Page 1

100 Years of

HPISD Park Cities People


FRANK PURCELL

214.729.7554

Happy 100th Anniversary HPISD!

3712 Wentwood Drive $2,825,000 5 Beds/5.2 Baths/4 LAs 5 Fireplaces/Multi-Level Pool 2-Car Garage/6576 SF Clean Lined French Design

Give me a call if you would like to know what your home is worth in this Hot market.

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KELLEY WINSOR

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LYN WILLIAMS

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CAROLE MCBRIDE

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JULI HARRISON

Carole McBride Senior Vice President

214.212.0921 carolemcbride@ realtor.com

214.207.1001

Celebrate Your Home

Lyn Williams Senior Vice President

214.505.4152 lynpwilliams@gmail.com

HPISD ads for agents.indd 1

4400 Belfort Avenue

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Juli Harrison Senior Vice President

214.207.1001 jharri2092@aol.com

9/9/14 11:05 AM


ENTER TO LEARN

|

GO FORTH TO SERVE

100 Extraordinary yEars Congratulations to the Highland Park Independent School District

3601 Greenbrier Drive | SOLD Mary Poss | 214-738-0777 Represented Buyer

4224 Belclaire Avenue | $3,995,000 Linda Jordan Hobbs | 214-535-3732

3500 Centenary Avenue | SOLD Paula Wier Scofield | 214-232-0562 Kenneth Walters | 214-923-3297 Represented Buyer

3612 Villanova Street | $2,699,000 Penny Rivenbark Patton | 214-632-0805

4305 Livingston Avenue | $2,495,000 Michelle Unwin | 214-392-5147

2909 Southwestern Boulevard | SOLD Victoria Barr | 214-213-2593

Representing the finest homes for nearly 70 years.

Preston Center | 214.692.0000 Ginger Gill, Manager, 214.725.9036 GingerGill@Ebby.com | Ebby.com

Preston Hollow | Park Cities | 214.210.1500 Keith Newman, Manager, 214.210.1533 KeithNewman@Ebby.com | Ebby.com Š2014. Equal Housing Opportunity.


4  OCTOBER 2014

HPISD CENTENNIAL Alumni Recall What Makes HP Special By Sarah Bennett

ROLL CALL

People Newspapers Highland Park is a district that doesn’t just pride itself on the bells and whistles of plaid and bagpipes. It’s the academic rigor and sense of community that stand out — and that’s something any alum will tell you. “I can take my daughter to school and see five people I went to high school with,” 1996 HPHS graduate Katherine Trungale said. Growing up, her family moved her from Ursuline Academy to Highland Park so she could play basketball in a more competitive environment, eventually earning her a scholarship to the University of California at San Diego. Today, she has a daughter at Bradfield Elementary, and the sense of community is what brought her back. “You pick up a school directory, and you’re going to see your teacher’s home phone number and address and know that you can call them whenever you want,” she said. “That doesn’t happen anywhere else.” Even for Parkies who spent their entire academic life in the school district, the impact of having faculty willing to go the extra mile is notable. “I won’t forget being pulled into [principal] Ben Wiseman’s office,” 1950 HPHS graduate Pierce Allman said. “He said, ‘I noticed your last report card … and I know you can do better.’ And, boom, that was it. But that’s part of Highland Park. The principal knows every kid.” Not only did Wiseman exemplify the faculty’s personal attention to students, but he also showcased the district’s dedication to academic excellence that continues today. “There’s no question the program prepared us for the future,” 1971 HPHS graduate Guy Kerr said. “But while we were going through it, we didn’t think it was anything special. We just thought that was the way it worked. It’s only been since we’ve been gone and moved back later that we realized what a blessing and opportunity we had to go through and what it did for us.” Kerr met his wife, fellow 1971 graduate Cindy Kerr, at the old middle school building on

n Margaret McDermott (1929): philanthropist and community leader n William P. Clements, Jr. (1934): 42nd and 44th governor of Texas n John Leedom (1939): state senator n Don Houseman (1940): former University Park mayor n Dorothy Malone (1941): Academy Award winner n Louis A. Beecherl, Jr. (1943): UT Board of Regents chairman n Doak Walker, Jr. (1945): Heisman winner n Jack Turpin (1947): Dallas Theological Seminary board president n Skippy Browning (1948): Olympic diver n Jayne Mansfield (1950): Golden Globe winner n Blackie Holmes (1953): former University Park mayor n Charles Otstott (1955): 1960 West Point valedictorian

