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FIRST PEEK

March 31, 2014 · Volume 146, Issue 12

 

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FIRST PEEK

As of a vote by our board of directors last week, The Peak has decided to leave the Canadian University Press (CUP). If you haven’t been paying attention to the Canadian student newspaper world lately, let me tell you, things have been going on. The Canadian University Press (CUP) is a non-profit, member owned and operated organization of Canadian student newspapers, and the oldest student newswire service in the world. In this capacity, CUP has provided services and support such as conferences and a national newswire to its members, including The Peak. All sounds good, right? Right now, not so good. Currently, CUP is facing a financial crisis so bad that on Feb. 28 they launched a $50,000 Indiegogo fundraising campaign in an effort to keep themselves afloat, after facing their third consecutive deficit year. As of press time, they’ve raised a little over $7,000. How did things get to this point, you ask? CUP depends on membership fees — calculated

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by the available finances of the individual paper — to operate. It’s a fine balance of providing services valuable to larger papers with plentiful resources, and to those with much less. Unfortunately, recently member papers started leaving, deciding that in the changing financial landscape of press that CUP fees were no longer worth the services they were receiving. CUP suddenly had a lot less

money to keep up their national staff and expensive wire service. The tensions arising from this financial state culminated in a plenary meeting at this year’s national conference in Edmonton, when a coalition of current and former members, including The Peak, tried to pass a new fee structure and online article plan to replace the current newswire. The proposal was rejected, with softer fee cuts chosen instead. Over the past two years, The Peak has repeatedly voiced concerns about relevant services, asking for a more productive

newswire service or an RSS feed that would allow papers to push content quickly and effectively, providing more diversity and choice for republishing. CUP has not made any serious moves to respond to these requests. At this point, the mismanagement of the organization, the lack of response to our needs, and the resistance to decisive change have moved us to do something we have been discussing since I started at The Peak over two years ago: leave CUP. If you need us, you can find us over at the National University Wire (NUW ), which launched last Monday. NUW was founded out of collaboration between two former CUPpies, Geoff Lister of UBC’s The Ubyssey and Joshua Oliver of U of T’s The Varsity, in an effort to address the need that CUP has actively ignored. It’s the collaborative, user-generated feed we’ve always wanted. And the company’s not bad either. Along with The Peak, members of NUW are student newspaper heavyweights, including The Gateway, The Ubyssey, The Martlet, and six others, all of which can be found on the NUW site. We are proud to be a part of a wire that is working towards creating a strong, collaborative, unified student press, which is the most valuable thing we could ever receive from an organization. We hope CUP will be able to provide that again one day. But for now, we’re trying something NUW.


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NEWS

Out of one of the most heated SFSS elections in recent history, Chardaye Bueckert has emerged as the next president of the SFSS board of directors. Bueckert ran a tight race against ACE slate presidential candidate Brandon Chapman, winning by just 23 votes. Despite the success of the Move the Mountain’s (MtM) presidential candidate, it was a near landslide victory for ACE; of the 14 total slate members, nine were elected to the 2014/2015 board of directors, giving those candidates a majority on the 16 memberstrong board. Chief executive officer of the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC), Lorenz Yeung, told those in attendance that this election had the lowest voter turnout in a number of years. Of the approximate 25,000 undergraduate students who attend SFU, only 9.44 per cent cast a ballot. At the beginning of the night, the mood was tense, but jovial,

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as the candidates moved from the Highland Pub to one of the MBC conference rooms to hear the election results. Said presidential candidate Alexander Morris, who has been the subject of much electoral controversy, “My stomach feels a little upset because I tried to chug a beer with my friend, Adhar [ . . . ] I hope the people have chosen the best president that will represent them.” Bueckert had similar words for The Peak. “It’s all up to the voters,” she said. “No matter what happens, there’s no getting rid of me. I’m here for another year — [I] got elected to senate — so that part-time student bursary is my goal before I leave SFU.”

“I’m just honestly looking forward to it being done,” said Chapman. “There’s been way too much negativity surrounding this election, and I know that no matter what happens next year, I’m hoping whoever gets elected focuses on the positivity

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because nothing good will come of [being negative].” Yeung began by announcing the results of the three referendum questions, two of which concerned extensions to the current Health and Dental Plan. Students voted in favour of increasing the plan’s fee to $255 for the enhanced option; students will still be able to opt out of the plan entirely or choose the $198 basic plan. However, students did not vote to grant the SFSS board the power to increase plan fees by a maximum of five per cent in any given year. The membership voted “overwhelmingly” in favour of recognizing the Society of Arts and Social Sciences as the official faculty student union. Nonetheless, the motion only exceeded its required voter quota by 12 votes. Of the six candidates who ran for at-large representative positions, Rebecca Langmead (MtM) and Jeremy Pearce (ACE) clinched the two board spots. For the three contested faculty rep positions, ACE candidates Shadnam Khan for Business and Katie Bell for Education claimed two of the victories. Deepak Sharma triumphed over his two opponents to be named the Science representative. Unopposed candidates Ben Rogers (MtM) for Applied Sciences, Brady Wallace (ACE) for

Leah Bjornson associate news editor news@the-peak.ca / 778.782.4560

Arts and Social Sciences, Shirin Escarcha (ACE) for Communication, Art, and Technology, Tesicca Truong (ACE) for Environment, and Ayla Kooner for Health Science were all elected.

As the IEC began to announce the winning executive candidates, a hush fell over the crowd, save for a few dramatic “ooohs.” VP University Relations candidate Moe Kopahi won his fourth consecutive SFSS election by 82 votes over opponents Clay Gray (MtM) and Sarah Flodr (ACE). Incoming VP External Relations Darwin Binesh (ACE) won by a similar margin of 89 votes over Kathleen Yang (MtM). Kayode Fatoba, who made a splash on social media with his campaign rap, beat out both slates’ candidates and another independent for VP Student Life. ACE VP Student Services candidate Zied Masmoudi won his seat on the board by a wide margin of 370 votes. Nevertheless, it was the VP Finance position that received

Melissa Roach

the most votes cast of any executive spot. Receiving a total of 1,036 votes, Adam Potvin (ACE) won by 538 over opponent Nomin Gantulga (MtM). With ACE having claimed nine of the 15 spots, it seemed as though the slate’s momentum would carry them to a presidential win. The crowd gathered around Chapman, while Bueckert stood in the wings surrounded by a few close supporters. Yeung announced, “The next president of the Simon Fraser Student Society: Chardaye Bueckert.” A shocked and excited Bueckert told The Peak, “I’m honoured to have won, but I’m sad that that few people voted. That really kills me.” When Bueckert went to shake opponent Chapman’s hand, Chapman refused, saying, “You played a very dirty game Chardaye. You didn’t deserve this.” Fellow presidential candidate Morris remarked, “I feel that this reflects a lot of what I thought was going to happen.” He continued, “Chardaye’s got experience, ACE has experience, so it’s a fantastic transition. I foresee an interesting student government.” These results are unofficial and will be confirmed on Monday, after they are ratified by the current board of directors.


NEWS

The Walrus Magazine held an event on Tuesday, March 25 in the Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema during which seven different speakers were given seven minutes each to discuss an issue surrounding sustainable renewable energy. Topics included First Nations rights in relation to resource extraction, the political climate surrounding the Northern Gateway and Kinder Morgan pipelines, and the role for young people in mitigating climate change.

Angelika Neuwirth, one of the world’s leading scholars of the Qur’an, spoke at SFU Surrey on Thursday, March 27 about “Reading the Qur’an as a Text of Late Antiquity.” Opening with a quote by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe about the Qur’an being the “book of books,” Neuwirth unpacked a weighty thesis on how the Qur’an can be read as a literary text in its own context. In her lecture last Thursday, she argued that the Qur’an deserves to be recognized for it’s “epistemic shift” towards morality for the sake of humanity, rather than as a mere continuation of the preceding Abrahamic texts.

