shape. $15. 452-9693, eves. CRAB POT PULLER: Honda, aluminum tower, $450. 460-3774 DRESSES: 5 nice prom dresses 4 size small, 1 size med, like new worn once, call for description. $30 each. 452-9693 or 417-3504. FIREWOOD: $175 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910 www.portangeles firewood.com FIREWOOD: Fir, $175 a cord or $185 delivered. 808-5891. Gas lawn mower. $45. 457-8656. Leaf/Lawn Vacuum Craftsman, professional, 5.5 hp B&W engine, barely used, paid $1,100. Now $725. 681-3522.

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General Merchandise

GENERATOR: 8000 watts, diesel. $1,000. 452-5154. MISC: Husqvarna chainsaws: #395, $650. #385, $450. #575, $300. Leister plastic air welder, $200. Antique partridge bamboo fly rod, #8, $200. Commercial canopy, side and full backdoors, short bed, white, $800. Willies Jeep tranny, 3 speed with overdrive, $800. 461-8060 SEAHAWK TICKETS (2) Section 337, seat 21 and 22, row T. Oct. 24, vs. Arizona Cardinals. $78 ea. 461-3661 TIMESHARE WEEK Hot August Nights! RENO August 6th-13th Tons of old cars and old time music. LOCAL SELLER. Great Christmas Gift! $500. 460-6814. TOOLS: Wood planer, Delta model DC-380, $750/obo. Bosch router table, compete, $450/obo. 460-5762 TRAILER: Snowmobile, quad, utility trailer, 7x12, always garaged, excellent condition, 3,500 lb. axle. $1,495. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210

73

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

General Merchandise

VENDORS WANTED Eagles Crafts Fair and Flea Market. Nov. 6th. Table rental, $25. 360-683-6450 WANTED LOGS FOR FIREWOOD 477-8832

XBOX 360 ELITE 1 wireless controller, 5 games - Rainbow 6 Vegas, Saints Row 2, Skate 2, Lego Batman, and Pure. $300/obo. 360-477-8505 XBOX 360 ELITE With Grand Theft Auto 4, wireless controller, like new condition, with high definition cables. $350/obo. 775-5767 or 681-7771

74

Home Electronics

COMPUTERS: Rock solid computers, Rock bottom prices. Guarantee 683-9394

75

Musical

GUITAR: Acoustic left handed Carlos brand adult size, like new condition with semi soft case and two beginning books. $350 firm. 452-9401.

75

Musical

VIOLIN: 3/4, nice shape. $150. 452-6439

76

Sporting Goods

GUN: S&W model 57, 41 mag, 6” barrel, clam shell shoulder holster, $650. 360-912-1277 GUNS: 45-70 plus ammo, $400. German sporting rifle, $700. 461-6339 after 4 p.m. MISC: Belgian FN Mauser 338 Win mag, Flaig ported barrel, Leupold scope, $500. HK USP 9 mm pistol, 2 mags, holster, $550. 461-3181 PISTOLS: EAA Witness 40 cal., $450. Llama 45 ACP, $450. Marty 670-8918 RIFLE: 1941 Winchester model 94, very good condition, with ammo. $650 firm. 460-7566. RIFLE: Savage model 93 R17, 17HMR caliber, thumb hole stock, Accutrigger, Bushnell 3 to 9 scope, bi-pod. $550. 457-9608 SKATES: Bauer aggressive skates, black, size 11 good shape $20. 460-0845

76

Sporting Goods

SKS: 7.62x39, new black stock, tactical scope. $450. 457-0943

77

Bargain Box

DRESSER: Older, 4 drawer, white and soft green. $10. 452-2026

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANTED: Silver dollars, $18 and up. Bars. Halves, quarters, dimes, pre 1964. 452-8092. WANTED: Stock trailer, good condition. 683-1179

PINE ARMOIRE ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Beautiful. $125/obo. 808-1767

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

GARAGE Sale: Sat. only, 8-2 p.m., 1000 Eagle Heights Rd. Follow Hwy 112 West to Gerber Rd. (1/4 mile past Freshwater Bay Rd on left) Follow signs!!!

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

MOVING Sale: Fri., 93 p.m., 82 Starry Rd off March Banks. 30 gallon lawn sprayer. Welding table. CB radios, etc.

79

Wanted To Buy

LOOKING FOR HAND CARVED HITTY DOLL Please call 417-7691

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

CYPRESS: 6’-7’, $13 ea. G&G Farms, 95 Clover Lane, off Taylor-Cutoff. 683-8809.

82

Pets

AKC Mini Schnauzer Puppies. Litter of 2 male, 3 female puppies. Tails docked and dewclaws removed. Black/silver and salt/pepper coloring. First shots. $500 each. 360-460-7119

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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LAWN/YARD LAWN CARE CAREROOFING

TRACTOR

KITCHENS/BATHS/DOORS

PRUNING

MANUFACTURED/MOBILE HOMES

PAINTING

AIR DUCT CLEANING

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SERVICE DIRECTORY HOME REPAIR

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M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

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Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

It’s a terrific way to reach a whole new market for anything you might want to sell. www.peninsuladailynews.com 61246807

For details on how your ad can be on the internet call: 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7724


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Pets

Pets

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Farm Animals

BASIC OBEDIENCE CLASSES Starting on Sat. Oct. 23rd at Goin’ to the Dogs. Call for more info. 681-5055 BEAGLE: Female, spayed. Pr Br Beagle F. 5yrs loves the indoors as well as out.. should have fenced yrd-leash when walking. great companionship, for kids or elders. kind loving, my name is Dolli. $100. 360-461-4622 BLACK LABS: AKC/ UKC Black Lab pups excellent hunting lines. $650. 461-7583 CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES 2 females, 2 males, ready to go. $350 ea. 452-7746 FERRETS: (2) Large cage, toys, gadgets. All for $90 to loving home. Jill at 477-1312 FISH TANK: 80 gal., with 5 saltwater fish, pump, lights everything included. $100. 460-0965 FREE: Cat. 3 yr. old, needs lots of attention and love, great for older person. Neutered and has all shots. 417-2130. FREE: Downsizing. Cats to kittens, to good homes only. Call for info. 360452-1120, leave message if no answer. HALLOWEEN PUPPIES AKC Golden Retriever pups, 5 male $400 ea., 1 female $500, 20 yr. breeder, father on site, 1st shots, wormed, quality, guarantee health. 582-3181

AQUARIUM: 30 gallon aquarium. $45. 360-457-1560

HAY: Alf/grass. $5.50 bale. Grass, $4.50. In barn. 683-5817.

FREE: To good home Tabby cat, adult male, neutered, best for adult home only. 683-9899

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Peninsula Daily News can print your publication at an affordable price! Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

GRASS HAY No rain, $5 bale. 457-8704, 460-6847

LABRADOODLE PUPPIES CHOCOLATE. Mom is AKC Chocolate Lab and Dad is AKC Chocolate Standard Poodle. 5 girls and 2 boys. First set of shots, wormed and vet checked. Happy, healthy and ready for their new homes. $900. Call 360-460-6605

Horses/ Tack

AQHA: Gelding, 15 yrs., reining/cow horse, $25,000 in training. $2,500. 461-7583 FILLY: 2 yr old registered AQHA. Ready to be started, friendly. $475. 640-2325. HORSE TRAILER: 2 horse, straight load, Safari 1969, good condition. $950/obo. 683-1179

PUPPIES: (5) purebred Havenese, 8 weeks old, $400 ea. 360-477-8349

85

PUPPIES: Boston Terrier pups. $250$350. Call 797-3189 after 4 p.m.

