Page 1

GO LOCAL! SUPPORT YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESSES!

Park Cities People BUS I N E S S

JULY 2014 I Vol. 34, No. 6 parkcitiespeople.com  

POSTAL CUSTOMER

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID DALLAS, TX PERMIT NO. 3210

@pcpeople

FORMER DALLAS MAYOR JOINS FIGHT AGAINST PRESTON CENTER APARTMENT COMPLEXES 14 S C H O O LS

HP parents upset about racy required reading 5 LIVING WELL

Butts get kicked at Beyond Studios  20

Classic Rockers

SPORTS

HP FAMILY TURNS FRONT LAWN INTO VINTAGE PLAYGROUND

BUSINESS

Tomlin Antiques finds a new home  16

 29

SOCIETY

La Fiesta debs dip in dresses at ball   24

Lacrosse player wraps up career with two titles 1B COMMUNITY

A look inside the new HP town hall   28


OYSTER PERPETUAL DATEJUST L ADY 31

2  JULY 2014

CONTENTS FROM THE PUBLISHER

Motivated to Provide Great Content

W

rolex

oyster perpetual and datejust are trademarks.

ith each edition of Park Cities People in our new monthly format, I’m more and more excited about the stories and features in our paper and online. I’ve been asked many times what sets us apart from all the other publications that folks have available to them. My answer is simple: “Great content.” In this world of reduced resources, we have refocused our goals on good journalism, on stories that are important to the community, that inform, that teach you something, or simply touch your heart. In this issue, we are tackling the hot topic of parents that are illuminating objectionable content in their students’ required reading lists, of course causing a lot of chatter among HP parents and the greater community (page 18). We also have a wonderful feature on some outstanding Girl Scouts who have earned the Gold Award for creating projects that are making changes to benefit our community and the world now and into the future (page 30). Highland Park Town Hall has reopened with an emphasis on honoring the past. The renovations included new council chambers and boardrooms, the former equipped with Spanish Colonial décor and sage finish. See the story on Page 28 and more photos online. We’re also chronicling the debate over two new developments planned at the intersection of Preston and Northwest Highway, one in Preston Center and one on the northeast corner of that insertion. Representatives from both projects have been meeting with area residents to discuss the proposed developments. It’s gained the attention of such locals as former Dallas Mayor Laura Miller, attorney Lisa Blue Baron and former Dallas City

POLICE . ............................................................ 4 SCHOOLS ......................................................... 5 BUSINESS . ..................................................... 14 LIVING WELL ����������������������������������������������� 20

PAT M A R T I N

Council member Michell Rasansky, who object to the height and density. In Living Well, take a look at a fitness center that combines spinning, Pilates and barre. I’m an early-morning, weighttraining, spin-class gym-goer, but this scares me. We’re also highlighting a book that explores how to choose a plastic surgeon or opt for a less invasive procedure. Our Society pages have bright beautiful faces with the DSOL Deb dress show, La Fiesta de Las Seis Banderas, a Trains at NorthPark party, The Wilkinson Center's CAN DO Luncheon, and the Genesis Women’s Shelter & Support Luncheon. And don’t miss the spectacular pictures of the newly graduated young men and women, the Blanket Awardees, and shots of the UP Fishing Derby on pages 10 and 11. Such priceless traditions carry on. We hope that we’ve succeeded in our goal of bringing you a diverse and varied paper. We’d love to hear from you. Let us know how we can do it even better. Pat Martin, Publisher pat.martin@ peoplenewspapers.com

SOCIETY ......................................................... 23 COMMUNITY �����������������������������������������������28 CLASSIFIEDS ����������������������������������������������� 32 WEDDINGS ��������������������������������������������������� 34

Park Cities People EDITORIAL

O P E R AT I O N S

A DV E R T I S I N G

Interim Editor Todd Jorgenson

Associate Publisher Dorothy Wood

Senior Account Executives

Assistant Editor Sarah Bennett

Business Manager Alma Ritter

Kim Hurmis Kate Martin

Art Director Elizabeth Ygartua

Distribution Manager Don Hancock

Account Executives

Assistant Art Director Curtis Thornton ANTEKSHOME.COM | 214.528.5567

O P E N 1 0 A M T O 5 P M M O N D AY T H R U S AT U R D AY 1135 DRAGON ST | DALLAS, TX 75207

Consulting Editor Jeff Bowden Interns Claire Kelley Katie Shelton

Intern Megan Ghrist

Publisher: Patricia Martin

Stephanie Collins Clarke Dvoskin Geraldine Galentree DeeAnna Thompson

Park Cities People is published monthly by CITY NEWSPAPERS LP, an affiliate of D Magazine Partners LP, 750 N. Saint Paul St., Suite 2100, Dallas, TX 75201. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved. No reproduction without permission. Submissions to the editor may be sent via e-mail to editor@peoplenewspapers. com. Correspondence must include writer’s name and contact number. Main phone number, 214-739-2244

People Newspapers are printed on recycled paper. Help us show love for the earth by recycling this newspaper and any magazines from the D family to which you subscribe.


3601 Greenbrier Drive $4,990,000 | SOLD - Represented Buyer Mary Poss | 214-738-0777

Representing the finest homes for nearly 70 years.

4224 Belclaire Avenue | $3,995,000 Linda Jordan Hobbs | 214-535-3732

3620 Caruth Boulevard | $2,500,000 Lake Gamso Team | 214-906-0355

6230 Prestonshire Lane | $2,395,000 Clarke Landry | 214-316-7416

6414 Deloache Avenue | $1,695,000 Clarke Landry | 214-316-7416

3441 University Boulevard | $1,499,000 Kenneth Walters | 214-923-3297

8200 Forest Hills Boulevard | $1,450,000 Celeste Williams & Bettie Abio | 214-692-0000

10909 Strait Lane | $1,395,000 Clarke Landry | 214-316-7416

6715 Northwood Road | $1,175,000 Kay Weeks | 214-676-8230

4933 Gulfstream Drive | $765,000 Kay Weeks | 214-676-8230

EBBY.COM

Ebby’s Little White House | 214-210-1500 Ebby Preston Center | 214-692-0000 Ebby Lakewood | 214-826-0316 Ebby White Rock/Lake Highlands | 214-341-0330

©2014. Equal Housing Opportunity.


4  JULY 2014

POLICE SKU LD U GGE RY of the M O N T H CLE ANE R CLE ANS UP B E F O RE JO B At 10:27 a.m. on June 5, a resident of the 4600 block of Livingston Avenue reported the theft of $160 in cash by a contractor hired to clean windows and gutters. The thief was supposed to complete the work on May 31, when he took the money to purchase supplies. But despite repeated calls from the homeowner, he never returned to finish the job.

K E E P I N G TA B S

Thief Almost Caught in the Act Ultimately Gets Away

F

or the family involved, a bizarre incident in the early-morning hours of May 31 might have been both scary and relieving. It began at 2:46 a.m., when an officer spotted a white Ford pickup stopped in the 4200 block of Edmondson Avenue in Highland Park. The driver said he was checking his tire pressure, even though none of his tires appeared low. The officer told him to get a broken taillight fixed, but after finding he had no active warrants, did not detain him. A minute later, the officer found three bags in some nearby shrubbery containing a pair of Jimmy Choo shoes, a pair of Neiman Marcus pants, some

TODD JORGENSON clothing from Gap Kids, a few coins, and assorted flight logs. The officer found the owners of the merchandise in a nearby house. They said it was stolen from three unlocked cars in their driveway. A black glove also was found at the scene. Meanwhile, it was later discovered that the driver who fled the scene has an extensive criminal history that includes arrests for burglary, fraud, DWI, and drug possession.

BE FIT. BE HEALTHY. BE WELL. INTRODUCING A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE T O H E A LT H A N D F I T N E S S I N B I G D

DMAGAZINE.COM/BEWELL

N O TA B L E I N C I D E N T S H I G H L A N D PA R K May 20 At 5:22 p.m., a homeowner in the 3400 block of Potomac Avenue reported finding a Stetson hat in his flower bed containing a box of Hornady rifle ammunition, a pair of Jimmy Choo women’s sunglasses with case, two more pairs of sunglasses, an iPod audio cable, an empty bottle of Izod cologne, and two cases of Clif bars. June 4 Between 10:30 p.m. on June 3 and 7 a.m. on June 4, a thief stole eight copper downspouts, valued at $1,000, from a the 4600 block of Abbott Avenue. June 5 At 8:49 p.m., an employee of Highland Park United Methodist

Church reported finding a man passed out in the church bathroom after an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting. When awakened by police, the man’s breath smelled of alcohol. He admitted to drinking two beers and taking prescription medication after the meeting. The 20-year-old man was issued citations for minor in possession and consumption. June 13 At 9:20 a.m., a resident of the 3200 block of Dartmouth Avenue was scratched five times in the leg by her neighbor’s cat, prompting her to receive a tetanus shot at an urgent-care clinic. A town ordinance requires the blackand-white tabby, named Roy Orbison, to be quarantined for 10 days at a veterinary clinic.

47

Value, in dollars, of several bottles of Head & Shoulders shampoo taken by a shoplifter from the CVS store in Park Cities Plaza about 8:30 p.m. on June 11.

WANT TO READ MORE CRIMES? SIGN UP FOR OUR WEEKLY POLICE REPORT E-NEWSLETTER parkcitiespeople.com/ policereport

U N I V E R S I T Y PA R K June 2 Between 9 and 9:05 a.m., a thief entered an unlocked silver 2011 Jeep Laredo at St. Christopher Episcopal Church and stole a $2,000 Louis Vuitton purse, an $800 Louis Vuitton wallet, a $400 iPhone, and $400 in cash. Between 8:05 and 8:15 a.m. on June 5, a burglar broke into a silver 2012 Volkswagen Passat at the same location and stole a $200 Kindle reader, a $100 purse, and a $10 checkbook. June 5 Between 11 and 11:45 a.m., a thief stole a $600 iPhone 5 from a restroom in the teacher workroom at University Park Elementary School. June 8 Between 12:55 and 6 a.m.,

a vandal threw asphalt at the door of a home in the 4200 block of Emerson Avenue, causing $1,000 in damage. June 10 At 2:30 p.m., someone reported that a man exposed himself outside Hyer Elementary School. He fled before police arrived. June 12 At 2:41 p.m., a resident of the 3500 block of Asbury Avenue reported the theft of a $7,250 pear-shaped diamond ring from the bathroom vanity of a house. At 2:55 p.m., a hit-and-run driver struck a cyclist in the 6500 block of Douglas Avenue, damaging a Carrera Crossfire hybrid bicycle.


JULY 2014  5

S C H O O LS Reading List Leads to Hot Debate HPISD parents question high school's picks By Sarah Bennett

People Newspapers When University Park resident Sarah Jordan saw her daughter reading at the family dining table, she didn’t expect to see her high-achieving student using White-Out on the book. “I picked it up and ended up reading the book cover to cover,” Jordan said. “If this was made into a movie, it wouldn’t even be NC-17." Her daughter’s pre-AP, 10th-grade English class was reading The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein, which Jordan felt to have pornographic passages regarding an inappropriate relationship between two characters. The book is one of many that has caused heated debate among parents of Highland Park High School students. To break it down, there are three types of reading lists used by the school: summer reading, core curriculum, and “recommended outside reading,” or ROR. Jordan’s daughter was reading a book from her class’ core curriculum list, but many of the other books in question — such as The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky — are from ROR selections. The full ROR list includes 250 to 300 books, which are approved by a review committee (made up of parents and teachers) and the administration. Teachers then make a “short list” for their students to choose from based on that list. “For the last three years in particular, we have been very delicate in making sure [the books] go through multiple department chairs,” HPHS principal Walter Kelly said. Unlike the summer reading and core curriculum lists, the master ROR list is not housed online. Instead, students must log into their Moodle account to view their own teacher’s individual list. That has led to confusion and frustration on the part of many parents — many of whom prefer that a master list be made available online. Kelly called the parents’ call for a comprehensive online list a “fairly recent request.” Another point of confusion lies in permission slips. Kelly said that though permission slips are not given out for every text covered, they are distributed when a book may have controversial material. But some parents feel the slips are not detailed enough in their descriptions of the books. “We don’t want to stomp on anybody

MORE ON THE WEB

These classics were censored when first published in the U.S. parkcitiespeople.com/bannedbooks-that-shaped-america

else’s right to read the material,” said HPHS parent Tavia Hunt. “We just want true and informed consent.” Lately, these issues have caused a flurry of emails among parents, ranging from the concerned to the outraged. In response, Kelly sent out an email to parents on May 12. “Our processes and selections should meet the developmentally appropriate balance of challenging our students’ thinking while upholding community values and standards,” Kelly said in the email. He also reminded parents that they have the option to refuse a particular

text, per state law. But parents are not always made aware of this so easily. “I was never made aware of that,” Jordan said. “We would have taken that, had we been told.” In fact, following multiple meetings with the school, the Jordans decided to pull their child out of the Highland Park school system and enroll her in private school. Another common argument — one that helped the Jordans reach their decision — is that the lists should rely more heavily on “classic” pieces of literature. But the school maintains a standard of including reading material from all different periods of history, including more contemporary works. “It’s just wrong for me to sit back and not try to improve the quality of literature for our kids,” Hunt said. Going forward, members of the PTA and the Highland Park Literary Festival committee will be enlisted to nominate parents for the book review committee. After all, upholding community standards is one of the goals Kelly has outCONTINUED ON 8

