Issuu on Google+


BW 2.6 WW 46.8 YW 87.2 M 19.3 TM 42.7

BW 2.3 WW 44.4 YW 86 M 20 TM 42.2

HTA Factor Red 202Z Sir Boom x Ripper BW 75 • Adj 205 706 • Adj 365 1348 BW 1.6 WW 56 YW 99.9 M 16.2 TM 44.2

HTA Camaro 258Z Bravia x Nobleman BW 94 • Adj 205 771 149 • Adj 365 1449 BW 3.1 WW 51.8 YW 90.7 M 18.6 TM 44.5

HTA Maddox 268Z Quigley x Dividend BW 101 • Adj 205 800 • Adj 365 1512 BW 3.7 WW 47.1 YW 92.5 M 22.4 TM 46

HTA Copyright 224Z Merit x Rio Blanco BW 99 • Adj 205 808 • Adj 365 1349 BW 2 WW 51.8 YW 97.6 M 14.3 TM 40.2

HTA Urban Legend 290Z Ice x Durango BW 99 • Adj 205 769 • Adj 365 1422 BW 2.9 WW 51.1 YW 96.2 Milk 18.7 TM 44.3

STA Cobalt 205Z Harpo x Everest BW 92 • Adj 205 777 • Adj 365 1462

View the catalogue online at www.buyagro.com We invite you to stop by to walk through the pens anytime!

HTA Raider 251Z Bravia x Nobleman BW 98 • Adj 205 846 • Adj 365 1411

Find us on Facebook!

PO Box 639, Rivers, MB R0K 1X0 Shawn & Tanya 204-328-7704 or 204-724-8823 Harry & Joan 204-328-7103 or 204-724-3605 Raymond & Barb 204-566-2134 or 204-724-3600 htacharolais@gmail.com • www.htacharolais.com

Charolais Connection • March 2013

3


contents

The Charolais Connection 124 Shannon Road Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1 Ph. (306) 546-3940 • Fax (306) 546-3942 charolaisbanner@gmail.com www.charolaisbanner.com ISSN 0824-1767 Manager/Publisher Helge By

MARCH 2013 • VOL. XXX, NO. 2

From the Field........................................................................................8 du champ .............................................................................................10 Canadian Charolais Association .........................................................12 Herd Health– Calving Guidelines .......................................................14 Canadian Charolais Youth Association News....................................18 Profile – Wood vs Steel .......................................................................22 Plan Now to Extend Grazing & Reduce Winter Feed Costs..............32 Explaining Growth Promotants Used in Feedlot Cattle ...................34 Canada Beef Inc. Partners to Develop a Meet the Ranch Promo.....42 Don’t Forget the Bulls .........................................................................44 Leveraging Positive Beef Nutrition Research ....................................46 Proper Application of Livestock Manure ...........................................48 Winter Feeding on Perennial Pasture ................................................50 How Rumen Acidosis Impacts Animal Health ...................................52 Industry Info ........................................................................................54 Intranasal Vaccine ...............................................................................56 Critical Harvest Period for Alfalfa ......................................................58 Do Your Cattle Have Attitude?...........................................................60 Leptospirosis........................................................................................62 Lighter Heifers Lose Nothing..............................................................64 Calendar of Events ..............................................................................74 Index of Advertisers............................................................................78

Managing Editor Candace By charolaisbanner@sasktel.net Production/Graphic Design Susan Penner charolais.susan@sasktel.net Web Design Dalyse Robertson pdmrobertson@gmail.com Liaison française and Web Co-ordinator Cynthia Beck (306) 436-2007 CBeck@charolais.com FIELDMEN: Alberta & British Columbia Craig Scott 5107 Shannon Drive, Olds, AB T4H 1X3 Res. (403) 507-2258 Fax (403) 507-2268 Cell (403) 651-9441 sbanner@telusplanet.net Saskatchewan, Manitoba, USA & Eastern Canada Helge By 124 Shannon Rd., Regina, SK S4S 5B1 Office (306) 546-3940 Office Fax (306) 546-3942 Res. (306) 584-7937 Cell (306) 536-4261 charolaisbanner@sasktel.net SUBSCRIPTIONS: $6.30 per year (Prices include 5% GST)

$16.80 – 3 years

The Charolais Connection is mailed to 10,000 cattlemen nationwide. Those cattlemen include all purebred Charolais breeders, buyers of purebred Charolais bulls from the past six years and all subscribers to the Charolais Banner. No material contained in the Charolais Connection may be reprinted without the permission of the Charolais Banner. The publishers reserve the right to refuse any advertisements. The material produced in this publication is done so with the highest integrity, however, we assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. We are responsible for only the value of the advertisement.

on the cover… a beautiful day for a bull sale at Hunter Charolais.

Animals in the photographs in the Connection have not been altered by computer enhancement or mechanical methods according to the knowledge of the publisher.

Printed by Print West, Regina, Saskatchewan Publications Mail Agreement No. 40047726 Postage paid at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Photo: Michael Hunter, CCYA Sr. Photography entry Design: Susan Penner

4

Charolais Connection • March 2013

Postmaster: Please return undeliverable publications (covers only) to Charolais Banner, 124 Shannon Road, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1, Canada. Email: charolaisbanner@sasktel.net Published by the Charolais Banner, Regina, SK (3 times per year - February, March and Fall)


FEATURING 38 CHAROLAIS YEARLINGS • 1 Charolais Herdsire • 26 CSS Gridmaker 2W sons • 8 G.Bros Ultimate 918X sons • 4 Sparrows Reno 824U sons

HE SELLS CSS SIR GRIDMAKER 2W Canadian Western Agribition RBC Supreme Challenge Bull CE 93 BW .4 WW 28 YW 52 M 25.5 TM 40

Cedarlea Supreme Grid 16Z Polled, BW 92 lb. BW .3 WW 40.4 YW 78.6 M 25.6 TM 45.8 Grid x CSS Show Boat 5J

Cedarlea Grid Master 22Z Polled, BW 98 lb. BW 3.3 WW 42.1 YW 82.1 M 22.4 TM 43.5 Grid x SOS Polled Detonator 8M

Cedarlea Red Stone 25Z Horned, BW 107 lb. BW 3.2 WW 37.1 YW 70.7 M 24.5 TM 43.1 Grid x NOR Grizzly 5G

Cedarlea Ultimatum 77Z Polled, BW 102 lb. BW 2.3 WW 40.7 YW 90.7 M 24.6 TM 45 Ultimate x SOS Polled Detonator 8M

Cedarlea Ultimo 79Z Polled, BW 82 lb. BW -1 WW 33.7 YW 77.1 M 25.4 TM 42.3 Ultimate x SOS Polled Detonator 8M

WINDY WILLOWS FARMS featuring: • 60 Black Angus and 10 Red Angus Yearling Bulls • Select Group of Open Heifers Contact: Collin & Michelle Sauder 306-677-2507 Collin’s cell 306-677-7544

CEDARLEA FARMS

Garner & Lori Deobald & family ph 306-677-2589 • Garner’s cell 306-677-7777 g.deobald@sasktel.net • www.cedarleafarms.com

• FREE DELIVERY UP TO 300 KM • FREE BOARD UNTIL MAY 1 • ALL BULLS SEMEN TESTED Videos available online at www.cattleinmotion.com

Sale Manager:

Helge & Candace By 306-584-7937 Helge 306-536-4261 Candace 306-536-3374 charolaisbanner@gmail.com

Catalogue online at www.cattlemanagement.ca and www.bylivestock.com Charolais Connection • March 2013

5


6

Charolais Connection • March 2013


MXS 212Z

MXS 228Z Sparrows Landmark x MSW Y2K BW 2.5 WW 54 YW 100 M 22 TM 49

Merit Roundup 9508W x Sparrows Alcatraz 18N BW .1 WW 44 YW 86 M 25.7 TM 48

MXS 244Z Erixon’s Spitfire 127T x Sparrows Alcatraz 8N BW 1.4 WW 43 YW 87 M 20.5 TM 42

HEIFER BULL • MXS 243Z Revelation 467 x SVY Deliverance Pld 401P BW -2.4 WW 37 YW 67 M 19.2 TM 38

MXS 205Z Merit Roundup 9508W x Western Spur BW .2 WW 48 YW 90 M 21.8 TM 46

Charolais Connection • March 2013

7


POINTS TO PONDER

From the Field Helge By

It is the middle of February as I write this editorial and one of the most common questions I have received in the past month, from both purebred breeders and commercial cattlemen, is how are the bull sales going to be this spring? By the time you read this there will have been some more sales and we will see if the trends are happening as I see them. The Angus sales will have some fluctuations with the established, quality breeders having solid sales again but some of the newer breeders finding a tougher market as supply has probably exceeded demand here. With the bred heifer market not making everyone money last year I don’t see as much of that happening, so there will probably be less demand on the heifer bull side of things. The scenario of ‘last in first out’ tends to

happen in every breed that has a run. The last people to buy into becoming a purebred breeder in the expanding breed doesn’t have a market developed and when the market contracts, they are the first ones squeezed out. We have seen this in the Hereford breed in the 1980s and the Charolais breed in the 1990s. I feel the Simmental bull market will see a bit of a cooling off. There will still be some very strong sales as this breed experienced the highest averages for the last few years. The Red Angus/Simmie cross female is still one of the hottest commodities in the commercial industry and that will continue to drive demand here. I have had a number of commercial producers who have been using both Simmental and Charolais in a more terminal sire program say they will be buying more Charolais bulls. Interestingly, because the Simmental bull market has been so strong, they say they can buy more bull for their dollar in the Tisdale, Saturday, April 6, 1:30 p.m. • Over 70 Charolais, Charolais breed; Red Angus, Black Angus & Simmental bulls on offer and the Charcross A sample of our offering of yearlings and two year olds calves are still the sale toppers, to BDT 3Z which all other Sire JWX Silver Bullet 524W Born Feb 2/2012 calves are BW 94 • Feb 1 Wt 1232 compared. BW 1.2 WW 50.4 YW 89.9 TM 45.1 I see the Polled, thick, hairy, excellent Charolais bull temperment sales being very strong as the BDT 17Z demand will Sire SVY Pilgrim PLD 655S outweigh the Born Mar 2/2012 • BW 96 supply. Over the BW .5 WW 42.1 YW 97 TM 45.3 Polled, thick, stout, excellent past decade we temperment have seen many breeders leave but the ones who have White & Red Factor Bulls for sale on the farm stayed have expanded and Brian, Denise, Ashton & Mackenzie Temple improved the Box 171, Carrot River, SK S0E 0L0 • bdtcharolais@hotmail.com quality to a very T 306-768-3218 • C 306-768-8000 high level. We View the catalogue at www.buyagro.com have seen, and

TEMPLE FARMS to the NORTH EAST BULL SALE

Temple Farms

8

Charolais Connection • March 2013

will continue to see, many more new breeders begin raising Charolais bulls. This is definitely needed as there are some areas that are lacking the number of breeders needed to supply the market place. In some localities right now, as commercial producers you may need to drive further to find the bulls. With more and more commercial producers realizing that the Charolais bull on the black cow is the great crossbreeding option, the demand will continue to increase for the bulls. The future looks extremely bright for Agriculture and especially the cattle industry. There are already predictions of record calf prices this fall with the world cow numbers down and even with the higher grain prices. There will be record corn acreage planted in the US and with even average yields, the price for feed grains next fall should be lower. The US cow numbers are still contracting and with the drought not over, the expansion hasn’t started to occur yet. In Canada, we have seen a number of commercial producers retire and disperse in the past few years as well, although a lot of those cows did find their way back in the industry in herds that were expanding. There are definitely fewer producers in Agriculture but they are covering the same ground with either equipment or cattle. The old saying of ‘go big or go home’ has been happening. The calves from the bulls you buy this spring should be selling into the highest market we have ever seen. Don’t pull up short on the quality of bull you purchase as the returns should be great on the extra quality in the calves produced. I wish you all a good calving season and a merry bull buying spring. If Craig Scott or myself can be of any assistance, please don’t hesitate to give us a call. Until next time, Helge


HUNTER 33 CHAROLAIS 5 Bull Sale

Thursday, April 4th, 2013 1:30 p.m. DST • At the farm, Roblin, MB

YEARLING BULLS TWO YEAR OLD BULLS

Most are Polled • Some Red Factor 















HC ZEELAND 261Z

HC ZIP CODE 213Z ET



CE 71 BW 2.9 WW 46 YW 83 M 18.1 TM 41 TR Mr Fire Water 5792R x HC Roxanne 529R(Junction) 3rd Gen Pld • BW 108, Adj 205 711



CE 60 BW 3.9 WW 51 YW 99 M 18.3 TM 44 Elder’s Special Edition 835U x Rosso New Horizon 8L 3rd Gen Pld • BW 100, Adj 205 667





• Complete Performance Data Available.

HC ZONE POINT 203Z

HC ZUMBA 2105Z



CE 53 BW 5 WW 58 YW 106 M 17.4 TM 47 RPJ Carrera 53X x HTA Blocker 508R Red Factor, 3rd Gen Pld • BW 110, Adj 205 651



CE 98 BW -1.7 WW 36 YY 81 M 23.5 TM 41 JWX Silver Bullet 524W x CS Pld Junction 4J Dbl Pld • BW 84, Adj 205 670



• Video sale, come early to inspect the bulls and join us for lunch.







• Bulls can be viewed any time.



 HC ZANTANA 270Z









Maternal Brothers

CE 74 BW 1.5 WW 53 YW 111 M 25.1 TM 51 Elder’s Special Edition 835U x M6 Grid Maker 3rd Gen Polled • BW 104, Adj 205 764

HC YARDMASTER 1111Y CE 68 BW 1.5 WW 51 YW 104 M 26.1 TM 51 TMR Wendigo 14W x M6 Grid Maker Dbl Pld • BW 104, Adj 205 797, Adj 365 1453

HUNTER CHAROLAIS A Charolais family operation for over 30 years

Contact us for more information

Doug, Marianne, Jim, Kristi & Michael Hunter Box 569, Roblin, MB R0L 1P0 • 204-937-2531 Doug 204-937-7737 • Michael 204-247-0301 huntchar@mymts.net

View the videos and catalogue online at www.huntercharolais.com Charolais Connection • March 2013

Sale Manager:

306-584-7937 Helge 306-536-4261 Candace 306-536-3374 charolaisbanner@gmail.com www.bylivestock.com

9


POINTS À RÉFLÉCHIR

Du champ Helge By

Jʹécris cet éditorial au milieu de février. Pendant le mois passé des sélectionneurs de race et des vachers commerciaux la question la plus commune que mʹai été demandé est comment seront les ventes de taureau ce printemps ? Quelques ventes de taureaux se seront produites avant que vous lisiez ce magazine, on verra si les tendances se produisent comme je les vois. Fluctuations éprouveront les ventes dʹangus. Sélectionneurs établi de qualité auront de bonnes ventes encore mais certains des sélectionneurs plus nouveaux trouveront un marché plus dur parce que lʹapprovisionnement du taureau angus a probablement excédé la demande du taureau angus. Il y aura moins de demande des taureaux angus à multiplier avec des génisses en raison du marché pauvre de génisse multiplié lʹannée dernière. Chaque race qui a une strie de popularité tend à se produire le scénario du ‘dernier de devenir un sélectionneur de race est le premier sélectionneur en dehors de la race’. Les dernières de devenir un sélectionneur de race pendant que la race augmente nʹa pas un marché développé quand le marché se contracte. Ces nouveaux sélectionneurs sont dʹabord serrés dehors de la race. Nous avons le vu dans la race hereford dans les années 80 et la race charolaise dans les années 90. Je me sens que le marché haussier de simmental verra un peu refroidir. Il y aura toujours quelques ventes très fortes car cette race a eu les moyennes de vente les plus élevées pendant les dernières années. La

10

femelle rouge angus croissé simmental est toujours lʹun des produits le plus populaire dans lʹindustrie commerciale et cela continuera à conduire la demande ici. Il y a un nombre certain de producteurs commerciaux qui emploient les taureaux simmental et charolais dans un programme plus terminal de père qui indiquent ils achèteront plus de taureaux charolais. Intéressant qu’ils obtiennent plus de taureau pour leur dollar c’est la raison d’achetant des taureaux charolais. Le marché haussier de simmental a été si fort qu’il est difficile dʹacheter un bon taureau pour lʹargent décent. Les veaux croissés charolais « Charcross » toujours vente pour le prix supérieur, auquel toutes autres races sont comparées. Je vois que les ventes de taureau du charolais seront très fortes parce que la demande sera supérieure à lʹapprovisionnement. Pendant la décennie passée, beaucoup de sélectionneurs ont quitté la race du charolais, mais ceux qui reste ont augmenté et ont amélioré la qualité de leur troupeau jusqu’un niveau très élevé. Nous avons vu, et continuerons à voir, beaucoup plus de nouveaux sélectionneurs commençons à élever des taureaux du charolais. Il est nécessaire certainement car il y a quelques secteurs qui manquent les sélectionneurs requis de fournir le marché. Dans quelques localités les producteurs commerciaux doivent conduire plus loin à trouver les taureaux. La demande pour les taureaux charolais continuera à augmenter à cause de plus en plus les producteurs commerciaux se rendant compte que la vache noire multiplié

Charolais Connection • March 2013

au taureau charolais crée la grande option de croisement. Lʹagriculture et particulièrement lʹindustrie de bétail le futur est extrêmement lumineux. Même avec les prix plus élevés de grain il y a déjà des prévisions des prix record de veau cet automne en raison des nombres diminués de vaches dans le monde. Il y aura des acres record de maïs plantées aux Etats‐Unis et même avec les rendements moyens, le prix des céréales fourragères lʹautomne prochain devrait être inférieur. Le nombre de vaches aux États‐Unis diminuent toujours et la sécheresse nʹest pas finie, lʹexpansion nʹa pas encore commencé à se produire. Pendant les dernières années au Canada, un certain nombre de producteurs commerciaux se sont retirés et ont dispersé. Beaucoup de leurs vaches ont été vendus aux troupeaux qui augmentaient. Il y a certainement moins de producteurs dans lʹagriculture, mais avec dʹéquipement ou de bétail ils couvrent la même terre. Les taureaux de meilleure qualité que vous achetez ce printemps produiront les veaux de meilleure qualité. Ces veaux se vendront dans le marché le plus élevé que nous avons jamais vu. Investissez dans un taureau de bonne qualité et vous auriez de plus grand retour sur les veaux produit. Je vous souhaite le succès d’une saison de vêlage et un printemps joyeux en achetant un taureau. Si Craig Scott ou moi peut être de nʹimporte quelle aide, veuillez ne pas hésiter à nous donner un appel. À la prochaine, Helge


Bringing You the Right Kind Consigning 30 bulls to Transcon’s Mountain View Simmental, Angus and Charolais Bull Sale March 23rd, 2013 Innisfail Auction Mart

GERRARD PREDICTABLE 57Y • Gerrard Preacher x Gerrard Lois June 12, 2011 • BW 92 • 205 DW 869 • 365 DW 1344 BW -0.4 WW 41.5 YW 66.8 M 21.8 TM 42.5

GERRARD BIG BANG 54Z CJC Big Sky x Gerrard Roxanne March 1, 2012 • BW 102 205 DW 844 • 365 DW 1511 BW 2.7 WW 54 YW 94.2 M 20.5 TM 47.6

GERRARD BIG BROTHER 55Z CJC Big Sky x Gerrard Roxanne March 4, 2012 BW 104 • 205 DW 893 365 DW 1504 BW 2.7 WW 54 YW 94.2 M 20.5 TM 47.6

GERRARD PRIME TIME 21Z Gerrard Preacher x Gerrard Roxanne Jan 22, 2012 • BW 107 • 205 DW 896 • 365 DW 1493 BW 2.6 WW 53 YW 91.9 M 24.3 TM 50.8

GERRARD PASTOR 35Z Gerrard Preacher x Gerrard Roxanne Feb 3, 2012 • BW 102 • 205 DW 883 • 365 DW 1515 BW 2.6 WW 53 YW 91.9 M 24.3 TM 50.8 email: transcon@transconlivestock.com www.transconlivestock.com

Sale Managed by:

Transcon

Livestock Corp.

