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PECKHAM COAL LINE Feasibility Study June 2018

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

June 2018

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Introduction

Louise, Friends of the Peckham Coal Line

Graeme, Adams & Sutherland Architects

“This is a feasibility study with a difference. It was conceived, commissioned and made through the input of local people. Our experience and aspirations illuminate the findings through quotes gathered at events, workshops and festivals. Look out for these boxes through the document and thanks for being part of the story.”

“The Peckham Coal Line is an exciting project full of possibilities that is helping to bring the community together through engagement.”

The Peckham Coal Line is a communityled initiative that aims to reconnect Peckham’s neighbourhoods with a new linear link park between Queens Road Peckham and Rye Lane.

“The Peckham Coal Line is a fantastic local community project that we are delighted to This will transform walking and cycling support. I’m looking connections around Peckham, bridging forward to seeing how busy roads and creating a more direct link between two high streets. It will turn we can continue disused space into a source of civic pride working with the Coal Line team to deliver that brings benefits to health, culture and business, and celebrates Peckham’s this ambitious and exciting project for Mark, Southwark industrial past. The development and Councillor design of the Coal Line is also acting as Peckham.” a catalyst for community engagement while providing much-needed green space for Peckham. “The Coal Line will be This feasibility study analyses how the Peckham Coal Line can be delivered successfully. It accounts for economic, technical, legal and scheduling factors. It includes the business case for the project and looks at possibilities for its ongoing organisational structure. It also identifies any logistical problems, as well Kirsty, Friends of the the solutions to alleviate them. Peckham Coal Line

an innovative, high quality urban park with a wide range of physical and social benifits. We’ve simplified these into six key areas for the purposes of this study.”

This feasibility study has been developed by a collaboration between Friends of the Peckham Coal Line, architects Adams & Sutherland and Arup, who have worked together to engage both the public and major stakeholders, including landowners and public institutions, to refine the initial idea and set out how the project can be delivered. The feasibility study has been funded by the donations made by almost 1,000 backers through a Spacehive campaign in 2015. The Peckham Coal Line could not have got this far without the broader, dedicated and ongoing support of the local and wider community. This report (and supporting materials) offers an overview of findings and potential design options. It concludes that the Peckham Coal Line is absolutely feasible in varying forms.

Nick, Friends of the Peckham Coal Line

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“This is our urban garden, the graffiti is our wild flowers and the clattering of the trains our birdsong. The Peckham Coal line is a community initiated project to turn the disused Rickett’s coal sidings into a high-level urban linear park that would connect Queens Road with Rye Lane, creating the missing link in a network of

Stephen, Friends of the Peckham Coal Line “Local children created the motifs for the project at the Peckham Festival in 2016. We organised treasure hunts along the route as part of the ‘Make your Mark’ workshop and the kids found an amazing array of natural objects which we helped them draw, stencil and print into symbols. These form the base of the Coal Line graphic inspired by the colour and energy of Peckham. Today six key


Contents

Introduction 2 Contents 3 Executive Summary 5 1. Setting the Scene 6 1.1 An Evolving Project 8 1.2 Friends of the Peckham Coal Line 10 1.3 The Peckham Coal Line 12 1.4 The Feasibility Study 14 1.5 Locating the Peckham Coal Line 16 1.6 Peckham Community Design 18 2. The Case for the Project 20 2.1 What is there now 22 2.2 Project Benefits 24 2.3 Connectivity 26 2.4 Heritage 28 2.5 Community 30 2.6 Greening the City 32 2.7 Innovation & Local Prosperity 34 2.8 Health & Wellbeing 36 2.9 Land Ownership 38 2.10 Planning Context 40 2.11 The Business Case Condensed 42 2.12 Learning from Best Practice & Past Failures 44 3. Concept Design 46 3.1 The Peckham Coal Line Concept 48 3.2 Connecting Spaces 50 3.3 Character 52 3.4 Accessibility 54 3.5 Think of it as . . . 56 3.6 Think of it as not . . . 59 3.7 Landscape 60 3.8 Delivering Public Space by a Railway 64 3.9 Safety & Security Considerations 66 3.10 Design Considerations 67 3.11 Peckham Coal Line as Catalyst 68 4. Delivery & Governance 70 4.1. Realising the Peckham Coal Line 72 4.2. Delivery Options 74 4.3. Our Approach 76 4.4. Governance & Maintenance 78 4.5. Road Map 80 4.6 Costs & Funding 82 5. Working Process 84 5.1. Coaction: a Community-Led Approach 86 5.2. Coaction: In Practice 88 5.3. Tools & Approaches 90 5.4. Working with Stakeholders & Decision-makers 92 5.5. Case Studies 94 5.6. In Context: a Growing Movement 98 6. 6.1. 6.2.

Actions & Next Steps Bringing the Project to Reality Next Steps

100 102 104

Appendix An Appendix information pack supplements this document with further detail including, The Business Case, Site Sections/Site Images, the Network Rail documents and Analysis Drawings.

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

June 2018

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Executive Summary

The Peckham Coal Line is a feasible project which offers numerous benefits. Once developed, the linear park will link Queens Road Peckham with Peckham Rye, connecting communities, opening up business possibilities and creating new green space. What’s more, it makes perfect sense. The Peckham Coal Line started as a big idea around which to generate local conversation. It has now grown into a proven proposal that is acting as a catalyst of social and physical connection. The publishing of this crowd-funded design and feasibility study has demonstrated that the Peckham Coal Line is both technically possible and desirable. The study found that the project would meet multiple local authority and Greater London Assembly objectives around health, innovation, connection, education, nature and community, while the process of collating the report through citizen participation has continued to expand interest in seeing the project realised. The feasibility study finds that only through developing the full vision and multiple different layers of the project will all of the benefits be realised. However, the nature of the project and its multiple sites lends itself to staged delivery as different development sites and associated resources become available. The governance section explores funding streams of comparable projects to learn how these might be applied to the Peckham Coal Line. Each site along the route will offer different opportunities and, as a result, will be able to attract different forms of funding. This broad base of investment in the project is a strength, as it increases the number of stakeholders and expertise from which to draw. The crowd-funding and feasibility process have demonstrated the project’s power to connect people and steer local developments towards the needs of the local community. It is an exciting beacon of what is possible in a progressive city open to inclusive citizen-led innovation. As the project develops so does its potential, creating a platform for an open democratic dialogue in neighbourhood planning and steering both local and city-level evolution. The Peckham Coal Line can also be described as a series of projects that add up to more than the sum of their parts. Each part will need to go though a process of design, consultation, approvals, and funding, to achieve delivery. Some are more complex than others, particularly those where there are interfaces with the live railway. The Road Map sets out a five-year vision to bring projects within three of the seven sites identified along the route to reality by 2023, with an overarching, detailed plan for the entire route also in place. The key for future success lies in three different strands: • • •

Continued community participation at the heart of the way the project operates and functions. Securing resources, including time and skills as well as financial resources, to develop the next phases. Continued institutional support and commitment from key stakeholders including Network Rail, Southwark Council, Transport for London and the Mayor of London.

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

June 2018

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Section 1 Setting the Scene

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

June 2018

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1.1 An Evolving Project

The Peckham Coal Line began as a local architecture student’s ambitious final project. It captured the collective imagination through an online article published at the end of 2014. The response was instantaneous, and soon after, the first collaborative Coal Line workshop took place at the Bussey Building. From very early on it became obvious that there was a wealth of local skills and energy on offer. A local paper, The Peckham Peculiar, wrote about the Coal Line, which in turn drew attention from the Southwark News, and then from London-wide and national media. On a local scale, walks through the back streets of Peckham have continued to attract people interested in learning more and becoming part of this everevolving project. Buoyed by early interest from Southwark Council and Network Rail, a three-month

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crowdfunding campaign was embarked upon to raise funds for this Feasibility Study. The campaign saw more than 900 local residents, businesses, councillors, the local MP and the Mayor of London back the project, raising £75,757 in total. Within a year of its inception the Coal Line had grown from an idealistic vision into its own entity: a registered charity, a shared vision and a platform for people in Peckham to gather around. A core of local residents continues to work together to steer the project, working with volunteers and external organisations to create a web of connections with a diverse array of skills. This new approach to urban design – from the bottom up – comes from the community it is designing for. And it means that the Peckham Coal Line is dynamic, constantly evolving and full of surprises about what will come next.

RIGHT Buddleia and silver birch in front of the Bussey Building provided the initial spark of inspiration for the wider project. BELOW The Peckham Coal Line journey as a networked timeline


Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

June 2018

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1.2 Friends of the Peckham Coal Line

Friends of the Peckham Coal Line (FPCL) exists to deliver the Coal Line in a way that connects not only places but also people and communities. FPCL ensures that the process for developing the Coal Line, and its associated community and social benefits, is just as important as the delivery of the final project. FPCL acts as a steward for the project, ensuring that it is grounded locally with meaningful community ownership. FPCL is a constituted charity with clear guiding principles to promote and deliver the Peckham Coal Line project.

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ABOVE The project meets residents in their spaces – here at the library. LEFT Understanding the Peckham Coal Line structure as a collaborative organisation. BELOW Illustration of the terms of governance and charitable objectives of Friends of the Peckham Coal LIne

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Connectivity: significantly improved connectivity for local people, as well as providing a crucial link in a sub-regional walking and cycle route that stretches from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and soon to Canary Wharf.

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Community: the embodiment of citizen participation. The Coal Line demonstrates how diverse communities can work together to build new infrastructure that can be enjoyed by everyone.

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Health and Wellbeing: the Peckham Coal Line will provide a place to run, walk and cycle – to enjoy clean air and escape the noise of the streets below. It will be a place of quiet and peace, providing space to think, wander and explore.

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ouise, Friends of the eckham Coal Line

raeme, Adams & utherland Architects

we are delighted to celebrating Peckham’s role in London’s economic history. conceived, commissupport. I’m looking sioned and made forward to seeing how through the input of wea place can continue Health and Wellbeing: the Peckham Coal Line will provide to run, local people. Our walk and cycle – to enjoy clean air and escape the noiseworking of the streets with the Coal below. It will be a place of quiet and peace, providing space to think, experience and Line team to deliver wander and explore. aspirations illumithis ambitious and nate the findings exciting project for Mark, Southwark The quotes Peckham Coal Line graphics were created in one of FPCL’s workshops – Make your Mark. through Peckham.” Councillor Greening the City: by clusters of green the line Theseathave been used to Nature: represent the benefits ofenhancing the Peckham Coal Line along and will be seen gathered events, Community: the embodiment of citizen participation. The Coal Line using tree planting and gardening projects to connect existing nature to throughout workshops and the document. demonstrates how diverse communities can work together to build new create a corridor for people and wildlife. infrastructure that can be enjoyed by everyone. festivals. Look out for “The Coal Line will be these boxes through an innovative, high the document and CONNECTIVITY: improving connectivity for local people, as well quality urban thanks for being part Heritage: a landmark that protects, repurposes and brings back to Nature: Greening the City: by enhancing clusters of green along the line park Connectivity: significantly improved connectivity for local people, aslife well as providing a crucial link in a sub-regional walking and cycle with a wide range of London’s industrial history revealing the past by emphasising and using tree planting andlink gardening projects to connect existing nature to of the story.” as providing a crucial in a sub-regional walking and cycle route that routea that stretches from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and and soonsocial to celebrating Peckham’s role in London’s economic create corridor for people and wildlife. physical stretches from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and soon to history. Canary Wharf. Canary Wharf. benifits. We’ve simplified these into Enterprise: Innovation and local prosperitythe protects, Peckham Coal Line HERITAGE: creating a landmark Health and Wellbeing: the Peckham Coal that Line will provide arepurposes place to run, for the “The Peckham Coal six key areas represents a new way of doing things infrastructure for the people, by Heritage: a landmark that protects, repurposes and brings to life walk and cycle – to enjoy clean air and escape the noise ofback the streets and brings back to much-needed life a piece of London’s industrial history; Line is an exciting the people. It will create and studio-space purposes of this study.” London’s industrial history revealing thenew pastworkspace by emphasising below. It will be a place of quiet and peace, providing space toand think, revealing the past by emphasising and celebrating Peckham’s along the route, connect the two vibrant high streets of Rye Lane and project full of possicelebrating London’s economic history. wander andPeckham’s explore. role inKirsty, Friends of the Queen’s and support local economic role inRoad London’s economic history.prosperity. It helps unlock the bilities that is helping Peckham Coal Line and socially. potential of people and places by connecting physically to bring the community together through COMMUNITY: demonstrating how communities Health and Wellbeing: the Peckham Coal Linediverse will provide a place to run,can Community: the–embodiment of citizen participation. The walk andtogether cycle to enjoy clean air and escape the noise of can theLine streets engagement.” work to build new infrastructure thatCoal be demonstrates diverse communities canproviding work together new below. It will behow a place of quiet and peace, spacetotobuild think, enjoyed by everyone; creating a forum for social exchange and infrastructure that can be enjoyed by everyone. wander and explore. the development of skills.

Nick, Friends of the Peckham Coal Line

This is our urban garden, the graffiti is our ild flowers and the clattering of the trains our rdsong. The Peckham Coal line is a community itiated project to turn the disused Rickett’s al sidings into a high-level urban linear park at would connect Queens Road with Rye Lane, eating the missing link in a network of eenways that runs from Brixton to the hames. Beyond the physical project the idea is so activating a community.

GREENING THE CITY: existing pockets of line nature Nature: Greening the City: by connecting enhancing clusters of local green along the Connectivity: significantly improved connectivity for as well Community: the embodiment of citizen participation. The people, Coal projects Line along the using planting and gardening using tree planting and gardening projects to connect existing nature to to as providing aline; crucial link intree a sub-regional walking and cycle route that demonstrates how diverse communities can work together to build new create a corridor for people and wildlife. connect both people and nature; creating a green corridor for stretches from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and soon to Canary Wharf. infrastructure that can be enjoyed by everyone. people and wildlife.

Enterprise: Innovation and local prosperity- the Peckham Coal Line INNOVATION & LOCAL PROSPERITY: creating new workspace represents new way of doing things - infrastructure for the people, by Heritage: a alandmark that protects, repurposes and brings back toaslife Connectivity: significantly improved connectivity for local people, well the people. It route; will create much-needed new workspace and studio-space along the connecting two high streets and supporting local London’s industrial history revealing the past by emphasising and as providing a crucial linkthe in atwo sub-regional walking and cycle route that along the route, connect vibrant high of Rye Lane and celebrating Peckham’s role in London’s economic economic prosperity; representing astreets new way of doing things – stretches from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and soon to history. Canary Wharf. Queen’s Road and support local economic prosperity. It helps unlock the infrastructure for the people, by the people. potential of people and places by connecting physically and socially. Enterprise: Innovation and local prosperity- the Peckham Coal Line Health and Wellbeing: the Peckham Coal Line will provide a place to run, HEALTHa& WELLBEING: providing a placefortotherun, walkbyand represents new way of doing things - infrastructure people, walk and cycle – to enjoy clean air and escape the noise of the streets the people. It will create much-needed new wellbeing workspace and studio-space cycle, improving social economic in the borough; below. It will be a place of quiet and peace, providing space to think, along the route, connect the two vibrant high streets of Rye Lane and creating peaceful place – an escape from the pollution and wander and aexplore. Queen’s Road and support local economic prosperity. It helps unlock the noise of the streets below. potential of people and places by connecting physically and socially. Community: the embodiment of citizen participation. The Coal Line demonstrates how diverse communities can work together to build new infrastructure that can be enjoyed by everyone.

“To my mind, t project that ha most closely in original, and in trumps it, is th Line in south L easy to unders and brilliance o the elevated ra above busy roa

Connectivity: significantly improved connectivity for local people, as well as providing a crucial link in a sub-regional walking and cycle route that Stephen, Friends stretches from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and soon to Canary Wharf. of the

Peckham Coal Line

Enterprise: Innovation and local prosperity- the Peckham Coal Line “Local children created the motifs for the represents a new way of doing things - infrastructure for the people, by at the Peckham Festival in 2016. We the people. It willproject create much-needed new workspace and studio-space along the route, organised connect the two vibrant high streetsalong of Rye the Laneroute and as treasure hunts Queen’s Road and support local‘Make economic prosperity. helps unlock the part of the your Mark’It workshop and potential of people and places by connecting physically and socially.

the kids found an amazing array of natural objects which we helped them draw, stencil and print into symbols. These form the base of the Coal Line graphic inspired by the colour and energy of Peckham. Today six key symbols bring the benefits of the project to life. You'll see these used throughout the document.”

his map shows a network of route itineraries ccording to interests such as nature and eritage trails. The numbered key spaces will be ctivated by connecting into the linear park.”

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

June 2018

Neil, Southwark Council

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1.3 The Peckham Coal Line

Stephen, Friends of the Peckham Coal Line

Nick, Friends of the Peckham Coal Line “This is our urban garden, the graffiti is our wild flowers and the clattering of the trains our birdsong. The Peckham Coal line is a community initiated project to turn the disused Rickett’s coal sidings into a high-level urban linear park that would connect Queens Road with Rye Lane, creating the missing link in a network of greenways that runs from Brixton to the Thames. Beyond the physical project the idea is also activating a community.

“Local children created the motifs for the project at the Peckham Festival in 2016. We organised treasure hunts route as URBAN viewalong of thethe Bussey Building part of the ‘Make your Mark’ workshop and Factories, tall buildings and activity dominate the kids found an amazing array of natural the western end of the Coal Line. objects which we helped them draw, stencil and print into symbols. These form the base of the Coal Line graphic inspired by the colour and energy of Peckham. Today six key symbols bring the benefits of WILFRED the project toWOOD 3 BISHOP life. You'll see these used throughout the ARCHES: A PLATFORM document.”

UNDER THE RAILWAY

This map shows a network of route itineraries according to interests such as nature and heritage trails. The numbered key spaces will be activated by connecting into the linear park.”

The walk passes through double-height Victorian arches revealing a wider view towards London. There is space to stop and reflect, and also opportunities for local businesses and events.

1 RYE LANE: A BUZZ OF VIBRANCY AND CONTRASTS Sharing the street with the new station square are the market stalls and independent traders synonymous with Peckham. A new stair and ramp climb to the Peckham Coal Line, an oasis of calm above the hubbub.

Neil, Southwark Council

“The Peckham Coal Line now has ‘planning clout’. It is situated in the New Southwark Plan and has the ability to rally support against conflicting neighbouring developments.”

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2 THE OLD COAL YARD: PECKHAM’S HISTORICAL INDUSTRIAL CENTER HERITAGE TRAIL NATURE TRAIL CYCLING ROUTE ENTERPRISE TRAIL 12

Tucked between railway arches and imposing factories, the atmospheric coal yard is revealed from the old coal sidings, overshadowed by the Victorian Bussey Building to the south and Peckham Levels in the multistorey car park to the north.


NATURE

North-east towards Old Kent Road, Canada Water and Canary Wharf

trees in Kirkwood Nature Reserve

The eastern section passes beneath mature trees and through the nature reserve.

OPEN views of the City of London The central section has open views across floodplain towards the city skyline.

7 BIDWELL STREET: BRINGING AN ANCIENT STREET TO LIFE This dead-end street will be reimagined with a new link to Cossall Walk; planters and artwork to enhance the public space; and a dedicated event space and field office.

ASYLUM ROAD

6 KIRKWOOD NATURE RESERVE: AN OASIS OF NATURE OPEN TO ALL A segregated walking route and cycleway will encourage more people to use the nature reserve, making it safer and more accessible.

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S ROAD

8.

4 MAYA BALCONY: BIG VIEWS AND A VITAL CONNECTION

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The Coal Line route continues above Maya Close. The elevated position at the edge of the floodplain gives long views towards the city.

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8 QUEENS ROAD PECKHAM: A GATEWAY AND NORTH / SOUTH ACCESS

5 THE OLD STABLE YARD: DOUBLE HEIGHT ARCHES FACE THE OLD HORSE BLOCK

Opposite Queens Road station square, the eastern entrance of the Coal Line will better connect the area and bring the greenery of the nature reserve into the neighbourhood centre.

The opportunity to support and resource the wider project through connecting, unlocking and opening this historical space to Peckham residents and businesses. Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

June 2018

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1.4 The Feasibility Study

This Feasibility Study develops the initial vision of Friends of the Peckham Coal Line (FPCL), setting out the value and potential scope of the project, and describing a clear path to the next stages of work which will lead to implementation. The study tests and develops the compelling original vision of the project. The study has evolved in close collaboration with FPCL, and in parallel with their work around developing the project in the wider community. Section 1 sets the scene. It contains a brief description of the initial vision and the work that led to the successful crowdfunding for this study; the development of FPCL; and the location and nature of the project. Section 2 sets out the project benefits within six broad, but not exclusive, categories, chosen to best describe the project in terms of themes common to major funding applications. One strength of the project is that it addresses many different issues in an overlapping way. The case for the project is supported by an overview of land ownership, the planning context and a detailed business case undertaken by Arup. Comparisons with similar projects are also made. The Concept Design described in Section 3 undertakes a more detailed analysis of the scope and nature of the project. Opportunities to address character, connectivity, accessibility, technical issues and landscaping are set out. The key technical constraint of delivering a public space by an operational railway line is addressed, and the value of the project as a catalyst for positive local change is outlined. In the discussion about delivery and governance in Section 4, the light touch and community-based approach of FPCL is shown to be central in being able to develop the full vision for the project to the next stage, while also concurrently

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looking to make early wins with standalone satellite projects. An assessment of the process and outcomes behind FPCL is made in Section 5. This project is pioneering in its ambition to deliver ambitious communityled green infrastructure, a process that to date has almost completely been the preserve of established institutions or the state. This new approach is part of a growing movement and its successes and challenges are worthy of reflection. This in turn will inform the project as it moves forward. The study ends with a timetable and brief description of the next steps for the project. The Business Case, site section drawings and details of the ongoing Network Rail consultation process are appended.