FRESHMAN CORE The following books appear on the syllabus for freshman English Standard, Pre-AP, Pre-AP TAG:

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak n  The Odyssey by Homer n  The Life of Pi by Yann Martel n  Romeo and Juliet by n  William Shakespeare n Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer Tuesdays With Morrie by n  Mitch Albom Specific to Pre-AP: The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho n  Specific to Pre-AP TAG: The Once and Future King by n  T.H. White Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey n  Chaucer A Tale of Two Cities by Charles n  Dickens


3900 STONEBRIDGE | $4,495,000

Turtle Creek Estates situated atop a cliff w/6,500sf, 4 bedrooms, 4LA, pool, wine room Ralph Randall | Madeline Jobst | JL Forke | 214.533.8355

3102 SAINT JOHNS | $1,897,000

5700+ sf home w/4 bedrooms, 5 baths, 3LA, study, pool Tom Rhodes | 214.520.4422

3708 HARVARD | $4,300,000

7400 square foot home in Highland Park with 5 bedrooms, 7.1 Baths, 3 Living areas, 3-Car, Pool Hickman+Weber | 214.300.8439

3533 HAYNIE | $1,645,000 | SOLD

4444 POTOMAC | $1,799,000 | SOLD

Hill-Country 5 bedroom, 6.1 bath custom near Snider Plaza Keith Callahan | 214.675.6777

Immaculate custom in UP w/5 bedrooms, 5.1 baths, pool, spa Christine McKenny | 214.662.7758

4000 MARQUETTE | $2,450,000

University Park home built-in 2013 w/5 bedrooms, 5.1 baths, 3LA, study, downstairs media Jennifer Miller | 214.701.7717

3005 AMHERST | $1,875,000

5 bedroom, 5.2 bath Mediterranean w/formals, family, study, game, media, pool, spa Diana Stewart | 214.215.6516

m

3716 MARQUETTE | $1,675,000

Stellar location! Extensively updated 2014, pool, on 70 ft. lot, walk to school & parks. Jennifer Miller | 214.701.7717

3532 STANFORD | $1,299,000

4,100+ sf home in UP Fairway w/4 bedrooms, 4.1 baths, 3LA Shelly Bailey | 214.673.4323 ©2014 EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

4509 BELFORT | $1,399,000

Updated Highland Park home w/4 bedrooms, 3.1 baths, formals, family, pool, spa, pergola Christine McKenny | 214.662.7758

THE HOUSE - 2200 VICTORY | MID $300’s - $1,250,000

Contemporary high-rise w/premium views, pool, concierge, valet The House Sales Team | 214.303.1200

2844 FONDREN | $1,249,000

Well-maintained 4 bedroom, 4.1 bath w/4,143 sf, 3LA, study Christine McKenny | 214.662.7758 AN EBBY HALLIDAY COMPANY


D

der Plaza

THE RESIDENCES AT THE RITZ-CARLTON | $3,850,000-$895,000

From penthouse to pied-a-terre. 5-star Uptown hotel amenities, restaurant, valet, room service Sharon S. Quist | 214.695.9595

6438 PRESTONSHIRE | $1,495,000

4,900+sf home w/4 bedrooms, 3.1 baths, study, game room Rebecca Meyercord Brown | 214.636.9086

4241 WOODFIN | $2,699,000

Renovated custom home in Rockbrook Estates w/5 bedrooms, 5.3 baths, 4LA, study, 3-car Lisa & Kristi Johnson | 214.356.5616

4036 Purdue | $1,529,000 | SOLD

Traditional home w/4-5 bedrooms, 5.1 baths, 2LA, game, 2-car. Paige & Curt Elliott 214.478.9544

7242 LAKEWOOD BOULEVARD | $1,795,000

Newer custom Tudor w/6,300+sf, 5 bedrooms, 5.2 baths, formals, den, game, study, 2-car Scott Jackson Team | 214.827.2400

2924 SOUTHWESTERN | $1,395,000

Cape Cod style 4 bedroom, 3.1 bath w/fresh updates Cindy Bruner | 214.675.0834

10842 CAMELLIA | $1,780,000 | PENDING

Renovated Preston Hollow home on one-half-acre w/5 bedrooms, 4.3 baths, 3LA, study, media Brady Moore 214.680.6555

m a r k e t i ng p r op ert i e s of q ua l i t y a n d c h a r a c t er

6553 LAKE CIRCLE | $1,225,000

Lakewood custom w/4 bedrooms, 4.3 baths, formals, game, library, pool, cabana, outdoor living Scott Jackson Team | 214.827.2400

4 GRANTLEY COURT | $980,000

Traditional home w/luxury finishes, 4 living areas, pool Eloise & James Martin | 214.616.3343 PRESTON CENTER | 214.369.6000

4032 LOVERS LANE | $899,000

Charming and completely renovated in HPISD with 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, formals, den, study Hickman+Weber | 214.300.8439

2 RUE DU LAC | $695,000

Almost 4,000 sf, 3 bedroom, 3 bath in gated enclave w/lake Laura Michelle | 214.228.3854

HIGHLAND PARK | 214.526.6600

INTOWN | 214.303.1133

29 ASHTON COURT | $609,000

3 bedroom, 3 bath home in Churchill Pointe gated community Evelyn Ponder | 214.535.8170

PARK CITIES | 214.522.3838

LAKEWOOD | 214.522.3838


8  JULY 2014

S CH O O LS CONTINUED FROM 5 lined for literature selection. “There’s not always a clear-cut answer, and people don’t always agree,” he said. “There is a healthy push-pull about what is a community standard.” The district is already revising permission forms for next fall’s classes. On the forms, parents will be encouraged to read the texts in full prior to consent, and the form will indicate where in the book there might be controversial passages. A timeline for how quickly parents would need to return the forms is yet to be determined. “We want to be more transparent about that,” Kelly said. Parents do have the option of formally requesting that books be added or removed from the ROR list. To do this, they must fill out a form and return it to the district office. But Kelly said that no parent has done so, to the best of his knowledge. “I encourage our parents to research and work with us as partners to make sure we’re all making the right decisions,” Kelly said. “The more informed parents are, the better those decisions are.”

Bandmates Take on Drum Corps By Paige Skinner

Special Contributor Two students from the Highlander Band and color guard have earned a spot with Crossmen, a world-class Drum and Bugle Corps with Drum Corps International. "This is a huge achievement not only for these two outstanding students, but for the Highlander Band as a whole,” said Highlander band director Reagan Brumley. Caroline Gharis, a senior, is the color-guard captain at HPHS. She also plays the French horn. This is her second year with Crossmen, and she will be part of the flag line. Peter Sommers, a junior euphonium player, will spend his first year in Crossmen as an alternate on the flag line. “They had to audition against some of the most talented young people from across the country,” HPISD Highlander Band and color guard director Danny Martinez said. Members of the Corps spent 12 hours a day for three weeks learning the marching show in San Antonio at the Crossmen headquarters.

C O U R T E SY P H O T O

Peter Sommers and Caroline Gharis

After a debut performance on June 13, they loaded the buses to begin their tour. The Crossmen will perform in 20 states, competing against other DCI groups from around the nation. Their tour will

end with the DCI World Championships on August 9 in Indianapolis. In the Dallas area, the Crossmen will perform in Southlake on July 16, and at Lake Highlands High School on July 21.


When you see our sign out front, you can trust there’s something special behind it. A Virginia Cook sign in the yard tells you there’s something special about the home behind it. It also says a lot about the Realtor behind the sign: Experience, training, character, plus a sixth sense for matching buyers and sellers – these are all hallmarks of every Virginia Cook agent. Should you put a Virginia Cook agent to work for you? All signs point to yes. www.virginiacook.com. LUXURY PROPERTIES G IN D N PE

N IO PT O

LD SO 4343 Margate Drive

6023 Waggoner Drive

5849 Norway Road

3805 Greenbrier Drive

$1,995,000 Peerless quality! Five Bdrms, 6.2 baths, pool and enchanting garden, over-sized lot.

$1,995,000 Proposed new construction. 5 bedrooms, 5.1 baths, 3 car garage.

$1,650,000 Fine craftsmanship and quality for

5 bedroom. New Preston Hollow Home.

$1,399,000 One of the few remaining cottages left in University Park.

Lori Sparks

Greg Pape

Greg Pape

Kathleen Schiele

214.680.6432

214.546.4066

11917 Edgestone Road

12210 Park Bend Drive

214.641.8751

N IO PT O

LD SO

N IO PT O

4117 Stanhope Street

214.546.4066

6934 Orchid Lane

$1,195,000 Prime Park Cities location! Sparkling pool with covered patio.

$949,900 Cul-de-sac lot in gated Lake forest. 3 bedrooms, 3.1 baths, impressive den and study.

$899,000 Charming C-Shape Soft Contemporary. 3 bedrooms , 3.1 baths with private courtyard.

$735,000 Gorgeous, light & totally updated! 5

Bill Wallace

Margot Tschantz

Margot Tschantz

Lori Sparks

214.213.8066

972.743.2891

214.680.6432

N IO PT O

LD SO 4517 Shady Hill Drive

6004 Northwood Road

972.743.2891

bedrooms, 3.1 baths. All bath’s with stones & tiles!

3843 Regent Drive

12010 Timberlake Court

$725,000 Unique 2 bed, 2.1 baths in Preston Hollow. Lg landscaped lot (100X175). Gourmet eat-in kitchen.

$600,000 Extensive updating, freshly painted and

$599,000 Large rooms & high ceilings round out

$569,000 4 bedrooms, 3.1 baths and 4 car garage!

Marilyn Schaffer

Don Thomas

Chris Papazian

Lori Kircher

214.207.5757

great drive up appeal! 4 bedrooms, 3.1 baths.

214.641.7001

this stunning 3 bed, 3 bathTimberlake Gardens home. 214.683.0130

Updated, open floor plan with winderful features.

N IO PT O

N IO PT O

4126 Lomita Lane

214.789.4060

3756 Vinecrest Drive

7009 Eudora Drive

4116 Deep Valley Drive

$560,000 Maticulously updated 3 bedroom home

$530,000 Truly unique 4 bedroom, 3.1 baths with

$522,500 Quality home with impressive updates!

$500,000 Incredible updating in kitchen and

Karen Smiley

Ed Murchison

Lori Kircher

Don Thomas

in Midway Highlands!

214.850.4318

large guest quarters. Qrtrs has full kitchen.

PARK CITIES 5950 Sherry Ln, Dallas,TX 75225 | 214.696.8877

214.395.7151

3 bedrooms, 2 baths with large grassy play yard!

NORTH DALLAS 6060 Forest Ln, Dallas,TX 75230 | 214.750.7373

214.789.4060

master suite. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths.

214.641.7001


10 窶カULY 2014

S CH O O LS

CAPS OFF TO HP'S CLASS OF 2014

Benjamin Klimko and Stuart Forrester

DON JOHNSON

Highland Park's senior class totaled 512 blue-and-gold-clad graduates who filed into SMU's newly renovated Moody Coliseum for their commencement ceremony on May 30.

Principal Walter Kelly congratulates salutatorian Victoria Piranian.

Micah Bires, Grace Dieb, Katie Greer, Jake Hockett, Morgan Ladd, Sam Malone, Matti Miller, Rachel Pride, Martin Spradley, Rodman Steele, Hank Swayze, Hannah Ward and Travis Warren perform "Vienna" by Billy Joel.

Jordan Bethea shakes hands with Kelly.

Valedictorian Lauren Murski

Miller Susens performs Cassado's "Suite for Cello."

Superintendent Dr. Dawson Orr

Carson Crow turns his tassel.


JULY 2014  11

S C HOOLS

HPHS Seniors Awarded at Annual Honors Ceremony

U N I V E R S I T Y PA R K C H I L D R E N ' S F I S H I N G D E R BY

Amanda Toole said she had used "little bits of hot dogs to catch little fish." Mary Catharine McKeithen and her parents Dan and Polly

By Sarah Bennett

People Newspapers Highland Park High School seniors took part in the age-old tradition of “Blanket Awards” and scholarship announcements on May 29. “Honestly, I thought it was kind of shocking,” valedictorian Lauren Murski said of receiving her honor. “There are so many smart kids here.” In addition to the school’s 82 scholarships Rodman and awards that highlight Steele stars of all subjects from nursing to athletics to literature, the 2014 seniors collectively earned $15.6 million in scholarship money from the colleges they will soon attend. “This school has given me so much and means so much to me,” said Blanket Award recipient Rodman Steele. “I love this place.” The ceremony also honored the students who graduated cum laude, magna cum laude, and summa cum laude, as well as the top 10 graduates. “Really, with what you’ve already done as a class and what you realistically can accomplish in your lives, you make me very humbled,” principal Walter Kelly said. "It’s that hope; it’s the hope of combining what you’ve done and what you can do that really provides the inspiration for these awards and these honors.”

CLAIRE CASNER

Beckley Wilson, Steele Tobin, Hayden Wilson, and McKinley Oliver

Kids eagerly waited to hear how many inches their fish measured.

Kieran Brannon kisses his fish.

Brenna Walters said she used corn as bait to catch this 20-inch fish.