Box 300, Sundre, AB T0M 1X0 403/638-9377 Fax 403/206-7786 JG Cell 403/556-5563 BW Cell 403/540-3084 GN Cell 780/542-0634 SM Cell 403/363-9973 DP Cell 403/323-3985

CATTLE COMPANY INC.

RR 2, Innisfail, AB T4G 1T7 Dory, Janine, Alex, Damon & Kane Gerrard GERRARD MONTEGO 52Z • Gerrard Montezuma x Paynes Natalie Feb 29, 1012 • BW 90 • 205 DW 797 • 365 DW 1450 BW 2.2 WW 42.3 YW 75.2 M 22.5 TM 43.7

403-227-5632 C 403-302-1016 403-227-2503 www.gerrardcattlecompany.com

Dave,Terry & Kurt Gerrard

Videos of our sale bulls can be viewed online at www.cattleinmotion.com Charolais Connection • March 2013

11


FROM THE CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION

The Only Constant Is Change Bob Jackson, Saskatchewan & Manitoba Charolais Associations Fieldman

CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION 2320 - 41st Avenue N.E. Calgary, AB T2E 6W8 Phone: (403) 250-9242 Fax: (403) 291-9324 cca@charolais.com www.charolais.com PROVINCIAL REPRESENTATIVES: ALBERTA President: Lyle Bignell, Stettler Secretary: Don Grant, Bowden SASKATCHEWAN President: Orland Walker, Hudson Bay Secretary: Dave Blechinger, Rosetown MANITOBA President: Shawn Airey, Rivers Secretary: Rae Trimble Portage la Prairie ONTARIO President: Gord Tomlinson, Norwood Secretary: Doris Aitken, Mount Forest QUEBEC President: Francois Couture, Notre-Dame-du-Bon-Conseil Secretary: Laurent Jourdain MARITIMES President: Ricky Milton, Cornwall, PE Secretary: Jennifer MacDonald, St. Mary’s, Kent Co., NB STAFF: Registry & Office: MEL REEKIE Registry: LOIS CHIVILO Registry: JUDY CUMMER French Membership: CYNTHIA BECK 306-436-2007 CBeck@charolais.com EXECUTIVE: PRESIDENT: WADE BECK Box 5, Lang, SK S0G 2W0 Ph (306) 436-4564 wcbeck@sasktel.net 1st VICE-PRESIDENT: BRENT SAUNDERS RR 3, Markdale, ON N0C 1H0 (519) 986-4165 Fax (519) 986-4273 saunders@bmts.com 2nd VICE-PRES: JOHN WILGENBUSCH Box 4, Halbrite, SK S0C 1H0 (306) 458-2688 Fax (306) 458-2371 wilgenbusch@sasktel.net PAST PRESIDENT: LYLE BIGNELL Box 1055, Stettler, AB T0C 2L0 (403) 742-6792 Fax (403) 742-8128 lylebignell@hotmail.com DIRECTORS: CAMPBELL FORSYTH Box 3, Eriksdale, MB R0C 0W0 (204) 739-2678 Fax (204) 739-5547 cmforsyt@mts.net BERNARD BEGIN 1630 Rg St-Martin, Ste-Marie, PQ G6E 3A8 (418) 387-7514 Fax (418) 387-5623 louberfarm@hotmail.com BRIAN COUGHLIN RR3 1012 Snake River Line, Cobden, ON K0J 1K0 (613) 646-9741 (613) 312-0270 cornervu@nrtco.net URSULA CORPATAUX Box 397, Erskine, AB T0C 1G0 Ph/Fax (403) 742-3337 ucorpataux@xplornet.com DORY GERRARD RR 2, Innisfail, AB T4G 1T7 (403) 227-5632 Fax (403) 227-2583 info@gerrardcattlecompany.com RICKY MILTON 4558 Rt. 19 RR 2, Cornwall, PE C0A 1H0 (902) 393-8699 rmilton@upei.ca

12

Everyone has a mentor, and mine would be Jim Kidney. Ten years my junior, this man lived and breathed Charolais cattle, they were his whole life. I was introduced to this breed, by Jim, in 1969 and registered my first animal in 1976. Since that time, I have been a seed stock producer, commercial cow‐calf operator, and association board member at the provincial and national level; everything leading to the promotion and use of Charolais in the beef industry. These last 35 years have been spent sharing the benefits of Charolais with countless commercial producers, and now to be asked by my fellow Charolais breeders to be their fieldman for Manitoba and Saskatchewan is humbling and truly an honour. This past fall, in my new role as fieldman, I travelled to 15 auction markets across Saskatchewan and Manitoba. I kept busy promoting the benefits of using Charolais bulls in commercial herds. In every market, calf sales without exception, started with Charolais as their lead‐off offerings. Charolais calves matched or topped the price for any given weight across the board. In conversations throughout the auctions, some misconceptions around the use of Charolais bulls were shared, such as: the willingness to nurse soon after birth and birth weight. Sometimes ease of calving is overlooked and needs to be taken into consideration. Everyone is quite happy with the price of calves this fall; however, we don’t want to lose sight of where we have come from. Some very interesting information has been researched by a former Charolais breeder’s daughter.

Charolais Connection • March 2013

Kathy Larson, nee Lang, a WBDC Beef Economist, presented at Saskatchewan Beef Industry Conference in Saskatoon this past January. Her presentation on the 10 year overview of the beef industry compares the gains in cattle prices to pre‐BSE prices against the rising input costs of producers. For example, 550 lb. calves were 3% higher, D1 and D2 cows were 16% higher and 850 lb. steers were 6% higher in 2012 than in 2001. In that same time period, fuel costs are 75% higher and wages have increased 62%. Although the return to pre‐BSE pricing is encouraging, we need to be mindful of continual rise in cost of production. The number of cows in Canada is down 13%, however cows in Saskatchewan are up 3.4%, a clear indication of the strength in our provincial beef industry. As I was mentored in my early days with the breed, I now have the role of mentor to pass on my knowledge to others in the industry. The cycle of change continues, as calves were sold in the fall, new ones are arriving daily. As we continue to educate producers about the industry and be ever mindful of the past, we will ensure a cycle of growth continues. In closing, it is an interesting time to be in the livestock business. Hopefully, it will continue to move forward and actually begin to make a reasonable profit at the end of the day. I wish everyone a good calving season. Where's the Margin? A 10-Year Overview. Saskatchewan Beef Industry Conference. January 2324, 2013. Kathy Larson. WBDC Beef Economist ... www.wbdc.sk.ca/pdfs/presentations/Jan2013_Larson_SBIC.pdf


Muscle is round, fat is flat. Packers trim the fat and pay for the muscle. Do you want a bull that is pretty or profitable?

Semen Exportable World Wide

HICKS REVOLVER 14R Homozygous Polled • No Scurs • BW – lighter than breed average • WW – heavier than breed average • YW – heavier than breed average • Plus more milk and muscle than breed average

Yearling and Long Yearling Polled Revolver Sons Available Visit us online at www.hickscharolais.com or www.hicksrevolver.com

Charolais Connection • March 2013

13


HERD HEALTH

Calving Guidelines Roy Lewis, DVM

This time of year it is always good to review our procedures and methods for the newly arriving calf crop. The goal is to deliver as many lively calves as possible with a minimum of stress. The biggest loss in the cow�calf sector comes at calving time. Hopefully the following points will enlighten even the most experienced cattlemen or cattlewomen. I know very few calving problems exist these days but anyone can learn something from the following points. Good facilities are imperative to properly examine cows safely, thoroughly, and cleanly while causing minimal stress. A maternity pen will pay for itself numerous times over by utilizing it for vaginal exams allowing calves to nurse and treating recently calved cows. One person is then in total control of the calving. Producers often comment how they cannot believe they did without one all those years. Always be critical of yourself when pulling a calf. The goal is to get out a lively baby not just an alive calf. If you find calves after pulling are grunting from pain have swollen legs or seem slow to rise and suckle perhaps the pull has been too excessive. In some cases it may have been too fast. Pull only in unison with the cow’s contractions. Always check the viability of the calf first. The best is to stick your fingers down the throat for the swallowing reflex or pinching between the toes. Gently pushing against the eye for a blink reflex is also done. If any of these reflexes are sluggish it indicates a stressed calf, which may not withstand a hard pull like a vigorous calf. With backwards calf a gloved finger can be placed in the rectum and feel for the sphincter pressure. This can be sluggish though even in a very lively calf. You may even be able to feel the pulsing of the umbilicus. A calf kicking very 14

violently is often running out of time. Keeping yourself and the cow as clean as possible is imperative. All producers need to wear obstetrical gloves on every examination. For women if they are too big rip off the fingers and wear tight latex gloves. Wash the cow up good with a surgical scrub such as betadine or hibitane. By keeping the cow clean you minimize the chances of uterine infection as rebreeding in the subsequent season must be considered as well. A good nonirritating sterile lubricant is also imperative for prolonged or dry calvings. The force of no more than two people should be used to pull a calf. If using a puller keep in mind this force rule still applies. It is very easy in the heat of the moment to apply excessive pressure with a calf jack (upwards of 2000 lb.). Never, never pull a calf in improper position. We always need three things coming. Two front legs and a head for a forwards presentation or two back legs and a tail for a backwards presentation. If more or less than two legs are present sort it out first. There is a simple trick to distinguish back versus front legs. The first two joints of the front legs bend the same way. The two joints in the back legs bend the opposite way. Investigate if 30 to 40 minutes of hard contractions and no progress. A misnomer by many farmers is if the water bag has not broken they have lots of time. This is totally false the calving process starts internally and the water bag breaking has no relevance on this. Investigate if there is no progress after 90 minutes in heifers and 60 minutes in cows. Always assist a backwards calving. If you see the dewclaws pointed upwards often a backwards calf is impending. The umbilical cord will pinch off approximately when the tail Charolais Connection • March 2013

head is coming through the vulva. At this point it is wise to pull relatively quickly as they calf may start breathing. This is the only time a fast extraction is advised. Initially pull the calf straight back making sure the tail is between the back legs. Check for twins after an assisted calving especially a backwards calf or when more than two legs were felt. With twins the TOP calf must come out first. Schistosomas reflexus (inside out calves) can present with all four legs and be mistaken for twins Twins come in all possible malpresentations but the vast majority are one backwards and one forwards. Some herds especially the exotics have upwards of 8% twins. Cows with a history of twins will often repeat. Remember most heifers born twin to a bull calf are sterile freemartins and should not be kept as replacements. If frank blood is seen from the anus or vagina investigate. This could indicate a tear, excessive straining or placental separation. If two to three hours of abdominal discomfort persist a vaginal exam is in order. A breech or uterine torsion present this way. Breech calvings (backwards tail first with both legs tucked forwards) are best handled by a veterinarian. It is very very easy to rip the uterus when repositioning these so often veterinary assistance is a wise move. It is not uncommon for the backwards twin to be coming breech. ALWAYS recognize your limits. Some producers are more experienced than others so if not making any forward progress after assisting for 15 to 20 minutes get help. You will be tired by then and excessive time inside the cow can damage her reproductively. Limit the help to ONE other person either a spouse or experienced neighbor otherwise phone your veterinarian. Recognize a closed or partially continued on page 16


W WIE 32Z • Sparrows Bolivar X Sparrows Cossack BW 105, Oct. 1 878 BW 4 WW 40 YW 81 M 22 TM 42

WOB 96Z • Sparrows Chitek X Sparrows Bolivar BW 100, Oct. 1 835 BW 2.8 WW 50 YW 94 M 24 TM 49

WOB 56Z • Sparrows Sanchez X M6 Grid Maker BW 95, Oct. 1 840 BW .2 WW 31 YW 67 M 28.9 TM 45

11th Annual DIAMOND W Bull Sale CHAROLAIS & RED ANGUS Selling:

59 BULLS

45 CHAROLAIS Two Year Old & Yearlings Polled and Red Factor

Thursday, March 21, 2013 – 1:00 p.m. VALLEY LIVESTOCK SALES, MINITONAS, MB (5 miles East of Swan River on Highway 10)

Our bulls will work for you:

14 ANGUS Red & Black Yearlings

Delivery Available: $75/bull or $50 off the purchase price if you take the bulls home sale day

• Big, solid bulls that can cover pastures • Big Testicles, Good Feet, Easy Fleshing • Lot of Hair – Full of Meat • Performance Tested • Structurally sound • Semen Tested, Measured and Ready to Work!

View the bulls online at www.bylivestock.com

DIAMOND W CHAROLAIS

SALE MANAGER:

Helge & Candace By 124 Shannon Rd, Regina, SK S4S 5B1 ph 306-584-7937, cell 306-536-4261 email: charolaisbanner@gmail.com

Ivan, Ethel & Orland Walker Box 235, Hudson Bay, SK S0E 0Y0 ph/fax 306-865-3953, cell 306-865-6539 email: diamondw@sasktel.net

Commercial Consultant: Clayton Hawreluik, Heartland Livestock, Yorkton, SK 306-621-3824 (cell) Valley Livestock Sales: Randy Hart, 204-734-8624 (cell)

WOB 142Y • Sparrows Bolivar X Diamond W Redcat April Two Year Old BW 3.5 WW 44 YW 85 M 25.8 TM 48

WIO 14Z • Red Six Mile Full Throttle X Red T-K Duster BW 85, Oct. 1 715 BW .8 WW 53 YW 79 M 14 TM 41

Charolais Connection • March 2013

WIO 3Z • Red Get-A-Long Unltd X Red T-K Duster BW 85, Oct. 1 750 BW .1 WW 48 YW 63 M 14 TM 38

15


HERD HEALTH, CONT. FROM PAGE 14

closed cervix. This structure dilates internally when parturition is pending. A closed cervix feels like a doughnut the middle of which you can insert a finger into. As it dilates it feels like a thin band of tissue encroaching into the vaginal vault. Sometimes especially in older cows the cervix may not dilate properly and a c‐section may be needed. For a head back purchase a head snare or use a chain behind the ears and through the lower jaw. Every year too many jaws are broken from twine placed solely on the lower jaw. Keep in mind often with a head back it indicates lack of room in the pelvis. Heifers that present this way usually are c‐sections. For one or both front feet back gently push the head back in and try to bring the legs up. Check if thewre is enough room. The shoulders should be able to be pulled through without the front feet crossing. Stimulants for a sluggish calf include snow or cold water poured in the ear and straw up the calf’s nostril will help. In order to establish proper breathing put the calf in the dog sitting position. We pull both legs straight back and this allows both lungs to oxygenate evenly. Hanging a calf does nothing other than

putting pressure on the lungs from the abdominal organs, which is counterproductive. Most of the fluid, which drains out, is simply coming from the stomache and the fluid remaining in the lungs will be absorbed naturally. If the meconium (first manure) has stained the calf yellow this should raise a red flag. These calves are often more susceptible to calfhood diseases since the birthing has been delayed. Consult with your veterinarian on whether prophylactic antibiotics are necessary. ALWAYS double wrap the chains above and below the fetlock (first joint) with the pull coming off the bottom of the leg. This spreads out any force and goes a long way to avoid broken legs. A good source of COLOSTRUM is imperative. The natural source is better than any commercial products but some that are available now aren’t bad. Keep frozen and thaw in a warm water bath. Calf needs about 1‐2 liters at birth within the first six hours. Fat heifers and cows are prone to tearing at calving from internal fat pushing out the vaginal area. Often one to two weeks later a large necrotic lump will extend out the vagina. Your veterinarian may

remove this and will often suture up the tear it leaves. A prolapsed uterus usually occurs immediately to several hours after calving. It is advisable to get cattle right up after calving to avoid these. This is a veterinary emergency and very quietly moving a cow to an area where she can be handled is advisable until help arrives. This is not a heritable condition so if the cow breeds back (most will) she can be retained in the herd. Prolapsed vaginas come out before calving are smaller (one gallon) and are heritable. In weighing calves I’ve always been skeptical of calf slings as a source of navel infection. Keep slings very clean and if possible cut a large hole in them so irritation is not created in the navel area. Some herds with problems with navel ill use prophylactic antibiotics in this regard. Hiplocks are generally stifle locks. Relax your puller and position it straight down between the heifer’s hind legs. This is only possible with the heifer down in lateral. By adhering to a lot of these principles a few more calves will be saved and you will have more cows breed back helping to increase your profit margin.

Swistun Charolais to North West Bull Sale Monday, March 25, 2013 • 1:00 p.m. • Kramer’s Big Bid Barn • North Battleford, SK

A sample of the bulls going to the sale. Both sired by SVY FOCUS PLD 15X, the 2010 Agribition Sr. Bull Calf Champion.

Call for more information on these and others.

Swistun

DPS 12Z BW 94 lb., 205 DW 742 lb., 365 DW 1516 lb. CE 89 BW 1 WW 44 YW 80 M 21.8 TM 44 Dam is a full sister to MXS Vermillion’s dam

16

CHAROLAIS

Donnie & Heather Swistun RR 1, North Battleford, SK S9A 2X3

ph 306-445-9868

DPS 31Z BW 98 lb., 205 DW 772 lb., 365 DW 1426 lb. CE 88 BW .8 WW 47 YW 80 M 20.7 TM 44 Dam is a 13 year old granddam of Vermillion

Charolais Connection • March 2013


Winn Mans Investment 945 Y

Merit 7329T x Winn Mans Lanza BW –0.6 WW 50 YW 102 MM 18.1 TM 43

Winn Mans Bushwhacker 9115 Y

NATURALLY MUSCLED

Our bulls are developed in the “real world” on mom’s milk and grass with NO CREEP! They went on stockpiled grass as yearlings in April, brought home in November and are being fed a gentle TMR. They are built to last by “common sense” cattlemen.

Winn Mans Marquez x ABC Zorro BW –0.8 WW 41 YW 82 MM 23.8 TM 44

Winn Mans Supreme 805 Y

BORN EASY, WEAN BIG

Our roots are deep in the commercial cow-calf business. In 2013 we’ll calve over 800 cows on grass and background the calves, so we realize how important it is for our bulls to sire calves that are born easy, wean big, have great feed conversion and look the part in the sale ring.

MORE BULL FOR YOUR BUCK

We are the only Charolais sale in Manitoba that offers this volume of 2 year old bulls. These guys were specially selected for this sale and were never before offered for purchase! Get more cows covered with these older bulls and forget the hassle of babysitting those frustrating yearlings.