VISION

PROPOSE

Design

Friends of

Network Rail

Team

Peckham Coal

Southwark Council

Line

GLA

FEASIBILITY STUDY Strategic Case

WHAT ACTUALLY IS THE PROJECT?

Economic Case

Commercial Case

Financial Case

Management Case

HOW WILL IT BE DELIVERED?

WHERE WILL THE FUNDING COME FROM?

HOW WILL IT BE MANAGED AND MAINTAINED?

Estimated Costs

Procurement Options

Estimated Economic Benefits

Required Delivery Structures

Funding Options and Procedures

Potential Governance Structures

Funding Sources

Continuing Community Involvement

WHAT IS THE PROJECT VALUE?

Establishing Local and Community Objectives + Strategic & Policy Context Understanding the Opportunities & Constraints Developing and Testing of Options Recommended and Prioritised Phased Delivery

Possible Estimated Benefit Cost Ratio

Recurrent Funding

Local People Local Businesses

REALISING THE VISION

CONSULT

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

Local Organisations

New Friends

June 2018

Future Funders Future Partners London-Wide Support

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1.5 Locating the Peckham Coal Line

Part of a swathe of distinctive South London inner-city communities, Peckham, located in the centre of the London Borough of Southwark, is set between New Cross in Lewisham and Brixton in Lambeth. Originally a village, then a fashionable suburb, the metropolitan nature of today’s Peckham was defined by nineteenth-century railways. That same local rail network provides the opportunity for the Peckham Coal Line, which connects a series of sites between Peckham Rye and Queens Road Peckham stations. Throughout the twentieth century, Rye Lane developed into one of the most important shopping streets in south London and is now identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London. London Context

Waterloo

London Bridge

Southwark Park

Burgess Park Kennington Park

New Cross

Queens Road Station

Peckham Rye Station Brixton Ruskin Park

LAMBETH

Significant Green Space Peckham Coal Line Railway Railway Station Southwark Borough Boundary River Thames

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SOUTHWARK

Peckham Rye Park and Common

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South London Context


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One Way Railway Line Bus Route Bus Stops Bus Station Peckham Coal Line

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Site Plan

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

June 2018

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1.6 Peckham Community Design

Peckham has a long history of community-based activism, and one that is far from latent. Over the years, local grassroots organisations such as Peckham Vision have created a culture of engagement and participation. This is particularly relevant at the moment as Peckham (and not just Peckham) goes through rapid change. With regeneration comes upheaval, and these community groups work tirelessly to ensure any changes are in the best interests of the area’s residents and businesses, as well as the preservation of local architecture, green spaces and sites of interest.

Peckham Vision For an integrated town centre

Current plans for the regeneration of Peckham town centre include council-backed projects such as the Station Square and Peckham Square, which use community engagement and support as their inspiration, as do independent projects such as Peckham Levels and Peckham Lido. Active friends groups such as Friends of Nunhead Cemetery and The Peckham Society have had long associations with the preservation of sites of historic interest, while certain sites such as the Old Stable Yard demonstrate community-inspired change of use over the years. Such an active, vocal and well-connected community well versed in getting involved with community design has undoubtedly aided the fates of a project with the ambitions of the Peckham Coal Line. It has been central to its history so far, and will continue to be built upon.

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“Peckham Vision is about creating and nurturing ways of connecting people in Peckham who share enthusiasm and desire to help develop and realise the potential of the neighbourhood.” “The Peckham Coal Line fits with the community vision for transforming central Rye Lane. “The Livesey Exchange aims to bring life, new skills and jobs to a neglected corner of south east London. It was conceived as a place where people from diverse backgrounds will meet, have fun and discover programmes that can help them progress in their chosen paths.”

5. INN -- Ma 4. GREENING THE CITY

“I support the Coal Line because green safe areas are vital in cities. I’ll come with everyone I know and meet new people and we will enjoy, forage, explore and see nature.” The Peckham Society Lesley, Friends of the Peckham Coal Line OKR STUDIOS

“My Coal Line is based on an ecosystem, it LIVESEY EXCHANGE has space for trees and places for children to play and places to learn about things they haven’t before.” Jamael, Year 4 John Donne school “I support the Peckham Coal Line because I love the way Peckham has developed into a place of real character, and the Coal Line seems to express that further still. It feels unique, inclusive, roomy, green - all the things a big city very often isn't. I'll come with our child and we will look at the view, inspect plants, look for bugs and talk to other people.” Simon, Peckham Festival walk

P o

“ s e D

H a e a t e f a y M c


MY COAL LINE IS:

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

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20


Section 2 The Case for the Project

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

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2.1 What is there now

The route of the Peckham Coal Line follows the line of the railway from the hustle and bustle of Rye Lane, past a dramatic backlands urban landscape of industrial buildings, viaducts, arches and railway embankments, to the secret tranquillity of Kirkwood Nature Reserve. From Queens Road, an uninspiring path winds through an estate with no access to the nearby nature reserve which many locals are surprised to discover is there. Residual plots of land are overgrown, unconnected and underused.

13 12

6 7 4

3 2 5

8 9

10

1

1. Elevated overgrown coal sidings and market off Rye Lane

3. Access to arches to west of Consort Road

22

2. Double-height arches to rear of scaffolding yard

4. Elevated coal sidings off Rye Lane

5. Scaffolding yard

11


6. Cossall Walk looking towards Gordon Road

7. Gordon Road railway bridge

8. Yard to the east of Consort Road

9. Consort Road railway bridge

11. Bidwell Street railway bridge

12. Kirkwood Nature Reserve from Bidwell Street 13. Cossall Walk, looking west

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

10. Old Stable Yard off Consort Road

June 2018

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2.2 Project Benefits

The Peckham Coal Line has evolved to be more than one project – it is a network of projects with multiple purposes and benefits. These can be described within six key opportunities for Peckham and London’s residents and workers. An initial Business Case, undertaken by Arup, where benefits are detailed in terms of the level of opportunity they provide and the challenges they can help overcome, is appended. This also identifies where benefits respond to key stakeholder priorities and demonstrates how these can be quantified and measured.

Louise, Friends of the Peckham Coal Line

Graeme, Adams & Sutherland Architects

Connectivity: The proposals will deliver 900 metres of new urban cycling and walking paths, connect two high streets, and will link “This a feasibility in toiswider walking and cycling routes study with a differacross south London and beyond. ence. It was conceived, Heritage:commissioned and made The Peckham Coal Line is a way of through the input of preserving local heritage while updating local andpeople. makingOur it relevant for the future. experience and aspirations illumiCommunity: nate findings Thethe Peckham Coal Line has proved through from itsquotes inception to be a project around gathered events, can galvanise and which aat community workshops and develop proposals to improve their local festivals. Look outoffor area. It is a way inspiring and bringing these boxesdiverse through together communities, and is a theway document andin the short-to-medium of tackling, thanks being part term, for many of the challenges that face Peckham. of the story.”Although difficult to reverse the wave of London-wide gentrification, it is possible to soften the trajectory for local communities and make sure that “The Peckham Coalthe changes. they benefit from Line is an exciting project full of possiGreening the City: bilities that is The Coal Linehelping addresses the problem to of bring theofcommua lack open and green space for nity together through local communities in central Peckham. engagement.” It would help to improve local air quality, biodiversity and access to green space.

Mark, Southwark Councillor

“The Peckham Coal Line is a fantastic local community project that we are delighted to support. I’m looking forward to seeing how we can continue working with the Coal Line team to deliver this ambitious and exciting project for Peckham.”

“The Coal Line will be an innovative, high quality urban park with a wide range of physical and social benifits. We’ve simplified these into six key areas for the purposes of this study.” Kirsty, Friends of the Peckham Coal Line

Innovation & Local Prosperity: The Coal Line will provide access to and allow the opening up of around 2,300 square metres of new workspace. These disused spaces can be used by local businesses and communities, unlocking and creating revenue. Health & Wellbeing: The project addresses a lack of clean and safe walking and cycling routes and fits well into Southwark Council’s health and wellbeing strategy. 24

“To my m project th most clos original, a trumps it Line in so easy to un and brillia


An innovative, high quality and elevated urban park

A New Public Space for Peckham Air quality Biodiversity Preserving heritage

w e f

Nature: Greening the City: by enhancing clusters of green along the line using tree planting and gardening projects to connect existing nature to create a corridor for people and wildlife.

Heritage: a landmark that protects, repurposes and brings back to life London’s industrial history revealing the past by emphasising and celebrating Peckham’s role in London’s economic history.

Health and Wellbeing: the Peckham Coal Line will provide a place to run, walk and cycle – to enjoy clean air and escape the noise of the streets below. It will be a place of quiet and peace, providing space to think, wander and explore.

Platform for local businesses

mbols mbols mbols

Increase local spend

Community: the embodiment of citizen participation. The Coal Line demonstrates how diverse communities can work together to build new infrastructure that the canCity: be enjoyed by everyone. Nature: Greening by enhancing clusters of green along the line

The benefits of the Peckham Coal Line:

using tree planting and gardening projects to connect existing nature to create a corridor for people and wildlife. Nature: Greening the City: by enhancing clusters of green along the line 1. CONNECTIVITY using tree planting and gardening projects to connect existing nature to Connectivity: significantly improved connectivity for local people, as well create a corridor for people and wildlife. as providing a crucial link inbya enhancing sub-regional walking cycle route Nature: Greening the City: clusters of and green along thethat line stretches Brixton Rotherhithe, and soon to Canary Wharf. using treefrom planting andtogardening projects to connect existing nature to Heritage: a landmark that protects, repurposes and brings back to life create a corridor for people and wildlife. London’s industrial history revealing the past by emphasising and celebrating Peckham’s role in London’s economic history. Enterprise: andprotects, local prosperitythe and Peckham Heritage: a Innovation landmark that repurposes bringsCoal backLine to life 2. HERITAGE represents a new way of doing thingsthe - infrastructure for the people, London’s industrial history revealing past by emphasising and by the people. Peckham’s It will createrole much-needed workspace and studio-space celebrating in London’snew economic history. Heritage: aroute, landmark thatthe protects, repurposes and brings toand life along connect two vibrant of Ryeback Healththe and Wellbeing: the Peckham Coalhigh Linestreets provide aLane place to run, London’s industrial history revealing the past bywill emphasising and Queen’s Road and support localair economic prosperity. It helps unlock the walk and cycle – to enjoy clean and escape the noise of the streets celebrating in London’s economic history. potential of Peckham’s people and role places connecting physically and socially. below. It will be a place of quietby and peace, providing space to think, Health and Wellbeing: the Peckham Coal Line will provide a place to run, wander and explore. walk and cycle – to enjoy clean air and escape the noise of the streets below. will be a place of quiet and peace, providing space to think, 3. Itand COMMUNITY: Health Wellbeing: the Peckham Coal Line will provide a place to run, wander and explore. walk and cycle – to enjoy clean air and escape the noise of the streets below. It will be aembodiment place of quiet peace, providingThe space to Line think, Community: the of and citizen participation. Coal wander and explore. demonstrates how diverse communities can work together to build new

: the Coal Line delivers significantly improved connectivity for local people, as well as providing a crucial link in a sub-regional walking and cycle route that stretches from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and soon to Canary Wharf. : the Coal Line will be a landmark asset that protects, repurposes and brings back to life London’s industrial history and heritage. It will reveal the past, emphasising and highlighting Peckham’s role in London’s economic history.

mbols mbols

w w e e f f

Green space Grow local communities

mbols

w w w e e ef f f

Walking & cycling

the Coal Line represents a unique way of building a community asset. It is an emblem and embodiment of citizen participation and development and demonstrates how diverse infrastructure that can be enjoyed by everyone. communities together to build new infrastructure that can be Community: the embodiment ofcan citizenwork participation. The Coal Line demonstrates how diverse communities can work together to build new enjoyed used by everyone. infrastructure that can and be enjoyed by everyone. Community: the embodiment of citizen participation. The Coal Line demonstratessignificantly how diverseimproved communities can work to build Connectivity: connectivity fortogether local people, asnew well 4. GREENING THE CITY: infrastructure canCity: be enjoyed by everyone. as providing athat crucial link inbya enhancing sub-regional walking cycle route Nature: Greening the clusters of and green along thethat line stretches Brixton Rotherhithe, and soon to Canary Wharf. using treefrom planting andtogardening to connect existing nature to Connectivity: significantly improvedprojects connectivity for local people, as well create a corridor for people and wildlife. as providing a crucial link inby a enhancing sub-regional walking cycle route Nature: Greening the City: clusters of and green along thethat line stretches Brixton Rotherhithe, and soon to Canary Wharf. using treefrom planting andto gardening projects tothe connect existing to Enterprise: Innovation and local prosperityPeckham Coalnature Line Connectivity: significantly improved connectivity for local people, as well create a corridor for people wildlife. represents a anew way of doing things - infrastructure forcycle the people, by as providing crucial link in and a sub-regional walking and route that the It will create newsoon workspace andWharf. studio-space stretches from Brixton tomuch-needed Rotherhithe, and to Canary Enterprise: Innovation andprotects, local the and Peckham Coal Linelife 5. people. INNOVATION & prosperityLOCAL Heritage: aroute, landmark that repurposes along the connect the two vibrant highPROSPERITY: streetsbrings of Ryeback Lanetoand represents a new way of doing thingsthe - infrastructure for the people, by London’s industrial past by emphasising Queen’s Road and history supportrevealing local economic prosperity. It helpsand unlock the the people. It will create much-needed new workspace and studio-space celebrating Peckham’s role in London’s economic history. potential of Innovation people and places byprosperityconnecting physically and socially. Enterprise: and local the Peckham Coal Linelife Heritage: landmark that protects, repurposes and brings along the aroute, connect the two vibrant high streets of Ryeback Lanetoand represents a new way of doing thingsthe - infrastructure for the people, by London’sRoad industrial past by emphasising Queen’s and history supportrevealing local economic prosperity. It helpsand unlock the the people. Peckham’s It will create much-needed new workspace and studio-space celebrating in London’s economic history. potential of people and role places by connecting physically and socially. along the route, connect the two vibrant high streets of Rye Lane and Health and Wellbeing: the Peckham Coal Line will provide a place to run, Queen’s Road and support local economic prosperity. It helps unlock the walk and cycle – to enjoy clean air and escape the noise of the streets potential of people and places by connecting physically and socially. below. It will be a place of quiet and peace, providing space to think, Health the Peckham Coal Line will provide a place to run, wander andWellbeing: explore. & 6. and HEALTH WELLBEING: walk and cycle – to enjoy clean air and escape the noise of the streets below. It will be a place of quiet and peace, providing space to think, wander and explore.

The Coal Line will provide crucial new green and open space for Peckham’s residents and workers. It will be a place to meet and play, explore and interact with local habitats, grow food and encourage biodiversity. the Coal Line represents a new way of doing things – infrastructure for the people, by the people. It will unlock much needed new workspace and studio space along the route, connect the two vibrant high streets of Rye Lane and Queen’s Road and support local economic prosperity.

the Coal Line will provide a place to run, walk and cycle – to enjoy clean air and escape the noise of the streets below. It will be a place of quiet and peace, providing space to think, wander Community: the embodiment of citizen participation. The Coal Line and how explore. demonstrates diverse communities can work together to build new infrastructure that can be enjoyed by everyone. Community: the embodiment of citizen participation. The Coal Line demonstrates how diverse communities can work together to build new infrastructure that can be enjoyed by everyone.

Connectivity: significantly improved connectivity for local people, as well as providing a crucial link in a sub-regional walking and cycle route that stretches from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and soon to Canary Wharf. Connectivity: connectivity for& local people, as Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends significantly of Peckhamimproved Coal Line with Adams Sutherland + well Arup as providing a crucial link in a sub-regional walking and cycle route that stretches from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and soon to CanaryCoal Wharf. Enterprise: Innovation and local prosperitythe Peckham Line represents a new way of doing things - infrastructure for the people, by the people. It will create much-needed new workspace and studio-space

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2.3 Connectivity

The Peckham Coal Line delivers significantly improved connectivity for local people, as well as providing a crucial link in a sub-regional walking and cycle route that stretches from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and soon to Canary Wharf.

A

2.1 miles 13mins

B

0.5 miles 3mins 2.9 miles 15mins

C

The Peckham Coal Line completes important strategic links both in the wider context of south London and locally in Peckham. The Coal Line provides a missing part of a new, safe and direct link, supporting cycling between south London and the business district Canary Wharf. This will be facilitated in the longer 1.atCONNECTIVITY: term by a new foot and cycle bridge at Rotherhithe, but in the short term by a passenger and cycle ferry.

C

2. HERITAGE: B A

“Wow, what a great project! Linking the two main roads together and helping to regenerate the areas in between them.” Tejinder, crowdfunder “I support the Peckham Coal Line because the main part of the line will be through the church parish of St Mary Magdalene. I’ll come with some church friends and we will hope to develop the ideas of the Coal Line as a link between the parts of our parish rather than as a barrier.” Michael, Church Warden, St Mary’s Church “I support the Peckham Coal Line because I walk everyday in the area and would value a link between Rye Lane and Queen's Road. I’ll come with with my beagles and we will enjoy not being in traffic.” Anna, Local resident

Link to the Thames: a new east/west route from Brixton to Canary WharfN

A

0.6miles 11mins

B

0.5miles 9mins

“I support the Peckham Coal Line because it is a brilliant heroic idea to re-use a brownfield linear site for cheerful social use. I'll come with my sketch book, friends, my bicycle. We are really looking forward to the Coal Benny, local resident Line. And we will draw, historian and cycle and admire crowdfunder unusual, unexpected views of my beloved Peckham.” A

B

“I donated money to the Coal Line in the

Connecting Peckhamcrowdfunding to the Bakerloo Line extension campaign as I believe in the N

unique vision of the project and would love to see my city of London build a world famous civic walkway and community space out of its industrial heritage.” Anonymous, crowdfunder “I think it's something quite unique that is a nod to Peckham's past yet is very much of and for the 21st century. I see it as part of the regeneration of Peckham a practical yet creative and and artistic response to our industrial heritage.” Janet, crowdfunder 22

CS7

23

2

Adding to the strategic south London cycle network N

Cycle Superhighway Cycle Route Existing Quiet Route Peckham Coal Line

6. HEALTH AND WELLBEING

Proposed Rotherhithe Crossing

7. WORKING PROCESS

River Thames

26

“I’ll come with the hope that it will create a space

“I truly believe in this


f

Communit demonstra infrastructu

Connectivi as providin stretches f

Enterprise represents the people along the r Queen’s R potential o

In addition the route of the Coal Line will also provide a connection towards Old Kent Road and the proposed Bakerloo Line extension. This east/west route helps to extend and integrate the TfL and national cycling network – a network that in London tends to be concentrated on radial routes towards the centre rather than orbital routes.

ABOVE Hostile roads and improved links to high street and public spaces

The 900 metre east/west connection between Queens Road and Peckham Rye stations will provide a new walking and cycling route, upgrading connectivity for Peckham’s residents and local workforce. This will cut journey times for people walking and cycling between the stations and walking to, or from, the town centre, as well as providing a much safer route avoiding busy and congested roads. Shorter north/south connections, which form part of the network of routes that makes up the Coal Line, will improve permeability, unlocking areas such as the old coal yard site and spaces around Kirkwood Nature Reserve and Bidwell Street. One consequence of the part pedestrianisation of Peckham Town Centre has been significantly increased traffic along side roads, including Consort Road. This exacerbates the already poor condition of the public realm in this area, with the Consort Road junction being a particular problem. A raised cycle / pedestrian walkway will provide an alternative trafficfree means of negotiating these problem areas in addition to creating new routes to the town centre.

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

High St. Amenity

15MINS

Housing Estates Traffic Severance Heavy Traffic Node Railway Improved Links Green Space N

Pedestrian Key

5MINS

Direct Route Secondary Routes Pedestrian Only Locked at night Cycling Key Existing Route Alternative Routes One Way Peckham Coal Line

TOP Improving pedestrian routes between Rye Lane and Queens Road. ABOVE

N

Improving cycle routes between Rye Lane and Queens Road

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2.4 Heritage

The Peckham Coal Line will be a landmark asset that protects, repurposes and brings back to life London’s industrial history and heritage assets. It will reveal the past, emphasising and highlighting the role of Peckham in London’s economic history.

3. COMMUNITY:

2. HERITAGE:

“I support the Peckham Coal Line because it is a brilliant heroic idea to re-use a brownfield linear site for cheerful social use. I'll come with my sketch book, friends, my bicycle. We are really looking forward to the Coal Benny, local resident Line. And we will draw, historian and cycle and admire crowdfunder unusual, unexpected views of my beloved Peckham.”

“I support the Peckham Coal Line because I Former coal it yard signage just off Rye Lane Pre-1970s Peckham railway think has the potenlandscape tial to develop into an important for As the viaducts of the Victorian railways cut space through Peckham, a local communities, notViaduct hinterland of fragmented industrial activity was created. to overgrown enjoy green arches and small yards tucked inonly beside embankments but alsomuch to less intensively. and bridge abutments still remainspace active, albeit socialise and come Rickett’s Coal Yard, sited to the east of Peckham Rye station Jilke, researcher together in.” yard) was served between the viaducts (currently the scaffolding by a dedicated railway siding – the original section of the Peckham Coal Line. Despite bomb damage during WW2, parts of this line, now Eileen, P “I support the Peckham Coal Line because its disused, remain. Visible traces of the coal yard and other past uses Vision an important community project with the are to be found in the adjacent industrial landscape. potential to empower local voices. I’ll come with my dog and we will walk the line and Peckhamenjoy has a the longview and noted history.reserve.” From its mention in the and nature Domesday Book,event through housing noted industrialists and artisans Sarah, volunteer in the 19th century, to Rye Lane’s development as one of London’s “I support the Peckham Coal Line I evolving most important shopping streets, Peckham is because continually want a Itbeautiful, easy pathway and developing. is important to and use safe this heritage to help tell the between Queens Roadand Peckham Peckham story of how Peckham is today could beand in the future. The Coal Rye connect local andsidings bring and the Line opens uptothe remnants of communities 19th-century coal business opportunities to the area. come a viewing ruins of more recent utopian infrastructure, andI’ll provides open and we will platform with from an which to heart surveyand the mind ever-changing landscape of south show LondonCoal - andLine Britain whatshape the future London. The Peckham could- help the identity of of community can look like.” Peckham in future years. Rory, crowdfunder Nicholas, & Livesey

“I donated money to the Coal Line in the crowdfunding campaign as I believe in the unique vision of the project and would love to see my city of London build a world famous civic walkway and community space out of its industrial heritage.” Anonymous, crowdfunder “I think it's something quite unique that is a nod to Peckham's past yet is very much of and for the 21st century. I see it as part of the regeneration of Peckham a practical yet creative and and artistic response to our industrial heritage.” Janet, crowdfunder

COAL LINE

current scaffolding yard

Rye Lane

Abercrombie’s is planned t through Peckh

The railways arrive and with it the industrial revolution. New factories (1) produce prams (2), beer and cricket bats all fuelled by coal (3) energy brought in on the Coal Line. Thousands of Victorian terraces are constructed (4) to house workers and a vibrant high-street of shops forms around Rye Lane (5).