Each year, a public lecture is held in honour of the late SFU professor of communication, Dallas Smythe. This year’s memorial lecture, titled “Pulling Punches: Media Power, People Power,” was given on Monday, March 24 by Natalie Fenton, a communications professor from the University of London. Fenton discussed whether or not the media affects the practice of democracy in our society, and if so, which forms of media might have the most influence.

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Build SFU recently held an open session in the Think Tank where the architects of the SFSS project presented three possible designs for the new Student Union Building (SUB). Not only will the new SUB be located at, “the heart of SFU,” between Maggie Benston Centre (MBC) and the AQ, but the building is meant to be “the heart of the student experience” and as such, student focused. Feedback has indicated a desire for community interaction, access to daylight, an opportunity to experience nature, as well as an outstanding design with a clear “wow factor.” Students were asked which characteristics of each design worked to meet the above goals. The three schemes are not distinct options for the building, but rather a varied display of concepts from which the best elements will be chosen and incorporated into the final design for the SUB. Student commentary given at the Think Tank will be factored into the design process. “Terrace”, “Pavilion”, and “Loft” are the three concepts that were presented, each with its own unique features. Marc Fontaine, Build SFU general manager, says that each design has its advantages and disadvantages: “Some pieces of [the models] could respond better to the campus architecture.” One distinguishing feature of the “Terrace” design is that it has varying levels of outdoor space. Its storeys are also staggered, so the south side of the building aligns visually with MBC. The “Pavilion” model is unique in that its floors that are above Convocation Mall level have a distinguishable rounded shape. Students seemed to like that the different shape made the building clearly identifiable, but it would mean pushing more student space to lower levels. The “Loft” design is different in that it reaches higher than the others, equalling the height of the 5000 and 6000 levels of the AQ.

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One drawback of some of the designs was an overhang into Freedom Square, something that the university has particularly requested be avoided, so as not to block any light coming into that area. Another concern was having too much student space underground. The double-height lounges, the opportunity for natural light, and the connections to Freedom Square, MBC, and the AQ that would result in new circulation patterns on campus are all factors that generated positive responses from attendees. A comment from one student was, as noted in the minutes, “It is nice to have different access levels to the AQ. [ . . . ] It makes travel across campus smoother.”

Fontaine commented on the feedback, “We can use that information to try to create a new concept that responds to student requests and responds to the university architecture as it stands.” Responses from the project’s upcoming sustainability workshop will also be taken into account. The new schematic design report is set to be revealed midMay. After its review, the design development phase will begin — a phase that will involve all of the interior and exterior design decisions that must be made before construction. As for what will be inside the SUB, the space program developed by Build SFU allocates space to different purposes determined to be most important to students based on consultations done in 2013. The most recent version of the program was updated in Feb. and has set aside more than a quarter of the building for lounge and study areas. There will also be ample space for meeting rooms — available to all students — and multiuse space. Another great portion of space will be reserved for student organizations, clubs, and services. Other features of the SUB include a large multi-purpose room, unisex as well as gender segregated washrooms, additional dining space, and what is being called

the “cabaret”; Fontaine likens this to, “the upper part of the pub, but without the age restriction.” It would be a comfortable place with audio/visual capabilities that could serve as a venue for events like open mic nights. One of Build SFU’s main goals is for the SUB to be a distinctly student oriented building. In pursuit of this goal, workshops and

open discussions will continue to be held to ensure that student opinion is kept in mind during the creation of this building. At this time, construction is scheduled to begin in the summer of 2015. You can follow Melissa Roach


6 NEWS

This year’s cohort of SFU urban studies graduate students recently returned from Portland, OR, where they explored the future of urban development. In a city known for “keeping it weird,” students drew inspiration from the concrete jungle as well as the work of admired innovators in their field. The trip, which was first initiated in 2008, allowed those in attendance to opt into whichever workshops and seminars interested them on the two-day itinerary. The 40 students who travelled to Portland this year heard talks on immigrant and refugee community issues, city repair, and sustainable transportation, to name a few. Students were significantly impacted by the hands-on experience of the trip. Said urban studies graduate student Peter Marriott, “It was sort of a

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highlight and defining moment of the program. Going to our laboratory of nearby cities, whether it’s Seattle, Portland, Victoria, maybe one day San Francisco, it really gives us an opportunity to study cities first-hand and to explore such a huge diversity of people who are working and researching in different cities.” One speaker who left many of the students inspired was Mark Lakeman, a national leader in sustainable development who has created more than 300 community-generated public spaces in the Portland area. Student Katelyn McDougall spoke about what resonated most with her — that the initiatives Lakeman discussed are run by, “people who aren’t afraid to stand up for their own use of what communities should be, contrary to what planning departments are telling them.” One such initiative is Dignity Village, a self-governed, permanent housing encampment built by and for homeless people. Since being officially recognized by the city, the area houses approximately 60 people. It even elects its own officers, provides comforts such as showers, and offers a variety of community services.

Upon arriving at Dignity Village, student Robyn Craigie said, “It was quite awe-inspiring. I would recommend anyone go and see it, just the ability of people, who supposedly have no capacity to help themselves, are really creating something for themselves.”

Many students appreciated similar opportunities to see theory in practice, exploring the neighbourhoods that they had heard about in their workshops. “It was really neat to hear that from the professors earlier and then to go out and experience the gradient of gentrification and neighbourhood change,” said Marriot. With Portland only a stone’s throw away from Vancouver, participants were also exposed to initiatives that could potentially be made to work in our own urban world. “A lot of the

issues we’re dealing with in Vancouver, you can find in a lot of major cities on the continent,” said Craigie. “You can read about that commonality of issues and experiences but it’s much more powerful, I think, to go down and experience what people are living and how they’re similar to you.” Beyond an opportunity to consider new ways of thinking about urban development, the trip was an opportunity for urban studies students to engage with their peers and experts in their field. “Grad school can be a fairly isolating environment,” said Marriott, “It really strengthens us in the program, the program [itself], and what we were able to learn by going on this trip.” Despite Portland’s attempts to keep itself “weird,” the understanding of urban issues brought back from the trip by students may not be so farremoved after all. McDougall commented, “Understanding the inequalities and the nature and fabric of the urban landscape is very important in terms of how we move forward creating a sustainable, economically [and] socially just place in the future.”

Divest SFU and Sustainable SFU made the case for divestment from fossil fuels to SFU’s Board of Governors last Thurs., Mar. 27. One argument they made is that SFU’s investment in fossil fuel companies is contradictory to its mandate of sustainability. Their campaign has gained support from just over 10 per cent of faculty members. Members of the board agreed that they made great arguments, but the main concern was that divestment is not a financially viable option. One board member asked if this was really the best way. Presenters Andhra Azevedo of Divest SFU and James Hoffele of Sustainable SFU made the point that divestment is more than just withdrawing financial support — it is about taking a social stance.

The office of vice-president, finance Pat Hibbits brought the board up to date following the “successful completion of a public consultation process,” regarding the creation of a new athletics facility on SFU’s Burnaby campus. The tentative deal entails the construction of a 50,000 square foot facility at no financial cost to SFU, in exchange for a lease of approximately 3.5 acres of land in Discovery Park. The company would build a 12,000 square foot building on this land with the intention of leasing it out as a school of chiropractic. The consultation process yielded 1,894 responses, 69 per cent of which were in support of the project, with 19 per cent definitively opposed to it. Some questioned whether 69 per cent is enough to go forward, while other concerns from the board were for the reputation of the university and how the school of chiropractic could be misconstrued as having an affiliation with SFU. Hibbits brought up other complaints she had heard during consultations, such as a dislike of public-private partnerships and an aversion to cutting down more trees on Burnaby Mountain.


