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Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

“Leading The Way For A Safer Pinellas”


TABLE OF CONTENTS MESSAGE FROM THE SHERIFF................................. 4 ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW................................. 5 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART......................................................6 BUDGET.................................................................................8 COMMUNITY OVERVIEW.........................................................9 ACCREDITATION...................................................................10 HUMAN RESOURCES BUREAU..............................................11 USE OF FORCE......................................................................12 ADMINISTRATIVE INVESTIGATION DIVISION........................13

OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW.................................... 15 CRIME RATES.......................................................................15 CONTRACT CITIES & SERVICE CONTRACTS..........................16 PATROL OPERATIONS BUREAU.............................................19 PATROL OPERATIONS BUREAU: CENTRAL DISTRICT..............................................................20 PATROL OPERATIONS BUREAU: NORTH DISTRICT..................................................................21 PATROL OPERATIONS BUREAU: SPECIAL OPERATIONS..........................................................22 PATROL OPERATIONS BUREAU: YOUTH EDUCATION & ADMIN SERVICES...............................23 INVESTIGATIVE OPERATIONS BUREAU.................................24 JUDICIAL OPERATIONS BUREAU..........................................25 DEPARTMENT OF DETENTION & CORRECTIONS...................26 DEPARTMENT OF DETENTION & CORRECTIONS: MEDICAL DIVISION...............................................................27

MAJOR EVENTS & CASES..................................... 28 NEW INITIATIVES................................................. 31 UPDATES ON CURRENT INITIATIVES..................... 33


MESSAGE FROM THE SHERIFF Last year was challenging for everyone. Our community struggled with the impact of COVID-19, and law enforcement faced increased scrutiny following the murder of George Floyd. I had candid conversations in the community about what happened in Minneapolis, the policies we have in place, and other reformative programs that addressed a lot of the policing-related concerns being discussed at a national level. I found that many members of the community were unaware of our programs and policies, which told me that we needed to do a better job of getting the word out. As a result, I am pleased to present our 2020 Annual

educated discussions about the ways we can work together

Report. Within the report, you will find an agency overview,

to make our community safer.

a comprehensive operational summary, detailed statistics, updates on ongoing initiatives, and more.

Thank you for continued partnership and support.

I hope that you will take some time to review the report in

Sincerely,

order to gain a better understanding of how our agency operates and the proactive steps we are taking to address the unique challenges facing law enforcement today. Staying informed is one of the most important things

Bob Gualtieri

that you can do as a citizen because it allows us to have

Sheriff, Pinellas County

On Wednesday February 17, 2021, Deputy Michael Magli lost his life in the line of duty. Initially hired as a part-time Criminal Justice Specialist, Deputy Magli transferred to a deputy recruit position and was assigned to the Patrol Operations Bureau in 2013. He served eight years with the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office. Deputy Magli has the unfortunate distinction of being the first line-of-duty death in the 109-year history of the agency. He leaves behind his wife, Stephanie, and two young daughters. His name will be added to federal, state, and local law enforcement memorials. The Deputy Michael J. Magli Memorial Fund will serve as the official memorial fund for the Magli family. Those interested in donating are asked to visit any SunTrust banking location or send checks to the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office Fiscal Affairs Bureau made payable to the memorial.

4 MESSAGE FROM THE SHERIFF


ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW

Responsible for law enforcement and public safety, the sheriff is designated by Florida law as the chief law enforcement officer of the county, and the sheriff is designated as the “conservator of the peace.” The Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office (PCSO) is also responsible for service of all legal process (writs, warrants, subpoenas, and other legal documents) directed to it by the courts or the county commissioners, and like many counties, is the sole keeper of the county jail and provider of court security. The foundation of the PCSO is built on leadership and

The sheriff’s office employs approximately 850 sworn law

technology. The organization possesses a strong set

enforcement deputies. In addition to law enforcement

of values that direct how our mission is accomplished.

services, the sheriff’s office is responsible for the care,

All members strive to conduct business consistent with

custody, and control of approximately 3,000 inmates

our foundation.

in the Pinellas County Jail. The sheriff’s office employs approximately 700 sworn corrections deputies, and more

In Pinellas County, the sheriff provides several countywide

than 1,300 non-sworn support staff.

services including Sexual Predator and Offender Tracking (SPOT), law enforcement aviation, civil process, and child

The sheriff’s office is structured into thirteen distinct

protection investigation. In 2013, the PCSO assumed

organizational components. Whether patrolling our streets,

responsibility for misdemeanor probation. The sheriff’s

operating the county jail, or securing our courthouses, all

office is one of only five law enforcement agencies in Florida

components of the PCSO work collectively to provide the

to provide misdemeanor probation services.

best public safety services countywide. The organizational structure of the agency allows all members to work

As the largest law enforcement agency in Pinellas County,

effectively and efficiently to serve the citizens of Pinellas

the sheriff’s office has a 1.8 officer to citizen ratio which

County regardless of the member’s assignment.

is below the state average of 2.5. The sheriff’s office operating budget exceeds $400 million annually. The bulk of the budget consists of personnel services. ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW 5


SHERIFF

CHIEF DEPUTY

PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS BUREAU

ADMINISTRATIVE INVESTIGATION DIVISION

STRATEGIC PLANNING DIVISION

OPERATIONS ASSISTANT CHIEF DEPUTY

INVESTIGATIVE OPERATIONS BUREAU

PATROL OPERATIONS BUREAU

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION

NORTH DISTRICT STATION

NARCOTICS DIVISION

CENTRAL DISTRICT STATION

CHILD PROTECTION DIVISION

SPECIAL OPERATIONS DIVISION

HUMAN RESOURCES BUREAU

YOUTH EDUCATION AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

6 PINELLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE


PINELLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

FISCAL AFFAIRS BUREAU

PUBLIC RELATIONS BUREAU

SUPPORT ASSISTANT CHIEF DEPUTY

SUPPORT SERVICES BUREAU

DEPARTMENT OF DETENTION & CORRECTIONS

PUBLIC RECORDS PROCESSING UNIT “PRPU”

NORTH DIVISION

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY BUREAU

JUDICIAL OPERATIONS BUREAU

SOUTH DIVISION

COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION RECORDS DIVISION

FORENSIC SCIENCES DIVISION

GENERAL COUNSEL

JUDICIAL SERVICES DIVISION CENTRAL DIVISION

PURCHASING & MATERIALS DIVISION

SUPPORT & HEALTH SERVICES BUREAU

AFIS DIVISION FLEET SERVICES DIVISION

TRAINING DIVISION PROPERTY & EVIDENCE DIVISION

CUSTODY MANAGEMENT DIVISION

SUPPORT DIVISION

HEALTH DIVISION

ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW 7


ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW BUDGET The Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office primarily receives its funding from the county’s general fund budget. The Board of County Commissioners approves the sheriff’s budget on an annual basis. 2020-2021 OPERATING BUDGET