HIGHLANDER YEARBOOKS: 1932-2006

TOP: William Clements, Doak Walker, Blackie Holmes, and Charles Ostott SECOND: Cindy Vaughan Kerr, Guy Kerr, and Wendy Kopp BOTTOM: Stephanie March, Stark Sands, Clayton Kershaw, and Matthew Stafford

“ WE BE L IEV E I N WH AT W E’R E DO I NG. W E BE L I E V E IN E DUCATIO N AN D WE H O PE W E’R E DO I NG A V ERY G O O D JO B WI TH I T. ” P I E RC E A LLMAN, C L A S S O F 1 950

Normandy Avenue, and the two have been together ever since — Cindy even collected a few bricks when the building was demolished. Now, they have had two children go through the school system: Preston, class of 2005, and Audrey, class of 2009. “I hope people really understand how special this centennial is,” Cindy said. “It’s kind of a culmination of looking 100 years back, but preparing for the next 100 years.” In fact, that academic rigor is what has sustained Highland Park for 100 years and what propels it into the future. “It’s not a superior attitude at all,” Allman said. “We care and we share and we dare. We

believe in what we’re doing. We believe in education and we hope we’re doing a very good job with it, and we’re always looking for a way to do things better.” No matter how long it’s been since a graduate walked across the stage, the affect of Highland Park is immediate and lasting. “We need to take what educational opportunities are given to us,” 2008 graduate Carly Bender said. “At Highland Park, we have good teachers and a good reputation, so you’re supposed to take that education and use it for good — go forth in the community and make a positive impact as an alumnus.” Email sarah.bennett@ peoplenewspapers.com

n Alton Thomson (1956): 1960 Naval Academy valedictorian n Wendy Kopp (1985): founder of Teach for America n Shaun Jordan (1986): Olympic swimmer n Megan Mylan (1988): Academy Award winner n Stephanie March (1992): celebrity ambassador n Hank Kuehne (1994): professional golfer n Stark Sands (1997): Broadway actor n Matthew Stafford (2006): Detroit Lions quarterback n Clayton Kershaw (2006): L.A. Dodgers pitcher


6  OCTOBER 2014

H PI S D CEN TENNIA L

Building a District, One School at a Time School names honor town’s first leaders By Sarah Bennett

People Newspapers In Highland Park, the vision that started with one school grew slowly over time to seven campuses. Many honor community leaders in name, but each campus keeps the spirit of tradition alive while contributing its own personality to the district’s character. For an area that shares one high school, much of that personality comes from the four elementary campuses. “Tradition has so much to do with community,” 1950 HPHS graduate Pierce Allman said. Though community leaders used an old house as “Highland Park School” starting in 1909, John S. the newly incorporated Bradfield district’s first chance to make an impression came in 1914 with the Armstrong School. Named after town founder John S. Armstrong, the land on which the school sat was donated by Armstrong’s widow, Alice. So touched was the community by her generosity, that the first issue of the Highlander yearbook (which came years later in 1917) was dedicated to her. “To her who has ever proven in every way a faithful friend of our beloved school, and an ardent sympathizer in and promoter of its best interest, to Mrs. John S. Armstrong, this, our first volume is affectionately dedicated,” the issue read. And that spirit of generosity continues on today, reflected in each campus. The Armstrong School added the word “elementary” to its name once Highland Park High School opened in 1922 on Normandy Avenue. Then came Bradfield Elementary in 1926 on Southern Avenue, named after school board president John S. Bradfield, who served from the district’s founding in 1914 to 1933. “When my grandfather retired, my grandparents bought a farm. It was so far out in the country on Forest Lane, just across Greenville [Avenue],” Bradfield’s granddaughter Claire Roberts said. “The school board gave him a saddle for his horse, and my grandmother, a beautiful watch that hung on a chain around her neck, which I have.” University Park Elementary, added in 1928, doesn’t honor a specific leader in name, but rather reflects a growing community. With SMU opening in 1911, the city of University Park grew up around it and was incorporated in 1924. True to its name, a cornerstone on the