TRACTOR: John Deere Model H. Resotred. $3,200. 457-3120

Farm Equipment

PUPPIES: Jack Russell Terriers, Powder Puff China-Jacks, registered, vet checked, shots, wormed. $800 each. 582-9006

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Farm Animals

WANTED Free spoiled hay. 360-461-5026

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 Western Star. 3406E, 500 hp, does not use oil, no leaks, good Dyno report, cruise, air, jakes, air ride cab, power mirror and windows, new 16’ box and wet kit, and hitch for pup, excellent inside and out, all new brakes. $42,000. 460-8325. FLAT BED: ‘73 Ford F600 with liftgate, needs work. $1,000. 457-3120 GMC: ‘91 Top Kick. GVWR 26,180 lbs, 19,466 mi., 16’ bed, dump-through lift gate, Fuller 10 spd. $19,995. 683-2383. SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153. TRACK LOADER 125E, I-H Dresser, 1,900 hrs. $11,000. 683-3843

PUPPIES: Chihuahuas. Very cute, 3 females, 1 male. Ready to go October 18th. $175 each. 452-5049 or 670-5118 PUPPIES: Golden Retrievers, beautiful AKC, dark golden, championship lines on sires side, ready 10/15. 4 males, $450 ea. 2 females, $500 ea. 1st shots, wormed. 681-3160, after 4 p.m.

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Marine

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

APOLLO: ‘77 20’. Must see! Very clean in and out. Rebuilt 302 IB OMC OB. Fresh water cooled, hydraulic trim tabs, head, galley. Priced to sell. $3,800/obo. 681-0411

91

BAYLINER: ‘02 2452 Classic with ‘05 EZ Loader Trailer. 250HP, Bravo 2 outdrive, micro, stove, refrigerator, marine head, masserator, heated cabin, radar, fish finder, VHF radio, GPS, (2) Scotty electric down riggers, Yamaha 8T kicker motor, all safety equip., trim tabs, hot water, cruising canvas, fresh water cooling. $28,500/obo. 360-683-3887

Aircraft

ULTRALITE: Avenger/Hurricane. 503 Rotax engine, 10 gal tank, new tires, 4 year old sails, always hangered, full instruments including CHT, EGT, RPM, airspeed, recording G meter, hr meter, hydraulic disc brakes, ballistic chute. $7,500. 360-640-1498 360-374-2668

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Marine

Aluminum 17 ft., C/C, 2 Mercury 4 strokes. $8,000 firm. 452-2779 ARIMA: ‘89 17’, 70 hp Yamaha, canvas top, galv. trailer, with extras. $8,000. 928-3900 BAYLINER: With 70 hp Evinrude. Fully equipped with EZ Loader trailer, lots of extras. $4,000. 683-4698 COOKIE MONSTER ‘78 Sloop, 30’. 4 head sails, main, 3/4 and 1/2 oz. spinnakers. Head foil and hydraulic backstay. All new halyards, knot, depth, and wind meters in ‘08. Best of all, new 14 hp FWC Yanmar diesel in ‘09. Propane 2 burner stove and cabin heater. Marine UHF radio and Sony AM/FM CD radio. Sleeps 5. See at slip Q-5 in P.A. Boat Haven. $18,500. 457-8382. CRESTLINER: Sturdy ‘96 16’ aluminum boat. With newer 20 hp merc, E-Z Loader trailer, good cond. Light use, freshwater only. $2,250. 360-681-7989 GLASPLY: ‘79 19’. Cuddy cabin, 170 hp I/O, newer 15 hp Honda tolling motor and pot puller, galvanized trailer, electric winch. $8,000. 360-417-2606 GLASPLY: They don’t make ‘em like they used to! ‘77 24’. Lots of extras. $12,000/obo 360-374-2234 HEWESCRAFT: ‘06 18’ Sea Runner. 115 hp and 8 hp 4 stroke Yamahas, all elelctric tilt, much more. $21,900. Just completely serviced. Bob 360-732-0067 JET SKI: ‘96 ZXI750. Low hours. $2,600/ obo. 928-3450.

Marine

MALIBU: ‘01 Sportster LX. Fuel injected 350, great shape, only 240 hours. $17,000. 808-6402. MALIBU: ‘96 Response. 514 hrs., heater, shower, custom Bimini top. $11,500/ obo. 928-9461. OLYMPIC: ‘94 22’ Resorter. Alaska bulkhead, ‘06 225 Merc Optimax. ‘07 9.9 4 cycle Merc Bigfoot. Large fishing deck, solid and fast. 84 gal. fuel. $16,000/ obo. 683-4062 or 530-412-0854 OUTBOARD: 2010 Yamaha 4 hp, 3 hrs., no salt ever, as new. $875. 681-0151. RAIDER: ‘07 24’ aluminum, well equipped. $53,500. 683-5120 REINELL: ‘95 19.5’ V6 I/O. EZ-Load galvanized trailer, half cutty. $4,800/obo. 452-2459 RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711. SAIL BOAT: 1932 42’ Frank Prothero fishing scooner, 50 hp Isuzu diesel, Paragon gear, solid construction, needs TLC. $3,000. 360-468-2052 SAIL BOAT: 1940 34’ Rhodes 6 meter cruising sloop, heavy construction. $2,500. 360-468-2052 SAIL BOAT: 30’ sloop. Yanmar diesel, low hrs., VHF radio, depth and knot meter, working galley and head, color TV, CD player, wheel steering, sleeps 5. $10,500. 457-0684. SAILBOAT: 16’ classic daysailer. Very stable, very good condition, a beauty, trailer and more incl. $10,000/obo. 360-582-1683

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010

93

Marine

SAILBOAT: 12’ wooden, extra sail, trailer. $990. 683-6889. SANGER: ‘76 Super Jet. Built 455 Olds, Hardin in water exhaust, seats 5, upholstery good, dog house fair, turnkey ready. $2,500/obo. 681-3838

Sea going sailing canoe. Project wood boat partially restored, all parts including good sail, mast, tiller,dagger board, lines, mast and rudder with all fittings except for oars. 17 feet long with a wide beam. $500. 360-683-6575 or 360-808-5200 YAMAHA: 8 hp long shaft, 2 cycle, excellent condition. $750/obo. Call Terry 461-6462

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Motorcycles

94

Motorcycles

Harley Davidson 1993 Wideglide, custom wheels, lots of extras. $15,000. 477-3670 HARLEY: ‘02 1200 Sportser. Black, lots of chrome. Saddle bags, detachable windshield, beautiful bike! $5,995. 360-461-0961 HARLEY: ‘05 Soft Tail Deluxe. Glacier white, vivid black, 2,000 mi. 1450 ST1 EFI, bags, chrome foot boards, sport rack, back rest, lots of chrome, much gear included garaged. $17,500. 460-0895.

HD: ‘05 Electra Glide Ultra Classic. Black cherry/black pearl, 10,850 miles. One owner, garage kept. Screamin' Eagle and Tall Boy package. never down or in rain. Excellent condition! $15,900. 360-461-4222 HD: ‘06 1200 Sportster. 7K miles, mint, extras. $7,900. 452-6677

BMW: ‘94 K1100RS. Exceptionally clean bike, 41,000 miles, ABS brakes, 4 cylinder engine, stainless steel exhaust, Corbin seat, saddlebags, no road-rash, blue paint. For information call Ed. 360-681-2334 CAN-AM ‘08 OUTLANDER XTMAX QUAD 4x4, 2 seater, 400cc EFI, winch. VIN#000298 $5,700 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘08 1200C. 450 miles. $8,495/obo. 452-6448

HONDA: ‘04 CFR 100F. Less than 60 hrs., original owner. $1,500. 417-1151. HONDA: ‘04 XR650L. Only 3,000 mi., excellent condition, includes hitch carrier. $3,500. 460-4420. HONDA: ’06 Shadow VLX 600. Saddle bags, windshield, custom paint, lots of chrome, 1,800 mi., super clean, must see. $4,000/obo. 452-5813 HONDA: ‘99 XR400. All stock, low hrs., good tires, new graphics. $1,950. 461-1202

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Motorcycles

HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153. KAWASAKI: ‘03 KX125. 2 stroke, exc. cond., hardly ridden, must go. $2,200/ obo. 452-5290.