S T. M A R K ' S S C H O O L O F T E X A S

S H E LT O N S A L U T E S

MORE ON THE WEB

For more photos from graduation and the honors ceremony visit: parkcitiespeople.com/photos

Families gathered at Caruth Park on June 7 for the annual extravaganza. Trophies were awarded every hour for the biggest and smallest fish. More: parkcitiespeople.com/photos

C O U R T E SY S T. M A R K ' S

Valedictorian Halbert Bai addresses his fellow students, faculty, family, and friends at graduation on May 23. You can watch his speech at: smtexas.org/Classof2014

Mikey Halperin graduated from Shelton School as his class' salutatorian on May 31. Mikey is the son of James and Gayle Halperin of Highland Park. He will be attending the McCombs School of Business at the University of Texas at Austin this fall. Mikey has been interning at Heritage Auctions, his father's company, since he was 10 years old. At Shelton, Mikey was AllDistrict in track and soccer, and All-State in cross country. He was also involved in theater and was the lead in several plays. Mikey was prom king and elected by his class to give a speech at graduation. He is looking forward to making friends with brilliant people, his father said.


12 窶カULY 2014

SCH O O LS A R M S T R O N G F I E L D D AY

Lowell Shoaf, Ella Dunston, Blair Schiller, and Lyla Gaubert

Erin Smith, Morgan Passanante, and Indie Lane

On May 30, Armstrong Elementary students celebrated the last day of school with field day activities and a picnic. Field Day was themed "The Armstrong 100" with teams, games and events modeled after IndyCar races.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING CONTENT DAVE PERRY MILLER & ASSOCIATES

Home in Gated Los Arboles

Dave Perry-Miller, Ryan Streiff and Sharon Redd with Dave Perry-Miller & Associates are marketing 3 Los Arboles (3losarboles.daveperrymiller. com) on a heavily treed, half-acre lot. Attention to detail is the hallmark of this home built by Cy Barcus and architect William Briggs, along with consultation from designer Neal Stewart. Offered for $2,795,000, this stunning property successfully combines a sense of peace, security and privacy with exceptional design and quality throughout. Expansive formal entertaining areas that open onto the pool and terraces areas are beautifully integrated with the informal rooms, custom Bentwood kitchen appointed with all the amenities imaginable and the first-floor master suite featuring room-sized separate closets, a fireplace and three sets of French doors leading out to the rear

out features lighted bookshelves and a triptych window. There are five wood burning fireplaces with gas logs and marble or Cantera stone mantels imported from Mexico. Upstairs is an office area, an additional den and three spacious bedroom suites that provide designer baths and large closets. This truly magical setting is reminiscent of premier resort living in a private gated enclave at a location convenient to all the best Dallas has to offer. To arrange a private showing, contact Dave Perry-Miller at 972.380.7723/dave@daveperrymiller.com, Ryan Streiff 469.371.3008/ryan@daveperrymiller.com or Sharon Redd 469.835.5363/ sharon@daveperrymiller.com. Dave Perry-Miller & Associates (www.daveperrymiller.com) is an Ebby Halliday Company; and a member of Leading

grounds. The spacious library with cherry wood through-

Real Estate Companies of the World and Luxury Portfolio International (www.luxuryportfolio.com).


PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM I JULY 2014  13

S C HOOLS

Demographic Study Confirms Rapid Growth By Sarah Bennett

People Newspapers At the June 10 meeting of the Highland Park ISD school board, trustees heard detailed data from demographers that reiterated one thing: the district is booming. That may come as no surprise, as district enrollment has been steadily on the rise for years. But the breakdown was of specific importance to the board. “It will confirm why parents are concerned about class size,” superintendent Dawson Orr said of the demographic study results. Last year’s district-wide enrollment was 7,037 students. That’s an 11.15-percent increase in five years. Of that total, 501 students were kindergarteners. From the four elementary schools, Bradfield saw the most growth in the last two years, with a 6.6-percent spike. So what does this all mean? According to PASA Demographics — a firm out of College Station that performed the study — growth will continue. “The homework assignment that I give you is to think about how much demand there is among parents for this dis-

POOLING RESOURCES

HP School Board Talks Natatorium Teardown With UP City Council

HPISD GROWTH TREND

7,037

'05-'06 was up 1.78% over '04-'05 from 6,166 to 6,276 '10-'11 was up 3.74% over '09-10 from 6,448 to 6,689.

5,853 2000

2014 S O U R C E : PA S A D E M O G R A P H I C S

trict — this small demographic area,” said Pat Guseman, president of PASA. But there are not just Highland Park students to consider in terms of population. An estimated 1,583 students from the Highland Park district borders are enrolled in local private schools such as Ur-

suline Academy and St. Mark’s. In addition, SMU’s new requirement that all sophomores live on campus (and the consequent construction of new residence halls) means more housing will be made available within the area. The full report is available on HPISD's website under "facility planning."

In June, trustees from the Highland Park ISD school board met with members of the University Park City Council to consider the possibility of demolishing HP's existing natatorium in order to make room for more classrooms. "The district is seeking ways to address the enrollment growth it has experienced," superintendentDawson Orr said. The existing natatorium is roughly 50 years old and takes up 9,800 square feet. That has the possibility to house 22 to 24 standard classrooms (800 square feet) and two or three labs, depending on construction plans. A potential partnership with the city would include construction of a joint-use facility at the Holmes Aquatic Center site that would meet the needs of both parties. So far, discussions are preliminary.


14  JULY 2014

BUSINESS Preston Center Developers Want Life of Luxury By Todd Jorgenson

People Newspapers What is the future of Preston Center? A better question might be, when is the future of Preston Center? That’s the dilemma that has two developers at odds with vocal residents from both the Park Cities and Preston Hollow over a pair of luxury-apartment developments that both sides agree could start a trend in the area surrounding the venerable retail development. Crosland Group hopes to secure approval from the city of Dallas this summer for Highland House, a 22-story project on a 0.5-acre site in the 8200 block of Westchester Drive that would replace an aging three-story medical building. Next up is Transwestern, which has submitted plans for a complex on the northeast corner of Preston Road and Northwest Highway that would reach as high as six stories at its peak. Both developers say they’re trying to meet a need for luxury apartments in the area from baby boomers and empty-nesters looking to downsize. Each has met with concerned local residents and city officials multiple times, and has scaled back their plans as a result. Yet the opposition has continued to grow, with former Dallas mayor Laura Miller, who owns a house in nearby Bluffview, joining the battle along with high-powered attorney Lisa Blue Baron and former Dallas City Council member Mitchell Rasansky. Miller said that while the locals welcome new development at both locations, the specific projects are too high and too dense, and would create issues with traffic and property values in a congested area. “I think this whole thing presents a good opportunity for everyone to work together to improve the future of Preston Center,” Miller said. “Change is coming, for sure. Everybody knows that. But it would be nice to have some parameters.”

Highland House looking up Crosland Group’s original proposal would have made Highland House the king of the Preston Center skyline at 29 stories. Now, it’s been lowered to 22 as a concession to con-

C O U R T E SY C R O S L A N D G R O U P

Crosland Group is proposing a 22-story luxury apartment complex, called Highland House, in the 8200 block of Westchester Drive.

LUX U RY L I V I N G Here’s a look at proposals for two luxury apartment complexes in the Preston Center area.

Highland House

Transwestern

Site acreage

0.5

3.5

Stories 6

22

Units 220

210

Average unit size

1,300 sq ft

1,400 sq ft

Est. monthly rent

$4,000-$5,000

$2,500-$5,000

cerned neighbors, but the desire to make a statement remains. “This project is big. To put enough people in the building to have an impact, you have to make it big,” said Rick Williamson, Crosland executive vice president of development. “This is upscale, and it’s supposed to make an impression. People pay for a view.” The plan calls for a maximum of 210 units over 16 stories, with a parking garage that would consume six levels both above and below ground. Apartments would average about 1,300 square feet, with rental rates of $4,000 to $5,000 per month and numerous amenities.

Anything over nine stories at that site requires rezoning approval, which led to a public hearing in front of the Dallas Plan Commission this spring. The City Council likely will vote on the idea this summer. “The current traffic is a complete nightmare,” Miller said. “The people want a better solution.” Crosland contracted with the DeShazo Group, a Dallas consulting firm, on a traffic study that concluded the Highland House project would have a positive impact on traffic in the area compared to the existing medical complex, even if perceptions suggest otherwise.

“We’ve got as much of a stake in Preston Center as anybody,” said Crosland chairman and CEO Luke Crosland, whose company is based in an office tower only a few blocks from the proposed site. The site is located within Highland Park ISD, which already is dealing with overcrowded campuses. The school district has not taken a stance on the project. However, Williamson said Crosland is not marketing the complex to families with school-age children. Williamson said the company ultimately wants to help change the image of Preston Center. “This is an incredible mixeduse development. The one thing it’s missing is a residential element,” Williamson said. “This is built for people in these neighborhoods. It gives them a place to downsize and still have all the amenities they’re used to. This is the start of the retooling of Preston Center into what we think it could be.”

Building behind the pink wall The Transwestern case doesn’t yet have a date for rezoning consideration by the plan commission, but the com-

pany’s most recent plans have seen the original eight-story proposal cut to six stories and the total number of units reduced from 296 to about 220. Current zoning at the site calls for three stories and density of no more than 120 units. “It’s a really important corner. We want it to present an appropriate entrance into Preston Hollow,” said Mark Culwell, Transwestern managing director for multifamily development. “It’s preserving the character of the neighborhood.” Culwell said Transwestern’s $80 million project calls for underground parking with controlled access, ample landscaping and open space, and no exterior balconies on the side facing the adjacent townhouses. The average apartment size would be about 1,400 square feet, according to Culwell, with rental rates starting at $2,500. There would be no efficiency units smaller than 1,000 square feet, and 60 percent coverage on the 3.5-acre lot. Such a complex would join only a few significant multifamily developments on the north side of Northwest Highway,

CONTINUED ON 16


Global. History. Experience.

PAIGE WHITESIDE 214.549.2540 paigewhiteside@yahoo.com

MARY O’KEEFE 214.882.0082 mary.okeefe@cbdfw.com

SANDRA MELMED 214.384.5767 sandra.melmed@cbdfw.com

SHELLY HAMMER 214.207.7937 shammer@sbcglobal.net

LILA RICHARDS 214.502.0852 lila.richards@cbdfw.com

ESTABLISHED IN 1933.

AGED TO PERFECTION PHILIP WALKER 214.769.4322 philip.walker@cbdfw.com

After eight decades of exceptional results, Coldwell Banker Previews International® continues to set the benchmark for luxury real estate marketing around the globe. Using a winning combination of experience, expertise and resources, Previews® Property Specialists have mastered the fine art of handling extraordinary properties.

NANCY REAGAN 214.536.9399 nancy.reagan2@gmail.com

SABRINA BELL 214.707.1780 sabrina.bell@cbdfw.com

NED CAMMACK 214.707.4066 ned.cammack@cbdw.com

CBDFW.com/Park Cities | ColdwellBankerPreviews.com 50+ countries

|

3,100 offices

|

85,000 agents

7001 Preston Road, Suite 125; Dallas, TX 75205

Africa North America Central America South America Asia Australia Caribbean Europe Middle East LORI LAMB 214.538.8862 lori.lamb@cbdfw.com

STEVIE CHADDICK 214.533.1234 stevie.chaddick@cbdfw.com

Agent and office numbers for the Coldwell Banker Previews International program include all Coldwell Banker-branded offices in the Coldwell Banker franchise system as of December 2013. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker ©2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker logo, Coldwell Banker Previews International and the Previews logo are registered and unregistered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. 8365_DFW5/14

JINI CYR 972.345.6256 jini.cyr@gmail.com

LINDA VALLALA 214.789.6272 vallala1@airmail.net

BRENDA DAVIS 214.205.6393 brenda.davis@cbdfw.com

SUZAN KONTOULIS 949.933.9439 suzan.kontoulis@cbdfw.com

CRYSTAL PIENAAR 214.683.7425 crystal.pienaar@cbdfw.com


16  JULY 2014

BUS I N E S S

Gerald Tomlin Antiques Moves Into New Digs HP Village was home for 25 years By Sarah Bennett

People Newspapers After 25 years as a tenant in Highland Park Village, Gerald Tomlin Antiques has moved its fine furnishings to Slocum Street in the Design District. “We just kind of ran out of room,” Joanne Tomlin said. The shop has always been a family operation, with Joanne and her husband, Gerald, at the head and their three sons — Gerald Jr., Edward, and Christopher — fulfilling the rest of the duties. The Tomlins have had a showroom on Slocum for some time, but enjoyed having a storefront in the Village and close to customers. Just as they were nearing their need to transition to a larger space, tragedy struck. Gerald Jr., the family’s eldest son, lost his battle with cancer in April. “Before he passed away, we had talked about moving,” Joanne said. “He anticipated that he might not be with us long, so he kind of pushed us.’” Joanne had also been on the board for the Village, so when the family was ready to move, the Village helped to make the transition as simple as possible. “We are going to miss them,” said Becky Snow, general manager of the Village for more than

C H R I S M C G AT H E Y

Joanne Tomlin shows off a secretary desk with ivory detailing in the new showroom on Slocum Street.