Merit 7329T x Winn Mans Lanza BW 0.2 WW 48 YW 99 M 19.2 TM 43

Winn Mans Big Rig 639 Y

Winn Mans Lottery 848 Y

Winn Mans Lincoln 948 Y

MD On Top x Sparrows Durango BW –2.3 WW 50 YW 91 MM 21.3 TM 46

Merit 7329T X Sparrows Durango BW –1.9 WW 38 YW 84 MM 21.7 TM 41

Merit 7329T x Winn Mans Lanza BW –0.4 WW 52 YW 101 MM 19.5 TM 46

Longest running One-Iron Charolais Bull Sale in Manitoba To receive a free detailed catalogue call, email or text:

JEFF, ASHLEY & KASSI BEYAK Ph: 204.656.4991 Cell: 204.648.6443

KEVIN & SHERRY BEYAK and Sons Box 487, Winnipegosis, MB R0L 2G0 Ph: 204.656.4689 • beyak@hotmail.ca

Charolais Connection • March 2013

SALES CONSULTANTS Kim Crandall 204.657.2267 Myles Masson 204.447.2266

17


CANADIAN CHAROLAIS YOUTH ASSOCIATION NEWS

New Youth Partnership Kirstin Sparrow, President

The CCYA is proud to announce that we have partnered with a new and exciting initiative called Agriculture More Than Ever. This new Canadian agricultural promotion campaign started by Farm Credit Canada is a way to network with other Canadian agriculture enthusiasts by sharing your agriculture story through blogs, CCYA National Board charolaisyouth@gmail.com President: Kirstin Sparrow kp.sparrow@hotmail.com Vice-President: Luke Marshall futureal@telusplanet.net Treasurer: Sarah Weinbender sarah.weinbender@gmail.com Secretary: Tomina Jackson tomi_j_@hotmail.com

videos and even clothing! They are found on Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and their website is agriculturemorethanever.ca. We shared our CCYA story and we encourage you to also visit their site and share yours. Our partnership works to promote youth and the positive face of agriculture, which is also this year’s essay question for our youth members. We are excited to

Director: Michael Hunter mike_hunter40@hotmail.com Director: Travis Jozwiak jozwiak@telus.net Director: Holly Smith holly27smith@gmail.com Director: Courtney Black blackbern@hotmail.com

partner with such an enthusiastic program that is as passionate about agriculture as we are. Check out their website (see above) to view a story from one of our past members! As always, you can find us on our website at www.youth.charolais.com, Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @charolaisyouth. Happy Calving!

CCYA 2013 Conference Executive Co-ordinator: Billie Jo Saunders dbjsaunders@gmail.com Co-Chair: Holly Smith holly27smith@gmail.com Co-Chair: Randi Aldcorn randi.aldcorn@yahoo.ca Secretary: Courtney Black petunia-101@hotamil.com

Treasurer: Emily Bromley ebromley@uoguelph.ca CCYA Provincial Advisors SK: Darwin Rosso 306-693-2384 ON: Brad Buchanan 705-534-0137 MB: Donna Jackson 204-564-2547 AB: Kasey & Arlana Phillips 780-358-2359 Youth Coordinator: Brandon Sparrow b.sparrow265@gmail.com

8TH ANNUAL SAUNDERS CHAROLAIS BULL SALE with Guest Consignors Blue Mountains Charolais and Where Eagles Soar Charolais Saturday, April 6th, 2013 • 2:00 p.m. at Keady Livestock

Selling: 25 YEARLING CHAROLAIS BULLS and 4 LONG YEARLING BULLS

JSR 3Z • Grand dam of JSR 3Z is 2012 National Champion BW 83, AWW 751, AYW 1389 • BW -.6 WW 42.9 YW 74.3 Milk 19.3 3Z is a Revelation out of a Trophy 2-year old www.cattleinmotion.com Sarah Buchanan 519.546.3352 sarah@cattleinmotion.com

JSR 27Z • BW 80, AWW 695, AYW 1377 BW -1.6 WW 46 YW 80.3 Milk 18.1 27Z is a Made Easy out of a Blue Grass two-year old

John & Marie • Brent & Marni • Darrell & BillieJo RR 3, Markdale, ON N0C 1H0 • saunders@bmts.com

519-986-4165 • Brent cell 519-372-6196

Videos and catalogue online at www.cattleinmotion.com • Catalogue online at www.charolaisbanner.com 18

Charolais Connection • March 2013


Charolais Connection • March 2013

19


Selling: 60 Yearlings • 10 Two Year Olds

STEPPLER GENESIS 80Z Seminole x Santiago BW -.3 WW 45 YW 89 M 22 TM 44 BW 97, Adj WW 763, Adj YW 1384 STEPPLER DILIGENCE 113Z • Polled • Seminole x Steppler 71M BW 2.9 WW 64 YW 121 M 25.1 TM 57 BW 107, Adj WW 1017, Adj YW 1590

Join us for a presale lunch in our heated sale barn

STEPPLER DAVID 266Z Distinction x Bud BW .7 WW 40 YW 81 M 22.1 TM 42 BW 95, Adj WW 775, Adj YW 1362

STEPPLER RED LABEL 223Z Red Baron x Santiago BW 1.1 WW 39 YW 77 M 21.6 TM 41 BW 96, Adj WW 740, Adj YW 1316

STEPPLER TROY 334Y Oakridge x Santiago BW 1.9 WW 41 YW 75 M 17.6 TM 38 BW 98, Adj WW 662, Adj YW 1323 20

STEPPLER DOUBLE UP 102Z • Seminole x Oakridge BW 2.3 WW 62 YW 116 M 18.3 YW 49 BW 97, Adj WW 951, Adj YW 1508

Charolais Connection • March 2013


STEPPLER LD 373Y Oakridge x Fehr BW .3 WW 46 YW 87 M 19.6 TM 43 BW 96, Adj WW 717, Adj YW 1375 STEPPLER QUANTUM 11Z • Seminole x Oakridge WW 1.5 YW 54 M 105 TM 20.3 BW 98, Adm WW 830, Adj YW 1294

STEPPLER TORY 285Y Titanium x Impressive BW 1.6 WW 46 YW 87 M 19.3 TM 42 BW 93, Adj WW 669, Adj YW 1211

Volume Discount Available • 3 bulls - 3% off • 4 bulls - 4% off • 5 or more bulls - 5% off

Stop by to view the bulls anytime

STEPPLER CLIMAX 164Z • Seminole x Memphis BW .1 WW 50 YW 95 M 19.3 TM 44 BW 89, Adj WW 809, Adj YW 1417

Call for more information or view the catalogue and videos online at www.bylivestock.com Sale Manager:

Box 7, Miami, MB R0G 1H0

Andre & Katie Steppler Tel 204-435-2463 • Cell 204-750-1951 Dan & Pat Steppler • Tel 204-435-2021 stepplerfarms@hotmail.com • www.stepplerfarms.com Charolais Connection • March 2013

Cattle in Motion, LLC Sarah Buchanan 1.888.554.VIDS

Helge & Candace By T 306-584-7937 Helge 306-536-4261 Candace 306-536-3374 charolaisbanner@gmail.com 21


Alley way from the maternity pen and spring sorting pen

PROFILE – HARD ROCK LAND & CATTLE CO. Candace By

M

any people are debating the investment of steel panels for corrals over the standard wood employed by most cattle operations. For Paul and Kelly Robertson, the question of whether the investment was worth it, was simple. Like most operations, time is of the essence. Operations are trying to do the same or more with less manpower and the repairs required to wood corrals are endless and time consuming. Sometimes it is simply a part of weathered aging, but it can also be the result of rambunctious fighting bulls. “We’ve been switching over for six or seven years. We’re probably about half finished now. We don’t repair anymore, we replace with steel,” Paul explains. “It may cost more initially, but the steel lasts forever and it’s a one time cost. If we ever decide to sell the cows, we can sell the steel panels. Wooden corrals are worth nothing after a few years, plus we have too many rocks for putting posts in the ground.”

“Operations are trying to do the same or more with less manpower and the repairs required to wood corrals are endless and time consuming.” “We have 30 foot drill stem panels at a cost of $475 per panel. We get them from north of Neepawa at Ridge Road Welding. We usually end up doing all of our purchasing at year end.” A side benefit that didn’t play into the decision has also been gained. “We’ve noticed the cattle respect them more. 22

Dalyse, Madisyn and Paul Robertson

They don’t try to test them or jump them. We don’t have any fighting bulls snapping posts or causing repair work.” “They also sell portable windbreak steel framed panels and we use some of those around our bull pen.” The Robertsons have been innovative with the product. They have five bar panels and can chain up the middle bar or let it drop right down. This continued on page 24 enables them to use the panels for feeding. The cattle can stick their heads through the panels to plastic feed bunks they have put in place outside the pens. The more they use them, the more they want to use them. Their entire calving barn now utilizes steel panels. The panels have also allowed the Robertsons Yvonne and Kelly Robertson

Charolais Connection • March 2013


Charolais Connection • March 2013

23


“The Robertsons have been innovative with the product. They have five bar panels and can chain up the middle bar or let it drop right down.” to create a proper alleyway and sorting system, something that was lacking with the wooden corrals due to the large amount of rock in the barnyard area. In the spring, they process their cattle on high, dry ground. They simply haul some panels out, set up a system and sort them according to the pastures where they will summer. They are trucked from dry ground to pasture. “The most convenient thing about them comes at corral cleaning time. We just lift the panels out and we can clean without fence in the way. It is so versatile. “About the only disadvantage is they have to be moved with a tractor. We have five pastures for summer and it is all rented. None of the pastures have any handling facilities and building handling facilities on rented land doesn’t make much sense. We load up a bunch of panels and go to the pastures. We are fortunate to know people close to each pasture where we can borrow a tractor and set up a system in a matter of minutes.”

The open end of the bull pen

“We want a profitable weight on our calves, so we calve early.” The Robertsons calve 130 cows. Their cowherd base is Simmental x Red Angus and they use Charolais and Red Simmental bulls. They sell most of their calves through Heartland in Brandon in the fall, but keep a few of the smaller calves to background and market in January before calving starts. For commercial producers, calving in January‐March isn’t always popular. “We have to calve that early to get the calves we want to market in fall. We want a profitable weight on our calves, so we calve early. We prefer to have calving wrapped up before we hit the fields in the spring. Seeding around here can start as early as April 15 and we have to be ready to roll as we don’t have a hired hand. Processing cattle takes place before seeding begins and the cows are shipped to pasture on a wet or rainy day when we can’t be in the field – we call it our “family bonding day.” When the corrals are under the most stress, is also when the work load and play load are heaviest. Both Paul and Kelly are competitive curlers and spend a fair amount of time in curling rinks during the winter. Their operation is set up to be a one person show at the moment, which makes it much easier for everyone when they are curling. Kelly also suffers from severe rheumatoid arthritis so a user friendly setup is important. Kelly is a two‐time Manitoba Senior Men’s

Feed bunks utilizing the steel panels

Alley to the chute and main calving barn

continued on page 26

24

Charolais Connection • March 2013

Main calving barn


ING

SELL

57LING

YEAR LLS BU

9TH ANNUAL BULL SALE

and 75+

commercial open heifers from our customers

March 30, 2013, 1:00 p.m. Ashern Auction Mart, Ashern, MB

FFBB BRENT PLD 265Z • Dbl Pld JSR WITCHITA x SOS POLLED DETONATOR CE 49 BW 3.3 WW 50 YW 97 M 22.6 TM 48 BW 97 lb. , WW 794 lb., Feb. 2/13 1,265 lb.

FFBB CAPPY PLD 291Z • 3rd Gen. Pld WHITECAP DOMINATION x SOS POLLED DETONATOR CE 41 BW 3.5 WW 54 YW 103 M 14.1 TM 41 BW 104 lb., WW 838 lb., Feb. 2/13 1,270 lb.

FFBB MCALLUM PLD 214Z • Dbl Red, Pld C2 SIR XTREME x ELDER'S COCOA CE 78 BW 2.6 WW 59 YW 109 M 17.3 TM 47 BW 104 lb., WW 930 lb., Feb.2/13 1,335 lb.

TMJF ZALUSKI 217Z SVY KABOOM x JWK IMPRESSIVE D040 CE 97 BW -.3 WW 38 YW 79 M 18.3 TM 37 BW 64 lb. (twin), WW 870 lb., Feb. 10/13 1259 lb.

TMJF ZADO 228Z • 3rd Gen. Pld MERIT ROUNDUP x S$ MONTANA SILVER CE 96 BW -.3 WW 51 YW 93 M 14.7 TM 40 BW 9l lb., WW 940 lb., Feb. 10/13 1360 lb.

TMJF ZELLER 250Z • 3rd Gen. Pld WINN MANS BONITA x M6 GRID MAKER CE 91 BW 1 WW 52 YW 101 M 24.9 TM 51 BW 108 lb., WW 800 lb., Feb. 10/13 1240 lb.

All Bulls Semen Tested We will keep them until May 1 View the sale catalogue online at www.charolaisbanner.com For catalogues or information contact:

Forsyth Bros. Charolais

Tee M Jay Charolais

Campbell, Molly & Jay Box 3, Eriksdale, MB R0C 0W0

Terry & Marilyn Johnson Box 206, Ashern, MB R0C 0E0

Ph: 204.739.2678

Ph: 204.768.2819

cmforsyt@mts.net

tmjfarm@mts.net

Sale Consultant: Jerry Kanewischer Sterling, AB

Ph: 403.382.9374

YOUR COMMERCIAL CONNECTION... Coming from producers who understand the commercial industry in the heart of cow country – running over 600 cows between them. Charolais Connection • March 2013

25


Kelly Robertson – All Star Skip at the Canadian Senior Men’s Curling Championships

Curling Champion and skipped in the Canadian Senior Men’s Curling Championship to win Gold in 2011 where he was named “All Star Skip”. They competed at the World Senior Men’s Championship in Denmark achieving a Silver medal for Canada in 2012. He has competed 19 times at the Manitoba men’s provincial championships and along with his wife Yvonne, hold the most wins for Manitoba Mixed Provincials as a team.

“With all of this curling and calving happening during the coldest months of the year, corrals are the last thing they want to spend time fixing.” In 2012, both Kelly and Paul curled on separate teams in the provincials. This year, they have both earned a seat again, but they won’t compete against each other unless they both make the final eight. Curling in the Super league and at spiels throughout the province, they do face each other throughout the season. “Chores can be pretty quiet the next morning, depending on who won,” Paul chuckles. Paul is lead on the Chudley team. This year they beat the Fowler team, last year’s Manitoba Champions and 3rd at the Brier, for a spot in the provincials.

Canadian Sernior Men’s Curling Gold Medalists

26

Team Chudley

With all of this curling and calving happening during the coldest months of the year, corrals are the last thing they want to spend time fixing. Paul is a CCYA Alumni and attended three conferences ‐ Vermilion in 1996, Owen Sound in l997 and Brandon in 1998. He was on the organizing committee when Manitoba hosted the conference in 1998. CCYA is an experience he remembers fondly. “It is a great program. I can’t describe how much it’s done for me. I have contacts all over Canada now and friendships I wouldn’t have gained any other way.” When asked if he hopes to encourage their daughter, Madisyn to attend CCYA, the response is affirmative. “Bert and Judy McDonald have been a big part of our lives. They have done a lot to encourage Madisyn to become involved in showing cattle. She showed for the first time at the Manitoba Winter Fair and won her class, so she now has the show bug. She showed the heifer owned by the Manitoba Fun Bus Syndicate and Judy made sure she was ready.” continued on page 28

Manitoba Fun Bus Syndicate - the JMB Show Crew

Charolais Connection • March 2013


RGCG 295Z • 4th Gen. Pld BW 81, WW 690, Adj. 365 1258 ACC I AM LEGEND x JMB DATELINE CE 94 BW -1.5 WW 34 YW 72 M 20.8 TM 38

RGCG 307Z 3rd Gen. Pld BW 103, WW 858, Adj 365 1420 PRIDE'S REDKING x 4-G DURAMAX CE 70 BW 2 WW 46 YW 91 M 24.5 TM 48

RGCG 303Z 3rd Gen. Pld BW 95, WW 860, Adj 365 1295 PRIDE'S REDKING x LT RIO BLANCO CE 83 BW -.3 WW 41 YW 82 M 21 TM 42

Offering: 46 6 2 DBLG 689Z 4th Gen. Pld BW 88, WW 800, Adj 365 1336 ACC I AM LEGEND x BEAVER CREEK REDZONE CE 79 BW .7 WW 42 YW 81 M 19.9 TM 41

HEP 17Z BW 94, WW 855 WIWA CREEK ESCALADE x TOWN N COUNTRY RANCH HAND BW 4.5 WW 29 YW 50 M 17 TM 32 CE -2

FREITAG PERROT CATTLE CO. Anna-Marie & Greg Perrot 306.489.2224 freitagperrot@sasktel.net Alameda, SK S0C 0A0

15

Charolais Yearlings Angus Yearlings ¾ Angus X ¼ Simmental Yearlings Open Commercial Heifers sired by Gilliland bulls

DBLG 700Z 4th Gen. Pld BW 85, WW 770, Adj 365 1293 ACC I AM LEGEND x SRK RED MAN CE 95 BW -1.1 WW 34 YW 72 M 19.3 TM 36

Greg & Dayna Gilliland 306.928.4841 Ron Gilliland 306.928.2118 Box 254, Carievale, SK S0C 0P0

DBLG 696Z 4th Gen. Pld BW 102, WW 1005, Adj 365 1399 G.BROS HOMBRE x SVS MASTERCARD CE 80 BW 2.6 WW 49 YW 95 M 22.4 TM 47

DBLG 707Z 3rd Gen. Pld BW 103, WW 800, Adj 365 1327 G.BROS ULTIMATE x A-JAY'SPLDCLASSIFIED CE 48 BW 1.5 WW 42 YW 86 M 21.6 TM 42

Sale Manager

Helge & Candace By 306.584.7937 cell 306.534.4261 charolaisbanner@gmail.com

For more information or a catalogue contact us, or view the the catalogue online at www.bylivestock.com Charolais Connection • March 2013

27


“Bert helps us out at harvest by driving a combine and I help him out in the fall on the show road. It’s a good trade for both of us.” Paul has been a part of the JMB show crew for a number of years and many people in the industry will recognize him from his continued presence at the Manitoba Livestock Expo and Canadian Western Agribition. “Dad and I, along with Grandpa, whose 82, farm about 3000 acres of grainland. We only do 50 acres of corn silage and enough barley and oats for feed. The rest is sowed to wheat or canola.” When Merv and Doreen (Paul’s grandparents) aren’t curling or golfing themselves, they along with Dalyse, Madisyn and Yvonne look after the cows when Paul and Kelly both have to be away. Dalyse works in Neepawa as a finance assistant for the Town fulltime and also works part time doing web work for the Charolais Banner. This year when Neepawa hosted the provincials, Dalyse volunteered to look after having live results on the web throughout the bonspiel. Being part of the operation and working with the cows is something she enjoys doing. Being hands‐on in the farm is also a lifestyle they feel is important as a family. Madisyn is a true farm girl and is outside at the barn or in the field any opportunity she gets. Running a bunch of cows is a lot of work, but making them work profitably for you is an important management component. Finding a balance that allows you to do enjoyable things on the side is a commendable achievement. 

