__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

Issue 27 | Spring 2019

The Peak District National Park Magazine

FREE for you to enjoy

LEADING THE WAY ON LITTER

Sprin into o g favou ur seaso rite recip nal es!

Osian's award recognises a passion for the National Park

70 YEARS YOUNG

Penny Anderson on seven decades of National Park protection

A wild life behind the lens The photographers with a focus on the Peak District

• Events • News • Your stories

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk


A very special year Britain’s Original National Park Started by You, Supported by You Established 17 April, 1951 following decades of campaigning. We’re still as passionate about the place today. www.peakdistrict.gov.uk/donate

Contact us: customer.service@peakdistrict.gov.uk 01629 816200 Peak District National Park, Aldern House, Baslow Road, Bakewell, Derbyshire, DE45 1AE

@peakdistrict

/peakdistrictnationalpark /peakdistrictnationalpark

O

ur National Parks were set up in 1949 to retain our most treasured landscapes as the best places to experience the British countryside. Today, they still hold an important place in our hearts – whether you’re stepping out in them for the first time, having fun or learning within them, living there, farming within the landscape, or doing business among countless local communities. Why do we remain some of the best places to do all this? Because we are big and we are small – we are part of a global family, we think in millennia and we stretch for mile after mile... but we are also tiny, we’re local, we care very much about muddy paths, microflora and midges.

There is much to celebrate... but we want to achieve so much more This year marks the 70th anniversary of our founding legislation, and there is much to celebrate from the past seven decades. But we want to achieve so much more. This year is an opportunity to help each and every one of us feel connected with nature and feel great – which is why we are supporting the Government’s Year of Green Action. The focus of our work as the National Park Authority for the next five years has very much the same thread running through it. We care about enhancement and conservation of the landscape and its every detail. We care about actively supporting the many communities who live and work in the National Park because they care for this landscape too. And we care about diversifying and re-awakening public support and love of National Parks from the many urban communities surrounding us. As you delve into this edition of ParkLife, I hope you’ll find inspiration across many of these themes, from the natural world captured on camera (p8), inspirational people for whom the Peak District has been life-changing (p12, p29), the work of our farmers helping rare wildlife (p14), and the bigger picture of what the next 70 years could hold for our landscapes (p24). However you choose to connect with us in this very special celebratory year, we look forward to welcoming you into the Peak District National Park.

@PeakMillie Chief executive Sarah Fowler @peakchief sarah.fowler@peakdistrict.gov.uk

Issue 27 | Spring 2019

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

The Peak District National Park Magazine

FREE for you to enjoy

LEADING THE WAY ON LITTER

Spring into our favourit season e recipesal !

Osian's award recognises a passion for the National Park

70 YEARS YOUNG

Penny Anderson on seven decades of National Park protection

A wild life behind the lens The photographers with a focus on the Peak District

• Events • News • Your stories p1PLifeSpring2019.indd 1

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk 01/03/2019 11:31

ON THE COVER: A pair of stunning fragrant orchids nestle in a wildflower meadow – captured by Karen Frankel (more on page 8).

Share your pledges for the Year of Green Action with #iWill and don’t forget to tell us: @PeakDistrict

Unless otherwise stated, views expressed in this magazine may not be those of the Peak District National Park Authority. Editorial team: Alison Riley, Fiona Stubbs and Tom Marshall Design: Sheryl Todd and Jonny Stunt

parklife@peakdistrict.gov.uk All images and content © Peak District National Park Authority 2018 unless stated otherwise.

2

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

Picture perfect Kieran Metcalfe’s Peak District image scooped the top spot in the Campaign for National Parks’ photography awards in February from almost 1,500 entries taken across all of the UK’s National Parks.


24

As national parks legislation celebrates 70 years, ecologist Penny Anderson reflects and looks forward to the next chapter in our history

Stood here in 1949, we’d have had a very different experience to today

Contents Updates from across local communities, awards, education, wildlife and ways you can enjoy the Peak District this spring!......................4

FEATURES

Look sharp – we meet four photographers with very different perspectives on the UK’s original national park ...............................................8 Talon show – the birds of prey who make a home in the Peak District..................................... 20

A PERSONAL VIEW

My Peak District – inspirational young volunteer Osian Wilson......................................... 12 Renowned ecologist and National Park member Penny Anderson reflects on 70 years of National Park protection................ 24 5 minutes with... Yvonne Witter and what makes the Peak District the perfect place to get away from it all................. 29

Chair’s diary – in a new feature, our chair Andrew McCloy takes a tour around recent events in the National Park .... 30

INSPIRATION

All dew respect – the ponds that can make a real difference for wildlife on our farms ...... 14 Events – discover more in the Peak District National Park this spring...... 15,18

12

PHOTO: TOM MARSHALL

NEWS

Explore – our full-size A3 map can help you locate our popular visitor centres, trails and cycle hire facilities............... 16 Cultural Heritage – out of the ashes, 2018 wildfires reveal hidden heritage secrets......... 19 On your bike – an epic cycle challenge is just one of the ways people are fundraising for the National Park this year .... 26 Tasty spring treats from Bamford’s Anglers Rest community hub............................. 27 Your photographs from around the National Park shared on our social media ..... 28

20 www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

3


News

The newly refurbished station at Millers Dale will open at Easter. Inset: visiting house martins make their homes on the station’s exterior.

All aboard for a new look at Millers Dale Visitors to Millers Dale on the Monsal Trail will be able to step inside the recently refurbished station building from this Easter, along with enjoying a brand new café. Completed over the winter months – to minimise impacts on resident and migratory wildlife – the project has seen the building taken back to its bustling heyday; today ready to welcome cyclists, walkers and families where intrepid travellers on the Midland Line once passed through.

The new café and information point are expected to be a welcome stop-off for over 330,000 visitors that use the Monsal Trail annually. As well as providing some additional homes for visiting house martins on the outside, the inside of the station reflects a number of aspects that would have been familiar to those travelling more than half a century ago, such as vintage chairs and railway memorabilia. Having kept as many of the original features and decorative elements of the

station building as possible, attention will now turn to fundraising efforts to reinstate the roof of the adjacent goods shed, an equally valuable historical feature of the Millers Dale station complex. We hope to provide updates in ParkLife throughout 2019. You can see the station’s progress over the last few months at www.peakdistrict.gov.uk/ millersdaledevelopment

NATIONAL AWARD FOR OUR OUTDOOR LEARNING

Young people undertaking a scientific study of water quality and living creatures at Grindsbrook, near Edale – led by engagement ranger Pete Bush and youth engagement officer Jackie Wragg.

4

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

In October 2018, the Peak District National Park’s Education and Outreach team were awarded the Learning Outside the Classroom (LOTC) Quality Badge for the second year running. Accredited and awarded by the Council for Learning Outside the Classroom, the scheme acknowledges the best in the provision of safety and learning beyond the classroom environment. With around 16 million people living within an hour’s drive of the fringes of the Peak District National Park, the area remains a hugely popular destination for learning opportunities across all aspects of education. The award follows a robust assessment

of the National Park team’s activities across a range of delivery areas, including an observation day in September 2018 during one of the team’s ‘mountain environment’ days with a local school. Engagement manager Lorna Fisher said: “We’re thrilled to have been recognised with the LOTC for the second year in a row; a reflection of the hard work, passion and enthusiasm put in by our staff and volunteers. Our education provision is now experiencing year-on-year growth, a welcome sign with the pressures of digital technology and a period of trend away from outdoor learning in recent years.”


NEWS

Red kite.

A new National Park cycle hire facility will be available for visitors to enjoy from 15th April on the Manifold Track at Hulme End. Based in the listed former station building, the facility will be an ideal place to start exploring the Manifold Valley. Our usual wide range of bikes will be available, including ‘e-bikes’ and options for families and youngsters. See all of our cycle hire locations at www.peakdistrict.gov.uk/cyclehire

Challenges remain for raptors Published in December, the 2018 Peak District Bird of Prey Report noted a welcome increase in breeding success for some birds of prey such as the peregrine (with nine young raised across the National Park) – and other species such as merlin and short-eared owl broadly in line with previous years’ numbers. The last year also saw an increase in the number of gamekeepers and estates participating in the monitoring programme. This positive news was, however, tempered by a series of incidents that included the shooting of both a red kite and two different owl species in the Dark Peak during the summer and autumn of 2018, along with the disappearance of

PHOTO: LAURA PAGE

One of the Roshni visitors photographs the Longshaw countryside.

MANIFOLD CYCLE HIRE OPENS

two satellite-tagged hen harriers from the season’s only nest in the National Park. The apparent loss of one harrier youngster in the north of the Peak District was followed by its sibling a few months later in the North York Moors National Park, with neither the birds nor their tagging equipment recovered in either instance. Local police have said that the potential for wildlife crime playing a role ‘could not be ruled out’. The bird of prey report can found via our online ‘News’ pages at www.peakdistrict.gov.uk READ MORE: Discover more on birds of prey on page 20.

Visitor operations manager Helen Bower.

LIGHTING THE WAY AT LONGSHAW A National Trust and Peak District National Park partnership has been welcoming Roshni – the Sheffield Asian Women’s Resource Centre – to the Longshaw Estate to explore the area’s rich ancient woodlands and moorland. Roshni, which means ‘light’, supports the welfare and education of Asian women in Sheffield, and the visits to the National Park aim to open up the health and wellbeing benefits of the Peak District, which is just 7 miles from the heart of Sheffield. The National Trust hopes the programme will encourage visitors from Roshni to feel like Longshaw is a familiar welcoming place they can enjoy again and again. In turn, guests work closely with staff so that we can encourage more people from

diverse communities to enjoy visiting in future. Ghazala Razzaq, centre coordinator at Roshni, said: “On our visits to Longshaw in the past it has really struck me how a walk in the countryside can lead to a sheer transformation in spirit taking place, especially for some of the women we work with, who have very complex lives. These visits help them to find their inner child and to connect with nature for positive wellbeing.” During their trips the women explored our natural play trail, visited Longshaw’s kitchen garden, and learned about the trees and wildlife of the National Park. They also explored what the countryside means to them through art and photography. www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

5


NEWS

SAVE WITH NEW PARKING PERMIT

Walkies without worries Taking your dog for a walk in the Peak District National Park is an uplifting experience for pets and their people. It can be tempting to let dogs run free but this can create serious challenges for other people, livestock and wildlife – especially for ground-nesting birds. No-one wants their family pet to be harmed but if your dog chases or attacks livestock then you could be responsible for criminal damage or sheep worrying. Farmers have the right to shoot dogs that are worrying or attacking farm animals, so avoid problems by keeping your pets under close control. Signs are provided on rights of way across the Peak District, advising on the most sensitive areas to disturbance.

Keep your dog under control in style – with a collar and lead in Peak District National Park tartan! Find them in our visitor centres.

6

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

Crayfish clawing back The South West Peak Landscape Partnership Crayfish in Crisis Project has established two more ark sites in the Upper Dove Catchment. Native crayfish were collected from donor sites on Cannock Chase and translocated to their new homes in carefully selected tributaries of the River Manifold. The work was carried out in conjunction with Staffordshire Wildlife Trust, the Forestry Commission and the Environment Agency on a Natural England licence and funded through the National Lottery Heritage Fund. Two socalled ‘ark’ sites, which were established last year to act as hubs to kick-start a resurgence of the species, have been monitored this autumn and were seen to contain healthy populations of native white-clawed crayfish.

PHOTO: PAUL HOBSON

A new, simplified single parking permit is now available for regular visitors to National Park Authority car parks. At just £40, the annual permit covers the use of 18 National Park Pay & Display locations, meaning at less than 80p per week, the permit can save up to £75 a year for those who visit for a day just twice a month. A further 27 car parks remain free to use and Blue Badge holders continue to park for free at all locations. The Peak District parking permit remains one of the lowest priced across UK national parks and revenue continues to be invested into landscapes, trails and projects in the immediate area of our Pay & Display car parks. To support the fair use of our car parks (including disabled bays), enforcement patrols and penalty notices are now being undertaken, operated by the Derbyshire Parking Partnership (Derbyshire County Council).

All in the DNA Crayfish are also at the heart of an innovative new DNA sampling technique – funded through Natural England’s Innovation Fund – being trialled in the South West Peak. Water-based DNA, or ‘eDNA’, is being traced via river samples to detect the presence of white-clawed crayfish, non-native signal crayfish and crayfish plague – reducing the need for time-consuming and detailed surveys. The results help paint a picture of the crayfish populations present in the upper parts of the River Dove. www.southwestpeak.co.uk @swpeak @SouthWestPeak

WATCH: Search ‘South West Peak Landscape Partnership’ on YouTube to watch more on the Crayfish in Crisis project.

