a product message image
{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade

Page 1

ROUND TOP A N T I Q U E S

F A I R

FEATURING

MARKET HILL M A R C H 19 - A P R I L 5 | MARKETHILLROUNDTOP.COM


ROUND TOP SPRING 2020

Antiques Show Venues Below are listings of the major venues you will find at the Round Top Antiques Show; these are among Paul’s favorites. The following are numerically listed in geographical order, from north to south on Highway 237. Note that there are many other venues in addition to the ones listed. 1. LA BAHIA

9. THE BONEYARD AT ROUND TOP

17. COLE’S

550 Texas Highway 237 Burton, 77835 labahiaantiques.com 979.289.2684

1465 Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 713.899.1674

3625 Texas Highway 237 & Willow Spring Road (FM 954) Warrenton, 78961 colesantiqueshow.com 979.551.5916

MARCH 27 - APRIL 4

2. COUNTY LINE NORTH MARCH 21 - APRIL 4

1822 State Loop 458 Carmine, 78932 770-940-4002

3. THE BIG RED BARN MARCH 30 - APRIL 4

475 Texas Highway 237 South Carmine, 78932 roundtoptexasantiques.com

MARCH 21 - APRIL 4

10. BILL MOORE ANTIQUES MARCH 14 - APRIL 4

1350 N. Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 760.587.1300

11. ROUND TOP MERCANTILE 438 N Washington St, Round Top, 78954 877.568.0253

12. ROYERS ROUND TOP CAFÉ

MARCH 26 - APRIL 4

18. EXCESS I & II MARCH 24 - APRIL 4

Texas Highway 237 & Willow Spring Road (FM 954) Warrenton, 78961 excessfield.com 979. 278.3447

19. NORTH GATE MARCH 19 - APRIL 5

105 Main St. Round Top, 78954 royersroundtopcafe.com 979.249.3611

Texas Highway 237 Warrenton, 78961

13. ELLIS MOTEL 185 Henkel Circle Round Top, 78954

4001 Texas Highway 237 Warrenton, 78961 979.885.8762

MARCH 21 - APRIL 4

14. JUNK GYPSY

21. RENCK HALL

6. MCLAREN’S

1215 Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 gypsyville.com 979.249.5865

4137 Texas Highway 237 Warrenton, 78961 warrentonantiques-renckhall.com

4. BLUE HILLS

MARCH 21 - APRIL 4

1707 S. Texas Highway 237 Carmine, 78932 bluehillsatroundtop.com 979.278.3691

5. THE VENUE

2000 N. Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 beardauction.com MARCH 14 - APRIL 5

1745 Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 mclarensantiquesandinteriors.com 917.900.5036

7. ARBOR ANTIQUES MARCH 25 - APRIL 4

1503 Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 arborantiques.com 888.233.5414

MARCH 19 - APRIL 5

15. MARBURGER FARMS ANTIQUES MARCH 31 - APRIL 4

2248 Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 roundtop-marburger.com 800.947.5799

16. THE COMPOUND MARCH 21 - APRIL 4

20. BAR W

MARCH 19 - APRIL 5

MARCH 26 - APRIL 4

22. ZAPP HALL

MARCH 27 - APRIL 4

4217 S. Texas Highway 237 Warrenton, 78961 zapphall.com 713.824.1157

23. RECYCLING THE PAST MARCH 19 - APRIL 5

1132 FM 1291 N. Round Top, 78954 recyclingthepast.com 979.484.7288

8. MARKET HILL

2550 Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 roundtopcompound.com 979.551.5916

1542 Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 markethillroundtop.com 800.732.3722

More locations and dates are available at roundtop.com.

MARCH 19 - APRIL 5


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Departments

06

18

PAUL MICHAEL COMPANY

ROUND TOP ROUND-UP

In his natural element, Paul Michael explores the real, tangible beauty and art of raw materials.

Stay awhile. A round-up of our favorite lodging options in Round Top.

12

22

THE MARKET HILL EXPERIENCE

LET'S EAT, Y'ALL

The premier shopping destination is also the hub for hanging out in Round Top.

When we're out and about, away from Market Hill, we can count on these restaurants to provide great food and hospitality.

16

23

THE RESTAURANT AT MARKET HILL

AROUND TOWN

Open for lunch and dinner, the restaurant brings everyone together.

We made the rounds and made a list of places to go and things to do while you’re here.

2 | SPRING 2020


SPRING 2020 markethillroundtop.com

MARKET HILL FOUNDERS PA U L M I C H A E L C OM PA N Y Paul and Debbie Michael COFOUNDER Jake Michael

MARKET HILL MAGAZINE

Volume 3, Issue 2, Spring 2020 Publisher • Paul Michael Editor • Nicole Boddington Art Director • Ashlee Nobel Lee Lee Arts + Design Managing Editor • Elizabeth Michael Copy Editor • Brenda Worm Printed By: DP&L Thomas Whitney Postmaster: Send address changes to: Paul Michael Company PO Box 826 Lake Village, AR 71653 Magazine Inquiries: customerservice@paulmichaelhome.com

Photo by Ashlee Nobel

CONTRIBUTORS Kelly Framel, Ruth Framel, Camila McConaughey, Miguel Rangel, Haylei Smith, and Liza Voloshin

markethillroundtop.com | 3


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Features

32 34 24 28

CREATING A WORLD OF HER OWN Artist Kelly Framel finds her passion and purpose in Oaxaca, Mexico.

WOMAN OF TODAY Camila McConaughey introduces her online community to the real Round Top.

MAPS: Antiques Show Venues - Pg 1

Market Hill Vendors - Pg 72

4 | SPRING 2020

32

OUR FIRST JUNK-O-RAMA PROM

34

THE ELLIS MOTEL

The disco ball at night is big and bright, deep in the heart of Texas.

Houston restaurateur Lee Ellis relocates to Round Top and opens a bar-lounge.

ON THE COVER:

Stephanie Wheeler evokes a sense of calm in her paintings through her use of color seen here in Rhapsody in Blue (54" x 70"), available exclusively at Market Hill.


MARKET HILL

Vendor Vignettes

39

PROVENANCE ANTIQUES

42

ANTICA COLLECTION

56 57

44

ARCHITECT’S DAUGHTER

58

GALLERY AUCTIONS

45

ABLES ANTIQUES

60

SACRED HEART ANTIQUES

45

PROPS ANTIQUES

62

SUSAN HORNE ANTIQUES DÉCOR & LIFESTYLE

46

For Yarek and Artur, it’s about finding that perfect piece that has it all – quality, beauty, and integrity.

A collector first, Lisa Strait Vanpoucke brings an impressive selection of Italian lamps among other found objects.

Interior designer Michelle Cheatham follows a less-is-more philosophy, focusing on quality over quantity.

After 30 years, Tony and Kitty Ables consider Round Top a second home.

It’s a family affair for Klint and Cindy Griffin and their eight-year-old son who return to Market Hill.

ARCHITECTURAL ANARCHY

Chicago duo Gosia Korsakowski and William Rawski attract adventurous clients with their unexpected items.

47

MODERN STATE ATELIER

48

PAUL MEYER

49

HASTENING DESIGN STUDIO

50

DON AND MARTA ORWIG ANTIQUES

52

THE ELEPHANT WALK

54

NOMADIC TRADING COMPANY

Gosia Korsakowski introduces a new spin-off of Architectural Anarchy.

Austin-based artist Paul Meyer and wife Stephanie create an experience around his paintings.

Louis Shields has a profound appreciation for fine quality antiques, which he shows along with his original art.

For Don Orwig, it’s about the buying, not the selling, that excites him the most.

Ender Tasci shares his design approach and where he finds inspiration.

An expanded showroom allows Nomadic Trading Company to express its style and display more products.

THE PLAID VERANDA

For Judy Jones, antiques add warmth, charm, and style.

RECOOP DESIGNS

Houston-based craftsman Cooper Meaders takes pride in using salvaged materials to create something unique.

The top female auctioneer in Texas, Vikki Vines brings a diverse mix to Market Hill.

Jessica Fairbrother shares with us her favorite pieces to present this spring.

With a love of people and entertaining, Susan Horne offers hospitality along with her fine collection of antiques.

64

SHABBY SLIPS

For Renea Abbott, her favorite place is a flea market, which is why she makes Round Top an annual trip.

65

VINCENT PEACH

66

WOODSON ANTIQUES

67

SMITH VANOSDELLE

68

THE SELECT PICK

70

SCOVILLE BROWN COOPERATIVE

71

STEPHANIE WHEELER

Jewelry designer Vincent Peach brings his exquisite collection of pearls to his custom-built showroom.

Blake Craghead and Rick Ingenthon say there are no rules to design – just surround yourself with things you love.

Specializing in upscale seating, stop by SvO to find the right pair of chairs – or to sit, relax, and enjoy an espresso.

With her select picks, Stacy Graubart creates an element of surprise and fun in every space.