KAWASAKI: ‘09 KLX 250s Dual-Sport Excel. cond., 1,600 mi., street legal, 65 mpg, elec start, 6 speed, liquid cooled, new tires, Comes w/ riding gear and helmet, perfect for commute and trail! $3,850. 360-477-7589 KAWASAKI: ‘00 Vulcan 800. Mustang seat, also has stock seat, K&N air filter, new chain and rear sprocket, 29K miles. $2,000. 206-913-7906 POLARIS ‘08 TRAILBOSS 330 QUAD Auto, racks. VIN#316882 $3,200 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272

QAUD: ‘05 POLARIS PHEONIX 200. Red, automatic, approx. 5-10 riding hours, Like new $2,300. 360-460-5982 QUAD: ‘00 Polaris. 250cc, plus extras. $1,500. 417-9170. QUAD: ‘04 Honda 250 EX Sportrax. Low mi. $2,200. 683-2107. QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki 250. Like brand new. $2,500 firm. 452-3213

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E10

94

Classified

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010 Motorcycles

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95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘88 25’ Alpenlite. $7,000. 457-4914

SUZUKI: ‘05 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, well maintained. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. Garage stored. $3,500/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com SUZUKI: ‘98 Maurder. 800cc, 1 owner, FMC, D&H pipes, custom seat, cruise, sissy bar, billett mirrors, 15K. Great entry cruiser. $2,500. 360-457-6510 TRIKE: ‘08 Suzuki Burgman 400 CC. Looks and runs like new. Very stable. $6,500/obo. 683-6079 TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bonaville. 1,000 mi., extras. $5,500. 460-6780 URAL: ‘03 Wolfe. 1,000 mi. $3,200. 460-0895 YAMAHA ‘07 GRIZZLY 350 4X4 QUAD Auto, reverse, warn winch. VIN#OU1599 $4,300 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 YAMAHA: ‘03 V-Star 1100. Excellent condition, windshield, bags, air kit, crash bars, 15K mi. $4,300. 452-7184. YAMAHA: ‘05 FJR 1300. 8,400 miles, lots of extras. $8,750. 460-3162. YAMAHA: ‘09 250 Star. Under 500 mi., mint cond. $3,500. 765-4775, leave msg

YAMAHA: ‘03 YZ85. Runs great, son outgrown, $800. 360-457-0913 or 360-461-9054

95

Recreational Vehicles

‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40’, 3 slides, 6 speed Allison Trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner cooktop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sony AM/FM/CD, VCR, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/dryer hookup, 6 kw generator, leveling system, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k), gently used, non smokers. $117,000. 360-683-3887

5TH WHEEL: '01 36' Cardinal by Forrest River. Fully equipped home. 3 slides, 3 axles, 2 AC, Trailaire pin box, hydraulic brakes, Alum rims. Retail $35,000 asking $26,000 w/ or w/o tow vehicle. 582-0803

5TH WHEEL: ‘05 34’ Montana Mountaineer 348RLS. 3 slides. Great condition. Extended warranty. 50 amp, central heat/air. Kelley Blue Book is $32,000. Asking $24,900/obo. Call Steve at 360-477-3949

5TH WHEEL: 2007 Mckenzie Lakota 33SKT 4 SEASON. 3 slides, no smoke/ pets, dual Euro recliners, king bed, large corner shower, washer/dryer closet, large wardrobe closets, central vac, more than adequate storage, very nice little one bedroom on wheels. Over 11,000 under dealer value at $37,900. elgreengos@hotmail.com for more pictures or come see. 683-7411 or 477-5621. 5TH WHEEL: ‘89 25’ Alpenlite DL. Gas stove/oven, electric/gas freezer, fridge, air, microwave, antenna, AM/FM cassette stereo, roof ladder, storage, new tires, Hijacker Ultraslide hitch with mounting brackets, Super Shade awning, ONAN gen. set, low hours, very good condition. $5,000. 360-452-3402 5TH WHEEL: ‘95 25’ Terry. Slide hitch and air tailgate, bought last spring, never used, one previous owner, excellent condition. $5,000 all. 683-7877 Affordable Home 32’ Royal Coachman, park model, very clean, good shape. $5,500. 457-6540. BRAND NEW STORAGE 18’x44’ with 12’x14’ door. $225 mo. 2 units available. 452-1254, 460-9466

Recreational Vehicles

MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Winnebago Journey 39K. 27,000 mi., loaded, 3-sides, 350 Cat diesel, 6.5 Onan generator. $115,000. 460-0895 MOTOR HOME: ‘82 24’ Travelcraft. Must see. $3,400/obo. 452-2609 MOTOR HOME: ‘89 21’ Winnebago Warrior. New tires and refrigerator. $8,000. 360-681-7614 MOTOR HOME: ‘92 23’ Itasca. 30K, good condition. $11,500. 452-2162. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 38’ Country Coach Affinity, their best model. Mint condition, loaded, 325 Turbo Cat, 7,500W diesel generator, solid oak and leather throughout, air ride and leveling, was $400,000 new, very livable. Reduced again! $52,000/ obo. 360-460-1071. MOTOR HOME: ‘93 30’ Monterey. Loaded $9,500. 797-1625

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 25’ Tioga Class C. Gen., A/C, kept in garage, V10. $16,500. 457-7097. TRAILER: ‘00 24’ SandPiper By Forest River. Built in the Northwest, for the Northwest, w/queen bed up front, sofa & dining areas convert to bed, awning. In Sequim. $8,000. 602-615-6887

MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Bounder diesel pusher. Loaded. $95,000/obo. 360-460-0432 MOTOR HOME: ‘03 29’. Ford Sunseeker, under 8,000 mi, double tip-out. $55,000/ obo. 360-808-6392.

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Parts/ Accessories

WE PICK UP Unwanted cars and trucks in area. State licensed and bonded auto wrecker. A&G Import Auto Inc 800-248-5552

97

4 Wheel Drive

BE APPROVED IN MINUTES! Lowest in house financing guaranteed! Buy here! Pay here! Kia ‘03 Sorrento LX. Blue, tan cloth interior, power locks, windows, air, cruise, auto, 4x4, clean, nice! 123K. $7,995. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 BUICK: ‘04 Rainier. V8, AWD, leather, 87K, premium sound, wheels, all power. $12,800. 460-3037 CHEV ‘06 SILVERADO LT CREWCAB LB 4X4 6.o liter Vortec V8, auto, loaded! White exterior in excellent shape! Gray leather interior in excellent condition! Dual power heated seats, moon roof, OnStar, CD with Bose sound dual climate, power folding mirrors, premium alloys, spotless 2 owner Carfax, and more! Very nice well optioned Chevy at our no haggle price of only $18,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

TRAILER: ‘05 22’ Arctic Fox. 1 slide, most options on board. $14,000. 417-5082.

CHEV: ‘02 Trailblazer LTZ. Low mi., all power, air, leather, new tires/brakes, Bose audio & more. Low book. $9,250. 460-4765

TRAILER: ‘06 26’ Jayco. Excellent condition, extras. Reduced price. $13,000. 477-3695.

CHEV: ‘97 1/2 ton extended cab, 3 doors, short bed, 80K mi. $5,000. 406-381-9362

TRAILER: ‘72 Sportsmaster 20’ living space and tongue. Good condition. $3,000/obo. 775-7504

CHEV: ‘02 Club Cab. Long bed. 4WD. Loaded. 44,000 mi., $15,500. 452-8713.