NEWS

The West Gym hosted SFU’s sixth annual Relay for Life, lasting 12 consecutive hours, from 7:00p.m. to 7:00 a.m. on March 21 to 22. The charity event saw approximately 380 people, with 42 teams, as well as more than 30 volunteers. Relay for Life (RFL) is an event organized entirely by students. According to Eve Mitchell, RFL youth coordinator, the fundraising target of $33,000 was exceeded before the night had even started, reaching $48,000 and counting. Proceeds will go to the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) to fund research, prevention initiatives, and care services for people affected by cancer. RFL aims to bring communities together in universities and high schools across Canada in a fun and festive way, while

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raising awareness around cancer prevention. As team members took part in turn in the relay — walking or running laps for the duration of the event — a number of activities were scheduled throughout the night, partly to keep participants awake. This year at SFU, as participant Norman KrismantaraCheng told The Peak, “People were playing around, doing yoga, [listening to] two bands, trying to have fun.” Participants were also fed and able to decorate luminaries against cancer. “The theme of the event changes every year, and actually I think this is the first year that SFU has done a theme, [superheroes against cancer],” said Mitchell. She continued, “I think it’s really nice because it’s that extra bit of fun; everyone loves dressing up so it gives them something to rally around.” She added that the costumes she saw were the best she had seen at a relay event, setting a high bar for next year. At around midnight, participants joined for a solemn walk in the dark to remember cancer victims in what turned out to be a very emotional moment for

some. However, there were also merrier moments, such as the survivors’ victory lap. Ayla Kooner, co-chair of the organizing committee and a health sciences major, is one such survivor. Diagnosed at 12 with Ewing’s sarcoma, a bone cancer, she underwent a heavy year-long treatment involving both chemotherapy and radiation. This year, she will celebrate her 10 years in remission. Kooner told The Peak, “The thing that people don’t understand about being a survivor is that you are forever living with the consequences of [your cancer]. [. . .] There are long-term side effects

of chemotherapy we kind of all have to live through, and I will have to be going for check-ups for the rest of my life.” The relay is SFU’s longestrunning university event. “I think it started as a res event, so there was a really good awareness of getting people together, creating that community spirit, and also promoting health awareness,” Mitchell explained. The RFL involves teams of up to 15 people fundraising for the CCS, both individually and as a team. One of the key programs funded is Camp Goodtimes at Loon Lake in Maple Ridge, where children and their

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families can go to forget about cancer treatments. It’s a place that, for Kooner, “puts your faith back into humanity.” “One thing I would hope [participants] learned is that the fight against cancer is far from over,” Kooner concluded. “I hope that they take away how important life and time really are. [Anyone] could be diagnosed with a lifethreatening disease like cancer tomorrow, so you better make the time you have count.” You can follow Olivier Calvet


8 NEWS

The newly launched SFU action group Wild Salmon Creative Action sought to spread environmental activism and awareness last week through a medium everyone could enjoy: pancakes. The Simon Fraser Public Interest Research Group (SFPIRG) affiliate’s breakfast fundraiser “Pancakes Not Pipelines,” held on March 24, was a collaboration with Nature’s Garden. The Cornerstone cafe has already declared their organic deli farmed salmon free, as has Nester’s Market. Wild Salmon Creative Action is campaigning to make SFU a farmed salmon free zone — an issue that extends beyond environmental activism to questions of social justice and democracy. Said Mia Nissen of her introduction to environmental activism, “It was like waking up from a naïve slumber.” Nissen, a member of Wild Salmon Creative Action, went on a seven-day hunger strike last December after hearing of the National Energy Board’s conditional

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approval of Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline. Shortly after breaking her fast, Nissen attended a Stó:lo First Nation wild salmon ceremony where she was introduced to the wild salmon as a keystone species in terms of ecology, economy and culture. Nissen admitted that a lot of people are uncomfortable with the term genocide, but said that if oil spills or fish farms compromise the BC coastline, “the people who depend on wild salmon will no longer be able to sustain themselves.” She declared, “If you’re controlling the food supply, you’re controlling the people.” Wild Salmon Creative Action opposes pipelines and fish farming as threats to wild salmon habitats and migration routes. Nissen cited a risk assessment conducted by SFU that suggested that there is at least a 90 per cent probability of an oil tanker spill if the Northern Gateway pipeline proceeds. Fish farms can be equally devastating to wild salmon populations, says Nissen, as they can create breeding grounds for sea lice and disease. Nissen said of government compliance with both oil companies and fish farms: “It’s a continuation of exploiting the land and oppressing indigenous people.” Partial proceeds from the breakfast will go to Unis’tot’en Camp, a First Nations community located in the middle of the

proposed Northern Gateway route that refuses to cede their land to the government or private enterprise. This is the site where, Nissen says, if all other forms of resistance fail, protestors will lock arms against the pipeline. Despite this, Nissen resents the term “radical.” Wild Salmon Creative Action’s ultimate goal is

to normalize resistance and make activism accessible to everyone. “Our group wants to demonstrate that the culture of resistance is not about being an anarchist or about being radical. It’s about identifying social wrong and taking a critical stance,” said Nissen. She and Wild Salmon Creative Action hope that events such as

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their pancake breakfast will increase public awareness and encourage all kinds of involvement. “I have tons of optimism,” said Nissen, “otherwise I wouldn’t be doing this.” You can follow Erika Loggin


OPINIONS

You’ve been eyeing the job boards lately, looking for that perfect internship to kick-start your professional career. Then, suddenly, it’s the end of March. The warmer weather is an ominous reminder that you might have to beg your old boss at that dreaded customer service job to take you back. Searching for summer work as a student can be stressful. When else in life do you have to cycle through unemployment and full-time employment so frequently? The added stress of exams and the foreknowledge that that tuition payment isn’t so far away don’t help, either. So what’s the best thing to do? Blow off studying for finals and use the time to hand out resumes? Hope that summer work will land in your lap? Give up on seeking opportunities that further your career and fall back on an old job that will pay

Recently, members of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) voted unanimously in favour of adopting a proposal to condemn the Crimean referendum as illegal, with two exceptions: China, who abstained, and Russia, who voted against the proposal. In any other democratic forum, this would not matter, but Russia, as a permanent member of the UNSC, can veto any resolution that this organization attempts to pass. This veto power needs to be reformed.

opinions editor email / phone

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the bills? The answer: none of the above. Finals are overwhelming, and job hunting can be stressful, but the good news is that

When the United Nations was founded during World War II, it was decided that Great Britain, China, the Soviet Union, the US, and France would be the permanent members of this Security Council, and would have veto power in issues relating to threats to the peace and stability of the world. One reason for this power was to ensure the major powers act in concert, and to prohibit the UN from taking future actions against its principal founding members. In many ways, these five nations are the biggest threat to world peace. A report to the United States Congress on international arms sales found that these five nations together were responsible for 78 per cent of all arms deals to developing and industrialized countries from 2004 to 2011. Further, all five of these nations have been guilty of using the power of veto

doing both is not unmanageable. We live in a world where, even if you walk into an office in a suit, resume in hand, you will be informed you that the

to block actions against their own countries. These have included an attempt to condemn the American invasion of Panama, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, and the Suez Crisis. The veto has allowed these nations to act as they see fit without fear of condemnation by the UN.