25 years. “It was always fascinating to hear Joanne or one of the boys talk about a new item they just received.” In the spirit of new beginnings, the family packed up their fine consignment and estate pieces, and prepared for the move. “It was nerve-wracking, just because we’ve got a lot of stuff that can get broken,” Ed said. “But after years of having a system in place, it makes it a little

easier. We had a vision in mind of what we wanted to do.” The new location divides items up by style, including traditional French, country French, English, Russian, and biedermeier German. “There’s history in antiques,” she said. “You see how people lived.” A few of Joanne's favorite pieces in the shop are two marble side tables once owned by the Duke and Duchess of

Windsor and a set of 10 dining chairs dating back to 1750. “That’s 250 years of bottoms,” she joked. Jo a n n e g r a d u a t e d f r o m Ursuline Academy and SMU before teaching English at Thomas Jefferson High School. She didn’t get into antiques until meeting her husband, who traveled with “Antiques Roadshow.” Together, the family found their different roles in the business.

“Gerry is pure artist,” Joanne said. “I know dollars and cents.” Despite life’s changes, the Tomlins will always think of their years at Highland Park Village with good memories. “It was a bad situation that they made very comfortable for us,” she said. “Our sons grew up there, and they were always fond of and dedicated to the Village.” Email: sarah.bennett@ peoplenewspapers.com

C O U R T E SY T R A N S W E S T E R N

has been sparse since the creation of the Preston Center Special Purpose District in 1989. But she suggested that before a precedent is set with the approval of a single project, perhaps a grander plan could be established — something that would create guidelines to account for traffic and infrastructure concerns. Miller said concerns about both proposals have helped to galvanize local residents and business owners. An online petition opposing the Transwestern complex has garnered more than 1,500 supporters. “It’s a really tight-knit community. It’s great that we have so many people who want to

get involved and help shape the neighborhood,” Parks said. “We are supportive of development at that location, but it needs to be thoughtfully done with regard to what’s currently in the neighborhood.” Miller, who has kept a low political profile since her second mayoral term ended in 2007, admits she was hesitant to become involved. But she said both proposals should be delayed at least until city leaders have a chance to look at some larger issues. “They provide a wake-up call to the businesses and the residents in the Preston Center area,” Miller said. “What does this area want to be, and what makes sense?”

CONTINUED FROM 14 west of Hillcrest Road, since the 1980s. “We don’t understand why they can’t develop a high quality project at that corner that keeps with what current zoning would allow,” said Ashley Parks, president of the Preston Hollow East Homeowners Association. “You can do luxury apartments at three stories. To say that you can’t have luxury unless you go up higher, I don’t think is accurate at all.” However, Culwell said that if such apartments don’t become part of the landscape in the area soon, it might prompt a continued migration to the suburbs,

Transwestern is hoping to build a six-story luxury apartment complex at the corner of Preston Road and Northwest Highway. where luxury mixed-use developments are more common. “Over time, demands change and preferences change. A city has to continue to reinvent itself,” Culwell said. “We’re just trying to respond to the de-

mand.”

Neighborhood concerns Miller and her neighbors understand the need to bring Preston Hollow into the 21st century. After all, development there


JULY 2014  17

BU S I N E S S

LYFE Kitchen Opens in Preston Center By Jacie Scott

Special Contributor P i z z a d i l l aw i c h . A r t ’s Unfried Chicken. Baked Garlic Parmesan Sweet Potato Fries. These are a few of the mouthwatering dishes re s i d e n t s c a n feast upon at LYFE Kitchen in Preston Center. LYFE, short for Love Your Food Everyday, Jeremy Bringardner is a fast-casual restaurant committed to providing affordable, health-conscious food. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, the menu includes gluten-free, vegan, and vegetarian options. LYFE is also LEED certified and uses low-voltage lighting as well as recycled materials for countertops. Chief communications officer and co-founder Mike Donahue views it more as a health revolution. “Our goal is really to help change the way America eats,” said Donahue, a former McDonald’s executive. “We consider ourselves more of a lifestyle brand.” Donahue, alongside anotherformer McDonald’s executive, Mike Roberts, came up with the concept for LYFE in February 2010. The idea was to create the Whole Foods Market of the restaurant industry. They paired up with a team of chefs including Oprah’s former personal chef Art Smith, noted vegan chef Tal Ronnen, and Jeremy Bringardner, recent winner of the Food Network’s "Chopped." “LYFE Kitchen just kind of fell right on my lap and I jumped on board,” said Bringardner, LYFE’s executive chef. “It was the first chance for me to put both of my loves together.” Chefs use locally sourced

"IT WAS T H E F IRST CHANCE F O R ME TO P UT BOT H O F MY LOV E S TO GET HER . " JE R EMY BRI N G AR D N E R

ingredients, replace creams and butter with “good” fats like avocado and coconut milk, and get creative with fresh herbs and spices. “My goal is to create food that you feel good about eating and gives you a clean, energizing feeling after,” Bringardner said. “To have a restaurant that’s full of options and doesn’t sacrifice taste, that’s really my mission.” That goes for dessert, too. Bringardner created a chocolaty, creamy dessert that replaces eggs and cream with the “good” fats of coconut milk. Pomegranate and chia seeds are combined to create a tart sauce.

“I wanted to create a dessert that actually gives you some health benefit and, of course, still has taste with a responsible portion. That’s the Chocolate Budino,” Bringardner said. When asked what sets LYFE apart from other restaurants in the area with similar goals, Donahue said simply the taste, the transparency of the menu and the team’s belief in indulgence. “People have a love-hate relationship with their food. We want to change it to just a love,” Donahue said. The restaurant is located at 8315 Westchester Drive.

C O U R T E SY O F LY F E K I T C H E N

Lyfe Kitchen will open one of its three Dallas-area locations in Preston Center this summer.

Judy Yates, our pet portrait artist, has been with us for 15 years. She is currently painting “Old Masters” backgrounds with your Best Friend incorporated. www.judyates.com

The FREE Way to Arts & Culture From destinations in the downtown Dallas arts district to shops and restaurants in historic Oak Cliff, you’ll find it all on D-Link! It’s your link to arts, fun, culture and dining.

214.979.1111 DART.org

www.billibonze.com 4225 W. Lovers Lane Phone: 214-350-2963


18  JULY 2014

BUSINE S S

Sparkman-Hillcrest Undergoes Renovations to Provide Facelift

Nationally recognized heart care. Right in the heart of Dallas.

C H R I S M C G AT H E Y

A new columbarium will expand the facility's ability to provide for cremations.

By Sarah Bennett

You don’t have to go to great lengths for comprehensive, nationally

People Newspapers

recognized heart care. It’s downtown at Baylor Heart and Vascular

Sparkman-Hillcrest Funeral Home may be more than 100 years old, but that kind of longevity doesn’t come without making some updates. That’s why the family-owned operation is going through a seven-phase remodel, which will include a completely renovated chapel and construction of a new columbarium. “We’re really excited about it,” president and general manager Daniel Salter said. “It’s one of a kind for the state of Texas. There are others throughout the country, but very few. It’s very unique, and we feel that our clientele is going to be very receptive to it.” The indoor columbarium, which will encompass about 2,000 square feet, will include glass-front niches where family members can personalize the space for their loved ones. Though the facility has niches throughout right now, a columbarium of this scope will allow Sparkman-Hillcrest to accommodate more families on a grander scale. “We advocate cremation and cremated remains having a final resting place, and not going to a family’s home,” manager Mark Patterson said. The groundbreaking for the columbarium will take place in the fall. But before that, the chapel will undergo significant renovation in July. “With this renovation, we’re really brightening things up,” Salter said. In remodeling, the facility operators hope to echo the taste of their clients. “The families we serve use high-end decorators, so we’re trying to complement what they have and meet their expectations,” Patterson said. The facility was last renovated in 2005 and 2006. Overall, the grounds are in the third stage of renovation. The massive

Services at Dallas. Here, we diagnose and treat everything from complex arrhythmias to structural heart disease with advanced technologies and a specialized staff dedicated to quality, personalized care. We offer a hospital solely devoted to heart and vascular care. Our quality exceeds national standards, and we are recognized year after year for our performance and patient satisfaction. So whatever care you need for your heart, it’s right here in the heart of town.

For more information about heart and vascular services or for a physician referral, call 1.800.4BAYLOR or visit us online at BaylorHeartHospital.com

Physicians are members of the medical staff at one of Baylor Scott & White Health’s subsidiary, community or affiliated medical centers and are neither employees nor agents of those medical centers, Baylor Jack and Jane Hamilton Heart and Vascular Hospital or Baylor Scott & White Health. ©2014 Baylor Scott & White Health BHVH_564_ 2013 475 CE 06.14

Interior renovations are already underway throughout the main building.

project began early February with interior updates. “We decided to give the entire building a facelift,” Salter said. Interior designer Suzanne Willis said she’s planning a sophisticated look for the remodel, including color schemes of taupe, black, and cream. She’s also incorporating some contemporary artwork for the interior portions. New carpeting and furniture will cap off the last stage of updates. “Our families have been very understanding and very gracious,” Salter said of client interaction during the renovations. Today, Sparkman-Hillcrest is in its fifth generation of family ownership. Though its current location on Northwest Highway is well known now, it was once housed in the Belo Mansion downtown. The funeral home is planning an open house in the fall pending further construction progress.


JULY 2014  19

MEADOWS MUSEUM

214.768.2516

meadowsmuseumdallas.org

BUSINE S S BRIEFS

Ebby Appoints New Sales Manager of White House Ebby Halliday Realtors has appointed Keith Newman as sales manager of the Ebby’s Little White House office at the corner of Northwest Highway and Preston Road. The Dallas native has been in real estate sales since 2001, and most recently served as sales manager of the company’s Willow Keith Bend office in Plano. Newman He was appointed by company president and CEO Mary Frances Burleson, and will report to Betty Misko, executive vice president and director of sales offices.

PH Resident Promoted to VP at Boys & Girls Club Regina Fonts Morris recently was named vice president of resource development and marketing at the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Dallas. In her role, she will provide direction in all marketing and development activities for the nonprofit agency. Morris previously was director of

marketing at eVerge Group, a software implementation consulting company.

HPUMC Secures New Executive Staff Director Ken Reiser has joined Highland Park United Methodist Church as executive director of staff and systems. Reiser is a longtime church member who has served on several councils and committees. For the past 12 years, he was owner and president of Meletio Lighting and Electric. Previously, he and his father operated Reiser and Associates, a commercial carpet contractor.

Metrocare Names Center After Local Psychiatrist Metrocare Services recently named The Altshuler Center for Education and Research in honor of Dallas psychiatry pioneer Dr. Kenneth Altshuler. The nonprofit provider of mental and behavioral services launched the center in 2011 to train physicians, nurses, counselors, and others on mental health treatment. Altshuler is a former chairman of the psychiatry department at UT Southwestern Medical Center.

DRAWINGS FROM MURILLO TO GOYA

SPECIAL ADVERTISING CONTENT

IN THE HAMBURGER KUNSTHALLE

EBBY HALLIDAY REALTORS

Firm Supports Landry Classic After legendary Dallas Cowboys Head Coach Tom Landry’s passing in 2000, the “Tom Landry Classic” was created to honor his legacy. For 14 years now, “the Classic” has had strong ties to Metroplex high school football programs and awarded scholarships to the participating schools’ student-athletes. Although the game is played in the fall, the culmination of the Tom Landry Classic is in the spring when a banquet is held to honor scholarship winners. In late April, Ebby Halliday Realtors presented its 2013-2014 scholarship winner, Conner Rambin, at the Classic’s annual banquet. It marked the 14th time in as many years that the Ebby Halliday Companies has supported the Tom Landry Classic. Scholarship applicants must exhibit Landry-like characteristics and are selected on the basis of three criteria: academic excellence, community service and leadership. “Tom Landry was a man of faith and family, which he valued even more than his highly successful 29-year coaching career, and scholarship recipients like Conner truly excel in balancing those qualities,” says Mary Frances Burleson, president and CEO of Ebby Halliday Realtors. Conner, who graduated with Distinguished Achievement from Highland Park High School, will attend The University of Texas at Austin in the fall. Ebby Halliday Realtors will again support the Tom Landry Classic in 2014-2015. The event will

MAY 25 - AUGUST 31, 2014 MEADOWS MUSEUM, DALLAS

COMING UP AT THE MEADOWS MUSEUM Sundays, July 13 & 27, 1:30-3 p.m. Drawing from the Masters Informal drawing instruction in the galleries by guest artist Ian O’Brien Free with regular museum admission. Saturday, July 19, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Going to the Dogs! Hands-on workshop by blind artist John Bramblitt on using line to compose art Materials fee $25; $10 for members. Register at 214.768.2740. Shown at the recent Tom Landry Classic Banquet are President & CEO of Ebby Halliday Realtors Mary Frances Burleson and scholarship recipient Conner Rambin.

The Exhibition has been organized by the Meadows Museum, SMU, the Hamburger Kunsthalle, and the Museo Nacional del Prado, and is funded by a generous gift from The Meadows Foundation

with the collaboration of CEEH-Center for Spain in America

host the Highland Park Scots vs. the Frisco Centennial Titans and the Allen Eagles vs. the Denton Guyer Wildcats. To learn more about Ebby Halliday Realtors, its offices, Associates and listings, visit the award-winning ebby.com.