Planning awards success An evening of outstanding architecture, development and community projects were celebrated at the inaugural Peak District National Park Planning Awards in November, at Thornbridge Hall. The awards were created to recognise excellence in developments, where schemes have made a positive contribution to the special qualities of the Peak District National Park. Winners included a sensitive mill restoration, a community resource, a striking residential development and an innovative use of buildings on the Chatsworth Estate. Andrew McCloy, chair of the Peak District National Park Authority, said: “The schemes use local materials and building styles to contribute to local distinctiveness, but also have strong sustainability credentials and prove that even in a national park setting new development can and should

Winner of the Best Landscape Scheme – the Heart of Hathersage project.

respond to the impacts of climate change through imaginative design. We hope people who are considering new schemes will be encouraged by these inspirational developments in the Peak District National Park.” A full list of winners is available at www. peakdistrict.gov.uk/planning-awards


News Ranger Jo Hanney teaches bushcraft skills to junior rangers.

NEW GUIDE BOOK: Miles without Stiles

JUNIOR RANGERS

Are you 11 to18 and love nature? Our Junior Ranger programme is open to 11 to 18-year-olds who have an active interest in the outdoors, particularly in wildlife and conservation. Our groups meet once a month to undertake tasks such as navigation, ranger patrols, conservation and engaging with the public and we are looking for new members. There are groups at Marsh Farm near Tittesworth, Millers Dale, Longdendale, Edale, and affiliated groups at Barbrook Cottage near Owler Bar (close to Sheffield), and at Hardwick Hall. There will also be a new group starting at Langsett, north of Sheffield. If you’re interested in this group, there is a taster day on Saturday 16th March. Plans are also in place to start a group in Buxton.

Junior ranger Anabel Cole at Marsh Farm, said: “The sessions give me a total change from my normal environment near a busy city. I love how we ‘muck in’ and are part of a global nature movement. As well as bird watching, geocaching, stream dipping, learning navigation skills, dry stone walling and bushcraft, we have done a climate change survey in the Goyt Valley, helped Severn Trent Water conserve the Willow Tit at Tittesworth, and we’ve gained the John Muir Award.” You can find out how to join at www. peakdistrict.gov.uk/junior-rangers If you are over 18 and interested in helping with one of these groups, please contact carina.humberstone@ peakdistrict.gov.uk

WHAT’S HAPPENING AT TOPLEY PIKE? The footpath at Deep Dale, next to Topley Pike quarry has been closed for eight years, until 2026, so that the valley can be restored to its former glory. Old quarry material will be removed and the daleside and original watercourse reinstated to restore habitats. A mosaic of grassland, native broadleaved woodland, rocky outcrops, scree slopes and river habitats will encourage wildlife back to the site. The work is being carried out by Aggregate Industries, on land owned by Derbyshire Wildlife Trust, to comply with planning permission issued by the Peak District National Park Authority to secure substantial environmental benefits.

View down on the western part of Deep Dale.

An alternative route has been signposted along the top of the dale. Once restored, walkers will be able to enjoy walking the full length of Deep Dale, which has not been possible since the 1960s.

The Peak District National Park’s most accessible routes are highlighted in a new book, Miles without Stiles. The guide introduces 20 routes, showcasing some of the Peak District’s finest landscapes. Written by Peak District National Park Authority access officer Sue Smith, the book contains clear maps and descriptions along with striking photography. Sue says: “Miles without Stiles routes are for everyone to explore and enjoy. All routes are well-surfaced, free from stiles, steps and narrow gates and are graded for different abilities. They are suitable for people of all fitness levels and those with limited mobility, including wheelchair users, families with pushchairs and the visually impaired – as well as dog walkers with less agile dogs! Some routes are also ideal for cycling.” The Miles without Stiles book costs £5.95 and can be bought at Peak District National Park visitor centres and via https://shop. peakdistrict.gov.uk Every penny from sales of the handbook will go into the Peak District National Park’s Access Fund for improvements to existing and new Miles without Stiles routes. For more details of Miles without Stiles, go to www.peakdistrict.gov.uk/mws Share your experiences of Miles without Stiles – we’d like to include pictures of visitors enjoying our first 20 routes in our next handbook. Share with us on social media using #MilesWithoutStiles #PeakDistrict

Happy trails at Tissington Visitors to the Tissington Trail may notice a new and improved section of up to 1.4 miles (over 2,250 metres) after a series of works took place during the winter near Spend Lane. A brand new, widened ‘WRAP’-approved recycled surface will benefit all users, whilst associated drainage and tree maintenance took also place at the same time – reducing the need for future closures. The scheme is part of a range of improvements to our trails (see more on Millers Dale station along our Monsal Trail on page 4). www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

7


Behind the LENS Taking photographs is a great way to take notice of the Peak District National Park in detail, to get to know nature and cultural heritage, and appreciate the elements. Alison Riley talks to four local photographers happy to share their knowledge and experiences to inspire you when you’re out and about this spring.

Nature – the insect world in particular – has fascinated Alex Hyde for as long as he can remember. “Insects are incredible creatures but it’s hard to see their details with the naked eye. Use a macro lens and even your garden becomes a safari of amazing mini-beasts. Macro photography is more accessible now thanks to digital technology, there are even clip-on macro lenses for iPhones. “It’s thrilling to discover what invertebrates look like close up, there are so many different bizarre-looking body forms, you learn so much through your macro lens. Discoveries new to science are made all the time in the insect world, and photography can be an important tool to aid this. “But insect photography can’t be rushed 8

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

Jumping spider (Euophrys frontalis).

– be patient and slow down, pick your way carefully through the undergrowth, draw on your knowledge of previous encounters with species and look for tiny giveaway movements. “On a typical day I can meet many different insects but only a handful will be in the right position or condition for a photograph. I pay great attention to the background, if it is too busy and cluttered the fine details of your insect subject can be

PHOTO: ALEX HYDE

Natural history photography

difficult to resolve. Simplicity is often key. “Invertebrates are all around us but we tend to overlook them – think how many insects you see on a sunny day in comparison to birds and mammals. Getting close to nature has helped me appreciate that we need to look after our environment from the insect level up. Without insects the food chain we depend on would collapse.” THE PHOTOGRAPHER: ALEX HYDE, BONSALL Canon 5D Mark IV camera. Canon MP-E 65mm macro lens, Canon 100mm IS macro lens. Various off-camera flash units with diffusers. See more of Alex’s work and details of his macro workshops at www.alexhyde.co.uk

PHOTO: ALEX HYDE

Large red damselfly (Pyrrhosoma nymphula).


DISCOVER

PHOTO: PAUL HOBSON

Paul Hobson began photographing wildlife professionally in the 1980s and has experienced dramatic changes in the world of photography: changes in stock photography, the digital revolution, the boom in amateur photography with increased access to equipment, technology and specialist knowledge. Witnessing these changes has radically changed Paul’s photographic ethos: “We’re collectors and hunters by nature; that’s why we take photographs, as we want something more tangible than a memory. For me, it’s not just about taking pictures any more. I have loved and studied wildlife since being a kid, but over my lifetime I’ve seen how the pursuit of profit has put our wildlife under threat. I can’t watch any more, I have to make a difference. I want my pictures to really change things. “I believe wildlife photographers should be proactive in wildlife conservation. I now give my time to practical conservation work – I volunteered in the Peak District for two weeks on the Badger Vaccination and recorded everything on camera as well. I have also worked on the Crayfish in Crisis project with the South West Peak Landscape Partnership and Staffordshire Wildlife Trust, conserving and photographing. It’s not good enough to simply promote projects through photographs so I have a new way

Badger (Meles meles) in a Peak District garden.

of looking at wildlife photography – it’s nature reportage. “Photography used to be about individuals observing and learning about nature – you’d watch for four days and take pictures on the fifth. People often look for instant success these days and photography trips or workshops will deliver these. However, if the expert shows you where to stand to get the picture of the kingfisher or the otter you might produce some beautiful images, but what have you learnt about the species?”

PHOTO: PAUL HOBSON

Wildlife photography for conservation action

THE PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL HOBSON, SHEFFIELD Canon EOS 5D Mark III, Canon EOS 1DX digital cameras, various lenses. Paul has a regular column in Derbyshire Life magazine and has published several books, including Wildlife Photography Field Skills and Techniques. www.paulhobson.co.uk

Signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) out-compete our small native crayfish. www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

9


Visually impaired landscape photography

THE PHOTOGRAPHER: CHRIS NOWELL, DRONFIELD Full frame Canon 5D camera, Kase filters, Vanguard tripod. To enjoy more of Chris Nowell’s photography you can follow him on Facebook/peakphotographyproject and Twitter @ChrisNowell1867. 10

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

View from Baslow Edge.

PHOTO: CHRIS NOWELL

Former British Army lance corporal Chris Nowell took up landscape photography ten years ago during rehabilitation after experiencing severe head injuries and losing his sight in a rocket attack in Afghanistan. A mentor at Blind Veterans UK handed him a digital camera which led to a photography course which he now tutors on. “Learning how to take good photographs wasn’t easy, I put a lot of time into finding out how my camera works. I used online videos but being hands on with your camera is key, you’ve got to practise. “What I love most is being outside, in all weathers, away from roads, away from people. The peace and tranquillity in the Peak District National Park makes it a beautiful experience.” Chris has no vision in his right eye and limited vision in his left eye, which has its challenges in rough moorland terrain: “I have fallen over a few times but I like to be out on my own, it’s very calming to be alone with nature. Photography in remote parts of the National Park has been part of my personal rehabilitation. “Getting to hard to reach places makes it all the more rewarding. I remember walking to Crowstones (at the high end of the Upper Derwent valley), the light that night was insane! It was August, the heather was out, and I felt on top of the world. I have to plan for it though as I can’t drive myself there. “Knowing as much as you can about your location in advance is really important. I research online maps about the landscape so I know what hills and paths there are, where the rocks and edges are. I use weather apps – if cloud cover is below 50% and minutes of sunshine is above 100, it’s going to be good.”

PHOTO: CHRIS NOWELL

PHOTO: CHRIS NOWELL

Bridge over Ladybower Reservoir.

Gardoms Edge.


PHOTO: KAREN FRENKEL

DISCOVER

Bridge at Upperdale.

Landscape photography

PHOTO: KAREN FRENKEL

Karen Frenkel’s appreciation of photography came from her photographer father and grandfather. Given her first camera at age 12, Karen took black and white photos and watched her father develop them. “Landscape photography for me is about immersing myself in nature. It’s a real therapy to be outdoors, it calms me down. I like to discover subjects for myself so I steer clear of social media and the internet, then when I visit places I see things through fresh eyes. “Looking is very important. I try to find compositions, like a painter would. I look for patterns– it could be moss on a wall, flowers in a meadow, clouds, anything. I sometimes have to wait for the right light but even on a dull day, by honing in on things, you can find something to photograph. Stormy weather, when there are brooding dark clouds and sunshine, makes subjects interesting. “Light falling straight onto a landscape

can look flat so I look for light coming from the side or back lighting to make an image more interesting. Going out at dawn and dusk when the sun is low in the sky is good because low light sculpts out undulations and forms shadows across the landscape. “Spring brings a rapidly changing landscape when the emerging buds on trees and plants burst into life. Rivers are in full flow and skies full of fluffy white clouds. I head for the limestone dales as they come alive with wild flowers. If you get out at first light you can catch the early morning mist.” THE PHOTOGRAPHER: KAREN FRENKEL, LITTLE HUCKLOW Nikon digital camera. You can buy Karen Frenkel’s prints in the Peak Gallery at Bakewell visitor centre. She has published several books, and has an extensive range of photographic greetings cards available at all Peak District National Park visitor centres. www.karenfrenkel.info

Peak District meadow.

Tips to improve your photos • Get to know what wildlife lives near you and photograph local species. • Learn about animals, birds or insects before you photograph them. • Take your time, observe. Consider how your being there affects wildlife. • Get down to the level of what you are photographing. • Macro: Check background for distractions. Moving 1cm can make a big difference. • Macro: Using an off camera flash (e.g. a torch) can remodel light on your subject. • Find out what your camera does and practise using it. • Check your composition. Is everything in the frame? • Get the image right in the camera rather than rely on the computer afterwards to sort it out. • Use a tripod for stability. • Plan in advance. Research the location and weather. • Wear more layers than for walking, waiting for the light can be chilly. • Take food and snacks to keep energy levels up. • Always carry a camera!

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

11


ERSHIP PHOTO: EASTERN MOORS PARTN

My Peak Dis trict Osian Wilson

Inspirational teenager Osian Wilson tells Fiona Stubbs how the Peak District’s Eastern Moors saved his life – and how he now hopes to encourage others to look after our precious landscapes. Osian Wilson was named Young Volunteer of the Year at the 2018 UK National Parks Volunteer Awards. His passion for protecting the natural environment inspired him to launch a campaign to end littering through education in schools. Now 17-year-old Osian, who lives with autism spectrum disorder, hopes publicity from the award will raise awareness – and help end the plight of dumped waste in the Peak District National Park.

V

olunteering on the Eastern Moors has given me the will to live. I began volunteering with the Youth Rangers when I was about 14. When I was nearly 16, I became very unwell and could no longer go to school. I found peace and calm on the moors and one day I met a ranger, picking up litter.