7. WORKING PROCESS

3. 2.

Peckham is an agricultural village with orchards and dairy.

28

agricultural

arrival of the railway

1860

1880

“I truly believe in this project - what a fun journey to be part of.” Lorraine, crowdfunder

new arrivals from Ghana, Nigeria and the Carabean move into the area

5.

1.

Peckham history and the Coal Line

The Coal Line is damaged during WWII and is not rebuilt - demand drops as factories move abroad and energy mix switches to gas and electric.

8. TOOLS AND APPROACHES

4.

industrial

WWII

1910

1940

Coal sidings abandoned 1955

Ringways roads planned 1960

“Well done Peckham Coal Line – it’s been such an exciting campaign and a brilliant example of

Coss Estate

197


symbols

w e f

70

Heritage: a London’s i celebrating

Health and walk and c below. It w wander an

BELOW Parts of a historic map overlaid on

to a contemporary map identify the extent of the coal sidings and yard, and the line of the proposed motorway

Communit demonstra infrastructu

Queens Road

Connectivi as providin stretches f

Enterprise represents the people along the r Queen’s R potential o

Council model of the Southern Box motorway

Concrete retaining wall along Cossall Walk

X

TH

BO

U

AY W

SO

The ruins of more recent infrastructure also define the Peckham Coal Line. Along the north side of the railway, an oversized concrete retaining wall determines the line of what would have been a section of the Southern Box motorway. This 1960s utopian scheme to encircle London with motorways – thankfully undelivered apart from the Westway and the A10 in Bow – is a reminder of the destructive power of single-issue (in this case traffic) urban regeneration. The position and shape of Kirkwood Nature Reserve, with its only access at either end, is due to this proposed road, while the Cossall Estate, with its closed south elevation and north-facing balconies, was designed as a barrier block to be sited parallel to a motorway. There is potential for the Coal Line to adjust the access through the retaining wall to enhance connectivity, and in places repurpose it to gain structural support, bringing new meaning to these remains.

G

N RI Proposed extent of Southern Box motorway

s ring ways road to go straight ham town centre

sall e built

Nature: Gr using tree create a co

2012 London Overgound railway opens next to Coal Line improving connections.

Peckham is in decline and crime is increasing. The population is falling but cheap rents attract enterprise and small shops.

commercial 1980

Coal Line now overgrown

Southwark council see the future of Peckham town centre as a cultural hub.

People move into the area attracted by low rents. It becomes a hub of enterprise and creativity.

Joe Richards House built

mixed use low rent

Peckham Coal Line website

Peckham Coal Line open

cultural

1995

2010

2015

2025

2060

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

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2.5 Community

The Peckham Coal Line represents a unique way of building a community asset. It is the embodiment of citizen participation and demonstrates how diverse communities can work together to build new infrastructure that can be enjoyed and used by everyone. The Coal Line has been developed and to date funded predominantly by local people with support from wider communities. This project is much more than just infrastructure – it represents a new way of doing things. This doesn’t simply include engagement but also active participation in developing an idea and then delivering a project. It is a beacon for how the development of community infrastructure and assets can support social cohesion.

Peckham is a very mixed urban centre with varied ethnic backgrounds and minority groups. Communities originally from West Africa are especially prominent along Rye Lane, as are a younger, more city-wide crowd drawn by the unique cultural character of the area. However, the area is very socially mixed and there is significant social deprivation alongside developing gentrification. There are many large social housing estates close by, as well as sites undergoing mixed residential redevelopment. Through an improvement in local connectivity, the Coal Line project will help to improve community cohesion along the route, unlocking connections between those who are currently divided between east and west by Consort Road, or north and south by the railway.

3. COMMUNITY:

The project has already begun to inspire and inform local people and this will continue to develop. The benefits of improving access and connectivity to local schools along the route and in developing a cultural and social focus for the local community align with local council priorities to enhance civic pride and community cohesion. The case for enhanced community cohesion is further strengthened by the data that improved walking and cycling routes are likely to appeal to ethnic minority groups. Developing local connections and networks with diverse communities could improve educational outcomes and employment prospects. To date the Coal Line initiative has meaningfully engaged with hundreds of local people.

4. GRE

TOP RIGHT

m sa o

l

We Jilke, researcher

w,

“I support the Peckham Coal Line because I think it has the potential to develop into an important space for local communities, not only to enjoy green space but also to socialise and come together in.”

“I support the Peckham Coal Line because its an important community project with the potential to empower local voices. I’ll come with my dog and we will walk the line and enjoy the view and nature reserve.” Sarah, event volunteer

e

“I support the Peckham Coal Line because I want a beautiful, easy and safe pathway between Queens Road Peckham and Peckham Rye to connect local communities and bring business opportunities to the area. I’ll come with an open heart and mind and we will show London - and Britain - what the future of community can look like.” Rory, crowdfunder

ace

sa

et

30

The Peckham Coal Line’s Citizen Activating Network. BELOW LEFT TO RIGHT Citizen-led

Eileen, Peckham Vision

Nicholas, PemPeople & Livesey Exchange

“Peckham Vision activities: is farmers’ about creating and market stall; nurturing ways of ‘Make your Mark’ connecting people inworkshop; The Chelsea Fringe event Peckham who share Peckham Vision enthusiasm andwith desire to help develop and realise the potential of the neighbourhood.” “The Peckham Coal Line fits with the community vision for transforming central Rye Lane. “The Livesey Exchange aims to bring life, new skills and jobs to a neglected corner of south east London. It was conceived as a place where people from diverse backgrounds will meet, have fun and discover programmes that can help them progress in their chosen paths.”

“ h t t J

“ lo p s u t w in o


e f Joe Richards House

Cossall Estate Residents

Hopes, fears, experiences, skills, time, energy

Communit demonstra infrastructu

Lugard Road Residents

Lo ca l

One of Jackie’s desires is that there are more opportunities and a bigger stake in society for young people.

eas g id n i t tes

As a beekeeper Lesley is keen to see an increase in the diversity and amount of flowering plants.

Lea r n ing fro m

nd ra e h

collectively create the the Peckham Coal Line ea ch

ot

Cemel’s desire is that more training is available to those that have fallen through the cracks to help people get back on their feet.

One of Mered’s desires is to see a strong, connected supportive community.

Defining shared local values

A collective voice steering future action

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

June 2018

Connectivi as providin stretches f

Enterprise represents the people along the r Queen’s R potential o

ort pp su er pe

RESIDENT GENERATED IDEAS AND ACTIONS

Kirkwood Nature Reserve

Health and walk and c below. It w wander an

31


2.6 Greening the City

5. INNOVATION AN DLOCAL PROSPERTITY -- Matthew Tree picture in folder, or switch for Mickey Smit GREENING THEwill CITY The4. Peckham Coal Line provide crucial new green and open space for Peckham’s residents and workers. It will be a place to meet and play, explore and interact with local habitats, grow food and encourage biodiversity.

“I support the Coal Line because green safe areas are vital in cities. I’ll come with everyone I know and meet new people and we will enjoy, forage, explore and see nature.” Lesley, Friends of the Peckham Coal Line

e

ne ty g

“My Coal Line is based on an ecosystem, it has space for trees and places for children to play and places to learn about things they haven’t before.” Jamael, Year 4 John Donne school

e

“I support the Peckham Coal Line because I love the way Peckham has developed into a place of real character, and the Coal Line seems to express that further still. It feels unique, inclusive, roomy, green - all the things a big city very often isn't. I'll come with our child and we will look at the view, inspect plants, look for bugs and talk to other people.” Simon, Peckham Festival walk

ve

The project is closely aligned with the Government’s Natural Environment White paper (2011), which recognises that a healthy natural environment is the foundation of sustained economic growth, prospering communities and personal wellbeing. Greening directly addresses the critical need to improve air quality, a key mayoral policy, while introducing further climate change resilience.

“The Coal line will Kirkwood Nature Reserve is central to the Coal Line vision. be an amazing Opened in 2000, this small, predominantly woodland local amenity for area, complemented by grassland, scrub and a pond, is adjacent residents, facilito the railway and Cossall Walk and is an important resource tating access to for local wildlife. The Coal Line offers an opportunity to the high streets consolidate and extend this key local green asset, improving and encouraging the range of habitats, while making the nature reserve more local residents to visible, accessible and welcoming, and thus more valued. An stay in Peckham, active route through, or past, the woodland would introduce keeping business passive surveillance encourage greater use of the nature Polly, Peckhamand business in the area.” reserve. New areas of green space could complement owner & smaller crowdfunder the existing railway embankment habitat, much of which falls outside theCoal remit of Network Rail’s cyclical clearance and “My Line is an opportunity to create maintenance regime,and andaso further extend social capital sustainable localgreen amenity. economy” The Friends of Cossall Park and Kirkwood Nature Reserve Dwain,inlocal resident are working close partnership with Friends of the Peckham

Coal Line. It is indicative of the concealed character of the Having enjoyed High Line in New existing site that eventsthe held by FPCL over theYork past year have andmany seenthe thefirst beautiful results the together as a been for time they haveand gathered economic benifits for the surrounding area community to enjoy the space. and local community, I feel very honoured In addition improving local biodiversity, theregenCoal Line also to be to donating towards the ongoing offerseration a structure within which to introduce localhas food-growing of our community. This project projects. Fruit or nut trees, herb growing or even small-scale fantastic potential - if you are umming and crops ahing all extend the traditional functions of green about supporting, take the plunge,open spaces and are especially appropriate for a linear space. you will be part of something special.

Matthew, Peckham business owner & crowdfunder

ABOVE Viewed from Rye Lane, trees growing on the former coal sidings

10. IN CONTEXT

H INSTITUTIONS

The Peckham Coal Line will be a new addition to London’s strategic network of green and open spaces: the Mayor’s All London Green Grid (ALGG) framework; ‘an enhanced network of existing and new open spaces and green infrastructure that can serve to shape and support new and existing communities, respond to the challenges of climate change, support economic development and deliver an improved quality of life’. An important central London link runs between Crystal Palace and the South Bank and the Peckham Coal Line will be at the “The– Peckham Coal Line centre of this route. is a great example of ABOVE ‘Growhow the Line’ Theplanter Mayorwith of Coal Line motifs

32

adiq, Mayor of

London and GLA can work with Londoners in a new way, pioneering what community-led development can look like.”

“The Peckham Coal Line project is an exciting and satisfyABOVE FPCL community event held in counter Kirkwood balance Nature Reserve, 2016 ing to other London landmark projects – no less ambitious but with heart.” Ben, Sustrans


symbols

Nature: Gr using tree create a co

w e f

BELOW Map locating the Peckham Coal Line

in relation to local green spaces and indicating the time taken to walk the area

20 MINS Burgess Park

15 MINS

Heritage: a London’s i celebrating

Health and walk and c below. It w wander an

Communit demonstra infrastructu

Connectivi as providin stretches f

Enterprise represents the people along the r Queen’s R potential o

10 MINS

Queens Road Station

Peckham Rye Station

Nunhead Cemetery

Peckham Rye Park Greendale Playing Fields

The Peckham Coal Line, sitting at the centre of a dispersed local network of green spaces, will provide a link that connects smaller or more isolated spaces. Improved local connections to both new and existing green space are particularly important in Southwark, a very urban borough where access to public and green space is the eighth lowest across London.

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

Green Space Cycle Route Railway Railway Station Walking Distance Peckham Coal Line Heavy Traffic Green Chain Walk

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afe es. ne w

e

t n

eI a

2.7 Innovation & Local Prosperity INNOVATION DLOCAL PROSPERTITY The5.Peckham Coal LineAN represents a new way of doing things – Peckham is a good example of an innovative local economy. -- Matthew Tree picture in folder, switch Mickey Smith oneof start-ups and studios in the Bussey Building infrastructure for the people, by the people. Itorwill unlockfor much With its density needed new workspace and studio space along the route, and Peckham Levels, as well as along Rye Lane and other connect the two vibrant high streets of Rye Lane and Queen’s local streets, Peckham has become a thriving centre of ideas Road and support local economic prosperity. and exchange. This complements an existing vibrant and multi-ethnic local economy characterised by multiple small traders. The local community prides itself on its innovation, and on doing things differently. The Coal Line is aligned with this ideology and has been developed and invested in by the community itself, placing people at the heart of its ambition. “The Coal line will The project is a means of opening up more than 1,500 square be an amazing metres (excluding the scaffolding site) of commercial space in local amenity for arches, small sites and under new structures. It will connect residents, facilithe two main high streets of Peckham – creating potential tating access to new hubs for small-scale business and the creative industries, the high streets generating both new jobs and economic value. and encouraging Critically, the project will help unlock the site of the old Coal local residents to Yard, while complementing the current redevelopment of stay in Peckham, Peckham Rye Station Square. It will also provide further keeping business momentum to secure economic activity alongside and beneath Polly, Peckham business in the area.” the railway as it extends east and west from the site, in turn owner & crowdfunder attracting new visitors and new investment to Peckham. “My Coal Line is an opportunity to create social capital and a sustainable local economy” Dwain, local resident Having enjoyed the High Line in New York and seen the beautiful results and the economic benifits for the surrounding area and local community, I feel very honoured to be donating towards the ongoing regeneration of our community. This project has fantastic potential - if you are umming and ahing about supporting, take the plunge, you will be part of something special. Matthew, Peckham business owner & crowdfunder

s

w,

lk

1. Existing: Peckham Levels co-working spaces oversubscribed

2. Existing: Start-up independent market traders on Rye Lane

5. 1. 8. 2.

ONTEXT

3. 4.

34

“The Peckham Coal Line project is an exciting and satisfying counter balance to other London landmark projects – no less ambitious but with heart.”

6.


Connectivi as providin stretches f

Enterprise represents the people along the r Queen’s R potential o

3. Existing: Bussey co-working

6. Existing: Copeland Park

9. Potential: Cossall garages

10. Potential: Queens Road arches

11. Potential: spaces created under walkway

4. Existing: West African traders

10.

7. Proposed: Stable Yard

9.

5. Existing: creative culture

7.

8. Potential: old Coal Yard

The recent lift in economic activity around Queens Road station demonstrates the economic potential of sites near the railway. The success of the crowdfunded garages project off the neighbouring Old Kent Road also provides a good precedent. One consequence of extensive regeneration and associated increases in land values across London is a greater shortfall in the provision of smale-scale workspaces. A new link will provide the accessibility and footfall to connect currently disparate and relatively difficult-to-access, smaller sites.

Site Plan showing both development opportunity sites and potential for new workspaces related to or defined by the Coal LIne

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

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2.8 Health & Wellbeing

The Peckham Coal Line will provide a place to run, walk and cycle6.– HEALTH to enjoy clean and escape the noise of the streets ANDairWELLBEING below. It will be a place of peace and quiet, providing space to think, wander and explore.

Andy, local resident

“I’ll come with the hope that it will create a space free from pollution, where we can bring our grandchildren. Where the whole family can walk in safety to other parts of the borough. Where there will be community schemes our grandchildren can become involved with. We will follow your developments, support them and get involved where possible.”

“I support the Peckham Coal Line because of the value of off-road walking for physical and mental health. I’ll come with local mental health groups and we will be de-stressing and doing mindfulness.” Carol, crowdfunder “I support the Peckham Coal Line because I'd love to see more green areas in Peckham for running and cycling.” Beth, local resident

The Peckham Coal Line is not the first local project look holistically 7.toWORKING PROCESS at improving lives through innovative infrastructure. Only a street away, on Queens Road, the Peckham Experiment was established in the 1920s. This pioneering programme of preventative health work developed into the 1930s Pioneer Health Centre, built on nearby St Mary’s Road and designed by Owen “I truly believe in this Williams, a building that included leisure and social facilities. The Pioneer project - what a fun Health Foundation remains as a charity journey to be part of.” Lorraine, crowdfunder with a range of social ideals and concerns extending far beyond issues of healthcare. The Coal Line, with its integrated approach to health, Oliver Goldsmith wellbeing and social equality, sits Primary very much within this local spirit by andawesome support from “Impressed offers a 21st-centurycommunity, approach topeople and companies for addressing what arePeckham very long-term Coal Line. Stupendous people issues. power Peckham.” Lesley, volunteer One of the London Borough of Southwark’s stated aims is to prevent “My and Coalsupporting Line is a thread that tells the ill health by “promoting story and positive lifestyle changes and shows the actions of people coming responsibility for own healthtogether.” ... Anna, volunteer and improving people’s wellbeing, resilience and connectedness”. By promoting active transport and encouraging modal shifts, the Coal Line could improve the health and wellbeing of local residents through encouraging physical activity, providing clean open space in which to relax and explore, and through providing better connections to a chain of green spaces. The potential for food growing programmes along the Coal Line also offers direct and indirect health benefits. Local roads are hostile and busy, and providing a space of relief from the intensity of the city could deliver multiple benefits for local residents in both mental and physical health, as well as help towards reducing health inequalities.

Peckham Town Centre

Peckham Rye Station

36

Queens Road Station

Peckham Coal Line

Improving air quality is a huge challenge in London today. The pollution mapping clearly illustrates the current situation in Peckham. The Coal Line presents an opportunity for new routes that help avoid the main polluting roads. Where the route is raised at high level, this offers additional separation from the road network. The wider beneficial impact of greater contact with the natural world should also not be underestimated.

ABOVE Location of

local schools set in the context of existing busy roads and a 400m radius from the Coal Line. LEFT Map of air pollution in Peckham (extract from Mayor of London air quality survey 2015)

St Ja Grea

Harr


w e f

Heritage: a London’s i celebrating

Health and walk and c below. It w wander an

Communit demonstra infrastructu

Connectivi as providin stretches f

Harris Primary Academy

Enterprise represents the people along the r Queen’s R potential o

Kender Primary Nell Gwynn Primary

ames the at Primary

Queens Road Station John Donne Primary St Thomas The Apostle College

ris Academy

Edmund Waller Primary

St Mary’s Pre-School

Peckham Rye Station

St Mary Magdalene Primary

Hollydale Primary

Bellenden Primary

Rye Oak Primary

N

As of 2017, there are 15 schools in the vicinity of the project. John Donne Primary School and St Mary Magdalene Primary School would benefit especially from an enhanced local pedestrian network to improve safe routes to school, but all schools need safer and greener route networks. Local consultation has revealed accounts of just how awkward it is to move around the area without walking along main roads.

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

Schools School Gates Main Roads Busy Traffic One Way Peckham Coal Line Nodes of heavy traffic 400m radius

June 2018

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2.9 Land Ownership Bluecroft Property Development

The majority of the land required for the proposed Peckham Coal Line route comes under either Network Rail or Southwark Council ownership. The public nature of these organisations coupled with minimal private interfaces is a significant enabler for the realisation of the project. Key interfaces with private land include the rear gardens of Maya Close and the Old Stable Yard. Discussions with public and private landowners regarding the nature of future development and the benefits of the Coal Line are ongoing.

Yarnfield Square

Network Rail Southwark Council - Housing Southwark Council - Green Space Southwark Council - Adopted Highways Privately Owned Bluecroft Property Development

Cicely Road t ff Stree

sort d

Roa

Levels

fred p Wil Bisho lose C Wood

am + Peckh m Plex Peckha

Con

Moncrie

rd Coal Ya

ane

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38

pe lan Co

x Comple ) d Road n ing la d e il p u o C yB g Busse (includin

dR

oa d

Peckham Rye Station

Co

n


Queens Road Station

Queen

Co

ss

all

W alk

s Road

ell Bidw Stree t

ve

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re

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oo

Na

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w irk

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ad

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d

a Ro h ret

se

Clo

za

Na ble Yard Old Sta

ns

or

tR

oa

d

Source: Southwark Council, Network Rail and Land Registry (Stable Yard Area)

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

June 2018

39


Stephen, Friends of the Peckham Coal Line

2.10 Planning Context

“Local children created the motifs for the project at the Peckham Festival in 2016. We organised treasure hunts along the route as part of the ‘Make your Mark’ workshop and the kids of anatural Peckham is found a placean in amazing transition.array Already busy inner city objects which them draw, stencil local centre, therewe arehelped a number of significant developments and print intotown symbols. These the base of existing proposed for the centre, whileform redevelopment of the Coalhousing Line graphic by the The New larger council estatesinspired is also underway. colour and energy of Peckham. Today six key Southwark Plan (section DM45) says: “Planning permission will bring the benefits the project to be symbols granted for development thatofsupports the implementation life. You'll these usedacross throughout the of ‘Low Line’ see walking routes the borough”, specifically document.” including the Peckham Coal Line.

Andy, local resi The New Southwark Plan seeks to enhance links between centres of activity and enterprise by creating new attractive routes alongside rail arches and viaducts and their associated spaces and streets. The Low Line routes will facilitate economic growth and improve access and permeability along the rail viaducts.