Promotional support provided by

Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes (1746–1828), after Diego Rodriguez Velázquez (1599-1660), Prince Baltasar Carlos as a Hunter (detail), 1778-79. Red chalk and graphite on laid paper. Hamburger Kunsthalle, Kupferstichkabinett (38540). © Hamburger Kunsthalle / bpk. Photo by Christoph Irrgang.


20  JULY 2014

LIVING WELL Former Bodybuilder Helps Clients Go Beyond By Sarah Bennett

FROM THE EXPERTS

People Newspapers I n t h e h e a t o f s u m m e r, Dallasites prefer to sweat it out indoors for their daily workouts. So when Brandi Marino invited me to check out her Beyond studio in Preston Forest, I readily agreed. When I walked in for my 9:15 Beyond Pilates class, music was pumping and the studio was already almost full of eager participants. I had done Pilates classes before through another studio, but each machine is slightly different, so my instructor, Brittany Grignon, gave me a quick-and-friendly rundown. “People get bored — they do,” Marino later told me. “You have to change up your workouts in order to get results.” And that’s the secret behind all of Marino’s studios: she aims to go “beyond” traditional, predictable workouts by keeping things fresh in her Pilates, spin, and barre classes. The routines incorporate unique elements such as trampoline work and resistance-wall moves. Back in the studio, my heart rate was climbing with the core, arm, and leg routines. My instructor and fellow class members were friendly, and class ended with rapid-fire movements on a mini-trampoline. Talk about changing it up. Today, Marino has three locations: Lovers Lane, Forest Lane, and Snider Plaza. But her love affair with fitness began in Los Angeles, where she was active in the bodybuilding community. Due to her frequent trips to Dallas, she noticed a gap in

Why have combination barre, pilates and spin classes become popular? "Barre and Pilates have become so popular because of the undeniable way they can quickly and effectively transform women's bodies, all with low- to no-impact movements. Plus, it's fun!" - Britta Lofgren, owner of Pure Barre

C H R I S M C G AT H E Y

"Dallas has increased its desire for specialized workout instruction without the personal trainer price tag. People would rather workout with friends in an upbeat environment that doesn't feel as intimidating as a gym floor." - Meghann O'Leary, co-owner of The Pilates Barre

Instructor Brittany Grignon helps assistant editor Sarah Bennett perfect her form.

" TH E TH IN G TH AT ' S C O N TAG I O US A B O U T TH E STU D IO IS TH E P E O P L E . " B RI T TA NY GR IGNON

the market for boutique gyms. So four years ago, she made Preston Hollow her home and opened her first studio with Beyond Pilates on Lovers Lane. “We had wait lists that were probably 10-deep every day,” she said. “People were just happy we were here, and I don’t feel like we’ve lost that.” At the end of my class, Marino strolled in with Hendrix, a 3-year-old American bulldog.

Whispering Care Network Compassionate and Gentle In-Home Care for the Elderly

Specializing in non-medical programs for the elderly: - Live-in Care - Companion Care - Errands & Transportation - Recuperative Care Cell: 214-454-4967 Office: 972-939-9897 www.whisperingcarenetwork.com

A rescue, Hendrix has two “siblings” at home: Lily and Cadence. Hendrix was quick to greet the workout aficionados with a lick on the hand. “Our client is a dog person,” Marino said of her usual customers. “There’s such a great connection between fitness and dogs.” True to their word, the Beyond team is involved in or partnered with a number of

nonprofit, dog-friendly events and organizations: DogFit Dallas, Strut Your Mutt, and Paws in the City, to name a few. But it’s not just Marino’s dogs that feel like family around the studio — the staff do, as well. Grignon has been teaching at the studios for about two and a half years now. She started out as a customer. CONTINUED ON 22


JULY 2014  21

L I V I N G W E LL

Health Scare Gets Young Mom Exercising Carotid artery scan reveals atherosclerosis By Todd Jorgenson

People Newspapers Liza Schlitt is a physically fit mother of two toddlers. She eats healthy and exercises regularly, just as doctors and conventional wisdom dictate. So why did she find out in April, during a routine examination, that she had the arteries of a 57-year-old woman? A carotid artery scan revealed that the Preston Hollow resident had a hereditary condition that increased her risks for heart attack or stroke. “I’m fairly fit. I eat really healthy,” Schlitt said. “But I’m a mom without a lot of time. When this test came back, it was an eye-opener.” So Schlitt began to examine her lifestyle and made some adjustments to prioritize exercise each day — something as simple as walking around the neighborhood with her kids in a stroller — as well as a more nutritious diet that cuts down

Convenient location with convenient parking

C H R I S M C G AT H E Y

Liza Schlitt attributes her improved health to preventative medical check-ups. on sugars and fats, and includes multivitamin supplements. “Sometimes we don’t see how the little things we do can make a difference,” said Schlitt, public relations manager for

Diamond Luxury Healthcare in Preston Center. “Sometimes you forget about why you’re eating healthier or exercising more.” She hopes that another upcoming

scan with the same technology will note the same progress her doctors have seen with other patients, as she tries to reverse a quarter-century of aging on her arteries. “It’s something we can reverse. It’s something we see all the time with our patients,” said Dr. Anthony Lyssy, Schlitt’s physician. “We just have to put our foot down at times. It can be a long process.” The thickening in Schlitt’s arteries — known as atherosclerosis — included plaque buildup and inflammation consistent with someone much older. Although her condition is genetic, she didn’t know that until after she was diagnosed. “I’m just blessed that I found out now rather than later,” she said. Lyssy said her case stresses the importance of routine check-ups. After all, Schlitt wasn’t having any health problems or expecting to find anything out of the ordinary. “The preventative aspect is so important,” Lyssy said. “Sometimes people are so concerned about what they look like on the outside that they forget about the inside.” Email todd.jorgenson@ peoplenewspapers.com

I don’t just want a Mammogram, I want

Peace of Mind.

© Copyright 2014 Solis Women’s Health

Exceptional Experience. Exceptionally Accurate Results.

Schedule your Next Mammogram at Solis Women’s Health, Home of the Peace-of-Mind Mammogram.

Schedule at www.solishealth.com or Call Today at (866) 717.2551. Solis Mammography of Dallas - 6805 W. Northwest Highway, Dallas, Texas 75225


22  JULY 2014

LI VI N G W ELL

Surgeon Spreads Knowledge With Book By Sarah Bennett People Newspapers

C H R I S M C G AT H E Y

Beyond studio owner Brandi Marino and her pup Hendrix

CONTINUED FROM 20 “I would come and just get my butt whipped,” she remembered. Not long after, Grignon got her yoga-instructor certification, but she still longed for something else. “I found myself going back to Beyond, and just seeing them teach something they love so much.” Marino said Grignon has basically done it all within the company: she’s worked the front desk, she’s instructed pedaling classes, and now she instructs Pilates classes. “The thing that’s contagious about the studio is the people,” Grignon said. “The clients and the instructors we have feel like family once you start and connect.” Marino hopes to spread that family-like atmosphere to Fort Worth and Lakewood soon, but she’s cautious. A Southlake location is already in the works. “It just has to be the right fit,” she said. “There’s no rush for me. It’ll grow.” Email sarah.bennett@ peoplenewspapers.com

With more than 20 years under his belt at UT Southwestern, Dr. Rod Rohrich has seen a lot of things — including patient ignorance when choosing a plastic surgeon. That served as motivation for Navigate Your Beauty, a book he has co-authored with longtime patient Mary Crosland. “After seeing people that have had really bad problems from both cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, I wanted to write a book about how you really ask the right questions,” Rohrich said. With his experience writing medical textbooks and other scholarly work, he needed that colloquial, consumer-friendly touch to get the message across. That’s where Crosland came in. “There’s no consumer book out there that’s written from two perspectives,” she said. The book guides patients and consumers through making medical decisions based on “the three E’s” — experience, expertise, and exceptional results. “Everybody’s famous on their own website,” Rohrich said. “If you talk to others and teach other plastic surgeons, then you’re recognized by your peers. That’s really what an expert is.” Rohrich suggests checking to make sure your doctor performs the operation you’re seeking frequently, meaning once or twice a week for five or more years. “There’s such a need for the consumer to be safe and to be smart,” Crosland said. “I didn’t know, really, what to ask, and now I know what to ask, what to look for, and what’s a red flag.” That kind of research and compilation doesn’t happen overnight. Rohrich estimates that writing the manuscript

Dr. Rod Rohrich

Mary Crosland

" T H ER E 'S SUCH A N EED F O R T H E C O N SU MER TO BE SAF E AN D TO BE SMART. " MARY C RO SL AN D

Crosland and Rohrich's book is already available on Amazon and will soon find its way to local bookstores as well.

took about a year, which stemmed from his genuine concern for the consumer. “He didn’t write this for another patient — Dr. Rohrich doesn’t need another patient,” Crosland said of Rohrich’s reputation and experience. “This book gives you all the information you need. That’s why we wrote this together.” The book is already available on Amazon, and the co-authors’ publishing team is working to get it into the hands of industry professionals and in local bookstores. A launch party for the book took place at Highland Park Village’s Bistro 31 in May. “The hope is that it would reach everyone that has an interest in not only cosmetic surgery, but anyone who wants to look as good as they feel,” Rohrich said. “People are really begin-

ning to understand why it’s important, why it’s unique, and why it should be an important book.” Rohrich is not only a professor at UT Southwestern, but also the chairman of the Department of Plastic Surgery. His co-author received her bachelor’s business degree from SMU. Together, they feel that the book’s knowledge can be applied to selecting any type of doctor and seeking optimal beauty. “The book even goes into how to look great without plastic surgery, and how to avoid it, which is great,” Crosland said. “I wanted [to give people] as much information as we could when doing anything for lifelong beauty and maintenance.” Email sarah.bennett@ peoplenewspapers.com

FRUGAL FOODIE

Waste Not, Want Not

L

ast year at a friend’s house, I was pouring myself a drink and had a little spill. I was scouring his kitchen for paper towels when he walked in on me opening cabinets — “Where are your paper towels?!” — his reply was “I don’t have any. I try not to waste paper if I don’t have to.” Then handed me a cloth rag. Well. That was an idea I had never considered. The exchange stuck with me. Over the past year, I have repurposed old washcloths, cloth napkins at the end of their lives, cheesy souvenir T-shirts I’d never actually wear, and any other kind of reject cotton cloth in my house into rags. I cut them (with fabric scissors for ease) to varying sizes and leave a pile

STEPHANIE M. CASEY under the kitchen and bathroom sinks. A cute, little, thrifted box was purchased for my laundry area to toss the used rags into while accumulating enough of a pile to add to a wash load. It turns out, almost everything is rag-worthy rather than paper towel

territory. One paper towel roll now lasts me 4-6 weeks. I know ­— crazy! Here’s the situation: water is renewable; used paper towels and napkins are not. They will biodegrade, but production of them uses energy and chemicals and they are served up to us on the store shelf encased in plastic. And, of course, they are transported around from factory to store to home. Every little bit helps on the eco-front, and utilizing more cloth at home is an easy adjustment that causes less waste and saves money. If you have kids (or just messier folks in your life), what a great way to repurpose stained garments! And since the kiddos might stain cloth napkins more readily than adults, I recommend

picking some up at thrifts, garage sales, discount stores and such. Once stained permanently, into the rag pile. Cloth over paper is a wonderful habit to pass on to the next generation, who will be dealing with eco-issues in a much bigger sense than we are now. The transition to using less paper towels and no paper napkins was painless. The only reason I’d used paper instead most of my life is because I hadn’t thought to do otherwise. How to tell what is paper towel territory? Let your intuition guide you. Counter wipe downs, liquid spills, cleaning most surfaces, dining, catch cushion under a serving bowl of dripping chili? Cloth. Cat coughed up a hairball? Paper towel all the way.


JULY 2014  23

SOCIETY DSOL DEBS KICK OFF SUMMER WITH GOWN SHOW

2015 Dallas Symphony Orchestra League debutantes

Anna Bland Aston with Emily and Diana Bearden

Mothers and debs enjoy a fashion show.

Sisters Marina, Caroline (deb) and Elena Frattaroli

Austin Scarlett shows deb Emily Bearden possibilities.

Meg and Sarah Carlsen with Babs Lawrence

Arielle Iola, Brownlee Fielder, and Lauren Newman

CLAIRE CASNER

Michelle and Ellie Allums with Austin Scarlett

Suze and Sissi Buss

Arianna and Fariba Allen

The 2015 Dallas Symphony Orchestra League debutantes, mothers, and guests gathered at Neiman Marcus downtown for a reception and gown presentation on May 31. After the presentation, the girls were invited to try on the dresses. Fashion designer Austin Scarlett made a special appearance and was available for personal consults with the debutantes. The weekend marked the beginning of their season.


24 窶カULY 2014

S OCI ET Y L A F I E S TA D E L A S S E I S B A N D E R A S

Madeline Beecherl, Duchess of Broadway Melody, and father Robert

A L L I S O N S LO M O W I T Z

La Fiesta de las Seis Banderas debs and escorts dance the night away.

Natalie McDole, Duchess of United States, is escorted by Robert Schmitz.

.Hannah Bush, Duchess of Appalachian Spring, makes her dip flanked by escort Tucker Davidson and her father Shelby.

Claire Deptula, Duchess of the Silver Screen, and father Robert Deptula Jr.

Katie Reagan Chiles, Duchess of New Orleans Jazz, is escorted by Michael Fitzpatrick.