Like the architectural salvage he preserves, Jim Braunscheidel reclaims, rebuilds, and redefines himself through his work.

Creating a sense of calm is a concept Stephanie Wheeler aims for in her art.

markethillroundtop.com | 5


Paul Michael lets us in on his process at his workshop in Dermott, Arkansas. 6 | SPRING 2020


In His

Natural ELEMENT PAUL MICHAEL EXPLORES THE REAL, TANGIBLE BEAUT Y AND ART OF RAW MATERIALS.

BY NICOLE BODDINGTON PHOTOGRAPHY BY ASHLEE NOBEL AND LEIGH MICHAEL

L

ake Village, Arkansas, where Paul Michael calls home, is abundantly beautiful. From the dock in his own backyard are watercolor sunsets reflecting off Lake Chicot and expanding as far as the eye can see. The land is mostly flat, low-lying, dotted with large lakes – Lake Chicot being the largest natural lake in the state and biggest oxbow lake in North America. After a good rain, these waters swell, overwhelming their boundaries contributing to some of the richest farmland and best hunting grounds in the state. Surrounded by these natural occurrences, Paul Michael is in his element, always thinking, creating, building something from the raw materials at his disposal. This is most evident in his exclusive line of hand-crafted furniture for the Paul Michael Company, the iconic home dÊcor business and lifestyle brand he founded in 1993 with wife, Debbie. Available at their retail stores in Lake Village; Canton, Texas; and Monroe, Louisiana; and at Market Hill in Round Top, Texas, Paul Michael Exclusives are original designs constructed from reclaimed cypress, petrified wood, agate slices, quartz crystal, and his most recent inspiration, stone.

markethillroundtop.com | 7


Above: Contrasting geometric forms work together to support this stone bench. Seemingly ready to roll away, the stationary bench is made from boulders and stones harvested in a quarry in the Ozark Mountains.

For this issue of the magazine, with the theme of individuality, we wanted to dig deeper into Paul Michael’s personal connection to these raw materials and the stunning objects he makes with them. These pieces really are works of art – functional art – and we wanted to know how they come to be. “There’s been a use of stones and iron for a long time among American sculptors,” Paul says. “I think what it does is offer a combination and contrast of textures but, equally important, is a sense of mass and dimension that kind of speaks for itself. So, as you try to create something with it, it becomes the master and you become the servant. I don’t think you can create something out of stone without serving its needs.” Paul’s process starts at the source, selecting stones from an Ozark quarry. “[When you’re in the quarry], you’re thinking of a lot of different things,” he says. “Chiefly among what I am thinking about is the integrity of the rock, whether it’s going to crumble or not, whether it’s going to stand the test of time, how I am going to engi-

8 | SPRING 2020

neer it, how I am going to transport it, how I am going to fix it into a sculpture or work of art and it not fail. In some cases, it’s too big to transport as a sculpture, so I am beginning to think about how I can manufacture it, dissemble it and then assemble it onsite. There are lots of considerations to look at,” he says. “Then, in the end, it’s only a momentary inspiration. It can pass away. You’ve heard many times from different songwriters about how they have this brilliant song in their mind and then the next morning, they don’t have it anymore. It’s like watching a ship pass; you know, if you miss that boat, you miss it. So, a lot of times, I will be out buying these components, and be inspired by them, and by the time they get onto my yard and into my workshop, I can’t remember what I was thinking about them. On the other hand, sometimes when they arrive at the site where I intend to work on them they are even more inspirational, or I might combine that rock with something that was already there. It’s not like you’re some screaming genius. It’s the opposite of that. You gotta be humble about it. And you gotta be willing to fail. You can’t be afraid of failure.” Paul’s pieces continue to push him creatively as he experiments with components and techniques in his workshop in Dermott, Arkansas. It’s an unassuming location for an impressive operation, one that’s constantly evolving. Over the years, it’s gone from sawdust everywhere to sparks flying, a woodshop to a metal shop. “We are still heavily invested in wood,” Paul says. “We spend a lot of time designing and creating things from wood.”


« Paul's boulder tables are

functional pieces of art intended for a unique customer and unique situation.

“The challenge for any artist is to take an object and create emotion with it.”

“I suppose the reason I am thinking more about stones and metal is that it demands so much more attention. Many of the things that we do in wood, such as dining tables, is about knowing all of the laws and rules of wood and how it functions. Whereas, when you’re doing things in stone, some of it is very heavy and dangerous. Engineering is the most important consideration. It’s no good unless you can combine it with beauty. It has to command its existence. The way you interpret that is an endeavor that requires me. I have to speak for myself, if you will. There’s a lot go-

ing on there. You’re creating something to observe, but many times it’s not that functional. Some things I’ve created out of stone are primarily functional, like these console tables and dining tables, but the thing I am working on today is purely decorative. And it’s heavy. And it requires engineering. Sometimes it’s not what you do; it’s what you don’t do.” “So, anybody, well, not anybody, but most welders, can figure out a way to suspend that rock in the air, but to do it so it’s engineered, and so that it will stand the test of time, and also have it be

markethillroundtop.com | 9


Above: Marcus Jackson and Jeffery Childers assist Paul Michael with the mounting mechanism of a large stone sculpture.

beautiful and also have it be subtle and not overbearing so that the mounting mechanism is the primary consideration visually – where you’re not looking at the rock, you’re looking at all the iron the guy welded to it – it’s alright if it’s his sculpture, but it’s not alright if it’s my sculpture.” Paul realizes these pieces, especially the ones made of boulder, are unique

10 | SPRING 2020

and intended for a unique customer and a unique situation. “Any of these pieces of furniture can be a thousand pounds. The sheet of glass – three-quarter inch of plate glass – weighs 10 pounds by the square foot. The glass can weigh 350 pounds by itself. They are not for every situation.” They can be placed indoors or out, but he says, “Outside is not a controlled environment. Environment will have some effect on whatever you put out there. Whether or not that effect is tolerable to the owner is up to them. With placing stuff outside, there’s a yes, maybe, no, and hell no. That’s up to you if you want to stick it outside.”

In terms of how he knows if something works for that unique customer or situation, he doesn’t, but he’s been in the business long enough to know that it’s in the eye of the beholder – not only about how something looks but how it makes someone feel. “I think that all of art – any sort of decorative art – involves a combination of images and how those images relate to one another and how they appeal to a varied group, depending on the person observing them,” he says. “In some cases, it involves a continuity of line that is harmonious to the eye. In other cases, it involves the relation of one object to the other. And how one item relates to another.”


Right (from top): For Paul, mounting should complement, not distract from, the piece itself. Marcus (left) and Jeffery mold the metalwork to Paul's specifications. Paul Michael stands next to a sculpture of his design and engineering.

“One thing I think about sometimes is humanity. Human images. So, in the case of a human, there’s not only the impression of visual, it’s how that individual expresses himself or herself. In the case of imaging there’s no expression, it’s just the visual relation. But the configuration of these rocks in relation to one another is similar, and each one of them has its own personality in a way, so it’s how you combine them in a sculpture that defines its existence, and it’s also what might trigger some emotion in an observer. It’s that phenomenon – that emotion – that makes it art. The challenge for any artist is to take an object and create emotion with it.” Where this emotion comes from, for Paul, is nature. There is an impulse for him to connect with the earth, something he can touch and feel. In his art, he is searching for truth, realness, and honesty. “I’m an old man now …” he says. “I am looking at all sorts of modern ways of life, modern ways of thinking, modern ways of living compared to what I am acquainted with. One thing that goes against my grain is what they call ‘virtual reality.’ We are being bombarded with stuff that really isn’t real. From news to politics to shopping experiences to social media and all that, it isn’t a real experience. It’s got this false sense to it. I think within the minds of beholders of art, there’s a pent-up demand for something that’s tangible and real, and that combined with the convenience of mixing natural elements in a combination of images and textures winds up giving a realness, warmth, and value that we all thirst for today.”

Paul Michael’s pieces are best experienced in person. See them in real life at the spring show at Market Hill. Until then, follow @paulsworldAR, @PaulMichaelCompany and @Market_Hill_Round_Top for a peek at his process.

markethillroundtop.com | 11


the

Market Hill EXPERIENCE BY NICOLE BODDINGTON PHOTOGRAPHY BY ASHLEE NOBEL

A

rriving in Round Top is quite the experience. Thousands of people walk along the highway, traipsing on foot through the fields of this antiques carnival of sorts. For first-timers or relative newcomers, it’s hard to know where to begin. If you ask where to start people will say, “Paul Michael’s” and what they mean is “Market Hill,” Paul Michael’s 119,000-SF venue that’s unlike anything else around.

12 | SPRING 2020

Market Hill is where we go every day of the show – not because we have to, but because it’s become the hub, the hangout, for much more than shopping. It has amenities you can’t find in the fields, like free parking, A/C, clean bathrooms, free WiFi, food and drink and, of course, the best vendors in Round Top who bring their very best stuff, because it’s safe inside and not subjected to one of those big Texas thunderstorms that we often get in the spring.