Madisyn’s first experience in the show ring

Madisyn helps Great-Grandpa with chores

Maternity pen

One of four feeding areas

Alleyway to small calving barn

28

Charolais Connection • March 2013


Charolais Connection • March 2013

29


KLR 6Z • ELDER’S PLAYBOY PATRIOT • Polled/s Grant’s Playboy x Kaboom • BW 92, Adj 205 699 CE 95 BW -.3 WW 42 YW 80 M 19.3 TM 41 KLR 31Z • ELDER’S APPOLO • 4th Gen Pld Wahkamo x Merit 1058L • BW 91, Adj 205 733 CE 97 BW -1.1 WW 34 YW 76 M 23.4 TM 41

KLR 45Z • ELDER’S STALLONE • 3rd Gen Pld/s Grant’s Playboy x Silverado • BW 99, Adj 205 751 CE 94 BW -.1 WW 48 YW 87 M 18 TM 42

KLR 22Z • ELDER’S ZEUS • 3rd Gen Pld Grant’s Playboy x Silver Buckle • BW 95, Adj 205 821 CE 91 BW -.2 WW 48 YW 87 M 19.9 TM 44

Mel Elder Ron & Donna Elder 306-267-4986 Michael & Judy Elder 306-267-5655 Box 81 Coronach, SK S0H 0Z0

email: relder@sasktel.net Visitors Welcome 30

KLR 16Z • ELDER’S KOPPER • Dbl Red, 3rd Gen Pld Copper Kettle x Lil Boogie • BW 98, Adj 205 648 CE 91 BW 1.4 WW 45 YW 94 M 21.6 TM 44

Thank you to all our previous buyers for supporting and believing in our program! Charolais Connection • March 2013


QUALITY BULLS that will add the PERFORMANCE you want and the RETURN you need On Offer: 42 Yearling Charolais Bulls • Many Polled • Some Red Factor • Guaranteed • Free delivery up to 200 km before May 1 or take them home sale day & deduct $100 from your total purchase

KLR 59Z • ELDER’S MALIBOU • Polled/s Whakamo x Cougarhill Hank • BW 104, Adj 205 709 CE 70 BW 2.9 WW 43 YW 85 M 22.8 TM 44

KLR 5Z • ELDER’S PHOENIX • 3rd Gen Pld Grant’s Playboy x Silverado ’ BW 95, Adj 205 858 CE 97 BW -1.2 WW 51 YW 90 M 18.9 TM 44

KLR 79Z • ELDER’S LATORO • 3rd Gen Pld Wahkamo x Alcatraz • BW 99, Adj 205 625 CE 73 BW 1.9 WW 38 YW 83 M 21.4 TM 41

KLR 44Z • ELDER’S BALBOA • Dbl Pld Wahkamo x Mersyndol • BW 109, Adj 205 720 CE 56 BW 4.7 WW 47 YW 96 M 20.1 TM 44

Call for a catalogue or view it online at www.bylivestock.com Sale Manager:

KLR 84Z • ELDER’S ROCKY • 3rd Gen Polled Wahkamo x Mustang • BW 106, Adj 205 819 CE 80 BW 1.9 WW 49 YW 94 M 20.9 TM 45

Feel free to stop by, have a coffee and view the bulls. Charolais Connection • March 2013

Helge & Candace By 124 Shannon Road Regina, SK S4S 5B1 306-584-7937 Cell 306-536-4261 charolaisbanner@gmail.com 31


MANAGEMENT

Plan Now to Extend Grazing and Reduce Winter Feeding Costs Karin Schmid, Beef Production Specialist with the Alberta Beef Producers, in collaboration with Dr. Reynold Bergen, Beef Cattle Research Council Science Director

Extended grazing systems have a number of benefits. By extending grazing into the winter months, costs related to traditional winter feeding and the labour it requires can be significantly reduced. For example, research indicates that swath grazing can reduce total daily feeding cost per cow by 41 to 48%. This is based on a 78% reduction in yardage costs and a 25% reduction in feed costs. Extended grazing can also have environmental benefits, such as residue and manure management. However, extended grazing in our Canadian winters requires some added planning and management. Replacement heifers, young cows and mature animals all have different nutritional requirements due to their age and physiology. These differences are fairly easy to manage in a confined feeding system; however, managing the different classes of cattle during winter grazing requires more care. Winter grazing is a viable management option for many beef cattle operations, but it must be managed properly. There are a number of animal care considerations that must be attended to when extending the grazing season, whether your method of choice is swath grazing, bale grazing, or using stockpiled forages. Body Condition Cattle need to enter the winter in good body condition (aim for a body condition score of 2.5‐3). Winter temperatures mean that more feed is necessary to keep cows in good condition, and it is very difficult to improve the condition of thin cows during this energy expensive period. When access to feed is controlled, dominant cows get the most and the best feed. This can be avoided by segregating cattle into groups (e.g. mature cows, old cows, young cows and heifers). Check body condition 32

regularly, and ensure that cattle losing too much condition are removed and fed separately. For more information on body condition scores and management, please visit: www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$Department/ deptdocs.nsf/all/agdex3450#Scoring Water Although water requirements decrease in winter, a 1450 lb cow (the average cow size in AB) still needs 10 to 15 gallons/day, depending on stage of gestation. Cows can and will eat enough snow to meet these requirements if it is loose and clean. Water from another source must be provided if the snow cover is lacking, dirty, or crusted over. Frost‐free stock waterers are recommended. Although they are more expensive than dugouts or streams, they minimize the risk of drowning and are more reliable than snow, especially in areas prone to repeated freeze‐thaw cycles. Feed Testing Feed testing will help to ensure that your winter forage will meet the nutritional needs of the cattle, but it is important to monitor wastage. If feed waste is high, animals are likely selecting a higher quality feed than the test indicated. If there is little waste, the feed test quality is likely accurate, but feed intake may be lower than predicted. It is important to regularly monitor intake and body condition to ensure that all nutritional requirements are being met. For more information on feed testing and the nutritional requirements of bred heifers and cows in each trimester, please visit: www.beefresearch.ca/blog/feed‐testing Shelter Cattle in good body condition, with a good winter hair coat and a high quality diet can withstand temperatures of ‐10oC (calves) to ‐25oC (cows) without ill effects. However, a Charolais Connection • March 2013

35km/h breeze can make ‐25oC feel like ‐40oC. If sufficient bedding and natural shelterbelts or a portable windbreak is not accessible, cattle will lose body condition and may suffer frostbite or hypothermia, if these conditions are prolonged. Information on portable windbreaks is available on the internet or from provincial extension services. Control Grazing Electric fences reduce feed wastage by controlling access to the swaths or bales. If left to their own devices, cattle will always eat the highest quality feed first, which means that during colder weather and mid to late gestation, they will be left to eat the poor quality leftovers during the times when they need good nutrition the most. These cows will require supplementation, or else they will suffer from poor pregnancy rates in the following year due to poor body condition. Cross fencing is highly recommended to avoid this issue – when the poorest feed has been cleaned up, it’s time to move the fence. Check Cattle Regularly Cattle need to be checked frequently. If you are working off‐farm and are unable to see your cattle every day in the daylight, arrange with a neighbour or family member to do this for you. Ensure that the fencer is working, and that there is enough feed and water or snow. Body condition and animal behaviour will indicate if they’re getting enough nutrition and shelter from the weather. Any problems will be easier and less costly to fix if they are caught early. Cutting corners to save costs can quickly lead to negative consequences for the animals, and cancel the financial benefits of extended grazing. If you observe livestock with serious well‐being concerns, or if you continued on page 33


Cedardale Zorro 83Z • Double Polled CED Winchester X WCR Prime Cut BW 93 WW 860 YW 1478 BW 0.5 WW 41 YW 75 TM 41

Bull Calf Champion at 2012 RAWF Cedardale Zerkes 116Z • Double Polled CED Winchester X LT Bluegrass BW 91 WW 857 YW 1489 BW 1.3 WW 36 YW 65 TM 36

Featuring:

25 Purebred Charolais Bulls Sired By: Cedardale Winchester (Alcatraz X Cigar), WDZ Firemaker, Cedardale Tyrant, Merit Roundup

Cedardale Zander 136Z • Double Polled CED Winchester X Baldridge Fasttrack BW 92 WW 942 YW 1553 BW 0.0 WW 39 YW 67 TM 44

Cedardale Zeal 125Z • Double Polled CED Tyrant X HFCC Calypso BW 87 WW 889 YW 1548 BW 0.3 WW 40 YW 60 TM 40

Trevor, Scott & Ryan Nesbitt • 17100 Cedardale Road, Nestleton, ON L0B 1L0

Tel: (905) 986-4608 • info@cedardalefarms.ca • www.cedardalefarms.ca Follow Hwy 7A E of Port Perry 3 km E of Nestleton. Turn N onto Johns Rd., E onto Malcolm Rd., N onto Cedardale Rd. First farm on left.

Videos can be viewed online at: www.cattleinmotion.com Sarah Buchanan 519.546.3352 sarah@cattleinmotion.com

PLAN TO EXTEND GRAZING, CONT. FROM PAGE 32

need animal welfare advice, contact your provincial farm animal care organization or provincial cattle producer association. Confidential help lines are available in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Ontario. Contingency Plan A ‘Plan B’ and even ‘Plan C’ is especially important when winter

grazing. What will you do if the swath crusts over, or the snow melts and the field turns to mud? Ensure that you are prepared to handle anything Mother Nature throws at your cattle. It is also important to have access to a low quality feed and supplements so animals will have an easily accessible alternative if the higher quality feed runs out sooner Charolais Connection • March 2013

than expected. Learn more For more information and practical advice on how to get started or to improve your winter grazing program, as well as the economic and other benefits of extended grazing, visit: www.foragebeef.ca www.beefresearch.ca 33


INDUSTRY EDUCATION

Explaining Growth Promotants Used in Feedlot Cattle BeefResearch.ca

Feed efficiency in cattle can make or break profitability in the feeding sector, and affects environmental implications. The costs of buying a calf and the feed needed to finish it are the two largest variable expenses facing the beef cattle feeding sector. Feed costs are higher than ever because of poor growing conditions in major grain producing countries, because of the use of feed grains in ethanol production, and because of increasing competition of land for crop production versus urban development.

$ / Tonne

Ionophores are antimicrobials delivered through cattle feed that improve nutrient availability to the animal. They can improve feed efficiency and weight gain, reduce methane production, reduce the incidence of bloat and acidosis, and prevent diseases like coccidiosis. Ionophores improve feed efficiency by acting on the rumen microbes. Most rumen microbes convert the complex fiber and starch in forage and grain into simple molecules that can be absorbed into the Canadian Feed Grain Prices, 20052012 bloodstream to 300 provide energy and protein to the 250 animal. Some 200 rumen bacteria (known as Alberta Barley 150 methanogens) Ontario Corn 100 convert the dietary fiber and starch 50 into methane gas. Methane contains 0 energy, but it Source: Canfax 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 cannot be absorbed by the animal, so it is Growth promotants are among the belched out and wasted. Ionophores many sophisticated tools used by improve feed efficiency and weight feedlots and other producers to raise gain by selectively inhibiting more beef, more rapidly, using less feed, while maintaining high standards methanogenic bacteria, and allow the beneficial rumen bacteria to make more of animal health, carcass quality and feed energy available to the animal. food safety. Growth promotants include ionophores, growth implants, Hormonal growth implants and beta‐agonists. A number of Other growth promotants impact products within each category are how nutrients are used by the animal approved for use by Health Canada’s after the nutrients have been absorbed Veterinary Drug Directorate. into the bloodstream. Growth implants, delivered through a pellet under the Antimicrobials: Ionophores skin in the animal’s ear, enhance the Anitmicrobial: a substance that can destroy reproductive hormones that occur or prevent the growth of microorganisms. naturally in the animal. In steers, There are many different types of implants replace some of the hormones antimicrobial substances, including antibiotics, antiprozotozoals, alcohol, soap and bleach. that were removed when the animal Antibitotic: an antimicrobial substance was castrated. produced by a mircroorganism (or a synthetic Implants generally encourage version) that can kill or prevent the growth protein deposition and discourage fat of another microorganism. In human and veterinary medicine, antibiotics are used to deposition. This improves both treat bacterial infections. weight gain and feed conversion. Fat 34

Charolais Connection • March 2013

deposition requires more than twice as much feed energy as protein deposition does. In addition to this, muscle tissue contains around 70% water, while fat contains less than 25% water. This means that for every ten pounds of muscle gained, about three pounds comes from dry feed and seven pounds comes from water. This ratio is reversed for fat growth (roughly seven pounds from dry feed and three pounds from water). Aggressive implant regimes may negatively impact carcass quality (maturity, marbling score, tenderness, and possibly lean color), especially if used on the wrong types of cattle. Beta adrenergic agonists Beta adrenergic agonists are the newest class of growth promotants, commercially available since 2004. These feed additives are not antimicrobials, and do not mimic or supplement reproductive hormones. Asthma medications are also beta‐agonists. ‘Beta adrenergic agonist’ is a complicated name that describes what these products do. ‘Adrenergic’ means ‘resembling adrenaline’. ‘Agonist’ (the opposite of antagonist) means that ‘it works in a similar manner’. The ‘beta’ refers to the particular receptor that it binds to on the muscle cell surface. So a beta adrenergic agonist is a substance that binds to a beta receptor on the muscle, and acts sort of like adrenalin. Adrenalin diverts blood flow from the digestive organs towards the muscle during the ‘fight or flight’ response. Similarly, beta‐agonists re‐directs nutrients so that more growth occurs in muscle tissue than in internal organs. All beta‐agonists approved for beef cattle increase protein deposition (muscle growth), growth rate, feed efficiency, and carcass leanness. Some beta‐agonists also reduce protein continued on page 36


Charolais Connection • March 2013

35


GROWTH PROMOTANTS, CONT. FROM PAGE 34

turnover (reduce muscle breakdown), resulting in increased dressing percentage. Beta‐agonists are fed at the end of the feeding period, when muscle growth is slowing, fat deposition is speeding up, and feed efficiency is dropping off. As with aggressive implants, beta‐agonists must be managed appropriately, on the right class of cattle in order to avoid negative consequences on carcass quality. The benefit of feeding beta‐agonists can be lost if the product is fed for too long, or if the delay between product withdrawal and slaughter is too long. Benefits of growth promotants Growth promotants are valuable tools for the cattle feeding sector. In a study published in the Journal of Animal Science, Dr. Ira Mandell of the University of Guelph, Robert Berthiaume of the Agriculture and Agri‐Food Canada (AAFC) Lennoxville Research Station, and Carole Lafrenière of the AAFC Kapuskasing station reported that overall average daily gain was 21% higher and feed efficiency was 23% better for grain finished cattle given both implants and ionophores compared to control cattle. Economists John Lawrence and Maro Ibarburu at Iowa State University reported that feedlot average daily gain increased when ionophores (3% increase), implants (16%), and beta‐ agonists (16%) were used. Feed efficiency improved when ionophores (4% better), implants (10%) and beta‐agonists (14%) were used. Their analysis indicated that feedlot production costs would be 10% higher if producers chose not to or were unable to use implants, ionophores or beta agonists. Canfax data indicate that between 1977 and 2007, Canada slaughtered 20% fewer cattle but produced 11% more beef. When fed cattle exports are included in this calculation, Canada produced 10% more cattle, but produced 39% more beef. 36

Impact on food safety and human health Like vaccines and other veterinary products, all growth promotants approved for use in Canada have been reviewed for human and animal safety and approved by Health Canada’s Veterinary Drug Directorate. Label and veterinary directions indicate proper administration doses and routes, as well as pre‐slaughter withdrawal times that ensure that the product has been metablized by the animal before it is slaughtered. All animals and carcasses are subjected to pre‐ and post‐slaughter inspections to look for signs of ill health. Random samples of carcass tissues and organs are tested for residues from antimicrobials, growth promotants, and other contaminants. Lonophores Ionophores are often erroneously included in discussions about the concern of antimicrobial use in livestock and the potential link to antimicrobial resistance in humans. These antimicrobials are not used in human medicine, and therefore reducing or eliminating their use would have detrimental impacts on cattle production with no benefit for human health. When advocate groups spread statistics like “over 80 percent of all antibiotics used in the United States are used in food animals, and the vast majority of this use is for animals that are not sick”, they not

only ignore the much higher populations and body weights of livestock compared to Americans, they include ionophores in the calculation. Hormones Growth promotant safety has been reviewed by many experts and agencies, including Health Canada, the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. All have concluded that hormones can be used safely in beef production. The levels found in food products, such as beef, are too low to be of risk to human health. To put these levels into perspective, consider the levels of estrogens that occur naturally in all plants and animals, including humans. This table shows that a person would have to eat 3 million hamburgers every day from cattle administered growth hormones before he or she would be exposed to as much estrogen as average women produce daily. Testosterone‐containing implants are similar; there is a safety factor of several thousand‐fold based on the assumption that people consume the equivalent of 6 to 7 servings of beef per day. Beta-agonists Concerns about the use of beta‐ agonists in livestock are popular in the media, especially since the USDA received a petition from animal rights and food safety groups in December

Quantity

Source

75 g

Beef from steer given hormones

355 ml

Beer

75 g

Raw peas

75 g

Raw cabbage

1 pill

Birth control

Per day

Adult male

Per day

Adult woman

Per day

Pregnant woman

Nanograms of estrogen 2 15 500 2976 35,000 100,000 5,000,000 90,000,000

Source: BeefResearch.ca. Adapted from Ty Lawrence, Ph.D., (West Texas A&M University)

Charolais Connection • March 2013


20 bulls sell at Alameda Bull Sale on March 23rd Thank you to all our past, present and future customers for their support

Janelle Campbell Box 93, Griffin, SK S0C 1G0 ccfarms@sdcwireless.com

306-842-6231

Campbells Charolais CAMPBELLS I'M BUSY 136Z

CAMPBELLS LETS ROLL 115Z

CAMPBELLS ZORO 17Z

Pleasant Dawn Magnum 26T x RPJ Everready 403D BW 90 lb. WW Oct 12 879 lb. Performance and capacity

Pleasant Dawn Magnum 26T x DBLG’s Champ 9J • Double Polled BW 95 lb. WW Oct 12 930 lb. Powerful and complete

Pleasant Dawn Magnum 26T x Campbells Boo Boo 24G BW 93 lb. WW Oct 12 828 lb. Thick, deep individual

Also selling Angus bulls from Mantei Farms Angus GROWTH PROMOTANTS, CONT. FROM PAGE 36

2012. Some importing nations have a zero tolerance policy for certain kinds of beta‐agonists, which also make their use an issue in some trade negotiations. In fact, a person would have to eat more than 180 servings of beef per day, or 30 servings of liver per day, from cattle administered beta‐agonists in order to get the effect of one “hit” of asthma medication. Environmental impacts A 2012 study published in the Journal of Animal Science quantified how growth promotant technologies in North America (including ionophores, implants and beta‐

agonists) allow cattlemen to produce the same amount of beef from fewer cattle in less time, has led to environmental benefits. If we were to remove these technologies from our production system, we would need 10% more cattle, 10% more land, and 10% more feed to produce the same amount of beef. Doing this would also require 7% more fuel and fertilizer. The reduced feed efficiency and longer days to finish would also mean that the cattle would produce 10% more manure and greenhouse gas in the process. The adoption of these technologies have allowed North American beef

producers to continue to provide consumers with a safe, high quality product in the face of rising feed and land prices while reducing environmental implications. As with all refined technology, appropriate and optimal use of growth promotant products can improve animal performance and value, while improper use result in no benefit, reduced carcass value, and/or lost money. Feedlots, nutritionists and veterinary experts base their decisions to use these products on past experience, the type of cattle being fed, marketing practices and packer specifications.

Wayne & Melva, Matthew & Sarah Ramsey WMM ZEUS 203Z • Double Polled, Red Factor KBK Rally 24T x HTA Crown Prince 152L BW 108 lb., Feb 7th 1,440 lb.

Box 73, Cardale, MB R0K 0J0

204-566-2314 msramsey@live.ca

WMM ZANDER 206Z • 4th Gen Polled HTA Marcus 987W x HTA Whitehot 105A BW 98 lb., Feb 7th 1,420 lb.

Charolais Connection • March 2013

37


7 SONS OF RED SIX MILE INDEED 802S

9 SONS OF G.BROS. STANDOUT 8S

WRAZ 117Z CE 4 BW 1.9 WW 52 YW 80 M 17 TM 43

GBR 13Z

10 SONS OF RED PASQUIA TOAST 15W

CE 73 BW 1 WW 41 YW 81 M 20.8 TM 41

WRAZ 41Z CE 1 BW 2.3 WW 61 YW 97 M 20 TM 51

3 SONS OF RED SMW SMACK 31U

GBR 132Z CE 66 BW 3.6 WW 53 YW 96 M 18.9 TM 46

WRAZ 80Z CE 2 BW -.2 WW 53 YW 76 M 20 TM 46

Plus 5 sons of Red BCC Crimson Jewels 102U and 4 sons of Red YY Hitch 23X Sell Phil Birnie Box 461, Wawota, SK S0G 5A0

"The program you can count on"

38

Info@wraz.ca • www.wraz.ca T 306-739-2988 • C 306-577-7440 Gordon Murray T 306-739-2177 • C 306-646-7980

GBR 123Z CE 77 BW 1.5 WW 51 YW 96 M 22.8 TM 48

OPEN HOUSE at WRAZ Friday, April 5, starting at 1:30 p.m. Presale viewing of the bulls, their sires, dams & siblings with calves at foot.