H I G H L A N D PA R K H I G H S C H O O L

ARMSTRONG

BRADFIELD

THE OLD HPMS

U N I V E R S I T Y PA R K

HYER H I G H L A N D PA R K H I G H S C H O O L H I G H L A N D E R 1 9 5 6

In 1956, when the above photos ran on a campus history spread in the Highlander, there were 4,974 HPISD students. second floor still gives a picture of the community at the time, with a Bible, local newspapers, and coins. “I started out at UP,” Allman said. “I would suggest to anyone who’s ever feeling down, get out and walk through a grade school. It is so uplifting because of the spirit and energy and smiles.” With a decade of middle school shuffling in between, the final elementary school did not open until 1949, delayed by a lack of steel during World War II. Hyer Elementary finally opened its doors on Caruth Boulevard. “It was really special for me to go to Hyer, because my mom also attended the school,” 2008 HPHS graduate Margaux Anbouba said. “We had the same librarian and she remembered my mom, and joked she never spent her time in the library, but that was my favorite place on campus.” Once all four elementary schools were up and running, they were put to the test of time. Armstrong caught fire one night

in November 1951, first noticed by a patrolling officer. Once alerted, superintendent W.B. Irvin dashed into the school to save tax records. “We were in the new wing that they just built, so there were six classes that stayed in the new wing, and everybody else went to HPUMC,” said 1963 HPHS graduate Tom Rhodes, who was in first grade that year. Even Bradfield saw its share of danger when a twin-engine plane crashed on school grounds in 1967. Though the time of the crash was 3:30 p.m., students had been released early due to a staff meeting. But despite challenges and bizarre acts of God, the campuses still stand, with much of their traditional architecture and history. “When you’re aware of the past, you have a solid feeling for the future,” Allman said. “I hope that all of the traditions that the school system cherishes will carry forward.”

P I V O TA L M O M E N T S

1922

High school campus built on Normandy Avenue

1937 New high school opens on

Emerson Avenue; old campus becomes Highland Park Junior High School

1970

Junior high renamed Highland Park Middle School

1974 Campus renamed Arch H.

McCulloch Middle School, after the longest-serving school board trustee

1995 New campus opens as

McCulloch Intermediate School and Highland Park Middle School

1997

Old middle school campus demolished


Proud Sponsor of HPISD

Your Preston Center Team: Brett Butler, senior vice president; Rob Eggemeyer, senior vice president; Kimberly Fry, senior vice president, treasury management; and Brent Raindl, president.

PlainsCapital Bank is proud to be a Highland Park community partner. We appreciate the tireless work of the parents and teachers who educate and empower the young people of HPISD and offer our sincerest congratulations on their centennial anniversary. PlainsCapital Bank looks forward to seeing many more years of success and growth in the Highland Park community.

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8  OCTOBER 2014

H PI S D CEN TENNIA L

Mascot Evolution Can’t Tame Scottie Spirit By Sarah Bennett

People Newspapers For decades, Highland Park graduates have rallied behind the Fighting Scot, a Scotsman sporting a kilt, red hair, and a battle-ready face. But would you believe that for a time, students were known as the Highland Park Coyotes? After the district’s founding in 1914, the original colors were orange and black, and the mascot was, you guessed it, a coyote. “It wouldn’t surprise me if there were a lot of coyotes here at the time, so it would just be natural,” said Cristi Swayze, centennial co-chair of history and archives. So how did Highland Park become the Scottish-loving district it is today? The answer starts with a little lesson in land surveying and football. Highland Park founder John S. Armstrong named the town because the land sat physically higher than the surrounding areas — 100 feet, to be exact.