TRAILER: ‘94 40x10 Woodland Park. 2 slide outs, micro, W/D, air, full length porch with metal awning, refrigerator ice maker. $10,500. 425-776-5816 or 206-853-5546

CHEV: ‘70 3/4 Ton. $850. 360-434-4056.

CAMPER: ‘72. Fits 8’ bed, no leaks. $350. 797-4518 CAMPER: ‘94 11.5’ Northland. Always under cover, needs some work. $3,500. 360-374-8761

96

TRAILER: ‘03 30’ Airstream. Interior in great condition, some dents on exterior, reconstructed title. $9,995. 971-226-0002 TRAILER: ‘78 22’ Layton. Nice shape, good rubber. $800/ obo. 457-3627. TRAILER: ‘88 32’ Aljo Alliance. Everything works, good condition. $3,500/obo. 457-7600

96

Parts/ Accessories

Dee Zee Running Boards. ‘99-’10 F250/F-350 long beds. Includes cab running boards and side box boards, drivers side and passenger side. Comes with brackets, bolt/ nuts, and instructions. $250. 360-460-5420 GAS PUMP: Old gas pump and oil dispenser. $700 firm. 452-5803 SNOW/WINTER TIRES Nokian Hakkapelitta 4 Set of 4. Tires are studded with sipping. Size is 225/50R-17. Approx. 75%-80% tread left. $350. 360-460-5420

CHEV: ‘88 S-10 4x4. As is. $1,000. 457-9292 CHEV: ‘98 S10 Blazer. 4 dr, passenger door damage, runs/drives great, must see. $1,295. 452-5803. DODGE ‘05 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 4X4 5.7 liter HEMI V8, auto, 20� alloy wheels, spray-in bedliner, tow package, power windows, locks, mirrors, keyless entry, cruise, tilt, air, Sony MP3, CD player, information center. Kelley Blue Book value of $22,900! Only 48,430 miles! Sparkling clean inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today and save some bucks on your next truck! $18,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com DODGE: ‘88 3/4 ton long bed. $850/obo. 452-2459 FORD ‘00 F250 XLT EXTRA CAB LB 7.3 liter Powerstroke diesel V8, 6 speed manual trans! White exterior in great shape! Gray cloth interior in great condition! Power windows, power locks, cruise, tilt, CD/cassette, air, privacy glass, tow, running boards, bedliner, alloys, full 4� exhaust, predator chip, spotless 2 owner Carfax! A great diesel truck at our no haggle price of only $9,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

97

4 Wheel Drive

DODGE: ‘02 Ram 1500. 85K miles, lifted, canopy, 5.9 V8, new tires. $12,000. 477-5556 FORD ‘04 EXCURSION XLT 4X4 82K, original miles, 5.4 liter Triton V8, auto, loaded! 2 tone silver/gray exterior in excellent shape! Gray cloth interior in great condition! Dual power seats, CD/cassette, 3rd seat, rear air, privacy glass, roof rack, running boards, tow package, alloys with 70% BFG’s, spotless 2 owner Carfax! Very nice, very clean Excursion at our no haggle price of only $15,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 FORD ‘08 F150 LARIAT SUPERCREW 4X4 5.4 Triton V8, auto, loaded! White exterior in great condition! Tan leather interior in great condition! Dual power heated seats, 6 disk CD with auxiliary, park sensors, power slider, heated mirrors, privacy glass, wood trim, 18� alloys, spotless 1 owner Carfax, and much more! We are a ridiculous $7,500 less than Kelley Blue Book at our no haggle price of only $19,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 FORD: ‘09 F150 4x4. XLT super cab, 15K mi. $26,500. 360-765-4599 FORD: ‘79 Bronco. Full size, ‘351’ Cleveland, good body. $2,000. 797-3436. FORD: ‘85 Bronco. Sat. radio, 33� tires. $1,300. 640-8996. FORD: ‘94 Explorer. All power, auto, air, runs/drives great. $1,500. 457-8193 or 460-7534 GET READY FOR WINTER All WD, great in snow, ‘99 Oldsmobile Bravada. Leather, loaded, 129K, exc. cond. $6,299. 928-2181, 461-6273 GMC ‘03 YUKON 4X4 5.3 liter V8, auto, SLT package, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and dual power heated seats, leather interior, power sunroof, 3rd row seating, AM/FM CD with 6 disc stacker, memory seat and adjustable pedals, roof rack, privacy glass, running boards, alloy wheels, tow package, remote entry, and more! One owner. Expires 1023-10. $9,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

97

4 Wheel Drive

JEEP: ‘76 CJ7. Stock 304 engine with headers, auto, TH400 tranny, good tires, straight body, full cage, hard top, aluminum tow bar attached and ready to go, 1st year of Jeep CJ7’s, many new parts, can see at P.T. Golf Club. $5,750/obo. 360-531-2272 JEEP: ‘88 Cherokee. 89K miles, body and interior rough, good powertrain, driveable or parts. $650. 452-1162 MAZDA: ‘03 Tribute ES. Loaded, leather, great shape, 62K, towing pkg. $10,510. 928-9527 NISSAN ‘99 FRONTIER XE KING CAB 4X4 3.3 liter V6, 5 speed, alloy wheels, good rubber, spray-in bedliner, rear sliding window, Sony MP3 CD stereo, air, cruise, tilt, dual front airbags. This truck is sparkling clean inside and out! Service records include timing belt replacement at 100K! Always popular V6 and 5 speed combination! Stop by Gray Motors today! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com TOYOTA ‘06 TUNDRA DOUBLE CAB 4X4 4.7 V8, auto, SR5 package, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, and mirrors, AM/FM CD and cassette, TRD, off road package, power sliding rear window, alloy wheels, tube running boards, remote entry, and more! Expires 10-23-10. $17,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

TOYOTA: ‘94 4Runner. Sunroof, lifted, big tires, power windows and seats, leather interior, good shape. Needs tranny work. $2,800. 452-9693 TOYOTA: ‘01 Tacoma SR5. 4x4 extra cab, brand new 3.4 V6 engine installed by Toyota dealer, auto, PW, PDL, CD, tow pkg. with air bags and electric trailer brakes, canopy. $13,000. Call Bill at 460-3429

98

Pickups/Vans

BOX TRUCK: ‘00 GMC. 12’ box, runs great. $10,500/obo. 582-9006 CHEV: ‘00 Silverado. $10,000. 808-1731 or 360-477-7864.

GMC: ‘73 3/4 ton. Runs good, ugly. $1,495. 582-1381.

CHEV: ‘05 Suburban. Excellent, 1/2 ton. $16,800. 681-5403

GMC: ‘96 Sonoma. Two color, extra cab. $3,800/obo or trade for equal value SUV/ car. 360-460-3756.

CHEV: ‘89 1/2 ton. ‘350’ V8, auto, nice. $2,000. 681-7632.