Charolais Connection • March 2013


BAR J TROJAN 68X

GBR 48Z CE 93 BW -1.5 WW 45 YW 86 M 23.2 TM 46

BAR J SILVERADO 14S x FG LAURIER SIR PEACOCK 54M Top 1% of the breed for Calving Ease and Birth Weight EPD

GBR 11Z

Most are Polled • Some Red Factor

CE 96 BW -2.5 WW 41 YW 77 M 22.7 TM 43

GBR 100Z

GBR 8Z

CE 92 BW -.7 WW 46 YW 88 M 21.7 TM 45

GBR 24Z

CE 98 BW -2.5 WW 39 YW 76 M 22.3 TM 42

GBR 77Z

CE 97 BW -2.5 WW 35 YW 70 M 24.6 TM 42

View the catalogue online at www.bylivestock.com

CE 98 BW -3.2 WW 36 YW 68 M 22.6 TM 41 Sale Manager

Kelly, Tracey, William & Wyatt Brimner Box 93, Manor, SK S0C 1R0

T 306-448-2028 • C 306-577-7698 Charolais Connection • March 2013

Helge & Candace By • 306-584-7937 Helge 306-536-4261 Candace 306-536-3374 charolaisbanner@gmail.com 39


40

Charolais Connection • March 2013


Charolais Connection • March 2013

41


INDUSTRY NEWS

Canada Beef Inc. Partners to Develop a Meet the Rancher Promotion Consumers are increasingly interested in how, and by whom, their food is produced and Canadian retail stores are looking for ways to answer those questions. To this end, Canada Beef Inc. partnered with IGA Marketplace stores in British Columbia to promote Canadian beef – and the ranchers who raise that beef. Canada Beef worked with the B.C. Cattlemen’s Association and IGA Marketplace’s exclusive Northridge Farms™ brand to develop the IGA “These are our ranchers. This is our beef.” campaign. The promotion highlighted three ranching families in B.C. to partner with IGA to promote Canadian beef. The promotion utilized images of the three ranching families, at home and at work, and used them in various advertising and promotional pieces. Posters were displayed in IGA Marketplace’s meat departments, on cards attached to shelf dividers in the meat case, in advertising flyers and on IGA’s website. The Northridge Farms beef program at IGA is 100% Canadian beef, and rated AAA by the Canadian Beef Grading Agency. “All brands need an image – it allows consumers to build a belief system around that brand,” says James Bradbury, Canada Beef marketing manager, North America. “Canada Beef Inc. and Northridge Farms have this incredible resource available in Canada’s farmers and ranchers. Their stories and images help consumers understand where Canadian beef comes from, the work 42

that goes into raising it and offers them something to be proud of.” There are nine IGA stores and 31 IGA Marketplace stores in B.C. The poster images with accompanying Canadian beef branding were printed on 290,000 flyers, and received 35,000 hits per week on their website. The promotion resulted in an 11 per cent lift in the beef sales category between October 1 and November 28 of this year. According to Bradbury, the promotion may be used as a regular feature with IGA stores in B.C., and could expand in the future. “Consumers want to know more about where their food comes from, and we are helping them to learn more about that for Canadian beef,” he says. “As a team, IGA, Canada Beef and the BC Cattlemen’s Association worked to put a promotion together that highlighted these three ranching families and their connection to producing top quality Canadian beef.” Canada Beef Inc. is an independent national organization representing the marketing and promotion of the Canadian cattle and beef industry worldwide. Its efforts to maximize demand for Canadian beef and optimize the value of Canadian beef products are funded by cattle producers through the National Beef Check‐Off, which in turn makes it possible to access beef industry market development funds provided by the government of Canada and the Government of Alberta. Charolais Connection • March 2013


RED 211Z

RED 278Z

Look for these bulls at the

CATTLEMAN’S CLASSIC MULTIBREED BULL SALE Sunday, March 24, 2013 1:00 p.m. DST Heartland Livestock, Virden, MB BEAVER CREEK ZANTHUS 211Z BW 97 lbs. • BW 1.8 WW 38 YW 74 M 15.3 TM 35 Smooth Polled, Outcross Red • Silver Buckle x DC Revenue

BEAVER CREEK ZEIRA 278Z BW 84 lbs. • BW -0.9 WW 33 YW 64 M 19.6 TM 36 Smooth Polled • Calving Ease

RED 258Z

RED 299Z

Gord, Lisa, Ashley, Tristan & Kate-Lyne Nykoliation

Ph 204-748-1265 Fax 204-748-6845 email: 3kats@rfnow.com BEAVER CREEK ZERXES 258Z BW 87 lbs. • BW -0.6 WW 37 YW 74 M 18.2 TM 37 3rd Gen Polled • Heifer bull with plenty testicle

View the catalogue online at www.beavercreekcharolais.com

BEAVER CREEK ZOLTAN 299Z BW 96 lbs. • BW 2.1 WW 42 YW 79 M 15 TM 36 Dark Red, Double Red Outcross

An example of our 20 bulls selling at NMF 173Z • TRI-N Thriller PLD 173Z

NMF 169Z • TRI-N Chatahoochee 169Z

TRI-N Super Jammer 7J x TRI-N Payday BD 03/01/2012, BW 97, Oct 1 WW 942, Jan 6 wt 1453 Outstanding herbull prospect iwth a little different pedigree

Pro-Char Cptn Morgan x Hopewell Sasfire 729T(SDC Ferrugo) BD 03/01/2012, BW 99, Oct 1 WW 975, Jan 6 wt 1391 Thick, deep and wide in a dark red package

Cattleman’s Classic Multi-Breed Bull Sale Sunday, March 24th, 2013 1:00 p.m. Heartland Livestock Yards Virden, Manitoba For more information call

-N CHAROLAIS TRI Merv, Joanne, Jesse & Brittni Nykoliation Box 899, Lenore, MB

204-838-2107 merv1@prairie.ca

NMF 218Z • TRI-N Corona PLD 218Z

NMF 196Z • TRI-N New Design 196Z

Pro-Char Cptn Morgan x TRI-N Payday BD 04/10/2012, BW 80, Oct 1 WW 805, Jan 6 wt 1247 April bull with loads of performance & a moderate birthweight

Pro-Char Cptn Morgan x SDC Laredo BD 03/16/2012, BW 97, Oct 1 WW 905, Jan 6 wt 1308 Top tan bull out of a Gold Star dam

Charolais Connection • March 2013

See these bulls and others at

www.trincharolais.com Breeding Quality Red & White Charolais since 1986 43


MANAGEMENT

Don’t Forget the Bulls Kris Ringwall, Director/Extension Livestock Specialist, NDSU/Dickinson Research Extension Center

For many, the cows and calves head home, and then the calves are sorted for market. The busyness of it all is mind boggling at times. The pens are stretched to the max, and there is not enough time to get every animal fed and watered on a normal schedule. A quick sort often will move the bulls aside and put the cows and calves at center stage. Off in the distance, one can hear someone ask if the bulls have been fed. The point being, bulls still are a very important part of a cow‐calf enterprise. In all honesty, way too many times bulls take a back seat once the breeding season is done. Just like the cows, bulls need time to recover. If the bulls can’t hold up, why are they there in the first place? That question is a point of discussion. We all need to remember that many bulls are terminal bulls. In other words, they breed cows and sire calves that are designed to be feeder calves. These bulls often are purchased for high dollars, so the key to making the bulls affordable is years of use. A bull that can be depreciated out over four or five breeding seasons is much better for the bottom line than a bull that only lasts two or three seasons. The market calves will perform well in the feedlot and be aggressively sought after by feeder calf buyers. This means that the majority of bulls are not intended to produce replacement heifers. If, in fact, the bull was intended to sire replacement heifers, he better come in reasonable shape. Regardless, the bulls have worked hard and need some recuperation. The cow‐calf management class

44

that I teach at Dickinson State University is always fun, and listening to the students certainly brings insight into the beef business. A former student once wrote, “After the breeding season, many producers would like to forget about their breeding bulls, and some do. They become a hassle because no one wants them in the way. How much easier it is to push them to the back 40 and worry about them next spring. “Although it is apparent that breeding bulls do not require a lot of extra attention in the off‐season, some care must be fulfilled to reduce costs for the next year. Most breeding commences in the spring or early summer and extends for two to three more months. Even with a 60‐day prebreeding conditioning period, this still leaves approximately seven months of post‐breeding. These usually are in the fall and winter months. “After the completion of the breeding season, old or crippled bulls should be sorted off and sold. Mature, healthy bulls won’t require a lot of extra care, so they could go by themselves. This leaves the younger, thinner bulls to work with. These are the ones that should receive a little higher‐quality feed through the winter to increase their years of productivity. Properly balanced nutrition, including minerals, should be available to assure optimum reproductive performance. “Nutrition begins with adequate amounts of feed. For example, a 1,300‐pound bull needing to gain 1.5 pounds per day needs 26.1 pounds of dry matter. It would consist of 2 pounds (7.9 percent) of protein and 15.6 pounds (59.7 percent) of total digestible nutrients (TDN) or energy.

Charolais Connection • March 2013

A larger bull, say 1,900 pounds, needs to gain one‐half pound per day. This bull would need 32.2 pounds of dry matter per day. To accomplish this, the bull needs 2.2 pounds (6.9 percent) of protein and 16.8 pounds (52 percent) of TDN or energy. “Shelter also is an overlooked aspect. Testicles easily can be frozen in this part of the Midwest, so some bedding and shelter are important. Remember that bulls constitute 50 percent of next year’s calf crop. Therefore, wise management practices can reduce variable costs, which will result in greater overall revenue.” I couldn’t have said it better or been any more right when he said that producers sometimes would like to forget about the bull inventory because bulls can be a pain. The key to bull management, like all other cattle management, is the willingness to address topics in a very timely manner rather than waiting until a crisis arises. Bull care and nutrition needs to start now, not next spring prior to bull turnout. Bulls need to be physically healthy, athletic in nature and conditioned for a vigorous marathon. In addition, the bull requires approximately eight weeks for viable sperm cell development. For bulls that are mismanaged and have their spermatogenic cycle disrupted, a minimum of two months is needed for the bull to start having a viable sperm supply for the proper conception of next year’s calf crop. Listen up: Don’t forget about those bulls, so keep them in sight and properly fed. May you find all your ear tags.


Charolais Connection • March 2013

45


INDUSTRY NEWS

Leveraging Positive Beef Nutrition Research At the end of December 2012, an important health study was released and created a fair bit of buzz in nutrition circles. The study, “The Global Burden of Disease Study (2010)”, published in the very high profile journal Lancet, was an examination of a variety of factors with the goal of estimating each one’s relative contribution to disease and disability. It is the largest systematic study ever compiled to look at this. When health studies are published that involve beef in some way, this is an opportunity for Canada Beef to weigh in and influence how the study gets communicated. In the case of positive beef stories, this is an opportunity to disseminate the key results, and in the case of negative beef stories, Canada Beef has a responsibility to provide another viewpoint and, where appropriate, a defense. In the “The Global Burden of Disease Study (2010)”, this study found that the 3 leading risk factors for global disease burden were high blood pressure, tobacco smoke and alcohol use. The study identified diets low in fruits and high in sodium as the most prominent dietary risk factors for disease. In case you are curious, here’s what made the top 20: As you will notice, red meat is not on the list. The researchers evaluated red meat; it actually ranked dead last in the list of the 43 factors they examined. 1 High blood pressure

2 Smoking 3 Alcohol use 4 Household air pollution 5 Low fruit consumption 6 High body mass index 7 High fasting blood glucose 8 Childhood underweight 9 Ambient pollution 10 Physical inactivity 11 High sodium intake 12 Low nuts and seeds intake 13 Iron deficiency 14 Suboptimal breastfeeding 15 High total blood cholesterol 16 Low whole grains intake 17 Low vegetable intake 18 Low omega‐3 intake 19 Drug use 20 Occupational injury This study is important as the findings provide us with the opportunity to position beef in a broader context with respect to risk factors for disease. When health professionals have facts, there can be appropriate prioritization of health efforts and messaging. For example, this study shows that low fruit and high sodium intakes are leading dietary factors contributing to disease globally. It so happens that Canadians’ intake of fruit and veg is largely inadequate, and sodium intakes are too high. Clearly then, these are priorities. In contrast, Canadians consume a moderate amount of red meat (74 g/day on average), in line with Canada’s Food Guide. Thus, our messaging to Health Professionals is to remind

FOR SALE 10 Purebred Charolais Heifers bred Red Angus – will preg check LITTLE VALLEY VIEW RANCH Warren Henderson Forestburg, AB 1-780-582-2254 46

Charolais Connection • March 2013

them that efforts to increase vegetable and fruit intake and reduce sodium intake are likely to be beneficial; whereas, advice to limit red meat, such as beef, is likely to prove ineffective. To broadcast these important findings, Canada Beef has communicated this story in a variety of ways, specifically through our HealthLink program as well as through a variety of social media venues (our Blog, Facebook, Twitter, etc.). HealthLink is one of several important ways Canada Beef reaches Health Professionals. In 2012, 6 Healthlink stories were published. With each issue reaching over 2,5000 health professionals, cumulatively this gives us 15,000 occasions to deliver a positive beef message to influencers. This material will also be used in future health professional communications such as at conferences and presentations. Canada Beef Inc. is an independent national organization representing the research, marketing and promotion of the Canadian cattle and beef industry worldwide. Its efforts to maximize demand for Canadian beef and optimize the value of Canadian beef products is funded by cattle producers through the National Beef Check‐Off, which in turn makes it possible to access beef industry market development funds provided by the Government of Canada and the Government of Alberta.


ON OFFER:

24 Charolais Yearling and Two Year Old Bulls 22 Black Angus Yearling and Two Year Old Bulls 40 Open Commercial Replacement Heifers

CWC 73Z • BORDERLANDS MACK 138R x VCR SIR DUKE 914

CWC 76Z • LAE X-PLOSIVE 29X x VCR SIR DUKE 914

CWC 80Z • EC NO DOUBT x NOVOTEL

CWC 20Z • LT BLUEGRASS x HTA NORTHERN LIGHT 357C

CWC 111Z • LT BLUEGRASS x MVX COUGARHILL HANK 720G

CWC 113Z • LT BLUEGRASS x MVX COUGARHILL HANK 720G

• All bulls semen evaluated prior to the sale • Delivery available • Free board until May 1

BLDA 10Z • BORDERLANDS BANDO 7361X x CHICO HANNIBAL 43H

Thank you to our 2012 supporters!

BLDA 752Z • BORDERLANDS BANDO 7361X x BLACK RIDGE W WIDESPREAD 2K

Rockglen, SK

Glenn, Wendy & Wyatt Ching • 306-476-2439 View the catalogue online at: www.borderlandcattleco.com Charolais Connection • March 2013

47


MANAGEMENT

Proper Application of Livestock Manure Patrick Mooleki, PhD, PAg, Soil/Nutrient Management Specialist, Agriculture Knowledge Centre

Livestock manure is a good source of plant nutrients and organic matter that can improve crop productivity and soil quality if managed properly. Proper management of manure requires that the manure should be treated as a fertilizer rather than a waste product that needs to be disposed of. First, the manure should be analysed to determine its nutrient composition. Unlike chemical fertilizers, livestock manure has a variable composition. It contains many nutrients such as nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), sulphur (S), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), boron (B) as well as organic matter and water. Thus, the exact composition of livestock manure must be determined through analysis. Test results of manure provide nutrient composition in available and

total quantities. Available forms of the nutrients is what can be absorbed by crops, whereas the rest of the nutrients are in organic forms and require microbial breakdown and mineralization before they can be taken up by crops. Based on manure source and composition, the potential mineralization of the nutrients can be estimated. Typically, 25 per cent of the organic N, 50 per cent of the total P and 90 – 100 per cent of the total K are considered to be available to the crop in the year of application. Having determined manure composition and potential nutrient availability, the actual amount of nutrients to be applied depends on nutrient requirements of the crop to be grown as indicated by a soil test. Manures often contain more of one nutrient relative to another compared to the balance that crops need. Solid

cattle manure tends to have higher P than N levels while liquid swine manure tends to be relatively higher in N and lower in P. For the purpose of environmental protection, P levels in solid cattle manure should be considered in determining application rates. In liquid swine manure, N levels are considered first in determining application rates. Livestock manure can be applied in the fall or in the spring. Injection of liquid swine manure and incorporation of solid cattle manure are recommended practices. Significant N losses can occur when livestock manure of high available N content is applied on the soil surface. Livestock manure application on frozen soil or snow is not recommended. For more information contact the Agriculture Knowledge Centre at 1‐866‐457‐2377.

Thick, Deep, Commercial Cattlemen’s Bulls for Sale in Ontario A sample of some of the bulls we have on test Select group of BIO tested bulls consigned to the

PIC Sale, March 30th, 1:00 p.m., Carson Sales Arena, Listowell, ON

Great selection of BIO tested yearling and two year old bulls available at the farm 2Z • DBar Synergy son

Miller Land & Livestock

21Z • Sparrow Montenegro son

George, Dianne, Dwayne & Ashley Miller • RR 1, Jarvis, ON N0A 1J0 • 519-587-2755 48

Charolais Connection • March 2013


Saturday, March 30, 2013 • 1:00 p.m. Western Pride Auction Mart • Bonnyville, Alberta

65 Bulls • 25 Two-Year-Old Charolais • 20 Red Angus • 20 Black Angus

Disposition  Calving Ease  Moderate BW  Style  Structure  Growth  Feet



For a sale catalogue email or call:

MURPHY LIVESTOCK Ray, Leona, Erin, Ryan, Avery & Lisa Murphy • Box 7383, Bonnyville, AB T9N 2H7

T: 780-826-5477 • C: 780-812-0308 • murphylivestock@hotmail.com Charolais Connection • March 2013

49


MANAGEMENT

Winter Feeding on Perennial Pasture Lorne Klein, Regional Forage Specialist, Weyburn, Saskatchewan Agriculture, Agriview

At what location and density will your beef cows deposit their manure and urine this winter? Research at the Western Beef Development Centre (WBDC) has shown that as much as 34 per cent of the original nitrogen of feed can be captured or recycled, when feed or grazing is managed correctly. You will capture as little as one per cent when you don’t. The research compared winter feeding extensively on perennial pasture to winter feeding intensively in a corral. The corral manure was spread on pasture the following summer. Significant economic and environmental advantages to feeding on perennial pasture were found. Many producers have experienced these advantages on their own operations.

A critical issue is the feeding density. This must not be excessive, so the nutrients from the manure and urine enhance the vegetation rather than kill it. Generally, feed at a density of 1000 cow days/acre or less. Ensure that manure and urine is spread uniformly over the feeding area as much as possible. The ideal scenario is to feed: • On low fertility soil to get a relatively high yield response in the following crop; • On perennial forage containing a rhizomatous grass (smooth brome, quack grass) that can tolerate the winter traffic and thick litter layer if feed is left behind; • On perennial forage that normally dries the soil profile in fall

and enables a greater percentage of the spring snow melt carrying nutrients to infiltrate into the soil; • On land where the water runoff is contained instead of drained into creeks and rivers; and • Close to or at the feed source to reduce or eliminate the need for handling and transporting the feed. Feeding or grazing correctly on the landscape in winter can capture and retain more nutrients in the soil, reduce the need for machinery and diesel fuel, reduce the need for commercial fertilizer and eliminate manure hauling. For more information phone the Agriculture Knowledge Centre at 1‐866‐457‐2377.