SUMMARY EXPENDITURE: LAW ENFORCEMENT

Personnel Services

$

282,015,020

Operating Expenses

$

42,966,110

Capital Outlay

$

2,861,000

TOTAL

$ 327,842,130

FULL-TIME POSITIONS

1,116

Total Personnel Services

$

141,556,750

Total Operating Expenses

$

25,071,240

Total Capital Outlay

$

2,795,030

TOTAL

$ 169,423,020

86% PERSONNEL SERVICES SUMMARY EXPENDITURE: DETENTION AND CORRECTIONS

13% OPERATING EXPENSES 1% CAPITAL OUTLAY

BUDGET 5-YEAR HISTORY 2016-17

FULL-TIME POSITIONS

1,039

Total Personnel Services

$

112,734,050

Total Operating Expenses

$

16,161,620

Total Capital Outlay

$

65,970

TOTAL

$ 128,961,640

SUMMARY EXPENDITURE: JUDICIAL OPERATIONS $280,460,380

2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21

8 PINELLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

$286,768,760 $299,526,380

FULL-TIME POSITIONS

261

Total Personnel Services

$

27,724,220

Total Operating Expenses

$

1,733,250

TOTAL

$ 29,457,470

$315,458,040 $327,842,130


ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW COMMUNITY OVERVIEW The Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office (PCSO) provides

manufacturing and financial services. More than 440,000

primary law enforcement services to Pinellas County,

people are currently employed within Pinellas County.

which is situated on the west coast of Florida. The county is a peninsula bordered by the Gulf of Mexico and Tampa

The PCSO is the largest law enforcement agency in

Bay. Pinellas County consists of 283 square miles of land.

Pinellas County and provides primary law enforcement

Pinellas County has a full-time resident population of

services to 41% of the county’s total population. The

978,000. As the most densely populated county in the

remaining 59% of the population is served by 10 different

state, Pinellas County has 3,500 persons per square

municipal law enforcement agencies. The PCSO contracts

mile compared to the entire state of Florida, which has

primary law enforcement services with 13 of the 24

370 persons per square mile. Due to its numerous beach

incorporated municipalities. There has been a consistent

communities and Florida climate, Pinellas County is also

interest from smaller municipalities to utilize PCSO services,

a year-round tourist destination. It is projected that 15.3

including the use of its records management and computer-

million tourists and visitors come to Pinellas County each

aided dispatch systems (RMS/CAD). At this time, six law

year. Pinellas County is unique in that it is home to 24

enforcement agencies in Pinellas are utilizing the records

incorporated municipalities. These communities range

management and computer dispatch systems. This increases

from small municipal towns like Belleair Beach to large

law enforcement’s ability to communicate and investigate

metropolitan cities like St. Petersburg and Clearwater.

criminal activity across jurisdictional boundaries. Information

Pinellas County is home to approximately 35,000

sharing also creates stronger community partnerships

businesses ranging from tourism to health services,

among law enforcement agencies.

COUNTY DEMOGRAPHICS WHITE 783,216 BLACK 107,115 HISPANIC/LATINO 105,149 ASIAN 35,377 TWO OR MORE RACES 27,516 OTHER 25,550 NATIVE AMERICAN/ ALASKA NATIVE 2,948 PACIFIC ISLANDER 983

ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW 9


ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW ACCREDITATION Of the more than 3,000 sheriff’s offices nationwide, the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office (PCSO) is one of the few law enforcement agencies in the nation to achieve high marks in five areas of national, professional accreditation: law enforcement, corrections, inmate health care, forensics, and law enforcement aviation. Designed to reflect the best professional practices in each respective area, the standards deal with the “what”, leaving the decision of “how” up to each agency. The Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement

treatment, health records, administration, personnel, and

Agencies, Inc. (CALEA) was established in 1979 as

medical-legal issues. The PCSO has maintained NCCHC

an independent accrediting authority by four law

accreditation since 1987.

enforcement associations: The International Association of Chiefs of Police, National Organization of Black

The ANSI National Accreditation Board (ANAB) is the

Law Enforcement Executives, National Sheriffs’

largest multi-disciplinary accreditation body in North

Association and the Police Executive Research Forum.

America providing accreditation services to both public

Its accreditation program requires agencies to comply

and private sector organizations and is owned by the

with the highest standards in four areas: policy and

American National Standards Institute (ANSI). ANAB

procedures, administration, operation, and support

is now the longest established provider of ISO based

services. The PCSO has maintained CALEA accreditation

accreditation standards for forensic agencies in the United

since 1988.

States. ANAB began providing forensic accreditation in 1982, and in 2016, ANAB merged its existing forensic

The American Correctional Association (ACA) was

operations with those of ASCLAD/LAB. The PCSO has

founded in 1870 as the National Prison Association,

maintained ANAB accreditation since 2019.

changing to the American Correctional Association in 1954 to reflect their “expanding philosophy of corrections

The Airborne Public Safety Accreditation Commission

and its increasingly important role within the community

(APSAC) is an entity within the Airborne Public Safety

and society.” The ACA utilizes the principles of humanity,

Association (APSA) that provides, develops, and maintains

justice, protection, opportunity, knowledge, competence,

standards of accreditation for operations performed by

and accountability to develop sound corrections practices.

public safety aviation units and offers auditing, consulting,

The PCSO has maintained ACA accreditation since 1984.

and accreditation services to public safety aviation operations in accordance with those standards. The

The National Commission on Correctional Health Care

accreditation services provided are intended not only as a

(NCCHC) originated in the early 1970s as a result of a

means of evaluation, but also to encourage safe, efficient,

study by the American Medical Association which found

and accident-free aviation operations in support of public

health care in jails to be inadequate, disorganized, and

safety missions. The overall program is designed to

lacking in national standards. NCCHC was established

objectively evaluate and certify a unit’s compliance with

by professionals from the health, legal, and correctional

the standards as developed by APSAC and adopted by

arenas to provide standards for prisons, jails, and juvenile

APSA as best practice. The PCSO has maintained ASPAC

confinement facilities. These standards cover care and

accreditation since 2019.

10 PINELLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE


ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW HUMAN RESOURCES BUREAU The Human Resources Bureau processes thousands of applications and oversees the hiring process for hundreds of new employees on an annual basis. In 2020, HR processed over 4,000 applications, and less than 300 applicants were hired that’s less than 10%. For the position of deputy sheriff (law enforcement or

In addition to an oral board process, applicants

corrections certified) specifically, 638 individuals applied

must successfully complete an extensive background

for a certified law enforcement or corrections position and

check and polygraph test along with medical and

only 103 met the agency standards.

psychological testing.