The 2014 La Fiesta debs made their dips on June 14 at the Hilton Anatole. More than $6.3 million has been raised for beneficiaries of the ball since it was founded.


JULY 2014  25

T R A I N S AT N O R T H PA R K K I C KO F F PA R T Y

Trains co-chairs Tia Wynne and Jamie Singer with LUBLU owner Kira Plastinina and Ronald McDonald House of Dallas CEO Jill Cumnock and Diane Fullingim

Lynsey Provost and Kimberly Conley

RHI LEE

Annika Cail, Janet LaBarba, and Tia Wynne The committee planning this year's Trains at NorthPark exhibition, which benefits the Ronald McDonald House of Dallas, started prepping in a festive way with a kickoff party at LUBLU boutique in the Plaza at Preston Center on May 14. This year's exhibit will run Nov. 22 to Jan. 4.

Carrie Arnot and Claire Raggio

SPECIAL ADVERTISING CONTENT BRIGGS FREEMAN SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Moving to Dallas ©2013 Feld Entertainment

Tickets Start at $15! Restrictions, exclusions and additional charges may apply. Subject to availability.

JULY 30 – AUG. 10

AMERICAN AIRLINES CENTER

AUG. 13 – 17

Located on a winding street in Preston Hollow, the private estate at 10453 Epping Lane combines exceptional design, beautiful finishes and an outstanding location. Listed by Joan Eleazer for $3,495,000. from Florida to see 11 area cities in five days, providing information and introduction to schools, price points, characteristics, communities, etc. The family recently closed on a beautiful home in Rockwall.

President and CEO Robbie Briggs independently owns and operates Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty with six offices in Dallas, Lakewood, Uptown, Ranch and Land, The Ballpark and Southlake. Briggsfreeman.com

FT. WORTH CONVENTION CENTER Buy Tickets: Ticketmaster.com 800-745-3000 • Venue Box Office Brought to you locally by

Wireless for All. 275344

The North Texas Chamber recently reported that 1,000 people relocate to our area every day—thanks to welcoming neighborhoods, recognized schools, economic opportunity and a great lifestyle. Agents at Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty assist clients moving from across the street and around the world, pairing people with properties and neighborhoods and smoothing the transition along the way. One agent recently assisted a family looking at three areas whose priorities were schools, then neighborhood, then house. In each location the agent took them on tours of local schools (including athletic facilities and appointments with coaches,) showed them several homes in their price range and introduced them to the many amenities of each area. The family chose a home in a gated neighborhood in Southlake, and they are very happy with their new school. Another agent helped a family moving

#RinglingBros

Ringling.com


26 窶カULY 2014 WILKINSON CENTER HOSTS CAN DO LUNCHEON

The Women of Saint Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church

Anne and Terry Conner with Christie Carter The Wilkinson Center presented its second annual CAN DO Awards to celebrate entrepreneurship in philanthropy on May 13 at Dallas Country Club. The honorees were philanthropists Anne and Terry Conner, The Women of Saint Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church, and Wilkinson Center adult education client Alphonso Brooks, who recently completed his GED at Wilkinson Center. Check our blog for more photos.

Alphonso Brooks and Anne Reeder

Diane Gaskins and Ron K. Jones

Carla Sayklay, Susan McCombs, and Nan Golden

Mass Schedule SATURDAY ENGLISH SPANISH

5 pm 7 pm

DAILY ENGLISH SPANISH

7 am & Noon 7 pm

SUNDAY ENGLISH SPANISH SPANISH ENGLISH

9 am & Noon 7:30 am & 10:30 am 1:30 pm & 3 pm 5:30 pm Praise & Worship Mass

The Cathedral Shrine of the Virgin of Guadalupe 2215 Ross Avenue 窶「 Dallas, Texas 75201 窶「 214.871.1362


JULY 2014  27

G E N E S I S W O M E N ' S S H E LT E R & S U P P O R T L U N C H E O N

Tanya Foster, Katy Bock, Sonia Black, Paige Lane, Melody Rogers, Nancy Rogers, Julie Hawes, and Lisa Ogle

DANA DRIENSKY

Bunny Cotten, Jan Langbein, and Nancy Rogers

Kristina Whitcomb, Beth Thoele, and Robyn Conlon

Carmaleta Whitley and Otis Felton

Genesis Women’s Shelter & Support, along with luncheon chair Bunny Cotten and honorary chair Lydia Novakov, welcomed author Pat Conroy as the keynote speaker of its 21st annual luncheon on May 8 at the Hilton Anatole. Check our blog for more information about the honorees and photos from the event.


28  JULY 2014

COMMUNITY Town Hall Reopening Honors History By Sarah Bennett

People Newspapers When Highland Park Town Hall reopened its doors after 15 months of renovations, the accompanying ceremony was a way to celebrate the future. But more than anything, the gathering was about honoring the past. After all, the reopening ceremony took place 90 years to the day after the original Town Hall was completed on June 5. “Our town has a fascinating history,” said Mayor Joel Williams, who acted as emcee for the event. Indeed, sponsor Pierce Allman gave a brief “history lesson” of sorts to attendees on the town’s founding. He noted the importance of families such as the Coles, the Caruths, the Exalls, and the Armstrongs in gathering from various states to found Highland Park. “Today, as you look at this new and timeless landmark, just think of the name for a minute: Town Hall,” Pierce Allman said. “It evokes a sense of place and a sense of people.” Longtime philanthropist Margaret McDermott was an esteemed guest at the celebration. She first came to Highland Park with her family as a 7-year-old in 1919, and graduated from Highland Park High School in 1929. “I’m so thankful to be at Highland Park,” she said. “And I think even I should look forward to the future.” McDermott was one of 13 donors whose contributions went toward landscaping renovations including trees, flowers, tiles, pavers, and fountains. In true Americana fashion, the program also included the Pledge of Allegiance, led by director of public safety Chris Vinson. Operatic singer Angela Turner Wilson, daughter of SMU president R. Gerald Turner, sang “God Bless America.” Guests were invited to write messages on scrolls for a time capsule that will be buried on the Town Hall’s grounds. A copy of the video series “HP100,” which won silver at the 35th annual Telly Awards, will also be buried along with the scrolls. “The award, which is the highest you can win in the Tellies, means a lot to me personally,” documentarian Carrie Brewer Martinez said. “We’re all so honored to be able to tell the story of the town’s centennial.” La Duni and Mi Cocina provided refreshments, and volunteers acted as docents, handing out fans to guests on the hot afternoon. Finally, as the grand finale, vocalists from the Dallas Symphony Orchestra took part in Handel’s “Hallelujah Chorus” following a butterfly release in partnership with the Texas Discovery Gardens. The butterflies were handed out to

C H R I S M C G AT H E Y

Guests fanned themselves from the heat with handheld fans provided by volunteer docents while the festivites took place.

Residents file up the main staircase to explore the renovated rooms.

MORE ON THE WEB

Take a closer look inside the renovated town hall here: parkcitiespeople.com/photos/ hp-celebrates-opening-ofrenovated-town-hall/

willing audience members in individual envelopes, and were released at

Margaret McDermott gets a tour upstairs.

Williams’ signal. “The release of these butterflies is intended to symbolize the beautiful beginning of a new century for our beloved Highland Park,” Williams said. “Welcome, neighbors, to your new home.” A flood of residents then made their way to explore the extensive library on the first floor, and up the main staircase to explore council chambers, boardrooms, and offices ready for work. The council chambers — anything but stale —are equipped with Spanish Colonial décor, a sage finish, and understated chandeliers. Boardrooms and a fully equipped

break room sit ready for members of the town staff and elected officials to take advantage of. Town staff members, who have been cramped in temporary office spaces for more than a year, have spacious, new offices to fill. But mainly, members of the town staff and elected officials hope that it will be a place for residents to enjoy as well. “It’s wonderful to see the smiling faces,” town engineer Meran Dadgostar said. “People are impressed with the work that’s gone into it.” Email sarah.bennett@ peoplenewspapers.com


JULY 2014  29

C OM M U N I T Y

Corner Lot Becomes a Playground

PA R K C I T I E S H A S N E W L A N D M A R KS

Rockers add vintage touch to front yard By Paige Skinner

Special Contributor

CLAIRE CASNER

OICE RUNN E CH

P 2011

PEOPLE’S

The Park Cities Historic and Preservation Society dedicated 3524 McFarlin Blvd. and other homes as landmarks on June 7.

RU

It’s a 90-degree summer night, but that doesn’t stop Dr. Peter Beitsch from sitting on his front porch while his daughters and other neighborhood kids play in his front yard. At the corner of Potomac Avenue and Golf Drive in Highland Park, three old silver rockers help pass the time. Beitsch bought the rockers about 11 years ago at a mid-century modern show in Palm Springs, Calif., before any of his three daughters were born. When he first brought them home, he planted them in his backyard on Armstrong Avenue. But a few years and moves later, the three silver rockers — a seahorse, caterpillar, and giraffe — found a home in his front lawn instead. “It was shocking to me that anybody that would walk by would jump on them and play on them,” he said. “And not just the neighborhood kids, but people that would walk through. And then people were riding their bikes to there, so it was great.” He said he isn’t worried about any liability issues, adding walking on the sidewalk is just as dangerous. Kirk Smith, development services manager for the town of Highland Park, said the rockers do not violate any town ordinance. “Code enforcement officers have been by there and the town zoning ordinance does not prohibit those items from being located in his front yard,” Smith said. “Therefore, there’s no known violation to the town’s ordinances with what has been installed there.” Berkley, Beitsch’s oldest daughter, said she and her sisters usually play on the rockers during the weekends and said their friends enjoy them as well. “People around the block will come just to play on them,” the 11-year-old said. Each rocker is cemented into the ground — about 30 inches deep, Beitsch said. And what makes this front yard so special is that pres-

Meredyth Petree

TCNP #4970 mpetree67@sbcglobal.net Office: 214.942.5111 Cell: 214.534.8052 ptreegardenconcepts.com A L L I S O N S LO M O W I T Z

Dr. Peter Beitsch bought the old playground rockers about 11 years ago at a mid-century modern show in Palm Springs, Calif.

Consultation Landscape Installation Landscape Design Full-Service Maintenance

HIGH QUALITY SELF STORAGE RIGHT IN YOUR

NEIGHBORHOOD. Beitsch's daughters enjoy rocking aboard their favorite animals.

"P E O P L E A RO UND T H E BLO CK W ILL C O M E JU ST TO P L AY O N T H EM . " B E RKL E Y BE ITSC H

ent-day playgrounds don’t typically feature similar silver rockers anymore, Beitsch said. That’s why so many older passersby stop for a minute to play or take pictures. He added that Halloween is an especially fun time because of the amount of children walking around the neighborhood. “I’d see high school kids on them,” he said with a laugh. “[Even] adults on them.” While Beitsch and his family have only been at their current home for less than a year, he said he doesn’t plan on adding any more playground equipment.

We also feature wine lockers in our custom wine cellar!

6831 W. Northwest Hwy. Dallas, Texas 75225 (NW corner at NW Hwy. & Hillcrest)

214.556.3833

1 MONTH FREE + 5 Free Boxes

Bring in this ad for special offers valid on new leases. Offer good through 7/31/14

parkcitiesselfstorage.com


30  JULY 2014

C O MMUN I T Y

Girl Scouts' Golden Gals Benefit Communities By Karley Kiker

Special Contributor Just call them the golden girls. Local Girl Scouts Meredith Burke, Grace Cunningham, Meghan Harshaw, Ryan McBride, Susan Adelaide Moore, Farish Mozley, and Amanda White recently received the organization’s prestigious Gold Award for developing projects as global-minded as they are gilded. “It takes a minimum Meghan of 80 hours to complete Harshaw a Gold Award [project],” explained Ana Harshaw, who leads Troop 306. “Twenty of the 80 hours must be in leadership. The project must also be sustainable and global, and the girl must be able to evaluate the impact of the project.” In other words, a Girl Scout must not only identify a problem — she must take measurable action in order to solve it. Take Harshaw’s daughter-turnedTroop member, Meghan, for example. Concerned after observing two years of West Nile Virus outbreaks in Dallas County, Meghan began researching preventative measures that were both natural and eco-friendly. Her final solution? Let’s just say it’s a bit, well, batty. “In my zip code there was a major outbreak,” Meghan recalled. “I researched how to curb West Nile and we found out that bats eat a lot of mosquitoes, so we decided to build bat houses.” With full cooperation from her homeowners association, Megan began building and installing bat houses for every neighbor willing to participate. For those desiring an artistic touch, she added a spray-painted Batman logo. “Most people thought it was cool because they didn’t even know we had bats in our neighborhood,” Meghan

Top: Meredith Burke, Grace Cunningham, Meghan Harshaw, and Ryan McBride Bottom: Susan Adelaide Moore, Farish Mozley, and Amanda White

C O U R T E SY G I R L S C O U T S O F N O R T H E A S T T E X A S

Meredith Burke reintroduces native grasses at the Connemara Conservancy in Allen.