“The foresight that these people had early on is really great,” said Claire Roberts, granddaughter of community leader John S. Bradfield and 1953 graduate. Armstrong was a transplant from Philadelphia, so the name bore no Scottish roots originally — it was strictly a geographic connotation. It wasn’t until football coach Floyd Bettis arrived in 1923

that the mascot changed to the Highlander to better reflect the town’s name. He also changed the colors to their iconic blue and gold. “He said, ‘since we’re Highland Park Town, then let’s change it to a Highlander,’ which is obviously a person who lived in the highlands of Scotland,” Swayze said. The culture grew and grew for 20 years, accumulating more

Bank of Texas Congratulates Highland Park ISD on 100 years of success. At Bank of Texas, we are proud to be a part of our community. It’s our mission and our priority. We believe in supporting today for the growth of tomorrow.

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.

Scottish-based traditions, such as the symbolic Bagpipe yearbook and the actual bagpipes on the field. “I see [the true mascot] more as the Highlander, because there’s a great sense of tradition,” Swayze said. By the 1940s, fans were calling Highland Park players “the Scotties,” and the mascot even changed to a Scottish terrier. But manly graduates coming home from war thought the school had gone “to the dogs,” so a public meeting was held to dispel the pup, and the piping Highlander reappeared. Finally, in 1977, Dallas Morning News cartoonist and 1927 HPHS grad Bill McClanahan created “the Fighting Scot” as it is known today, and the image has imprinted everything from the stadium to yearbooks ever since. “Every team that uses the Scot has some sort of variation on the cartoon,” Swayze said. “I think that’s going to be around for a very, very long time.”

SCOTTIE FIRSTS

1917

First Highlander yearbook is published

1923 Mascot changes to Highlander from coyote

1933 First Bagpipe staff 1934

Bagpipes are added to the band

1935 First edition of The Kiltie is published

1939

First issue of The Clan directory is published

1943 First “Scottie Sweetheart,” today’s Homecoming Queen

1952 First issue of

literary magazine, The Tartan, is published


Congratulations HPISD on your Centennial!

Left to right front row: John Eller, Ashley Beane, Chari Oglesby, Forrest Gregg Left to right middle row: Sharon Palmer, Sylvia Scott, Erin Ballard, Chris Pyle, Kate Looney Walters, Thomas Bellinger Left to right back row: Sara Johnson, Susie Thompson, Greg Iker, Shirley Cohn, Alexis Pearl

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Linda is a Dallas native and has been a University Park resident for over 38 years. She began her Real Estate career over 23 years ago and during these years has consistently remained a “Top Twenty Producer.” D Magazine listed her as a “Top Seller” among the Best Realtors in Dallas. Linda specializes in the estate properties of the Park Cities and Preston Hollow areas but is knowledgeable and comfortable selling in all areas and price ranges.

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HPISD ads for agents.indd 4

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9/9/14 1:21 PM


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HPISD ads for agents.indd 3

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9/9/14 10:55 AM


12  OCTOBER 2014

H PI S D CEN TENNIA L

Teachers Fuel Success For Generations By Sarah Bennett

People Newspapers When Linda Raya promised to stay with Highland Park ISD for three years in the early 1970s, she didn’t know her promise would turn into a 40year tenure. “I never anticipated this,” she said. “But it’s been such a wonderful experience, I wouldn’t change it for the world.” She’s been teaching drama, speech, and English ever since, thanks to the recommendation of 1968 alum, Barbara Polk. “One of the girls in the drama department at Stephen F. Austin was from Dallas, and she said, ‘oh, you’ve got to go to Highland Park,’” she said. “I had never even heard of it.” But she’s not the only long-tenured teacher in town. In fact, Highland Park’s academic standards are known for attracting and keeping educators. “The kids were polite and very good students, and if they

weren’t, they worked at getting better,” said Wanda Spoonmore, who taught math and algebra at the middle-school level for 36 years before retiring from the district. Throughout the year, she taught at the original school building on Normandy Avenue, which went through a number of name changes before giving way to the newer McCulloch Intermediate School/Highland Park Middle School campus. That also meant she saw a number of principals. “The administrators made it enjoyable for you to come to school,” she said. “They let you teach and encouraged you to be inventive on your own.” As for Raya, whose tenure is still going strong, she started out teaching English, speech, and drama. Today, she’s also the director of fine arts. “This district is so small, we get to wear many hats,” she said. During her time, she’s helped to train award-winning and fame-garnering actors such

Thanks for the Memories!