AGENCY DEMOGRAPHICS VS. COUNTY DEMOGRAPHICS

AGENCY MAKE-UP

WHITE 78% 80%

44%

BLACK 12% 11% HISPANIC / LATINO 6% 11%

31%

ASIAN 2% 4% TWO OR MORE RACES

1% 3%

HAWAIIN / PACIFIC ISLANDER .2% .1% NATIVE AMERICAN / ALASKA NATIVE .1% .3%

13%

25% PCSO COUNTY

NON-SWORN

27%

LEO SWORN

DETENTION SWORN

4%

LAW ENFORCEMENT HIRED

DETENTION & CORRECTIONS HIRED

CIVILIANS HIRED

Applications Received: 499 Hired: 66

Applications Received: 139 Hired: 37

Applications Received: 3,792 Hired: 163

ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW 11


ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW USE OF FORCE The Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office (PCSO) is a national leader in capturing use-of-force data. Sheriff Bob Gualtieri represented the Major County Sheriffs of America in working with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to develop their Use-of-Force Data Collection program. The data allows for more comprehensive research into how and why law enforcement officers use force. In 2017, the PCSO was one of 64 law enforcement agencies in the United States to join the pilot program and the first in Florida. In the aftermath of the murder of George Floyd by police

other means before resorting to deadly force, requiring

officers in Minneapolis, the #8CantWait campaign was at

deputies to intervene if other members are violating the law

the forefront of advocacy groups. The campaign identified

or agency policy, and requiring comprehensive reporting of

eight policies that law enforcement agencies should have

all uses of force.

in place that could have prevented Floyd’s death. These policies included requiring de-escalation training, having

Every one of these policies was already in place at the

a use-of-force continuum, banning chokeholds, requiring

PCSO, for many years, in some cases. In 2020, three of

verbal warning before using deadly force, restricting firing

these policies were revised to including stronger language

weapons at moving vehicles, requiring exhaustion of all

to better reflect their intent.

LAW ENFORCEMENT USE-OF-FORCE INCIDENTS

LAW ENFORCEMENT USE OF FORCE– 5 MOST COMMON REASONS 2020

440

REFUSED TO COMPLY

435 324

Incidents in 2018

196

EVASIVE MOVEMENTS

Incidents in 2019

96

BATTERY ON DEPUTY

56

COMBATIVE SUBJECT

Incidents in 2020

BELIEF SUBJECT DANGEROUS

48 12

DETENTION & CORRECTIONS USE-OF-FORCE INCIDENTS

DETENTION & CORRECTIONS USE OF FORCE– 5 MOST COMMON REASONS 2020

257

EVASIVE MOVEMENTS

245 292

Incidents in 2018

168

COMBATIVE SUBJECT

Incidents in 2019

102

REFUSED TO COMPLY

57

BATTERY ON DEPUTY

Incidents in 2020

BATTERY ON INMATE

12 PINELLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

35 9


ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW ADMINISTRATIVE INVESTIGATION DIVISION The Administrative Investigation Division (AID) is essentially a law enforcement agency within a law enforcement agency. It is responsible for conducting thorough investigations of member misconduct. Once all of the evidence is gathered during the investigation, the member appears before the Administrative Review Board (ARB) for questioning. The findings and recommendations of the ARB are submitted to the sheriff for review, and he determines disposition of the complaint and any disciplinary measures. The sheriff’s findings of all closed AID cases are posted on www.pcsoweb.com. 2020 GENERAL AND BIASED-BASED COMPLAINTS

598

External (Citizen) Complaints Received

5

0

Complaints Alleging Bias on the Part of Our Members

Bias-based Complaints Were Substantiated

COMMAND LEVEL INVESTIGATIONS

COMMAND LEVEL INVESTIGATIONS

UNSUBSTANTIATED OPEN

SUBSTANTIATED EXONERATED

250 213

UNFOUNDED

78 74

200 169

60

55

150 120

40

100

82

81 82

50

64

61

20 6 2

0

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

FORMAL INTERNAL AFFAIRS INVESTIGATIONS

0

0

0

2

1

0

2018 (82 Total)

5 1

0

0

2019 (81 Total)

0

2020 (61 Total)

FORMAL INTERNAL AFFAIRS INVESTIGATIONS SUBSTANTIATED EXONERATED

100

UNSUBSTANTIATED OPEN

UNFOUNDED POLICY REVIEW

82 80

30

30

29

61 55

60

52

48

40

20

43

42

13

36

13 11

10

10

20 4

3

0

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

0

0

0

0

2018 (52 Total)

0

0

0

1

2019 (43 Total)

0

5

0

2020 (36 Total)

“Command Level” investigations are administrative complaints that are referred to the accused member’s bureau commander for investigation. “Formal Internal Affairs” investigations into apparent violations of agency policy or criminal law are conducted by personnel assigned to AID. “Substantiated” complaints are those in which an investigation indicates that the member committed the alleged act of misconduct. “Unsubstantiated” complaints are those in which an investigation indicates that there is insufficient evidence to clearly prove or disprove allegations of misconduct. “Unfounded” complaints are those in which an investigation indicates that the alleged misconduct did not occur.

ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW 13


The Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office has utilized the Chevrolet Tahoe as its primary patrol vehicle since 2013. Purpose-built for police work, these vehicles serve as a deputy’s home away from home.


OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW The Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI) Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program generates reliable statistics for use in law enforcement and includes data from more than 18,000 city, university and college, state, tribal, and federal law enforcement agencies. All participating agencies voluntarily submit their data directly to the FBI or to their state UCR program. “Index Crimes” refer to specific, more serious crimes. In the FBI’s UCR program, index crimes include murder, sexual offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny, and motor vehicle theft. TOTAL INDEX CRIME - HISTORICAL

TOTAL INDEX CRIME

% INDEX CHANGE

CRIME RATE/100,000

% RATE CHANGE

% CLEARED

2011 8,037

-7.9%

2,946.2

-7.6% 30.8%

2012 6,966

-13.3%

2,557.8

-13.2% 32.1%

2013 6,758

-3.3%

2,471.1

-3.4% 33.2%

2014 6,326

-6.4%

2,303.7

-6.8% 34.1%

2015 6,898

9.0%

2,493.2

8.2% 31.2%

2016 6,566

-4.4%

2,359.6

-4.9% 32.3%

2017 5,587

-14.9%

2,003.7

-15.1% 30.8%

2018 4,939

-11.6%

1,771.4

-11.6% 28.4%

2019 4,297

-13.0%

1,535.3

-13.3% 26.2%

4,

29

4,

7

93

5,

6,000

9

58

7

6,

56

6

8 89 6,

6

2013

32

2012

6,

75 6,

8

6 96 6,

8,000

8,

03

7

TOTAL INDEX CRIME - HISTORICAL COMPARISON

4,000 2,000

2011

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2016

2017

2018

2019

9%

TOTAL INDEX CRIME - HISTORICAL RATE OF CHANGE

10%

2013

2014

% .4

%

-3 .

-6

9%

3% -1

1. -1

9% 4. -1

-1

3.

3%

6%

-7 .