Yet there does exist a process by which the United Nations can circumvent a veto or the threat of a veto; UN Resolution 377, known colloquially

Joel MacKenzie opinions@the-peak.ca / 778.782.4560

application process begins online. Take advantage of this. Instead of making job-hunting a huge task that you put off until the last day of exams,

as “Uniting for Peace.” This resolution was adopted by the UN in 1950, allowing for the General Assembly to convene an emergency special session in the event that “the Security Council [ . . . ] fails to exercise [ . . . ] international peace and security in any case where there appears to be a threat to the peace, breach of the peace, or act of aggression.” The problem with Resolution 377 is that it is more a tactic of putting pressure on belligerent nations than firm action. Unlike the veto system in the United States, where a presidential veto can be overridden with a two-thirds majority in each house, there is nothing binding about the General Assembly overriding a Security Council veto. This is simply because the task of the Security Council is to enforce the peace, and any

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budget time for it now. Wake up half an hour earlier every day, get the coffee on, and discipline yourself to apply for just one job a day. This will help you focus on applying with quality, instead of the exhaustive “I’ll just hand my resume to every single business in the neighborhood and hope for the best” approach. Read the job description and the qualifications, and apply for positions that you would hire yourself for. It is great to stretch yourself, but you’re probably not a CEO, so don’t waste your time and the employer’s time. Take a few minutes to cater your resume to the qualifications that the employer is looking for (provided, of course, that you possess them), and take the extra 10 minutes to write a cover letter. With the stress of final papers and exams, too often we leave summer job hunting to the bottom of the to-do list, and end up with work that isn’t furthering us in the long run. Set aside some extra time to look for positions that will build your resume and apply for them with integrity. Doing so will set yourself up for success, and save yourself a lot of stress at the end of April.

permanent member that does not agree with the resolution is likely to prevent the deployment of peacekeeping forces to a conflict zone. So even if, for example, the UNGA was to initiate the process involved in invoking Resolution 377, it is entirely possible that Russia will simply ignore the action, much as they did in 1980 when the General Assembly protested the Soviet Union’s presence in Afghanistan. What is needed here is reform, but it is difficult to see how this can be accomplished. The United Nations does not have any real power to enforce its will, and the will of the international community, on nations that choose to ignore it. For all of its accomplishments, this continual failure to protect the nations of the world from the will of the permanent members will be part of its legacy.


10 OPINIONS

Hyundai is reportedly soon to give a whole new meaning to the term “gas tank.” It’s only a matter of weeks before the company introduces its new Tucson Fuel Cell car which is run on neither gasoline nor electricity, but poop. Human fecal matter will be the sole fueler of this automobile, and while I envision a potentially disastrous marketing campaign, I also see, should this campaign work, the exponential benefits for our environment and for saving the dollars in our bank accounts. How does poo translate to power? First we eat, then we digest, then we flush. Once our waste has been flushed it will be released into an airless tank called an anaerobic “digester” (yum). In this tank, our crap will then be broken down by microbes which release methane and carbon dioxide. These gasses will go to a public pump to be put into the fuel cell where the methane is converted to hydrogen to fuel the vehicle. At first, this concept may seem a little less than appetizing; among the immediate drawbacks that come to mind is driving with a farm-smell reminiscent of the

Chilliwack highway. But the concept of poo-fuel is brilliant. What more practical use can you think of for excrement, with the hydrocarbons from it now being used rather than wasted? Don’t answer that. Poop-pump stations would allow for more businesses to emerge, hence contributing to more job opportunities, and would possibly provide this fuel at a much cheaper rate than gasoline or diesel.

The use of poop as fuel would also surpass the high environmentally-friendly standards that have recently caused a big hoopla with the introduction of electricallypowered hybrid vehicles. According to Hyundai, the Fuel Cell (which will produce zero gas emissions) will only take three minutes to fill, as opposed to the hours it may take to charge electric vehicles. Furthermore, these cars can reportedly drive up to 483 kilometres (300 miles) before they need to be re-poo’ed; this is longer than your average electric vehicle. Sure, some people may question whether we have enough hydrogen to allow most of our current vehicles to be replaced by poopowered ones. But I say that with the leaps and bounds by which technology advances, and the fact

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that hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, I have no doubt that scientists will fit the pieces together and produce something that will allow all of our vehicles to be replaced with hydrogen-powered ones. With this innovation comes a negative. With the probability of water being taxed in the near future as it becomes an extremely, if not the most, valuable resource, taxing poop is a possibility. But I’m okay with it. If there is any place I don’t mind my future tax dollars going, it would definitely be towards powering my car. So now, if we want to drive longer distances, I guess we’ll just have to eat a little more. Or is this a bit of an overstatement? My point is that I do not smell poop, I smell success. Success that may, in the midst of roads with the fresh scent of livestock, bring about a more sustainable environment and help us to become more financially content.

It is no secret that times are getting tougher for post-secondary students who must support themselves through work. Minimum wage in BC is $10.25 while the living wage in the metro Vancouver region is $19.62 for a family of four with both parents fully employed. It is true that most working students are not fully employed parents, [but this] nevertheless points toward structural impoverishment for low-skilled workers. Most students come to university to develop skills and abilities that will improve their position within the labour market because their current skill levels place them firmly in the minimum wage, or near minimum wage, pay grade. Regardless of one’s political stance towards unionized labour, it is a fact that unionized workers on the whole have better wages and benefits and greater job security than do non-union workers. If this were not the case, businesses would not be so keen to oppose unionization or call upon the government to institute policies that erect barriers to workplace organization.

Unorganized low-skill workers, especially, are treated as readily substitutable for one another; economic precariousness is their hallmark condition of existence. The growing rift between wages and the cost of living implies both that workplace unionization to protect jobs and labour militancy to fight for better working conditions and standards of living are increasingly becoming a matter of survival for low-wage workers. Indeed, the job protection against arbitrary dismissals that a union job provides enables a more solid position from which a militant struggle for respect and a better life can be fought. There are a number of students who work on campus in unionized jobs. Teaching Assistants and Teacher Markers, the members of TSSU, are probably the most visible. The office, retail and library staff of both SFU and the SFSS as members of CUPE, are probably the second most apparent unionized workers on campus. Then there are the food and beverage services workers that you will find in the Highland Pub, who are also

CUPE members employed by the SFSS. Perhaps less apparent are the food and beverage service workers in the cafeterias, White Spot, Starbucks, Residence Dining Hall and the Diamond Alumni Club who are members of Unite Here! Local 40. These workers are employed by Compass Canada who holds the SFU food services contract. MBC private vendor food court workers are unorganized. Many Unite Here! Local 40 members on campus are not students, but many are. SFU Food Services is a key provider of employment opportunities for working students on campus. Therefore, the strength of presence of Local 40 at SFU is a determinant of well-being for working students at SFU. Unite Here! Local 40 will be organizing to increase its presence on campus and improve standards of living for its members, many being students. In solidarity, Joel Warren Chair, Labour Studies Student Union Member, Unite Here! Local 40 (off campus)


OPINIONS

One of the most popular articles The Peak has ever published is a witty opinions piece colourfully titled “I hate Jenny McCarthy.” The article, written by former editor Graham Templeton and published in 2009, took the eponymous talk show host and former model to task for her outspoken support of the anti-vaccination movement. Five years later, it’s still garnering views on our website — and, despite overwhelming evidence refuting any and all claims that vaccines cause autism in children, this movement is still going strong. Yes, seriously. Parents still think it’s a good idea not to give their children the MMR vaccine, which protects them against measles, mumps, and rubella, diseases that can and have killed hundreds of thousands of young people. Diseases that, thanks to modern medicine, shouldn’t be killing kids anymore. But they are, and in greater numbers every year. Canada’s vaccination rates have dropped to 84 per cent — lower than necessary to ensure population immunity. Our rates are lower than those of countries like Eritrea and Tunisia, where vaccinations are both costly and difficult to acquire. So why aren’t we vaccinating

March 31, 2014

our kids? For many, it’s because a man named Andrew Wakefield published a study in 1998 which claimed there is a direct causal connection between the MMR vaccine and autism. There isn’t. Turns out that Mr. Wakefield had been given money by lawyers looking for evidence against vaccine manufacturers, and that his data was both carefully manipulated and just plain false. In fact, Wakefield was later removed from the British General Medical Registry, making him unable to practice medicine in the United Kingdom — and, hopefully, anywhere else.