Paul Michael Company showroom.

Market Hill offers rest, comfort and genuine hospitality. You are treated like family. In fact, you are often greeted by Paul Michael, his son, Jake, wife, Debbie, or daughter, Elizabeth. It’s a place where you expect someone to ask, “Did you eat yet?” And, if not, then it’s “Well, get in line, grab a plate, and come sit by me.” Parking out front, you’ll enter through the Paul Michael Company showroom, which takes up 11,000-SF of the space. It’s beautiful inside and filled with original art, antique rugs, agate-topped tables, large cowhides, plush sofas, and decorative pillows. The remainder of the space is mostly dedicated to the vendors inside. Each showroom is well appointed and staged with the best lighting, antiques, accessories, rugs, and art you’ve ever seen in one place. The Restaurant at Market Hill is open for lunch and dinner. Everything is made

Each showroom is well appointed and staged with the best lighting, antiques, accessories, rugs, and art you’ve ever seen in one place.

from scratch daily, with a menu that changes, but always has hearty staples. It’s all consistently good, generous, and nourishing. There’s also a great beer and wine selection and homemade desserts. The open kitchen format allows you to see what’s going on back there and to meet the people kindly preparing your meal. It’s not just the food but it’s the gathering around the table that makes the restaurant special. Long tables encourage you to sit next to someone you don’t know and strike up a conversation, sharing stories about your day and your interesting finds. Vendors here feel the same about the way it brings people together. They also appreciate the permanent structure it provides, which allows them to load in and load out more efficiently, and a canvas to create a showroom that expresses their styles and offers them an opportunity to display their products in a way that aligns

markethillroundtop.com | 13


with their vision, and inspires customers to see how these items may be incorporated into their homes and their lives. Demir Williford of Nomadic Trading Company says, “In order for us to showcase products in the most effective way, it requires a lot of logistics. At Market Hill, I am not restricted by an eight-foot tent. I have walls. I can hang lights. I can hang rugs on the walls. I am not able to do that in other spaces, exposed to the elements where I may get mud on them. Things like cement floors help us move quicker, load and unload faster, get the product in and out. It makes a better show for us overall.” As artist Paul Meyer and wife Stephanie prepare for their first show at Market Hill, Stephanie says, “Over the years, as our business has grown, we recognized we needed something that offered a more permanent structure. We needed a space to create. We want our customers to feel wonderful in that space, and that’s what Market Hill provides.” She adds that their decision to show at Market Hill was also based

14 | SPRING 2020

on Paul Michael’s support, encouragement, and hospitality. “When we would go over [to Market Hill] and eat, Paul Michael would sit with us, and he and [my husband] Paul would talk about art. Their relationship started with their shared love of art. It became a great friendship.” This isn’t Kelly Framel’s first time to Round Top, but it is the artist-designer’s first time in a long time, and she says, “My mom was my guide. She’s been going to Round Top for 15 years. She brought me to Paul Michael. It was her recommendation [...] Paul Michael has created a real hub where you can discover beautiful things and receive generous hospitality.” It’s also a lot of fun. Market Hill hosts live music most nights and all concerts are free.That’s when the party really gets started. It’s common to see vendors you met that day along with new friends you just made at dinner, and Paul and Debbie Michael out on the dance floor. Past performances have included The Heart Collectors from Australia, and Black Cat Choir, a

This Spread (from left): Each vendor uses their showroom as a canvas to express their individual styles. Patrons gather around the table to enjoy a meal together. The party really gets started after hours with performances by crowd favorites, like Kimberly Dunn.

local rock band from Round Top. Another favorite is Austin-based country singer Kimberly Dunn, who drew a big crowd in the fall – fans of hers drove in just to see her perform – and we soon saw why as her petite frame took the stage and her largerthan-life stage presence emerged and captivated everyone in the audience. In addition to food and music, Market Hill hosts a series of events intended to engage and enlighten. Artists, designers, hoteliers, and restaurateurs gather at Market Hill. It’s a place to connect and share industry insights. This spring, Paul


Michael and Vincent Peach, master jeweler and Market Hill vendor, will lead two Round Top Roundtables. There will also be a fashion show and a master class with Vincent Peach. Come early to shop, stay for lunch and dinner, have a few drinks and catch a show or special event – all in one day, all in one place. That’s the Market Hill experience. Follow Market Hill Round Top on Facebook and @market_hill_round_top on Instagram for more music and event announcements during the spring show.

LOCATION AND CONTACT INFO:

1542 Highway 237 North Round Top, TX 78954 customerservice@paulmichaelhome.com 800-732-3722

HOURS

Open daily 9 a.m.-9 p.m. March 19 - April 5

Events MARCH 22 Round Top Roundtable – Session 1, 4-5 p.m. Join us for a lively and informative cocktail-hour discussion about the business of design hosted by Vincent Peach and Paul Michael, and featuring designer Renea Abbott. Wine provided.

MARCH 25 The Dolores Hawkins Runway Show, 3-5 p.m. Honoring supermodel Dolores Hawkins, the fashion show will feature Round Top designers and benefit the Round Top Family Library. Tickets are $20. Champagne and cookies included.

enjoy light appetizers as you make your own bracelet. Tickets are $30 with materials provided.

MARCH 29 Round Top Roundtable – Session 2, 4-5 p.m. Vincent Peach and Paul Michael discuss the business of design with Blackberry Farm designers Jason Bell and Samantha Feuer, and Urban Cowboy owner/designer Lyon Porter. Includes wine.

M A R C H 2 9 -3 0 Black Cat Choir, 7-10 p.m. Join us for dinner and a show with Black Cat Choir.

MARCH 26 Master Class with Vincent Peach, 5-6 p.m.

M A R C H 31 Kimberly Dunn, 8-9:30 p.m.

Tap into your creativity under the tutelage of Master Jeweler Vincent Peach. Sip on wine and

After dinner at Market Hill, dance the night away to the music of Kimberly Dunn.

markethillroundtop.com | 15


GATHER

ROUND B Y N I C O L E B O D D I N G TO N P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y A S H L E E N O B E L AND C O U R T E SY O F E L L I S & M I C H I E

16 | SPRING 2020


O

pen daily for lunch and dinner, the Restaurant at Market Hill is an important addition to Round Top and an important part of the Market Hill experience to Paul Michael. He has a passion for bringing people together, and it’s in this spirit of togetherness that he began hosting a pig roast each show – in fact, he even built a special smoker for the occasion. There will be two pig roasts this spring, so stay tuned for dates and details. Paul Michael loves creating an atmosphere of people gathering around, being a part of the process, seeing how food is prepared and having conversations about it. This kind of intention is evident in every detail of the restaurant, including the open kitchen where you’ll notice two new chefs at the helm, Lee Ellis and Paul Michie. Both seasoned restaurant veterans from Houston and Austin, respectively, the duo will work together to prepare lunch and dinners daily with grab-and-go options for those on the move, shopping the fields, and craving a healthier alternative to the standard festival fare. These options will include wraps, salads and power bowls.

skills in the kitchen. He’s very conscious about what and how he cooks. It’s important that we make everything from scratch. We did a couple of dinners during the winter show,” Ellis says. “We served over 60 people a night. The smoked and grilled vegetables went first. So, we tripled the amount of vegetables, and they still went first. Cauliflower steaks, portobello mushrooms, eggplant, Brussels sprouts with a char. We got the flavor out of the smoker then finished them on the grill.” The lunch and dinner menus will rotate giving guests multiple options to choose from at a fixed price. All meals will include a choice of protein, hot and cold side dishes, salads, fresh baked bread, and homemade dessert. The kitchen will also add charcuterie boards to the menu. Available for pre-order, vendors can purchase and offer them in their booths, or patrons of the restaurant can order ahead and take with them. As always, a variety of wine and beer will be available. Craft beer is something Michie knows a lot about, as he is set to open Round Top Brewing later this year. Ellis also brings an extensive knowledge of high-quality wine to the table.