10%

2015

-4 .4

2012

3%

2011

OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW 15


OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW CONTRACT CITIES & SERVICE CONTRACTS Of the 24 municipalities in Pinellas County, 13 do not have their own law enforcement agencies and contract with the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office (PCSO) to be their primary law enforcement provider. BELLEAIR BEACH began contracting law enforcement services with the PCSO in June of 2007. The City of Belleair Beach was established in 1950. The city is strictly a residential beach community. Belleair Beach has a reported population of 1,485 residents and has a land area of less than half a square mile. BELLEAIR BLUFFS began contracting law enforcement services with the PCSO in January of 1995. The City OLDSMAR

of Belleair Bluffs was established in 1963. The city’s residential and commercial population serves as a gateway

DUNEDIN SAFETY HARBOR

to the local gulf beaches and has a land area of less than half a square mile. Belleair Bluffs has a reported population of 2,329 residents and is home to over 200 local businesses. BELLEAIR SHORE began contracting law enforcement

BELLEAIR BEACH BELLEAIR BLUFFS BELLEAIR SHORE

services with the PCSO in June of 2007. The Town of Belleair Shore was established in 1955. The town is strictly

INDIAN ROCKS BEACH

a residential beach community with a reported population of 80 residents. Belleair Shore has a land area of less than one-tenth of a square mile.

SEMINOLE

DUNEDIN began contracting law enforcement services

NORTH REDINGTON BEACH REDINGTON BEACH MADEIRA BEACH

with the PCSO in October of 1995. The City of Dunedin was established in 1899 and has a quaint downtown setting home to shops, galleries, restaurants and numerous festivals. The city is home to two top-ranked beach

SOUTH PASADENA ST. PETE BEACH

parks: Caladesi Island State Park and Honeymoon Island State Park. Dunedin has a reported population of 36,381 residents and a land area of approximately 11 square miles. INDIAN ROCKS BEACH began contracting law enforcement services with the PCSO in December of 1993. The city of Indian Rocks Beach was established in 1956. The city’s residential and commercial population serves a thriving beach tourism industry in Pinellas County with a reported population of 4,243 residents. Indian Rocks Beach has a land area of less than one square mile.

16 PINELLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE


MADEIRA BEACH began contracting law enforcement

SAFETY HARBOR began contracting law enforcement

services with the PCSO in September of 1995. The city’s

services with the PCSO in October of 1976. The city hosts

residential and commercial population serves a thriving beach

a number of festivals and special events throughout the

tourism industry in Pinellas County and is home to John’s

year and is home to the Safety Harbor Resort and Spa and

Pass Village & Boardwalk. Madeira Beach has a reported

Philippe Park. The city was established in 1912 and has a

population of 4,300 residents and has a land area of less than

reported population of 18,657 residents. Safety Harbor has

one square mile.

a land area of approximately five square miles.

NORTH REDINGTON BEACH began contracting law

SEMINOLE began contracting law enforcement services

enforcement services with the PCSO in July of 1998.

with the PCSO in November of 1970. The city of Seminole

The Town of North Redington Beach was established

is the youngest city in Pinellas County, established in 1970.

in 1953. The town’s primarily residential population is

Seminole has a reported population of 18,866 residents

home to predominately single-family waterfront homes

and is home to the Seminole Recreation Center. Seminole

with a reported population of 1,242 residents. North

has a land area of approximately six square miles.

Redington has a land area of less than a quarter of a square mile.

SOUTH PASADENA began contracting law enforcement services with the PCSO in May of 1973. The City of South

OLDSMAR began contracting law enforcement services

Pasadena was established in 1955. The city hosts a number

with the PCSO in October of 1975. The City of Oldsmar was

of waterfront parks, local restaurants and shops and has

established in 1945 and boasts a number of parks, as well

a reported population of 5,088 residents. South Pasadena

as historic bungalows in a quaint downtown setting. The

has a land area of six-tenths of a square mile.

city is also home to a large number of commercial areas surrounding the city’s arterial roadways. Oldsmar has a

ST. PETE BEACH began contracting law enforcement

reported population of 14,657 residents and has a land area

services with the PCSO in January of 2013. The City of

of approximately nine square miles.

St. Pete Beach was established in 1957. Tourism is an integral part of the city’s economy and the community is a

REDINGTON BEACH began contracting law enforcement

collection of families, businesses, and tourist attractions.

services with the PCSO in July of 1998. The town is

St. Pete Beach has a reported population of 9,587 residents

primarily a waterfront community, and boasts four town

and a land area of approximately two square miles.

parks and a community recreation area with a reported population of 1,293 residents. Redington Beach has a land area less than a half of a square mile.

OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW 17


Community Policing Unit Deputy Eric Ford poses for a photo with a little girl at a bicycle safety event.


OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW PATROL OPERATIONS BUREAU The Patrol Operations Bureau (POB) is commanded by a major and is the largest law enforcement bureau within the sheriff’s office. It is comprised of four divisions: North District, Central District, Special Operations, and Youth Education and Administrative Services, each commanded by a captain. Members of POB are the face of the organization. When citizens contact the communications center to request a deputy, the members of POB are the designated first responders for all calls for service. LAW ENFORCEMENT ANNUAL COMPARISON

COMPUTER AUTOMATED DISPATCH (CAD)

The Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office (PCSO) utilizes a Computer Aided Dispatch system (CAD) to dispatch and track calls for service. Based on data captured from the system, “Unique Events” represents individual calls for service while “Units Responding” represents the total number of units assigned to

The Computer Aided Dispatch system (CAD) is used to prioritize and record incident calls, identify the status and location of responders in the field, and effectively dispatch deputies. Priorities are built into the CAD program based upon the nature of the problem.

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

those calls.

ARMED EMERGENCY CALL

361,446

3:12 Average Response Time 621,220

Armed Emergency Call Average Response Time is used for a high priority call with a weapon involved. Examples: Armed Person, Shooting – In Progress, and Armed Robbery – In Progress

408,064 671,213 412,442

HIGH CALL

674,862

4:43 Average Response Time High Call Average Response Time is used for an immediate dispatch. Examples: Assault/Battery – In Progress, Burglary – In Progress, and Robbery – In Progress

414,077 682,155 495,327 783,142

MEDIUM CALL

6:13 Average Response Time

560,735 867,806 545,715

Medium Call Average Response Time is used for non-emergency or non-life-threatening situations in which time is important, but not critical. Examples: Alarm, Disorderly Conduct, or Suspicious Person

846,960

LOW CALL

529,608 807,425

7:45 Average Response Time Low Call is used for a miscellaneous request for service in which time is not important. Examples: Animal Call, Noise, and Trespass

496,280 713,298 422,204 616,255 UNIQUE EVENTS

UNITS RESPONDING

OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW 19


OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW PATROL OPERATIONS BUREAU: CENTRAL DISTRICT Members of Central District provide uniformed law enforcement services for citizens in unincorporated Pinellas County and contract cities south of SR 60 (Gulf to Bay Blvd.). The District is divided into three geographic squad areas and serves ten law enforcement contract cities: Belleair Beach, Belleair Bluffs, Belleair Shore, Indian Rocks Beach, Madeira Beach, North Redington Beach, Redington Beach, Seminole, South Pasadena, and St. Pete Beach. The Central District station is housed in the Sheriff’s Administration Building in Largo. Deputies assigned to Central District respond to all calls for law enforcement services, provide traffic enforcement, and conduct routine patrol and extra patrol as requested. Central District also has designated community policing deputies who work with citizen groups and community partners on various problem-oriented policing initiatives.