Still, despite countless counter-arguments published by lawyers, scientists and medical professionals, the anti-vaccination movement marches on, stubborn and oblivious. The debate has recently resurfaced in the form of a few offhand comments made by reality star Kristin Cavallari, who, like McCarthy, refuses to vaccinate her kids. “To each their own,” she told Fox News. “If you’re really concerned about your kid, get them vaccinated.” Who can argue with that logic? If Cavallari wants to endanger her own kids, who are we to stop her? Except, of course, that just isn’t the case — the recent outbreaks of measles in Europe and North America are just one

example of the dangerous effects of the anti-vaccination movement. It’s not an isolated decision: it’s one that affects everyone, especially young people. Case in point: there have been 228 measles cases confirmed in British Columbia this year. We’re not talking about the black plague here; measles can be a dangerous disease, but it’s also one that’s easily treated in the Western world. Yet, on the premise of disproven evidence from a 25-year old article — not to mention the occasional staunch religious belief — parents are putting their children, and everyone else’s children, in danger. There are plenty of studies out there that prove people aren’t swayed by the cold hard facts. So maybe a different approach is in order. Parents: vaccinate your fucking kids. To not do so is not only ignorant and selfish, it’s a willful endangerment of children. About 120,000 young people die of measles every year — and that’s nothing compared to the pre-vaccination days, when the number was closer to 2.6 million. I still hate Jenny McCarthy, and in the immortal words of Graham Templeton, you should too. She and every other anti-vaccination airhead may desperately want to believe that vaccines which have the capacity to save hundreds of thousands of lives can cause autism, even though we know they don’t. But you don’t have to listen to them. Vaccinate your kids, vaccinate yourself, and tell everyone you know to do the same.

11

As I come closer to completing my degree in English and become more interested in writing in general, writing is becoming the practice. The continuous mountain. The never-ending journey. I find little else as satisfying. Handing in a completed essay feels fantastic. To have put together all the information from weeks of studying and research, to solve the puzzle of how to include as much info as possible from the semester into one complete package, I get a high.

The place of discovery that is writing also gets me stoned. Poetry specifically, but also prose and essay writing, allow the detachment of oneself from a written piece of work; the writing speaks for itself and can have unpredictable effects on a reader. Writing offers a means to create something new, and an opportunity to escape oneself in the process. Cocaine? No, thanks. I get my high from the pencil and the pen. I get my dopamine from the keyboard.

Holy crap, am I ever terrified of starting to write. I’m terrified of writing research papers, sifting through convoluted scholarly articles, potentially choosing the wrong ones, writing, editing, second-guessing, and nit-picking over every sentence. I’m terrified of opening myself up to critiques. Especially when writing opinions, I really don’t want to take a hard stance for or against something, to invite a reaction, to potentially have to question my own beliefs.

I’m terrified of potentially having to defend an argument against anyone who might feel more educated (or, God forbid, more passionate) about a subject. But I have to write like I have to speak. I have to express myself. I can’t live a life of fear, protected by the absence of rebuttals. And I have to write essays. Because profs say so. But this semester, I’m gonna give myself at least a month to prepare each. . . . Aaand the semester is over in a week. Well, I don’t really need sleep.

You can follow Max Hill

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14

ARTS

Veronica Mars is an addict. At least that’s the metaphor the new film plays with, poking fun at television’s favourite teengirl detective and her inability to stay out of trouble. After years of retirement from the private-eye lifestyle, Veronica is drawn back to her hometown of Neptune, CA, where her old flame Logan has become the lead suspect in a very public murder. Though she tries to keep out of the action, she is pulled headfirst into what she’s best at: wrangling her way into dangerous situations and solving crime, all served with her signature biting wit. But our heroine isn’t the only one addicted — it would be foolish to review the Veronica Mars movie without acknowledging the events which allowed it to come together in the first place. Mars was one of many too-quickly cancelled television shows, beloved by dedicated fans who spent years creatively campaigning for its comeback in television or film. This is the same group of fans who mailed thousands of Mars Bars and over 500 pounds of marshmallows to studio executives in protest of the cancellation. Veronica Mars stood out for its clever lead female character, a teenage private eye who involves herself in the film noir dealings of a rich beach town constantly on the verge of class war and scandal. Campy it was not — the show

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March 31, 2014

was grounded in gritty crime and character driven plot. When director Rob Thomas proposed his Kickstarter campaign to crowdsource the film through fans it, was met with a record-breaking response. It was fully funded in mere hours, and was sealed with a promise to make the best possible film for the deserving fans. So the question is: did it fulfill that promise? The film opens with a snappy overview of the basic premise of the show for any of the uninitiated watching for the first time. Moving swiftly along, Mars retains its film noir tone and traditional use of snarky voice-over narration. Using the premise of a 10 year high school reunion in Mars’ hometown, the film easily draws together its core group of characters — and then some. The film could drag through introductions but doesn’t, making the gathering of characters seem natural and allowing the plot to move on to the main mystery and action. The central crime results in tense conflict and a satisfying conclusion. But does this work for both the hardcore fan and the casual viewer? I would guess that first-time Veronica Mars viewers will enjoy the overall film, but miss many of the fan-heavy references that make the reunion of the characters so special. The film is balanced enough to be exciting for the general public but, true to intention, the most thrilled audience members will be the most dedicated backers. After all, this film was made by the fans and it’s set up in a way to keep them coming back for more. You can follow Justine Brenneis

Described as an essay about all matters to do with the heart, Wildlife’s On the Heart is about more than love. “It’s not just about being in love and being heartbroken, that’s definitely part of it, but it’s about everything related to the heart,” said lead singer and guitarist Dean Povinsky. As they embark on a national tour, Povinsky said that he is looking forward to playing in some cities that they haven’t played in a while, and also returning to Vancouver for their fifth show in the city. For their first few dates in Ontario they shared the stage with Fast Romantics, and for their western dates they will be playing with Boy and Bear. Povinksy says he misses his own bed the most when on the road, “and not sharing it with some dudes,” he adds, laughing.

Daryn Wright arts@the-peak.ca / 778.782.4560

Povinsky comes up with the lyrics and melodies for Wildlife’s songs first, then brings them to the rest of the band. It’s a collaborative process with everyone shaping each song together. For On the Heart the band worked with producers Peter Katis, Gus Van Go, and Werner F., and Povinsky said that the album developed organically and that it was a lot of fun to work with them. “Peter put the unifying patina on the whole album, so it didn’t sound schizophrenic,” said Povinsky. “You make an album and it’s bound to be a learning experience,” he continued. “There’s no way you can’t take something away.” He’s happy with the process and proud of the album: “It’s pretty reflective of what we were trying to do.” The theme of the record, said Povinsky, is reflected in “Don’t Fear” with its juxtaposition of happy and sad elements. “It encapsulates the record well,” said Povinsky, “sonically it’s a bit more melancholy and it’s instrumentally interesting — there’s a build up I like. Lyrically it reflects the tension we were trying to put in the songs.” Another element of tension is in the idea of romanticizing

something that might not be good for you and, on the other hand, being able to see the good in something negative. While a concert may be a place of tension for some, Povinsky said, “We’re good at making people have fun in a live setting.” He likes to talk to the audience a lot and put them in a good mood. “I let them know we don’t think we’re better than them,” he said, “We’re honest and earnest about what we’re doing up there — they can relate to that.” That being said, he doesn’t have anything specific prepared for each show. “I’m not a fan of delivering the same banter every night and having go-to jokes,” he said, explaining that the goal is just to make sure the audience has fun. “If I have to make fun of myself then so be it.”