HONDA: ‘06 Element EX AWD. $18,000. 43K mi. Excellent cond, Automatic, Air cond, Roof rack, 2" tow receiver, Hood and window wind deflectors, Warranty to 2014. Call 360-477-2196 between 10 AM and 10PM ISUZU: ‘91 Trooper. Runs good, new tires. $1,500/obo. 670-6041

CHEV: ‘38 Pickup. All original, garaged, needs rear end. $15,000. Only serious buyers please. 457-3990, 775-1139 DODGE ‘07 GRAND CARAVAN SXT 3.8 liter V6, auto, alloy wheels, power windows, door locks, and drivers seat, keyless entry, CD stereo, cruise control, tilt, air, information center, dual front airbags. Priced under Kelley Blue Book! Only 44,000 miles! Extra nice and clean! Stop by Gray Motors today! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘95 G-20 cargo van. Ladder rack, new radiator, tires and trans, tow package, clean. $1,900. 460-9178 DODGE: ‘05 Grand Caravan SE. 86K, good condition. Trailer hitch. $7,725. 460-0351 DODGE: ‘69 Flat bed. Strait 6, needs tune up. $285. 683-6597. DODGE: ‘95 Grand Caravan SE. 43K with lift and scooter. $5,000. 457-4837 leave message. DODGE: ‘96 Caravan. Great condition, gold color. $2,100. 683-3851 DODGE: ‘91 Cargo Van. Runs excellent, dependable. $850/ obo. 253-310-2799. FORD ‘02 E350 SUPERDUTY EXTENDED CARGO VAN 5.4 liter V8, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM cassette, power windows and locks, safety bulkhead, nice BIN package, heavy, heavy duty 1-ton chassis, nearly new tires, very, very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, nonsmoker, very nice cargo van. $8,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com FORD ‘03 F450 SUPERDUTY EXTRA CAB LB DUALLY 2WD 70K original miles, 6.0 liter powerstroke diesel, auto, loaded! Gray metallic exterior in great condition! Gray cloth interior in excellent shape! CD/cassette, power heated mirrors, Fontaine Classic Traveler 5th wheel bed, auto leveling air suspension, aux fuel tanks, diamond plate tool boxes, spray-in bed liner, on board air, spotless 1 owner Carfax! This is a whole lot of tow pig at our no haggle price of only $18,995

98

Pickups/Vans

GMC: ‘95 Short bed. V6, 1500 Sierra, 5 speed, 130K. $3,500. 452-5427. KIA ‘08 RONDO LX V6 MINIVAN 2.7 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, 7-passenger seating, alloy wheels, 38,000 miles, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, very clean 1 owner, non-smoker. $12,695 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com KIA ‘08 RONDO LX V6 MINIVAN 2.7 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, 7-passenger seating, alloy wheels, 38,000 miles, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, very clean 1 owner, non-smoker. $12,695 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

MAGIC RAINBOW HAPPY BUS 1973 Volkswagon Transporter $1,500/obo Not Camper Style Runs, Some Rust. Call: 360-797-3951 MAZDA: ‘88 B2200. Runs good. $1,000/ obo. 582-7486. NISSAN: ‘86 EX cab. 2.4L eng., good mpg, auto w/over drive, power steer., Pioneer stereo, rear jump seats, dark tint, 95,354 orig. mi., good tires/shocks, well taken care of, senior owned, bought locally. Must see to appreciate. $3,800 firm. 461-2709

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 FORD ‘04 E350 SUPERDUTY 11 PASSENGER VAN 55K original miles! 5.4 liter Triton V8, auto, loaded! White exterior in great condition! Gray cloth interior in excellent shape! Power drivers seat, CD, cruise, tilt, rear air, air, dual airbags, running boards, tow, privacy glass, spotless Carfax! Very nice, very well kept 11 passenger at our no haggle price of only $10,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 FORD: ‘70 heavy duty 3/4 ton. Runs great, new tow pkg. $900/ obo. 417-3959. FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844 FORD: ‘79 Flatbed. Runs good. $2,000/ obo. 683-0940. FORD: ‘90 F250. Ext. cab, long box, 48,660 mi., new HD service brakes, set up for 5th wheel, excellent condition. $5,500. 796-4929. GM: ’92 Gladiator conversion van. 350, auto, 140K, runs/ looks good! $3,500. 452-5522

HONDA: ‘05 Odyessy EX-L. 36.300 miles, excellent condition. $24,000. 504-2404.

NISSAN: ‘86 Kingcab. 4 cyl, 5 sp, new batt, alt, tires. 27 mpg. $1,600. 452-7439. PLUMBING VAN: ‘02 Ford, job site ready, plus extra plumbing parts, 28K orginial mi. $20,000/obo. 360-385-2773 PLYMOUTH: ‘94 Voyager. Auto, seats 7, 128K. $800. 460-4693 WANTED: Looking for a VW Eurovan Weekender edition. 360-379-3341

99

Cars

BE APPROVED IN MINUTES! Lowest in house financing guaranteed! Buy here! Pay here! Jeep ‘99 Grand Cherokee Laredo Limited, green, stock#3813, black leather, heated seats, sunroof, info center, auto, 4x4, too much to list! 126K. $7,995. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 BUICK ‘03 LESABRE CUSTOM 3.8 liter V6, auto, alloy wheels, power windows, door locks, and drivers seat, keyless entry, CD stereo, cruise control, tilt, air, information center, dual front airbags. Priced under Kelley Blue Book! Only 44,000 miles! Extra nice and clean! Stop by Gray Motors today! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

99

Cars

BUICK: ‘97 LaSabre. Excellent codntion, 1 owner. $4,700. 683-6051 after 4 p.m. CADILLAC: ’92 Sedan Deville. 144K, 4.9L, auto, runs/ looks good. $2,750/ obo. 452-5522. CADILLAC: ‘92 SeVille. Exc. shape, good mpg, new tires. $3,000/obo. 452-5406 CADILLAC: 1951 Coupe DeVille. 46,600 original miles, powerful, great driving car. Nice chrome, paint & upholstery, WW tires, Auto, V8, Sequim, $27,900. 360-683-3385 Rrobert169@Qwest. net CADILLAC: ‘38 LaSalle 91K miles. Calif V8 “Harley Earl� design, needs new restore. $9,500/obo. James 360-460-3467 CADILLAC: ‘85 Eldorado Commemorative Edition. Excellent condition, spoke wheels, loaded, no rust, always garaged, beautiful blue, 30K miles on new motor; 112K total miles. $2,900. 360-477-4817

CADILLAC: ‘95 Seville. Gray w/67K miles. Loaded. All serviced, must see! $5,500/obo. James at 360-460-3467. CHEV: ‘68 Camaro Z28. 302, 4 speed, stock. $29,999/obo or trade. 683-7965.

CHEV: ‘78 Corvette Silver Anniversary Edition. Fully restored interior and exterior. Silver twotone paint with sport striping. L48 automatic. Runs excellent. $18,500. 425-888-4306 or 425-941-4246 CHEV: ‘02 Monte Carlo SS. White with leather interior, sunroof, and all the extras. 27K orig. miles. $14,500. 360-301-1854 or magiejt@yahoo.com CHRYSLER ‘01 PT CRUISER LIMITED EDITION 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, AM/FM CD and cassette, power sunroof, leather interior with heated seats, trip computer, front and side airbags, 4 wheel ABS and electronic traction control, roof rack, privacy glass, chrome wheels, remote entry and low, low, miles. Expires 10-23-10. $6,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com CHRYSLER ‘02 300M Only 34,000 miles and loaded, including 3.5 V8, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and dual power heated seats, leather interior, power sunroof, 4 wheel ABS and electronic traction control, AM/FM CD stacker, trip computer, premium alloy wheels, remote entry, and more! Expires 10-23-10. $7,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

99

Cars

CHEV: ‘84 Corvette. Silver, 5.7 liter V8. $5,800. 437-7649. CHEV: ‘88 Camaro. Project car, running, licensed, with ‘90 Camaro parts car. $1,200/obo. 928-3863 CHRYSLER: ‘04 Sebring LXI Convertible. Gold, leather, beautiful condition. 74K mi. $6,000 firm. 360-457-4020 CHRYSLER: ‘06 300C Hemi, 63K, super clean, every option, silver, leather, must see and drive, sold new for $39,000. $13,900. 582-0696. CHRYSLER: ‘86 LeBaron. 4 cyl eng., auto, new head gasket, front and rear brakes, rear brake cylinders, right front caliper, outer boot. $450. 385-2304. CLASSIC: ‘59 Cadillac model 62, 4 door hard top, red, good shape. $14,000. 360-683-7640 DAEWOO: ‘01 Lanos S . 60,780 orig. mi., 2 door hatchback, burgundy/gray, 4 cylinder, auto, 32+mpg, tabs July ‘11, newer tires plus windshield, A/C, heat, radio cassette. $2,700. 681-5326. DODGE: 93 Stealth RT. Great condition, only 2 owners, no accidents, 129K mi., AWD, 5 sp., all power, awesome stereo, CD changer and battery. $3,000. Chris 360-732-4514 FORD ‘07 TAURUS SEL 3.0 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seat, full leather, power moon roof, keyless entry, alloy wheel, 45,000 miles, very clean trade in, non-smoker. $9,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com FORD: ‘05 Focus ZX4. Auto, 73K, new tires, all power. $8,000/obo. 460-4693 FORD: ’62 Thunderbird Coupe. Mostly all restored, approx. $30,000 put into it. $15,900/obo. 460-0401, 582-9597

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99

Cars

FORD: ‘98 Mustang convertible. 3.8 V6, 73,000 mi., power locks-trunk-left front seat, power top, leather seats, sharp car! $8,500/ obo. 457-6156.