In the Peckham and Nunhead Vision, the main driving force “I support behind development is the delivery of an increased density of of the valu housing, addressing London-wide demand. The local housing and menta market has also increased in activity as Peckham is becoming mental hea de-stressin Carol, crow

“I support because I'd in Peckham Beth, local

Neil, Southwark Council

“The Peckham Coal Line now has ‘planning clout’. It is situated in the New Southwark Plan and has the ability to rally support against conflicting neighbouring developments.”

Vision for Peckham and Nunhead

New Southwark Plan

40

Source: Southwark Council AAP

Nunhead and Peckham Ward Boundaries Source: Southwark Council AAP


recognised as a desirable and fashionable place to live. No new green space is included within the town centre development and the Coal Line has the potential to, in part, address this need. There are also a number of small sites near the route that could be developed, and the old Coal Yard is a site that will become available for development within the next few years. The Coal Line could enhance and stretch the programmes possible for the this site in particular. The Coal Line sits within two Peckham Wards: The Lane and Nunhead. The objectives and outcomes of the Coal Line sit well within the Area Action Plan (AAP) and the project is embedded within the high level strategic Borough Plan. Discussions with local planners have informed the development of this report.

Eagle Wharf Wooddene Flaxyards Site

Bellenden Rd Retail Park

Queen’s Road Station

Peckham Square

Aylesham Centre

Woods Road

Peckham Levels Peckham Rye Station Railway Arches/Scaffolding Yard Peckham Palms

Current/Proposed Development Copeland Rd Car Park

Potential Development Development Sites Source: Southwark Council

Community Public Services Station Schools Park Market Space Retail Potential development sites along Peckham Coal Line Potential Area of Peckham Coal Line Local Amenities

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

June 2018

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2.11 The Business Case Condensed

An initial business case for the Peckham Coal Line has been undertaken by Arup. This concentrates on making a strategic and economic case for the project through identifying and then beginning to quantify the multiple benefits that the project offers. This work is developed through a strategic level options appraisal and a quantified benefits comparison. Funding options are outlined and initial options for governance and delivery are discussed. The work is substantially more detailed than is usual for a project at this stage in development.

The Options Appraisal takes this analysis and applies it to a series of strategic level scenarios from a partially to a fully completed project. Although premature in terms of the project design this does give a clear indication of where the project value lies. The scenarios range from ‘do nothing’ or ‘groundlevel only improvements’ to a ‘partial’ or ‘complete’ delivery of the project vision. An appraisal is achieved through crossreferencing the delivery of benefits against the key challenges. The resulting quantified benefits comparison makes it clear that the whole project delivers significantly more than individual stand-alone components.

The Peckham Coal Line is described as addressing three key challenges in Peckham: • • •

This is a necessarily simplified approach, but the underlying principle is clear: a ‘conventionally phased’ sectional delivery approach may not deliver significant benefits for all users. A fully completed integrated new amenity, on the other hand, will deliver much more than the sum of its parts.

a lack of clean and safe walking routes a deficiency in green open space for communities threats to local economic activity from accelerated gentrification

In a development of the business case analysis, this feasibility study develops the idea that the project might be seen as a web, where a potentially phased delivery is seen as always contributing to the wider narrative.

A series of benefits are then described through six interrelated themes: Connectivity, Heritage, Community, Greening the City, Health & Wellbeing, and Innovation & Local Prosperity. These themes are analysed in terms of what specific benefits could be delivered for key stakeholders (local community, GLA, Network Rail, London Borough of Southwark, NHS) and what wider benefits could be subsequently generated. Benefits both ‘on line’ and ‘off line’, that is those directly on the Coal Line and the impact on the surrounding area, are considered.

Initial but complex discussions about funding, governance and delivery, raised in the business case, are discussed later in this document. Section 4.6 references costs analysis by the quantity survey appraisal, while the full Arup business case document is available as part of the supplementary appendix related to the feasibility study. This includes cost/benefit studies around the core business themes, explaining in detail how the benefits were calculated.

There is an accompanying initial quantification of these benefits. This has been based on the metrics and structure of the HM Treasury Green Book (a central government means of establishing the economic value of projects).

100%

100%

90%

Percentage of benefits realised (%)

80%

70%

60% 49%

50% 39%

40%

30%

24%

20%

16% 10%

10% 0% 0% Do nothing

On-road bike Kirkwood Road Low Line to Cossal Walk lane

Rye Lane to Rye Lane to The whole Consort Road Gordon Road Peckham Coal Line

ABOVE Percentage of potential benefits realised by each option

42

!


symbols

Nature: Greening the City: by enhancing clusters of green along the line using tree planting and gardening projects to connect existing nature to create a corridor for people and wildlife.

w eApproach to Benefits Quantification f

Heritage: a landmark that protects, repurposes and brings back to life London’s industrial history revealing the past by emphasising and celebrating Peckham’s role in London’s economic history.

Health and Wellbeing: the Peckham Coal Line will provide a place to run, walk and cycle – to enjoy clean air and escape the noise of the streets below. It will be a place of quiet and peace, providing space to think, wander and explore.

Community: the embodiment of citizen participation. The Coal Line demonstrates how diverse communities can work together to build new infrastructure that can be enjoyed by everyone.

symbols

w e w symbols ef w f e f symbols symbols

w symbols e w f e f

Connectivity: significantly improved connectivity for local people, as well as providing a crucial link in a sub-regional walking and cycle route that stretches from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and soon to Canary Wharf. Nature: Greening the City: by enhancing clusters of green along the line using tree planting and gardening projects to connect existing nature to create a corridor for people and wildlife. Enterprise: Innovation and local prosperity- the Peckham Coal Line represents a new way of doing things - infrastructure for the people, by the people. It will create much-needed new workspace and studio-space along the route, connect the two vibrant high streets of Rye Lane and Queen’s Road and support local economic prosperity. It helps unlock the Heritage: a landmark that protects, repurposes and back to lifeline Nature: Greening City: by enhancing clusters of brings green along the potential of peoplethe and places by connecting physically and socially. London’s history revealing the past emphasising using treeindustrial planting and gardening projects to by connect existing and nature to celebrating Peckham’s role in London’s create a corridor for people and wildlife. economic history.

Health and Wellbeing: the Peckham Coal Line will provide a place to run, walk and cycle – to enjoy air and escape and the noise the streets Heritage: a landmark that clean protects, repurposes bringsofback to life below. It will be a place of quiet and peace, space toand think, London’s industrial history revealing the pastproviding by emphasising wander andPeckham’s explore. role in London’s economic history. celebrating Nature: Greening the City: by enhancing clusters of green along the line using tree planting and gardening projects to connect existing nature to Health Wellbeing: the Peckham Coal Line will provide a place to run, create aand corridor for people and wildlife. Community: the–embodiment of air citizen The Coal walk and cycle to enjoy clean and participation. escape the noise of theLine streets demonstrates diverse communities canproviding work together new below. It will behow a place of quiet and peace, spacetotobuild think, infrastructure that can be enjoyed by everyone. wander and explore. Heritage: a landmark that protects, repurposes and brings back to life London’s industrial history revealing the past by emphasising and celebrating Peckham’s role in London’s economic Connectivity: significantly improved connectivity forhistory. local people, as well Community: the embodiment of citizen participation. The Coal Line as providing a crucial link in a sub-regional walking and cycle route that demonstrates how diverse communities can work together to build new stretches from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and soon to Canary Wharf. infrastructure that can be enjoyed by everyone. Health and Wellbeing: the Peckham Coal Line will provide a place to run, walk and cycle – to enjoy clean air and escape the noise of the streets Enterprise: Innovation and local prosperity- the Peckham Coal Line below. It will be a place of quiet and peace, providing space to think, represents a new way of doing things - infrastructure for the people, by wander and explore. Connectivity: improved connectivity for localand people, as well the people. It significantly will create much-needed new workspace studio-space as providing a crucial linkthe in atwo sub-regional walking cycle route that along the route, connect vibrant high streetsand of Rye Lane and stretchesRoad from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and soon to Canary Wharf. Queen’s and support local economic prosperity. It helps unlock the potential of people and places by connecting physically and socially. Community: the embodiment of citizen participation. The Coal Line Enterprise: Innovation and by local prosperitythe Peckham Line demonstrates howthe diverse communities can work together to build Nature: Greening City: enhancing clusters of greenCoal along thenew line represents a new ofgardening doing things - infrastructure the people, infrastructure that way can enjoyed by everyone. using tree planting andbe projects to connectfor existing natureby to the people. It will for create much-needed create a corridor people and wildlife.new workspace and studio-space along the route, connect the two vibrant high streets of Rye Lane and Queen’s Road and support local economic prosperity. It helps unlock the potential of people and places by connecting physically socially. Connectivity: significantly improved connectivity for localand people, as well as providing a crucial that link in a sub-regional walking cycle route that Heritage: a landmark protects, repurposes and and brings back to life stretches industrial from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and soon Canary Wharf. London’s history revealing the past by to emphasising and celebrating Peckham’s role in London’s economic history.

Enterprise: Innovation and by local prosperitythe Peckham Line Nature: Greening the City: enhancing clusters of greenCoal along the line represents a new way doing things - infrastructure the people, using tree planting andofgardening projects to connectfor existing natureby to the people. It will for create much-needed new workspace andastudio-space create aand corridor people and wildlife. Health Wellbeing: the Peckham Coal Line will provide place to run, alongand the cycle route,–connect twoair vibrant high streets of Rye Lane and walk to enjoythe clean and escape the noise of the streets Queen’s Road support localand economic It helps below. It will beand a place of quiet peace, prosperity. providing space to unlock think, the potential of people and places by connecting physically and socially. wander and explore. Heritage: a landmark that protects, repurposes and brings back to life London’s industrial history revealing the past by emphasising and celebrating Peckham’s role in London’s economic history. Community: the embodiment of citizen participation. The Coal Line demonstrates how diverse communities can work together to build new infrastructure that can be enjoyed by everyone. Health and Wellbeing: the Peckham Coal Line will provide a place to run, walk and cycle – to enjoy clean air and escape the noise of the streets below. It will be a place of quiet and peace, providing space to think, wander and explore. Connectivity: significantly improved connectivity for local people, as well as providing a crucial link in a sub-regional walking and cycle route that stretches from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and soon to Canary Wharf. Community: the embodiment of citizen participation. The Coal Line Enterprise: Innovation and communities local prosperityPeckham Linenew demonstrates how diverse canthe work togetherCoal to build represents a new of doing things - infrastructure for the people, by infrastructure that way can be enjoyed by everyone. the people. It will create much-needed new workspace and studio-space along the route, connect the two vibrant high streets of Rye Lane and Queen’s Road and support local economic prosperity. It helps unlock the potential of people and places by connecting physically socially. Connectivity: significantly improved connectivity for localand people, as well

The table below highlights the main beneficiary and type of benefit (economic or financial) for each quantified benefit as providing a crucial link in a sub-regional walking and cycle route that stretches from Brixton to Rotherhithe, and soon to Canary Wharf.

Enterprise: Innovation and local prosperity- the Peckham Coal Line represents a new way of doing things - infrastructure for the people, by the people. It will create much-needed new workspace and studio-space along the route, connect the two vibrant high streets of Rye Lane and Queen’s Road and support local economic prosperity. It helps unlock the potential of people and places by connecting physically and socially.

  – Source: Arup All tables   Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

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tudy.”

beagles and we will enjoy not being in traffic.” Anna, Local resident

2.12 Learning from Best Practice & Past Failures

The High Line, New York 1.45 miles / 2.33 km

Tim, journalist vel

et le

stre

“To my mind, the post-High Line project that has been envisaged most closely in the spirit of the original, and in some ways trumps it, is the Peckham Coal Line in south London... it was easy to understand the simplicity and brilliance of the idea, with the elevated railway line floating above busy road interchanges.”

6. HEALTH AND WELLBEING

The Greenway (Wick Lane to West Ham Section), London 1.5 miles / 2.4 km

et

re

st l

ve

le

Promenade Plantée, Paris 2.9 miles / 4.7 km

? ? ? ?

Peckham Coal Line, London 0.55 miles / 0.9 km

As more consideration is given to imaginative ways of improving the quality of urban life, a number of ambitious green infrastructure projects, often repurposing existing structures, have either been proposed or realised. The Peckham Coal Line is different in that it will be a project drawn from fragmented sites, relying upon constructing links as well as reusing infrastructure. However comparisons are, and have been, easily made and it is useful to compare scale and character as well as to outline lessons learned. The scale comparison above shows three very successful elevated green infrastructure projects. The High Line in New York and the Promenade Plantée in Paris create well-defined linear parks occupying abandoned inner-city railways, while the Olympic Greenway in Newham is an upgraded part of a longer 8km-long path along the top of the Northern Outfall Sewer,

44

7. W

“I’ll come with the hope that it will create a space free from pollution, where we can bring our grandchildren. Where the whole family can walk in safety to other parts of the street level borough. Where there will be community schemes Andy, our grandchildren can local resident become involved with. We will follow your developments, support them and get involved where possible.” street level

“I support the Peckham Coal Line because of the value of off-road walking for physical and mental health. I’ll come with local ? mental health groups and we will be? ? de-stressing and doing mindfulness.” ? ? Carol, crowdfunder ?

“I support the Peckham Coal Line because I'd love to see more green areas initially delivered for the London 2012 games but now an in Peckham for running and cycling.” integral part of the new Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park and Beth, local resident Lower Lea Valley regeneration. The spectacular success of the High Line is such that the ? suffix ‘- line’ has become synonymous with any landscape ? project occupying disused infrastructure. This ?is an understandable shorthand, looking for ?an immediate? and recognizable connection, but it can downplay ? the specifics of a site or place and disregard that this is not an unprecedented approach. A very different, but perhaps more useful, precedent for the Coal Line is the Lea River Park, a linear park connecting fragments of riverside land with a series of differently scaled discrete projects now coming into fruition after over a decade of work. A first phase opened in 2017.


The Garden Bridge, London

High Line, New York

London’s highest profile recent green infrastructure proposal is for the central London Garden Bridge river crossing. This project attracted a huge amount of support, controversy and funding prior to, after review, being very publically ‘cancelled’ by the new Mayor.

The New York High Line creates a new, elevated linear park through the west side of Manhattan, introducing green space into a very densely urban context. The project has proved an internationally acclaimed success and is currently being extended. However, success has brought a shift in the nature of the original project and in its outcomes.

The project successfully demonstrates: • • •

The capacity of a strong vision to unlock financial and institutional support. How good marketing and branding ensure a high project profile. The importance of attracting a broad base of skilled support from volunteers, employees and trustees.

But the reasons for failure included: • • • •

• •

A grand project that is all or nothing. No possibility of phasing. A lack of detailed and sustainable business planning. A business model which required restricted public access and a potential for privatised public space. Benefits were not clearly articulated and there was no clear case made for the main purpose – a new central London river crossing. An iconoclastic idea ‘gifted’ rather than drawn from the local community or wider city. A politically driven project that thus became vulnerable to a changing political context.

• •

• •

• •

Lea River Park, London

The new co

The Lea River Park, or Leaway, is a new linear park, which follows the River Lea the Lower Lea Valley, opening Thethrough long term ambition WAY GREEN up riverside access to areas formerly 1. Twelvetrees Crescent Ramp connection enclosed by industrial sites. More than a 2. Western Towpath decade in development, the park creates 3. Three Mills Green network of green infrastructure 4. a new Mill Meads 5. which Twelvetrees Gaswork Parknew amenity, addresses provides a historic east/west lack of connectivity across the Lea Valley and supports Although growing from local significant residential development on LEAWAY community action the project is now both sides of the river valley. seen as a city-wide amenity. Proposed Phase The project has become a popular • Complex land ownership and funding Leaway DDA complian Western Towp international tourist destination. led to phasing. Conceived as a connection This was not the original vision and series of discrete parts, phases that undermines local community value. achieve stand-alone objectives are High levels of use bring maintenance also integral to an overall vision. challenges. • The project is part of a wider area Unsurprisingly, given the New York strategic plan, including changes in property market, the project is land use and movement patterns. now an agent of regeneration and • Success has been achieved with redevelopment, transforming the a robust and appropriate palette of original neighbourhood. materials, in part developed from A partnership of public funding earlier work in the area including and private sponsorship has the Greenway. enabled a high-specification • The continuity of a strong narrative project to be realised and then has been essential in allowing the maintained. project be realised. There have been High design quality has ensured a number of different clients and a high profile for the project and even names for the project. reinforces its ambition. • Wider community and educational A strong and bold initial vision initiatives, some led by artists, have captured the imagination of been integral to the project delivery. funders, institutions, stakeholders • Local stakeholder engagement has and the public. been prioritised.

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

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Section 3 Concept Design

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

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3.1 The Peckham Coal Line Concept

The Peckham Coal Line is best understood as a network of new public routes and spaces, interwoven at both high and low level, connecting pockets of residual space by and under the existing railway line and linking Peckham Rye with Queens Road. Along the length of the Coal Line there are three areas of broadly different characters – urban, open and nature. A more complex and detailed narrative sets out a sequence of distinct spaces. These each respond to the specifics of their context as well as being capable of supporting different activities and forming the links that make up the project as a whole.

Yarnfield Square

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Design development

Design Development

1. RYE LANE: A BUZZ OF VIBRANCY AND CONTRASTS

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2. THE OLD COAL YARD: PECKHAM’S HISTORICAL INDUSTRIAL CENTRE

3. BISHOP WILFRED WOOD ARCHES: A PLATFORM UNDER THE RAILWAY

4. MAYA BALCONY: BIG VIEWS AND A VITAL CONNECTION .

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KEY TO THE COAL LINE CONCEPT 8

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8. QUEENS ROAD PECKHAM: A GATEWAY AND NORTH / SOUTH ACCESS

5. THE OLD STABLE YARD: DOUBLE HEIGHT ARCHES FACE THE OLD HORSE BLOCK

6. KIRKWOOD NATURE RESERVE: AN OASIS OF NATURE OPEN TO ALL

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

7. BIDWELL STREET: BRINGING AN ANCIENT STREET TO LIFE

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3.2 Connecting Spaces

The Peckham Coal Line follows the northern embankment of the railway and at both high and low level links a series of distinct places, creating a connected east/west route and activating new spaces. By enhancing existing routes and creating new ones, the project increases connectivity in an area of the city historically constrained by rail and road infrastructure. It opens up currently unconnected and underused spaces, including the fringes of rail embankments, blocked-off roads, empty yard spaces and a nature reserve.

The Coal Line would enable the redeveloped old Coal Yard to become a fully connected place, rather than an isolated island of residual space. Access stairs to high-level crossings of Consort Road and Gordon Road tie into improved public realm works and the new route through the Old Stable Yard. Kirkwood Road and Bidwell Street will be transformed from unattractive and somewhat threatening dead-end streets into green and active public spaces. A new opening in the concrete wall connects Bidwell Street with Cossall Walk and through to Woods Road, creating an important new link. Connections from Queens Road are also radically improved.

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New connectivity Access to high level Coal Line Existing connectivity improved Aspirational route under the railway embankment connecting Copeland buildings with multistorey car park High Level Coal Line Low Level Coal Line Existing and Proposed Station Squares

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

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3.3 Character

At just under a kilometre in length, the Peckham Coal Line may be short, but it cuts through a very varied and complex piece of city. From unlocking a mature nature reserve and providing high-level views to the city centre on the northern horizon, to new access to historic yards and railway structures, routes will be formed by an intense and unexpected sequence of spaces.

OPEN The central section has open views across the floodplain towards the City skyline

Running east to west there are three main areas with differing characters: nature (or woodland), open and urban. Although there is also some overlap between these areas, together they form a unified whole in which a consistent design language and repeated elements of, for example, the hard landscaping and street furniture, make the Coal Line an instantly recognisable and valuable contribution to the urban realm.

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WOODLAND The eastern section passes beneath mature trees and through a nature reserve

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B. Nature Reserve • Walkway around the edge of Kirkwood Nature Reserve (j). • Connecting two new public spaces under railway bridges on Kirkwood Road (k) and Bidwell Street (l) extending out from the nature reserve.

A. New Link • New public space in Bidwell Street. • Direct link (m) through existing wall to Cossall Walk and Queens Road.

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URBAN Former industrial buildings, larger buildings, high-street commerce and rooftop activity characterise the western end of the Coal Line

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C. Walkway and Belvedere • High-level walkway with views across to central London running parallel to line of railway and enhancing embankment planting (f). • Bridge crossings over Consort Road (g) and Gordon Road (h).

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E. High-level Arches • New deck will extend out to create high-level public space extending Coal Line under the arches (d). • Potential secondary access from base of multistorey car park (e).

D. Old Stable Yard • New public route through Old Stable Yard to encourage activity (i). • Renovated stables building for community, arts and SME uses (i).

F. Ramp and Yard • Ramp and stairs (a) leading from the yard off Rye Lane to elevated areas of the former Coal Line (b). • Ramp allows service access to railway level and will be an integral part of any future development of the old Coal Yard site. • Development will also allow railway arches (c) beside the multistorey car park to be opened up to enhance connectivity.

N The drawings until this point are all orientated with north to the top as above. The following sequence of drawings are looking south to maximise the area of the project which can be seen.

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

June 2018

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3.4 Accessibility

The project presents a number of challenges related to the negotiation of existing site constraints. These issues are summarised in the drawing, but it is accessibility that is the most important and governing factor. Close study of existing levels, the need to match clearance at road bridges and the space needed for inclined access, has led to the development of the proposed section shown below. An inclined ground of 1:21 or shallower provides access for pedestrians, cycles and the mobility impaired without recourse to the restrictions and regulations associated with steeper ramps. It provides a comfortable and compliant way of negotiating level changes in an urban context. The main east/west route is therefore accessed by a 1:21 incline.

Consort Road Crossing • Potential bridge maintenance access issue with new walkway as shown. • Height of new walkway matches bridge and is over minimum road requirement.

Gordon Road Crossing • Potential bridge maintenance access issue with new walkway as shown. • Height of new walkway matches bridge but is below minimum road requirement.