Dining at Market Hill, at “I grew up in a catering long family-style tables, is family,” says Michie. “I’ve almeant to be a communal exways been around food. I’ve perience, with good food, always had gardens. For me, wine and conversation flowit’s really important to use ing. After dinner, stay a while whatever is fresh and to cook to attend an event or to listen everything from scratch.” Beto live music, performed most The new chefs at the Restaurant at Market Hill, fore culinary school, Michie Paul Michie (left) and Lee Ellis. nights. It’s after hours that lived in Italy while in art vendors, designers, and shopschool and continues to find pers really get to unwind and inspiration in Mediterranean have fun. Market Hill is more than a shopping destination; it’s a food. This style of cooking includes seasonal ingredients, fresh gathering place, a hangout, and a hub where hospitality is served. produce, and meats and fish – all of which will direct the menu that Michie and Ellis are still concepting as we speak. To keep up with daily menus and special events like the pig “It’s creative, collaborative between us,” says Ellis, a longtime fixture in the Houston hospitality scene. “Paul [Michie] has mad

roasts, follow @market_hill_round_top on Instagram and like Market Hill Round Top on Facebook.

markethillroundtop.com | 17


ROUND TOP ROUND-UP BY NICOLE BODDINGTON PHOTOS COURTESY OF VENUES & BY ASHLEE NOBEL

18 | SPRING 2020


F

rom Austin, Texas, Round Top, the state’s smallest incorporated town, is about 75 miles away. In the springtime, the road to Round Top is dotted with bluebonnets and Indian paintbrush. It’s easy to spot cattle – and iconic Texas longhorns – grazing in the pastures. It is calm, idyllic. It’s only after passing the sign that reads: “Round Top City Limit (Pop.: 90)” that you truly enter the wonderfully wild world of Texas Antiques Week. White tents line the highway as far as the eye can see. You pass landmarks like Zapp Hall, which famously hosts the Junk Gypsy Prom, and Punkie’s Place as you make your way through the spectacle. It’s a lot to take in, and most people don’t know where to start or where to stay. For the uninitiated, the biggest question we field after telling people about Round Top is – where do you stay? So, here are a few tried-and-true places to hang your hat and kick off your boots after a long day.

Opposite Page: Everything you see in your Flophouze is available for purchase, or you can buy one of your own, and it can be shipped to you.

This Page: The Farmhouze is one of the recent additions to the Flophouze family of shipping containers-turned-overnight accommodations.

Black Bird Farm

Flophouze

A series of historic properties in nearby Fayetteville comprises the Black Bird Farm lodging experience. Here, you’ll find romantic, well-appointed interiors in an early Americana style. Choose from accommodations at the Grand Fayette Hotel, Market Street Inn, Red & White Inn, Bird House, 1850 House, Sealy House, or Blackbird Cabins. Herring Hall, the event space, hosts live performances. Take a tour online at BlackBirdTexas.com.

Matt White and his team, Recycling the Past, offer six flophouzes (“funky little outposts”), old shipping containers-turned-overnight-accommodations, all accented with salvaged materials, antiques, original art, and vintage touches such as a record player and vinyl records. All décor inside the flophouzes is for sale. If you like your flophouze so much you want to keep it, the company can custom build one to your specifications and ship it to you anywhere in the world. Also on the property is Beachhouze, a mid-century-modern loft located on the banks of a pond that sleeps eight; the Farmhouze, a 1900s farmhouse that sleeps 10 and features a Viking kitchen suite and Matteo brand linens; the modpool, an aboveground swimming pool made from a shipping container; and, the Round Top Ballroom, a large event space outfitted with antiques, artifacts, and odds and ends from Recycling the Past. See more at Flophouze.com.

The Carmine Coop Five minutes from downtown Round Top, the Carmine Coop offers three different lodging options – The Farmhouse, The Cottage, and The Airstream. Located on two acres and surrounded by corn fields, your neighbors are horses and cows, and your alarm clock is a rooster. While the lodges are appointed with rustic country charm, they do offer modern luxuries like HDTV and WiFi. For photos and more info, visit TheCarmineCoop.com.

markethillroundtop.com | 19


This Page (from top): The Glamp Inn brings the fun of camping indoors with its fleet of brightly colored vintage glampers. Choose from glampers or several fully furnished teepees at the Glamp Inn. You can’t beat the location of the charming Madelyn’s Rusty Bike Inn.

The Glamp Inn This indoor “glampsite” has all of the fun of camping but in comfort and style with 10 brightly colored vintage glampers, each with their own theme, and 18 teepees to choose from. The place sleeps up to 56 people in two separate buildings, The Glamp Inn and The Glamp Inn Cadillac, located inside a former car museum. Each unit is equipped with two twin beds. Restroom and shower facilities are centrally located (think: bathhouse-style but indoors). The glampers are equipped with their own mini-fridge, fan, and outlets. The teepees are all fully furnished with seating areas and a fan in each one. Guests have access to multiple seating areas, a big screen TV, an outdoor grill, a microwave, a coffee maker, and, of course, A/C and WiFi. Book your stay at LoneStarGlampInn.com.

Madelyn’s Rusty Bike Inn Madelyn's Rusty Bike Inn formerly served as barracks for soldiers at Camp Swift in the early 1900s and was moved to its current Round Top location in the 1940s. The main house consists of two guest suites, each with two bedrooms (queen beds), private bath, and living room. Out back, a converted buggy barn is now a large one-room cabin with two queen beds, dining area, comfy living room, and an original rustic interior decorated in the primitive style. All rooms have ceiling fans and free WiFi. The inn is just two blocks from the square and sleeps up to 15 people, so it’s a good spot for groups wanting a great location. See more at RustyBikeInn.com.

20 | SPRING 2020


This Page: Paige and Smoot Hull created a beautiful place to stay or host an event at The Vintage Round Top. Photography by Haylei Smith.

Rancho Pillow This 20-acre compound features multiple overnight options on the property, including four main lodges and a well-appointed, air-conditioned teepee. Each dwelling showcases hand-picked furnishings, paintings, books of poetry, and other thoughtful touches. Outside, there’s plenty of room to roam and make new discoveries, like neon signs, a playground with a zipline, hammocks, a bathhouse, a swimming pool, and a fire pit. Formerly available by invite-only for friends-of-friends, it’s now a more inclusive space where all are welcome to tap into the spirit found here. It’s heartfelt, soulful, mystical, and intentional where cool people go and good vibes flow. Feast in the Field takes place March 30 and 31. Fantastic chefs prepare the family-style meal served outdoors on the ranch. Purchase your ticket, or book your stay online at RanchoPillow.com.

The Raleigh Shane Brown of Big Daddy’s Antiques offers this 2,650-SF 1890s Victorian farmhouse with a new 30-foot pool and huge deck. It comes equipped with a full kitchen, four bedrooms (including a master suite), and two bathrooms. It sleeps nine people. The interior design is exceptional throughout with a beautiful mix of modern and antiques, and a Paul Michael Company piece or two. Book your stay on VRBO.com.

Round Top Inn The history of this place is evident in its many existing structures, including the only remaining building from the state’s once-thriving cigar industry. Three of the guest cottages are 1880s originals built by prominent Round Top resident Charles Henry Schiege of Schiege Cigar Factory. The property includes the gate house, a collection of farm houses, the little cottage, the loft, and other rooms for rent. Explore it for yourself at RoundTopInn.com.

The Vintage Round Top Paige and Smoot Hull developed The Vintage Round Top in 2012 when they opened their first renovated cottage, No. 1450. The 2,400-SF home was designed with sustainability in mind and is comprised of reclaimed materials and vintage finds creatively repurposed into light fixtures, furniture, and decor. In 2016, the second cottage named Boho was built in the style of an industrial farmhouse. Both properties are available for rent. The Hulls also host private parties, weddings, special events, and workshops yearround. Be inspired by their modern vintage aesthetic at TheVintageRoundTop.com.

Wander Inn Previously available only to friends such as country singer Miranda Lambert, Junk Gypsies Amie Sikes and Jolie Sikes-Smith have opened their guesthouse to the public. Wander Inn is luxurious but not about luxury. It’s about the land, the road, the magic of Round Top, and the feeling of arriving at a place, taking your boots off and staying awhile. Designed with comfort in mind, sink into a velvet sofa or slide into a rocking chair on the porch for views of longhorns in the pasture and the sun hanging low in the sky. Choose from eight beautifully appointed rooms at Gypsyville.com/wander-inn.

markethillroundtop.com | 21


Royer’s Pie Haven

Lulu’s

LET’S EAT,

Y’ALL

BY NICOLE BODDINGTON PHOTOGRAPHY BY ASHLEE NOBEL AND COURTESY OF LULU' S

Royer’s Round Top Café and Pie Shop

This is Bud “The Pie Man” Royer’s place, and the menu might surprise you. While you can find traditional café favorites like burgers, fries, and fried chicken (served on Sunday from noon until they sell out), you’ll also find a grilled shrimp BLT, grilled pork tenderloin with peach and pepper glaze, and “The Great Steak,” a 10-oz. center cut filet you can cut with a fork. Choose from more than 60 wines, and, of course, world famous pies. royersroundtopcafe.com

Royer’s Pie Haven

W

All in the family, Bud Royer’s daughter, Tara, opened a pie shop on Henkel Square. Who says you can’t have pie for breakfast? That’s what we did on our first visit. We tried the savory Hee Haw pie, made with eggs, sausage, jalapenos and cheese, and the blueberry lemon. royerspiehaven.com

Another concept by Armando Palacios is Lulu’s, a beautiful fine dining experience, Italian-style. Pastas, pizzas and salads – it’s comfort food taken up a notch. Lulu’s also offers a nice selection of wines and desserts that are to die for. lulustx.com

Located in Rummel Square, The Garden Co. is a lovely spot for lunch with bright salads and yummy sandwiches best enjoyed outside on the deck under the giant, sprawling, Instagrammable tree. For dinner service, the menu is elevated and includes a variety of protein options from braised pork shank to wild-caught salmon to prime rib. thegardencoandcafe.com

hile we typically call Market Hill home, enjoying lunch and dinner with vendors and friends, sometimes we are out and about, making the rounds, and we gotta eat. Below are our tried-and- true favorite restaurants in town that never let us down. We receive consistently great food and hospitality here, and we are likely to see a few familiar faces. We love supporting these local establishments, open year-round.