2020 CENTRAL DISTRICT OFFENSES TOTAL OFFENSES 16,612

QUARTER 1 4,356 QUARTER 2 3,933 QUARTER 3 4,206 QUARTER 4 4,117

2020 CENTRAL DISTRICT INCIDENTS TOTAL INCIDENTS 24,795

QUARTER 1 6,056 QUARTER 2 6,096 QUARTER 3 6,561 CENTRAL DISTRICT INCORPORATED POLICE DEPARTMENT SERVICE AREA

20 PINELLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

QUARTER 4 6,082 An offense is defined as an event that resulted in a criminal charge like assault, burglary, or motor vehicle theft. An incident is defined as an event that is not criminal like an assist motorist, a noise complaint, or an alarm call.


OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW PATROL OPERATIONS BUREAU: NORTH DISTRICT Members of North District provide uniformed law enforcement services for citizens in unincorporated Pinellas County and contract cities located north of SR 60 (Gulf to Bay Blvd.) to the Pasco county line. The North District area is divided into two geographic squad areas and serves three law enforcement contract cities: Dunedin, Oldsmar, and Safety Harbor. North District Station is physically located in the City of Dunedin. Deputies assigned to North District respond to all calls for law enforcement services, provide traffic enforcement, and conduct routine patrol and extra patrol as requested. North District also has designated community policing deputies who work with citizen groups and community partners on various problem-oriented policing initiatives.

2020 NORTH DISTRICT OFFENSES TOTAL OFFENSES 7,344

QUARTER 1 1,915 QUARTER 2 1,704 QUARTER 3 2,067 QUARTER 4 1,658

2020 NORTH DISTRICT INCIDENTS TOTAL INCIDENTS 14,650

QUARTER 1 3,775 QUARTER 2 3,569 QUARTER 3 3,745 NORTH DISTRICT INCORPORATED POLICE DEPARTMENT SERVICE AREA

QUARTER 4 3,561 An offense is defined as an event that resulted in a criminal charge like assault, burglary, or motor vehicle theft. An incident is defined as an event that is not criminal like an assist motorist, a noise complaint, or an alarm call.

OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW 21


OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW PATROL OPERATIONS BUREAU: SPECIAL OPERATIONS The Special Operations Division is comprised of a number of specialized enforcement components, including the Marine, Canine, Flight, DUI and Mental Health Units. Special Operations personnel are responsible for providing law enforcement services to the St. Petersburg-Clearwater Airport and Pinellas Safe Harbor jail diversion facility. Special Operations personnel also coordinate off-duty work assignments and develop and implement security plans for special events throughout the county. The Special Operations Division oversees specialized teams such as the Special Weapons and Tactics Team, the Dive Team, and the Major Accident Investigation Team.

228

Total Arrests with K-9 The Canine Unit is comprised of 14 teams that support patrol operations in tracking criminals and finding missing persons.

5,130

Calls for Service The Marine & Environmental Lands Unit is responsible for patrolling freshwater lakes, parts of Tampa Bay, the Intracoastal Waterway, and 9-miles out into the Gulf of Mexico.

880

Total Flights

1,489

Total Flight Hours

The Flight Unit provides aviation support to all Pinellas County law enforcement agencies and other regional partners.

980

Total DUI’s

2,091 Crashes

156

DUI Related Crashes

The DUI unit is comprised of one sergeant, one corporal, five deputies, and a breath testing operator.

22 PINELLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE


OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW

PATROL OPERATIONS BUREAU: YOUTH EDUCATION & ADMINISTRATION SERVICES Members of the Youth Education & Administrative Services Division (YEASD) serve a number of roles. YEASD is comprised of a variety of units including: School Guardian, School Resource Officer (SRO), Youth Services, Habitual Offender Monitoring and Enforcement (HOME), and School Crossing Guard. The YEASD also serves as a liaison to all contract cities. This division is responsible for programs such as: Juvenile Diversion, Narcotics Overdose Prevention and Education (NOPE), and the Pinellas County Police Explorers.

411

Active Assailant Drills The SRO and School Guardian Units completed 411 Active Assailant Drills over the course of seven months.

6,777

Compliance Checks The countywide HOME Task Force conducted 6,777 compliance checks on 367 delinquent juveniles, averaging 32 checks a night.

17,000+

Children Safely Crossed The School Crossing Guard Unit safely crossed 17,106 children at 151 different posts throughout the county.

400

Reunited Runaways One “Runaway Deputy” investigated and successfully reunited 400 runaway children with their families.

OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW 23


OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW INVESTIGATIVE OPERATIONS BUREAU The Investigative Operations Bureau is comprised of three divisions: the Criminal Investigation Division, the Narcotics Division, and the Child Protection Investigation Division. The Criminal Investigation Division is broken down into three

to complex drug conspiracy investigations. These

sections: Property Crimes, Crimes Against Persons, and

investigations are often broad and expand beyond the

Tactical Investigations. The following units are assigned to

PCSO jurisdiction, requiring partnerships with local and

the Property Crimes Section: Burglary and Pawn, Arson and

federal agencies such as High Intensity Drug Trafficking

Auto Theft, Digital Forensics, Economic Crimes Unit, and

Areas (H.I.D.T.A).

Criminal Intelligence. The following units are assigned to the Crimes Against Persons Section: Homicide/Robbery, Crimes

The Child Protection Investigation Division is primarily

Against Children, Cold Case, and Sexual Predator Offender

responsible for investigating allegations of child abuse,

Tracking. The units in the Criminal Investigation Division are

abandonment, and neglect within Pinellas County.

highly specialized, and investigate criminal activity related to

These investigations can range from serious neglect

each specific discipline.

resulting in the removal of an at-risk child from the parents to something minor where a family is referred

The Narcotics Division is responsible for investigating narcotics-related crimes from street-level drug dealing

2020 TOTAL CRIMES

FINAL DATA PUBLISHED IN MAY OF 2020

69.8% LARCENY 1.7% ROBBERY 11.1% BURGLARY

2.5% FORCIBLE SEX OFFENSES 8.8% AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 5.7% MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT .1% HOMICIDE OFFENSES OFFENSE CATEGORY

2018

2019

HOMICIDE OFFENSES

7

9

8

FORCIBLE SEX OFFENSES

155

119

141

ROBBERY

123 80 96

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT

436

BURGLARY*

740 676 603

LARCENY MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT TOTAL

400

2020

482

5,781 4,811 3,805 419

332

312

7,661 6,427 5,447 *INCLUDES VEHICLE BURGLARY

24 PINELLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

to a service provider.


OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW JUDICIAL OPERATIONS BUREAU The Judicial Operations Bureau is commanded by a major and has three sections: Criminal Court Security Section, Civil Court Security and Enforcement Section, and the Court Supervision Section.

2020 BAILIFF SCREENINGS PUBLIC ENTRANCES

COURTHOUSE LOCATIONS 2020 TOTAL

COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER PUBLIC ENTRANCE

213,183

SHERIFF’S ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

10,344

ST. PETERSBURG (CIRCUIT & TRAFFIC CTS.)