99

Cars

GEO: ‘93 Storm. Runs great. $2,500/obo. 775-9612 HONDA: ‘08 Civic EX. Silver, sedan, sunroof, 5 spd manual, CD, 43K, exc. cond. $13,400. 643-1410.

FORD: 1929 Model “A”. Roadster, 10 footer. $17,500 firm. 681-5403 GMC: ‘97 Suburban. Maroon, 4x4, studded tires and rims. Good condition. $2,800. 681-7032. HONDA: ‘06 Civic. Top 5 best mpg car, red/tan int., auto, CD, sunroof, exc. cond., 38K mi. $15,750. 461-1202. HONDA: ‘05 S2000. Fabulous 2 seater convert., wonderful handling, great mpg, exc cond., 27K mi. $17,500. 461-1202 HONDA: ‘06 Civic. 67,000 mi., 2 door coupe, clean, white with black/ gray interior. $10,000/obo 460-0845

101

Legals Clallam Co.

HONDA: ‘08 Fit-Sport. Auto, low miles, 35 mpg, A/C, cruise, CD/MP3, side airbags, alloy wheels. $14,495. 683-1044. HONDA: ‘90 Accord LX. 1 owner, needs work $800. 460-7442 HONDA: ‘93 Accord. 114K, original owner, well maintained, non-smoker, good upholstery and body. $2,700. 460-5241. LINCOLN: ‘87 Towncar Signature Series. Leather interior, power doors, windows, sunroof, low miles, grandpa car, excellent condition. $3,950. 452-9693 eves.

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Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION SALE OF CLALLAM COUNTY TAX TITLE PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that pursuant to an order of the Clallam County Commissioners, the Treasurer of Clallam County will hold a public auction sale in the 4th Street entrance to the lobby of the Courthouse in Port Angeles, Washington, Monday, October 25, 2010, at the hour of ten o’clock (10:00 a.m.) at which time and place she will sell to the highest bidder in accordance with RCW 36.35.120 and RCW 36.34.080, the following described property in Clallam County. This property is offered for sale as is, without title insurance issued through Clallam County. Settlement is expected with verifiable funds within one hour of the sale. In case of a contract, the contract is to be signed and 30% down verified within one hour. If these conditions are not met, it will result in a resale at approximately 11:00 a.m. on the same day. Tax Title Parcel for Sale: Parcel #053008 500860 Described as that portion of the 100’strip lying in the former Railroad bed located in Blocks 1 & 8 of Railway Addition to Port Angeles as recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, page 9 records of Clallam County, Wa. containing 1.83a There is no access to this property for ingress, egress, or utilities from any other County-owned property, including the Olympic Discovery Trail. Minimum Bid: $1,350.00 Resolution No. 79, 2010

Judith A. Scott, Clallam County Treasurer Legals Clallam Co. Pub: Oct. 10, 17, 24, 2010

File No.: 7069.25053 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC Grantee: John P. Norton, Sr., as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 063024-240070 Abbreviated Legal: Ptn SE NW 24-306W Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 29, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: That portion of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter in Section 24, Township 30 North, Range 6 West, W.M., described as follows: Beginning at the Southwest corner of the East half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter; thence East along the South line thereof 212 feet; thence North parallel with the West line of said Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter 220 feet; thence West parallel with the South line of said Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter 212 feet to the West line thereof; thence South along said West line 220 feet to the Point of Beginning. Together with an easement for ingress and egress over and across the North 30 feet of the South 220 feet of the East half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter in Section 24, Township 30 North, Range 6 West, W.M., except the West 212 feet thereof. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1806 Monroe Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 12/24/07, recorded on 01/07/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1214508 and re-recorded on 04/14/08 under Auditor's File No. 2008-1219324, records of Clallam County, Washington; Loan Modified on 10/29/09, from John Norton Sr. an unmarried person, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. "MERS", as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1254255. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/24/10 Monthly Payments $7,057.38 Late Charges $0.00 Lender's Fees & Costs $16.98 Total Arrearage $7,074.36 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,492.63 Total Amount Due: $8,566.99 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $172,779.28, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 29, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS John Patrick Norton, Sr. 1806 Monroe Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Patrick Norton, Sr. 1806 Monroe Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/10/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/10/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/24/10 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7069.25053) 1002.159747-FEI Pub: Sept. 26, Oct. 17, 2010

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File No.: 7021.27211 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A. Grantee: David Long and Karen M. Long, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 063015-580085 Abbreviated Legal: Lt 18 Canyonedge 7/30 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 29, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 18, Canyonedge, according to Plat thereof recorded in Volume 7 of Plats, Page 30, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 3770 Hill Circle Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/22/08, recorded on 01/29/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1215357, records of Clallam County, Washington, from David R. Long and Karen M. Long, husband and wife, as Grantor, to PRLAP, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Bank of America, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/24/10 Monthly Payments $10,680.30 Late Charges $424.80 Lender's Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $11,105.10 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,477.63 Total Amount Due: $12,582.73 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $160,332.77, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 29, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS David R. Long 3770 Hill Circle Port Angeles, WA 98362 Karen M. Long 3770 Hill Circle Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/10/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/11/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/24/10 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 5861900. (TS# 7021.27211) 1002.156288-FEI Pub: Sept. 26, Oct. 17, 2010 File No.: 8318.20013 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Sound Community Bank Grantee: Jon Vannote, also shown of record as Jon David Vannote and Jon D. Vannote and Brenda L. Vannote, also shown of record as Brenda Lee Vannote, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 043129010036 Abbreviated Legal: PCL 2 SP 4/47 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 29, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Parcel 2 as delineated on Short Plat recorded on January 27, 1978, in Volume 4 of Short Plats, Page 47, under Auditor's File No. 477958, being a portion of the North half of the Northeast quarter of Section 36, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. MORE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED AS: Parcel 2 as delineated on Short Plat recorded on January 27, 1978, in Volume 4 of Short Plats, Page 47, under Auditor's File No. 477958, being a portion of the North half of the Northeast quarter of Section 36, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. It is convenanted and agreed that said Real Property includes as an improvement thereto and thereon that certain 1990 CANDLEWOOD 28X66 Manufactured Home Serial# 1-11051 as per part thereof; it shall NOT be served nor removed therefrom. Commonly known as: 32 Wagner Lane Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/21/05, recorded on 07/25/05, under Auditor's File No. 2005-1161214, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Jon David Vannote and Brenda Lee Vannote, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Sound Community Bank, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/13/2010 Monthly Payments $11,374.00 Late Charges $517.00 Total Arrearage $11,891.00 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $450.00 Statutory Mailings $126.00 Recording Costs $65.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $800.00 Total Costs $1,511.00 Total Amount Due: $13,402.00 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $167,766.08, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 29, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Jon Vannote 32 Wagner Lane Sequim, WA 98382 Brenda Vannote 32 Wagner Lane Sequim, WA 98382 Jon Vannote P.O. Box 2185 Terrebonne, OR 97760 Brenda Vannote P.O. Box 2185 Terrebonne, OR 97760 Jon Vannote P.O. Box 1413 Redmond, OR 97756 Brenda Vannote P.O. Box 1413 Redmond, OR 97756 Jon Vannote P.O. Box 1354 Sequim, WA 98382 Brenda Vannote P.O. Box 1354 Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 02/20/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 02/22/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/13/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 8318.20013) 1002.147482-FEI Pub: Sept. 26, Oct. 17, 2010