More Bang for Your Buck QUALITY BULLS FOR SALE at the farm TOP GRANTS POWERPLAY 201Z

TOP EXTRA SERVICE 224Z

Polled, BW 97 lb.

Polled, BW 97 lb.

Grant's Playboy 3X x JDJ Smokester J1377 P

JDFJ Playboy 85U x Bar J Silverado 14S

CE 91 BW .3 WW 36 YW 65 TM 37

CE 95 BW -.2 WW 30 YW 63 TM 35

Grant Farms Registered Charolais and Border Collies

TOP GRANTS SUREFIRE 204Z

Polled, BW 103 lb.

TR Mr Fire Water 5792R x PCC Sudden Impact 848U

CE 51 BW 3.7 WW 45 YW 79 TM 39

50

Don & Nilda Grant Box 4, Site 13, RR 1 Bowden, AB T0M 0K0 T 403.556.2695 C 403.559.9911 dgrant@xplornet.com

TOP FIRELINE 205Z

Polled, BW 103 lb.

TR Mr Fire Water 5792R x embryo dam Rollin' Acres Lizzie 7S

Charolais Connection • March 2013

CE 37 BW 4.4 WW 22 YW 73 M 16.5 TM 37


Charolais Connection • March 2013

51


MANAGEMENT

How Rumen Acidosis Impacts Animal Health Bob Spring, PAg, Regional Livetock Specialist, Swift Current, Saskatchewan Agriculture

Cattle, at times, experience rumen acidosis. However its occurrence and negative impact on animal health and welfare may be greater than traditionally thought, according to Dr. Greg Penner, an Assistant Professor in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources at the University of Saskatchewan. Dr. Penner’s research is focused on development of nutritional strategies to enhance the health and productivity of cattle. His focus is on gut function, including the impact of rumen acidosis on the health and function of the rumen. Rumen acidosis occurs when the pH of the rumen drops below 5.5 and can be caused by many factors, including high grain diets, abrupt changes in diets and

feeding after a period of feed restriction, which may occur after long‐distance transport to a pasture or feedlot. It can even occur on 100 per cent forage diets and when grazing. The most commonly recognized impact of rumen acidosis is in feedlot cattle going ‘off feed’. Through the use of advanced gut membrane research techniques, Dr. Penner has found that rumen acidosis may have additional health implications for cattle. His research indicates that acidosis results in greater permeability of the rumen wall, potentially allowing pathogens to cross from the rumen into the blood stream, thereby increasing the animal’s susceptibility to disease. He also found that absorption of some nutrients through

the rumen wall is reduced during and after bouts of acidosis. Rumen acidosis is something that cattle feeders have been aware of and managed for many years. However, this new research suggests that the frequency of occurrence and negative impact of acidosis may be much greater than thought in the past. Further investigation into these areas will identify strategies to reduce the incidence, severity and duration of acidosis to improve animal performance and welfare in the future. For more information Bob Springer, Regional Livestock Specialist at (306) 778‐8289; or Saskatchewan Agriculture Knowledge Centre at 1‐866‐457‐2377.

4G CHAROLAIS BULLS • Two Year Olds • Yearlings • Reds, Whites, Tans • All Polled BULLS FOR SALE OFF THE FARM Check out the bull pen at www.4gcharolais.com 4G ZIGGY 22Z • 4th Gen Polled, Double Red

4G ZIP CODE 13Z • 3rd Gen Polled, Double Red

Sire: 4-G Classic 872U Dam sire: 4-G Fireball 158L

Sire: 4-G Classic 872U Dam sire: Harvie Craven A-Jay 9R

BW 100 • WW 859 • YW 1493 BW 4.9 WW 47.2 YW 93.9 M 24.5 TM 48.1

For more details give Jonathan a call: 306.783.4457 Cell 306.621.7101 52

BW 94 •WW 826 •YW 1452 BW 2.6 WW 44.5 YW 91.4 M 24.0 TM 46.3

4G YORKTON 21Y • 3rd Gen Polled

4G

CHAROLAIS RANCH

Sire: HTA Silvermist 720T Dam sire: 4-G Typhoon 114F

The Grunerts

BW 100 • WW 787 • YW 1446 BW 2.7 WW 35.8 YW 80.2 M 26.8 TM 44.7

Kent, Bonnie, Jonathan, Mark Box 1847, Yorkton, SK S3N 3R2

Charolais Connection • March 2013


7th Annual

Size Matters

Weinbender and Mangels

CHAROLAIS BULL SALE

Thursday, April 11th, 1:30 p.m.

Selling: 30 Yearlings Mostly Polled

At the Weinbender farm, Canora, SK (5.5 miles S on Hwy 9 and 1 mile E at Burgis Beach sign) WE STRESS

Performance • Calving Ease • Fertility • Hair We know you sell your calves by the pound, so SIZE MATTERS to us.

GLM 2Z • LT BLUEGRASS x LAE TEXAS BW 85, Sept 27 WW 680 BW -0.4 WW 40.3 YW 75.9 M 17.7 TM 37.9 SHSH 16Z • SPARROWS BIRMINGHAM x SOS DETONATOR BW 115, Actual Sept 26 WW 865 BW 2.7 WW 49 YW 93 M 23.4 TM 48

• Cash rebate of $75 per buyer if you take your bull/bulls home sale day. • Free board until June 1st • $75.00 charge per buyer for delivery after May 1, at sellers convenience

Join us for lunch sale day. For information or a catalogue contact:

GLM 5Z • BELMONT'S RED MIST x SPARROWS MUSCAT BW 94, Oct 1 WW 710 BW -0.6 WW 47.1 YW 89.2 M 13.6 TM 37.2

Carey & Lee Ann Weinbender Box 1809, Canora, SK S0A 0L0 SHSH 28Z • DYV SVY RIO x SPARROWS SERENGETI BW 93, Actual Sept 26 WW 820 BW .4 WW 48 YW 95 M 20.1 TM 44

306-563-6678 Cell 306-571-9035 clweinbender@gmail.com

View videos at www.slidinghillscharolais.com

Glen & Lori Mangels RR#1, Arborfield, SK S0E 0A0

306-769-4132 GLM 33Z • CIRCLE X HABANERO x SVS NOBLEMAN BW 80, Sept 26 WW 610 BW -1.5 WW 32.1 YW 62.6 M 20.2 TM 36.3

SHSH 43Z • EATONS ROYAL DYNASTY x SPARROWS SERENGETI BW 102, Actual Sept 26 WW 815 BW .3 WW 43 YW 80 M 20.1 TM 42

Registered Purebred Charolais Covering the Bases from Birth to Beef

Bull pictures available at grantspix.com

View the catalogue online at www.buyagro.com Charolais Connection • March 2013

53


NEWS

Industry Info High Protein Diet Has Benefits High‐protein, low carbohydrate diets may provide benefits beyond weight loss by helping to avoid the onset of cognitive impairment in older people. In a study conducted by researchers at the famed Mayo Clinics, it was determined that people with the highest carbohydrate intake were 3.6 times likelier to develop mild impairments. The report emphasized that “it is important that a diet retain a healthy balance of protein, carbohydrates and fat because each of these nutrients has a significant role in the body.” Gondola Runs on Manure A Vermont ski area has unveiled a gondola powered entirely by cow manure. Killington Resort, located in central Vermont has partnered with an electricity‐generating company to

JTA DIAMOND CHAROLAIS BULL SALE Saturday, March 30th 1:00 p.m. Johnstone Auction Mart Moose Jaw, SK

Beef on a bun 21 TWO YEAR OLDS Reds, Tans & Whites 5 YEARLINGS

More for sale on the farm Jerome & Cindy Tremblay 306-394-4406 Courval, SK

convert manure from nearby dairy farms to electricity. The co‐called “Cow Power” program uses waste from 10,000 cows that produce more than 300,000 gallons of manure per day. More than a dozen Vermont dairy farms are participating in the program. Feedlot Performance Increased by Bedding Cattle fed in bedded confinement facilities had improved feedlot performance compared to cattle fed in open lots, according to bedding versus no bedding records that were analyzed by animal scientists at Iowa State University and Land O’ Lakes Purina. Harvest weight (1,331 poinds vs 1,302), average daily gain (3.01 points vs 2.88) and feed to gain ratios (7.46 vs 7.93) were in favor of pens that were bedded. However, dry matter intake and death loss were no different between the two groups. UN Admits Flaw in Report on Meat and Climate Change Alastair Jamieson

The UN has admitted a report linking livestock to global warming exaggerated the impact of eating meat on climate change. A 2006 study, Livestock’s Long Shadow, claimed meat production was responsible for 18 per cent of greenhouse gas emissions – more than transport. Its conclusions were heralded by campaigners urging consumers to eat less meat to save the planet. Among those calling for a reduction in global meat consumption is Sir Paul McCartney. However, one of the authors of the report has admitted an American scientist has identified a flaw in its comparison with the impact of

View the catalogue online at

www.johnstoneauction.ca when available 54

Charolais Connection • March 2013

transport emissions. Dr Frank Mitloehner, from the University of California at Davis (UCD), said meat and milk production generates less greenhouse gas than most environmentalists claim and that the emissions figures were calculated differently to the transport figures, resulting in an “apples‐and‐oranges analogy that truly confused the issue”. The meat figure had been reached by adding all greenhouse‐gas emissions associated with meat production, including fertiliser production, land clearance, methane emissions and vehicle use on farms, whereas the transport figure had only included the burning of fossil fuels. Pierre Gerber, a policy officer with the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization, told the BBC he accepted Dr Mitloehnerʹs criticism. "I must say honestly that he has a point – we factored in everything for meat emissions, and we didnʹt do the same thing with transport," he said. "But on the rest of the report, I donʹt think it was really challenged." He said a more comprehensive analysis of emissions from food production was being produced and should be available by the end of the year. Dr Mitloehner told a meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco that producing less meat and milk would only result in “more hunger in poor countries” and that efforts should be focused on “smarter farming, not less farming”. Earlier this year, the UNʹs Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change apologised after wrongly claiming the Himalayan glaciers could vanish within 25 years.


BULL SALE MUTRIE FARMS BAR H CHAROLAIS Wednesday, April 10th, 1:00 p.m. Candiac (SK) Auction Mart 1 hour SE of Regina off Hwy 48

Offering Year Olds 16 Two 13 Yearlings BAR H 11Y ~ Red Factor, 3rd Gen Polled JWX Silver Bullt son with meat and volume, 760 lb. WW

SWR 1Z JWX Wadsworth son who was in our show string at Agribition

Plus A package of commercial Charolais heifers

SWR 10Z ~ Red Factor, 4th Gen Pld Pleasant Dawn Sudoku son in the top 2% of the breed for WW EPD

BAR H 40Z ~ 3rd Gen Polled LT Western Spur with built in calving ease, 96 lb. BW • Most are Polled • Many Red Factor • Easy calving • Structurally sound • Not over fat bulls • Industry leading genetics

SWR 14Y ~ Red Factor, Dbl Pld Growth, length, good feet that will last

BAR H 37Z ~ Dbl Pld SVS Nobleman son in the top 15% of the breed for calving ease, 90 lb. BW

BAR H CHAROLAIS

For more information or to receive a catalogue, give us a call, or view the catalogue online at

MUTRIE FARMS

Kevin & Donna Haylock and family Lawrence & Joan Haylock Box 459, Grenfell, SK S0G 2B0 306-697-2901 grenlock@sasktel.net Conveniently located 3/4 mile off Hwy 1

www.bylivestock.com

Richard & Helen Sydorko 306-429-2711 Wade Sydorko 306-424-2961 Box 57, Glenavon, SK S0G 1Y0 mutriefarms@gmail.com

Sale Manager

Helge & Candace By 306-584-7937 Helge 306-536-3374 charolaisbanner@gmail.com

Charolais Connection • March 2013

55


EXPERIENCE TALKS

Intranasal Vaccination Against Respiratory Disease Marianne Hunter, DVM, Hunter Charolais

In the past few years, we have experienced trouble with respiratory disease in our young calves. We would typically see them start to get sick about 5‐6 weeks of age. Using an intramuscular viral vaccine helped, unfortunately, we did not seem to get the timing right. They shouldn’t be vaccinated until they are about 3 weeks of age and with the vaccine response taking 10‐14 days we were always just a little slow in getting the vaccinating done. Now we use an intranasal vaccine that provides protection to 3 main respiratory viruses—IBR, BRSV and PI3. These viruses attack the calf’s first line of defense—the nasal mucosa. Once the mucosa has been destroyed or severely impaired it allows other viruses and bacteria to enter the respiratory system and cause more damage. These viruses also have the ability to cause suppression of the immune system. It’s like someone being very stressed and overtired—they get sick usually

with a cold and if the patient is not careful, can turn into pneumonia. The advantage of using an intranasal vaccine is it causes a local immunity, ie right in the nose where the initial “attack” occurs. This local immunity develops quickly after this vaccine is given and because it is a local immunity does not interfere with the antibodies the calf receives from the colostrum. Giving an intramuscular vaccine too early in the calf’s life may not work as good as it should if there are a lot of colostral antibodies. The biggest drawback of this vaccine is it acts quickly but it also disappears fairly quickly. You have to remember to booster the calves with either another intranasal or an intramuscular viral vaccine within 90 days. The vaccine is given to baby calves at birth—usually the last time you handle them before turning them out of the barn. The vaccine is given by squirting the vaccine up into the nasal passages using a long cannula.

It is quite easy to do. We do ours when we tag just before leaving the barn at 2‐3 days of age. We have had very good luck with preventing respiratory disease in the calves. The vaccine has also been shown to “prime” the immune system for the next vaccination—it helps to stimulate the immune response quicker when the next vaccine is given. This vaccine may also be of value in the face of a respiratory outbreaks because of the quick acting immunity that is achieved. Remember that vaccines are another tool but do not replace good management. Overcrowding the calves allows the viruses to easily transfer from one calf to another. Environmental issues also play a role—constant high humidity allow the viruses to be transferred easily on the water droplets. And once again, the calf’s immune system has to be ready to go to work so proper nutrition is key in the development of protective antibodies.

R & G McDONALD LIVESTOCK Selling by Private Treaty at the Farm 11/2 Year Olds & Yearlings • All Polled • Some Red Factor Will be semen tested Delivered and Guaranteed R & G McDONALD LIVESTOCK 61Z – HTA Bravia Grandson BW 98 lb. • Correct and Long BW 1.2 WW 46.9 YW 87.4 M 18.8 TM 42.3

56

Ron & Gail McDonald Box 85, Sidney, MB R0H 1L0

Tel: 204-466-2883 Cell: 204-724-2811 Charolais Connection • March 2013

155Y – HTA Rhapsody grandson BW 98 lb. • Red Factor with extra age BW 3.1 WW 43 YW 82 M 19 TM 41


Melanie Eastman and her family farm outside of Hartney, MB and have being using Charolais since 1973. I believe that the Charolais breed is in a league of its own. From start to finish, you can count on the Charolais females to perform. The Charolais steers gain in the feedlot and produce high yielding carcasses.

Melanie Eastman, Hartney, MB 2012 MCA Scholarship Recipient

Heart of Canada Show • July 19th, 2013, Harding Fair Charolais Pen Show • $500 cash prize for top PB pair and $500 cash prize for top commercial pair This year the Miami Ag Society as well as local Charolais breeeders are hosting the first Charolais Pen show held in conjunction with the Miami Fair and Rodeo, June 22 & 23, 2013. The show will commence at 3:00 pm after the open cattle show on June 22. Classes include PB Charolais class and Charolais influenced commercial class. • Cattle don't need to be halter broke. Pairs will be presented in a fenced show ring. • Cattle may be clipped but not a requirement • Pairs may show in the open show earlier that morning Join us for a post show meal. Contact Andre Steppler for more info.

Contact a Manitoba breeder near you. For a complete list go to the MCA website: www.charolaisbanner/mca.com President: Shawn Airey 204.328.7704 • 1st Vice President: Andre Steppler 204.435.2463 2nd Vice President: Hans Myhre 204.638.5664 • Sec-Treasurer: Rae Trimble-Olson 204.252.3115 Charolais Connection • March 2013

57


MANAGEMENT

Critical Harvest Period for Alfalfa John MacGregor, Extension, Manitoba Forage Council

As producers enter the fall season they often look at their alfalfa fields and wonder if they should harvest the standing alfalfa. Before making that decision there are a number of factors to consider that contribute to the potential for winterkill in the alfalfa. Some of the factors that contribute to winterkill are: • Stand age ‐ greater than 2 years • Variety ‐ most varieties have a winter hardiness rating • Soil type ‐ heavy or wet soils tend to be subject to heaving • Fertility ‐ soils low in potassium hinder carbohydrate storage • Harvest management ‐ alfalfa requires time to build root reserves for winter Fall Rest Period Harvesting alfalfa in the last 4‐6 weeks of the growing period has been associated with reduced yields and stand longevity. Typically alfalfa

58

requires 6 weeks or 450 Growing Degree Days (GDD) to accumulate root reserves, initiate crown buds and develop cold hardiness necessary to withstand normal winter temperatures. This period is known as the Critical Harvest Period. To better understand the importance of the Critical Harvest Period you need to realize that after alfalfa is cut, the new early growth draws carbohydrates from root reserves. Once the alfalfa plant has enough new leaf material (6‐8"), the plant starts to produce enough surplus energy to continue growing and to replace root reserves. With a multi‐cutting system (3‐4 cuts per year) alfalfa doesnʹt normally get enough time to fully replace root reserves and therefore a general recommendation is to allow the alfalfa to go to full flower at least once during the growing season. A killing frost for alfalfa is ‐4 to ‐5 C but as we get later in the season and the alfalfa is subject to cooler

Charolais Connection • March 2013

temperatures and shorter days the alfalfa begins to harden off. These factors increase alfalfa ability to withstand even lower temperatures but at this point the alfalfa has stopped growing. If less than 200 GDD are expected after the alfalfa has been cut, alfalfa will not grow to any significant degree. This can be useful if your alfalfa is in full bloom by the middle of September. Taking a final cut at this stage would normally be considered safe. For help determining GDD for your area go to the MAFRI Ag Weather site. One final point: when taking a final cut, leave enough stubble to trap 15‐ 20 cm of snow. This can be provided by leaving strips of standing alfalfa to trap snow. Snow cover is necessary to insulate the crowns of alfalfa during the winter. For more information, please visit www.mbforagecouncil.mb.ca.


A sample of the 25 bulls on offer • Many are Polled • Purebreds • Full French • French Influenced

JBF47Z • BW 106, Adj 205 838, Adj 365 1347 Merit Roundup x Nobleman An awful lot of things are right about this future herdsire.

XEB 35Z • BW 80, Adj 205 742, Adj 365 1172 A thick, long bodied, big-topped “herdbull” kind. He will make you some thick, hairy calves and his pedigree says it all, tracing back to the famous "Freedom" bull.

BMA 12Z • BW 105, Adj 205 741, Adj 365 1291 A long bodied stout made Freedom son out of a KCM RIO Chico daughter.