Rehearsal Dinners Birthdays Family Documentaries Anniversaries Photo Scans

Contact us at 214.696.4748 www.reelmemories.us ww susan@reelmemories.us Susan Bullock • Kelly Snowden

C O U R T E SY P H O T O A N D PA R K C I T I E S P E O P L E A R C H I V E S

Left: Linda Raya appears with HPHS principal E.A. Sigler celebrating Raya’s being named Teacher of the Year in 1981. Right: Wanda Spoonmore as Stark Sands and Stephanie March. She’s also won Highland Park’s Teacher of the Year award in 1981, been named a top-ten teacher by the Texas Exes Association, and she’s even had the HPHS stage named af-

ter her. But the students are her true accomplishment. “They are enormously talented,” she said. “They’re passionate about achieving their goals, and are always, inevitably, very kind.” Though Raya hasn’t hit re-

tirement yet, Spoonmore knew when the time was right for her. “It was fun to be at Highland Park long enough to teach the children of former students,” she said. “But when it got to ‘you taught my grandmother or grandfather,’ it was time to go.”


OCTOBER 2014  13

H P ISD CE NT E NNIA L

CONGRATULATIONS, HPISD, ON 100 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE IN NURTURING OUR CHILDREN.

C H R I S M C G AT H E Y A N D 1 9 5 5 H I G H L A N D E R Y E A R B O O K

Through the century, community members and students have been firmly behind the Scots football team.

Community Support Follows Gridiron Success, Vice Versa

CALL JANE DIRECT

214.478.7099

janegordon@daveperrymiller.com

By Todd Jorgenson

People Newspapers There are the milestones for a program that leads Texas in victories and playoff appearances. There are the famous names, from Doak Walker to Bobby Layne to Matthew Stafford. There are the state championships — three to be exact, most recently in 2005. But for players, coaches and fans who have grown up around the Scots, football has been woven into the fabric of the Park Cities community for almost a century. “We’ve got such a longstanding tradition,” said HPISD athletic director Johnny Ringo. “People really want to be a part of Friday night.” Since Highland Park went 9-1 in its first varsity season in 1923, there have been 34 seasons of 10 or more wins, and 19 undefeated years. Entering this fall, the Scots had amassed 767 wins total, including 89 in postseason play. Longtime fan Charles Barns, 82, who bought the first season tickets for Highlander Stadium in 1980 and has renewed them each year since, said the success of the team is tied in part to the support it receives from the community. “I’m not an athlete myself, but I’ve just grown up around it,” said Barns, who graduated from HPHS in 1950. “That’s what you do on Friday nights. They carry on from year to year.” Perhaps what is most remarkable is not the championships or the superstars, but the camaraderie within the program that seems to span generations.

HIGHLANDER YEARBOOK

Fleet-footed fullback Johnny Florer and the Scots defeated Port Arthur 20-9 for the school’s second state championship in 1957. “The players are very close because they grew up together. I love that these kids are playing because they want to,” said Mickey Holden, who directed a documentary called “The History of Highland Park Football” that will air this fall on Fox Sports Southwest. “They wanted to be with their friends and represent their school, and now they’re part of a continuum that goes back 100 years. There’s a bond that will always be there.” Email todd.jorgenson@ peoplenewspapers.com

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14  OCTOBER 2014

H PI S D CEN TENNIA L

REMEMBER WHEN...

W H AT YO U S A I D n Unquestionably, my sweetest, most profound, and most important HPISD memory was learning to read in Mrs. Ruby Bain’s first-grade class at Bradfield in 1964 -- 50 years ago this fall. These days, kids often learn to read before first grade, but that wasn’t always the case back then. I clearly remember Mrs. Bain sitting next to an oversized “Dick and Jane” reader perched on an easel, as we sounded out words. The first word I ever read was printed in big letters under a picture of Dick and Jane’s little sister, Sally. She carried an umbrella, wore yellow rubber boots, and was about to step into a rain puddle. Under the drawing was the word “look,” and I remember sounding out “LLLL” “OOOOO” “KKKK,” and then putting them together. “LOOK!” flashed in my brain, and it was like a key that unlocked a magic room full of treasures. Which it was. I will be eternally grateful to Mrs. Bain for that wonderful gift. — Jim Rain n Some of my favorite Armstrong memories include our principal, Dr. Kenneth Thomas. He would greet us every day at the front door and he knew every single student by name. And our P.E. teacher, Coach Rayburn, made us do push-ups and sit-ups and then do sprints, all the while yelling at us, “Go, chicken fat! Go!” In the cafeteria, we had these incredible, cornbread rolls that were literally swimming in a pan of butter. My friend Richard Means and I bet each other who could eat the most, and I won after finishing 18 of them. — Max Fuqua n I am a third-generation alum. I was the class of 1997, my mom was the class of 1967, and my grandfather the class of 1947. Although I love living in Richmond, Va., now, it kills me that my son will most likely not attend HPHS. HP is like no other and I find that I am constantly trying to find things that are similar. At least, we now have Chuy’s and Blue Bell ice cream here. — Holly Morris Raidabaugh