From Rye Lane in the west an incline ramps up alongside the existing railway embankment, through what is currently the scaffolding yard, to reach the upper level of the existing ruderal Coal Line landscape and high-level arches. From here a level walkway continues at high level, bridging Consort Road and Gordon Road, and gaining support from the embankment above Maya Close. The walkway then inclines down to Kirkwood Road, which will require some slight building up of the ground to reconcile the levels. The walkway alongside the nature reserve boundary wall is initially level then slopes down to meet Bidwell Street and then in turn inclines down to Cossall Walk. The lower walkway east of Gordon Road could gain some support from the existing concrete wall retaining the road. Car parking along Cossall Walk and access to yard space off Consort Road is carefully considered and retained. Secondary access points by stair provide a number of different ways of accessing the high-level walkway. There is no need to install lifts for the purposes of access. (However development of the high-level arches may include service access via an enclosed lift).

Proposed long section through Peckham Coal Line route looking south (route marked in red)

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Sheltered Housing Embankment • Difficulties of access for construction and potential disturbance of trees integral with embankment make this a problematic option to deliver.

Gordon Road

Kirkwood Nature Reserve

Kirkwood Nature Reserve • Options for route dependent in part on nature reserve’s conservation considerations.


Old Stable Yard • Development of Old Stable Yard should be understood as one part of a series of railway-enclosed sites on both sides of Consort Road.

Potential Link to Multistorey Car Park • Ramping difficult but generous stepped access could be integrated with refurbished arches.

Scaffolding Yard / Old Coal Yard • It is understood that the Scaffolding Yard is due to close in the near future and that the site will become available for redevelopment. • Option for direct access to former Coal Line area but this will not be accessible (without a lift) and will not be suitable for cycles (landscape strip is narrow). • New ramp can provide maintenance access for Network Rail. • There are differing approaches to integrating ramp, development and public space. • This raised section has an at-grade interface with live railway; this will need careful resolution.

Maya Close + Bishop Wilfred Wood Close • Potential overlooking of housing and gardens requires sensitivity, consideration and mitigation.

Kirkwood Road

Gordon Road

High Level Viaduct Arches

Scaffolding Yard

Details of proposed long section

Rye Lane

Consort Rdoa

Scaffolding Yard

Peckham Coal Line

701m Height chnage - 5.8m

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

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3.5 Think of it as . . .

In order to explore the potential qualities and future character of the Peckham Coal Line, and to enable stakeholders and workshop participants to imagine differing scenarios, a series of visual prompts was developed to describe the project. The intention was to suggest that a successful place contains many layers of meaning and can, simultaneously, hold different interpretations. This process continues to be a very useful way of envisioning the space without resorting to the limitations of a specific architectural language or structural solution. It is likely that the Coal Line will become a heterogeneous rather than homogeneous place as it develops.

. . . a CANAL TOWPATH

. . . a BRIDGE

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Think of it as a canal towpath: Urban towpaths are increasingly busy thoroughfares, hosting both wildlife corridors and thriving microbusinesses; with a shared-use path, different users are required to negotiate.

The walkways will form part of a bridge: A crossing in and across the city. A sectional comparison (below) with the popular and comfortable Millennium Bridge shows a gentler incline and much less height climbed.

Section through Millennium Bridge: height above ground 7.9m

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Long Section through Coal Line – Kirkwood Road to Rye Lane: height above ground 5.8m Peckham Coal Line

. . . a PARK

. . . a WILDLIFE CORRIDOR

701m

. . . a PRODUCTIVE LANDSCAPE Height chnage - 5.8m

Millennium Bridge

325m Height chnage - 7.9m

What makes a successful park? Which parkland elements are relevant here? • trees, benches, fountains, fields • picnics, games, play, pavilion, cafe • paths, vistas and quietness.

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A linear wildlife corridor extending Kirkwood Nature Reserve: Working with what is there (railway embankments are great habitats), valuing that which is secret to encourage biodiversity. Celebrating the ruderal.

A place to grow food and plants: • herbs, honey, fruit • a linear orchard • a place to harvest • a place to consume.


. . . the PRESENCE OF THE PAST

Think of it as a connection to the past: Ruins and memories of past industry and infrastructure are understood in a new way -– including a former coal depot, stables and an abandoned utopian urban motorway.

. . . a PIER or PROMENADE

. . . a FLOOR

Think of it as a pier or a promenade: It will be a linear space on the edge, the length of two or three seaside piers or a beachside walk: a high-level walkway with views. What will be at the end of the Peckham Pier?

Think of the route as a (magic) carpet: • a surface for activity: amphitheatre • a surface for sitting / playing • ‘a serviced ground’: lighting or power • supporting temporary events • integrated with (small-scale) activity/work

. . . a ROOF

. . . a PLANTER

. . . a HIGH PLACE

A look out: Adding to Peckham’s special culture of high-level activities connecting Bussey Building and Peckham Levels (and the potential of the scaffolding yard). A high-level place for all, connecting to the landscape. Planespotters, trainspotters, birdwatchers, stargazers, watching sunset and dawn. 0

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Scale 1:200 @ A3

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Walkway structures could also form roofs to buildings: An opportunity for a new ‘railway arch’ typology creating small-scale studios / workspaces and extending the project’s scope. There is high demand for small-scale places of work across London.

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

Think of any new structures as planters (especially if they are roofs): • deep trays of soil not just platforms • a potential linear urban wood • how green could it be?

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3.5 Think of it as . . . The initial list is not exhaustive and many other visual prompts could be applied. Each opens up a specific line of enquiry about future use, quality and/or activity. This exercise will continue to develop and inform the project.

. . . a PLACE OF PLAY

. . . a PLACE TO LEARN

. . . a SHELTER

. . . an URBAN SQUARE

. . . an INCUBATOR

. . . a VILLAGE GREEN

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3.6 Think of it as not... It is also helpful to define what the project is not, as a means of further focusing the nature of the proposal. There is a place for all of these examples and they are successful in their own right, but it is inappropriate, unsuitable or just not workable that the Peckham Coal Line becomes overwhelmed by grandiosity, or by large-scale infrastructural ideas. The project must also avoid being dominated by a single use or stakeholder, such as cycling provision.

Grandiose Infrastructure (bridge linking parks,Tehran)

A Land Bridge (Mile End Park, London)

Predominately a Tourist Attraction (High Line, New York)

Just a Cycle Route (The Snake, Copenhagen)

Much more difficult to control is the potential for a successful project to become a wider attraction. The engagement work by FPCL to date concentrates on local community need and this should remain a priority. A project strategy that is alert to and connects with local regeneration priorities will also ensure Peckham remains at the centre of the project.

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

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3.7 Landscape 1: Woodland

The landscaping strategy of the Peckham Coal Line enhances the three areas of different character – woodland (or nature), open and urban – with three differing approaches to habitat.

Continuation of woodland on rail embankment. Potentially gradual thinning out towards Gordon Road, at the approach to the ‘Open’ section of the Coal Line.

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These range from extending and reinforcing the existing woodland, to the introduction of grasses and scrubland on new raised platforms, to a celebratory mix of ruderal vegetation (opportunist plants, often non-native species, found on waste ground) and new exotic planting making reference to Peckham’s more tropical contemporary connections.

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1. Potential pedestrian entrance from Queens Road Peckham. An open space (A) is created, welcoming you into the site, with views into the woodland covering the railway bank. Localised felling and coppicing of trees and shrubs allows for the creation of a boardwalk among the trees, leading pedestrians into the site. This area is to function as a continuation of Kirkwood Nature Reserve. Slower and more intimate than the cycle route, it allows you to get close to the surrounding woodland. By elevating the path slightly, clear directions of movement are created, thus protecting vegetation from trampling, and focusing activity so that other areas are left relatively undisturbed for the benefit of wildlife. This route could be non-compliant if necessary, with the ‘cycle’ entrance acting as the DDA access.


deral meets Exotic u R , d l o ial, B n, Soc a b r U

Kirkwood Nature Reserve The slightly gothic, shady and lush woodland character of Kirkwood Nature Reserve is retained and enhanced, inspired by nearby Nunhead Cemetery, through careful editing of and addition to existing vegetation. It is important to maintain the secluded, wild character, especially for the benefit of local wildlife. Mainly native species will be used, and improvement of biodiversity will be the focus. Improving the potential for foraging, both for people and wildlife, will also be central. With the Coal Line running elevated along the boundary wall, the retention of the existing character is made possible within the reserve itself. Pedestrian paths slowly meandering under the canopy of the trees allow for interaction and appreciation of the reserve, while minimising disturbance to flora and fauna. Sites B and C are important, acting as entrance spaces to Kirkwood Nature Reserve. They create a more welcoming setting, but also act as a further measure to retain the seclusion within the reserve. If better incorporated they can act as two clearings within the linear woodland along the railway, and social activities and larger seating areas can be located here, rather than within the woodland areas. To maintain turning circles for emergency vehicles they need to be open, but careful placement of planting and street furniture can still make these spaces attractive, functional and well integrated within the woodland setting. 2. Potential alternative route for cyclists, as shown route is used as pedestrian entrance. This would mean less conflict between cyclists and pedestrians. 3. Trees planted along ramp to create filtered views, ensuring privacy is maintained for residents, while improving the aesthetic qualities of the site. 4. Dotted line showing potential extension of Kirkwood Nature Reserve, through incorporation of existing woodland on rail embankments. If a relocation of the fence to expand the reserve is not possible, an improved boundary treatment could aid in visually incorporating the banks. In the latter case it would be beneficial if the nature reserve was permitted to maintain the banks.

Sßdgelände Nature Park, Berlin

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

Nunhead Cemetery, London

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3.7 Landscape 2: Open

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5. Railway embankment with ruderal scrub woodland vegetation. If incorporated within the site the existing vegetation can be edited, but will regardless form a backdrop to the Peckham Coal Line, and set the tone for the soft landscape design.

Existing vegetation viewed from train

6. Elevated above the ground, this section of the Peckham Coal Line offers views towards the skyline of central London, as well as the trains moving past at high speed. The open, exposed nature will be embraced and enhanced through the soft landscape design, with planting that moves and rustles in the wind, and frames sightlines. The aim is to create a rich sensory experience, working with textures, seasonal changes, sound and movement.

As the grassland and scrubland habitats are unstable by nature, being the first stages of ecological succession, they need regular maintenance in order not to become thickets and eventually woodland. The management can, however, be incorporated as an integral part of the design. A pragmatic and straightforward maintenance strategy with a rotating clearance regime can, for example, create a cyclic colonising and revealing of railway rubble along the path.

Inspiration will be taken from the world of ruderal plants that naturally colonise railway embankments, creating important linear habitats through the urban landscape. Mainly ruderal grassland and scrubland vegetation will be utilised as part of the design, with the addition of carefully chosen species to further enhance the aesthetic and biodiverse qualities of the planting.

This approach assumes that planting can be incorporated within the walkway structure. If the embankments were to be part of the site it could be implemented there as well.

When working with ruderal plants as the basis for the design it is important to take visual qualities into consideration, as this type of environment is often perceived as unkempt. Through the integration with hard landscape elements, and combining with suitable companion plants with attractive visual qualities, it is possible to create a landscape that looks managed yet wild. For example, ornamental, less invasive, yet butterfly friendly, varieties of buddleia could be incorporated. RIGHT The High Line, New York.

Flora along disused railway tracks

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Planting incorporated within an elevated walkway (although the actual planting is not a Coal Line precedent)

Rubble and grass, Auckland Airport


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The scaffolding yard forms the entrance from the bustling Rye Lane. This is another special moment along the Coal Line, where the character found on the elevated walkway among the railway arches is repeated. At ground level bold, architectural, exuberant planting is used to create ‘Burle Marx’ style lushness held between the richly textured brick walls of the railways.

7. Stretching through the brick arches of the railway, the elevated walkway widens to form one of the key spaces along the Coal Line, likely to be its main social hub. This is to be emphasised in the planting design, where ruderal-inspired planting (following the majority of the Coal Line) suddenly intermingles with exotic, architectural plants, to create a layered lushness. This stylised landscape of foliage textures is inspired by the diverse range of plants found in Peckham gardens all around the site.

The transition between landscape types could be gradual, where more exotic looking plants are intermingled within the ruderal grassland, increasing in numbers as one approaches the arches, or sudden, with the exotics concentrated only in the area immediately surrounding the arches. The second approach is perhaps more desirable and fun.

Palais de Tokyo, Paris (Le Balto)

General Note: Food growing for community groups could potentially be incorporated within the two ‘exotic’ spaces.

Saint Nazaire, Gilles Clement

Roberto Burle Marx; BNDS Building Rio de Janeiro

Palais de Tokyo, Paris

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

Cornerstone, Oehme van Sweden

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3.8 Delivering Public Space by a Railway The principal challenge of the project is how to resolve the interface with an operational railway asset. There are a number of issues each related to different adjacencies, but taken individually they are neither unprecedented nor technically prohibitive. Detailed discussions with Network Rail are ongoing, as part of this feasibility process.

Consort Road Alleyway

Gordon Road Bridge Consort Road Bridge • • • •

Construction adjacent to Network Rail bridges Construction adjacent to retaining / viaduct walls Ensuring access for maintenance Construction over public highway: vehicle clearance and impact

• • •

Construction on Network Rail land at ground level Construction adjacent to retaining / viaduct walls Retaining third party access Surface water disposal

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Queens Road to Bidwell Street Embankment • • • • •

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Elevated Walkway behind Maya Close • • • • • •

Construction on Network Rail land at high level Adjacency to operational rail line Construction adjacent to retaining wall Construction adjacent to new building Surface water disposal Construction within embankment planting

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Scaffolding Yard (high level)

Scaffolding Yard (low level)

Construction on Network Rail land at high level Adjacency to operational rail line Construction within arches at high level Adjacency to Remote Control Equipment Integration with future/ongoing development Surface water disposal Adjacency to utilities trough Interface with operational railway Ensuring access for maintenance

• • • • • • • •

Construction on Network Rail land at ground level Construction adjacent to retaining / viaduct walls Construction within arches at low level Retaining third party access Integration with future/ongoing development Surface water disposal

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Construction adjacent to embankment Construction on Network Rail land at ground level Construction within embankment planting Construction adjacent to embankment planting 0

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Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

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3.9 Safety & Security Considerations Ensuring that the Peckham Coal Line is safe and secure is crucial to the success of the scheme. There are a series of different safety and security considerations that the feasibility study has identified and future detailed designs will need to further explore. The considerations include: • A path next to live railway line Much of the Coal Line runs parallel to a railway track with a live third rail. To mitigate risks of trespassing and injury there will need to be installation of a high, secure palisade fence between the Coal Line route and the railway embankment and track. Precedents: DNA Cycle Path, Cambridge; Millwall Quietway cycle path, London • Lighting The ambition is for the Coal Line to be used throughout the day and night. Appropriate lighting solutions will need to be implemented along the route to ensure this is possible and to prevent any enclosed spaces from becoming sites of antisocial behaviour.

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• Passive surveillance The Coal Line is designed to be used by a variety of people at different times of the day and night. The route is overlooked by the railway line and the Cossall Estate at the eastern end, as well as Peckham Levels and the Bussey Building towards the western end. There is likely to be space for local activity along the route with different opening and closing times. The design of the paths will ensure there are straight lines of sight as well as a series of different entrance and exit points to encourage footfall. This means there will be plenty of people using the route, enhancing the sense of safety and usability. The potential for CCTV will be considered at any locations requiring further safety consideration.

A number of the sites along the route, including Bidwell Street and Kirkwood Nature Reserve, have a history of antisocial behaviour. Small interventions during 2016 by Friends of the Peckham Coal Line, such as the introduction of planters and street art to Bidwell Street, reduced the incidences of fly tipping in the area over the summer months. This demonstrates the wider potential of the Coal Line to create safer and more secure public spaces.

As with other aspects of the Coal Line, Mickey, cafe and putting these ideas intoCLF practice developing appropriate solutions for “I think the Peckham Coal Line is different sites will be done by working • Designing out crime a great project and we are glad to with local people, the local police and fire Any public space design process be a partner. Places are safer services and other relevant agencies, as needs to consider how crime and when they’re being used.” well as Southwark Council. antisocial behaviour could be unwittingly encouraged. This will be considered in the development of each of the Peckham Precedents: Design Against Crime Research Centre at Central St Martin’s Coal Line sites to address unintended University negative consequences.

“Our crowdfunding initiative is a chance Logan and Peter, for all Londoners to Network take part in theRail regeneration of their “The London South East Asset Protection neighbourhoods - from (ASPRO) team have been advising the grassroots up.”the Peckham Coal Line of Network Rail’s operational Sadiq, Mayor of and commercial requirements to help inform this design feasibility study. The London feasibility report demonstrates that the high level ambition is potentially feasible and we “I will continue todetailed work look forward to advising on more with the council andas they proposals and management options Coal to come forward toPeckham best guide theLine Peckham Coal help ensure this vital Line team on delivering individual sites. We project goes ahead in see potential commercial merit for adjacent thethrough way thatthis theinitiative local Network Rail sites and community want.” grasswe are interested by the innovative roots approach, which creates its own specific challenges. We support further Harriet, Camberwellof the Peckham Coal Line development & Peckham beyondMP this initial feasibility.”

oal e t nd

For each of these issues there are precedents and there is much to be learnt from other projects and public spaces facing similar considerations.

Vinita, crowdfunder “Our crowdfunding “Congrats,initiative what a brilliant is a chance concept and inspiring to forvery all Londoners tosee that it's ledtake by local To part residents. in the make it a safe route, it should be regeneration of their well overlooked with appropriate neighbourhoods - from land uses at key moments.” the grassroots up.” Sadiq, Mayor of London “I will continue to work with the council and Peckham Coal Line to help ensure this vital project goes ahead in the way that the local community want.”

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Harriet, Camberwell


3.10 Design Considerations The Peckham Coal Line is a series of separate spaces and sites, each likely to be developed in different ways. To ensure that the overall vision of the project remains coherent, it will be important to have a strong and consistent design language, as well as repeated elements along the route.

LEFT Locals design

the base of the graphic language by stencil printing natural items they found as part of a walk along the route. BOTTOM Visitors walk along the old industrial route as part of London Open House weekend

This design language would manifest itself in the wayfinding, furniture, colour palette, graphics, streetscape and planting. From engagement with local people throughout the feasibility study, a number of guiding design principles have emerged: • • • • • • • • • •

industrial not corporate public not domestic dynamic not fixed wild not tidy relaxed not formal fragmented not homogenous robust not delicate responsive not gestural delightful not dull flexible not specific

These design principles will be added to the existing graphic language informed by past events – including the colours and symbols created at the Make your Mark workshop – and will be developed further as the aesthetic of the Coal Line continues to evolve.

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3.11 Peckham Coal Line as Catalyst

The Peckham Coal Line is not the passive provision of a new pedestrian cycle route or green amenity. The strength of the project is in its conception as a provocation – a challenge to the status quo. This is clearest in its potential to be a catalyst. The project will be socially transformative, engaging the community in its design, development and delivery, but it can also be an agent of physical change. A new route will bring activities, footfall and new links between currently disconnected or difficult-toaccess places. This in turn will activate underused or disused sites.

The walkway structure can act as the roof to new workshop space. Enhanced public space can provide a setting and focus for new activities. Landowners, principally the public bodies of Network Rail and Southwark, can benefit as much as local communities. This all brings value, a context and momentum for change, which is greater than the sum of the individual parts, further demonstrating the importance of the overall vision and narrative in understanding the project.

Potential future connection to Nunhead linking in with Capital Green Chain Walk.

Old Stable Yard NEW PUBLIC SPACE AND ACTIVITY

Kirkwood Road NEW PUBLIC SPACE

Bidwell Street NEW PUBLIC SPACE

POTENTIAL FOR NEW OR ENHANCED WORKSPACE UNDER NEW WALKWAYS

ENHANCED EA

ST / WEST CO

IMPROVED LINK FROM COSSALL WALK TO QUEENS ROAD

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NNECTIVITY


Scaffolding Yard DEVELOPMENT SITE ACTIVATED

D

E NC HA EN EA ST ES /W T TY

VI

ST

/ WE

ENHANCED USE OF ARCHES OPENING ON BOTH SIDES OF VIADUCT

TI

EC

NN

CO

AST ED E Y ANC T ENH ECTIVI N CON

POTENTIAL FOR NEW OR ENHANCED WORKSPACE UNDER NEW WALKWAY

NEW PUBLIC SPACE & ACTVITIY

Inset: the Peckham Coal Line is one part of the development potential of the parcel of Network Rail sites held between the viaducts and centred on Peckham Rye station

Sites directly related to Coal Line Adjacent Sites Site Plan showing both development opportunity sites and the potential for new workspaces related to or defined by the Peckham Coal Line

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Section 4 Delivery & Governance


4.1 Realising the Peckham Coal Line The economic benefits of the Peckham Coal Line are best exploited through delivery of the project as a whole. The ‘whole scheme’ consists of a network of routes at street level combined with a series of elevated decks that link existing green spaces. Each individual site poses different opportunities and constraints in terms of land ownership, development method, governance and liability. There are three options for realising the Coal Line. The first is to combine the delivery into one single linear process. Alternatively the project could be zoned into individual sites to be delivered in phases. The third option would a hybrid approach, developing the design of the route as a whole and safeguarding this through outline planning, then delivering individual sites as and when they become available. This section examines the next steps required, including options for the organisation and governance structure of the Coal Line.

3.

4.1

2.

1.

5

Proposed high line route (PCL) Project:

Re-imagine Bidwell

Drawing type:

Proposed low line route (PCL)

UNIT 4 professional development

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Mesh, 108 St Marys Road,

1.

Site zone

Scale

1.2000

Paper Size

A3

Site boundary

7.1

I

Date Issued:

10th August 2017 Drawing:

Locating site in c


7.1

6.1

Bidwell Street

4.3

6.2 4.2

Stable Yard

Initial site zone

7

8

7.2

Initial site boundary

Drawing number:

Queens Road

RBS.U4.001

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Contractor to check all dimensions on site Only figured dimensions are to be worked from.