Brought to you by the following progressive breeders: Sunrise Charolais Jim, Susan and Laurie Baker 1287 Conc 6 RR 4 Stayner, ON L0M1S0 705-428-3205; jsbaker3205@gmail.com

Bridor Charolais Brian and Doris Aitken RR 3, Mount Forest, ON N0G 2L0 519-323-2538; bridorcharolais@yahoo.ca www.bridorcharolais.com

Echo Spring Charolais Doug, Earl, Cory, Ryan and Erin Briggs 1064 Line 10 N RR 2 Hawkestone, ON L0L 1T0 705-487-5840; briggserin@hotmail.com

Contact us for further information or a catalogue or view online at www.charolaisbanner.com

2nd

March 29, 2013

Annual Family Bull Sale

at 1:30 p.m. at the Ranch

• 25 Hereford • 25 Angus • 30 Charolais AHT 21Y

THJ 5Y

KJW 217Z

Select Open Heifers Selling KJWW 7Z

MVY 21X 2012 Farmfair and Agribition Champion Bull, Agribition Beef Supreme Top 10 Finalist, tied for BOSS Show Bull of 2012

John & Kirsten Taylor Ph: 780.858.2435 Cell: 780.806.3395

KJW 124Z

Kevin & Janice, Kailey & Lexi Wirsta Ph: 780.724.2789 Cell: 780.614.5959 email: kcow@telus.net

Contact us if you would like to receive a catalogue… or view it online at Charolais Connection • March 2013

ww w.kcow.ca 59


MANAGEMENT

Do Your Cattle Have Attitude? Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs

Cattle behaviour is an important, but often overlooked trait. Everyone who handles cattle will have a few stories about animals that exhibited "crazy" behaviour, hopefully not including any injuries to people or animals. While these extreme situations live on in our memories, cattle exhibit a whole range of behaviours when handled, from being very docile to showing moderate signs of stress (like some head bobbing), to more dramatic actions such as continuous bouncing and kicking (like a teenager deprived of their smart phone). Calm cattle are much easier to work with and more likely to get their vaccines, implants, tags and other procedures applied properly ‌ you can only wait so long for the animal to settle down! Research has also found that cattle which have a calm temperament perform better in the feedlot than those with wild temperament, so there is an economic benefit to having calmer cattle. One of the most common methods of measuring cattle temperament is chute scoring. An observer stands back and evaluates the behaviour of an animal during the time it is in the scale or headgate, and assigns a score based on the amount and type of movement exhibited by the animal. An example of a chute scoring system is shown in Table 1. Chute scores are useful, repeatable measurements of cattle temperament,

but they require extra labour during processing (already a busy time!) and work best when always done by the same person. This is because they are subjective evaluations, and different people will score behaviour somewhat differently. A recent study by Thomas Sebastien and coworkers at the University of Saskatchewan compared the subjective scorecard method (Table 1) of evaluating temperament with 3 objective methods. These methods were i) using a strain gauge on the headgate to measure pressure exerted by the animal, ii) using chute exit time to measure the speed with which animals left the headgate, and iii) a movement measuring device which collected and analysed data from the load cells on an electronic scale. Four hundred steers were handled three times, at 2 month intervals. As part of the experimental procedure, each animal had its ear handled while in the headgate. Based on coat colour, the steers represented a mixture of common breeds and breed crosses. The researchers found that overall, the objective measurements were correlated with each other, showing that they were measuring different aspects of the same underlying trait. However, they also found that some of the average levels of the measurements were different between the 3 handling times, with cattle showing increased stress

Table 1 Chute scoring definitions1,a Chute Score

60

Behaviour Criteria

1

Very little or no movement

2

Low amplitude movements or <2 vigorous kicks or shakes

3

More than 2 violent/vigorous kicks, shakes, jumps, etc.

4

Nearly continous violent movements (some brief pauses)

5

Continuous violent movements (no pause)

Charolais Connection â&#x20AC;˘ March 2013

during the 2nd handling procedure compared with the 1st and 3rd handlings. It appeared that animals going through the chute for the 2nd time after a 2 month feeding period did not benefit from familiarity with the procedure. Subjective scoring (based on visual observation) was also correlated in general with the objective measurements (strain force, exit time, and load cell measures). This showed that both the chute scoring system and the mechanical/electrical measures were evaluating different components of the animalsĘš underlying temperament. However, the authors point out that objective measurements provide an advantage by eliminating observer bias and thus may be better tools for temperament selection. Since most of the chute scores were between 1 and 3, with few 4s and 5s recorded, the researchers divided cattle into 2 groups: i) calm, with scores of 1 or 2, and ii) wild, with scores of 3, 4 and 5. They found that most of the objective measures were statistically different between the 2 groups, for each handling event. They then compared cattle growth performance between the "wild" and "calm" groups. They found that the calm cattle had a significantly higher average daily gain (ADG) than the wild cattle (2.64 lbs/day compared to 2.47) (see Fig. 1). This indicates that animals which have a "poor attitude," and are more excitable when handled, are also more likely to be poor performers in the feedlot. Surprisingly, exit speed out of the headgate was not correlated with ADG. The authors indicate that this does not agree with earlier studies, and may be due to differences between beef cattle species [Bos taurus in this study vs. Bos indicus ] or other factors. Similarly, strain gauge measures were not correlated


with ADG either. The only objective measurement related to ADG was movement in the scale (measured by load cells), which had a significant negative correlation to ADG (see Fig. 2). This means that cattle which exhibited relatively vigorous movement when restrained gained less during the feeding period.

SKW 75Z • BW 92 lb. • Sept 800 lb. Alcatraz X Kaboom BW .38 WW 40.6 YW 80.8 M 22.7

SKW 45Z • BW 74 lb. • Sept 770 lb. Roundup X Steppler 83U BW -2.9 WW 45.8 YW 85.9 M 21

The movement of cattle restrained in electronic scales, recorded and interpreted by a special device, could be used to predict behaviour‐related differences among cattle for feedlot ADG. It could also be used to cull out wild cattle early on in the feeding period, or possibly prior to purchase. Since ADG has economic value, this

SKW 22Z • BW 105 lb. • Sept 1050 lb. Merit Roundup X Misty Creek Vision BW 1.8 WW 53.1 YW 100 Milk 22.2

Stephen & Kristin Wielgosz Yellow Creek, SK • T 306.279.2033 C 306.279.7709 wielgoszsk@gmail.com

Charolais Connection • March 2013

measure could be used to help estimate differences in profitability among feedlot cattle. It could also be included in genetic evaluation programs, especially performance tests of young beef bulls. Not only are cattle with the right attitude easier to handle, they also perform better in the feedlot!

SKW 29Z • BW 108 lb. • Sept 1000 lb. Steppler 83U X Peugeot Et BW 4.6 WW 53.3 YW 97.3

SKW 27Z • BW 75 lb. • WW 885 lb. Roundup X Durango BW -3.8 WW 39.2 YW 85.6 M 25.7

61


MANAGEMENT

If You’re Experiencing Unexplained Reproductive Losses, Leptospirosis Could be the Culprit By Troy Smith

A few years ago, numerous public health organizations issued information regarding the emergence of an “infectious disease of global importance” – warning that reports of leptospirosis outbreaks were increasing among populations of both industrialized and developing nations. That kind of announcement may have sounded ominous to their city cousins, but many livestock people realized that leptospirosis was not a newly discovered disease. They may not have realized that it is zoonotic, meaning humans as well as multiple species of animals are susceptible to the bacterial infection. Many cattle folk routinely vaccinate their cattle against “lepto”, knowing it is a potential cause of abortions in breeding herds. It’s an insidious threat since pregnant cows or heifers may become infected and abort without having shown any previous symptoms. In some cases, abortions and other reproductive failures occur in herds thought to have been immunized against the disease through vaccination. Understanding how that can happen requires some basic knowledge of leptospiral bacteria. “We’re not talking about a simple pathogen,” explains Iowa State University Extension Veterinarian Grant Dewell. “Over 200 different serovars (strains) of leptospira exist, and each is adapted to a different host. Cattle are the adapted host for the hardjo‐bovis serovar, which is believed to cause a lot of fetal loss.” That doesn’t mean cattle do not become infected by other strains of leptospirosis. They can. Historically, the five types considered to be of consequence to cattle are pomona, grippotyphosa, canicola, 62

icterhaemorrhagiae and hardjo. The maintenance host or carrier species for leptospira pomona, for example, is swine. “The old literature cited pomona as the likely cause of most leptospirosis in cattle. It probably was true back when many cattle producers also had pigs in the same barnyard. That’s seldom seen now, but dogs and other animals, including rodents, skunks and raccoons are hosts for other leptospira serovars that can infect cattle,” says Dewell. Regardless of serovar or the host to which it is adapted, leptospira colonize the urinary tracts of infected animals and are shed into the environment, through the animals’ urine. According to Dewell, the bacteria can survive for months in a warm, wet environment – especially standing water. Cattle can become infected by ingesting contaminated water, or bacteria may enter through wounds or through mucosal membranes. On farms and ranches, earthen dams, stock ponds and mud holes provide the most likely opportunities for cattle to come in contact with water contaminated with leptospira. Transmission also may occur through direct contact with urine, vaginal secretion or discharges associated with a recent abortion. Infected cattle also may transmit leptospira sexually. While abortions during the second half of gestation may be the most dramatic result of leptospirosis, Dewell says subclinical infections often cause more subtle infertility problems – cows that fail to rebreed in timely fashion or early embryonic deaths. Or, cows may conceive but ultimately deliver stillborn or weak, poor‐doing calves. Nor does Charolais Connection • March 2013

leptospirosis cause reproductive problems only. In calves, the acute form may attack the kidneys. Symptoms include dark‐colored urine, high fever and anemia. Vaccines for immunization against the five previously listed serovars have been available for many years. However, Dewell says the traditional “5‐way” vaccines often are ineffective against hardjo‐bovis. Remember, that is the serovar that is host adapted to cattle in the U.S. It’s not the same as the hardjo‐prajitno included in traditional vaccines. Bovine beasts infected with hardjo‐bovis can become reservoirs of infection, harboring the bug for long periods of time, shedding bacteria into the environment, and causing leptospirosis to persist in the herd. Colonized in the reproductive tract, hardjo‐bovis can be the cause of those subclinical reproductive problems. Bulls can become carriers too, showing no signs of disease but exposing females to infection with every service. Dewell advises producers to consult their veterinarian about an effective vaccination program. For producers in high‐risk areas or those whose herds have persistent reproductive problems, a truly comprehensive immunization program probably requires use of both 5‐way vaccine and a vaccine that targets hardjo‐bovis specifically. Annual vaccination is commonly recommended, usually four to six weeks prior to the start of breeding season, but some operations may benefit from vaccinating twice each year. It’s a good idea to make sure replacement animals are free of the disease and vaccinated before introducing them to the breeding


herd. It’s generally recommended that replacement heifers, or any females not previously vaccinated, receive a booster three to four weeks following the initial dose of any leptospirosis vaccine. Oklahoma State Veterinarian Rod Hall reminds producers that leptospirosis is transmissible to humans. It’s an occupational hazard to producers and veterinarians that come in regular contact with infected animals and their environment. In humans, says Hall, leptospirosis produces flu‐like symptoms. These include high fever, severe headache, chills, muscle aches, and vomiting, and may include jaundice (yellow skin and eyes), red eyes, abdominal pain, diarrhea, or a rash. Reported outbreaks of leptospirosis in humans are often attributed to participation in recreational activities in contaminated bodies of water. A majority of leptospiral infections are either sub clinical or result in very mild illness and recover without

any complications. “Normally, there’s not a huge risk of infection from livestock, if people use common sense and take routine sanitary procedures,” says Hall. “Dogs can spread leptospirosis, and pets probably pose a greater risk for infecting humans. Rats and mice are commonly infected and can be a source of contamination to feed and the environment. They are likely responsible for contributing to the spread of leptospirosis among cattle and other animals, and possibly to humans. Certainly, routine vaccination of cattle is recommended and helps reduce the risk of infection for people that work with cattle.” When a herd experiences unexplained reproductive problems, laboratory testing can determine whether leptospirosis is the likely culprit. According to Hall, urine can be cultured for leptospiral organisms, but an infection can be transient, so a negative test would not rule out leptospirosis.

“The best way to determine if a herd or an animal is experiencing problems due to lepto is to do blood tests on the cows that have aborted or to send a freshly aborted fetus to a diagnostic laboratory for testing,” recommends Hall. “The veterinarian will usually advise doing two blood samples on the cow. These are called ‘paired’ samples. Presence of a titer on the first sample could mean that the cow has lepto currently, has had it sometime in the past, or has been vaccinated against lepto. Finding a higher or rising titer on the second sample is a very good indication that it is a current infection and was most likely the cause of the problem.” Veterinary consultation can also help producers decide whether testing is warranted, economically, for their individual herds. With the authorʹs permission, this story is reprinted from the Angus Journal, 2012.

BULLS FOR SALE H A RO L A I S C J E L Call Jim and Rae Olson 204-252-3115 or 204-856-6357

Breeding for Calving Ease and Performance for over 30 years • Yearlings and Older • Red and White Factor Bulls • Semen Tested and Delivered

LEJ ZATS THE ONE 227Z • Red Factor, Dbl Pld CE 82 BW .9 WW 45 YW 88 M 22.3 TM 45

LEJ ZEPLIN 233Z • Red Factor, Dbl Pld CE 85 BW 1.2 WW 46 YW 93 M 22.9 TM 46

MRT YORK 101Y • Dbl Red, 3rd Gen Pld CE 79 BW 1.5 WW 38 YW 75 M 26.6 TM 46

CHAROLAIS LEADING THE WEIGH Charolais Connection • March 2013

63


RESEARCH

Lighter Heifers Lose Nothing Barb Baylor Anderson

Save on feed and maintain performance. If the drought has ravaged your feed options and your budget, researchers in Montana may have a solution. Heifers being prepared for breeding will still perform at lighter weights. A two‐year study completed on the state’s rangelands shows heifers can eat 20% less during the seven months between weaning and breeding with little to no impact on pregnancy rates. “With the cost of fuel and cost of production increasing, more and more people are open to new ideas. This is one tool producers can put in their toolbox,” says Richard Waterman, research animal scientist who led the study at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory rangeland beef cattle

64

facility. Waterman worked with colleagues Andrew Roberts, Thomas Geary, Leeson Alexander and Mark Petersen. The research results, published in the British Journal of Nutrition in 2011, confirmed heifers won’t suffer from reduced rations, and producers could save $21 per animal. More recently, Waterman has stated that although many factors have to be accounted for in respect to drought, the $21 savings was based on very conservative feed costs. A recent partial enterprise budget

analysis revealed a $37 advantage for heifers developed with the reduced‐ feed protocol. Study specifics The research was conducted with 32 heifers born to mothers fed harvested feed from the middle to the end of their pregnancies. Heifers were born from composite dams that

Charolais Connection • March 2013

are half red Angus, one‐quarter Charolais and one‐quarter Tarentaise. All belong to the Fort Keogh herd. The heifers were divided into two groups and fed in confinement during the development period between weaning and breeding. Heifers were weaned at seven months and bred at 14‐16 months of age. Animals in one group ate all they wanted. Feedbunks were never empty. Animals in the other group ate 80% as much feed as heifers of a common weight. “Heifers with unlimited feed grew faster than the calves on reduced rations, but the heifers that ate less used their feed more efficiently. It took less feed for them to gain a pound,” he says. Researchers administered two tests to measure how efficiently heifers turned feed into energy – a glucose‐


tolerance test and an acetate‐ producers” says Waterman. irreversible‐loss test. Acetate, which “Averaging the last eight years together, is a secondary energy source for we found that pregnancy rates have cows, is produced not differed by fermentation in between full‐ and The research results, the rumen. Waterman reduced‐fed heifers. published in the British Journal That indicates and colleagues evaluated how fast that reduced‐fed of Nutrition in 2011, acetate disappeared confirmed heifers won’t suffer heifers are not from the heifers’ reproductively from reduced rations, bloodstreams and compromised, was used for energy. even though these and producers could save heifers receive less Tests were $21 per animal. feed during the administered at the development period.” end of a 140‐day development period and again when the heifers Former Montana State University were pregnant with second calves. (MSU) Extension Beef Specialist During the second test, the heifers John Paterson, now executive director were grazing dormant forage of producer education with the on rangeland. National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, says while beef Waterman notes that a previous producers traditionally have thought study at the laboratory found that that heifers need to reach 65% of full animals use nutrients differently, body size by the time they are bred depending on the time of year. The for the first time, the study indicates worst time is fall and winter, when that percentage may only need to be range forage is dormant. Nutrients about 55%. can’t enter heifers’ cells as efficiently as other times. Waterman stresses that although reduced‐fed heifers are developed Similar research evaluating low‐ under this strategy, they are still input heifer development using growing, pregnant animals. different breeds and under different environmental conditions was “Following the development performed at the University of period, heifers should be maintained Nebraska, Waterman adds. on good‐quality forages and pastures,” Researchers found comparable results he says. “Heifers developed under related to production performance. this strategy are primed to take advantage of good‐quality Long-term success forages and pastures, and have “Heifer study was part of a long‐ improved ability to convert dietary term beef productivity study that feed into maternal body weight gain Fort Keogh scientists started in 2002, following development.” and it is unique and valuable to

Montana rangeland is good testing ground The Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory consists of about 55,000 acres, of which about 50,000 acres are native rangeland; 2,500 acres are dryland planted pasture; 1,000 are irrigated pasture; and 700 acres are irrigated cropland. Remaining acres contain headquarters, corrals and more. The lab has about 400 miles of fence and 220 miles of roads and trails. The facility has a 40,000‐ bushel feedmill and two feedlots for 1,000 head of growing cattle. Waterman says the beef cow herd has about 250 head of Line 1 Herefords, the oldest ongoing beef cattle selection experiment in the world. Another 400 head are cows used in the heifer study, and 750 head are commercial Angus‐cross cows. “Our research laboratory – native range – allows us to conduct long‐term research that provides beef producers with answers about long‐range effects of their short‐term management decisions,” says Waterman. “The laboratory affords the opportunity to conduct high‐ impact research and determine its feasibility, which reduces the risks beef producers have to take.”

SILVER A VALUABLE COMMODITY CHAROLAIS SIRED OUT OF A BLACK COW… IT WORKS! Charolais Connection • March 2013

65


66

Charolais Connection â&#x20AC;˘ March 2013


Have all of the Charolais news at your fingertips with a Charolais Banner subscription

Stay informed on Canadian genetics 8 times per year with the 124 Shannon Road, Regina, SK S4S 5B1 Canada Tel: 1.306.546.3940 Fax: 1.306.546.3942 email: charolaisbanner@sasktel.net

Subscription Order Form Name: _________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Tel: __________________________________ Email: __________________________________________________ Please check the term you prefer & send payment by cheque, or choose to pay by faxing or phoning in your credit card information.

CANADA

U.S.A.

OVERSEAS

 1 Year - $42.00  3 Year - $105.00

 1 Year - $75.00 CDN  1 Year 1st class - $115.00 CDN  3 Year - $200.00 CDN  3 Year 1st class - $320.00 CDN

 1 Year - $80.00 CDN  1 Year 1st class - $120.00 CDN  3 Year - $210.00 CDN  3 Year 1st class - $330.00 CDN

(Canadian funds, 5% gst included, #R106126014)

MC or VISA#: _____________________________________________ Expiry: _______________________________ Signature: ________________________________________________

Charolais Connection â&#x20AC;˘ March 2013

67


Services

68

Charolais Connection â&#x20AC;˘ March 2013


Alberta Breeders

Charolais Connection â&#x20AC;˘ March 2013

69


Manitoba Breeders

This could be your ad. Call today!

306.546.3940

British Columbia Breeders

70

Charolais Connection â&#x20AC;˘ March 2013


Maritime Breeders

Ontario Breeders

Charolais Connection â&#x20AC;˘ March 2013

71


Quebec Breeders

Saskatchewan Breeders

72

Charolais Connection â&#x20AC;˘ March 2013


This could be your ad. Call today!