View from Curbar Edge across the moors.

12

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

I volunteered to do this job for her. Now I litter pick across the Eastern Moors and I’ve begun a traineeship in conservation. I also do surveys on birds and mammals. I survey pathways for erosion and waterlogging. I help to plant trees and thin out woodlands and I love it all. My favourite memory from working on the moors is seeing long-eared owlets being

fed by their parents and then fledging. I also have special memories of bird surveys at Shillito Woods – and experiencing the astonishing range of species which visit this small woodland. The moors saved my life during my long recovery and now it is my turn to save them. I want to work for the ranger service to protect the Peak District National Park, where I became well again. Littering is a huge problem and I want people to truly realise just how long litter takes to decompose and that some litter never decomposes. I want people to realise just how important this area has been


PROFILE

Osian Wilson

Raised: Holmesfield, Derbyshire. Dark Peak or White Peak? I don’t have a favourite place in the Peak District because each part of the National Park is equally valuable to me and the variety of habitats are all beautiful in their own way.

PHOTO: TOM MARSHALL

Achievements: Young Volunteer of the Year in the UK National Parks Voluntee r Awards 2018, sponsored by Columbi a Sportswear. Overcoming ill-health to progress from youth ranger to conservation trainee.

Osian with his Young Volunteer of the Year award.

Ambition: To inspire other children and young people to end littering through his national campaign.

I’d like every child in the country to receive an education about the effects of litter on our environment through history and that it’s not just a wasteland. It is home to a huge variety of wildlife, while the ability of peat and mossy areas to absorb carbon dioxide is vital for the battle against pollution and global warming. I want people to know that the natural world has inspired our ways of life and I want them to be grateful and to help care for it. The Eastern Moors are so beautiful but, like many other places, are under attack from an epidemic of littering, fly tipping, dog waste and the reckless throwing of fast food containers, cans and coffee cups out of cars onto the verges. I really want to use my award to help my campaign on the issue of litter. I believe the only way to make a real difference is to start with children in nurseries and primary schools. I’d like every child in the country to receive an education about the effects of

litter on our environment as a compulsory course within the National Curriculum. I’d like to see a Good Citizen Awards Scheme where children receive a certificate and sign a promise to look after their world and never drop litter. I believe that if young children learn not to litter, they will become teenagers who don’t litter, then parents who will teach their children the same values. I have launched a petition and need 100,000 signatures to get it discussed in Parliament. The Peak District is where I want to spend my life, protecting it for future generations to come and enjoy it in beautiful solitude. We all need to visit wild places to escape from the noise and bustle of modern life. • For more details of Osian’s campaign and to sign his petition, see https://petition. parliament.uk/petitions/232897

Osian has found his vocation When he began volunteering on the Eastern Moors, Osian was anxious, frightened and depressed. Osian has autism, communication challenges, sensory processing challenges (fear of weather, temperature, noises, smells etc), which he has had to overcome to volunteer. He has OCD, which affects his fear of germs, so using a litter picker for hours each week has been a huge challenge – but he does it out of a sense of duty. “Osian says the moors saved his life and now it is his turn to save them. He has found his vocation – to protect the moorlands, animals and birds who live there. He has learned that he has a future, where he is valued. He has learned dedication, hard work and dependability. He has learned to be part of a team and to communicate with people in that team, to learn and share ideas. He has found peace of mind and a place where he feels calm and a sense of belonging. Osian’s mum, Alison Wilson

The Eastern Moors The Eastern Moors lie on the fringes of Sheffield and Chesterfield. Boasting a diverse mix of heather moorland, acid grassland, blanket bog and woodland, the area is designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). Over 70 registered volunteers, ranging in age and experience, assist with tasks including ecological surveying, drystone walling and monitoring Bronze Age monuments. The Eastern Moors Partnership is a joint venture between the UK’s leading conservation charities the National Trust and the RSPB. The Partnership manages the Eastern Moors on behalf of the Peak District National Park Authority.

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

13


FARMING

DEWPONDS: doer-uppers for newts

GREAT CRESTED NEWTS: Between March and July, great crested newts lay two or three eggs a day, wrapping them carefully in leaves. The larval newts look like miniature adults with gills, and eat tadpoles and insects. Adult newts spend the summer on land feeding off insects, worms and small frogs. They depend on good quality terrestrial habitat as well as a pond for their survival. Newts return to the same breeding grounds; ponds need to be clustered together to help the population spread.

For over 10 years, the Peak District National Park Authority has been working with farmers and land managers to restore a network of dewponds for wildlife.

O

ne hundred years ago, dewponds were common in fields across the White Peak landscape. The once dense network of rain-filled dewponds provided water for livestock and people before piped water supplies. Traditionally they are constructed with a waterproof puddle-clay base, overlaid by limestone setts or cobblestones. Eventually drought, plant roots and animal burrows crack the clay layer which leaks and the pond dries out. Even concrete dewponds, made in the 1940s, develop cracks or deteriorate. Two thirds of dewponds have been lost since mains water supplies and changes in farming practice made them redundant, and repair costs are high. Those left are often in poor condition and don’t hold water, which is bad news for amphibians.

Where there’s a pond there’s wildlife White Peak farmer Graham Kirkham of Newhaven Lodge Farm, Hartington, restored a dewpond in Hand Dale: “Watching flycatchers and pied wagtails bobbing around and seeing the brightly coloured damselflies and tiny pondskaters on the water is really satisfying, it makes the restoration worthwhile. The frogs and newts 14

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

Before

After

Dewpond at Hand Dale, Hartington before and after restoration.

like it too. It’s important to give wildlife a chance – if we don’t who will? “It cost £8,000 to do the work, with a grant from the National Park Authority. We wanted to restore it because dewponds are part of the farming tradition and landscape in this part of the world.” Grants for pond restoration on agricultural land are not available via Countryside Stewardship. However, dewponds are part of what makes the White Peak unique, so the Peak District National Park Authority supports one or two dewpond restorations each year. For more information about support for farmers and land managers, speak to a National Park farm adviser on Mondays at Bakewell market, in the Agricultural Business Centre, or call 01629 816 270.

Great crested newts

• The UK has 50% of the world population. • The White Peak is a national stronghold for them. • They are protected by internationa l law. • They grow to 17cm long and live for up to 27 years. • Males have a jagged crest along their backs. • Males and females have yellow or orange bellies with black blotches . • They hibernate between October and February in piles of leaves or logs or in walls.


EVENTS

The benefits of NATURE Have you noticed how much better you feel after a walk or cycle ride in the Peak District National Park? There’s a mountain of evidence that says spending time in nature is vital for our good mental and physical health at all ages. Family fun FAMILY DROP-IN EVENTS AT CASTLETON VISITOR CENTRE

Saturday 16th March 12pm to 4pm In British Science Week we will be running activities around bird migration as many of our favourite moorland birds will be starting to arrive back. Free.

FAMILY PLAY WILD

Thursday 25th April and Thursday 30th May, Longdendale Environment Centre SK13 1HS 10.30am to 1pm Come and play wild in our woods, with Forest School-style activities including den building, mud play and a campfire. Bring wellies and a picnic! Booking essential, £5 per child, adults free.

FAMILY ADVENTURE WALKS AT CROWDEN

Monday 8th April and Wednesday 24th April 10am to 1pm A gentle stroll in beautiful Crowden Valley. Build rock towers, race mini rafts, and look for creatures in the stream. For children ages 6 upwards. Bring wellies and a picnic! Booking essential, £5 per child, adults free. • Meet at Crowden car park SK13 1HZ

With wildlife, wildflowers, woodlands, warmer weather and welldressings on the go, spring is a wonderful time for experiencing the Peak District National Park.

BAKEWELL FOOD FESTIVAL

Saturday 27th to Sunday 28th April

TISSINGTON WELLDRESSINGS

Wednesday 29th May 11am to 4pm Wonderful woodlands session celebrating the importance of trees, with woodland crafts and tree identification activities. Free. Sunday 30th June 11am to 4pm Have a go at welldressing during Hope Wakes week and celebrate this ancient tradition. Make a mini well-dressing and a “Hapa Zome” flower print. Free.

Spring specialities

Thursday 30th May to Wednesday 5th June

HAYFIELD WELLDRESSINGS

Saturday 29th June to Sunday 7th July

BAKEWELL WELLDRESSINGS

Saturday 29th June to Sunday 7th July Create a felted landscape of the Peak District at one of the local craft workshops.

CRAFT WORKSHOPS

Wednesday 15th May, Castleton Visitor Centre Saturday 18th May, Moorland Centre, Edale 10am to 2pm Create a felted landscape. Learn the art of felting wool. Using the inspiration of the beautiful Peak District landscape, you will make a landscape picture. Booking essential. There will be a charge.

BAKEWELL AGRICULTURAL AND HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY

Sunday 30th June Celebrating ‘Farm to Plate over 200 years’, Bakewell Showground. ADVANCE NOTICE:

EROICA BRITANNIA

Sunday 18th August ‘The 500’ – cycle ride only event this year, Bakewell.

More events and booking details on page 18 www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

15


Holmfirth A6635 A Digley Res. Res. Digley Res. Digley 5 A63

◆ ◆ ◆◆ ◆◆

35 A6Res. Butterley Digley Res.

A635

36

A6

A61

9

Holmfirth Holmfirth

A6013 A6013

A6013

A6013

A6013

36 A6

◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆◆ ◆ ◆◆

25

2

t Ed

ge

A6

25

A624

A624

◆ ◆

R

◆ ◆◆

◆ ◆◆◆ ◆ ◆

ne

.D a

◆ ◆

◆ ◆ ◆ ◆

Da

A6024

R R A5 . Da . Da ne ne 27 0

◆ ◆ ◆ A624

ne

R.

RR Da . .DDaa ne nnee

R.

e

MANCHESTER

A61 9

70

◆ ◆ ◆ ◆

A5

A6

Fr

◆ ◆ ◆

◆ ◆

27 0

0

27

0

A5

27

A5

Edg

A6 ogg 25 att

F

◆ ◆ A624 ◆◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ A62 A62 4 4 ◆ ◆◆ ◆◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆A6024 ◆◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ A624A62 A6244 ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ A6024 ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ A6024 ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆◆ ◆ A6024 A6024 ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ A6024A6024 A6024 ◆ ◆ ◆

A5

0

AA55 2277 00

27

4

A5

4

15 515 A

9

00

A5

A61

00

gat

dge

tt E

rog ga

MANCHESTER

SHEFFIELD

25

R

SHEFFIELD

SHEFFIELD

SHEFFIELD SHEFFIELD SHEFFIELD SHEFFIELD SHEFFIELD

A61

MANCHESTER MANCHESTER ANCHESTER MANCHESTER MANCHESTER

A61

◆ ◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆

A5

A61 A61 9 9

A5

4

Fro g

00

ent

25

A6

◆◆◆ ◆

◆◆◆ ◆ ◆

A5

4 4 00 500 A

ge

◆◆◆ ◆ ◆

◆◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆◆◆◆ ◆

A5

t Ed

A61 A61

◆◆◆◆◆◆◆ ◆◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆◆ ◆ ◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆◆ ◆ ◆◆ ◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆

◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆

◆ ◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆

◆◆◆ ◆

◆◆◆ ◆

◆◆◆ ◆◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆◆◆ ◆◆ ◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆