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010

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File No.: 7023.75628 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. US Bank National Association, as Trustee for CMLTI 2007-WFHE2 Grantee: Scott Alan Ramsey and Cherilee Grace Ramsey, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 0630085813100000 Abbreviated Legal: 5, Blk. 13, Pennsylvania Pk Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 19, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 5, Block 13, Pennsylvania Park Addition, as per Plat recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, Page 66, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1018 MADRONA STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 12/29/06, recorded on 01/03/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007 1193867, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Scott Alan Ramsey and Cherilee Grace Ramsey, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Northwest Trustee Services, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. to US Bank National Association, as Trustee for CMLTI 2007-WFHE2, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1254248. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/16/2010 Monthly Payments $11,917.76 Late Charges $528.16 Lender's Fees & Costs ($448.09) Total Arrearage $11,997.83 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $697.01 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,407.63 Total Amount Due: $13,405.46 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $222,759.51, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 12/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 19, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/08/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/08/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/08/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Scott Alan Ramsey 1018 Madrona Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Scott Alan Ramsey PO Box 713 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Cherilee Grace Ramsey 1018 Madrona Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Cherilee Grace Ramsey PO Box 713 Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/09/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/09/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/16/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.75628) 1002.162829-FEI Pub: Oct. 17, Nov. 7, 2010 File No.: 7037.07282 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Chase Home Finance LLC Grantee: Joe E. Fuson, as his separate and Christine McDonald, as her separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 063-0000241680000 Abbreviated Legal: LOT 12, BLK. 241, TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, VOL. 1, PG. 27 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 19, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 12, Block 241, Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. More particularly described as: Lot 12, Block 241,Townsite of Port Angeles, as per Plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 27, records of Clallam County, Washington. Commonly known as: 1035 West 8th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/13/06, recorded on 10/19/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006-1189878, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Christine L. McDonald, as her separate estate and Joe E. Fuson, as his separate estate., as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. to Chase Home Finance LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1252501. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/19/2010 Monthly Payments $5,114.61 Late Charges $227.28 Lender's Fees & Costs $50.10 Total Arrearage $5,391.99 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $417.34 Statutory Mailings $19.56 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,143.40 Total Amount Due: $6,535.39 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $73,608.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/17/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 19, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/08/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/08/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/08/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Christine L. McDonald 1035 West 8th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Christine L. McDonald 1035 West 8th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Joe E. Fuson 1035 West 8th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Joe E. Fuson 1035 West 8th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/02/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/03/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/19/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.07282) 1002.158838-FEI Pub: Oct. 17, Nov. 7, 2010


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2010 Cars

LINCOLN: ‘63 Continental. Partially restored, suicide doors, runs. $2,750. 457-0272 MAZDA: ‘07 3. 5 sp., low hwy mi., charcoal/black interior, Thule roof rack, GPS, call for questions/test drive. $12,000/obo 206-375-5204

MERCEDES: ‘29 Replica Gazelle. 10K miles, immaculate. $12,500/obo. 681-3339 MERCEDES: ‘99 230 SLK. 70K, blk/blk, compressor, S/C, HT convert. $11,900. 452-6677 MERCEDES: ‘74 280. Runs well. $500. 683-2436 MERCURY: ‘89 Cougar. Hobby stock race car, fully loaded, seat belts, window net, ready to race. $1,000/obo. 477-9602

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Cars

SUBARU: ‘05 Forester. Mint condition, 30K mi. $16,000. 457-9183

SUBARU: ‘05 STI Black STI with tinted windows and silver BBS wheels. Stock except for headers, down pipe and complete stainless steel exhaust and muffler. Manual boost controller and front and rear alum skid plates. Tuned on a 4 wheel dyno and produced 300 hp and 364 ft/lb torque at the wheels. A fantastic daily driver with 65,000 miles. Adult owned and maintained. $14,900/ obo. Call Tim at 360-912-1467 SUBARU: ‘07 Forester. 24,500 mi., perfect condition, under warranty. $17,750. 452-6014 SUBARU: ‘96 Legacy wagon. Auto, loaded, well maintained, $3,200. 417-0468 SUZUKI: ‘00 Grand Vitara. Exc. cond., 87K mi., very clean. $3,950. 775-1132.

MINI COOPER: ‘05. White, 103,000 miles, Runs/drives great, no accidents, has had all scheduled tune-ups & oil changes, very clean interior, 2 new tires, highway miles, GREAT MPG. $9,995. Call Angela. 360-460-4802

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TOYOTA: ‘05 Prius Hybrid. Black, new tires, under, 67K mi. $11,085. 928-9527. TOYOTA: ‘10 Prius. As new, save $4,000. $20,000. 452-7273.

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TOYOTA: ‘03 Camry LE One owner, no accidents, well maintained, 4 cyl, auto trans, 95,000 mi. $7,250. 477-2183. TOYOTA: ‘89 Camry. $1,200. 928-9774. VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs good, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $3,295/obo. 775-9648 Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

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To: All Interested Parties From: Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission SUBJ: Dosewallips State Park Sewer System Improvements Informational meeting Monday, October 18, 2010, at 6:00 pm, in Brinnon School Gym, 46 School House Road, Brinnon, WA 98320. Questions, please contact Brian Yearout at brian. yearout@parks.wa.go v or (360) 725-9763. Pub: Oct. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 2010

OLDS: ‘90. Runs great. Looks great. $1,200. 460-1183. P LY M O U T H : ‘ 9 9 Breeze. Front WD, 4 cylinder, power windows, locks, mirrors, 107,000 mi., great condition and mpg. AM/FM/CD, air cond. $2,400. 457-3891 PONTIAC: ‘’04 Grand Prix. Low mi., 52K, very clean, must see. $8,000/obo. 457-9332 PORSCHE: ‘02 Boxter S. 56K miles, 6 spd, black on black. $21,500. 461-9635. SAAB: ‘94 900si. Must see. $900/obo. 477-4865

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NOTICE OF FINAL BUDGET HEARING The preliminary Operating and Capital Budget of the Port District of the Port of Port Townsend, for 2011, has been prepared and placed on file at the offices of the Port District. The Port Commission of the Port of Port Townsend hereby gives notice of the following date for a public hearing for the purpose of fixing and adopting the final Operating and Capital Budget, and tax levy amount for the fiscal year 2011, and rate adjustments of the Port of Port Townsend; a copy of which will be furnished to any interested party who will call at the Port Administration Office, 375 Hudson Street, during regular business hours (8:00 4:30, M-F). The Port Commission of the Port of Port Townsend will meet at the Port Administration Office, 375 Hudson Street, Port Townsend, Washington, on Wednesday, October 27, 2010 at 6:30 p.m. Any interested party may appear and give comments. Pub: Oct. 10, 17, 2010