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4.2 Delivery Options

The Peckham Coal Line project is ambitious and complex. This may make the project challenging to deliver but these characteristics are also integral to both the appeal and strength of the vision. A Quantified Benefits Comparison undertaken by Arup as part of the Business Case clearly demonstrates the value of the project delivered in its entirety. The construction of the project will be varied and complex, ranging from landscape works to new high-level walkways, including parts integrated with both new and existing architecture. Walkway structures and platforms will be structurally freestanding, but interfaces will still be required with railway arches, roads, retaining walls, landscape features and, potentially, future new development. Although the land ownership, with the exception of the central Old Stable Yard area, is broadly shared between Network Rail and the London Borough of Southwark, individual agreements will be required for different sites. Sites are of differing scales, value and legal status, and ownership boundaries will not necessarily align with the design proposals. Some aspects of the project

are relatively straightforward and uncontentious, whereas others are more problematic, costly and subject to unforeseen or uncontrollable factors. The relative impacts of a series of potential project scenarios (see right) were analysed as part of the Business Case. Given the identified demand for the project it is unsurprising that all of the proposed scenarios scored discernable benefits, but the whole project, which is after all the creation of a new connection, scored considerably higher. Two differing approaches to delivery were initially considered. Either the project, understood as a discrete piece of infrastructure such as a new bridge or park, would be designed, funded and delivered in one single linear process. Alternatively, the project would be delivered in a series of phases over a longer period of time and potentially through different sources of funding. Both approaches come with advantages, disadvantages and risks. Given the innovative nature of the project a more nuanced approach was agreed to be most appropriate.

1: Whole Scheme: Scope of Fully Delivered Project

- 0.70m

Yarnfield Square

0.00m

0.40m

0.90m

0.00m

4.40m

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2: Phased Delivery: Illustrative Phasing Scenarios (as used in Business Case analysis)

A. Kirkwood Road and Cossall Walk to Queens Road

B. Low Line: ground level connections only

C. Rye Lane to Consort Road

D. Rye Lane to Gordon Road / Kirkwood Road

Approach 1: The Whole Scheme At Once

Approach 2: Phased Delivery

Strengths: • This has maximum impact. • It is potentially the most efficient means of delivery. • It is attractive in its clarity. • It unlocks disused sites of land more quickly, enabling community use and development alongside. • The momentum and ambition of the project remain unchecked.

Strengths: • This is a more immediate and pragmatic option. • The project is seen to be real, with less complex parts appearing relatively quickly, which would reinforce credibility and community confidence. • A gradual implementation brings greater possibilities of a process of participatory delivery and the Risks: opportunity for the project to learn • All of the required funding would and evolve. need to be raised at once. • Challenging sections of the work, • There would be significant pressure which are not easy to predict, are to resolve all of the multiple given more time to resolve. agreements and issues prior to commencement. • The project is then only as strong as its weakest link, with single issues potentially exercising a disproportionate impact. • This is an all-or-nothing approach. • Participatory delivery wouold be potentially weakened.

Peckham Coal Line Feasibility Study Friends of Peckham Coal Line with Adams & Sutherland + Arup

Risks: • The project becomes spread over a longer period and so involves more resource and work. • There is a risk in lack of continuity between delivery agents resulting in delays or need for re-scoping, and dilution of the overall project. • As some benefit is accrued from partial implementation, the momentum and political will to overcome difficulties and complete the full project could be weakened. • Funding for a series of smaller projects might be more realistic, but the ambition and scale of the full project will attract a different level of interest and investment. • An apparently more modest project may discourage some public support.

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Coal Line because I brilliant heroic idea to think it has the potenre-use a brownfield tial to develop into an linear site for cheerful important space for social use. I'll come local communities, not with my sketch book, only to enjoy green friends, my bicycle. We space but also to are really looking socialise and come Jilke, researcher forward to the Coal together in.” Benny, local resident Line. And we will draw, historian In acknowledging andand addressing cycle the and admire • The project should still aim for a full • The project should therefore also crowdfunder support the Peckham Coal Line because its unusual, unexpected risks of differing strategies, a hybrid funding application for the “I whole be described as a series of different important community project withprojects. the views approach to delivery is proposed. This is of my beloved scheme. This keeps up thean ambition component parts and A to empower local voices. I’ll come should Peckham.” best described as a set of overarching and momentum. Approvalspotential need fragmented implementation with my dog and aim we will walk the line and principles underpinning an action plan. to be negotiated and difficult areas to have something, however enjoy the view and naturehappening reserve.”at all points on resolved process modest, “I donated money to the Coal Line in the and the sooner that Sarah, event volunteer The integrity and ambition of begins the site, not just at the seemingly crowdfunding campaign as I believe in thethe better. the project unique vision is essential ‘easier’ area around the nature vision of the project and would love “I support the Peckham Coal Line because I This need not be an exclusive reserve. For example, some kind of to see my city of London build a world want a beautiful, easy and safe pathway • Everything that is done should and community approachspace but a strategy of intervention at the west, Rye Lane famous civic walkway between Queens Road Peckham and Peckham continue to of clearly be seen as end is essential. out its industrial heritage.” implementation that builds up Rye to connect local communities and bring workingAnonymous, towards thiscrowdfunder vision. One over time business opportunities to the area. I’llneed comenot all part of the vision is a means of • Implemented projects with an open heart and mind and we will engaging wider • The Peckham Coal Line is a new be permanent. This builds on earlier “I the think it's community. something quite unique that is a show London - and Britain - what the future This hasnod been great strength high-level interventions by FPCL such as to aPeckham's pastofyet is very much of urban park created from of community can look like.” the work FPCL date. I see it asapart web of of spaces. This description is the ‘Grow the Line’ idea. Signage, and for has the done 21st to century. Rory, crowdfunderplanting, historic interpretation and helpfulyet in retaining an overarching the regeneration of Peckham a practical • The design of theand whole street furniture are all visible markers creative andproject artistic responsevision to ourand ambition whilst imagining must continue to be developed. non-linear component parts. that can be relocated as and when industrial heritage.” This provides wider framework necessary. Janet, acrowdfunder for addressing problem areas and • Component parts of the project delivering the bigger vision. should potentially be deliverable as • Workspace accommodation would soon as possible. However, they also benefit from a phased approach, • The whole project needs to be seen must always be presented as part allowing capacity to grow and as beneficial and deliverable, and of the wider vision. A good example refining the need and offer through have clear public support. This could would be a breach of the wall and experience. An early delivery of address the risk where specific new access ramp / steps at Bidwell part of this would demonstrate the areas might become a problem, for Street. The spirit of the whole breadth of the project. example Network Rail development project can be encapsulated in one interfaces. achievable detail. • Partnerships for delivery are likely to evolve with different stakeholders 7. WORKING PROCESS 8. and TOOLS AND APPROACHES neighbouring landowners. Differing approaches to funding and to the resolution of parts of the project reflect its complex and fragmented nature, but can be coherently delivered if understood within a strong overall project vision.

4.3 Our Approach

“I truly believe in this project - what a fun journey to be part of.” Lorraine, crowdfunder

“Impressed by awesome support from community, people and companies for Peckham Coal Line. Stupendous people power Peckham.” Lesley, volunteer “My Coal Line is a thread that tells the story and shows the actions of people coming together.” Anna, volunteer

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Eile Vis

Nich & Li

“Well done Peckham Delivery through individual Line components of differingCoal scales will– it’s been such anearly exciting allow the project to learn from phases and to adjust tocampaign changing and a brilliant example of circumstances and future constraints how to bring togethor opportunities. er and inspire a community.” Michelle, crowdfunder

“I think the Coal Line is really cool because for the first time chiildren get to share their ideas.” Shadia,Year 5 John Donne School

“Well done Coal Line team on your amazin campaign. Been great to see it evolve and can't wait to see it all come to life one day in the not too distant future. #peckhamlove” Elizabeth, crowdfunder


PHASE 1

PHASE 2

PHASE 3

Project fully delivered as a sequence of unconnected phases

Smaller projects

MAIN PROJECT

Project delivered in full, following a sequence of initial, smaller phases

Smaller projects

MAIN PROJECT

Delivery as a web: smaller stand-alone projects of differing impact delivered within the context of the whole project delivery

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4.4 Governance and Maintenance The Peckham Coal Line encompasses areas of adopted highway and open space as well as private land and newly constructed infrastructure. The project will also be, in some places, integrated into new, as yet undetermined, development. There are, necessarily, likely to be a range of different mechanisms and approaches regarding governance, coordination and maintenance. These will require detailed consideration as the project develops. Ongoing maintenance will depend on the specification and scope of the works. Lighting is important and 24-hour access is currently being discussed. There may be different maintenance regimes depending on the area but there does need to be consideration of the impact on the project as a whole. Much of the question of governance and maintenance depends on what will constitute the final entity of the Coal Line – how much it will be a loose coalition of separate areas as opposed to clearly defined territory or infrastructure. The Coal Line currently exists as a powerful vision without much direct physical linkage or any construction so far. Even so, ongoing delivery is required to sustain this. There are three main roles in the future governance of the Peckham Coal Line: • • •

The asset owner The asset operator The asset user

Asset Owner The land required for the Coal Line is currently primarily owned by Network Rail and the London Borough of Southwark. In addition, new assets will be constructed as part of the delivery of the Coal Line, which are likely to be owned by the project sponsor. It is also likely that the asset owner of the entire Coal Line will be a new body, potentially with shareholdings held by Network Rail, the London Borough of Southwark and other partners (including the GLA and potentially Friends of the Peckham Coal Line). This new body would require a Board of Trustees to steer major operational and capital decisions. However, a significant public body will be required to underwrite requirements for public liability insurances.

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Asset Operator The role of asset operator could be taken on by a range of bodies. One approach would be to establish a single lead operator who could then sub-contract individual operator roles for the different components of the project. For example, an organisation such as Transport for London could be the lead operator, but in turn sub-contract community programming to Friends of the Peckham Coal Line and the operation of commercial spaces to a private-sector operator. In addition it may be possible to use the experience of local operators such as Copeland Park (the owners and managers of the Bussey Building) or Peckham Levels. This is also a way to tap into existing, and proven, local demand. Asset User In addition to the operator, there will be a number of users of the Peckham Coal Line who could effectively pay a rent to an operator to support ongoing operations and maintenance costs. These could include: • Businesses • Community groups • Events companies Another model is to establish a kind of BID (Business Improvement District) – a now common way of localising added maintenance of the public realm. Recognising the commercial benefit of the amenity, a small levy drawn from adjacent businesses could fund some maintenance costs. Alternatively the idea of a wider Peckham Community Fund is under consideration. Peckham Levels, which operates in the multistorey car park on Rye Lane, intends to donate 10 per cent of its annual profits to a Peckham Community Fund. If this model was scaled up across Peckham this could provide a significant funding potential both for the Coal Line and other community projects. User groups could also contribute to some aspects of ongoing maintenance projects, building on current light-touch interventions.


Future Role for Friends of the Peckham Coal Line The role of the Friends of the Peckham Coal Line organisation could take many forms in the future. The table below shows identified roles of ‘Friends of’ organisations in other community infrastructure projects. As detailed, these range from catalyst to operator. Due to the complexity of the asset, particularly the interface with a live railway, it is likely that the lead operator would need to be a body such as Southwark Council, Network Rail or Transport for London. However it is certainly possible that FPCL could operate some of the component parts.

The role of “Friends e of “Friends of…” groups in community infrastructure projectsof...” groups in community infrastructure projects

Type of role

Example

Role

Assistance Providers

Friends of the Bloomingdale Trail

To promote collaboration between all stakeholders, to encourage community involvement and to help raise funds to enhance the trail.

Catalysts

The Friends of the West Toronto Railpath

To assist the City of Toronto in the creation and stewardship of this new linear park. The group was a key driver in bringing the idea to the attention of the city and seeing it realised.

CoManagers

The Luchtsingel Foundation

A non-profit organisation, they were the project partners with the architects ZUS who orginated the idea. The Foundation is now in charge of its maintenance.

Operators

Friends of the High Line

The High Line is a Public-Private Partnership between Friends of the High Line and the City government. It is owned by the City of New York and the Friends of the High Line maintain and operate the park, including public programming. Friends of the High Line pay for 90 percent of the park’s annual operating budget. This budget is covered by private donations raised by the Friends of the High Line.

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4.5 Road Map What happens next? The Peckham Coal Line can best be described as a series of projects that add up to more than the sum of their parts. Each section will need to go though a process of design, consultation and approvals, then funding, to achieve delivery. Some parts are more complex than others, particularly those where there are interfaces with the live railway. This diagram provides a high-level summary of the next steps involved for key sections. No Interface with Network Rail The elements of the project on land owned by the council or private landowners, and which do not directly interface with the railway, can be progressed in tandem to wider design work, which engages with Network Rail. 1. The Old Stable Yard • This site is in private land ownership. • The developers are currently consulting on proposals to develop the site, while accommodating the principles of the Coal Line within the design. • Active community engagement is underway to ensure that the final development, as submitted to planning, reflects the look and feel of the Coal Line and will integrate seamlessly with the rest of the project as its delivered in phases. • First Step: Develop design template and principles for elements of public realm design including landscaping.

2. Markers • Develop proposals for interim signage including wayfinders and boards showing project narrative and history at key points across the site. • Would act as a reinforcement and development of the current Coal Line walk and as a notice board for the emerging project. Could also integrate with ‘Grow the Line’. • First Step: Design, fund and install. 3. Bidwell Street • Improvements to the public realm of Bidwell Street, currently a disused space, is the first and arguably the least complex element of the project to deliver. • Discussions are underway with the council to develop the idea of removing a section of the reinforced wall, significantly improving local connectivity and accessibility. • Funding is required for detailed design. This, along with a business case, will unlock project funding. Detailed surveys are required. • First Step: Securing funding to develop initial designs to submit for planning permission. 4. Access from Queens Road • A business case and outline design will be developed with both the council and residents to improve access from Queens Road. • This element of the project complements the ongoing regeneration of Queens Road and the station.

7

Next 1–3 years Next 3–5 years

2

Next 5 years +

Key to timescales

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Phases of Delivery

First Step: Engagement with the council and local residents.

5. Kirkwood Nature Reserve • As Kirkwood is already open to the public, the next stage is to develop an outline design for delivering improved public access in the area adjacent to the nature reserve. • Achieving the correct balance between enhancing public access, with increased accessibility, and preserving and enhancing planting and wildlife in the nature reserve is critical. • Discussions with local residents’ associations, friends’ groups and the council will continue to ensure that the project reflects local needs. • First Step: Outline plan / detailed brief in order to fundraise for the planning approval process (including statutory consultation), business case and fundraising. Interface with Network Rail 6. Developing the Vision A continuing process of design is required to inform liaison with Network Rail, in order to understand how to deliver approved proposals that also address required safety and maintenance access. Work with Network Rail is already underway. Design work will be informed by an appraisal of operational railway interfaces and requirements; surveys of the land and existing structures; an assessment of potential risks to construction alongside the railway; and an asset protection


agreement to ensure that the delivery of the Coal Line does not infringe on the safe operation of the railway. 7. Scaffolding Yard, and access from Rye Lane, Bishop Wilfred Wood Arches and Maya Balcony • This is the most complex and ambitious area of work and is most likely contingent on being integrated with the development of the scaffolding yard. • Develop outline designs to further assess interfaces with the railway, providing enough detail to facilitate discussions about the longer-term usages of the Coal Line in relation to the scaffolding yard. This will further inform the local plan and the planning process. Partnership working with future developers will be essential. • Identify the right delivery model and funding structure for this element. Given the mixed usage of space, an assessment of suitable types of workspace use will need to be made. • Continue ongoing dialogue with Network Rail and Southwark Council. • First Step: Secure funding for continuing design and investigation work.

4

2

3+5 2

2

1 6 2

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4.6 Costs & Funding In the Business Case, options for funding are set out at a strategic level. Funding is required both for capital works – design and development and then construction – as well as recurrent funding for operations and maintenance costs. The capital cost for a fully delivered project is likely to be in the region of £20-25million. Funding Given that the Peckham Coal Line, with its many different aspects, is more than one project, it will almost certainly have more than one funding strategy. This, in turn, presents different opportunities and business cases for different funding streams. Components of the Coal Line include core infrastructure (ramps, access, wayfinding, elevated structure); commercial space (created alongside or within the infrastructure); landscape and planting; and community elements (cultural or educational events). A funding options narrative suggests that the majority of the project will require public funding, but that, critically, this will come from a mosaic of sources and interests, and will include a range of private sources. The multiplicity of the Coal Line is its strength: it may help the project attract specific funding support from different sources, whether this be for heritage, social action or environmental improvements. Similar projects are characterised by a number of funding sources. Funding for operations and maintenance is likely to be more of a challenge than raising initial capital costs. It is intrinsically linked to the nature of the organisation and future structure of the project, whether this is an overarching managing body or a more fragmented approach.

Cost Plan

Inclusions

An initial estimate was prepared in conjunction with cost consultants Rider Levett Bucknall. The estimated capital cost of £20-25million takes into account the delivery of the Coal Line in its entirety, with all of the associated project benefits.

• • •

This does not mean that a considerable impact, or the delivery of some of the project benefits, cannot be realised with less funds. Rather this estimate encompasses the scale and complexity of the overall vision, and its tangible deliverability. There is some room for interpretation within this figure but the quantum of work and cost is deemed to be realistic in terms of what is currently known about the project. The estimate is drawn from area rates from three different kinds of overlapping work across the project: • • •

public realm enhancements and landscaping construction of an elevated walkway structure construction of commercial and community workspace and studios.

• • • •

Construction cost Contractors’ overheads and profit Contractors’ prelims (with some allowance for difficult site access) Professional fees and project management Design risk Construction risk Contingency

Exclusions Nothing else is included, and elements such as legal fees, insurances and land acquisition costs will need to be accounted for within the funding strategy. The full list of exclusions is appended. The scheme for the Coal Line remains conceptual and as such this is a broadbased and indicative estimate. An initial assessment of the relative cost weightings of different areas confirms that the larger costs are borne in the Rye Lane / Scaffolding Yard end of the project.

The accompanying map shows the extent of those areas. The elevated structure is measured where it also forms a roof or cover to commercial workspace. There is no overlap between public realm or ground-level work and the other two categories. There are a number of specific exclusions, and inclusions are subject to the assumptions associated with outline feasibility work.

Consor

d ing Yar

Scaffold

t Road

ne

Rye La

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Queens Ro

ad

Bi

alk W l l a

ell

dw

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Co

et

re

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oa

dR

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Kir d Public Realm 5494m 2

on

rd

Go d

a Ro

Elevated Structure 3255m 2

Commercial (Workshops) 2354m 2

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Section 5 Working Process 84


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5.1 Coaction: a Community-Led Approach

The way the Peckham Coal Line is delivered is just as important as what is delivered. Local people are rarely involved in local planning or decision-making processes. When they are involved it is often a response or a reaction to predefined plans. A community-led approach turns this around. It is about a community proposing and steering new ideas. The people who live in an area are key to the design, development and delivery of any successful project. They know their neighbourhood and are therefore often best placed not only to identify any potential challenges, but also to work together – “coaction” – to find ideas and solutions to solve them, and, with the right support, seize opportunities. Individuals have different ways of identifying with their community and one area may mean many things to many people. New developments that don’t involve the local community can miss this and become linear and reductive. A community-led approach celebrates the differences and diversity within an area, designing from different perspectives to create a richer process and outcome.

Every community has a diverse wealth of energy, skill, talent and enthusiasm. It can be difficult to know how to harness this, and a key facet of coaction is the development of ways for people to participate and engage in their local community, creating a resilient network of residents whose collective strength can help define an area’s future in the face of external pressure. An initiative such as the Peckham Coal Line acts as a catalyst to engage. It provides a reason to meet, discuss and so connect the community. A project like this has a social power far beyond its physical realisation, as it links neighbours to a common cause and allows people to build new relationships that are essential for a healthy civil society.

Coal Line

1. Peckham Festival, September 2016

2. Planter Making, October 2016

3. Cossall Workshop, January 2017

Livesey Council Ward Peckham Council Ward

6.

SE15 postcode

5. 4.

8.

4. Peckham Plex, February 2017

3. 1.

2. Coal Line

7. The Lane Council Ward

Nunhead Council Ward

LEFT The Feasibility Study has received 5. Peckham Square, input from thousands March of 2017 residents both online and in person through events, activities, workshops and walks. The map highlights some of the locations where we have held events, displayed the model and encouraged involvement. The 6. numbers Peckham represent Library, April the 2017case studies within this chapter

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7. Nunhead Cemetary Day, May 2017


Defining Community-led Development The process of working together to create and achieve locally owned visions and goals. It is a planning and development approach that’s based on a set of core principles that (at a minimum) set vision and priorities by the people who live in that geographic community, put local voices in the lead, build on local strengths (rather than focus on problems), collaborate across sectors, is intentional and adaptable, and works to achieve systemic change rather than short-term projects.

Coaction noun / mass noun The action or process of working or acting together; cooperation. Source: Oxford English Dictionary © Oxford University Press

BELOW CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Peckham

Vision’s model of the town centre puts the Coal Line in context. Examples of engagement with local residents in a variety of situations

Source: The Movement for Community-Led Development

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business opportunities to the area. I’ll come with an open heart and mind and we will show London - and Britain - what the future of community can look like.” Rory, crowdfunder

5.2 Coaction: In Practice

Nicholas, PemPeople & Livesey Exchange

The Peckham Coal Line project was initiated by a handful of local residents but has evolved into a strong community network of active volunteers and supporters who have taken ownership of the project’s vision and delivery. Today, the Peckham Coal Line exists as a series of spin-off projects and initiatives. The collective force of local interest and coaction has made landowners and decision-makers not only pay attention, but raise their level of ambition for this project. A series of events, workshops, conversations, social media campaigns, surveys and market stalls has allowed a variety of 8. TOOLS AND APPROACHES people to participate. Many of these are people who wouldn’t normally think of being involved in local development projects, but whose input is continually informing the overall vision of the Coal Line.