A6013

R

R. Derw nt . Derwe

A6

A6A61A6 25 25

F F r o ggarogga tt E tt E dge dge

ent nt . Derwe R. DeRrw

A61 AA6611 9 99

A6013 A6013A6013

A61

AA66 2255

F FF r o ggarorogggaa tt E tt tEE dge ddggee

t ent eenentrw rw .D RR. .DDeeRrw

gat

A61 A61 A61

◆ ◆◆ ◆ ◆ ◆

Digley Res. Digley Res. SADDLEWORTH Butterley Res. Holme Holme Holme SADDLEWORTH SADDLEWORTH Information MOOR Barnsley Barnsley Barnsley MOOR MOOR ◆ Holme Holme ◆ Holme SADDLEWORTH SADDLEWORTH SADDLEWORTH ◆ Holme Moss ◆ Holme Moss Holme Moss Cycle hire ◆ ◆ MOOR Winscar Res. Dove Stone Res. Barnsley Barnsley Barnsley MOOR Dove Stone MOOR Winscar Res.Winscar Res. Dove Res. Res. Stone Holmfirth ◆ ◆ ◆ Trans Pennine Trail Trail PennineTrans Trail Pennine Holme Moss Moss Holmfirth Holme Moss Holme ◆ ◆ Trans ◆ Winscar Res. Winscar Res.Winscar Res. Dove Stone Res. Dove 6Stone Dove Stone Res. Res. Camping 5 Penistone Penistone Penistone A 3 Saddleworth Dunford Digley Res. Trail Trans PennineTrans Dunford Bridge Bridge Dunford Bridge Trans Pennine Pennine Trail Huddersfield Trail 5 3 A6 Saddleworth Digley Res. l ns Pe Penistone Langsett Penistone Penistone il PennnineeDunford Drinks and refreshments Traaiil TTrraarnaisl Pe Langsett Trans PennineT 6288 BridgeLangsett Dunford A Holme ns PDunford ennine Trarnnass Bridge Pen in Tr A628 Bridge SADDLEWORTH A62 a a T r r Crowden T Crowden Crowden Holme MOOR Barnsley SADDLEWORTH l T Langsett Res. Langsett Trans Pennine Trail Trans PennineTTrraanisl Pe Langsett Langsett 8 rail 28 Langsett 28rail Trai ◆ A62 Res.Langsett Res. Café s PennineRes. s PenninAe6 Tans Pennine T A6 Barnsley MOOR Torside Holme Moss ◆ ranTorside r ran ◆ T Res. Woodhead Res. T T Torside Res. Crowden Crowden Crowden Woodhead Res. ◆ l Woodhead Res. i Winscar Dove Stone Res. ◆ ◆ Tra lRes. Langsett Res. Langsett Res.Langsett Res. rail ◆ ◆2◆ Rochdale 88 Holme Moss ale Trai e TPennine ◆ Trans Trail nddale 28 Res. dal Res. Stocksbridge StocksbridgeStocksbridge Winscar Dove Stone Res. 662Res.Torside Shop 6AA2Woodhead Torside ◆ Res. Torside ddeen en Res. Tintwistle A6 Woodhead Res. Woodhead Res. g A d ◆ ◆ Tintwistle Tintwistle n l g l l i g i i ra◆ Penistone ra raLoon ◆ Trail ◆ n Trans Pennine T T T Marsden e e e o l l l 8 Bottoms 8 da Dunford Bridge a a L L 28 2 2 d d Stocksbridge Stocksbridge Stocksbridge Res. 6 6 n n n Res. Bottoms ARes. A6gdeBottoms Penistone de de Tintwistle A Tintwistle Tintwistle Dunford n ngBridge ong Trail Trans Pennine Trail 36 Langsett 8 Lo Lnnine Lo A62 A6 ns PeBLEAKLOW BLEAKLOW a Bottoms Res. il Bottoms Bottoms Res. Res. BLEAKLOW r P e s T n n n a Crowden r i n T Langsett e a 8 T r a il Butterley nnine Tr Langsett Res. Broomhead Res. A62 Res. Trran Res. ns Pe Broomhead Broomhead Res. T rans anss Pe Tra BLEAKLOW BLEAKLOW BLEAKLOW Crowden Hyde Torside ◆ Res.Glossop Pennn Pen Hyde Woodhead Res. Hyde Langsett Res. Glossop l i a r i ni nne ni n ◆ eT Broomhead Res. Broomhead Broomhead Res. Res. Trai Trran eT eT rans 28 dal Stocksbridge Torside ◆ Res. raill ail s Pe en Woodhead A6 Res. Pen Howden Hyde HydeTintwistle Hyde Glossop Glossop Glossop gd nn Howden Res. Res. Howden Res. ◆ Trail n ni n e Snake Pass l o i 8 ne T HolmfirthStocksbridge L Snake Pass Snake Pass e Tr da 62 rail Bottoms Res. en ail Charlesworth Charlesworth Tintwistle A gd Charlesworth Howden Res. Howden Res. Howden Res. Bradfield Bradfield Bradfield on 5 L 3 Snake Pass Snake Pass Snake Pass 6 A Saddleworth Digley Res. Bottoms Res. BLEAKLOW EDALE VISITOR CENTRE Charlesworth Charlesworth Charlesworth Derwent Res. BradfieldRes. Bradfield Bradfield Derwent Res. Derwent Res. Broomhead ◆ & FIELDHEAD CAMPSITE ◆ BLEAKLOW ◆◆ Pen Hyde Holme GlossopSADDLEWORTH◆ ◆ ni n Strines Res. Derwent Res. Derwent Res. Derwent Res. Tel: 01433 670207 Res. Strines Res. Strines Broomhead Res. e Tr Barnsley ail ◆ Stockport ◆ ◆ MOOR StockportStockport ◆◆ ◆ A ◆ Fairholmes Hyde Howden Postcode: S33 7ZN Glossop A5577 A57 Res. Fairholmes Fairholmes Holme Moss Snake Pass ◆ Strines Res. Strines Res. Little Hayfield Strines Res. LittleKINDER Hayfield KINDER SCOUT Little Dove Stone Res.Hayfield KINDER Winscar SCOUT Res. SCOUT Charlesworth Stockport Stockport Stockport Bradfield A57Trail A57 A57 Fairholmes Howden Res. CASTLETON VISITOR CENTRE Fairholmes Fairholmes Trans Pennine Snake Pass Little Hayfield Little Ladybower Res. Little Hayfield Hayfield Ladybower Penistone Res. Kinder Res. Ladybower Res. KINDER SCOUT KINDER SCOUT SCOUT Res. KinderKINDER Res. Kinder Tel: 01629 816572 Charlesworth Derwent Res. Dunford Bridge Bradfield ◆ Postcode: S33 8WN ◆ Ladybower Res. Ladybower Res. Ladybower Res. Kinder Res. Kinder Res. Kinder Res. s Pennine Trail Hayfield TranCENTRE a il 8 FAIRHOLMES VISITOR Hayfield Strines Res. Langsett Pennine Tr A62 Derwent Res. Edale SSt ans New Mills r Edale Edale S Stockport New Mills New Mills T aan Crowden t t ◆ & CYCLE HIRE A a Fairholmes ◆Hayfield 5 Langsett Res. naag 7 na Hayfield LittleHayfield Hayfield SCOUT Strines Res. Tel: 01433 650953 Edale St St gee EE St ge E Res. New Mills New Mills New Mills TorsideKINDER KEdale Res.Edale innil dWoodhead K Ki n an ◆ an an d i a e r L o r d o ◆ T p e r d L e r d Lo oop A57 Postcode: S33 0AQ aRes. olep ag dggee Fairholmes ag ge Stocksbridge Hope 8 a Ladybower g 2 Hope Hope A57 d Losehill Hall Kinder Res. en 6 e Losehill Hall Losehill Hall Little Hayfield KINDER SCOUT Bamforde E Bamforde Ed Bamford Ed TintwistleKin A Ki n K i n ng d Mam Tor Tor dg Stanage-North Lees Mam der Loop der Loop Mam Tor 7 Stanage-North Lees g Stanage-North Lees g 5 Loder Loop e e A Hope e Hope A57 Bottoms Res. Losehill Hall Hope Bamford Bamford Ladybower Res. Losehill Hall Losehill Hall Bamford Kinder Res. Hayfield Mam Tor Mam Tor Mam Tor Edale S Castleton Stanage-North Lees Stanage-North Lees Stanage-North Lees New Mills A6187 ta Castleton Castleton A6187 A6187 BLEAKLOW na Lyme Park Park Lyme Park Lyme R. D ge R. Hathersage R Hathersage Hayfield .Hathersage Broomhead Res. Whaley Bridge Deerw De Castleton Castleton Tran Castleton E K Whaley Whaley Bridge A6187 A6187 in der LooBridge dg A6187 sP rwen Bradwell rw Edale St Sparrowpit New Mills Bradwell p Bradwell enn Lyme Park HydeLyme Lyme Park Park Sparrowpit Sparrowpit Glossop Kettleshulme e e e Hope A57 a t nt Hathersage nt R.Hathersage R. D Bamford Kettleshulme Chapel-en-le-Frith R. D Kettleshulme Losehill Hallna Chapel-en-le-Frith Hathersage i ne De Whaley Bridge Whaley Bridge Whaley Bridge Trai erw ge erw r Mam Tor Sparrowpit l Stanage-North Lees w Bradwell Bradwell Bradwell Sparrowpit Sparrowpit ent ent Howden Res. ent Forest Ed Peak Kettleshulme KKettleshulme Peak Forest in der Loo Kettleshulme Snake Pass Chapel-en-le-Frith Chapel-en-le-Frith ge Peak Forest p Chapel-en-le-Frith A57 Pott Shrigley Losehill Hall Hope Charlesworth A Castleton Pott Shrigley Pott Shrigley Bamford A6187 A A 6 Bradfield Grindleford NEW IN Peak Forest Peak Stanage-North Forest 6223 62 Peak Forest Dronfield Dronfield Dronfield Lyme Park Mam Tor Lees 3 3 Grindleford Grindleford R. D Dove Hathersage Gt. Hucklow Combs Dove Dove 2019 Gt. Hucklow Whaley Bridge Pott Shrigley Pott Shrigley Gt. Hucklow Pott Shrigley Fernilee Combs Combs e A A A Fernilee Derwent Res.rw Fernilee Holes 6 6 6 Bradwell Holes Dronfield Holes Dronfield Dronfield Sparrowpit 2 2 23 ent Res. 3 Kettleshulme Grindleford Grindleford Castleton EyamGrindleford Res. Res. Chapel-en-le-Frith ◆ ◆ Dove A6187 3 Dove Eyam Dove Gt. Hucklow Gt. Hucklow Gt. Hucklow Eyam Combs Combs Combs Lyme Park Fernilee Fernilee Fernilee Foolow Strines Res. R Holes PeakHoles Eastern Goyt Holes Hathersage Foolow Foolow .D Forest Eastern Eastern Res. Res. Goyt Res. Goyt Stockport Rainow Whaley Bridge Eyam Eyam Eyam Rainow Rainow A5Tideswell Moors Valley Fairholmes Bradwell A erwenTideswell Moors Valley Moors Valley 7 Sparrowpit Tideswell Pott Shrigley Kettleshulme Foolow Foolow Foolow Little Hayfield Stoney t KINDER SCOUT 62 Stoney Stoney Grindleford Chapel-en-le-Frith Eastern Goyt Lamaload Eastern Dronfield Goyt EasternCurbar Goyt Lamaload Lamaload 3 Rainow Rainow Rainow Middleton Curbar Curbar Middleton Middleton Res. Dove Moors Moors Valley Moors ValleyCombs Tideswell Tideswell Tideswell Litton Gt.Litton Hucklow Errwood Res. Res. Valley Fernilee Peak Forest LittonStoney Errwood Errwood Res. StoneyLadybower Stoney Calver Holes Kinder Res. Res. Lamaload Lamaload Lamaload A537 Res. Res. A537 A537 Res. Curbar Curbar 1 Curbar Calver Calver MoEyam Middleton Middleton Middleton Pott Shrigley M M A Res. 62211 Res. Res. Litton FoolowoLitton oLitton Errwood A Errwood623 Errwood DronfieldA62 nnssaal D nsa A6 Grindleford Eastern l Dale Buxton Res.Goyt TrrlaaD Res. Cat & Res. ill a nssaall T A537 o Buxton A537 Hayfield A537 Dove M Rainow Calver Calver Calver a r T a i l Macclesfield Gt. Hucklow a Hassop Fiddle n i Macclesfield s o l n o Combs M M l le Mo Mo e St Mo Valley Macclesfield Hassop Edale Fernilee Macclesfield Macclesfield Cat & Fiddle Cat & Fiddle Tideswell 21 Moors 21 21 New Mills Holes nsa nsa Hassop nsa Stoney an A6 A6 A6 Forest Res. l lD l Lt. Lt. Longstone Longstone Lamaload Forest Forest aLongstone Gt. Longstone Buxton Buxton Buxton A619 Baslow Curbar al lTerail Lt. aHassop ge TraD l Hassop il aMiddleton saA6 Gt. Longstone onsal Trail EyamMonsDaA6 Gt. A619 A6 onLongstone A619 M M l l Baslow Baslow e e Macclesfield Macclesfield Cat & Fiddle Macclesfield Macclesfield Hassop Cat & Fiddle Macclesfield Cat & Fiddle Macclesfield Res. MILLERS DALE STATION Litton Foolow Errwood Ein Ki n Pilsley Chesterfield 57 Chesterfield dg Eastern Goyt Ashford e r Pilsley d L Pilsley o o Ashford in p Ashford in Forest Forest Forest Res. Lt. Longstone Lt. Longstone Lt. Longstone Rainow Taddington A537 e Hope A Calver Tel: 01629Valley 816200 Gt. Longstone Gt. Longstone Gt. Longstone A619 A619 A619 Taddington Taddington Baslow Baslow Baslow Losehill Hall Moors M the Water Tideswell A6 A6 the Waterthe A6 00 621 Bamford NORTH LEES CAMPSITE o 2 Water 0 A632 0 n 6602 APilsley sChelmorton ChesterfieldChesterfield Chesterfield StoneyChelmorton 02 Stanage-North al D in A Mam Tor Pilsley Lees Chelmorton AR Lamaload Postcode: SK17 8SN AR6Pilsley Ashford R Ashford in Ashford in Buxton . Wildboarclough r a T a l a W Curbar i s Tel: 01433 650838 l n o M Taddington le . Wye Middleton Taddington Wildboarclough . Taddington Macclesfield Wildboarclough Hassop Cat & Fiddle Macclesfield W Edensor Res. the Water the Water Edensor Edensor Litton Errwood 20the Water 6020 ye. 20 ye.. Postcode: S32 1DY Forest Chelmorton Chelmorton Chelmorton A60 AR60 AR Castleton Lt. Longstone Res. Gt. Longstone 5544 A537 A619 Three 4 Baslow .W .W Wildboarclough Wildboarclough Wildboarclough A6 Calver Flagg R. W2A6187 Three Shires Shires Mo ThreeAAShires 1e Lyme Park A 632 A5 y y Flagg Sheldon y Flagg Edensor Edensor Edensor e e R 6 Bakewell Chesterfield Sheldon Head . nsa . . Hathersage A Sheldon . D Pilsley Bakewell Head Head Ashford in l Whaley Bridger erw Dal Taddington 4Buxton Beeley ail onsal TShires 54 MThree Three ShiresA54 Bradwell ThreeAShires Beeley the Water Beeley e Flagg Sparrowpit 0 e HassopFlagg Sheldon Cat & Fiddle cclesfield Macclesfield A5 Kettleshulme 2 Flagg n t Sheldon Sheldon Bakewell BakewellBakewell Chelmorton AR60 Head Head Head Chapel-en-le-Frith Hollinsclough Flash Hollinsclough Hollinsclough Flash Flash Forest Wildboarclough Rowsley Lt. Longstone Rowsley Rowsley Gt. Longstone Over ye. A619Edensor Baslow . WMonyash Beeley Beeley Over A6 Over Peak Forest A6Beeley A632 A6 Monyash A6 Monyash Haddon Chesterfield Haddon 4 Haddon Pilsley Hollinsclough Hollinsclough Hollinsclough Ashford in Flash Flash Flash Three Shires le a Rowsley Pott Shrigley A5 Rowsley Rowsley D le Flagg le Taddington l Da A6 a il k Sheldon Over D Over Over Wincle l l th il Bakewell il Stanton the Water a k Head k Dronfield LLath Wincle Wincle 23 Stanton 20 Stanton A6 Monyash A6 MonyashA6 Monyash Lath Grindleford Haddon Haddon Haddon Chelmorton AR60 Dove Longnor Gt. Hucklow Combs in the the Peak Peak inBeeley the Peakin .W Wildboarclough Longnor Longnor Fernilee l Dale l Dale l Dale il il il Holes k y k k Edensor Wincle Wincle Wincle Flash e th th th Stanton Stanton Stanton Hollinsclough a a a . L LEyam L Res. Rowsley H Darley Dale Dale Darley DaleDarley H Over inYoulgreave H Youlgreave the Peak Youlgreave Peak 4 in the Peakin the Longnor Longnor Longnor Three Shires A6 Monyash A5 Flagg Congleton Eastern Goyt Sheldon Congleton Congleton Bakewell Foolow Haddon Head