1957 Scots 4A Football champs

Bill White ‘54, Art Barnes ‘51, Wade Smith ‘54, and Gifford Touchstone ‘54 in 2012

Chase Evans, Class of 1994

Ed DeLoach leads the ROTC band in 1956.

Anbouba family at Hyer Elementary on “Old-Fashioned Day” in the 1990s

1. Jack Sides - HP Varsity Football 1955 and 1956 2. Jack Sides - HP Varsity Football 1985, 1986 and 1987 3. Jack Sides - HP Varsity Football 2013, 2014 and 2015

Travel Club in 1947

Kathleen Cuellar in 1957

German folk music fills the halls in 1971.


OCTOBER 2014  15

HP I S D C E N T E N N I A L W H AT YO U S A I D

2005 4A state tennis champions

Mrs. Newman’s fifth grade Armstrong Eagles, 1980

HPHS Principal Ben Wiseman, 1928-1962

Quarterback Bobby Layne (‘45) also played basketball.

Middle schoolers Mollie Loftis, Hannah Ashe, Kelly Parma, Mclean Brittinham, and Helen Coffee in 1998

The school song circa 1926

2001 HPHS state swimming champs Candace Blackman & Megan McNamara

Sara Smetzer, 1995

Julie Ann O’Connell with grandchildren Hallie Henry, Caroline and Hudson Weibel, Patrick and Anna Walker, and Mad for Plaid Sign Committee Cochairwoman Kay Bradley in 2007

Young Scots fans cheer on the 2005 state fooball champions.

n The group photo is from Playbill in middle school. The funny thing (and the great thing!) is that I am still friends with a lot of those girls, and the theater program was very formative for my high-school years. It is where I found some of my best friends and it is one of my favorite memories from HPISD. Getting all sucked into the drama (on and off stage) was some of the most fun I ever had in school. The fact that we got to grow up together going to the same schools throughout the years was really special and something I didn’t appreciate until I left for college. The picture of me and a dude in a white jacket is actually me and my boyfriend, Travis, on our very first date, which happened to be junior prom. I’ll never forget that he drove the wrong way down our one-way street to pick me up and I was so afraid my dad was going to get mad at him. I would like to think we look much better now. — Erin Kanter