" TH E G O L D AWAR D H A S G IV EN M E A P L AT F O R M TO A DVO CAT E AN D F IG H T FO R T H E B L AC K L AN D P R AIR IE . " ME RE DIT H BUR KE

said. “Everyone I gave a bat house to already did some research on their own about [West Nile], so they were really interested.” And then there’s Meredith Burke, a member of Troop 603. After learning that less than one percent of the Blackland Prairie remains in North Texas, the Hockadaisy teamed up with Connemara Conservancy in Allen to create a method for reintroducing native plants to areas overtaken by invasive grasses. “This is one of the most endangered ecosystems in North America, and it’s right on our doorstep,” said Meredith, whose two-year restoration project was

funded in part by a $500 grant from Radio Disney. “The Gold Award has given me a platform to advocate and fight for the Blackland Prairie. It’s empowered me to … save something I love.” Although her Gold Award-winning project has officially been completed, Meredith’s efforts on behalf of the Blackland Prairie continue to increase. She’s currently raising quail in her backyard that she will eventually release into restored prairie lands. “Now that we have the plant life rejuvenated, we’re working on the animal life,” Meredith said. “We’re trying to rebuild the ecosystem one layer at a time.”

THE OTHER GOLDEN PROJECTS GRACE CUNNINGHAM Troop: 1834 Project: Refugee Transition Video School: Ursuline Grace worked with teenage refugees from Myanmar to create an informational video to aid future refugees by giving them a basic knowledge of American culture, traditions, technology and daily life. Her video will be used by the Catholic Charities and St. Patrick’s Refugee Outreach.

RYAN MCBRIDE Troop: 603 Project: Inspire With Art School: Hockaday

SUSAN ADELAIDE MOORE Troop: 3010 Project: Helping Heroes School: Ursuline

FARISH MOZLEY Troop: 358 Project: Monday Tutoring School: Ursuline

AMANDA WHITE Troop: 1053 Project: Reading For Kids School: Ursuline

Ryan addressed the lack of art education for children in underserved schools. She hosted an art camp held at the Pebbles Apartments, a complex for women and children who have been homeless. The camp covered all major art mediums. Each child was given an art box at the end of the camp.

Susan partnered with Soldier's Angels, which benefits injured service men and women, to create awareness of the organization. She fashioned "no-sew" blankets which were distributed to injured military personnel who were evacuated without any of their personal belongings.

Farish created the program Monday Tutoring to benefit Walnut Hill Elementary School students who required individual attention to improve their classroom performance. She recruited 40 girls from all grades at Ursuline to tutor more than 100 students every Monday. Ursuline will continue the program going forward.

Amanda focused on providing educational materials for children at the Ravine School in Guatemala. She created a library for more than 120 students and devised a catalog system that would work with the school’s limited resources and no electricity. Books will be donated annually by a club at Ursuline.


JULY 2014  31

C OM M U N I T Y

Boyd Still Rocks in Homemade Studio

C H R I S M C G AT H E Y

Park Cities painter Jack Smith, 13, has several of his paintings on display this summer at Zhen Music and Arts Institute.

Work of Teenage Artist is More Than a Pretty Picture By Todd Jorgenson

People Newspapers Jack Smith was 4 years old when his first painting of a penguin made the cover of his pre-school newsletter. And that was before he gave much consideration to elements such as color, form, and texture. Almost a decade later, Jack is a seasoned painter whose works have been commissioned and sold for thousands of dollars. His first gallery exhibition this summer has been well received. And he’s expanding into other media, crafting artwork out of anything from Legos to spare parts in his garage. “Anything that I can create out of other things, I like doing that,” said Jack, who will enter eighth grade at Highland Park Middle School in the fall. “I like really dynamic colors and lots of texture in my paintings.” Jack and fellow local artist Claudia Coker are being featured this summer in a show at Zhen Music and Arts Institute on Lovers Lane, where Jack has been a student for more than three years. Gallery owner Zhen Wu said the ongoing show includes about 15 of Jack’s paintings, all of which were created in the past year. He said they reflect Jack’s maturity in his technique. “For his age, it’s incredible what he’s done,” Zhen said. “He has a lot of talent. He’s technically sound. It’s not just someone putting paint on a canvas.”

C H R I S M C G AT H E Y

Park Cities resident Steve Boyd still plays about 10 shows each year as part of the White Animals.

Three Minds sold for $2,000. As a painter, Jack specializes in heavy-body acrylic canvases with abstract interpretations of nature and landscapes, although his styles vary. Some of his other creations include a pulley system for a fort in his backyard, a motorized chairlift using Legos, and a sprinkler made from PVC pipe. He said working in a diverse array of media provides him with different creative outlets. Jack also is involved in sports, music, and acting. He already is a veteran of several school plays, and his family recently hired an agent to help pursue work in other productions in the Dallas area. When he’s at home, Jack tends to ignore video games and television, instead spending most of his free time in his private studio, where he usually has multiple projects going at once. “Since he was 4 years old, he’s been painting and drawing. He’s always been so creative,” said Jack’s mother, Malley Smith. “He’s not about making money. He honestly just loves it.”

Bass player looks to help aspiring stars By Todd Jorgenson

People Newspapers He has spent most of his life on stage, performing in big arenas and intimate clubs, alongside famous rock bands like Duran Duran, Talking Heads, and Cheap Trick. Since his heyday during the 1980s as the bass player for the White Animals, the touring has slowed down for Steve Boyd, but his passion for music has not. Boyd, who moved to University Park last year, recently finished constructing a studio in his detached garage, and hopes to work behind the scenes as a mentor and producer to young musicians looking to get their start. “I’ve done the band thing, and I’ve done songwriting things,” Boyd said. “That’s something I really hope to share with people.” He’s still doing the band thing and the songwriting thing with the White Animals, which developed a sizable following among college students during the early 1980s with their mix of

Steve Boyd built a music studio in the detached garage of his University Park home. punk and pop-inspired sounds. The Nashville-based quartet had a couple of videos in major rotation during the early days of MTV, and toured as many as 250 days a year. The founder and lead singer of the band is Kevin Gray, a Highland Park High School graduate who was finishing his residency at Vanderbilt Hospital in 1980 when he was looking for a bass player and met Boyd, who was 19 at the time, through a mutual friend. "Steve is a brilliant musician. He's incredibly talented," Gray said. "He's written some wonderful songs on his own. People could learn a lot from him about how to craft a song."

Boyd and Gray went on to become the primary singers and songwriters for the band. After releasing six albums, the band called it quits in 1987, and Boyd worked on various side projects. The White Animals gathered for a reunion show in 1999, and still play about 10 shows each year, still with the same lineup, mostly in the southeastern United States. “Since that time, we’ve been sporadically playing. We’ve been getting back on the road,” Boyd said. “I still enjoy playing, just being able to get on stage in front of fans and relive what we used to do as younger men. But it’s never going to be full-time for me again.” That’s part of Boyd’s motivation for the studio, which has its walls peppered with concert posters from his glory days. He hopes it can be a creative space not only for him, but also for the next generation of rock stars. “I can clearly remember as a kid, first playing the guitar and hearing how beautiful that sound was. That’s something I would like to bring to people and impart that wisdom,” Boyd said. “I hope to find some good, talented people. I want it to be fun for them to work with me, and fun for me to work with them.”


32  JULY 2014

CLASSIFIEDS

C O MMUNIT Y

To place your ad in People Newspapers, please call us at 214-5235251, fax to 214-363-6948, or e-mail to classified@peoplenewspapers.com. All ads will run in Park Cities People and Preston Hollow People and online on both websites. Pre-payment is required on all ads. Deadline for our next edition is Tuesday, July 1. People Newspapers reserves the right to edit or reject ads. We assume no liability for errors or omissions in advertisements and no responsibility beyond the cost of the ad. We are responsible only for the first incorrect insertion.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

FA R M E R S M A R K E T B R I N G S TA S T E S O F S U M M E R

E S TAT E S A L E S

Nancy Wilbur and Louise Griffith

Ruth Taylor ESTATE SALES

Serving Dallas for Over 40 Years See Upcoming Sales:

RuthtayloREstatEsalEs.com

HOME SERVICES

Want to purchase minerals and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: P. O. Box 13557, Denver, CO 80201. I will pay cash for your gold and jewelry. Discretion and privacy ensured. Please call (469) 628-8107.

Kathy and Carly Turner with Molly McCoy

DECKS

Serving Park Cities since Nixon was in office

www.ParkCitiesDecks.com

972-422-3059 Shade Arbors & Patio Roof Covers CLAIRE CASNER

E D U C AT I O N

Back to School

BRIGGS FREEMAN SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

with Lauren Rose

I teach Spanish, Latin, English, French and English Essays. 214-284-6349

TCNP #4970 mpetree67@sbcglobal.net Office: 214.942.5111 Cell: 214.534.8052

ptreegardenconcepts.com

PEOPLE’S

Meredyth Petree

OICE RUNN E CH

Blount’s Tree Service

H E A LT H

47 Years Exp/Insured All Tree Work * Landscaping * Grass Sodding *

Detox, Weight Loss, Fertility, Cysts, Fibroids, Herpes, Impotence, Prostate, Prostate Cancer, Ovarian Cancer PLEASE CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION Leslie Duong, 214-887-8325

«  214-275-5727« blountstreeservicedfw.com

BS Biology, Health Nutritionist, Licensed Herbalist

LESLIEDUONG.COM

Medicare Supplement Insurance Competitive rates with high rated companies. Call Jim Simpson at 214 – 750 – 0655 www.dis2insurance.com

BUILDING OR REMODELING? Premier Custom Closet Designs for your builder to install

closetsbycarol@gmail.com CLASSIFIEDS 214.523.5251

P 2011

(214)802-8126

Fairy Tale Home in Old Highland Park

RU

Call or Text

Neighbors and foodies dropped by the St. Michael’s Farmers Market on June 14 to sample local fare and do some shopping. The market, located in the north parking lot of St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church on Douglas Avenue, is open every Saturday through Sept. 6, from 8 a.m. to noon.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING CONTENT

Summer Review

SAT/ACT PREPARATION

Patsy Shguit

Baugh Farms sells squash, tomatoes, and other fresh veggies.

www.PatioRoofCovers.com

FROM EXPERIENCED, PROFESSIONAL TUTOR Competitive Rates Guaranteed Score Improvement Specialize in Princeton Review Strategies

Pietro, Concetta and Gulio Macchiarolo

Perfectly placed on a beautiful setting in Old Highland Park, the home at 3712 Alice Circle is sure to sweep guests off their feet. Romantic and luxurious, this exquisite English stone manor is situated among mature cedars, chittemwoods and live oak trees. Its gardens boast glorious roses, azaleas, wisteria and English ivy. A pool and adjacent gazebo offer a charming oasis for entertaining among the spacious lawns and courtyards. Originally built in 1925, this 7,480 squarefoot home has been wondrously revived and restored throughout the years. Architectural details and quality updates blend seamlessly. Family and friends are welcomed through arched stone doorways and into a foyer that greets guests with elegant hardwoods, crown moldings and a stately staircase. Formal entertaining spaces flank the foyer. To the left, the lightfilled dining room offers the ideal backdrop for entertaining. To the right, a formal living room boasts a spacious conversation area and one of the home’s seven fireplaces. A fabulous kitchen features custom cabinets, authentic beamed ceiling and an antiqued hardwood floor. Stone detailing adds to the character of this chef’s paradise, and a spacious center island provides

Originally built in 1925, this 7,480 square-foot home in Old Highland Park exemplifies gracious estate living. The home at 3712 Alice Circle is listed by Lindy Mahoney for $10,500,000. additional prep space. A brick fireplace creates a warm and cozy feel. The spacious master suite offers true luxury with a fireplace and private sitting room. The master bath features luxurious marble flooring and a separate jetted tub and shower. Dual vanities and walk-in closets provide ample storage space. Additional amenities in this home include a handsome study with adjacent wet bar, an exercise room, a great room with vaulted

and beamed ceilings, as well as four additional bedrooms and a three-car garage. Listed by Lindy Mahoney for $10,500,000. President and CEO Robbie Briggs independently owns and operates Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty with six offices in Dallas, Lakewood, Uptown, Ranch and Land, The Ballpark and Southlake. For more information see briggsfreeman.com.


JULY 2014  33

CLASSIFIEDS

C O M M UNIT Y TROOPS NAME NEW EAGLE SCOUTS John Pirok is a member of Troop 35 and a senior at Highland Park High School. For his Eagle Scout project, he designed a plan then landscaped an 800-square-foot perennial garden at The Juliette Fowler Communities. He is the son of Paul and Angie Pirok of University Park. Trey Willis is a member of Troop 72 and a junior at Highland Park High School. For his Eagle Scout project, he designed and built three bookcases for the Wesley Rankin Community Center in West Dallas. He is the son of Bill and Kelley Willis of Highland Park.

Dawson Orr Named Fourth of July Parade Grand Marshal Highland Park ISD superintendent Dawson Orr has been named the grand marshal for the Rotary Club of Park Cities' Fourth of July Parade. The selection is a way for the Rotary Club to honor the school district's centennial. “For 100 years, Highland Park schools have set the bar for educational excellence and uncompromising standards,” said Rotary Club of Park Cities President Cleve Clinton. The parade, which takes place on Independence Day, starts at 9 a.m. on Euclid Avenue near Highland Park Town Hall. The free event ends at Goar Park with a family festival including music, food booths, and fun for children of all ages. This is the ninth year volunteers from the Rotary Club have hosted the parade. Thousands are expected to attend.