ARTS

Since then I have taken a barre class, which combines pilates with ballet exercises — no experience necessary — as well as a classic vinyasa yoga class. Each of these selections offered an invigorating, unique workout led by energetic and knowledgeable instructors. Chatting with Mazerolle about the studio, I learned that she and Pablico had first crossed paths through their collaborative work on various youth programs. Both had founded successful youth initiatives (Girlvana and VARS/TY) independently, and soon realized a mutual vision of creating a fun and inclusive community hub that would provide a

space for youth movement programs. From these beginnings Distrikt Movement was born: a multidisciplinary studio that welcomes all ages and abilities under one roof. Community, creativity, and collaboration are the key values at the heart of Distrikt Movement. Mazerolle discussed the importance of supporting local businesses and how this has shaped some of the studio’s offerings, including their partnership with Culver City Salads, a food truck that provides healthful lunches outside Distrikt every Friday. Moving forward, Mazerolle and Pablico intend to build upon the foundation they have created by providing new leadership opportunities for youth and becoming more involved in the community. When asked what it was like to start this business, Mazerolle confessed that it has been a tremendous amount of work. She recalled the long hours, learning curves, and continuous onslaught of obstacles that her and Pablico faced, both pre-and post-opening. Yet even while discussing these challenges she conveyed a genuine sense of warmth and affection for all things Distrikt. In terms of advice for other young entrepreneurs Mazerolle remarked, without hesitation, “Just go for it.� This week I asked other North Shore SFU students what their impressions of Distrikt Movement have been. One student described the space as having an unintimidating, relaxed atmosphere, while another characterized it as fun, friendly, and welcoming. SFU alumna Cassandra Van Dyck said of Distrikt, “[It’s] a fitness studio with heart. A place where you’re welcomed as you are and supported. [ . . . ] You feel like you’re part of a community of people who care about being healthy, having fun, and feeling good about who you are.� Distrikt Movement is not just a studio where people come to exercise; it is a community that offers a healthy dose of camaraderie — a space that strips away some of the seriousness of life in an honest and accessible way. To quote Mazerolle, when it comes down to it, it’s all about “people sweating and moving together.�

15

EXPLORE

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If you live on the North Shore and have any interest in fitness, it’s likely you’ve heard of the new kid on the block, Distrikt Movement. The studio, owned by established movement instructors and community leaders Alex Mazerolle and Jian Pablico, opened its doors the second week of January, bringing the ‘hood a new space to explore. I first heard of Distrikt Movement through social media, and being an avid yogi and North Van lifer, I was immediately intrigued. I wondered, how would this one be different? In a city full of fitness centres and yoga studios, it was hard to imagine a newcomer offering up something truly original. Nonetheless, I decided to explore Distrikt Movement with an open mind and high hopes. Before I even set foot in the studio, I was impressed by the variety of classes offered (yoga, dance, martial arts) and their refreshingly creative names (Core Mechanic, Ugly Sweaters). I chose a class entitled crush/hush for my first Distrikt adventure as it provided an appealing combination of fast-paced conditioning and plyometrics followed by a relaxing bout of yoga.

March 31, 2014

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16 ARTS

After 40 years of teaching in SFU’s English department and penning over a dozen books on Canadian literary authors, it seems an odd departure for David Stouck to write a book about an architect. But in fact, a book about Arthur Erickson is a serendipitous fit for a retired SFU professor, as Erickson designed the Burnaby campus. Stouck actually wasn’t the one who came up with the idea for the book; it was Ethel Wilson’s niece, Mary Buckerfield White, whom he had interviewed during his research of Ethel Wilson. Mary contacted Stouck in 2004 and said no one was writing about her long-time friend, Arthur Erickson. Despite knowing next to nothing about architecture, and very little about Erikson, Stouck decided to take on the project. “I thought it would make an interesting retirement project,” Stouck comments lightheartedly, “[but] I was skeptical, because I

“The artist’s job is not to succumb to despair, but to find an antidote for the emptiness of existence.” For those who live by such words, today’s North American cultural industries have infinitely failed us. The corporate monopoly production of culture that comes out of Hollywood reflects capitalist values that individualize life’s miseries rather than provide a remedy. But thanks to the sharing capacities of the Internet, not all North American art production has succumbed to this despair.

March 31, 2014

did not know the technical language of architecture.” What he didn’t realize was the sheer amount of background research he would need to conduct — educating himself in everything from painting and philosophy to Japanese and Indonesian culture. “It was a huge job,” states Stouck, “[Erickson] had a huge life.” Stouck began research in 2005 and conducted nearly weekly interviews with Erikson, bringing archival material to Erickson’s house on the weekends to help jog his memory. He was surprised to learn about Erickson’s personal life, which became rather flamboyant when he moved to LA. Stouck finished writing in 2011, two years after Erickson passed away. Then, after a small snag with the publisher, the book Arthur Erickson: An Architect’s Life was published in September 2013. The research process took Stouck and his wife traveling, as Erickson told him that to understand his influences, he would have to visit Florence in Italy, Kyoto in Japan, and the island of Bali in Indonesia. “SFU is a good example of how Bali influenced him,” explains Stouck. “The landscaping of a mountain top in Bali, the buildings hug the landscape, and are very

In the last 10 years, the economy has become increasingly dependant on the generation of knowledge through creativity and innovation, otherwise known as the creative industries. The rise of the creative industries has shifted cultural production away from corporations, and into the hands of the masses. This reduces the strength of cultural monopolies, and allows for meaningful artistic work that reflects the real values of middle class citizens living in North America. Although the creative industries have changed the face of cultural production, there are

low.” All the other architects who put in proposals for SFU’s Burnaby campus had huge high rises as a central focus. When Stouck and his wife visited Bali they saw terracing of the rice fields up and down the mountainside; those who are familiar with SFU Burnaby will understand how Erickson applied this concept. “Japanese influence was really important too, both in landscaping and design. The idea that the building doesn’t rise up, but should be an intimate part of the landscape.” Erickson also studied philosophy and believed in the creation of open, common areas for gathering and interdisciplinary mingling — which is reflected clearly in Convocation Mall and the AQ. Arthur Erickson: An Architect’s Life has since been nominated for

barriers preventing the free flow of meaningful art. These barriers come in the form of intellectual property rights. Take the example of the new-age digital music producer. This person takes sounds from other artists, remixes them, and puts them on top of various other tracks. The web presents an unlimited number of mediums to showcase and market this kind of work. However, if a large record label owns the rights to a song, any reproduction of that song is strictly prohibited. If a new-age digital music artist uses only a few seconds of that song they

several awards, including the RBC Taylor Prize and two categories of the BC Book Prizes, for which the shortlist was announced on March 13. Also on the BC Book Prize shortlist is Renée Sarojini Saklikar, graduate of the SFU Writer’s Studio and founder of Lunch Poems at SFU. Saklikar is nominated for her debut collection children of air india: un/ authorized exhibits and interjections, reflecting on the Air India Flight 182 bombing in 1985. The Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize includes two other poets with SFU connections: Jordan Abel, shortlisted for his title The Place of Scraps, is an instructor in the Continuing Studies department. Russell Thornton’s book of poetry, Birds, Metals, Stones and Rain, was also shortlisted for the

could be heavily fined. The only way to legally produce a track that uses a protected song is to buy rights to it. Unfortunately, those don’t come cheap. But even with strict intellectual property laws, the Internet and the creative industries have still revolutionized cultural production. There is now a population of creators who make a living in online video production, blogging, online graphic design, and a range of other practices made possible by the creative industries. Copyright laws stifle the innovative practices the creative industries provide and restrict