The Garden Co.

Lulu’s

Mandito’s

Armando Palacios is a known figure in town with many concepts that contribute to the culture. Mandito’s is one of them. On any given night, Armando is typically at the classic Tex-Mex restaurant, working the room, checking on each guest. This place is popular. If you can’t snag a table, it’s just as fun to sit at the bar and make new friends over Margaritas. manditos.com

Prost on Block 29

An intimate wine bar and shop housed in a stone cottage that happens to be the oldest building in Round Top. Order by the glass, bottle, or case (to take home with you), and choose from handmade cheeses, farm-to-table vegetables, tapenades and charcuterie, or eat from the food truck. Sit inside at the bar or at a small bistro table, or hang out on the outdoor patio around the firepit. prostonblock29.com

22 | SPRING 2020

The Stone Cellar & Round Top Dance Hall

An authentic 1907 Texas dance hall has been relocated to this site. The sign on the door reads, “Must wear boots inside the hall at all times” – our kind of place. Inside, it’s a relaxed pizzeria – known for its thin crust pie, a local favorite – that serves a variety of craft beer and wine, and hosts live music on Fridays and Saturdays. stonecellarwines.com


Town

AROUND

BY NICOLE BODDINGTON PHOTOGRAPHY BY ASHLEE NOBEL

Abejas

Townsend Provisions

I

t may be the smallest incorporated town in Texas, but Round Top’s got a lot going on. An easy day trip from Austin or Houston, it welcomes a lot of weekenders. When we return each spring and fall, we love making the rounds, popping into local spots which are open yearround – not just during the shows. Whether it’s a brand-new concept or a longtime establishment that’s new to us, there’s always something to discover. Here’s what we found around town on our last trip.

Magnolia Pearl

Inside the Farmloft, a rustic, whitewashed building on the north end of town, is Magnolia Pearl, the whimsical world of Robin Brown. The attic feel of the space complements the clothing and décor. An iron bed is layered with French linens. Next to the bed is a rack of white and ivory cotton robes and nightgowns. Vintage lace bralettes and crocheted collars are stacked atop display tables. Eyelet tops, patchwork coats, distressed denim, and railroad overalls complete the Victorian-gypsy vibes. 306 N. Washington St.

Kilgore’s

Punkie’s Place

Abejas

Located on Henkel Square, Abejas is an airy, light-filled boutique with handmade hats, silver and turquoise rosaries, squash blossom necklaces, and leather jackets all artfully displayed. With the flagship store in Houston, the Round Top outpost provides owner Christina Mitchell another venue for her Southwest aesthetic. 201 N. Live Oak St.

Curate by Stash

The brick-and-mortar for Stash, a modern line of heritage leather goods, is a favorite for its leather bags, linen clothing, bandanas, candles, perfumes and more. 111 Bauer Rummel

Kilgore’s

Adjacent to Magnolia Pearl, on the patio of the Farmloft is Kilgore’s Modern Country, a collection of antique furniture, kitchenware, and china sets. 306 N. Washington St.

You can’t miss Punkie’s Place, a mansion made of junk. It sits just off the main road into Round Top – and is worth a stop for a photo op. Inside, the explosion of colorful décor continues with antique furniture, housewares, textiles, clothing, and accessories everywhere. 4281 Hwy. 237

The Ellis Motel

Not actually a motel, but a bar-lounge of Lee Ellis’s design on Henkel Square, see Page 34 for a feature on this spot that became our new favorite watering hole. 185 Henkel St.

Magnolia Pearl Punkie’s Place Curate by Stash

Townsend Provisions

We always pop into Townsend Provisions on Rummel Square to see Ryann Ford, her husband, Nick Mosley, and Nick’s mom, Linda. This time, we were happy to find the “boot room,” filled with hundreds of vintage cowboy boots, had been expanded and moved upstairs. Tees, totes, cards, and other items make it a great gift shop for bringing home a little piece of this place. 101 Bauer Rummel

markethillroundtop.com | 23


C t

rea ing

a WOR L D of HER OWN

Framel at her home-away-from-home in NYC. Photography by Liza Voloshin 24 | SPRING 2020


ARTIST KELLY FRAMEL FINDS HER PASSION AND PURPOSE IN OAXACA. BY NICOLE BODDINGTON

I

n 2008, Kelly Framel had no idea that her fashion blog, The Glamourai, would take off, reaching and resonating with as many people as it did. It was one of the first fashion blogs of its kind – Jane Aldridge’s Sea of Shoes, Rumi Neely’s Fashion Toast, and Jamie Beck’s From Me To You also come to mind. The common thread among them was their ability to connect with readers through their personal editorial style. Each one had something unique to say, and their voices rose above the crowd in a digital space that would only continue to get louder. When she started The Glamourai, Framel was working as a fashion designer, designing evening wear in the middle of an economic recession. “It just felt like there was a big divide between my day job and my own personal experience of fashion,” Framel says. “Street style was bridging the gap.” This was before “influencer marketing,” but brands came calling, and Framel began consulting. “With my first check, I reinvested the money back into the blog. Producing photo shoots and creating my own fashion editorials is when I learned I love creating worlds,” she says. “It was the right place and time to be, but I always had a complicated relationship with [The Glamourai]. I never expected it to be so successful. I loved doing it, and it opened the world to me. I had creative freedom entirely, but it didn’t feel like the highest form of expression to me.”

Soon, she transitioned from consulting for fashion brands to hospitality. “I love the theater of restaurants. I think of design as permission. Everything in the space is a subtle clue as to what level of experience you are being invited to have.” After a consulting project for Mandarin Oriental, she was invited to Miami – during the middle of New York Fashion Week – for a meeting with Alan Faena on a concept that would become Faena Bazaar, an addition to the Faena District anchored by the resort hotel on historic Collins Avenue. “I flew down that day and came back that night [for NYFW],” she says. “I brought books and objects from my own life that Alan really responded to and connected with. The idea of the bazaar is that Miami is always in flux. Its personality is always changing. Having worked in digital for so long and seeing how the rise in digital created a decline in retail, I understood the need for truly impactful IRL [in real life] experiences. I presented to Alan the idea of ever-rotating pop-ups. We could be nimble, responsive to the zeitgeist, creating another stage.” “After that project [which opened in 2016], I immediately went into another full restaurant design commission in New York. I’ve always been a person who works a lot. I always have lots of things going at once, but I had mostly phased out of The Glamourai at that point. Hav-

ing gone from such an intense project [as Faena] then going straight into another one, I was burned out. I had collected so many rich and diverse creative experiences, and they taught me that I am happiest when I get to make my own work. I was ready to follow my own vision again – I could feel there was something inside me that wanted to come out, I just wasn't sure what or how.” During her time in Miami, Framel traveled to Mexico on several occasions. In 2017, she applied for an artist residency in Oaxaca. “It was only for a month, but a week into it I knew it was the life for me. I wanted freedom – to wake up in the morning and make whatever I felt like making.” A classically trained painter, Framel had private tutors and rigorous training her whole life until she went to university to study fashion design. “I had studied painting for so long, but I only knew how to paint like the masters. I didn’t know how to paint like me. I understood there is a difference between being a painter and being an artist, and I wanted to be an artist. As a child, I painted murals on every surface of my bedroom and made apartment buildings out of cereal boxes. Everything pointed me back to making art. It’s my place of joy. But I can recognize now that I had to grow into it – I needed to go out and see the world in order to be able to come back to myself and have something unique to say.”

“Man, sometimes it takes you awhile to sound like yourself.” – Miles Davis markethillroundtop.com | 25


“The joy of my life in Oaxaca is that the child inside of me has taken the reins.” “The time around Faena, a lot of my income was coming from consulting and branding work. I didn’t want to waste my life having inane design arguments about purple pillows versus blue pillows. I wanted to help clients understand how to create a brand story, so I would lead them through archetypal research, ideas that are part of the collective unconscious, universal themes that everyone can understand. The most famous archetype is the hero’s journey. In every hero’s journey, there are battles. There’s a dark forest one must journey through to get to the castle. The hero must be tested, and I definitely have been. Suddenly, I was making a lot less money in my 30s than I did in my 20s, losing friendships, clients, and Instagram followers. In the grand scheme of things, none of these is a big deal, but it will make you question your identity. It forced me to face myself very honestly and find what makes me really happy and what I came to this earth to do – my purpose. Above: Artist Kelly Framel in her happy place, Oaxaca, Mexico, touring venues for her art show in the fall. Photography by Miguel Rangel.