Saddleworth

SaddleworthA635 Saddleworth

◆ ◆◆

Saddleworth Saddleworth Saddleworth

A61

PPe igihgh

nt 1155 15. Derwe gh P i AA55 A5R

vvee DDoo RR. . R

R.

Do

15

eR

Th

ve R

A5

A5

15

R

44 4 0000 00 AA55 A5

ees cchh ooaa R R R ee e TThh004 Th

A5

e ch oa R R e e Th Th


Do

Longnor Warslow

H Tideswell

ac

Tr ak Pe

Do

ve

ve

igh

ess hes ac 15 Ro 5

A

es

R.

o eR

ac

Th

Fro

A61

9

A53 AA5533

Matlock

Matlock Matlock Matlock Matlock

ale

fo . Ma n i

Da

ne

T M

h ac Ro ifold Tr ail e n h a

R. Hamps

R

d

ve D

. Ma n i

il old Tr a nif

fo l

R. Hamps

Waterhouses

Do

ss ingto n

A51

Ashbourne

Fenny Bentley

Tissington

Parwich 7

l

7

A52

A519 A519A519

A519A519

A519

A52

7

A52

7

HIGH PEAK TRAIL

Wirksworth

Crich A 609 A609

DERBY

A51

7

A609

Belper

tt eenn TTrr RR. .

A609

DERBY DERBY DERBYDERBY DERBY TISSINGTON TRAILDERBY

Carsington Water

Belper

Trail Park Park Cycle Trail National Park Boundary Boundary Trail National National Park Boundary National Park Cycle Hire Hire National National Park Cycle Hire 600 600 600 Rivers/Canals City/Town Pennine Bridleway Trail National ParkBridleway Boundary National Park Hire Trail Trail DERBY Rivers/Canals National Park Boundary National Park Boundary Trail Rivers/Canals National Park boundary National Park Boundary City/Town Pennine Bridleway City/Town Pennine National ParkNational CycleCycle Hire National Park Cycle Hire Park Cycle Hire 600 600 400 600 600 400 400 ◆◆◆ Pennine Way Reservoir Rivers/Canals City/Town Pennine Bridleway ◆◆◆ Way Railway and Station ◆◆◆ Rivers/Canals Rivers/Canals Pennine Way Rivers/Canals Reservoir 400 Reservoir/river/canal NORTHCity/Town 0 Km Pennine Reservoir City/Town Pennine Bridleway Pennine Bridleway Pennine Bridleway City/Town Pennine Bridleway Railway and Station Railway and Station 10 Km Km 0 Km 0 Km 10 Km 10 400 200 400 400 2000 200 ◆◆◆ Pennine Way Reservoir km 10 Railway and Station Information Centre/Point PDNP owned estates ◆◆◆ ◆◆◆ ◆◆◆ Railway Tunnel 0 Km 10Km Km Pennine Way Information Centre/Point Reservoir Reservoir Reservoir Way PDNP owned estates Information Centre/Point Pennine Way PDNP owned estates Railway and Station Railwayand and station and Pennine Station WayPennine Railway Station Railway Tunnel Tunnel 0 Km 10 0 Km 10 Km 0 Km 10 Km t 200 200 75 200 200 Information Centre/Point en PDNP owned estates 75 75 Railway Tunnel r A Road Road Tunnel YHA Hostels North Lees Campsite Information Centre/Point Information Centre/Point Information Centre/Point PDNP owned estates PDNP owned estates PDNP owned estates T YHA hostel A-road Railway Tunnel Railway Railway Tunnel A A Road YHA Hostels North Lees Campsite YHA Hostels North Lees Campsite N 00 Mile R. Mile N 0 Mile 75 75 0 75 750 YHA YHA Hostels North LeesPark Campsite 0Mile Trail ndary Trail Motorway A Road A Road 0 10 Miles Miles A Road A Road National Cycle Hire YHA Hostels North Lees Campsite YHA Hostels North Lees Campsite Hostels North Lees Campsite N 0 miles 10 10 600 N 0 Mile N 0 Mile N 0 Mile 0 0 0 0 Rivers/Canals City/Town y 400 ◆◆◆ Pennine Way Reservoir n 0 Km 10 Km Peak District National Park Authority, Aldern House, Baslow Road, Bakewell, Derbyshire DE45 1AE 200 Information Centre/Point PDNP owned estates

NATIONAL PARK CYCLE HIRE - ASHBOURNE Tel: 01335 343156 Postcode: DE6 2AA

Ilam Thorpe

ale

t

ve

ve D

15

en

Do

A5

Tr

es

15

Ti

ail Tr

R.

Ti

Wetton

aailil ail TTrr Tr

NATIONAL PARK CYCLE HIRE - MANIFOLD VALLEY Tel: 01629 816200 Postcode: SK17 0EZ

R. Hamps A5

T

R. Hamps

R.

Do

ail Tr

R.

il old Tr a nif

Ma

Ashbourne

aa ale vveeDD ve D DDoo Do

Onecote Grindon

Ti il il 1155 ra 15 ra AA55 T A5 T lele

t

TTi i

en Tr

Ma

Leek

. Ma n i psamps R. Ham R. H l Tr ail ifold . Ma n i f o n Ma

t ent Trren RR.. T t en Tr R.

A53

27

A5

Ti r ail kT 5 15 1 Tr ea A5 A5 el alel gh P l a i Dofviolea nDi f o a oMvaeanDnTi.rofiM D. .M Ti ilil il 15 ooldldTTrroaald Tr a A5 nnifif nif le 15 MMaa Ma l voel Da A5 Ti o f D n oi f ss e s . M5a1n5. iMaam p p p v am am H R. He o A RR. .H DRa.l D aldil Tr ail Dove r T d l o o if nif n l Ma Ma fo

t en Tr R. t n e t. Tr reRn

Tr ak Pe

R.

s

Ti

A53

he

Biddulph

ent

Metres

Biddulph Biddulph

Pilsley Biggin Biggin Warslow Matlock BathBonsall Matlock Bath Matlock Bath Cromford Warslow Warslow Matlock Bonsall Bonsall Taddington Cromford Cromford Birchover 0 Winster Middleton 32 Hulme End RobinChelmorton 602 Tittesworth Res. 6 A 2 01 Hood’s A5 MONSAL TRAIL Butterton A R. W Rudyard Lake Warslow Butterton Butterton Warslow Warslow Wildboarclough Cromford Biggin Matlock Bath Cromford Cromford ye. EdensorBonsall Stride a il Alstonefield Warslow Alstonefield Alstonefield Biddulph Biddulph Biddulph Middleton Wensley Leek Middleton Middleton 4Leek Estate ButtertonWarslow Butterton Butterton Three Shires A5 Hartington Flagg Elton Sheldon Bakewell Middleton Cromford Crich Alstonefield Alstonefield Alstonefield Parwich Crich Crich Matlock Parwich Parwich Middleton Middleton Biddulph Leek Leek HeadLeek Beeley ss s Winster s s Onecote Wetton Butterton Hulme End iinngto Onecote Onecote Wetton Wetton s Tittesworth Res. i 2 n 01 gtonn A5 Alstonefield gton Crich Crich Crich dyard LakeNATIONAL PARK CYCLE HIRE Hollinsclough Flash Parwich Parwich Parwich R Rowsley Middleton Biggin R R s Matlock Grindon Over Bath Leek Grindon Grindon ss s Bonsall Onecote A6 Onecote Onecote Monyash Wetton Wetton - PARSLEY HAY singt Wetton singt ingtoHaddon Wirksworth on o WirksworthWirksworth nTissington n Crich Parwich R R R l Dale Warslow Tissington Tissington Tel: 01298 84493 Cromford Stanton Grindon Grindon Wincle Grindon Lathkil ss Onecote Wetton ingtod Wirksworth Wirksworth Wirksworth in the Peak Postcode: SK17 0DG d d n Carsington Water Water RLongnor Butterton Tissington Tissington Carsington Carsington Water Ilam Ilam Tissington Ilam Thorpe Darley Dale Alstonefield Grindon H Thorpe Thorpe Wirksworth Youlgreave Middleton d d d Leek Waterhouses Carsington WaterCarsington Water Carsington Water Congleton Waterhouses Waterhouses Fenny Bentley Ilam Thorpe Ilam Thorpe Ilam Tissington FennyBirchover Bentley Fenny Bentley Thorpe Middleton Crich Parwich 32 d Robin Hood’s A6 Carsington Water ss Waterhouses Waterhouses Waterhouses Ilam Onecote Wetton Fenny Bentley Fenny Bentley Fenny Bentley ingto Stride a il Thorpe Warslow n Wensley R Estate Waterhouses Grindon Fenny Bentley Elton Ashbourne Hartington Belper BAKEWELL BelperCENTRE BelperVISITOR Wirksworth Ashbourne Matlock Tissington Winster Tel: 01629 813227 Hulme End Tittesworth Res. 012 Belper Belper Belper Rudyard Lake AshbourneA5Ashbourne Ashbourne d BigginCarsington Matlock Bath Postcode: DE45 1DS Bonsall Water 77 Ilam Thorpe 1 Belper 7 5 Ashbourne 1 1 A A5 A5 NEW IN Warslow Cromford Waterhouses Fenny Bentley 7 Biddulph 517 2019 517 A A51 A Butterton 7 1 Alstonefield A5 Middleton

Elton Ashford in Biggin the Water

Tr Tr ak ak Pe Pe h ig

Rudyard

e

Th s he

Congleton

ch

a Ro

Wincle

ne

Da

R.

Valley

R.

A52 A5 7 27

Rainow Wincle Lamaload Hollinsclough Res.