Governor General’s Award for Poetry in 2013; Thornton completed his MA at SFU. On Thursday, April 3, there is a free soirée to celebrate the shortlisted authors at Joe’s Apartment at 6:00 p.m. The winner of the Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Literary Excellence, a lifetime achievement award, will also be announced at the event. In mid-April, the BC Book Prizes On Tour will kick off, touring select authors (to be announced) around the province to visit schools, bookstores, and libraries in various communities. The winners of the BC Book Prizes will be announced May 3 at the Lieutenant Governor’s BC Book Prize Gala, an award celebration to be held this year at the Renaissance Vancouver Harbourside Hotel.

the free flow of meaningful cultural production. But, as Woody Allen tells us, “We should not succumb to despair.” Although the commodification of art in the cultural industries has led to corporate monopolies on creativity, innovation, and the production of culture, the web has provided us with an arena for meaningful cultural production at our fingertips. The web may be limited by intensive copyright laws at this point in time, but it has increased artistic practices that better reflect the values of the majority of North American citizens.


ARTS

When one thinks of fashion, SFU probably isn’t the first place that comes to mind. With NCAA sports teams, a world renowned co-op program, and notable academic achievements, fashion would seem to be the least of our concerns. So it might’ve come as a surprise that SFU would be hosting its first ever Fashion Week, right here on Burnaby campus. As a school lacking in any sort of fashion design or marketing program, SFU seems like an odd locale for such an event. According to SFU Fashion Week’s creative director Kayode Fatoba, this was exactly why the event was created: “The vision behind Fashion Week for us is to be able to represent a community that has more to offer than just academics.” The SFU community has its own distinctive style, one that is, according to Viven Low, the event’s public relations and social media organizer, “based on the individuality of each person.” This individual style is what pushed organizers to bring SFU Fashion Week to life. In order to exhibit SFU’s fashion community, organizers decided to set the stage for local designers to show off their collections. Showcasing brands such as Sleepless Nights, Dipt Vancity, Lavish Tee, Lily Rose, SFU Athletics, and the SFU bookstore, Fashion Week was able to bring forth this university’s hidden designing talent. During the final show of the event, each brand displayed original designs on a runway; Sleepless Nights incorporated tribal prints with street wear through lightweight pants, eccentric hoodies, and loose shirts. The brand paired high-waisted slacks with simple t-shirts and beanies, with embellished bomber jackets paired with tribal-print harem pants. Lavish Tee displayed everyday luxurious wear with an array of different prints, ranging from versatile t-shirts, tank tops, and sweaters, making the collection perfect for busy SFU students. Lily Rose’s collection, on the other hand, used girly aspects to play up classic pieces, with floralprint dresses, bohemian bags, and blush-coloured skinny jeans, for an overarching feminine feel.

17

March 31, 2014

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Dipt Vancity, a well-known brand throughout the city of Vancouver, displayed logo-clad hoodies, shirts, and snapbacks, representative of Vancouver’s ever-popular street style. Last of the independent designers, Chreetee displayed more exotic silhouettes with vibrant sequined maxi skirts paired with equally embellished crop tops.

It was inspiring to witness the artistic talent of the SFU and Vancouver communities, and to hear about the process behind getting into the fashion industry. At panel talks during Wednesday’s event, each designer spoke about breaking into the fashion world, showing how difficult yet rewarding the industry really is. Along with networking and blogging, Sleepless Nights founder Jason Bempong says that it is important “to be brave

enough to talk to people you don’t know and just put yourself out there.” Though not necessarily a fashion capital, Vancouver’s fashion scene is increasingly making itself present on the global scale. If this fashion week proved anything, it is that fashion is present in this city and, as panelist Kevin Lalune stated, “Vancouver fashion is going to get big soon.” I cannot wait to see SFU Fashion Week grow and expand in the future, and maybe even take on a more high-fashion and haute

couture aspect. The fact that SFU hosted such an event just goes to show that there is a desire for fashion to be expressed in a more creative and impactful way on this campus. Bringing together the community through the creative medium of fashion is not only inspirational, but it also presents a new platform for others to express their passions at future fashion weeks. As Fatoba put it, “While it is the first year of SFU Fashion Week, the journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”

PeakSFU


18 DIVERSIONS / ETC

March 31, 2014

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2. What I did to all the articles in the Features section this semester 3. Famously dim-witted (and extinct) bird 5. Game of Thrones actor and award winner Peter 6. A sheep goesâ&#x20AC;Ś 9. A dangerous disease causing hemorrhaging; common in deer (abbr.) 10. Goetheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s magnum opus, based on a popular German myth 12. Scorsese, to his friends (and pretty much everyone else) 13. A Maori canoe, or one third of an Atlanta rapperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stage name 14. Nathan Fillion, Marshall McLuhan, K.D. Lang, e.g. 16. The foremost broadcaster of eSports tournaments (abbr.)

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SPORTS

After a year of both triumph and heartbreak, struggle and perseverance, SFU’s athletic calendar is nearing its end. Last Wednesday, the Clan recognized their best and brightest student athletes at the annual awards banquet. The 2013-14 winners are as follows: The Rick Jones Award for Courage honours an individual who has persevered through adversity to lead their team, and was awarded to Brad Erdos of Clan football, who missed the entire 2012 Clan football season with an injury just months after being drafted by the Calgary Stampeders. He rehabbed and was back on the field in 2013, leading the Clan offensive line in his senior season. The Bill DeVries Award for Outstanding Academic Achievement is presented to a student who exhibits outstanding academic achievement and athletic performance as well as the personal qualities of integrity and generosity. The 2013 recipient was Adam Staschuk, a captain of the men’s soccer team, who helped the Clan reach the NCAA Div. II Final Four in each of his two seasons with the men’s soccer team, while sporting a 3.80 GPA.

Staschuk’s men’s soccer team was named the President’s Athletic Team of the Year for winning its fourth straight Great Northwest Athletic Conference title, second consecutive NCAA West Region title and making its

March 31, 2014

second straight appearance at the Final Four. The award was presented by SFU President Andrew Petter, who also awarded the President’s Academic Team of the Year award to the women’s basketball team. The Clan boasted a team GPA of 3.12 and also finished second in the Great Northwest Athletic Conference and reached round 32 at the NCAA Div. II Tournament. The Lorne Davies Senior Grad Award, presented to the senior athlete who has achieved excellence in competition, in the classroom and in the service of the community was awarded to women’s wrestler Victoria Anthony. Anthony went undefeated through four years of collegiate competition, winning four WCWA championships in her weight class while facilitating a busy international schedule and maintaining a 3.59 grade point average. The Department Scholar Athlete Award presented to the junior or senior athlete with the highest overall GPA went to Nicole Cossey of women’s swimming, who boasts a 3.86 GPA. She would be honoured again during the evening as she was also named the Clan’s Female Athlete of the Year. She was a two time All-American at the 2014 NCAA Championships surpassing the 100-yard freestyle’s old NCAA record time and finishing second in the event, leaving her with the second fastest time in the event in NCAA Division II history. The Clan’s Male Athlete of the Year was soccer All-American Chris Bargholz, who was the Great Northwest Athletic Conference Player of the Year. The Clan also honoured their 2013-14 All-Americans at the event, including Nicole Cossey and Carmen Nam (Swimming), Erin Chambers (Basketball), Helen Crofts, Lindsey Butterworth, Sarah Sawatzky (Outdoor Track and Field 2013), Butterworth, Kirsten Allen (Cross-Country), Chris Bargholz, Magnus Kristensen (Soccer), Victoria Anthony, Helen Maroulis, Justina DiStasio, Jenna McLatchey, Darby Huckle, Nikki Brar, Mallory Velte, Laura Anderson, Monika Podgorski, Michiko Araki (Wrestling), Lemar Durant and Jamal Kett (Football).

sports editor email / phone

Adam Ovenell-Carter sports@the-peak.ca / 778.782.4560

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March 31, 2014

After SFU hired former BC Lions offensive coordinator Jacques Chapdelaine as the football team’s new head coach, scoring points was no longer going to be a concern. Stopping the other team from doing so? That’s something the Clan haven’t been able to do since entering the NCAA. But with the brand new hiring of Abe Elimimian as defensive coordinator, things may finally turn around. Elimimian comes to SFU from Div. I’s Washington State, where he served as the cornerbacks coach. Last season, his Cougars ranked fourth in the PAC-12 against the pass, against the likes of Oregon State’s Brandin Cooks — a first-round receiver prospect in this year’s NFL draft — and Oregon quarterback Marcus Matiota, who’s projected to go first overall next year.