87,925

CLEARWATER (CIRCUIT, CTNY., TRAFFIC)

TOTAL MAGNETOMETER

22,524 333,976

ALTERNATIVE SENTENCING UNIT MONITORING EQUIPMENT FINANCIALS TOTAL DOLLARS BILLED BY 3M FOR MONITORING DOLLARS COLLECTED (OFFENDER PAY) COLLECTION RATE

2020 TOTAL $2,010,419.90 $525,646.23 26%

NORTH COUNTY TRAFFIC COURT 29582 U.S. 19 NORTH CLEARWATER, FL 33761

ELECTRONIC MONITORING PROGRAM AVERAGE DAILY OFFENDER COUNT

343

TOTAL PLACED

1,501

TOTAL REMOVED

1,018

TOTAL VIOLATIONS COSTS SAVINGS IN LIEU OF INCARCERATION*

336 $16,288,360.26

CLEARWATER COURTHOUSE 315 COURT STREET CLEARWATER, FL 33756

DAY REPORTING PROGRAM AVERAGE DAILY OFFENDER COUNT

17

TOTAL PLACED

7

TOTAL REMOVED

3

TOTAL VIOLATIONS

2

TOTAL DAYS WORKED

38

COST SAVINGS TO OTHER AGENCIES

$4,825.12

COSTS SAVINGS IN LIEU OF INCARCERATION*

$25,700.73

PINELLAS COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER 14250 49TH STREET NORTH CLEARWATER, FL 33762

CONTINUOUS ALCOHOL MONITORING PROGRAM AVERAGE DAILY OFFENDER COUNT

454

TOTAL PLACED

1,897

TOTAL REMOVED

1,565

TOTAL VIOLATIONS COSTS SAVINGS IN LIEU OF INCARCERATION*

272 $20,215,284.24

ST. PETERSBURG COURTHOUSE 545 1ST AVENUE NORTH ST. PETERSBURG, FL 33701

PRE-TRIAL SERVICES PROGRAM AVERAGE DAILY DEFENDANT COUNT

1,317

TOTAL PLACED

3,804

TOTAL REMOVED

2,862

FTAS (INCLUDED WITHIN TOTAL REMOVED) COSTS SAVINGS IN LIEU OF INCARCERATION*

96 $59,293,428.66

SUPERVISED BOND AVERAGE DAILY DEFENDANT COUNT

510

OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW 25


OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW DEPARTMENT OF DETENTION & CORRECTIONS The Department of Detention and Corrections (DDC) is comprised of South Division, Central Division, North Division, and the Support and Health Services Bureau. The DDC is one of the largest components in the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office and oversees an average daily population of 3,000 inmates. The DDC is responsible for the care, custody, control, and general welfare of all inmates housed within the jail facility. The 2020 county jail statistics are skewed significantly lower due to COVID-19. At the height of the crisis, the sheriff partnered with Pinellas County law enforcement agencies, the state attorney, the public defender, and the courts to reduce the number of arrestees and speed up the court processes to expedite the release of inmates awaiting trial.

9

2 11

2

10

11

00

0

2,

3,

7 96

3 88 2,

3 75

120

2016

2017

2018

2019

100 80

73

2,

23

4

2,

3,000

11

AVERAGE DAILY BOOKINGS 9

AVERAGE DAILY POPULATION

60 2,000 40 20 1,000

2020

2020

25

TOTAL BOOKINGS & RELEASES

40,000

2017

2018

2019

40 , 40 61 ,4 0 91

15

40 , 40 70 ,7 0 32

39 , 39 712 ,5 11

RELEASED

40 , 40 42 ,4 6 08

BOOKED

35 27

2019

27

2018

27

2017

24

2016

35

AVERAGE LENGTH OF STAY (IN DAYS)

5

26 , 27 80 ,0 6 66

2016 30,000

INMATES TRANSPORTED STATEWIDE 2016

20,000

10,000

2020

9,308

2017

12,360

2018

12,344

2019

13,015

2020 2016

2017

2018

2019

26 PINELLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

2020

4,903 3,000

6,000

9,000

12,000

15,000


OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW DEPARTMENT OF DETENTION & CORRECTIONS: MEDICAL DIVISION The Medical Division is comprised of Medical Services, Mental Health Services, Dental Services, and Administrative Services. Medical Services is responsible for coordinating the medical care for an average of 3,000 inmates in the jail. Services include dental, mental health, and urgent/emergency care as well as chronic and preventative care. Patients are medically screened upon entry into the system. Depending on their health needs, patients may be referred for further services. Mental Health Services includes crisis intervention, psychotropic medication management, individual counseling, and referral of inmates with needs beyond those that can be provided onsite. Dental services are also available and include immediate access for urgent or painful dental conditions, education and instruction in oral hygiene, and preventative care. MEDICAL ADMISSIONS

TOTAL MEDICAL, PSYCHOLOGICAL, DENTAL VISITS 106,934

118,690

112,240

109,933

2017 109,939

113,936

115,494

2019

2020

108,673

113,742

116,746

2017 Total Admissions

447,833

QTR 1 QTR 2 QTR 3 QTR 4

108,464

2018

369

447,797

82

77,391

91,490

86,172

QUARTER 2

QUARTER 3

QUARTER 4

371

86

99

97

89

QTR 1 QTR 2 QTR 3 QTR 4

404

MEDICAL PRESCRIPTIONS ADMINISTERED BY NURSES

2019 Total Admissions

96

46,567

2017

87

2018 Total Admissions

355,339 QUARTER 1

97

105,249 444,410

100,286

103

106

107

95

QTR 1 QTR 2 QTR 3 QTR 4

11,614

514

45,565

2018

11,586

2020 Total Admissions 43,669

2019

12,494

97

84

155

178

QTR 1 QTR 2 QTR 3 QTR 4 36,455

2020

9,345

TOTAL PRESCRIPTIONS ADMINISTERED

PSYCHIATRIC PRESCRIPTIONS ADMINISTERED

TOTAL INMATES ON MEDICATIONS

17,681 in 2017

21,732 in 2018

22,234 in 2019

18,435 in 2020

OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW 27


MAJOR EVENTS & CASES

Sheriff Gualtieri speaks at a press conference following the reopening of the beaches on May 4, 2020.