Birchover Darley Dale Birchover Middleton 2 Birchover H l Dal Middleton H athkilYoulgreave Moors Darley DaleDarley Dale Middleton Youlgreave StantonRobin Youlgreave 6332 L 32 Beeley Stoney A Robin Hood’s Hood’s RobininHood’s A6 A6 the Peak Stride a Curbar Birchover Flash Stride Birchover aMiddleton Stride Birchover a il Middleton Middleton iill Middleton Warslow Warslow Litton 32 32 32 Errwood Over H Rowsley Wensley Wensley Darley DaleWensley Robin Hood’s Robin Hood’sRobin Hood’s A6 A6 A6 Estate Estate A6 Monyash Estate Youlgreave Res. Hartington A537 Calver Haddon Elton Hartington Hartington Stride a Stride a Stride a M Elton Elton 1 Warslow Warslow i Warslow il il 2 l ons le Wensley A6 Wensley Wensley Birchover al D kill Da Estate Estate Middleton Estate Lath Buxton 32 Winster Winster Winster rStanton aElton ail onsal TEnd MHartington le Robin Hood’s Tittesworth Res. Hartington Hulme Hartington Hulme End End Hulme 22 Elton Macclesfield Hassop Cat & FiddleRes. Macclesfield Elton 01 A6 A5 Tittesworth Tittesworth Res. in the Peak 2 Rudyard Lake 01 01 A5 A5 Longnor Rudyard Lake Rudyard Lake Biggin Stride a Matlock Warslow i Biggin Biggin l Longstone Forest Matlock Bath Bath Matlock Bath Lt. Winster Winster Bonsall Wensley Winster Longstone A619 Bonsall Baslow Bonsall Darley DaleGt. Hulme End HulmeA6End Tittesworth Res. Estate H Hulme End TittesworthTittesworth Res. A5012 A5012 A5012 Lake Rudyard Chesterfield RudyardRes. Lake Lake Hartington Youlgreave

A52 AA5522 77 7

Ro

k

A53

e vPeea Digoh R.

igh Tr

A53

ee ve Do R.

0

Congleton Congleton

es hes ac Ro

A53 A5 3

R.

Congleton

TTrr Tr akak ak Pee h Pe ig

R. Derw

Metres Metres

Metres

Metres

Telephone: 01629 816200 Email: customer.service@peakdistrict.gov.uk Website: www.peakdistrict.gov.uk 75

Metres Metres Metres

A 609

10 Miles 10 Miles

t en Tr R. t en Tr R.

A 609

A


EVENTS Continued from page 15

Sunday 2nd June – enjoy a leisurely 6-mile walk and discover Eyam’s history.

Discoverarks National P

Saturday 6th to Sunday

21st April

National Parks Week is now Discover National Parks fortnight! The annual National Parks family festival has moved to spring to time with Easter school holidays. From treasure trails to guided forest walks, diverse events are on offer in the UK’s 15 National Parks. Discover more at: www.nationalparks.uk www.peakdistrict.gov.uk/discover nationalparks #DiscoverNationalParks

WILD FAMILIES AT MACCLESFIELD FOREST

Guided walks Get the lowdown on the high ground or the highlights of the lowlands on a walk with a Peak District National Park ranger! Discover routes that become family favourites.

SOUTH WEST PEAK WALKS

A MINDFUL FOREST WALK

The Roaches, Tuesday 19th March; Countryside of Warslow, Thursday 11th April; Goyt Valley, Tuesday 14th May All walks start at 11am Discover the natural and cultural history of the South West Peak. Walks last between 2 and 3 hours, on easy terrain. Booking is essential, visit www.southwestpeak.co.uk/activities

“THE MIGHTY WOE” – EYAM’S PLAGUE REMEMBERED

23rd and 24th March, Sheffield Adventure Film Festival. 19th May, Marsden plant fair with the National Trust. Visit the Bogtastic van and discover the story of blanket bogs, where water is stored to help reduce the risk of flooding, carbon accumulates to tackle climate change. • Visit www.moorsforthefuture.org.uk Contact moors@peakdistrict.gov.uk

Saturday 11th May 10.30am to 3pm Explore practical mindfulness techniques on a 5.5-mile walk. Reach a greater awareness of your surroundings. • Meet at Trentabank ranger centre, SK11 0NS. Cost: £8 per adult.

Sunday 2nd June 10.30am to 4pm Leisurely 6-mile walk back in time to discover Eyam’s special place in plague history. • Meet opposite the museum on Hawkshill Road, Eyam, S32 5QP. Cost: £8 per adult.

WILD FLOWERS AND LEAD MINES – EXPLORING WHITE PEAK LANDSCAPE

Saturday 15th June 11am to 4pm Discover the old lead mining village of Sheldon and Magpie Mine on a 5-mile walk. See wildflowers in Deep Dale Nature Reserve and return through ancient woodlands. • Meet at Sheldon Village, outside the Cock and Pullet pub, DE45 1QS. Cost: £8 per adult.

18

Special interest

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

BOGTASTIC VAN

LONGDENDALE JUNIOR RANGERS

Sunday 7th April, Sunday 12th May and Sunday 9th June, 10.30am to 2pm Practical skills and adventures at Longdendale Environment Centre. Email learning.discovery@peakdistrict.gov.uk for more details. • Find out about all our Junior Ranger groups at www.peakdistrict.gov.uk/ junior-rangers

SPIRIT OF KINDER

Saturday 27th April, 2pm to 4pm Held at Winnats Pass, Castleton, this year the celebration includes the 70th anniversary of the National Parks & Access to the Countryside Act of 1949, and the National Trust’s ‘People’s Landscape’ campaign. Invited speakers and traditional singing of Ewan MacColl’s ‘Manchester Rambler’.

Monday 8th April, 10.30am to 12.30pm, and 1to 3pm Bug hunting, crafts, team challenges and more! Bring a picnic. For families with children aged 4-7. Younger and older siblings/friends welcome. No need to book. Free. • Park at Trentabank car park, nearest postcode: SK11 0NS. Run by the South West Peak Landscape Partnership. Visit www.southwestpeak.co.uk for info.

EASTER FUN AT CASTLETON VISITOR CENTRE

Wednesday 10th April and Saturday 13th April, 11am to 4pm Easter fun for families to drop in on. Mask making, clay modelling, nest building and more. Free.

BIG BILBERRY BUMBLEBEE HUNT

Friday 12th April,11am to 3pm Family drop-in event at Edale Visitor Centre. Join our friends from the Bumblebee Conservation Trust for family activities to discover the Peak District’s Bilberry Bumblebee. Free.

THE WILD WEST OF THE DERWENT VALLEY

Saturday 13th April 10am to 4.30pm A challenging guided 11-mile walk to Bleaklow Stones and back via Alport Castles. Booking essential – see below. • Meet at Fairholmes near the cycle hire. Cost: £8 per person aged 18 and above. • See centrefold map for all directions

Find out more For full details of all National Park ranger guided walks, visitor centre events and navigation skills training – and to book – please visit www.peakdistrict.gov.uk/events Click ‘book online’ to see the full range for 2019.


CULTURAL HERITAGE

Archaeologists examine a prehistoric feature affected by wildfire near Stalybridge in 2018. PHOTO: ANNA BADCOCK. (Inset) Archaeological remains are vulnerable to wind and water erosion during and after fires. PHOTO: DAVID DALRYMPLE-SMITH

Out of the ashes: Ancient landscapes revealed Prehistoric field systems, an ancient house site, and wreckage from a twentieth century plane crash are among the features that have come to light since last summer’s moorland fires.

T

he exposure of archaeological features is a double-edged sword for the Peak District National Park’s cultural heritage team. Natalie Ward, senior conservation archaeologist, explains: “Archaeology on moorland can be difficult to see because low, subtle features are easily hidden in the vegetation – the lack of visibility means it’s often not appreciated or valued. On one hand, it’s a fascinating opportunity to understand and record the revealed earth mounds and stones of barrows (burial mounds), clearance cairns and field systems, but on the other, it’s concerning because without the protection of vegetation the features have no protection from the weather and the erosion that it causes, or from damage caused by people or livestock walking across them.” Archaeologists, landowners and partner organisations, including the Peak District National Park Authority, Historic England, Greater Manchester Archaeological Advisory Service, and the National Trust, are working

Discovering evidence of the uplands’ past is exciting, but now the features are exposed and vulnerable together to capture information and record features. Aerial photography, drone footage and ground surveys have been carried out over the winter. Anna Badcock, cultural heritage manager, says: “The peat on our moorlands is not only a valuable habitat, it holds a record of cultural heritage from prehistory onwards – it can cover hunter-gatherer flint working sites, hearths and later features, and it contains pollen and deposits that show what trees and plants have been present, evidence of industrial pollution and previous fires. Healthy peat means protected cultural heritage, but when it’s damaged by fire, evidence is lost and

cultural heritage is lost or damaged and needs protecting. “The extent of last year’s fires and the possibility of future fires means we’re taking a landscape-scale approach with partners to protect our cultural heritage. We are sharing best practice and learning lessons from our experiences, such as acting fast to protect fragile sites from the weather by placing jute mesh and heather brash over it. Co-ordination is all-important – for example letting fire-fighters know where the Scheduled Monuments are, and liaising with voluntary archaeology groups to keep an eye on sites.” • The Peak District National Park landscape has been shaped by human activity for more than 10,000 years. • Upland archaeology is often subtle and hard to see. • Wild fires burn vegetation and expose cultural heritage features to further damage.

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

19


Eyes to the

SKIES

The peregrine falcon is widely regarded as the fastest animal on the planet.

The Peak District National Park is home to some of our most inspiring birds – from those with unparalleled speed, to those soaring the skies with peerless aerial prowess. Here we meet just a few of them. 20

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk


WILDLIFE

Bes t of the rest

THE FASTEST At more than 200mph in a stooping dive, the peregrine falcon is widely regarded as the fastest animal on the planet. Couple this with impressive binocular vision, and you have one of the finest aerial hunters around. It’s also believed the nostril ‘baffles’ seen in the peregrine helped inspire the same features that enable modern-day jet engines to work effectively. Now in residence in the neighbouring cities of Sheffield and Derby, peregrines still remain at home in the Peak District’s quarries and gritstone edges. Look out for their sickle-shaped wings as they stoop down from height.

Common buzzard – the ‘tourist’s eagle’, the buzzard is another raptor that can appear to hover, but it can only do so in a head-wind! Look out for them soaring in small groups on hillside thermals, especially in the spring. Goshawk – a rare resident of the Dark Peak, and a woodland specialist. Can occasionally be seen in springtime displays in the Upper Derwent Valley.

Barn owl.

THE QUIET ONE Famed for their all-but-silent flight, the barn owl is at home in the Peak District from the moorland fringes of Sheffield, to the lowland valleys of the White Peak. Rather paler and appearing smaller than its shorteared cousin, barn owls often perch along roadside walls and can also be seen outside the hours of darkness.

Short-eared owl.

THE NIGHT (AND DAY) OWL

THE OTHER ‘BARN’ OWL

A surprise to many, the short-eared owl isn’t just a ‘night owl’ but can just as easily be seen during the day, hunting or ‘quartering’ upland areas. Its pale appearance can at first glance appear like a barn owl, but longer wings eventually give it away, and a pair of piercing bright yellow eyes bear an unmistakable and unforgettable stare. As the coldest weather sets in, short-eared owls often move away to lowland areas, returning in the spring to nest.

WIND HOVER Visit any of the Dark Peak’s gritstone edges, and the inevitable breeze is likely to be taken advantage of by the kestrel. The only bird of prey which regularly hovers, this is a classic tell-tale sign for this most familiar of raptors. Late summer can see family groups tumbling and learning their craft together, whilst a walk along Stanage, Froggat or Curbar Edge could get you eye-toeye with their otherwise privileged world.

A hovering kestrel.

Standing just a few inches high, there’s no surprise in the name of the little owl. Despite its small stature and status as an introduced species as far back as the 19th century, today it remains a firm favourite and treat for anyone lucky enough to spot one. Dry stone walls and old buildings make good vantage points for little owls to catch worms and other prey from – giving you a great chance to spot the owls too.

Hobby – another seasonal visitor with a taste for dragonflies; look out for a speedy, dark-coloured falcon. Merlin – our smallest falcon, little larger than a large thrush and a moorland specialist. A ‘blink and you miss it’ bird, merlin can sometimes be seen perched on rocks or fence posts in our uplands. Osprey – a summer-only visitor that may visit lakes and reservoirs to fish en route to breeding territories in Wales, the Midlands and Scotland. Red kite – these large, unmistakable forktailed birds of prey are being spotted with increasing frequency in the Peak District, as birds from a number of reintroduction projects across the UK start to expand and explore new areas.

Mixed fortunes for the hen harrier

Birds of prey and wildlife crime

Once a feature of Peak District uplands, the enigmatic hen harrier today remains a rare visitor and breeding species, with 2018 seeing the first successful nest for several years as four young were raised on National Trust land within the National Park uplands. This positive return for the harrier was later tempered by the news that two fledgling harriers had disappeared in the Peak District and North York Moors National Park’s respectively, with no recovery (at time of writing) of either the birds or their satellite tags.