“Well done Peckham Coal Line – it’s been such an exciting campaign and a brilliant example of how to bring together and inspire a community.” Michelle, crowdfunder “I think the Coal Line is really cool because for the first time chiildren get to share their ideas.” Shadia,Year 5 John Donne School

Common ingredients that allow a community-led approach to thrive: • Create a shared vision that acts as a magnet for people to meet around. • Meet people where they are, don’t assume that people will come to you. • Create invitations that allow people to take part and get involved. • Inspire ownership: ask people what they can contribute, not what they Harriet, want. Camberwell • Keep it fun. & Peckham MP

1. Passers by do not engage with the environment around them. They travel through without noticing or caring.

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2. People look up and take an interest. They listen, think and take limited emotional ownership in their mind without actively participating.

e

ipation rtic pa Lea din

Ac tiv

Em oti on

Directed inw a

Least Engaged pation rtici pa al

Ensuring that the Peckham Coal Line is representative of all the different groups and interests in the local area is central to the project’s success. At the start there was broad interest in the project, but it was clear it was attracting a certain demographic. To avoid becoming a one-dimensional project, the Coal Line has had to consciously move offline and reach out to different places and groups, taking the idea 9. intoWORKING schools, churches, WITH INSTITUTIONS mosques, homeless shelters and estate groups. It can be intimidating for people to go to new places, so the Coal Line has also had a presence in places where a diversity of the local community gathers, such as the library, the cinema and the market square. The process has highlighted the value in embracing the differences that make up a balanced and “The Peckham healthy community. is a great exam how The Mayo In order to be a success, the Coal Line London and G will need to continue to develop ways work with Lon to involve a wide spectrum of the a new way, pio community by running events, building what commun partnerships and creating new things development c together. There is a huge opportunity for like.” future developments in Peckham and Sadiq, Mayor of beyond to continue to work in this way. London Some lessons we have learnt:

“Well done Coal Line team on your amazing campaign. Been great to see it evolve and can't wait to see it all come to life one day in the not too distant future. #peckhamlove” Elizabeth, crowdfunder

volvement s in rd

things a big city with our child a inspect plants, l other people.” S

from diverse backgrounds will meet, have fun and discover programmes that can help them progress in their chosen paths.”

3. Active participation is when people respond to questions posed to them. They donate money or fill in a form. They might like something on Facebook or be a part of a workshop.

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“I will continu with the coun Peckham Coal help ensure th project goes a the way that t community w

Most Engaged ment olve inv

4. Leading involvement is when people take true ownership and make it their own by creating something new and sharing it with others. They have confidence and are prepared to lead new activities.

LEFT Diagram showing the stages of engagement


Example 1: Peckham Festival flag-making What: Making flags to show why people support the Peckham Coal Line and in the process creatively bringing to life the project benefits as identified in the feasibility study.

Who was involved: Peckham Coal Line volunteers, Peckham Festival, 250 local people.

Catalyst: Volunteers Stephen and Bartley were inspired by a local artist to turn the feasibility study data into something more engaging.

Some lessons we have learnt:

When: September 2017 How this involved people: Over one day at the Peckham Festival, people were invited to create their own flag to be included in a Peckham Coal Line art work. Each flag colour and stencil represented one of the six project benefits. A simple questionnaire and set of stencils (designed by local children at the 2016 Peckham Festival) were created for people to choose which benefit of the project was most important to them. These were used to print colourful flags showing what people saw as the key benefits of the Coal Line. The flags were then paraded through the streets and installed as a piece in Kirkwood Nature Reserve.

• People love to make and create things. Having a physical and tangible thing people could touch helps to make the project real. • Visualising choices is a great way to engage people with the process and provide new ways to communicate with people beyond written reports. • A strong, recognisable identity for the Peckham Coal Line has helped to catch people’s attention and encourage interactions.

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5.3 Tools & Approaches

The Peckham Coal Line has experimented with a number of different tools and approaches to broaden and deepen people’s participation in the process. In addition to coaction around the project, we’ve also used tried-and-tested methods such as flyers, posters, market stalls, models, slots at local community meetings and hundreds of conversations over cups of tea. We’ve created props for people to bounce off, graphic images, questionnaires, visual metaphors and personalised templates which allow people to think more about what the Coal Line might mean to them. We’ve also experimented with social media participation and crowdfunding, looking to balance the Coal Line’s presence both online and in person. The diversity of approaches is what allows the project to have more reach and traction. In January 2017, the Peckham Coal Line was awarded Best Community-Led Project at the London Planning Awards.

Mickey, CLF cafe “I think the Peckham Coal Line is a great project and we are glad to be a partner. Places are safer when they’re being used.”

Participation approaches used as part of the feasibility process: 1. The feasibility study was funded 2. A physical model of the concept through a crowdfunding campaign with proposal (below) was created and support from the Mayor of London’s used by the design team to test the #crowdfundLDN program. In total 928 proposition and then to communicate the backers raised the funding for the work nature of the project to both stakeholders and got involved in shaping the initial and members of the public. sketches and ideas. The territory of the Coal Line is coloured “Our crowdfunding The benefits of this approach have been light brown while opportunity and initiative is a chance to: a) validate and propel the project potential workshop or development sites for all Londoners to forward; b) provide the money progress taketo part in the are in red. The scale and complexity of the project; c) indentify a community to of their the railway viaducts and embankment regeneration hold the project accountable to; and d) clear, as is its impact on connectivity. neighbourhoods - are from help build collaborative relationships with The the grassroots up.” importance of mature trees to the stakeholders. character of the area is also evident.

Sadiq, Mayor of London

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There is a vital ongoing role for supporters as the feasibility work develops.

Vinita, crowdfunder

“I will continue to work with the council and Peckham Coal Line to help ensure this vital project goes ahead in the way that the local community want.” Harriet, Camberwell & Peckham MP

3. To keep residents and supporters involved in the feasibility process, we have: • sent regular newsletters to share progress • asked them to fill in a series of surveys and questionnaires about how they would use the line in the future • organised a series of events – including a mapping workshop and model sessions • provided opportunities to volunteer in Coal Line activities.

“Congrats, what a brilliant concept and very inspiring to see that it's led by local residents. To make it a safe route, it should be well overlooked with appropriate land uses at key moments.”


Example 2: Crowdfunding Campaign What: Crowdfunding campaign to raise £65,000 to further develop the Peckham Coal Line. Catalyst: Volunteer Jess identified the Mayor of London’s crowdfunding programme as a natural next step for the project following positive responses to initial public events and constructive discussions with Southwark Council. When: July–October 2015

Crowdfunders have continued to be involved in the feasibility process through regular newsletters, attending working sessions and events, via questionnaires or through volunteering their time. The community has had a pivotal role in affecting the developments and successful integration of the Peckham Coal Line into the Old Stable Yard site.

How this involved people: Launching on a tight deadline to qualify for the chance to win funding from the Mayor of London’s High Street Fund, momentum was built through events such as tea parties in the local nature reserve, taking part in Open House weekend and the Beer Line event. Local businesses were also asked to support the project. The response was overwhelming, with pledges including £1,000 from PeckhamPlex, the local independent cinema.

Who was involved: 928 crowdfunders, Spacehive crowdfunding platform.

Hyper-local newspaper The Peckham Peculiar – itself the product of a crowdfunding campaign – had picked up on the vision of the Peckham Coal Line from the start and helped to spread the message locally. This, combined with social media activity, captured the imagination of the wider community. This acted as a catalyst for further publicity from the Evening Standard, London Live, BBC London News, The Guardian, The Telegraph, the Independent and other national media.

• The crowdfunding process provided not just money but also public validation and legitimacy that helped to move the project forward.

These factors combined to create a network of support for the Coal Line. The breadth of community support inspired Sustrans, Southwark Council and the Mayor of London to pledge funds to the project, and the crowdfunding target was beaten, with more than £75,000 raised. As important as the amount raised was the breadth and diversity of supporters willing to pledge money to the project – the funds were contributed by 928 individuals, businesses and organisations.

Some lessons we have learnt: • Combining online and offline tactics helps to involve a larger number of people in crowdfunding processes.

• The process helped to build collaborative relationships with Southwark Council, the Mayor’s Office and Network Rail. • The project is accountable to the community of crowdfunders. Find out more: www.spacehive.com/peckhamcoalline www.shareable.net/blog/co-designing -the-crowdfunded-sharing-city

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5.4 Working with Stakeholders & Decision-makers

Collaboration with stakeholders and decision-makers is at the heart of the Peckham Coal Line approach – a belief that no one person or group has the answers, but that together we can do more. As well as working with hundreds of individuals, it has been essential for the Coal Line to engage and work with a number of key local and London-wide institutions and organisations in order to move the project forward. The swell of support within the community and among Logan and Peter, the stakeholder groups that was demonstrated through Network Rail legitimacy and crowdfunding process gave the Coal Line project momentum. It also secured support from Southwark Council, “The London South(GLA), East Asset Protection the Greater London Authority Network Rail and Transport (ASPRO) team have been the study. for London to work collaboratively on advising this feasibility Peckham Coal Line of Network Rail’s Throughout the feasibility process the Coal Line has been operational and commercial requirements to able to continue to strengthen and build on this institutional helporganisation inform thishas design feasibility study. The and support. Each shared its expertise, advice guidance feasibility about the planning and development process and report demonstrates that the high Friends oflevel the Coal Line has been able tofeasible contribute ambition is potentially andexperience we of what it look takesforward to run a to community-led This approach advising on project. more detailed may affectproposals the role that organisations need andstakeholder management options as theyto play in development that is community led and challenges come forward to best guide theposes Peckham Coal for how toLine equitably this. As well as meeting each team resource on delivering individual sites. We institutionsee independently, FPCL has been able convene potential commercial merit fortoadjacent sessions that bring these different organisations together Network Rail sites through this initiative andand strengthen between them.grasswecommunication are interestedflows by the innovative roots approach, which creates its own Collaboration hasn’t stopped with there are specific challenges. Weinstitutions; support further pre-existing and dense community networks across development of the Peckham Coal Line Peckham and southbeyond London.this FPCL has built collaborative relationships initial feasibility.” with some of these networks, and the project has potential to be a platform for local groups to use, too. Throughout the feasibility study FPCL has worked with existing local collectives, groups and organisations – Friends of Cossall Park and Kirkwood Nature Reserve, John Donne School, local businesses such as Blackbird Bakery and BuildBase, and The Peckham Society and Peckham Heritage Partnership, to mention a few. With all these collaborations, FPCL has been looking to move away from a relationship designed around dependency or hierarchical power towards modelling a relationship of co-dependency based on mutual learning and experimentation.

We have learnt that successful collaborations work when you: • see personal relationships as the foundation • can be honest • value diversity and different perspectives • are open to change • can be comfortable with the unknown • are flexible and adaptable • reflect and learn together • value the journey not just the end destination • are patient and recognise that things take time.

“Our crowdfunding initiative is a chance for all Londoners to take part in the regeneration of their neighbourhoods - from the grassroots up.” Sadiq, Mayor of London “I will continue to work with the council and Peckham Coal Line to help ensure this vital project goes ahead in the way that the local community want.” Harriet, Camberwell & Peckham MP

LEFT Diagram from

The Hackable City research project (2016)

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Example 3: Old Stable Yard site campaign What: Campaign to challenge a plan for a private development on one of the sites of the Peckham Coal Line. Catalyst: Spotting a planning application seven days before the consultation closed. When: July 2017 How this involved people: On discovering a planning application affecting one of the Coal Line sites, a last-minute campaign was launched to gather local opinions on the proposals. Within one week more than 400 comments had been submitted to the council planning portal. This was enough to instigate conversations between the developers and FPCL that Southwark Council helped to facilitate. Since then the initial plans have been withdrawn and, following developer-led community consultation, new plans have been submitted. These revised plans respond directly to concerns raised by the local community and now include retaining some of the old buildings, providing more local job opportunities and integrating the Coal Line into the route. The support garnered through the crowdfunding process and continued community engagement allowed this to happen very quickly – and it demonstrates the potential of the Coal Line project to help steer the direction of local developments and planning policy. It also means that the first section of the Coal Line could exist by the end of 2018, shifting a private development into a new piece of public space for the neighbourhood that everyone can use and enjoy.

As a consequence of this and to ensure that this doesn’t happen on future sites along the route, the Peckham Coal Line has been written into the New Southwark Plan, which should see greater consideration and protection from any future developments. Who was involved: 429 Peckham Coal Line supporters, Southwark Council, Bluecroft Developers, Adam Camp Architecture, CMA Planning. Some lessons we have learnt: • Local people are interested in planning decisions affecting their area but often don’t have access to information about what is going on. The campaign helped to translate and provide easy ways for people to engage. • Through the networks built up through the Peckham Coal Line we were able to mobilise people really quickly to respond to this development. • There is a need to find ways for community groups to communicate with developers.

“The Coal Line is a great initiative that signifies the creative and cultural preservation that makes the area so unique. We need more green space in SE15.” Public comment -- July 2017 Scheme before: residential close Scheme after: includes public space

“I object to the threat to the Peckham Coal Line. Green space in London is essential for mental health and wellbeing.” Public comment – July 2017

Find out more: http://www.peckhamcoalline.org/blog/ urgent-the-coal-line-is-under-threat-fromdevelopers http://www.peckhamcoalline.org/blog/ update-4-stable-yard-site

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5.5 Case Studies

Example 4: Beer Line Walks What: Crowdfunding event for the Peckham Coal Line, linking people and local businesses to the project. Catalyst: A local blogger who walked the route and joked about it being called the ‘Peckham Beer Line’. When: October 2015 How this involved people: An afternoon of walks and promotional offers in four local establishments along the Coal Line route – Gosnells Mead, Brick Brewery, The Nines and Beer Rebellion – to support the crowdfunding campaign. Brick Brewery also brewed a Peckham Coal Line Porter for the event with proceeds from the sale of the drink contributing to the campaign. Some lessons we have learnt: • It provided a unique opportunity for local businesses to promote themselves while supporting the Coal Line. • The Coal Line provides a platform for local businesses to collaborate that wouldn’t do so otherwise. • Community-led projects provide space for local enterprise activity which we hope to develop further in the future.

Example 5: Grow the Line What: The first physical manifestation of the route – starting to grow the line with planters to support wayfinding along the Coal Line, long before any hard infrastructure gets built. Catalyst: A budding group of volunteers interested in greening and growing projects. When: Summer 2016 – Spring 2017 Who was involved: A group of volunteers, donations from local timber merchants and Hillier Nurseries, workshop and storage space provided by Copeland Park. How this involved people: A team of volunteers came together to design, build, paint and install a series of planters to place along the Coal Line. Permissions were gained from Southwark Council to put street planters along the route; the initial planters were installed as part of the Reimagine Bidwell Street event. The planters have inspired the Clear Horizons homeless shelter to start their own growing projects. Some lessons we have learnt: • Building and creating something helps to make it real. • Simple planters brighten up an otherwise dead space.

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Who was involved: Four local bars and breweries, Coal Line volunteers and hundreds of local revellers.


Example 6: Working with local schools What: Working with local school children and their families to be part of the Peckham Coal Line process.

Some lessons we have learnt:

Catalyst: Local crowdfunder who is also a parent at John Donne School made connections to school teachers.

• Children love to learn about local history; they were fascinated by the history of coal, for example.

When: Ongoing Who was involved: John Donne School, Friends of John Donne, Rye Oak School, University of Westminster. How this involved people: Over the last few years FPCL has run school assemblies, worked with school councils, run workshops to gather children’s ideas and designs for the Coal Line and been part of parent and carers’ events.

• Young people are full of bright and unexpected ideas for improving their local area. • Working with schools helps to connect children to their local area and allows outreach to a broad spectrum of the local community.

The Coal Line was also able to make connections between the school and University of Westminster students who were also studying the project.

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5.5 Case Studies

Example 7: Feasibility Study

Catalyst: The need to make the case for the project to Network Rail and Southwark Council to ensure further development of the idea.

Who was involved: 928 crowdfunders, a panel of local residents, Southwark Council and the GLA, Adams & Sutherland Architects, Arup and JCLA landscape architects, plus hundreds of people in Peckham.

When: January 2016 – June 2018

Some lessons we have learnt:

How this involved people: The feasibility study was commissioned and funded through a successful crowdfunding campaign in 2015. Recruiting a consortium to deliver the work was an open and competitive process and all interviewees had to pitch to the local community. Through the process FPCL has continued to engage, share and learn. The team has held 11 events, in 8 locations, with more than 1000 people participating. We’ve had input from 400 people through surveys both in person and online, and worked with 300 local schoolchildren. We have used a number of different approaches, events, forums and tools to gather input, including a model, mapping workshop, tea party, Open House walks, school workshops, ‘Make your Mark’ stencilling, stalls in local landmarks and the creation of a new community growing project.

• If you ask the right questions and design everyday experiences, everyone is interested in plans for their local neighbourhood.

What: A crowdfunded, commissioned and participatory feasibility study.

• Balancing the perspectives of ‘expert’ and ‘lived experience’ knowledge is a challenge. Our society values one over the other, but both are equally valuable to community-led projects. • The key benefit of a project like the Peckham Coal Line is building a stronger community; this is impossible to quantify in economic terms.

Find out more: http://peckhamcoalline.strikingly.com/blog/the-design-feasibility-tender-process http://peckhamcoalline.strikingly.com/blog/adams-sutherland-pitch-to-peckham

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Example 8: Reimagine Bidwell Street What: An event to reimagine Bidwell Street, one part of the route which today is an unloved dead end next to Kirkwood Nature Reserve. Catalyst: Spotting regular fly-tipping in the area, followed by conversations with volunteers and Friends of Cossall Park about what might be possible to bring the space to life. When: April 2017 How this involved people: For one day, the Peckham Coal Line took over Bidwell Street, demonstrating the potential of the space to be different. It was a day of activity which hundreds of people attended, many passing through for the first time. There was music, a raffle with prizes donated by local businesses, food and drink donated by local supermarkets, as well as opportunities to help fill planters or create some street art.

Who was involved: a team of volunteers, Friends of Cossall Park and Kirkwood Nature Reserve, local street artist Artful Dodger, drummers, GoodGym, local business donating raffle prizes. Some lessons we have learnt: • Temporary events demonstrate the potential of spaces. • Events are a great way to bring people together who wouldn’t otherwise meet. • Small changes to an area prevented fly-tipping for two months after the mural and planters went in.

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5.7 In Context: a Growing Movement

The Peckham Coal Line is one project in a wider movement to change the way that communities engage with and steer development to create great places to live and work. Around the world there are many examples: such as urban farms in CONTEXT factories in Detroit; the Citizen Lab learning from each other across Europe; a park on a flyover in Liverpool; and beehives in abandoned cemeteries in London.

“The Peckham Coal Line project is an exciting and satisfying counter balance to other London landmark projects – no less ambitious but with heart.”

Ben, Sustrans

This work is not without its challenges, and there are a number of live questions to take into the next stages of the project. We have found it valuable to ask ourselves the following questions:

“Kudos and love from Singapore!” Kia Jie Hui , Crowdfunder

• How is it best to acknowledge and value the contribution of people’s time and skills in a community rather than a formal work environment?

INTERN ATI ON AL NATION AL Citizens Lab Friends of the Flyover

Dalston Curve Garden

• What are appropriate models for organising and governing community-led projects? • What are the best approaches for diversifying and widening participation in a local community?

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Peckham Coal Line

Company drinks

Pempeople

Arquitecturas colectivas

Peckham Vision

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Aarhus Kulbroen

a support network sharing skills, contacts and experiences

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Sydney Goods Line

Hastings Greenway

Without such an active, vocal and wellconnected network of related projects, an ambitious idea such as the Peckham Coal Line may not have got beyond the initial concept. We are proud to share the lessons we’ve learnt with other projects. This network is vital to the Coal Line because mutual support and learning allows the sharing of ideas and provides a platform from which to catalyse new projects and pathways.

“Walked the High Line in NYC on holiday, and it's such a wonderful thing. Hope you can make it happen, best of luck from Germany.” Sonja, Crowdfunder

Part of a wider growing grassroots movement

What the Coal Line offers to this movement is the learning garnered through coaction. Yes, we have established some traditional structures around the project – including its charitable status – but our biggest innovation has been to set no rules or limitations. By encouraging innovation, ownership and creativity from all our supporters, they have been free to interpret the project in individual ways. This is how life has already been breathed into the Coal Line ahead of the first physical section being built.

• How can you chart and value the impact of the journey of the project, not just the final destination? • How can you transition a communityCompany drinks led idea into a large-scale development project, without losing the original ethos of the project?

RIGHT Events and

workshops have reached out to different sections of the local communiy


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Section 6 Actions & Next Steps


6.1 Bringing the Project to Reality

The Peckham Coal Line has a five-year vision to bring three of the seven sites identified along the route to reality by 2023, with an overarching, detailed plan for the entire route in place. During this time the Coal Line will have to navigate design considerations, planning consultations, landowner and public space agreements, funding strategies and ongoing maintenance agreements, to name but a few.

The road map in Section 4.5 includes a five-year plan, where each part of the route has its own timeline. This separates the easy wins from the areas that involve more complex strategies. The approach to phasing must, however, remain flexible as much depends on the progress of development of adjoining sites.

The key enablers of the next phase of the Peckham Coal Line are:

Green • The Old Stable Yard (site 5) and the Queens Road entrance (site 7.2) will be the focus of the coming year. • Bidwell Street (site 7.2) is a natural progression from the Queens Road entrance and plans for these areas will be developed in association.

Traffic light key to sites

• Continued community participation The Coal Line will only be credible if community participation remains at the heart of the way it operates and functions. Building up common commitment to collectively demonstrate and influence the social, political, environmental, health and enterprise values of the project to the traditional decision-makers. • Resources to develop the next phases These include commitments of time and skills, as well as financial resources. The power of influence will also be important in securing match funding from foundations and other non-governmental and governmental organisations. • Institutional backing and commitment The project needs to continue to play a central part in future neighbourhood planning. Stakeholders – Network Rail, Southwark Council, TfL and the Mayor of London – need to commit to developing the project together.