PRESTON HOLLOW

THE BECHARD GROUP

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Kitchen & Bath Remodeling Specialists

CONNECT † WORSHIP † GROW † SERVE † GIVE

Love God. Love Neighbor. Change the World.

Ceramic Tile, Natural Stone & Hardwood Flooring Granite Countertops

Sunday School: 9:00 a.m. Worship: 10:00 a.m.

25 Years Experience Building Great Customer Relationships in The Park Cities/ N. Dallas Area 214-232-8453

6315 Walnut Hill Ln, Dallas, TX 75230 214-363-4393 www.PrestonHollowUMC.org

THEBECHARDGROUP.NET

Trinity Episcopal Church Family owned and operated since 1956. Tree Pruning & Removal | Disease & Insect Control www.arbormasters.com phone: 682-223-1796 H & H Home Repair All types of home repair including painting. Licensed and insured. Randy Hood, 214-328-3008

We'll remove unnecessary items,

BRIEFS

WORSHIP SERVICES

HOME SERVICES

rearrange n freshen up ur home. Need help downsizing? Got too much stuff?

declutter ur life

9:15 a.m. - Christian Education 10:30 a.m. - Holy Communion 12727 Hillcrest Dallas, Texas 75230

WORSHIP WITH US LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR CHURCHES ONLINE: www.parkcitiespeople.com/category/worship www.prestonhollowpeople.com/category/worship

PET SITTING

E D I T design services

AND TOTO 2 PETSITTING Neighborhood References “There’s No Place Like Home!” 12 Years Serving Dallas 214-263-5104 AndToto2.com BEST IN DALLAS!

214 293 3113

PHOTOGRAPHY

RITA K. WILDER PHOTOGRAPHY Ramon's Interior/Exterior Paint, Sheetrock Repairs 214-679-4513

972.991.3601 www.tecdallas.org

If your church isn’t among these, have them call 214-523-5251.

ST. JUDE CHAPEL SATURDAY MASS: 4:00 p.m. SUNDAY MASS: 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. DAILY MASS: (Monday thru Friday) 11:40 a.m. & 12:15 p.m. 1521 MAIN STREET DALLAS, TX, 75201

214.742.2508 st.judechapel.org

ritakwilderphotography@gmail.com

214-912-6242 Family Photo Sessions Starting at $75

UNIVERSITY PARK UMC PRESENTS:

A MUSIC CAMP FOR KIDS!

R E A L E S TAT E

AUG. 11-15 | 9 AM-12:30 PM Join us for a wonderful week of music, drama, movement, and set building, for children entering grades 3-7. Performance on Sunday, Aug. 17.

MLS # 72096 - 3300 SF 4/4/2 $419,000

Cedar Creek Lake Waterfront Specialists

Register at upumc.org/AMP

Richard Avery

903-880-6455 averyrealtygroup@gmail.com

Marsha Bourne

Visit out website for other listings like this:

903-880-3722 marsha@marshabourne.com

2/1/2 Open Water Bungalow $229,000

AVERYREALTYGROUP.COM

Private Lake Fork Waterfront $797,000

4/2.5/3 Home, 21+ Acres 3,000 ft. of Shoreline • 400 ft. Well 80x40 Shop • 2 Bay Boathouse

Janet Martin Realty 903-885-1234

EVENTS • WEDDINGS • FASHION This glossy magazine celebrating local events, weddings and fashion, will be passed out at charitable events and will be included with both Park Cities People and Preston Hollow People newspapers.

Issue Date: October • Ad Res Date: August 22

Interested in advertising? advertising@peoplenewspaper.com


34  JULY 2014

C O MMUN I T Y

I Was an Inmate in a Technological Prison

I

’ve just been released from jail and I’m still in a grumpy mood. Today I was a prisoner of technology. It has taken all day to get “sprung” from various hostage crises, and I still have to report to my “probation” officer, Ma Bell. I picked up my landline to make a doctor’s appointment while multitasking and surfing emails on my cell phone. No dial tone. I had just cleared about ten robo-calls from my answering machine the night before, so I wondered if this port-a-phone was just not charged. All other phones in the house were also dead. When I called my home on my cell, it just rang and rang. I could feel my blood pressure rise as I had zero time for this; I was trying to dash out the door to meet the tech guy at my office to figure out why important documents were being marked as junk or going to my spam filter, which I didn’t know until a title company person called me to ask if I had received them. Time was of the essence so I allotted the AT&T repair call five minutes of my time. The AT&T gods began to laugh. I got the customer service number online (not easy — they don’t want you to find it) and tapped my toe while going through the voice menu with the annoyingly soothing voice that sounds like Hal the Computer in “2001 A Space Odyssey.” Finally, I got an agent and hurriedly asked her to schedule a tech guy to come fix the issue. This woman wanted to run some tests and have my three-digit

LEN BOURLAND

" WH Y D O I H AN G O N TO A N U M B ER T H AT ’ S BE E N IN MY L IF E F O R 25 Y E AR S ? IN ERT IA? BE CAU S E I' V E A LWAYS H AD O N E? IT WO U L D B E O N E L E S S BI LL TO PAY. H MMM. "

number following my phone number on the bill. I didn’t know it and didn’t have a bill since I pay online, so she refused to help me as she couldn’t “identify” me. While she was going through her speech, I was trying to boot up my bank account to see if the number was on my online banking bill, but my log in was frozen. It was asking for a password reset. I needed to get a bank tech support guy, too, but later. Meanwhile, Miss AT&T offered to call my phone to identify me if I answered. “The line is DEAD!” I seethed through gritted teeth. “Not according to my test,” she countered. I asked for a supervisor. She got angry and refused and began a lecture on her job duties. I clicked off my cell and stormed to the office before I missed my crucial slot with the computer guy. An hour later, after watching a man who speaks computers go into my laptop and do some mumbo-jumbo with system preferences, etc., my messages were “released.” I had zero comprehension of what he did and didn’t care any more than I care how my engine works if my car needs repair. Mechanical, I’m not. Back to personal problems. I got my bank login fixed with a tech person and, voila, no three-digit number on my online banking bill. It was Round 2 with the phone problem. I redialed the AT&T menu and this time tried the fix-it-yourself option (easy three steps) according to the cloying voice. After teetering on

my kitchen stool with a flathead screwdriver opening my gray box and testing a phone to no avail, I went for Round 3. I’d spent at least an hour trying to report my phone outage. This time I tried a different option and got a very nice man who asked for no ID and took my request for a technician without any rigmarole. Why couldn’t this guy have picked up this morning? “He’ll be by sometime between 8 and 5 late next week. We’re backed up due to the rains,” this very mellow, polite man told me. This got me thinking ... a week with no landline. Do I even need a landline? My adult kids don’t have one. They just use their cells. I don’t fax anything anymore. All the phone messages on my machine are from politicians or CVS with a reminder to pick up prescriptions. I give me cell number to anybody I want to talk to. I mainly use my home phone for directories, and to call my cell phone when I can’t find it in the house. My iPad can ping it now if I lose it. Why do I hang on to a number that’s been in my life for 25 years? Inertia? Because I’ve always had one? It would be one less bill to pay. Hmmm. I felt strangely liberated knowing I could get out of this jail whenever I want. So I did what happy girls do. I went shopping. Anybody checked out the new Trader Joe’s? Bourland blogs at lenbourland.com. Email len@lenbourland.com.

WEDDING

MARY ANNE ROBERTSON & MITCHELL WYLY

M

ary Anne Robertson and Mitchell Evan Wyly exchanged wedding vows on June 7 at Highland Park Presbyterian Church. The Rev. L. Nelson Bell II officiated their ceremony. Festival Brass of Dallas provided a six piece ensemble to accompany Michael Shake, the organist. Signed, Sealed, Delivered provided reception music and entertainment, including the couple’s first dance, “All I Do is Dream of You.” A reception with dinner and dancing followed at the Dallas Country Club. The bride is the daughter of Ms. Angela Lane Robertson and the late Mr. Edward Frank Robertson of Dallas. She is the granddaughter of Mrs. Jean Lane and the late Mr. George William Lane, and Mrs. Mary Robertson and the late Mr. Frank Varnon Robertson. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Turner and Mr. and Mrs. Evan Acton Wyly, of Dallas. He is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Evans Wyly,

Mr. William Rex Beattie, the late Ms. Rosemary Acton, and the late Mrs. Justine Boozman Beattie of Dallas. The bride chose a couture gown by Carolina Herrera with a mermaid silhouette, featuring ivory Alencon lace with a bateau neckline opening into a deep “V” in the back. A cathedral-length, Alencon lace veil framed her face and extended down past her cathedral-length train. The bride carried a bouquet wrapped in a rosary passed from her late paternal grandfather to her late father. She also included her Delta Gamma pin, and a handkerchief carried by several generations of Robertson women. She wore a gold and diamond bracelet belonging to her maternal great-grandmother. Andra Hood assisted the bride as maid of honor. Bridesmaids included Julie Munguia, Sihana Shala, McCary Gilbert, Lucy Rose Conklin, Alex Robertson, Kinsey Baker, and Ashley Lindsey. Savannah Grace Conklin, the groom’s niece, was the

flower girl. Attending the groom as best man was Elias Sinkus. Groomsmen were Jeff Robertson, Kyle Conklin, Will Gilbert, Robert Casner, Dixon Milner, Ross Anthony, and Cesar Jasso. The ring bearer was McAmis Kyle Conklin, the groom’s nephew. Mary Anne graduated in May with a Juris Doctorate from the SMU Dedman School of Law. She received a Bachelor of Arts in government, with minors in business and Spanish, from The University of Texas. The bride is a 2007 graduate of Lake Highlands High School. The groom received his MBA from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas in May. He also earned an economics degree from Princeton University. The groom is a 2005 graduate of the Episcopal School of Dallas. Following their honeymoon, to a surprise destination planned by the groom, the couple will make their home in University Park.

ANDREA POLITO PHOTOGRAPHY


extraordinary lives | extraordinary homes Summer, Sun and Service

L

ooking for a way to prevent summer boredom? These volunteer opportunities for both youth and adults will allow for a fun-filled summer full of giving. Voices of Hope

Serving at-risk children and summer fun go hand in hand when volunteering at Voices of Hope Ministries Summer Day Camp. The Voices of Hope camp provides children living in West Dallas “with strong character models, education support, life skills and family support services to become productive Christian citizens.” Day camps run through August 1. Be prepared to play sports, take part in enriching activities and chaperone field trips, all while building students’ confidence and promoting learning.

6532 LaFayette Way | $1,699,000 TOM HUGHES | c 214.649.3323 thughes@briggsfreeman.com

Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children Who says you have to be a nurse or doctor to work in a hospital? Volunteers are a vital part of Texas Scottish Rite hospital’s warm and friendly atmosphere. From greeting patients and their families, to manning the hospital’s unique popcorn stand and everything in between, Scottish Rite has something for everyone. The junior volunteer five-week program, for ages 14-17, allows youth to gain real-life work experience and be introduced to the medical field.

CitySquare offers opportunities for volunteers of all ages to help fight poverty throughout Dallas.

cookies or treats to CitySquare any Friday and bring a smile to a child’s face. By Mary Sedeño

For More InForMatIon

City Square

voiceofhope.org

Join CitySquare in their effort to fight poverty. Volunteer opportunities range from helping in the CitySquare thrift shop, to teaching fitness and cooking classes. With the wide range of volunteer opportunities there is sure to be one that is right for you! Don’t think you have time to volunteer? That’s okay; CitySquare has just the thing. Cookie Fridays are a way to brighten up a child in and transitioning out of foster care. Bring your prepared

tsrhc.org

4400 Bryn Mawr Drive | $1,359,000 JUDY SESSIONS | c 214.354.5556 jsessions@briggsfreeman.com

citysquare.org updatedallas.com for the latest in real estate news President and CEO Robbie Briggs independently owns and operates Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty.

9029 Broken Arrow Ln | $2,195,000 LINDY MAHONEY | c 214.546.1555 lmahoney@briggsfreeman.com

3.82 acres - waterfront in Little Elm

3959 Spinnaker Run Point | $2,795,000 Live an extraordinary lakefront lifestyle only thirty-five miles north of Downtown Dallas. Enjoy sunrises and sunsets on Sunrise Bay. Beautiful trees, contemplative gardens, gorgeous pool, private boat dock, expansive lawn.A contemporary architectural masterpiece. Photos and details at beckyfrey.com

BECKY FREY c 214.536.4727

4317 Shenandoah Street | $1,425,000 MICHELLE WOOD | c 214.564.0234 mwood@briggsfreeman.com

bfrey@briggsfreeman.com

3020 Bryn Mawr Dr | $1,495,000 ANNE GOYER | c 214.457.0417 agoyer@briggsfreeman.com

4412 Belclaire Avenue | $3,995,000 Inside this elegant Highland Park home, sophisticated formals make entertaining effortless. First floor amenities include a family room, breakfast area, and updated kitchen offering marble countertops and a spacious island.

CLAIRE DEWAR c 214.808.6045

cdewar@briggsfreeman.com

An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Briggs Freeman Real Estate Brokerage, Inc. is independently owned and operated.

5600 W. Lovers Lane, Suite 224, Dallas, TX 75209

briggsfreeman.com

Park Cities People -- July 2014  

Park Cities People is a monthly publication produced by People Newspapers in Dallas, Texas. For advertising inquiries, email advertising@peo...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you