File No.: 7023.75614 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: Daniel M. Dye, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 001334029 Abbreviated Legal: PTN SE 33-30-1W Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 29, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: That portion of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 33, Township 30 North, Range 1 West, W.M., Jefferson County, Washington; being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the East 1/4 corner of said Section 33; thence South 1 degrees 30' 45" West along the East line of said Section 33 for a distance of 1283.95 feet to the Northerly right of way limits of Four Corners Road; thence North 58 degrees 47' 12" West along said right of way 173.61 feet; thence North 1 degrees 30' 45" East 258.76 feet; thence North 3 degrees 16' 02" West 943.33 feet; thence South 88 degrees 16' 00" East 229.40 feet to the Point of Beginning. (Parcel 10) Situated in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Serial #: 157108 Make: Golden West Homes Model: GE 56 IF Year: 2003. Commonly known as: 965 4 Corners Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 12/12/05, recorded on 12/23/05, under Auditor's File No. 506796; Re-recorded 1/20/2006 AF#507612, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Daniel M. Dye. A married man as his separate estate, as Grantor, to Jefferson Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Golf Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Wells Fargo Bank, NA, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 553025. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/27/2010 Monthly Payments $5,721.36 Late Charges $237.40 Lender's Fees & Costs $30.00 Total Arrearage $5,988.76 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $698.10 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,512.22 Total Amount Due: $7,500.98 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $161,700.69, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 29, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Daniel M. Dye 965 4 Corners Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Daniel M. Dye PO Box 983 Lakeport, CA 95453 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner Of Daniel M. Dye 965 4 Corners Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner Of Daniel M. Dye PO Box 983 Lakeport, CA 95453 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/22/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/22/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/27/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 5861900. (TS# 7023.75614) 1002.161056-FEI Pub: Sept. 26, Oct. 17, 2010

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File No.: 7023.76460 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: Paul R. Donaldson Tax Parcel ID No.: 990 400 485 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 89, Area 4, Port Ludlow #1 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 19, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Lot 89, Area 4, Port Ludlow No. 1, as per Plat recorded in Volume 5 of Plats, Pages 26 through 32 inclusive, records of Jefferson County, Washington. Commonly known as: 162 MACHIAS LOOP Port Ludlow, WA 98365 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/20/09, recorded on 04/03/09, under Auditor's File No. 541924, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Paul R Donaldson, as Grantor, to Madison Settlement Services, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for American Bank, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Wells Fargo Bank, NA, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 553023. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/13/2010 Monthly Payments $8,522.64 Late Charges $255.69 Lender's Fees & Costs $60.00 Total Arrearage $8,838.33 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $1,143.62 Statutory Mailings $38.24 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,887.36 Total Amount Due: $10,725.69 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $333,342.35, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 19, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/08/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/08/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/08/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS PAUL R DONALDSON 162 MACHIAS LOOP Port Ludlow, WA 98365 PAUL R DONALDSON 22255 MARILLA ST CHATSWORTH, CA 913114746 AVRIL B DONALDSON 162 MACHIAS LOOP Port Ludlow, WA 98365 AVRIL B DONALDSON 22255 MARILLA ST CHATSWORTH, CA 91311-4746 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/08/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/09/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/13/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.76460) 1002.162623-FEI Pub: Oct. 17, Nov. 7, 2010 File No.: 7037.07083 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Chase Home Finance LLC Grantee: Jason Thompson, as his separate estate and Kendra R. Rezendez, as her separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 952800606 Abbreviated Legal: E 1/2 Lt 11, All Lt. 12 & E 1/2 Lt. 13, Blk 6, Garfield's Add'n Vol. 2 Pg 39 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 29, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: The East 1/2 of Lot 11, all of Lot 12, and the East 1/2 of Lot 13, Block 6, Garfield's Addition to Harrisburg, according to the plat recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, page 39, records of Jefferson County, Washington; Together with that portion of vacated Pine Street, under Resolutions 21 - 01 of the County Commissioner of Jefferson County, that would attach by operation of law. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 51 E FITCHBERG AVE PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/09/07, recorded on 04/09/07, under Auditor's File No. 522222, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Jason D Thompson, an unmarried man, Kendra M Rezendes, an unmarried woman, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc solely as nominee for Coldwell Banker Mortgage, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc to Chase Home Finance LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 552032. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/27/2010 Monthly Payments $19,259.68 Late Charges $819.68 Total Arrearage $20,079.36 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $19.56 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,384.13 Total Amount Due: $21,463.49 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $160,203.87, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 29, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS JASON D. THOMPSON 51 E FITCHBERG AVE PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 KENDRA M. REZENDES 51 E FITCHBERG AVE PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of KENDRA M. REZENDES 51 E FITCHBERG AVE PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of JASON D. THOMPSON 51 E FITCHBERG AVE PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/18/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/19/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/27/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.07083) 1002.157108-FEI Pub: Sept. 26, Oct. 17, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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File No.: 7301.26018 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. CitiMortgage, Inc. Grantee: Katina Frantz and Paul Frantz, wife and husband Tax Parcel ID No.: 991200207 Abbreviated Legal: Tax 51, Quilcene Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 19, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: That portion of vacated Hamilton Avenue lying between the southerly boundary of Chattanooga Avenue, and the northerly boundary of Muncie Street, per order of vacation filed under Auditor's File No. 137866 record of Jefferson County, Washington, in the Townsite of Quilcene, as per plat recorded in Volume 2 of plats, page 33, record of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in Jefferson County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 81 Muncie Avenue Unit A/B Quilcene, WA 98376 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/12/06, recorded on 01/17/06, under Auditor's File No. 507518, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Paul L. Frantz and Katina M. Frantz, husband and wife as community property, as Grantor, to Joan H. Anderson, EVP on behalf of Flagstar Bank, FSB, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for America One Finance Inc. and its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for America One Finance Inc. and its successors and assigns to CitiMortgage, Inc., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 553114. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/13/2010 Monthly Payments $16,128.70 Late Charges $570.18 Lender's Fees & Costs $216.50 Total Arrearage $16,915.38 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $559.34 Statutory Mailings $28.68 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $140.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,364.52 Total Amount Due: $18,279.90 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $128,322.92, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 06/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 19, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/08/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/08/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/08/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Paul L. Frantz 81 Muncie Avenue Unit A Quilcene, WA 98376 Paul L. Frantz 81 Muncie Avenue Unit B Quilcene, WA 98376 Paul L. Frantz 420 West 6th Street Aberdeen, WA 98520 Katina M. Frantz 81 Muncie Avenue Unit A Quilcene, WA 98376 Katina M. Frantz 81 Muncie Avenue Unit B Quilcene, WA 98376 Katina M. Frantz 420 West 6th Street Aberdeen, WA 98520 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/13/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/13/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/13/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Claire Swazey (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7301.26018) 1002.163009-FEI Pub: Oct. 17, Nov. 7, 2010

File No.: 7219.20669 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. Grantee: Kevon Walsh and Darcy Walsh, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 721174005 Abbreviated Legal: Ptn. Gov. Lt 2, 1727-1 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 19, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: The portion of the South 10 acres of the West 15 acres of Government Lot 2, lying North of County Road No. 9 right-ofway, Section 17, Township 27 North, Range 1 East, W.M., records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 2282 Thorndyke Road Port Ludlow, WA 98365 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/13/09, recorded on 03/23/09, under Auditor's File No. 541609, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Kevon Walsh, Darcy Walsh, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Washington Administrative Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 553280. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/12/2010 Monthly Payments $15,432.46 Late Charges $576.54 Lender's Fees & Costs $19.75 Total Arrearage $16,028.75 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $959.34 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,752.46 Total Amount Due: $17,781.21 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $354,451.88, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 19, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/08/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/08/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/08/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Kevon Walsh 2282 Thorndyke Road Port Ludlow, WA 98365 Kevon Walsh PO Box 268 Port Gamble, WA 98364 Darcy Walsh 2282 Thorndyke Road Port Ludlow, WA 98365 Darcy Walsh PO Box 268 Port Gamble, WA 98364 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/24/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/24/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/12/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7219.20669) 1002.157842-FEI Pub: Oct. 17, Nov. 7, 2010


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