Homemade and wholesome since HPISD was 11! The

bird g n i k Moc White

Arboretum

Rd

Central

Rock Lake

H P ISD C E NT E N N I A L DISTRICT VOICES

r ne ck Bu

NW Hwy

16  OCTOBER 2014

Join Us in Celebrating Years of Excellence in Learning, Service

W

Ga rla nd

e count ourselves fortuDoak Walker’s letter jacket and Clayton Kershaw’s Cy Young nate to be here during awards. this historic, 100-year anniversary of Highland Park Indepenn Coffee table book: We are 1200 N Buckner 11–8 every day 214-324-5000 11–8 every day • 1200 N Buckner • highlandparkcafeteria.com dent School District. Our cenpublishing a book that looks at tennial motto is, “Celebrating HPISD’s history over the de100 years of excellence in learncades and features photos of ing and service,” which echoes many of HPISD’s many tradithe words that are proudly dis- Dawson Orr, tions, distinguished alumni and played at every campus: “Enter superintendent school and community leaders. to learn, go forth to serve.” You can order your copy by visWe are inviting the community to join iting hpef.org/centennial-book. n Oral history video project: We us in celebrating the spirit and history of Highland Park ISD and all the wonderful have interviewed hundreds of the people people who have committed themselves about their years in HPISD, and these to making it great. We have a series of special memories and reflections will be special events planned for this year: posted on our YouTube channel throughn Oct. 17 (1:30-3:30 p.m.): All of our out the school year. Thanks to our many underwriters and campuses will host open houses. We in4013 SOUTHWESTERN vite all alumni and community members volunteers who have made these celebra$2,995,000 | 4 BED | 6.1 BATH | 6,605 SQUARE FEET to visit our campuses to see special dis- tions possible. We also want to thank the play cases and visit with friends and fac- Rotary Club of the Park Cities, which KIMBERLEE GROMATZKY TAYLOR GROMATZKY ulty members. highlighted HPISD’s centennial in the 214-802-5025 | KimG@DavePerryMiller.com 214-802-5002 | Taylor@DavePerryMiller.com n Oct. 19 (2-5 p.m.): HPISD will host July 4 parade, and to the parents and faca Community Centennial Celebration at ulty members who made the first day of Highlander Stadium and the Multi-Pur- school so special. pose Activities Center (MPAC) across the It is our hope that you enjoy learning street. Grassmere Lane will be blocked more about the history of our schools off for the party, which will feature food and the people who have made them the trucks, a Kids Corner with bounce hous- extraordinary places they are. Please vises and more inside the stadium, student it hpisd.org for more details about the performances on stage, and a special cer- centennial and to see a list of our underemony at 3:30 p.m. Across the street, the writers and volunteers. MPAC will be transformed into the Scots In gratitude and appreciation, Museum, which will be filled with hisDr. Dawson Orr torical displays and artifacts, including HPISD Superintendent

Centered Around Centennial

A

s student body president serving in Africa, providing not only an orphanage but also an at Highland Park High education to children who desSchool, I am honored to get to perately need both. serve at a time so unique and special. The school display of faOne hundred years is a long mous alumni is only the tip of time, and as I stood onstage the iceberg when realizing the during the convocation cerelevel of impact this school has mony that launched the school Gabby Crank, had in the greater communiyear for all the teachers in the HPHS studentty over the years. There are so district, I wondered what the body president many stories of achievement whose first chapters were writschool founders must have been thinking around this time of year in ten in our neighborhood and school. 1914. Did they anticipate the legacy that The legacy of amazing athletes, scholwould be created, the quality of learning ars, and many others who walked in our that would continue to advance within very same footsteps has given all of HP’s Highland Park’s hallways? students a standard of greatness that alTeachers here truly embody and instill lows us to reach higher, to challenge ourin us the school motto that states, “En- selves, and to attain things we only ever ter to Learn. Go Forth to Serve.” and al- dreamed about. To celebrate the cententhough I have yet to “go forth” to serve in nial of a school that transitioned from bemy life, at convocation, I was able to hear ing the coyotes to the Highlanders to the from someone who has done so. Keynote Scottie Dogs, and finally, to the Highland speaker and HP alumna Ellen Kershaw Park Fighting Scots is both a privilege began as a timid student, but her expe- and a lesson demonstrating how perseriences in Highland Park schools helped verance and a solid foundation can truly her gain confidence. Now she has made thrive when we make the effort to make a global impact by opening a charity and it count.


OCTOBER 2014  17

HP I S D C E N T E N N I A L

Five Questions With The Centennial Chairs Bruce and Leeanne Hunt first met in eighth grade, and dated through high school and college. Now, they have three sons who all graduated from Highland Park: Marshall (2003), Carter (2004), and Bailey (2008). How has the experience of chairing the Centennial been so far? We are proud to serve as the honorary chairs for the HPISD Centennial. It’s been amazing to see how many people have volunteered their time and energy to organize and plan the celebration. Their passion for HPISD really shows in preparation for the Centennial celebration. Name a favorite memory of yours from your own Highland Park days. We both have many wonderful memories but probably the best is meeting each other in Mrs. Morgan’s eighth grade homeroom. We started “going steady,” as it was called back then, and have been together ever since. Why was this project important to you? We both grew up in this communi-

Notice how many families in the Park Cities cover multiple generations at HPISD, and that’s not by coincidence. We look forward to our grandkids growing up in the Park Cities, attending HPISD, and having the same, positive experience that we and our kids had.