In Oaxaca, she says, “Everyone is a creator. There is an abundance of creativity, color and craft. It felt like this was the place where I could find my voice. There’s a Miles Davis quote that goes, ‘Man, sometimes it takes you awhile to sound like yourself.’ I knew how to paint academically, but I didn’t yet know how to paint in the way that only I can. I needed to go to a place of extreme solitude to find out what that was.” This meant leaving her New York City apartment and living on a dirt floor in Mexico with a family of ceramicists. “I needed to have my comfort zone removed. I shaved my head. I am not comparing myself to a monk, but I had to embrace a new extreme – to live very simply and fully inhabit this very rural life. My hair was kind of the last vestige. I stripped everything else down to the most honest, the most essential. I almost couldn’t help but have my physicality mirror that.” This has been her life for the last two years, making art in various forms from totem poles to paintings. But she isn’t ready to show or sell anything yet.

26 | SPRING 2020

“For me, in wanting to remove myself from all outside influences and make art, I made a promise to myself early on that I would wait as long as I possibly could to sell anything. Give myself time to develop. Not have money influence what I was making. Fashion and design trends tell you what will sell and that made me very cautious. It changes the nature of your creations. I really wanted to know what I sounded like, and hone that voice before I presented it to the world. I wanted to be able to say, from deep down in my soul, that this is my truth, and it doesn’t matter if it sells.” What brought her home to Austin, Texas, and to Round Top last fall, is a new design project she has been asked to do in Aspen, Colorado. “After being in Oaxaca for two years, there’s still a part of me that loves to be a part of the world, to create all of these amazing extravagant experiences. I was missing the world of design, missing people and human connection. The project in Aspen – a fantasy camp for adults – is exciting for Framel, because it’s an invitation for people to express themselves creatively. “Creative expression is in all of us. If you don’t believe that – just look at kids,” she says. “In Mexico, spending weeks and months building ceramic totems on a dirt floor, children in the village started to show up, sit around me and watch me work. What really touched me is that when you put a crayon in a child’s hand, they will start to draw. When you


put a crayon in an adult’s hand, they will tell you they can’t draw. No child will tell you that. We all have a child inside of us. We forget about that. The joy of my life in Oaxaca is that the child inside of me has taken the reins. In creating this camp for adults with so many activities in nature – again, with the idea of design as permission – I want to give them permission to allow their creative selves to come out and play. This kind of work matters to me. It will be impactful.” When it came to designing this world, Framel knew she could find what she was looking for in Round Top. “I’ve always been a market gal. I have always explored the world through markets. It’s my favorite lens to experience a culture — it’s what led to the idea of Faena Bazaar. And, Round Top is the ultimate market. It’s one of those rare places where no matter your style or aesthetic, you can find it here. My mom was my guide. She’s been going to Round Top for 15 years. I could not have done it without her. I needed that expertise. She brought me to Paul Michael. It was her recommendation. I design in a way that feels collected versus designed. Market Hill is a great representation of that, because you have the mix of the old and new. It’s an important addition to the Round Top experience. Paul has created a real hub where you can discover beautiful things and receive generous hospitality. You can create a very layered story – and load a truck in a short time! I will be back in the spring.” As for when we can see her art on display and for sale, her first exhibition will be in the fall. “We haven’t confirmed a date yet, but we have a venue. Eventually I will bring the work to the U.S., but it is important for me to show it in Oaxaca first, to give thanks and recognition to that place. The work is mine, but it’s also Oaxaca’s.” Until then, you can take a peek into her world of design, art, photography, and storytelling at kellyframel. world and follow her personal exploration of “myth, materiality, and mystic truths” on Instagram @kellyframel.

Above (from top): Pictured here, at Market Hill, Framel selects a Paul Michael sculpture for her current design project. Photography by Ruth Framel. Installed on-site in Aspen, the Paul Michael sculpture stands among the pines in its new home. Photography by Kelly Framel.

markethillroundtop.com | 27


Woman Today OF

CAMILA MCCONAUGHEY INTRODUCES HER INCLUSIVE ONLINE COMMUNITY TO THE REAL ROUND TOP.

BY NICOLE BODDINGTON

Camila McConaughey greets guests at The Vintage Round Top. Photography by Haylei Smith. 28 | SPRING 2020


ifestyle expert, entrepreneur, wife, mother and founder of Women of Today, Camila McConaughey, is a woman who does it all. And yet she is quick to admit that she certainly doesn’t know it all. She opens up about her life and career in a way that’s vulnerable and relatable on Women of Today, the digital platform she created as a space for women to connect and learn from one another.

“I believe we need to support each other, share our stories and find strength in numbers. I created Women of Today to do just that.”

“I believe we need to support each other, share our stories and find strength in numbers. I created Women of Today to do just that. To be an online home for all women to visit, to lend support, to pick up some guidance, to be mentors, to laugh together, to know we are not alone in this journey,” McConaughey says. Building on the connection happening online, Women of Today is creating opportunities for people to gather and meet in real life.

“[It’s about] inclusion. It’s mostly women, but men are welcome, too. We can learn from them, and they can learn from us, sharing knowledge. We all have different things to bring, and it’s not this is how you should do things; it’s this is what I have learned in health, beauty, fashion, business, living a pure life, a better life,” McConaughey says. Based in Austin where she lives with her husband, Matthew McConaughey, and their three children, she says, “Austin is home. Round Top is the place that I love.” During Antiques Week, you can find her at the show every day. “I typically make the drive back and forth. I have a big truck. The biggest truck you can have without having a special license for it. I will take business calls while I’m driving, but I don’t miss [the show]. “In Round Top, everyone is celebrated for their individuality. The most

Right: The Women of Today team pictured in Round Top. Photography by Haylei Smith.

markethillroundtop.com | 29


Above: McConaughey is a Round Top regular and rarely misses a show.

“That’s the beauty of the show, you can find anything. It’s all tastes. It’s so creative.” unique things I have in my home are from Round Top – custom barstools, chandeliers, a chair in my office. That’s the beauty of the show, you can find anything. It’s all tastes. It’s so creative. I have redesigned rooms based on something I have found. In my guest bathroom, I made all of the design decisions around this piece I found at Market Hill – a sink made of quartz. I knew I had to have it. I said, ‘Listen, I am meeting with the design team tomorrow. Can I take it, try it out?’ I didn’t even pay for it. I took it home and tried it out. It took seven guys to put it in the truck. I came back the next day to pay for it.”

Above (from top): A quartz sink from Market Hill served as the design inspiration for McConaughey’s guest bathroom. Custom-made barstools are another Round Top score.

30 | SPRING 2020

“Round Top is a real community, created by good people. People who are creative. People who want to help you. They help you brainstorm. They help you find something. They help you load your truck. Even though Round Top is growing, I hope there is always this community spirit.” It’s in this spirit of community that McConaughey hosted a Women of Today event here last spring at The Vintage Round Top. “It was a two-day event. We had the opportunity to meet face-to-face with our readers and smart and business-savvy people in food, wellness, and design.”


The festivities kicked off with a press event featured in People magazine with craft cocktails by liquid chef, Rob Floyd, and dinner with Kristen Kish, best known as the Season 10 winner of BravoTV’s Top Chef. “Kristen came and did a beautiful dinner in an open kitchen where everyone could watch. The award-winning Andy Grammer performed. It was very intimate. The next day, it was a ticketed event that anyone could attend. There were workshops all day, where we could learn from panelists and from each other in business and social media and other things. Paige and Smoot Hull [of The Vintage Round Top] created the dream setting for us.”

and individuality made for the perfect meeting place for an event like this. There will be more opportunities for readers of Women of Today to meet and connect with events in Dallas and Chicago in the works. In the meantime, McConaughey says there are a lot of exciting things happening on the site, including a wellness

program launching soon. The best way to stay tuned is to sign up for the newsletter at WomenofToday.com and to follow along on Instagram @womenoftoday. There may not be any events planned for Round Top this spring, but, if she's in town, McConaughey is sure to be there with her big truck.