Despite being among our most iconic wildlife species, the conservation of raptors remains a challenge in many parts of the UK, including here in the Peak District. The 2018 breeding season demonstrated that whilst birds of prey have the potential to recover to historical numbers, illegal activity remains a threat to their recovery. Incidents of shooting were reported against a red kite and both tawny and short-eared owls within the national park last year. The National Park Authority continues to work with a wide range of partners, including the police, to work towards improving bird of prey populations in the Peak District. Annual bird of prey reports and other updates can be found on the news pages of our website. If you believe you have witnessed a wildlife crime incident, please contact the police in the first instance on 101.

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

21


PROMOTION

NEW FOR

2019!

Get hands-on with our National Park Ranger team What’s it really like to be a National Park Ranger? If you’ve ever wanted to get a taste of what it takes to look after the UK’s first National Park, now’s your chance with the English National Park Experience Collection – right here in the Peak District National Park. In the 70th anniversary year of the first steps that led to National Parks as we know and love them today, two brand new experiences are ready for you to enjoy – right alongside the people who know the Peak District best. Our National Park Rangers help to look after the Peak District National Park for everyone. They help and advise visitors and make your visit safe and enjoyable. They work with farmers and landowners to enhance wildlife and biodiversity, they engage with school and youth groups and help to maintain public access to open countryside and 22

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

our properties. Their role gives National Park Rangers a unique perspective on our countryside at a landscape scale. These premium experiences will give you an insight into the work our rangers do in caring for Britain’s original National Park. You’ll hear their stories, learn about their role, discover more about the wildlife and cultural heritage, and meet other local people throughout the day. Funds generated through these experiences are reinvested in caring for the Peak District National Park for future generations to enjoy.

Above: Andy Bentham – Peak District National Park Ranger © Tom Marshall


A Ranger’s Journey along Stanage Edge

White Peak Trails by e-Bike

Join the Peak District National Park rangers on a voyage of discovery. Peel back the layers of time and explore the history of the iconic Stanage Edge on the North Lees Estate. Revel in the wild open moorlands and rocky edges with hidden wildlife, rich in archaeology, industrial history and agriculture that shaped this stunning part of the Peak District and inspired many famous stories. Learn how the Rangers care for this special place. Enjoy a ‘brew with a view’ on Stanage Edge, a traditional British picnic, and finish the day in a fine English pub with open fires and local beers.

Highlights: • Enjoy a ‘trek and trails’ adventure with local Rangers, discovering the history of the unique landscape and its people. • Visit the quintessentially English village of Hathersage and North Lees Hall, the inspiration for Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre. • Savour a ‘brew with a view’, a traditional British picnic and a local beer in an English pub.

Join a National Park Ranger on a guided cycle tour by electric bike. Enjoy traffic-free cycle trails and minor roads on the National Cycle Network. Cycle on former railways, passing through the beautiful limestone landscape of the White Peak region. Discover local history and visit the oldest working winding engine in the world, which is part of the UNESCO Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site. Visit an English Estate and enjoy a traditional pub lunch. The tour ends with a visit to an ancient hilltop burial site with fabulous vistas.

Highlights: • Learn about the landscape and cultural heritage from a National Park Ranger, whilst enjoying cycling through the landscape on an e-bike. • Visit a quintessentially English Estate, an ancient burial tomb site, and the world’s oldest working winding engine. • Enjoy a traditional English pub lunch.

The detail: 8 hours

The detail:

Active 30-mile bike ride on

6.5 hours

power assisted bikes

Low 5km (3 miles) trek with some steep ascents and exposure to the elements

£

£80 per person including lunch Starts at: Hathersage

Dates: Weds 5th June

Sat 6th July

Weds 12th June

Sat 10th Aug Weds 4th Sept

£

£120 per person including lunch and e-Bike hire

Starts at: Parsley Hay Cycle Hire Centre Dates: Weds 8th May

Weds 26th Jun

Fri 6th Aug

Fri 31 May

Sat 13 Jul

Weds 21st Aug

Sat 15 Jun

Weds 24 Jul

Thurs 29th Aug

st

th

th

th

Fri 6th Sept

Book these experiences online now at peakdistrict.gov.uk/visiting/rangerexperience

Going global These experiences form part of The English National Park Experience Collection, a new range of bookable experiences across all our National Parks, each telling the stories of our landscapes and their people. The experiences are being promoted to international audiences through VisitBritain (the national tourism agency) and overseas tour operators.

The project aims to provide greater connection between visitors and our protected landscapes. Spreading the benefits of international tourism more widely, moving visitors out of London to benefit smaller rural tourism businesses.

nationalparks.uk/discoverengland www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

23


Looking back, moving forward As we celebrate the 70th anniversary of landmark legislation, leading ecologist and National Park Authority member Penny Anderson talks to Fiona Stubbs about conservation lessons learned... and future challenges.

T

his is a big year for the Peak District and all the UK’s National Parks. It marks the 70th anniversary of the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949, which set out to protect landscapes and make the countryside more accessible to people. And it will see the conclusion of an independent review, led by writer Julian Glover, looking at how National Parks meet 21st century needs. Trying to find a balance between the many interests involved in the Peak District National Park is central to Penny’s role as an Authority member. And close to her heart is the health of our landscapes and habitats. “I am very aware of the importance of habitats for providing a wide variety of benefits to people other than nature conservation,” she says. “These ‘ecosystem services’ include clean water, provision of food, control of downstream flooding and more. Holding carbon in the peat and other soils is a prime function which we can manipulate through good management to help reduce the effect of climate change, which itself is a real threat to the future of our habitats and species.” She recalls: “In my first moorland survey in 1978-79 for the former Nature Conservancy Council across the whole Longdendale catchment, I quickly learned which parts you could stand in and which you couldn’t. I only lost a welly once! That’s when I really got to know the landscape – I’ve been in love with the moors ever since.” Penny has extensive knowledge and expertise in moorland restoration. She first worked with the Authority in 1979 as a consultant on the Peak District Moorland Restoration Project, which continued until 1997 and was the forerunner to the Moors for the Future Partnership. She says: “One of my roles was to map moorland, identifying all areas that were bare. If we did that now we’d use a Geographic Information System (GIS) to capture, store and analyse data. But then it was done with mm2 graph paper!” Since then, Penny has provided input into conservation and ecology issues in the National

24

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk


REFLECTIONS

PHOTO: TOM MARSHALL

The majority of people who visit the moors come because of that fantastic feeling of wilderness and wellbeing. But does it make them go home and reduce their own carbon output?

Penny in the Peak District National Park.

Park and was involved in surveys of the Warslow and Eastern Moors estates. Under the 1949 Act, National Parks would “preserve and enhance natural beauty” and “provide recreational opportunities for the public”. Following a 1995 revision, they are now required to “enhance natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage” and to promote opportunities for people to understand and enjoy the special qualities of national parks. Penny says: “When National Parks were set up, there was no real tool for achieving the first purpose. The only mechanisms we’ve had are agri-environmental schemes which provide funding to farmers and land managers to farm in a way that supports biodiversity, enhances the landscape, and improves the quality of water, air and soil. But monitoring has shown that agri-environmental schemes don’t always achieve what they’ve set out to do. There’s nearly always a compromise. “The only other way that wildlife has been preserved is through being Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) or European sites – overseen by Natural England. “If we were here in 1949, I think we’d have a completely different experience

to what we have now in terms of the abundance of plants and animals. Even though we’ve got protected areas of land, habitats and biodiversity have declined, particularly in the grasslands.” Penny believes that climate change and biodiversity are closely linked. “It’s a national – or international – issue,” she says. “Climate change is very high on the agenda but it’s not easy. Moors for the Future is a fantastic project and is doing so much to restore moorland areas and make them more resilient to climate change. To what extent do people appreciate that? I don’t know. The majority of people who visit the moors come because of that fantastic feeling of wilderness and wellbeing. But does it make them go home and reduce their own carbon output? One of the problems is that people have got used to the ‘new norm’ – seeing far fewer birds and butterflies, for example, than there used to be. “We are becoming de-natured. Studies show a very sad loss of connection with the natural environment for all sorts of reasons – lack of funding, knowledge, people using cars rather than walking or cycling, modern technology... “I’ll be very interested to read the Glover report. There’s a potential to supplement what’s already being done – one possibility is carbon off-setting, another would be greater support for habitat restoration and protection. “I hope the report is positive and brings an opportunity to develop and change National Parks and their wildlife for the better. I hope central government funding continues. It’s very important not to be diverted from our primary purposes.”

Path to the Parks • The National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949 was passed with all-party support as part of Britain’s post-war reconstruction. • The Act sought to establish National Parks, to preserve and enhance their natural beauty and provide recreational opportunities for the public. • The Peak District became Britain’s first National Park on April 17, 1951 .

Penny Anderson Penny Anderson is a chartered ecologist. She joined the Peak District National Park Authority in April 2015 as a Member appointed by the Secretary of State. The Authority has eight ‘National’ Members appointed directly by the Secretary of State, based on their relevant skills and experience. Penny led one of the UK’s leading ecological consultancies – Buxtonbased Penny Anderson Associates Ltd – for over 40 years and, though ‘sort of retired’, still chairs its Board. Involved in nature conservation in the Peak District for many years, she has extensive experience of habitat restoration and management and co-authored, with Dave Shimwell, The Wildflowers and Other Plants of the Peak District.

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

25


FUNDRAISING Engagement manager Lorna Fisher will be cycling 1,600 miles, visiting all 15 UK National Parks to raise funds for the Peak District National Park Foundation.

Building a foundation for the

FUTURE OF OUR NATIONAL PARK

T

his year is the 70th anniversary of the Act of Parliament which led to the Peak District becoming the UK’s first National Park. We’re passionate about keeping alive the spirit of access and enjoyment of our National Parks. As we celebrate the 70th anniversary of this landmark legislation, we’re looking to the future with our newly

established charity The Peak District National Park Foundation. Throughout 2019, the Foundation will be working to raise £70k for a range of high impact projects that care for the stunning landscapes, wildlife and cultural heritage of the Peak District and enable more people to enjoy our National Park. The Peak District National Park

Pedal the Parks – #70for70 National Parks Weeks 2019 will see our engagement manager Lorna Fisher cycling 1,600 miles, visiting all 15 UK National Parks to raise funds for the Peak District National Park Foundation. Lorna says: “I’m an explorer at heart who loves being outside – I’m happiest when walking in the hills, whizzing along country lanes or simply exploring. “I’ve previously taken part in 400km and 600km audaxes (time-limited distance rides), but at around 2,500km over two weeks this will be like nothing else I’ve attempted before.

“In my role at the Peak District National Park I’m incredibly lucky to have the opportunity to inspire and engage others, sharing my passion for Lorna Fisher the natural world. “During my challenge there’ll certainly be plenty of time to tune in to the landscapes and meet some of those who live and work in our national parks. Seeing the world from two wheels always brings a new perspective.”

Millers Dale Station Development As you’ll see in our news section (page 4), we’ve renovated the former ticket office to create a new café and visitor information point at Millers Dale Station. The next phase of the development is to secure grant funding to repair the derelict goods shed, an important piece of industrial heritage, and transform it into a 21st century interpretation space. The renovated goods shed will help to tell the story of Millers Dale Station, from its heyday as an important junction on the Midland Railway Line, to its current position as a popular rest stop on the Monsal Trail. It will be a flexible space used by school and community groups, as well as being open to the public. To find out more sign up to ourPeak.

Foundation has been set up to grow support and to raise funds to care for the Peak District National Park for everyone to enjoy forever. Looking to the next 70 years we want our National Park to be in a better condition for future generations to continue to enjoy and champion. And Lorna’s epic challenge could not be a greater start. Thanks Lorna!

WE’RE NEARLY READY TO MEND OUR MOUNTAINS Thank you to everyone who has donated so far to the British Mountaineering Council’s Mend Our Mountains: Make One Million campaign. We’re delighted to announce that, later this year, repair works will start at the Bog of Doom on the Cut Gate bridleway and at the hugely popular Great Ridge, between Mam Tor and Lose Hill. A generous donation from the SYNED Ramblers and a grant from the Oglesby Trust kicked off the campaign, a crowdfunding drive pushed us forward – and now we’re on the home stretch to raise the funds that we need for these much-loved routes. Could you help us over the finish line? Donate now at: https://mendmountains.thebmc. co.uk/donations/great-ridge/ or text MOMM11, followed by the amount you want to give, to 70070.

To keep up to date with these exciting fundraising campaigns, please sign-up for our regular e-newsletter – ourPeak. Visit www.peakdistrict.gov.uk/donate and click on the ourPeak sign-up link, or email donations@peakdistrict.gov.uk 26

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk


Taste of

A

FOOD

spring

fter winter’s hearty comfort food, spring arrives with the promise of light, tastebud-tempting meals, packed with flavour. For inspiration this season, we’ve asked the Rest Café – part of the community-owned Anglers Rest in Bamford – to share two favourite recipes. Daytime cook Andrea Dyson (pictured) says: “Two of our most popular dishes are gluten-free Bacon, Brie and Cranberry Quiche and Mediterranean Tomato Soup. Our delicious crustless quiche is perfect for people who follow a gluten-free diet for health reasons and for those who simply want a lighter diet. “Our Mediterranean Tomato Soup is also gluten-free and the recipe is wonderfully versatile. Just add less water to create a quick and easy pasta sauce!” *The Anglers Rest is a holder of the Peak District Environmental Quality Mark (EQM).