KIM LEESON

Bruce and Leeanne Hunt both graduated in the class of 1976. ty and went through the HPISD system, graduating from Highland Park High School — as did our all three of our children. The school district is one of the things that makes the Park Cities such a great place to live. The involvement and support of the community combined with the quality education of the HPISD makes for a special and unique place to live and raise your family.

What do you think makes Highland Park ISD special? HPISD is supported by the entire community. We have a great leadership in the administration and school board, excellent teachers, and counselors who really care about the kids. They teach in such a way to provide a solid foundation, build confidence, strong character, and values. Our community revolves around HPISD, and in turn, the schools provide the heritage and foundation for our future leaders. What’s one thing you hope for HPISD’s future? That the HPISD continues to provide a strong education foundation for the current generation of students and their kids.

F U N FAC T S Wartime Efforts During World War I, students kept war gardens on school property and used the vegetables for Armstrong families and those in need. The PTA also raised money to send Christmas boxes to orphans in France. Then in World Ware II, students mailed copies of The Bagpipe to HP alums overseas, and took part in selling war bonds. They also started a memorial fund for alums killed in action in 1943. Cafeteria Helpers The tradition of volunteers in the cafeteria dates back to the 1920s, when members of the PTA offered to manage and finance the district’s first lunchroom, which opened in January 1921.

“Your Neighbors in the Neighborhood”

Curt Elliott - 214.675.8353

Paige Elliott - 214.478.9544

elliott@daveperrymiller.com


18  OCTOBER 2014

H PI S D CEN TENNIA L 2014 SNAPSHOT

581 Armstrong 695 Bradfield 727 Hyer 706 UP

1,103 MIS 1 , 098 HPMS

2 ,112

HPHS

7,022 Total district enrollment

Students Inherit Spirit of Gratitude It’s no secret that Highland Park is full of traditions. For seniors preparing to leave the nest, that means decorating a square on a wall in the high school, expressing their individuality. But for the youngest members of the district, whose journeys are just beginning, there’s another tradition: receiving their “class of ” T-shirts on the first day of kindergarten is a special reminder of their seemingly far-off graduation date. “I took a picture with my friends when I graduated and we all had our shirts still,” 2006 HPHS graduate Erika Burton said. “It just shows how long we’ve been friends and how far we have come.” Today, the district includes seven campuses and an enrollment of more than 7,000 students. But in 1914 when the district was first incorporated, it included one school, four classrooms, and 95 students. How things can change in 100 years. However, one thing that doesn’t seem to change is the

Twirler Carly Bender and drum major J.J. Hipes switch roles on Senior Switch Day in 2008. FILE PHOTO

HPISD students pose in front of the senior wall at Highland Park High School in 2002. praises teachers sing of their students. “Almost every day, when the kids leave the class, they’ll say, ‘thank you! Thank you!’” teacher and fine arts director Linda Raya said. “It’s our job, and they say thank you. Any teacher will tell you. We love that.”

In an area rich with history and culture, perhaps then, it is “enter to learn, go forth to serve” that acts as the greatest tradition. “Our motto always fits, whether student or alum, young or old,” 2002 HPHS graduate Beau Longino said. “With it, HP can secure another 100 years.”

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TERRI PATRICK COX

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“Go Forth to Serve”

Celebrating HPISD and 100 Years of Greatness in Learning & Service Terri Patrick Cox Senior Vice President Top Producer 972.841.3838 terri.cox@alliebeth.com

SUSAN BRADLEY

214.674.5518

Excellence Never Goes Out of Style

Congratulations on 100 TERRI PATRICK COX 972.841.3838 Years of Excellence

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Profile for People Newspapers

Park Cities People -- HPISD Centennial Special  

Celebrate 100 Years of Excellence with our Highland Park Independent School District's Centennial Special.

Park Cities People -- HPISD Centennial Special  

Celebrate 100 Years of Excellence with our Highland Park Independent School District's Centennial Special.

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