The small, creative community of Round Top and its culture of inclusion

Clockwise (from top left): Kristen Kish, Season 10 winner of BravoTV’s Top Chef. Andy Grammer gave an intimate performance after the press event dinner. Women of Today workshop with McConaughey and panelist Ashley Rose of Sugar & Cloth. Photography by Haylei Smith.

markethillroundtop.com | 31


OUR FIRST

Junk-o-Rama

PROM

T H E D I S C O B A L L AT N I G H T I S B I G A N D B R I G H T, DEEP IN THE HEART OF TEX AS. BY N I C O L E B O D D I N G TO N P H OTO G R A P H Y BY AS H L E E N O B E L

A

s legend has it, during the antiques show many moons ago, the Junk Gypsies of Gypsyville discovered a box of forgotten vintage prom dresses in need of another twirl. They gathered a few vendors and friends, scoured the grounds for decorations, put on their party dresses, and danced the night away in what would be the first Junko-Rama Prom. What started as a spontaneous party in a cow pasture has grown to become THE event of Antiques Week, a world-famous affair held twice a year, penciled in on everyone’s dance card. “It’s the best people-watching on the planet,” said the Junk Gypsies, who have seen it all over the years. “You will see everything from the most glamorous vintage prom dresses to outrageous costumes, homemade hats out of junk, piles and piles of vintage costume jewelry, perfectly worn-in dancin’ boots. It’s an anything goes Texas party under the stars.” “It’s more than a dance party. It’s a prayer party. It’s a place to be revived. It's a celebration of life!” said Denver Courtney, a.k.a. Denverado, a.k.a. Disco Jesus, a.k.a. the white James Brown, a.k.a. the Funky Monkey, a.k.a. the Facilitator of Funk and Fun, creator of Disco Alley, one of the main attractions at the prom. “Over half my life I've been singing, dancing, and performing on stage under a mirror ball,” he added. “And the symbolism of the mirror ball, for me, has become God’s face. I've never seen God’s face, so, to me, the disco ball represents just that.” Designer Phillip Lantz told us about his first prom, “I felt surrounded by love and creativity. I remember saying to my client, Heather, that my faith in humanity was restored. I might have yelled that out loud while drinking sangria and dancing to 80s hip-hop with a group of middle-aged women dressed up as the Golden Girls! I kept thinking that not only would my pals in Chicago relish this, but my actual blood sisters in Arkansas would make more friends here than a feather boa has feathers!” Everyone we talked to had been or was going to prom … and was raving about it. We added it to our agenda for the fall show. The day of prom, we shopped the fields in

32 | SPRING 2020


Opposite Page: Denverado, a.k.a. Disco Jesus, a.k.a. the white James Brown, a.k.a. the Facilitator of Funk and Fun lives up to his many monikers as he presides over Disco Alley. This Page (clockwise from top left): It’s more than a dance party — it’s a celebration of life under the flickering lights of the disco ball. Partygoers, including Paul Michael, at left, show off their festive attire. Our editorial staff and friends pose for a prom pic at Market Hill.

path illuminated by the flickering lights of the giant disco ball in the sky. We soon discovered the Master of Ceremonies himself, Denverado, our High Priest, in full regalia, robe, headdress and all, leading the biggest dance party we’d ever seen. As promised, it was more than a dance party, it was an experience in letting go, letting loose, and letting the rhythm or spirit move you. As the records spun and the disco ball turned, we lost track of time and each other. In the wee hours of the morning, we reconnected and eventually returned

to the ranch where we hung our hats and kicked off our dancing shoes, waking a few hours later to share stories as if it were all a strange dream. Prom marked the end of our time together at Texas Antiques Week, but it felt like the beginning of a new tradition for our group, a holy baptism by the white James Brown. Now we belonged to his congregation, and we vowed to make the pilgrimage in the spring. We hope to see you there on April 2, dancing under the stars, faces shining in the light of the disco ball.

search of prom dresses. In fact, we found our winning looks from a vendor located directly across the street from Zapp Hall, where prom is held. After making our purchases, we waited for the hot sun to set on another day of antiquing. At dusk, our group gathered at Market Hill to take prom night pics, and to pre-party over dinner and drinks. Finally, it was time to mosey over to the main event. Arriving at dark, we made our way through the crowd to the VIP area, Vincent Peach’s storefront, where we got our bearings and more wine before meandering through the throngs of people, then dipping down Disco Alley. We followed the sounds of that funky 70s soul groove, our

markethillroundtop.com | 33


34 | SPRING 2020


The

Ellis

MOT E L

HOUSTON RESTAUR ATEUR LEE ELLIS RELOCATES TO ROUND TOP AND OPENS BAR-LOUNGE. BY NICOLE BODDINGTON PHOTOGRAPHY BY ASHLEE NOBEL

T

here’s no vacancy at the Ellis Motel – only because you can’t actually book a room there. All are welcome, though, to come on in and stay awhile at the bar-lounge of Lee Ellis’ design. Hospitality is something Ellis knows a lot about; he made a career of it in Houston as a renowned restaurateur who took comfort food like Frito pie, fried chicken, and ice cream to another level. Recently relocated to Round Top, he found a home for his latest concept in an 1800s building on Henkel Square. “To me, it’s the main square of town — the heart of town,” Ellis says. Maintaining the character of the original structure and evoking the pioneer spirit of its earliest inhabitants, the Ellis Motel was designed by Ellis himself. “The whole idea of it was that there wasn’t a bar in town,” he tells us. “I wanted it to be a place where people could meet up, socialize, feel at home. I wanted it to be sizable enough for everyone to sit around the bar.”

Opposite Page: Almost everything that catches your eye is for sale at the Ellis Motel.

markethillroundtop.com | 35


“I wanted it to be a place where people could meet up, socialize, feel at home.” The bar is very much the centerpiece of the space. Smooth to the touch, it’s built from beautiful, soft blonde sycamore sourced in southern Arkansas from the Paul Michael Company and hand-crafted by Jake Michael. One of the most aesthetically pleasing fixtures, it’s also one of the only permanent ones, as (almost) everything else that catches your eye is for sale. A motorcycle atop a console piece. A bison head mounted on the wall. A neon sign

36 | SPRING 2020

that reads, “DRUGS.” Antique rugs. Leather sofas. Chandeliers. Black and white photographs of rock and roll legends. “I picked all of it,” Ellis says, the majority of which was found in Round Top. “Not all of it goes together, but I like mixing it up, old mixed with new.” This means, every time you return to the Ellis Motel, it will look a little different. Things come and go. (In fact, he tells us


Opposite Page (from left): The bar was built from sycamore sourced in South Arkansas from the Paul Michael Company and hand-crafted by Jake Michael. Lee Ellis says he picked all of what you see here with the majority of the furniture and décor found in Round Top. This Page (from top): Some of the pieces photographed for this article have since sold, but it works to create an ever-evolving space that will look a little different every time you visit. You can’t actually stay the night at the Ellis Motel, even though you may never want to leave.

some of the items we photographed for this article have since sold.) When asked if there’s anything not for sale, he admits there are a few pieces, a couple of paintings, that are special to him. In keeping with the theme of hospitality, Ellis also carries thoughtfully selected specialty items, like grooming products and goods from Man Ready, a Houston-based apparel and apothecary company, and some packaged snacks for those in need of some sustenance along with a couple of stiff drinks – he’s got those, too. “My wife [Melissa Savarino] had quite a bit of input on the cocktail menu. We put together a list of what we like and thought people would enjoy.” Open Wednesday through Sunday, Ellis says he’s likely to be there Monday and Tuesday, too, and will open the door for anybody who’s on the square and wants in. “We want it to be a place to hang out where we can provide great service.” What he’s created delivers on that – comfort, hospitality, and feeling right at home – you know, if your home happens to be this impeccably decorated and well-curated. At the Ellis Motel, you can check in any time you like, but you may never want to leave.

markethillroundtop.com | 37


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

TH E RE AL

Standouts

Texas Antiques Week draws 100,000 people to the tiny town of Round Top (population: 90). Many customers are looking for that needle in a haystack, something no one has seen before. Out of hundreds of vendors, Paul Michael invited the best of the best to Market Hill. These are the vendors who've got it, and if they don't have it, they will know who does. Because each one stands out with their unique perspectives and personalities, individuality emerged as a theme of this issue. While their stories are all different and fascinating in their own way, a common thread weaves the narrative together – quality. They spoke about the quality of the pieces; the quality of the people; the quality of this place; and the quality of the experience you’ll find at Market Hill.

AS TOLD TO NICOLE BODDINGTON

38 | SPRING 2020


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Provenance Antiques PHOTOS COURTESY OF PROVENANCE ANTIQUES

W

hether you are a seasoned veteran or a first-timer to the antiques fair, Provenance Antiques wishes you the warmest of welcomes to Market Hill. Provenance Antiques is thrilled to be back at Market Hill – our “home away from home” twice a year for the fall and spring antiques fairs. We have so many wonderful pieces to share with you. Provenance Antiques is based in Atlanta, Georgia, with a 10,000-SF store and our own warehouse facility outside Nice, France. Provenance Antiques personally selects our own antique furniture, accessories, artwork, architecturals and garden from France, Italy, Spain and Portugal. Provenance Antiques celebrates the exceptional, and our mission is just that – procuring the finest antiques possible to present to you – our friends and clients. We are inspired to find that perfect piece that has it all – quality, beauty, and integrity. Provenance Antiques has been returning to Round Top, Texas, going on 15 years now. Each fair is always new and exciting. One of the greatest opportunities Market Hill presents is meeting so many wonderful people. All sorts of people with a shared passion – the love of beautiful and quality antiques and art.