COVID-19 RESPONSE On March 11, 2020 the World Health Organization officially categorized the spread of COVID-19 as a pandemic. Following that declaration and an increasing rate of infection in the county, the Board of County Commissioners (BCC) declared a Local State of Emergency (Resolution 20-16) two days later on March 13th. Their action set in motion a series of events that significantly changed the way we do business internally and out in the community. (COVID-19 RESPONSE CONTINUED ON PAGE 29) 28 PINELLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE


(COVID-19 RESPONSE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 28)

MAJOR EVENTS & CASES: DNA COLD CASE

The first notable changes in response to the pandemic were

The Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office Cold Case Unit

internal. Deputies were issued personal protection equipment,

successfully utilized the Florida Department of Law

sanitizing stations were set up for all patrol vehicles, and

Enforcement’s (FDLE) genetic genealogy investigations

symptom screenings were conducted at the entrance to all

program to solve two sexual assaults that were decades

PCSO facilities. Deputies would no longer respond in person

old. Genetic genealogy provides leads to investigators

to certain calls for service if they could be handled over the

based on DNA matches to relatives found in public

phone, and all law enforcement agencies across the county

genealogy databases.

were encouraged to utilize notices to appear or employ existing diversion programs to keep the jail population to a

In the most recent case, a detective reviewed a sexual

minimum. Additionally, Sheriff Gualtieri coordinated with

battery case that occurred in September of 1988 to

other components of the criminal justice system, like the State

determine if evidence once unsuitable for testing

Attorney’s Office, to expedite the disposition of lesser offenses.

could now yield a DNA profile. The case involved an unidentified male in his mid-twenties that entered a

A significant increase in COVID-19 cases in Broward and

St. Petersburg gift shop, ordered a 50-year-old victim

Miami-Dade counties during Spring Break were being

into a back room of the store, and sexually battered her

associated with large crowds on the beaches. With Spring

at knifepoint. Evidence was collected during the initial

Break around the corner in Pinellas County, the beaches

investigation, but no suspects were ever identified.

became a point of contention. The BCC voted to close

Eight years later, investigators were able to develop a

Pinellas County beaches for two weeks beginning March

male DNA profile from the evidence, but there were no

20th and passed the “Safer At Home” order on March 25th.

matches found.

Hundreds of deputies participated in the initial beach closure and the distribution of notices to thousands of businesses

In February 2019, detectives received approval from

across the county.

the FDLE Familial Search Review Committee to expand the DNA search to possible family members of the

As the BCC began to consider the reopening of the beaches,

suspect. In September, detectives were notified that a

there was concern about overcrowding. Sheriff Gualtieri

convicted offender in the database was a direct male

proposed a “Beach Capacity Dashboard” that would provide

relative of the unidentified DNA suspect profile. This

real-time updates on capacity at all county beaches so that

new information led investigators to 54-year-old Larry

beachgoers could practice social distancing effectively. The

Eugene Gould who was residing in Tennessee. With the

web-based program was created in just a few days by the

help of local police and the District Attorney’s Office, a

Information Technology Bureau with assistance from the

DNA sample was collected from Gould and sent to the

Patrol Operations Bureau and the Public Relations Bureau.

FDLE for testing.

The dashboard was active for the first few weekends following the beach reopening and was operated live by

Gould’s DNA matched the previously unidentified

agency personnel at a command center. Updates were routed

DNA profile collected during the initial investigation

to the command center by deputies that were stationed at

back in 1988. On January 10, 2020, Gould was taken

every beach access point and parking area along the coast.

into custody and charged with one count of Armed Sexual Battery.

Social media remained a powerful tool for the PCSO to communicate updates and information about the

The use of genetic genealogy helps keep our community

pandemic. Sheriff Gualtieri teamed up with Pinellas County

safe by taking suspects off the streets, and more

Administrator Barry Burton for a weekly, interactive question

importantly, bringing justice that was, in this case,

and answer session live on Facebook. To reach young

a long-time coming.

children unable to be in school, dozens of agency members volunteered to read children’s books that were recorded and shared on social media. MAJOR EVENTS & CASES 29


Sergeant Maurice McCloud of the Crime Prevention & Community Awareness Unit wears a body-worn camera for the first time at the start of the field trial on October 28, 2020.


NEW INITIATIVES BODY CAMERA IMPLEMENTATION In October of 2020, Sheriff Gualtieri announced that the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office (PCSO) was going to implement body-worn cameras. Concerns about the cameras once held by the sheriff were alleviated by significant improvements to the technology and thoughtful feedback from the community in support of the cameras. The sheriff launched a field trial program on October

a deputy unholsters their firearm, turns on their TASER,

28, 2020 composed of 30 deputies assigned to different

or they are within a set vicinity of other deputies up to 30

areas of the agency to work out any logistical or technical

seconds after they trigger their cameras. For example, if a

issues before outfitting all law enforcement deputies.

deputy arrives at an incident and draws his or her firearm

Implementing the program will cost approximately

or turns on the TASER, the cameras of any deputies that

$25 million over the next six years, but the contract is

arrive within 30 seconds will automatically activate. Body

comprehensive and cost-effective. The contract, awarded

cameras must be activated manually for all other events,

to Axon, includes all the necessary equipment and data

and there is a set policy and procedure for when cameras

management support to equip more than 800 deputies with

should and should not be activated.

body cameras. Additionally, the dash-mounted cameras installed in nearly 600 patrol vehicles will eventually be

Any new technology or process necessitates constant

replaced with an Axon product for additional integration.

evaluation and adjustment, but the body-worn program is here to stay at the PCSO. The technology will ultimately

The cameras are mounted to the chest area with a magnetic

serve as piece of mind for deputies and the community in

mounting system. They are automatically activated when

our current climate.

USE OF DEADLY FORCE TASK FORCE In the wake of the unrest following the murder of George Floyd, Sheriff Gualtieri successfully engaged local agency partners to create the Pinellas County Use of Deadly Force Investigative Task Force. The effort addresses concern about the perception of agencies investigating their own deadly force incidents. The PCSO, St. Petersburg Police Department (SPPD), and Clearwater Police Department (CPD) each contribute three detectives to the task force, and the Pinellas Park Police Department (PPPD) contributes one. Other departments are able to join but are not required to contribute additional detectives.

Per the detailed agreement, PCSO deputy-involved

policies, the task force will conduct a criminal investigation

shootings are investigated by the SPPD or CPD depending

and present their findings to the agency that employs the

on where it occurs, and the PCSO is responsible for all

officer involved. The task force has the ability to bring

other investigations. The agreement also encompasses

criminal charges against an officer if it determines that their

details like forensic science resources, the release of

actions violated the law when using force. Their criminal

information, reporting requirements, and costs associated

investigation and conclusions are independent of the State

with the investigation.

Attorney’s Office determination.

While respective agencies are responsible for determining whether or not their members’ actions violated their own

NEW INITIATIVES 31


Members of the North District Community Policing Unit salute health care workers at Mease Countryside Hospital on April 20, 2020.