306.546.3940

USA Breeders

Charolais Connection â&#x20AC;˘ March 2013

73


IMPORTANT ACTIVITIES IN OUR INDUSTRY

Calendar of Events March 6 1st Annual Wrangler Made Charolais Bull Sale, at Sekera‐Triple J Livestock Market, Westlock,AB

March 9 Neilson Cattle Co. Range Ready Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Yorkton, SK

March 8 A. Sparrow Farms Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Vanscoy, SK

March 10 108th Annual Regina Bull Sale, Evraz Place, Regina, SK

March 8 South Central Alberta Charolais Breeders Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart March 8 10th Annual Northern Classic Bull Sale, Grand Prairie, AB March 9 Horseshoe E Charolais Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Johnstone Auction Mart, Moose Jaw, SK March 9 Vente Synergie, 12:30 p.m., Ste‐Sophie de Levard, QC

March 12 McTavish & Guests Charolais and Red Angus Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Moosomin, SK

March 15 Family Tradition Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at Rolling D Charolais, Dropmore, MB March 15 Northern Alliance Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Spiritwood (SK) Stockyards March 15 Reese Cattle Co. Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart

March 12 Valley Charolais Bull Sale, 12:30 p.m. at BC Livestock Co‐op, Kamloops BC

March 16 Pleasant Dawn Farms 11th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Virden, MB

March 13 Buffalo Lake Charolais and Shorthorns Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Stettler (AB) Auction Mart

March 16 Rollin’ Acres & Guests 3rd Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Maple Hill Auctions, Hanover, ON

March 14 Charolais Power 2012, 1:00 p.m., Dryland Cattle Trading Corp., Veteran, AB

March 16 Lanoie Bros. Charolais Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Johnstone Auction Mart, Moose Jaw, SK

WAWEDASH FARMS LTD. All Red Factor Charolais Bull Sale Wednesday, March 20, 2013 • 1:00 p.m. • Dryland Cattle Trading Corp, Veteran, AB

45

Semen Tested Two Year Olds

2

Purebred Simmental Two Year Olds WAWEDASH ECHO 50Y

WAWEDASH RED SHOT 5Y

WAWEDASH FARMS LTD. Wayne, Wendy & Dale Hislop 306-968-2414

Brad & Shannon Kuzmiski 403-664-2755

Graham Schetzsle 403-575-3772

Watch the sale at www.drylandcattle.com • Our ranch has been listed for sale 74

Charolais Connection • March 2013


CHARWALD CHAROLAIS BULL SALE March 27, 2013, Provost Livestock Exchange Held in conjunction with the Provost Bull Sale Selling

15 Yearling Bulls 4 Two Year Old Bulls CHARWALD 10Z (Horned) MXS Marathon 849U x JSR Equity 17M BW 2.4 WW 48 YW 87 TM 44

CHARWALD CHAROLAIS Norman and Garnet Dewald Box 16, Altario, AB T0C 0E0

March 16 Sandan Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Erskine, AB March 16 Ferme Palerme Charolais Bull Sale, Vinoy Test Station, 1:00 p.m., at Ferme Gagnon, Cheneville, QC

CHARWALD TRV 23Z (Horned) SOS Polled Detonator 8M x XPB Wind 12H BW -.1 WW 47 YW 91 TM 53

CHARWALD TRV 18Z (Polled) Shelco Made Easy 512R x SVY Freedom Pld 307N BW 5.1 WW 33 YW 57 TM 41

March 23 Wilgenbusch Charolais North of the 53rd Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the CSS Charolais Ranch, Paynton, SK March 23 PIC Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Carson Sales Arena, Listowell, ON

March 16 27th Annual Northern Impact Charolais Breeders Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Nilsson Bros. Livestock, Clyde, AB

March 23 Transconʹs Mountainview Angus, Simmental and Charolais Bull Sale, Innisfail, AB

March 20 Wawadash Farms Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Dryland Cattle Trading Corp., Veteran, AB

March 23 Benchmark Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Renfrew Pontiac Livestock Facility, Cobden, ON

March 21 Diamond W Charolais & Angus 11th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Valley Livestock Sales, Minitonas, MB

March 23 Alameda Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Alameda (SK) Auction Mart March 24 Best of the Breeds Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Parkland Livestock Auction, Leross, SK

March 22 Winn Man Farms 12th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Winnipegosis, MB March 22 Thistle Ridge Ranch Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Taber (AB) Agriplex

March 24 Cattleman’s Classic Multi‐Breed Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Virden, MB

Charolais Connection • March 2013

Norman 780-753-1229 Garnet 780-753-4533

March 25 White is Right Bull Sale, Perlich Bros. Auction Mart, Lethbridge, AB March 25 North West Bull Sale, 1;00 p.m., Kramer’s Big Bid Barn, North Battleford, SK March 25 Harvie Ranching Bull Sale, at the ranch, Olds, AB March 26 Steppler Farms 2nd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Steppler Sale Barn, Miami, MB March 27 Charwald Charolais Bull Sale at Provost Bull Sale, Provost, AB March 27 Hi‐Weigh Charolais Breeders Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Neepawa (MB) Fairgrounds March 27 Tradition Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Bow Slope Shipping, Brooks, AB

75


March 28 Elder Charolais 3rd Annual Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Coronach, SK March 29 K‐Cow Ranch Family Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the Ranch, Elk Point, AB March 30 Murphy Livestock Charolais & Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Western Pride Auction Mart, Bonnyville, AB

March 30 Impact Angus & Charolais Bull & Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sales March 30 Borderland Cattle Company Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Rockglen, SK March 30 PIC Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Carson Sales Arena, Listowel, ON

March 30 Gilliland Bros. Charolais & Perrot‐ Frietag Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Alameda (SK) Auction Mart

April 1 Wilgenbusch Charolais 10th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Halbrite, SK

March 30 Forsyth Bros. and Tee M Jay Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Ashern (MB) Auction Mart

April 2 Cedarlea Charolais & Windy Willows Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Windy Willows Farm, Hodgeville, SK

March 30 JTA Diamond Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Johnstone Auction Mart, Moose Jaw, SK

April 3 White Cap/Rosso Charolais & Howe Red Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at White Cap Charolais, Moose Jaw, SK

March 30 2nd Annual High Point Charolais Breeders Bull Sale, 6 p.m., Carmarthen Lake Farms, Singhampton, ON

April 4 Hunter Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., DST, at the farm, Roblin, MB

76

Charolais Connection • March 2013

April 6 Manitoba Bull Test Station Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the test station, Carberry, MB April 6 Saunders Charolais 8th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Keady (ON) Livestock Market April 6 VerMillionaires Charolais Group 27th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Nilsson Bros. Livestock Exchange, Vermilion, AB April 6 Maritime Bull Test Station Sale, at the test station, Nappan, NS April 6 N.E. Source Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Edwards Livestock Centre, Tisdale, SK April 9 Top Cut Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Stockman’s Weigh Co., Mankota, SK April 9 Transconʹs Cattle Country Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Beautiful Plains Ag Complex, Neepawa, MB


WPLB Consignments to the Last Chance Bull Sale TUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 Johnstone’s Auction Mart • Moose Jaw, SK 12:00 Noon

WPLB 8X

Selling 5 Yearlings sired by WPLB 8X, our BLUEGRASS son with a 90 lb BW Selling 3 Two Year Old bulls sired by RPJ MIDORA 955W

WPLB 6Z

WPLB 3Z

BW 90, WW 836, Jan 18 at under 10 mos of age 1150 lb.

BW 85, WW 819, Jan 18 at under 10 mos of age 1185 lb.

WPLB CHAROLAIS

Thank to our You 2012 buyers

Walter & Lydia Palaschuk Box 580, Raymore, SK S0A 3J0

WPLB 9Z

306-835-2612

BW 98, WW 874, Jan 18 at under 10 mos of age 1150 lb.

April 10 Mutrie Farms/Bar H Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Candiac (SK) Auction Market April 11 Size Matters Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at Sliding Hills Charolais Farm, Canora, SK April 13 Eastern Select Bull & Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., Hoards Station Sale Barn, Campbellford, ON April 20 Cornerstone Charolais & Red Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Whitewood (SK) Auction Mart April 20 Cedardale Charolais 10th Annual Bull & Select Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Nestleton, ON April 27 Vente de Taureau D’Asbestos,12:30 p.m. at Ranch Lougami, QC May 28 Last Chance Bull Sale, 12 noon, Johnstone’s Auction Mart, Moose Jaw, SK June 7 & 8 Saskatchewan Charolais Association 50th Anniversay Celebration & AGM in conjunction with the Canadian Charolais Association AGM, Moose Jaw, SK

View the results of all the Charolais happenings

www.charolaisbanner.com

July 17-20, 2013 CCYA Conference & Show, Shelburne, ON

Updated daily Charolais Connection • March 2013

77


LOOKING TO FIND SOMEONE?

Advertisers Index Amabec Charolais .........................................71 Anchor J Charolais ........................................69 Arntzen, Dean ...............................................68 B Bar D Charolais ..........................................71 Bar H Charolais.........................................55,72 Bar Punch Ranch ...........................................69 Bar 7 Easy Charolais .....................................69 Beau Char Charolais......................................69 Beaver Creek Charolais.................................43 Beck Farms.....................................................72 Be-Rich Farms ................................................69 Blackbern Charolais ......................................71 Bo-Jan Enterprises.........................................72 Borderland Cattle Company.........................47 Bova-Tech Ltd. ...............................................68 Bow Valley Genetics Ltd. ..............................68 Bricney Stock Farms ......................................72 Bridor Charolais........................................59,71 Brimner Cattle Company ....................38,39,72 Buffalo Lake Charolais .................................69 By Livestock ...................5,9,15,20,21,27,30,31, ...............................................38,39,55,IBC,OBC Campbells Charolais......................................37 Carey, Brent ...................................................68 Cattle in Motion.............................18,20,21,33 Cedardale Charolais .................................33,71 Cedarlea Farms................................................5 Charla Moore Farms .....................................72 Char-Maine Ranching ...................................69 Charolais Journal...........................................68 Charwald Charolais .......................................75 Charworth Charolais Farms ..........................69 Chomiak Charolais .......................................69 Circle Cee Charolais Farms............................69 Clear Lake Charolais .....................................69 Cornerstone Charolais ..................................71 Cougar Hill Ranch .........................................72 Creek's Edge Land & Cattle Co. ..............61,72 C2 Charolais..............................................51,70 Davis-Rairdan ................................................68 Diamond W Charolais..............................15,72 Dog Patch Acres ............................................35 Dorran, Ryan .................................................68 Double L Ranch .............................................69 Dubuc Charolais ............................................72 Dudgeon-Snobelen Land & Cattle ...............71 Eaton Charolais .............................................73 Echo Spring Charolais ...................................59 Elder Charolais Farms .........................30,31,72 Ericson Livestock Services .............................68 Everview Charolais ........................................70 Fawcett Cattle Company Inc. .......................69 Fischer Charolais............................................69 Fleury, Michael ..............................................68 Foat Valley Stock Farm .................................69 Footprint Farms ............................................69 Forsyth Bros. Charolais ...........................25,70 4-G Charolais Ranch.................................52,73 Freitag Perrot Cattle Co................................27 Future Farms .................................................69 Gerrard Cattle Co.....................................11,69 Gilliland Bros. Charolais...........................27,73

78

Good-Anchor Charolais ................................76 Grant Farms ..............................................50,69 GRP Ltd. .........................................................68 H.S. Knill Company Ltd. ................................68 Happy Haven Charolais ................................70 Harcourt Charolais ........................................35 Hard Rock Land & Cattle Co.........................70 Harvie Ranching ...........................................69 HBH Farms Purebred Black Angus ...............23 HEJ Charolais ................................................69 Hicks Charolais .........................................13,71 High Bluff Stock Farm.............................IFC,70 Holowaychuck, Rob ......................................19 Horseshoe E Charolais ..................................73 Howe Red Angus ..........................................41 HTA Charolais Farm .............................3,23,70 Hunter Charolais .......................................9,70 JMB Charolais ...............................................71 Johnstone Auction ........................................68 Jordan River Charolais .............................53,73 JTA Diamond .................................................54 Kaiser Charolais Farm ...................................69 Kanewischer, Jerry ...................................25,68 Kay-R Charolais ............................................69 K-Cow Ranch .................................................59 Kirlene Cattle ................................................71 La Ferme Patry de Weedon ..........................72 Lakeview Charolais .......................................76 Land O' Lakes Charolais................................71 Langstaff Charolais .......................................71 Lanoie Bros. Charolais ..................................58 Laurel Creek Ranch .......................................73 Leemar Charolais ..........................................69 LEJ Charolais.............................................63,71 Lindskov-Thiel Charolais Ranch....................73 Little Valley View Ranch ...............................46 LiveAuctions.TV.............................................68 M & L Cattle Co.............................................71 Mack's Charolais............................................72 Manitoba Charolais Association ..................57 Maple Leaf Charolais ....................................70 Martens Cattle Co. .....................................7,73 Martens Charolais .........................................71 McAvoy Charolais Farm ...........................29,73 McKay Charolais............................................71 McKeary Charolais ........................................70 McLeod Livestock ..........................................68 McTavish Charolais........................................73 Meadows Charolais.......................................71 Medonte Charolais........................................72 Miller Land & Livestock ...........................48,72 Misty Hills Charolais......................................76 Murphy Livestock .....................................49,70 Mutrie Farms ............................................55,73 Myhre Land and Cattle.................................71 Nahachewsky Charolais ................................73 Norheim Ranching ........................................68 P & H Ranching Co........................................70 Packer Charolais ............................................72 Palmer Charolais ...........................................73 Parklane Charolais ........................................70 Patton Charolais............................................72

Charolais Connection â&#x20AC;˘ March 2013

Perlich, Bob ...................................................19 Perrot-Martin Charolais ................................73 Phillips Farms.................................................73 Pleasant Dawn Charolais ..............................71 Poley, Chris ....................................................68 Poplar Bluff Stock Farm................................59 Potter Charolais ............................................72 Prairie Cove Consulting ................................68 Prairie Gold Charolais ...................................73 Pro-Char Charolais ........................................70 Qualman Charolais ......................................73 R&G McDonald..............................................56 Rammer Charolais ..............................23,37,71 Ranch Ostiguy Charolais...............................72 Rawes Ranches ..............................................70 Rebuild with Steel.........................................68 Reykdal Farms Charolais...............................71 Ringuette Charolais ......................................71 Rollin' Acres Charolais ..................................72 Rosso Charolais..............................................41 RRTS Charolais...............................................70 Saddleridge Charolais ...................................70 Sandan Charolais Farms.............................6,70 Saunders Charolais...................................18,72 Scarth Cattle Co. ...........................................71 Serhienko/Voegeli Cattle Co. .......................73 Sharodon Farms ............................................72 Skeels, Danny ................................................68 Sliding Hills Charolais ..............................53,73 Sproule Charolais ..........................................70 Spruceview Charolais ....................................70 Stephen Charolais Farm................................73 Steppler Farms Ltd. ............................20,21,71 Stock, Mark ...................................................68 Stockmen's Insurance....................................68 Sunrise Charolais ......................................59,72 Swistun Charolais ..........................................16 T Bar C Cattle Co.............................6,23,29,35, Tee M Jay Charolais ......................................25 Temple Farms .............................................8,73 Thistle Ridge Ranch .................................19,70 Toner, Bob .....................................................19 Transcon Livestock Corp. ...................IFC,11,69 Tri-N Charolais ..........................................43,71 Turnbull Charolais .........................................70 Wawedash Farms Ltd...............................73,74 Western Litho................................................69 Whiskey Hollow Cattle Company ................72 White Cap Charolais ................................41,73 White Heather Charolais ..............................70 Wienk Charolais ............................................73 Wilgenbusch Charolais...................73,IBC,OBC Windy Willows Farms .....................................5 Winn Man Farms...........................................17 Winters Charolais ..........................................72 Wood River Charolais ...................................45 WPLB Charolais .............................................77 Wrangler Charolais .......................................70 WRAZ Red Angus.....................................38,39 XXX Farms .....................................................76


Selling: 51 Charolais Yearlings JWX 895Z

JWX HORRIBLE BOSS 895Z • Polled HTA THOR x PCC NAVIGATOR BW 96 Adj 205 770 Adj 365 1413 CE N/A BW 2.3 WW 44 YW 79 M 21.2 TM 43 JWX 53Z

JWX WIDE AWAKE 53Z • Polled CSS SIR NAVIGATOR x CSS FIRST WIND BW 104 Adj 205 791 Adj 365 1525 CE 38 BW 4.3 WW 48 YW 87 M 14.8 TM 39

JWX 16Z

JWX DARK KNIGHT 16Z • Polled HTA THOR x PCC NAVIGATOR BW 100 Adj 205 662 Adj 365 1417 CE N/A BW 3.2 WW 39 YW 70 M 19.2 TM 39 JWX 60Z

JWX LIMITLESS 60Z • Horned PCC NAVIGATOR x CSS SIR CLEAR CUT BW 111 Adj 205 896 Adj 365 1594 CE 58 BW 4.4 WW 50 YW 87 M 20.3 TM 45

JWX 23Z

JWX DOMINO 23Z • Dbl Pld CSS SIR NAVIGATOR x HTA PLD RAIN BW 99 Adj 205 710 Adj 365 1424 CE 62 BW 3 WW 39 YW 71 M 15.4 TM 35 JWX 113Z

JWX GOON 113Z • Horned PCC NAVIGATOR x KAYR GRID GRID IRON BW 114 Adj 205 749 Adj 365 1405 CE 45 BW 4.7 WW 42 YW 73 M 26.4 TM 48

• All bulls are Semen Tested • All bulls are Guaranteed • Delivery Available • Ultrasound Data Available Contact us for more information • View catalogue or videos of bulls online at www.wilgenbusch charolais.com

John & Brenda, Colin, Conrad & Erica, Craig & Tricia Wilgenbusch Box 4, Halbrite, SK S0C 1H0 T 306-458-2688 Cell 306-458-7873 Craig’s cell 306-458-7482 wilgenbusch@sasktel.net www.wilgenbuschcharolais.com

Sale Manager:

Helge & Candace By 124 Shannon Road Regina, SK S4S 5B1 T 306-584-7937 Cell 306-536-4261 charolaisbanner@gmail.com www.bylivestock.com


Selling: 20 Two-Year-Olds • 55 Yearlings

JWX 955Z 3rd Gen Red, Dbl Pld Moderate, correct, dark red son of SRK Solid -.6 BW EPD and still a 742 lb. 205 DW

Bigger and better than ever is this year’s offering of white and red factor bulls

JWX 910Z

JWX 706Z

Tan, horned son of SRK Solid. You want length, top, muscle it is all here. Just an 81 lb. BW and a -1.7 BW EPD and he still had a 1389 lb. YW

Reserve Grand Champion Bull at the Manitoba Livestock Expo last fall, this 3rd Gen Pld son of JWX Silver Bullet puts it all together.

• Semen Tested • All Bulls Guaranteed • Red Factor

Delivered when you need them Terms Available – Contact Us Ultrasound Data Available

Prime Rib Supper and bull viewing Sunday, March 31 ~ Supper 5-7

Sired by the RPJ Carrera bull he had an 88 lb. BW but his EPD still put him in the top 3% of the breed for WW & YW and his dam has produced other sons working in purebred herds.

Bulls Guaranteed To Work and Make You Money

Will keep bulls for FREE until you need them in the pasture

10TH ANNIVERSARY

JWX 421Z

JWX 1024Z Dbl Pld son of the proven M6 Gridmaker who started out with an 88 lb. BW and still has a 1479 lb. YW and an EPD in the top 10% of the breed for milk.

JWX 1084Z 4th Gen Pld Calving ease son of our homegrown JWX Superduty bull. 81 lb BW and in the top 5% of the breed for calving ease.

Box 4, Halbrite, SK S0C 1H0 John & Brenda 306-458-2688, cell 306-458-7873 Craig & Tricia 306-458-7482 Colin, Conrad & Erica wilgenbusch@sasktel.net www.wilgenbuschcharolais.com

Call for more information or a catalogue. View catalogue and videos of the bulls online at www.wilgenbuschcharolais.com

Sale Manager:

Helge & Candace By 306-584-7937 Helge 306-536-4261 Candace 306-536-3374 charolaisbanner@gmail.com www.bylivestock.com


Charolais Connection March 2013