“We were looking for someone who was going to be able to come in and be a good teacher, who was going to have a great way to communicate with the young people at the college level,” said Chapdelaine of his new colleague. “From that point of view, Abe was the ideal candidate in a sense that he’s had experience coaching at the college level and he brings a great deal of understanding and relevance, not only from his NFL playing experience but also from the college coaching staffs he has worked with.” Elimimian, a University of Hawaii alumni, signed with the San Diego Chargers in 2005 and the Chicago Bears in 2006. He also has some NFL coaching experience, working as an intern with the Green Bay Packers as a defensive assistant. “The opportunity to work at a wonderful university and for an excellent head coach in Jacques

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After 17 straight losses to open the season, the Clan softball team is finally back on track after sweeping the Northwest Nazarene Crusaders in Nampa, ID. As with most things this season, the wins didn’t come easy for SFU. The first, a 3–2 triumph, took two extra innings to get the job done. After the Clan’s Danielle Raison scored in the top of the ninth, Jessica Goulet retired the Crusaders to give the Clan their first win of 2014. “It was an outstanding performance from Goulet in the first game and [catcher Kaitlyn] Cameron called two great games today,” said head coach Mike Renney. “We got some timely hits

Chapdelaine is outstanding,” said Elimimian. “From when we first spoke on the phone, I could tell he was a man of high character and high integrity and a man who knows how to win. Once I came here I found the people were outstanding, very smart and the atmosphere very welcoming.” He takes over a program that has been dismal defensively since joining the GNAC, but Chapdelaine sees progress already. “So far his communication skills with the players have proven to be very efficient and our student athletes are finding themselves in a scheme where they can perform freely and aggressively,” said the head coach. And, after four years of struggle, any signs of progress are welcome. You can follow Adam Ovenell-Carter

and some clutch at bats. We got some runs when we needed to. We had some situations where the wheels could have come off but they didn’t. We bent but we didn’t break. We squandered some chances but we got ourselves out of some jams too.” The second game, thankfully, came a lot easier. The Clan jumped out to an 8–1 lead in the top of the sixth, and though NNU would claw back, the lead this time was too big for the Clan to give up. “It’s good to get the monkey off our backs and get a couple in the win column,” added Mike Renney. “We earned a hard fought win in extra innings in the first game and it was good to get some run support for our pitching in the second game coupled with a good pitching performance.” Despite the sweep, the Clan’s record improves to just 2–10 in the Great Northwest Athletic Conference, and 2–17 overall, easily last in the conference.


SPORTS

March 31, 2014

It was a successful, but far from flawless road trip as the Clan braved the desert heat to play three out-of-conference games down in Arizona. The trip started with a hardfought, nighttime battle in Tucson against the #14 Arizona Wildcats. The Wildcats struck first, putting the Clan behind early for the third game in a row. But after the initial blow, the Clan came back and led for the rest of the game. The Wildcats nearly matched the Clan goal for goal, but were always one step behind. Four Clan players scored multiple points led by Ward Spencer with four (two goals, two assists). Goaltender Darren Zwack stood tall between the pipes, stopping 15 of 22 shots in the Clan’s 8–7 win. The Clan then made their way to Glendale to take on the #1 ranked Arizona State Sun Devils. SFU matched the Devils early but couldn’t stand the searing temperatures as the home team shut the door on the Clan, holding the high-scoring squad to just five goals on the day.

The Sun Devil’s own highpowered offence, led by junior Dan Davis (seven goals) and senior Logan Quinn (two goals, four assists), picked the Clan defence apart, out shooting them 53–32 over 60 minutes, routing the Clan 18-5. After the thumping from the day before, the Clan came back to Glendale with a vengeance to take on the unranked Illinois Fighting Illini in a neutral site game. From the first whistle it was all Clan, all the time, with leading scorer Kirkby continuing his dominant season with four goals and two assists. Spencer (two goals, three assists) and Sam Clare (two goals, two assists) also had big nights. The offence kept the Illini goaltender busy, ripping 30 shots on net. Backing up the high-powered offence was a stout Clan defence, a complete 180-degree flip from the day before, holding the Illini to just seven shots on the game, with both Zwack and Jeremy Lasher splitting time in net, allowing only two goals apiece to make the final score 11–4 in favour of the Clan. With these results the Clan improve their record to 5-0 in the conference and 9-2 on the season, remaining at #10 in the rankings for another week. The Clan tone it down for the rest of the season with just one game a week until playoffs. Their next home game will be on April 5 against 0–8 Portland State on Terry Fox Field.

The Clan men’s golf team continues to climb leaderboards ahead of April’s championship season. Last week the men travelled south for the California Baptist Invitational where, after a very strong opening round that saw them take the lead, they finished in second place at tournament’s end. The SFU squad posted a

team score of 875, only three strokes behind the winners and Great Northwest Athletic Conference (GNAC) rivals, Western Washington University. Senior captain Mike Belle led the team through the threeround event, finishing in a tie for 10th position with rounds of 71-70-75 for a tournament total of 216. Belle’s was not the only quality performance, as four of the five men finished in the top 30 of the 96-player field. Following his captain was John Mlikotic who finished in a tie for 14th with a total of 218 strokes and rounds of 70-7375. Bret Thompson followed

in 24th place after faltering in the latter rounds of the tournament. The sophomore’s opening round of 67 was five strokes below par, but he couldn’t hang on, adding 77 and 78 in rounds two and three. Freshman Kevin Vigna finished in a tie for 29th place with scores of 78-72-73, improving significantly over the second two rounds and only one stroke behind Thompson. Their tournament totals were 222 and 223 respectively. Rounding out the Clan side was freshman Craig Titterington, appearing in his first collegiate tournament where he opened with a very respectable

round of 74. He stumbled in the later part of the tournament with rounds of 77-83, posting a three-round score of 234. The Clan men have one final

tournament before they head to the GNAC Championships in mid-April.

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Boasting three of the top-10 scoring averages in the conference in Belle, Thompson and Vigna, the Clan have an excellent chance to win the title. Sitting at 19th in the NCAA Division II rankings, the Clan also hold the second best team scoring average in the GNAC with 298.6, just behind Montana State Billings with 298.1. The men will be looking to advance to the West Region Championships for the first time since joining the NCAA in 2010, a chance they narrowly missed in 2013, when the Clan finished third at the conference event.


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HUMOUR

March 31, 2014

humour editor email / phone

Brad McLeod humour@the-peak.ca / 778.782.4560


HUMOUR

March 31, 2014

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features editor email / phone

To  my  Ex-­Beard,

Max Hill features@the-peak.ca / 778.782.4560

March 31, 2014

Illustrated by Rachelle Tjahyana

24 LAST WORD


A New 'Daye