UPDATES ON CURRENT INITIATIVES MENTAL HEALTH UNIT EXPANSION The Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office (PCSO) responds to about 5,000 mental health-related calls a year, and approximately 11,000 Baker Acts are initiated annually in Pinellas County. Although 50% of these Baker Acts are completed by law enforcement, deputies are not the most qualified to determine an adequate response to a mental health problem. In 2016, the PCSO created the Mental Health Unit to help

The sheriff’s office provides referrals to the PIC Team and

reduce the number of Baker Acts and arrests related to mental

the system coordinators assist individuals with navigating

health issues. It was just the beginning of a long-term effort

the behavioral health system and connect them with

to assist individuals who suffer from mental illnesses and

services. Since inception, the PIC Team has provided

prevent them from entering the criminal justice system.

case management to about 350 people, with 70-90 people receiving mental health services from them at

Initially, the Mental Health Unit was based on a co-

any given time.

response model where a deputy and mental health professional responded to active calls that included a

After a dedicated analysis on the effectiveness of the

mental health issue and followed up with individuals who

Mental Health Unit, Sheriff Bob Gualtieri determined the

were Baker Acted. Upon evaluating the pilot program, the

unit needed to be expanded by adding more deputies and

unit was transformed and became a case management

hiring licensed mental health professionals to serve as

function. Instead of responding to active calls, the unit

crisis response specialists.

followed up with people who were either recently Baker Acted or experienced a mental health-related emergency.

Each team, made up of a deputy and crisis response specialist, will respond to in-progress 9-1-1 calls that

Between 2016 and 2018, the Mental Health Unit contacted

involve a mental health-related issue. Two of the six teams

160 people a month for follow-up services. Even though

will be dedicated to conducting follow-up with the people

the system was effective, it still lacked referrals to a true

in need of services. The response teams will work between

case management entity that could establish long-term

noon and midnight, Monday through Friday, which are peak

solutions for the patients.

periods for mental health-related calls.

By July 2018, the sheriff’s office helped form the Pinellas

This expanded co-response approach, in addition to the

Integrated Care Alliance and the Pinellas Integrated Care

current collaborated efforts with the PIC Team, will allow

(PIC) Team, which is staffed with eight case managers from

deputies to focus on doing what they do best--protecting

BayCare Health System, Personal Enrichment Through

and serving the public.

Mental Health Services (PEMHS), Directions for Living, and the Suncoast Center.

UPDATES ON CURRENT INITIATIVES 33


UPDATES ON CURRENT INITIATIVES ADULT PRE-ARREST DIVERSION One bad decision can impact a person’s life negatively

2016, more than 5,500 people successfully completed the

forever–but it doesn’t have to. Since October 2016, the

program, served 107,957 community service hours, and

Adult Pre-Arrest Diversion (APAD) program diverts

paid $85,789.46 in restitution.

individuals who commit certain eligible misdemeanor offenses from the criminal justice system.

The community service aspect of the APAD program supports non-profit organizations in Pinellas County

Sheriff Bob Gualtieri created APAD to not only save

because they get the help they need instead of having to

taxpayers and the sheriff’s office money, but also help the

use resources or hired help. Individuals in the program can

community, and influence Pinellas County citizens to make

mow a church’s lawn, pick up trash, or stock the shelves of

better decisions.

a food pantry. Many times people in the program want to give back to organizations that helped them in the past as a

Minor offenses such as possession of marijuana,

way to pay it forward.

trespassing, petty theft, and public intoxication may be eligible for APAD. A person with little to no criminal history

Coming in contact with law enforcement does not mean

can avoid sitting in jail awaiting a trial that is often dropped

someone is going to jail. APAD helps those who make

and instead do community service and pay restitution

one mistake not ruin their future, and it gives them the

to the victim. For example, if a person steals food from a

opportunity to correct their behavior. PCSO is doing

grocery store, the individual could pay for the cost of the

everything law enforcement can to help people learn to

sandwich, serve at a soup kitchen for 24 hours, and avoid

make better decisions and keep them out of the criminal

being arrested altogether. Since the inception of APAD in

justice system.

FOUR-YEAR ACCEPTANCE DATA

TOP 5 ELIGIBLE OFFENSES

2,315 Rejected

1,443 Accepted

2017

3,758 Total 1,289 Rejected

1,118 1,542 POSSESSION OF MARIJUANA 742 1,782 RETAIL THEFT

1,451 Accepted

2018

2,740 Total 1,363 Rejected

2019

2,206

1,027 Accepted 2,390 Total

1,286 Rejected

2020

441 395 PETIT THEFT

633 Accepted 1,919 Total

TOTAL REJECTED

96 TRESPASSING

624 49 DISORDERLY INTOXICATION

TOTAL ACCEPTED

INELIGIBLE

ACCEPTED

FOUR-YEAR COMPLETION RATES

1,443

1,451

1,027

633

70%

70%

70%

64%

2017 Total Accepted SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION

2018 Total Accepted

34 PINELLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION

2019 Total Accepted SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION

2020 Total Accepted SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION


UPDATES ON CURRENT INITIATIVES HABITUAL OFFENDER MONITORING ENFORCEMENT TASK FORCE In Pinellas County, some juvenile offenders get stuck in the cycle of criminal activity and incarceration. It can be hard for them to change their habits on their own. That is why the Habitual Offender Monitoring Enforcement (HOME) Task Force works hard to help these chronic juvenile offenders break the cycles of crime and create better lifestyles. The HOME Task Force was created in 2016 as a response

The HOME Task Force not only reduces the opportunities

to a surge of vehicle burglaries and motor vehicle thefts by

for juveniles to commit new delinquent acts, but also

juvenile offenders. Its mission is to bring a positive cultural

quickly solves cases by becoming familiar with the chronic

change of responsibility among juveniles and provide

offenders and identifying them while reviewing video

intensive supervision and intervention of chronic offenders

surveillance.

to divert their behavior and prevent further victimization of citizens.

Some of the crucial factors that initiate change include establishing positive role models, and offering

The multijurisdictional team includes law enforcement

comprehensive navigation services through the

officers throughout Pinellas County and juvenile electronic

partnership with Personal Enrichment through Mental

monitoring specialists who work together with parents and

Health Services (PEMHS).

community leaders to keep juvenile offenders accountable for their actions.

The HOME Task Force members share the same focus on keeping the community safe and work diligently to stay

The HOME Task Force conducts compliance checks by

aware of the criminal juvenile population and their ability

visiting the juveniles and their families, serving search

to commit new crimes, as well as encourage them to make

warrants on social media accounts and cellular devices,

positive lifestyle changes.

and using investigative techniques to locate firearms, narcotics, and wanted juveniles. The team also meets with local and state agencies to discuss crime trends and active cases involving juvenile suspects.

HOME INTENSIVE SUPERVISION DATA

The graphic below depicts the number of felonies committed during the calendar year when the group of juveniles were monitored by HOME compared to the year prior without supervision. 2018 IDENTIFIED JUVENILES (32 TOTAL) 2017 FELONIES 2018 NEW FELONIES

216 56

2019 SUPERVISED JUVENILES

143

62% Decrease

54

in New Felonies

2020 IDENTIFIED JUVENILES (25 TOTAL) 2019 FELONIES 2020 NEW FELONIES

165 61 TOTAL FELONIES

NEW FELONIES

74% Decrease in New Felonies

2019 IDENTIFIED JUVENILES (34 TOTAL) 2018 FELONIES 2019 NEW FELONIES

2018 SUPERVISED JUVENILES

2020 SUPERVISED JUVENILES

62% Decrease in New Felonies


Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office 10750 ULMERTON ROAD LARGO, FL 33778 (727) 582-6200 www.pcsoweb.com

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