Amber • Development of the route around Kirkwood Nature Reserve (6.1) has a stronger business case once the Bidwell Street and Queens Road sections are complete. Section 4.3 linking Cossall Walk with Gordon Road creates the opportunity for local enterprise but this will be best realised once the Old Stable Yard section and Queens Road links are open, allowing a greater number of users into the space.

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1.

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undertake detailed design work with public commitment and engagement from Network Rail and Southwark Council.

continue the programme of community engagement and fundraise to develop the first site, Bidwell Street.

work closely with stakeholders and the wider community to confirm the plans for the initial phases.

start to develop a strategy for the wider route including the Scaffolding Yard site.

continue to be alert to a fastchanging development environment.

remain flexible and capable of evolving in response to potential new developments.

4.1

t Road

2.

3.

To support the development of these projects the Coal Line will need to:

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Red • The elevated walkway structures (sites 1–4.2) are the most complex areas of work and are therefore likely to be the last stage to be delivered. This is to some degree dependent on the development of the Scaffolding Yard.

5


Governance As the project continues to evolve and grow, considerations include:

Exploring how to evolve from a solely voluntary organisation to an organisation with employed support, and an associated funding strategy.

Determining the most appropriate models of community ownership for this project.

The evolution of the day-to-day oversight and governance of the Coal Line as it becomes an increasingly significant London-wide project.

7.1

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Identifying the forms and structures needed for decision making in order to remain accountable to the local community and those who have supported it to date.

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Short term: next 1–3 years Medium term: next 3–5 years Longer term: next 5 years +

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6.2 Next Steps

The feasibility process has demonstrated overwhelming support for the Peckham Coal Line, both from the public and from institutions and stakeholders. However, long-term continuing commitment from key London institutions is vital to secure the future of the project.

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The Peckham Coal Line asks: Southwark Council to: • work with future developers along the route to incorporate the Coal Line, delivering sections of the project as part of consented schemes. • collaborate in exploring leasing options for sections of the route to help the Coal Line become economically sustainable. • prioritise the project as an innovative way of addressing social and economic challenges.

Transport for London to: • commit seed funding towards the development of the project as a walking and cycling corridor linking into wider principal access routes to the proposed Rotherhithe bridge. The Greater London Authority to: • see the project as part of the collective evolution of south-east London, and to include it in the plans for new homes around Millwall and the Old Kent Road.


The Mayor of London to: • publically back and commit to the project as a way of socially connecting communities; engaging residents in shared city spaces; creating a sustainable travel corridor and a catalyst for enterprise and opportunity. • ensure the project is embedded into its strategies and policies.

Network Rail Commercial to: • work with the Coal Line to formulate an ambitious, mutually beneficial strategy that will maximise the organisation’s assets along the route.

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Network Rail Operations to: • collaborate with the Coal Line in exploring ways in which the project can be accommodated alongside the operational railway in a way that improves operational access and safety to the railway while also benefitting the organisation’s commercial arm.

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6.2 Next Steps

The Peckham Coal Line asks the public to: • commit to continuing to support the Peckham Coal Line. • share the story and make the Coal Line community ever bigger. • lobby stakeholders, institutions and local government to continue to commit to the project. • get involved: the Coal Line exists thanks to the generosity and perseverance of its supporters, who have contributed their time, skills and effort to drive the project forward. But it always needs more help so please be part of the journey. . This is an exciting stage for the Peckham Coal Line. For the first time the project will take a tangible form, existing on the ground, not just on paper. While developers will push forward the Old Stable Yard site, the Queens Road and Bidwell Street sites will need funding. So the Coal Line is looking at a range of innovative ways to fund this next stage, and will aim to raise the first £1million in the next year and create the first section of the route. So the final Peckham Coal Line ask is for all of us to: • look at the post-feasibility Action Plan and see where the Coal Line is going next. www.peckhamcoalline.org

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Acknowledgements: those that made the Feasibility Study possible through generous donations Individuals who backed the project: A H Trotter, A Mohiddin, Abigail Tripp, Adam Blezard, Adam Dunseath, Adam Norton, Adam O’Neale, Adam Wilson, Alan Sekers, Alasdair Ebeling, Alasdair Gardner, Alastair Salmon, Alberto Campora, Alec Leggat, Aleksander Sumowski, Alex Bray, Alex Eburne, Alex Knights, Alex Raha, Alex Scharaschkin, Alexander Wells, Alexandra Rees, Alice Chesterman, Alice Tyler, Alison Crockford, Alison Furey, Alison Homewood, Alison Levey, Alison Long-Guckel, Alison Robinson, Alison Timewell, Alison Weston, Alistair Bates, Ally Goddard, Aly Gillani, Amanda Gore, Amanda Gregor, Amber Wood, Amy Little, Amy Adams, Amy Passmore, Ana Abascal, Ana Jordan, Anna Rose Hughes, Ana Rojas, Andrea Helou, Andrew Cryan, Andrew Lindsay, Andrew Radley, Andrew Rowson, Andy Bennett, Andy Macloed, Andy McCulloch, Andy Wales, Angela Combeer, Angelita Bradney, Angus Miln, Angus Watson, Ann Coley, Anna Thursby, Anna Beddow, Anna Birney, Anna Holmstrom, Anna Maria Adams, Anna Simpson, Anna Simpson, Anna Warrington, Anna Wigley, Annette Jezierska, Annie De Saulles, Annina Salo, Anthony Edwards, Anthony Law, Anthony Legon, Anthony Shoring, Antonia Palmer, Aphra Brannan, Aris Constantinides, Ashley Slater, Aveen McHugh, Ayako Iseki, Azeem Ahmad, Bart Hallett, Bartley Shaw, Beatriz Brown, Ben Fisher, Ben Brown, Ben Crouch, Ben Farber, Ben Robinson, Ben Sims, Benjamin and Aya LLoyd-Ennals, Benjamin Brace, Beth Adelmann, Beth Follini, Bethan Harris, Bev Haywood, Bev Lewis, Bill Guest, Bobby Chatterjee, Brett Taylor, Briony Bowe, Bruce Lynn, Bryony Elliott, Bryony James, Candace Piette, Carlos Gallego, Carol de Burca, Carol Edwards, Caroline Allis, Caroline Folley, Caroline Jones, Caroline Platt, Carolyn Barraclough, Carolyn Davidson, Cat Jenkins, Cath Prisk, Catherine Allison, Catherine McKenzie, Cathy Dearson, Cathy Hirschmann, Celia Bannerman, Celine Marchbank, Charlie Holland, Charlotte Grinling, Charlotte Hodkinson, Chloe Davies, Chloe McCulloch, Chris Gourlay, Chris Armstrong, Chris Barker, Chris Newman, Chris Trantom, Christina Hildrey, Christopher Stewart, Cian Agnew, CJ Gibson, Claire Dempster, Claire Hall, Claire Jones, Claire Matthews, Claire Neillands, Claire Scott, Clare Gill, Clare Jenkinson, Clare Wadd, Cleo Oliver, Constance Craig Smith, Corina Angheloiu, Dan McBeth, Dan McMillan, Dan Watson, Daniel Hill, Daniel Laosirichon, Daniel Lewis, Daniel Prideaux, Daniel Schuldes, Daniel Ward, Daniel Whitlock, Dave Broome, David Amor, David Bent-Hazelwood, David Boa, David Chambers, David Howe, David Janes, David Kenington, David Knight, David Simmonds, David Wilson, David Hodges, Deanna Heer, Delphine Guillemet, Des Garrahan, Dexter Johnstone, Diana Cochrane, Diana Marrs, Dominic Fox, Douglas McCabe, Draeyk van der Horn, Dragana Gavrilovic, Drummond Pearson, Duncan Hart, Duncan Wilson, Dylan Heslop, Eddie Heywood, Edmund Gliniecki, Edmund Sumner, Edward Prentice, Edward Harrison, Edward Hartwell Goose, Edward Parkes, Edwina Eliott-Lockhart, Eleanor Margolies, Eleanor Murray, Eleanor Purser, Eleanor Rennie, Elizabeth Mann, Ella Phillips, Eloise Shepherd, Elsie Burns, Elwira Dell’Anna, Emdadur Rahman, Emer O’Connell, Emilio Rangel, Emily Barry, Emily Burns, Emily Nielsen, Emily Pemberton, Emily RenshawSmith, Emily Wright, Emma Burdon, Emma Burnand, Emma Coleman, Emma Goode, Emma Hoyle, Emma Joseph, Emma Reiss, Emmanuelle Mitchell, Essi Lindstedt, Esther Maughan McLchaln, Evelyn Heathcoat Amory, Evelyn Ting, Fabrice Senac, Faith Jayne, Faith Wilson, Fergus Knox, Finn Coyle, Fiona Bruce, Fiona Flynn, Fiona King, Francesca Allen, Francesca Brady, Francesco Nicosia, Francis Byrne, Fraser Perrie, Fred Sharrock, Fred Tarr, Gabrielle Deschamps, Gareth Horner, Garry Charnock, Gary Armstrong, Gary Williams, Gavin Cambridge, Gavin Goodhart, Gemma Doyle, Gemma Knights, Geoffrey Coad, Geordie Watson, George Watson, Georgia Brown, Georgina Carless, Georgina Chatfield, Gerry Atwell, Gila Tabrizi, Gillian Cross, Gillian Phillips, Grant Cassin, Greg Goodwin, Greg Spencer, Greg Stump, Greig Burnside, Gus Lamb, Guy Haslam, Guy Hornsby, Guy Tallon, Halima Hassan, Hannah Padgett, Hannah Riches, Hannah Russell, Hannah Winchester, Hannah Wylie, Harold Shiel, Heather Parker, Heidi Hammond, Helen Churchill, Helen Crampton, Helen Ewen, Helen Ganiaris, Helen Hardy, Helen Johannessen, Helen Markides, Helen Quine, Helen Reid, Helen Trainor, Hermione Taylor, Hilary Claire Dunham-Phillips, HJ Fantaskis, Hugh Lewis, Hugh Corrin, Hugh Knowles, Hugh Wallis, Hugo Gorst-Williams, Hugo Lowry, Hugo Simms, Ian Johnston, Ieva Bach, Ilga Leimanis, Ilka W, Illtyd Foster, Imogen Wetherell, Ines Hartmann, Irene Cotton, Iris Penny, Ivan Steward, J, C & B Barnes, Jack Kelly, Jack Taylor, Jack Wallington, Jacqueline Hall-Shaw, Jacqueline Teggin, Jake Wetherall, James Crawford, James Donkin, James Goodman, James Harris, James Holding, James Leech, James Lehmann, James MacLeod, James Mann, James Nurton, James Stockdale, James Westoll, Jane Cooper, Jane Booth, Jane Champion, Jane Collis, Jane Looker,Jane Martin, Jane Merrick, Janet Guest, Janet Wood, Jay Jernigan, Jayne Hill, Jemma Golby, Jemma Ooi, Jennie Jones, Jenny Morgan, Jenny Sheridan, Jenny Teasdale, Jeremy Crump, Jeremy Leach, Jessica Behar, Jessica Crouch, Jessica Rowson, Jiehui Kia, Jillian Clemison, Jim Waterson, Jo Stimpson, Joan Casey, Joan Leifer, Joanna Knight, Joanna Vinall, Joe CookJoe Downie, John Baumber, John Bingham-Hall, John Harrison, Jon & Pauline Fitzmaurice, Jon Brooks, Jon Khoo, Jon Petter, Jonathan Bayfield, Jonathan Breeze, Jonathan Fisher, Jonathan Holmes, Jonathan Mokrani, Jonathan Smith, Jonathon Porritt, Jordan Whitmarsh, Jordi Torren, Jose Rosa, Josephine Chanter, Joshua Cohen, Josie Tapper, Joy Clarke, Joy Green, Jude Deakin, Judith Bull, Judith Cooke, Judy Willcocks, Julia Clough, Julia Davis, Julia Diniz, Julia Parfitt, Julian Bishop, Julian Kenny, Julie Brinkworth, Julie Reeder, Julie Silverlock, Jumoke Fashola, Justin Small, Justine Gordon, Kara Kennedy, Karen Keenan, Karen M Kelleher, Karen McQuaid, Karl Schulenburg, Karon Cook, Kate Heaps, Kate Alexander, Kate Allen, Kate Inai, Kate Newbury-Helps, Kate O’Hagan, Katharine Segal, Katherine Hartman, Katherine Johnson, Katherine Potsides, Katherine Walker, Kathryn Geels, Kathryn Norris, Katie Nordgreen, Katie Allen, Katie Newman, Katie Shaw, Katy Baldwin, Katy Cooper, Keith Doyle, Keith Turpin, Kelly Middleton, Kevin Harrington, Kevin Jordan, Kevin Rose, Kieran Hayes, Kirsten Dunham, Kirsty Austin, Kit Hui, Kylie Cameron, Kylie Mather, L O’Mara, Laura Childs, Laura Hanbury, Laura Whitwell, Lauraine Turner, Laurence Ryan, Layla Atkinson, Lee Hewett, Leigh Turvey, Lena Staafgard, Leo Wood, Leon Sherman, Lesley Ballantyne, Leslie Gilotti, Leyla Yilmaz, Liam Sollis, Liron Schur, Lisa & Andy Cooper, Lisa Blanchflower, Lisa Greensill, Lisa Storey, Liz Alexander, Liz Black, Lizzie Foyle, Lizzy Shaw, Lloyd Ffrench, Loraine Rutt, Lorna Harrison, Lorraine Clarke, Lorraine Milne, Louis Woodford, Louisa Shanks, Louise Armstrong, Louise Crow, Louise Murray, Lucie Parker, Lucy McMillan, Lucy Allen, Lucy Dawkins, Luis Otero, Luke Holder, Luke Hollowell-Williams, Lydie Billat, Lynn Turner, Lynne Bateman, Mael Cornic, Magnus Hultberg, Marcia Hurst, Margaret Taylor, Maria Campbell, Maria Francolini, Marika Thorogood, Marilyn Thompson, Mark Calderbank, Mark Darnell, Mark Hildrey, Mark Jacob, Mark Paul, Mark Woodford, Marlijn Wijkhuizen, Martha Henson, Martin Catchpole, Martin Conder, Martin Hall, Martina Ward, Maru Rojas, Mathew Holloway, Matt Bardsley, Matt Davies, Matt Gilbert, Matt Parsonage, Matt Smith, Matt Soper, Matt Vaight, Matthew Haydenn, Maureen Ellinwood, Maya White, Mel Stark, Mel Yurt, Melissa Ellis, Merryl Bryse, Michael & Liz Pountney, Michael Lynskey, Michael McKee, Michael Toolan, Michael Tye, Michael Veale, Michel Lee, Michelle Isme, Michelle Key, Michelle Williams, Michelle Yung, Miho Aishima, Mike Begent,Mike Freeman, Mike Howitt, Mike Salmon, Nadra Kebaili, Nadya Smith, Natalie Wastnidge, Natalie Armstrong, Natalie Moore, Natalie Newey, Natascha Leanage, Natasha Roe, Nathan Philpott, Neil Walsh, Neil Weatherall, Nic Morris, Nicholas Jones, Nicholas Ruffley, Nick Ambrose, Nick Cash, Nick Woodford, Nicky Johnson, Nicola Alexander, Nicola Carver, Nicola Denley, Nicolas Myers, Nicole Poole, Nigel Doran, Nigel Gourlay, Nina Farrell, Nina Sosanya, Niraj Dattani, Odin Church, Oliver Collins, Oliver Hargrove, Oliver Woodford, Owen Davies, Owen Jones, Owen King, Owen Marriott, P K, Padraig Gibbons, Pamela Fennell, Patrick Harmsworth, Patrick & Darren Lodge Woodhouse, Patrick Leahy, Paul Day, Paul James, Paul MacMahon, Paul Milnes, Paul Oglesby, Paul Teesdale, Paul Underwood, Paula Moran, Penny Sedgwick, , Pete and Soph Jolly, Peter Cope, Peter Edwards, Peter Frost, Peter Goldsack, Peter Hill, Peter Molyneux, Peter Murray, Peter Staines, Phil and Shell, Phil Mincher, Pierpaolo Inga, Pip Page, R Butler, Rachel Reynolds, Rachel Bright, Rachel Burnett, Rachel Phipp, Rachel Simpson, Raife Gale, Ralph Smyth, Raoul Pinnell, Rebecca Kong, Rebecca Palser, Rebecca Stephens, Rebecca Williams, Rebecca Wilson, Rebekah Hayes, Ribbet Malone, Rich Major, Richard Odumosu, Richard Day, Richard Gates, Richard Lewis, Richard Lovering, Richard Maxey, Richard Needham, Richard Wilberforce, Rob Hayward, Rob Tolfts, Robert Charnock, Robert Gamble, Robert Marchbank, Robin Marcus, Roger Manser, Roger Scott, Ronald Dunning, Ronnie Busby, Rory Curley, Rory Curran, Rory Fegan, Ros Gelbart, Ros Woodford, Rose Epps, Rose Ades, Rose Wetherell, Rosie Ferguson, Rosie Luff, Ross Gilbert, Rowena Warrington, Rumi Bose, Rupert Harding, Rupert McDonnell, Rupert Tebb, Rus Wetherell, Ruth Colvin, Ruth Whitten, S Napper, Sabine von Toerne, Sally Gilbey, Sally Jones, Sally Lane, Sally-Ann Whittaker, Sam Arnold, Sam Crump, Sam Jarman, Sam Newell, Sam Solnick, Sam Wilberforce, Sam Wilson, Sandra Parish, Sandra Roling, Sanjeet Hundal, Sara Baroni, Sara Corrin, Sara Strappini, Sarah Browne, Sarah Goodwin, Sarah Gordon, Sarah Guise, Sarah Heyes, Sarah Histronimedes, Sarah Jane Griffiths, Sarah Macdonald, Sarah Mahomed Ross, Sarah Plampin, Sarah Wanendeya, Sarah Ward, Saskia Sidey, Satish Kalia, Sean Whyte, Seb Jones, Seb Lloyd, Sebastian Aguirre, Serena Urzi, Sharon Shahani, Shaun Richards, Shelley Burke, Shelley Lees, Shereen Docherty, Shirley Borrett, Siân Wynn-Jones, Simon Roberts, Simon Baker, Simon Brott, Simon de Glanville, Simon Dilly, Simon Elder, Simon Gleisner, Sonja Mangels, Sophie Gregg, Sophie Bragg, Sophie Bulmer, Sophie Franklinos, Sophie Johnson, Spiro Katsanis, Stacey Williams, Stella Papaioannou, Stephanie Atkins, Stephanie Bell, Stephen Brough, Stephen Hardingham, Stephen Howe, Stephen Matthew, Steve Morse, Steve Silcock, Steven Batchelor, Steven Hitchins, Stewart Whitworth, Stuart & Miriam McGinty-Lowe, Stuart Leech, Sue Armstrong, Sue Plain, Suneil Saraf, Susan Allott, Susan Mcloughlin, Susan Rotter, Susie Mesure, Suzanne Dixon, Suzy Davis, Sylvia Baron, Tabi Joy, Tacita Wharton, Tamsie Thomson, Tamsin Bacchus, Tannaz Aliabadi-Zadeh, Tansy Drake, Tanya Metcalfe, Tanya Nash, Tarek Merlin, Tejinder Khera, Tessa Crook, Thabata Woodford, Thea Palmer, Theo Luke, Theodore Woodford, Thilo Schneider, Thomas Bailess, Thomas Dewhurst, Thomas Foster, Thomas Keenes, Tim Barnes, Tim Beckett, Tim Collingridge, Tim Richardson, Tim Williams, Tobias Heinrich, Toby Bennett, Tom Brough, Tom Connolly, Tom Halloran, Tom Manser, Tom Rogers, Tom Rogers, Tom Szekeres, Tony Bonnar, Tony Fletcher, Tracy Davis, Truda Spruyt, Ursula Allison, Ursula Paredes, Vanessa Allen, Veronica Hendry, Veronika Dashchinskaya, Vic Lee, Vicky Karambatsos, Vicky Skingley, Victoria Sellwood, Violeta Jawdokimova, Virag Szabo, Vivienne Gamble, Vivienne Thomson, Wayne Hobbs, Wei Du, Wendy Devolder , Wesley Pickering, Wil Stewart, Will Dawson, Will Heaney, William Lush, Zahra Davidson, Zoe Avery, Zoe Hooper, Zoe Kennedy, Zoe Le Grand. Organisations who backed the project: Archic, Banprivatecarsinlondon.com, Barker Langham, Brick Brewery, Cafe Viva, Casa of Peckham, Codfellas Fish Bar, Copeland Park, Crafty Fox Market, Dead Dolls House, General Store, Gosnells London Mead, Hackney Irish Social Club, Hemingway Design, InfiniData, Jane Brockbank Gardens, Jo Thompson Landscape Design, KnoxBhavan, Little Bird Gin, Lost Dog, Michael OMARA Books, Miss Tapas, Nunhead Food Assembly, Oi Spaghetti, Old Spike Roastery, PECKHAMPLEX, Petitou, Richard Armitage Transport Consultancy Ltd, Southwark Cyclists, Sustrans, Southwark Living Streets, Spatial Practices Programme - Central Saint Martins, The Begging Bowl, The Butchery Ltd, The Creativity Club, The Montpelier, The Nines, The Peckham Pelican, The Pished Fish, The Ramblers Inner London Area, Urban Gilt Limited, Ways & Means Events, The Peckham Settlement.

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Peckham Coal Line feasibility study - June 2018  

Crowdfunded feasibility study outlining the viability of the Peckham Coal Line project. Find out more: www.peckhamcoalline.org

Peckham Coal Line feasibility study - June 2018  

Crowdfunded feasibility study outlining the viability of the Peckham Coal Line project. Find out more: www.peckhamcoalline.org

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