Mediterranean Tomato Soup Serves 2 Ingredients • 400g tin plum tomatoes • Jar of sundried tomatoes • Jar of olives of your choice • 2 spring onions chopped • Gluten-free vegetable stock cube • Salt, pepper and sugar to taste • ½ tsp mixed herbs • Drizzle of olive oil to serve Method 1. Pour tomatoes into a large saucepan and add half a can of water. Add app rox six chopped sundried tomatoes, chopped spring onions and one tablespoon of olives. 2. Bring to the boil. Sprinkle in vegetable stock cube and simmer for about 10 minutes. 3. Blend with a hand blender until smooth. Add salt, pepper and a little sugar to taste. Sprinkle in the mixed herbs and stir. Serve with a drizzle of olive oil.

Gluten-free Bacon, Brie & Cranberry Quiche

3. Grease an 8-inch quiche dish and place bacon pieces into dish. Add the slices of brie.

Ingredients • 5 large eggs • 2 rashers of cooked bacon, cut into bite-sized pieces • 100g brie, sliced into 1-inch strips • 1 tbsp of cranberry sauce or dried cranberries • Salt and pepper • Milk – full fat or semi skimmed

4. Place quiche dish onto a baking sheet and half fill the dish with the egg mixture. Place tray onto oven shelf and top up with egg mixture.

2. Break the eggs into a measuring jug and beat together. Add enough milk to make 400ml of liquid. Add cranberry to the egg and milk mixture, plus a pinch of salt and pepper.

6. For a non gluten-free quiche, line the dish with shortcrust pastry and blind bake for 10 to 15 minutes before adding the ingredients. Then continue as above. PHOTOS: TOM MARSHALL

Method 1. Preheat oven to gas mark 4/350F/180C.

5. Bake for about 20 minutes, until quiche is golden and set. Allow to cool a little and serve with a generous side salad.

Why not try...? Ring the changes with other tasty fillings, such as smoked salmon and asparagus or goat’s cheese and caramelised onion chutney. www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

27


YOUR NATIONAL PARK

Peak views

Get in touch with us by email, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or write. We love to hear from you.

Taking a br eather at Wellington ’s Monumen t, Baslow Ed ge. #ExploreEaster nMoors @JessieLPhoto

ged ‘There be dragons!’ The rug and Hill use ridges of Parkho reef Chrome Hill are limestone al, cor m fro d me for – lls kno . over 340 million years old ard sniW @Te #Protectedlandscape

More of your moments Whether you’re posting a great Peak District National Park selfie, wowing with wildlife, or capturing priceless memories with your family, we’ll share some of our favourites here.

@accessTOG Tideswell Dale is a wheelchair friendly route in the heart of the Peak District National Park. #TheOutdoorGuide #AccessForAll

@TraceyWhitefoot Sunrise at Curbar Edge, all the more mysterious with the temperature inversion. #mistymorning

Curlew use their curve d beaks to probe the ground for insects and worms. #Curlewliveheretoo @MikeCritchlow

@RealBakewellPud Did you spot Larry and George Lamb on their biking tour of the Peak District National Park? #BritainByBike @peakdistrict

Did you know there are 5,440 miles (8,756km) of dry stone wall in the Peak District National Park? #Ifwallscouldtalk @MyGuidedWalks

/peakdistrictnationalpark /peakdistrictnationalpark @PeakMillie You can write to us at: ParkLife team, Peak District National Park office, Aldern House, Baslow Road, Bakewell, Derbyshire, DE45 1AE. We read all your letters but we aren’t able to respond personally.

WINTER COMPETITION BOOK WINNERS Thank you to everyone who entered our competition in the winter edition to win copies of books we had reviewed. The winners were selected at random from the correct entries. Scrambles in the Dark Peak, by Tony Corker and Terry Sleaford, was won by Stephen Hill of Ambergate. The two copies of Wonders of the Peak: Then and Now, by Roly Smith and Chris Gilbert, were won by John Smith of Chesterfield and Sarah Males of Buxton. 28

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk


PROFILE

5 minutes with... With her love of the great outdoors and a passion for sharing the countryside with other people, Yvonne Witter – chair of Peak District Mosaic – is a true champion of our National Park.

I

I am very grateful for the opportunity to be a proactive community champion for the Mosaic project – encouraging people from black and minority ethnic communities living around the borders of the Peak District National Park to visit and learn more about it. I was introduced to the Peak District by a former Mosaic project worker and instantly I felt at home – minus the mango, guinep and star apple trees I am accustomed to in the countryside in Jamaica! I love the sheer beauty of the landscape, the joy of being in a peaceful place where I can converse with nature. I enjoy the challenge and excitement of the outdoors on my own and with friends – walking, running, cycling, camping, glamping, horse riding, talking, laughing, singing. The Peak District National Park is a haven where tranquillity erases fear and dramatic hills calm my weary soul. The best part of my role is being able to promote the National Park to new audiences and help them to experience this gem which is right on their doorstep! I am passionate about supporting different groups to access the outdoors to improve their health and wellbeing. I’m proud to be instrumental in raising the profile of Peak District Mosaic at regional and national events.

PHOTO: TOM MARSHALL

became a Mosaic community champion in 2008. Before that, I completed a Communications Studies degree at Sheffield Hallam University and worked as a development officer for a local community group. I then worked two parttime jobs for a voluntary organisation and Employment Services (now Department of Work and Pensions) before moving to a contracts and monitoring officer role for an out of school childcare organisation and community regeneration. I currently work as a community health trainer.

I don’t have a favourite spot in the Peak District; however, Mam Tor is one of the iconic locations I have been to several times. I like it when I conquer the steep hill from Castleton or Edale and announce my arrival, by spreading my wings and shouting silently: “I am alive.” Last summer I organised a group walk with a Peak District National Park ranger and felt proud to stand on Mam Tor with three of my grandchildren – the youngest being six years old. The thing that would surprise most people about my role is that I am a volunteer. I devote a lot of time ensuring that, as the chair of Peak District Mosaic, I am not afraid to take on a challenge to ensure that the organisation is managed in a professional way. To get the most out of the Peak District National Park I’d urge people to focus on the benefits and treat it like your home. Respect it and remember it is a place for learning and re-energising.

Yvonne is passionate about supporting different groups to access the outdoors.

The strangest question I’ve ever been asked in my role? That has to be when someone asked: “Have you ever seen a cobra snake when you have been camping in the Peak District?” If I could be anywhere else in the world, I would be sitting on a beach in Jamaica, sipping freshly-sourced coconut water and relaxing with a book after a delicious lunch of jerk chicken, rice and peas, green salad and some juicy sugar cane. Or I would be enjoying the beat of the thundery waterfall on my back at Dunn’s River Fall, Ocho Rios, Jamaica – followed by a wellearned treat of Jamaica patty and coco bread with a fruit juice. Bakewell tart or Bakewell pudding? Neither! Carrot cake or banana cake for me!

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

29


THE CHAIR

PHOTO: TOM MARSHALL

22nd November 8th February 14th February

National The launch of the Miles Without Stiles guidebook, written by Peak District from Accessible Park Authority access officer Sue Smith (centre, with Jane and Gillian for 40 years’ service; Derbyshire); top left, volunteer ranger Derek Pay receives an award and Emily. Rob Lloyd, ces apprenti hip Partners e Landscap left, South West Peak

Chair’s Diary – Andrew McCloy

W

hen I became Chair of the Authority last summer someone remarked that I would need to buy a bigger diary for 2019, since the pages are rapidly filled with a variety of engagements – from the routine like monthly standing committees and meetings with local authority leaders and MPs, to the one-off events. Most are stimulating and rewarding (and just occasionally a little vexing), so here is a taste of what chairing this extraordinary national park involves:

November

11th November: I was honoured to represent the Authority at various Remembrance events held by local parish councils within the national park. This was especially memorable at the treeplanting with Dungworth and Bradfield schoolchildren, although the lighting of the beacon at the top of Holme Moss in a roaring gale was slightly hair-raising. 22nd November: A trip up to Fairholmes in the Upper Derwent Valley to present volunteer ranger Derek Pay with an award for 40 years’ service. Elvis was still alive when Derek began turning out for us! Extraordinary dedication from our many volunteers.

December

6th December: The Peak District Local Access Forum (LAF) kicked off December. Twenty principled but amiable people from different interest groups quietly seeking understanding and consensus on some tricky points. National politicians could learn a thing or two here. 11th December: A visit to check on progress restoring Millers Dale railway station, soon to be a classy tearoom and information hub on the popular Monsal

30

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

Trail. It was great to see the meticulous workmanship and real respect for this historic building. Passing cyclists and visitors were already peering in to look at the changes afoot.

– a business-led tourism initiative across English parks. Some fantastic choices, including a behind-the-scenes tour of this stunning (if rather chilly in January) period house.

January

February

25th January: Donned my walking boots and warm fleece for a bracing walk along the Great Ridge from Mam Tor with representatives from the Oglesby Charitable Trust. Grateful for their generous donation towards restoring this iconic path as part of the BMC-coordinated Mend our Mountains campaign.

14th February: An absorbing day out in the Staffordshire and Cheshire side of the national park learning about the South West Peak Landscape Partnership. We’re coordinating 18 separate projects spanning landscape, wildlife, heritage and community. Amazing work and so proud of our team, including three wonderful young apprentices hard at work in the outdoors – the Peak District’s future is evidently in safe hands.

12th January: I opened the annual Derbyshire Archaeological Day at Chesterfield and told the packed audience how national parks should be inspirational outdoor classrooms for every schoolchild. Some fascinating presentations that fired up my interest in cultural heritage, even if I’m still a bit vague on when the Bronze Age came and went.

31st January: A busy day ahead as the Peak District hosts a meeting of all ten English national parks, followed by a trip to Haddon Hall for the unveiling of the new National Park Experience Collection

8th February: To Castleton for the launch of the Miles Without Stiles guidebook, describing 20 easy access trails for all abilities across the national park. We follow one of these to the mouth of Peak Cavern, a happy outing of pushchairs, dogs, wheelchairs and children. A great cuppa and cake back at the Blueberry Café at the visitor centre, lots of smiles all round (including mine!).

Andrew’s diary will return in the next edition of ParkLife.


MembersPark as of February 2019 Members as of February 2019 Peak District National Authority 2

2

7

2

3 3

Cllr Andrew McCloy Parish Member

Cllr David Chapman Council Member

01629 816323

01298 85067

4

Cllr Jason Atkin Council Member

Mr James Berresford Secretary of State Member 07810 528460

01629 258834

2

Mrs Penny Anderson Secretary of State Member 01629 816382

Mr Paul Ancell Secretary of State Member 01625 613995

3

3

5

Cllr Doug Birkinshaw Council Member

Cllr Patrick Brady Parish Member

01226 770770

01298 85798

5

This map shows which members cover the area where you live. Use the colour code to help.

5

1

4

6

Cllr Chris Carr Parish Member

Cllr Mike Chaplin Council Member

Cllr Tony Favell Parish Member

Cllr Chris Furness Council Member

01335 390342

07789 549790

01433 670281

01433 621811

7

7

1

Mr Zahid Hamid Secretary of State Member 0114 2366332

1

6

6

Cllr Andrew Hart Council Member

Cllr Gill Heath Council Member

01782 379431

01538 381601

Mr Robert Helliwell Secretary of State Member 01433 670250

Cllr Caroline Howe Council Member

Cllr Harold Laws Council Member

07800 819901

0114 247 5376

6

6

7

4

4

Cllr Barry Lewis Council Member

Cllr Jamie Macrae Council Member

Cllr Colin McLaren Council Member

Cllr Jim Perkins Council Member

Cllr Kath Potter Parish Member

07920 484207

07872 807367

0161 6274197

01298 812927

01629 734320

7

Cllr Lesley Roberts Parish Member 01538 388900

5

Mr Ken Smith Secretary of State Member 01629 816382

6

5

6

Cllr Robert Walker Council Member

Cllr John Walton Council Member

Cllr Becki Woods Council Member

01484 221000

01433 650031

07970 741890

To find more information about our Members go to:

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk/members

www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

31


Book now and save

RHS

C H AT S WO R T H FLOWER SHOW

Inspirational gardens, plants and floral displays | Expert talks and workshops Unique shopping | Art and entertainment | Artisan food and drink

5–9 June 2019 | RHS Members’ Day 5 June Book now rhs.org.uk/chatsworth Every ticket sale supports the charitable work of the RHS RHS Registered Charity no. 222879 / SC038262

Partnered by

Profile for Peak District National Park

ParkLife Issue 27 - Spring 2019  

Your events, news and stories in the Peak District National Park for Spring 2019.

ParkLife Issue 27 - Spring 2019  

Your events, news and stories in the Peak District National Park for Spring 2019.