Above: A grand-scale farm table, a trestle table, from the Catalan region of Spain; 18th-century primitive cheese-making board, now presented as a coffee table; a stunning pair of early 19th-century flambeaux flame finial statues; and, a very rare and monumental pair of French palatial mirrors.

Our style can best be described as very eclectic – ranging from quite primitive to the very refined. We buy with our hearts. We buy what we love. The only requirements for the pieces we purchase are that they are not only beautiful and of quality, but each must have exceptional characteristics. We greatly enjoy working very closely with our clients, getting to know who they are, what they do and what they love. This communication absolutely helps us to better serve our clients, fulfilling

markethillroundtop.com | 39


Clockwise (from top left): Primitive 18th-century billot table from the Ardeche region of France; 18th-century Spanish Santos fragments; and, a fabulous set of three 19th-century jardinieres/cache pots in painted cast iron from the Provence region of France Early 18th-century French Regence chaise lounge/bathtub. The seat slides off to expose a fabulous copper tub. 18th-century credenza from the Veneto region of Italy; Arte Populaire early 18th-century copper girouette weathervane from Provence, France; an oil-oncanvas painting from Blois, France of a country home kitchen presented in its primitive frame; and, a set of 18th-century stone mortars from Spain.

not only their needs but their passions, as well. Our clients are as unique and as individual as our antiques. We equally enjoy sharing our pieces with our clients and visitors, thoroughly describing what a piece is, how it is constructed, where it was found, and, most importantly, what makes the piece so special and unique. Knowing that a very special piece is perfect for someone, and that it is going home with someone to be loved as much as we have loved it, is very satisfying indeed. A more-than-satisfied client becomes a loyal client and a friend. Some of the very special pieces we are bringing to Market Hill for the spring show, include:

40 | SPRING 2020

An exceptional grand-scale farm table, a trestle table, from the Catalan region of Spain. Beautifully constructed from apple wood, and with an excellent patina, it’s a perfect table for large gatherings. This piece is accompanied by a very attractive 18th-century primitive cheese-making board, now presented as a coffee table;


Right: A 19th-century French Deux Corps Napoleon III period bibliotheque in painted wood with beautiful wavy glass; French 18th-century statue of a wonderfully carved angel presented on its iron stand.

a stunning pair of early 19th-century flambeaux flame finial statues, expertly carved from Pierre De Bourgogne stone from the Burgundy region of France; and, a very rare and monumental pair of French palatial mirrors masterfully constructed from beautiful gilt wood. A wonderful primitive 18th-century billot table from the Ardeche region of France, perfect as a coffee table, surrounded by 18th-century Spanish Santos fragments; a fabulous set of three 19th-century jardinieres/cache pots in painted cast iron from the Provence region of France; and, an extremely rare and very sensational early 18th-century French Regence chaise lounge/ bathtub which has a wonderful painted finish. The seat slides off to expose a fabulous copper tub. A very unique piece to grace any living area, bedroom, or bathroom. Also part of this unique collection is a very handsome 19th-century French Deux Corps Napoleon III-period bibliotheque in painted wood with beautiful wavy glass, along with a very stunning French 18th-century statue of a wonderfully carved angel complemented by beautiful detailing presented on its iron stand. Yet another showpiece is a stunning 18th-century credenza from the Veneto region of Italy. Beautifully constructed in painted wood with canted sides – scantonata – four doors on a plinth base, accompanied by a fabulous Arte Populaire early 18th-century copper girouette weathervane from Provence, France. And, last but not least, a very charming oilon-canvas painting from Blois, France, entitled “Interieur Abandonne,” or "Abandoned Interior," of a country home kitchen presented in its primitive frame; and, a handsome set of 18th-century stone mortars from Spain. Enjoy the show.

To learn more about Provenance Antiques, visit ProvenanceAntiquesAtlanta.com.

markethillroundtop.com | 41


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Antica Collection PHOTOS COURTESY OF ANTICA COLLECTION

L

isa Strait Vanpoucke has been collecting antiques for more than 20 years, a passion that turned into a business. Making frequent trips to Europe to hunt for special pieces, she has been showcasing her finds in Round Top since 2004.

“Round Top is an important venue because it allows me to reach the most clients in a short period of time,” she says. “The pieces I’m bringing to this show are about simple edited design and a polished finish. Although I have a pair of rare Italian side tables and several antique dining tables, I’m really excited about my Italian lamps. The Italians love great lighting. I couldn’t agree more. Like great jewelry on a woman, beautiful lamps make a room.”

“The pieces I’m bringing to this show are about simple edited design and a polished finish.” Lisa has a line of signature candles she will bring to the show.

42 | SPRING 2020


“What I love most about what I do is that it doesn’t feel like a job. It’s a treasure hunt that doesn’t end.”

When it comes to what these pieces reflect about her personal style she says, “I feel like my style is always evolving. I prefer incorporating period antiques into a modern edited setting.” In determining a client’s style, she says, “I like to ask questions about lifestyle and favorite design periods to determine in what direction to steer a client.”

young professionals looking for key pieces and designers looking to find the right combination of great pieces to polish their design project.” This keeps Lisa inspired. “What I love most about what I do is that it doesn’t feel like a job. It’s a treasure hunt that doesn’t end.”

Her client base is ever evolving and always expanding. “In the past, it was the antiques collector. Now it’s a combination of

Read more about Lisa’s story and view select pieces online at AnticaCollection.com.

markethillroundtop.com | 43


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Architect’s Daughter PHOTOS COURTESY OF ARCHITECT’S DAUGHTER

I

Clockwise (from top left): Michelle Cheatham, owner of Architect's Daughter; French painted table with original iron trestle; Pair of 18th-century limestone lions from Italy; Pair of French Louis XV fauteuil cabriolet armchairs in walnut, newly upholstered in Clarence House lemon yellow velvet; Pair of iron 18thcentury streetlights in Paris that can be converted into gas and are newly wired for electricity in U.S.

“Texan hospitality is unlike anywhere else in the U.S. Texans are uber friendly and genuine people. Designers and decorators flock to Round Top. They share a similar passion – enjoying the hunt and discovering the ultimate treasure. Being an interior designer, I enjoy working with other designers as well as homeowners,” Michelle says. “I specialize in vintage pieces and objects that highlight local artisans’ savoir faire. I may find an iron grate or gate in France that I transform into a table or chair or a wall panel. I buy from the best suppliers and manufacturers to supply and build for me with an emphasis on exquisite quality. My collection runs a great range, but it’s all within my aesthetic,” she says.

‘less is more’ holds true. I focus on buying fewer things of the very best quality. I like to incorporate at least one piece of furniture that has history, patina, and age to add interest and soul to the space. I also like to add a few original pieces of art.” As for what she’s bringing to the spring show, her selections are very personal.

per particular with what I buy. I steer with my intuition and buy only what I would put in my own home. What you do not buy is at least as important as what you do buy.” When it comes to connecting her customers to those special pieces she’s chosen, she says, “I love the interaction with my customers. I focus on personal relationships and provide excellent service. I have a deep knowledge about, and passion for, what I sell. They are not just items to sell. They are unique pieces that add legacy and history to interiors. My hope is to create a lasting impression and that the buyer will return with a newfound trust and buy with confidence in what they are getting.”

“My style is my art, my vision. I have an eclectic, timeless style. The concept that

“We are in a business that is driven by our emotions and beautiful things. I am su-

Come meet Michelle and see what special finds she’s brought to Market Hill.

nterior designer Michelle Cheatham is the owner of ARCHITECT’S DAUGHTER, a home furnishings and design company based in Napa Valley and San Francisco. In advance of her third show at Market Hill, we asked about her Texas experience and what she has in store for the spring show.

44 | SPRING 2020


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Ables Antiques

& Props Antiques PHOTOS COURTESY OF ABLES ANTIQUES & PROPS ANTIQUES

B

ased in Ripley, Tennessee, Ables Antiques got its start in 1990. After Tony and Kitty Ables tied the knot, they set out antiquing on their honeymoon and never looked back. “It’s never boring or monotonous,” says Kitty about their business, which has brought them to Round Top for the last 30 years. “Great friendships have developed,” she says. “It’s like a second home.” As for what we can expect at Market Hill in the spring, she says, “Lots of unusual signs and neons as well as mid-century modern and country store finds. A custom 1960s dining table – the likes of which nobody else has – a unique and fantastic piece. A corner sofa with all original fabric in great shape – truly a mid-century gem!” Ables Antiques shares a space with Props Antiques of Leiper’s Fork, Tennessee. Owners Klint Griffin and his wife, Cindy,

Above (from top): Custom 1960s dining table; corner sofa with all original fabric in great shape.

love roaming the backroads looking for Americana relics. “We love what we do!” Klint says. “Searching and scouring for unique items that really speak to us gives us a thrill. Seeing through to the hidden potential of pieces and then being able to connect with the perfect people for them is so satisfying. This will be our fourth year in Round Top and our second year at Market Hill,” he says. “The opportunity to source from and sell to people from all around the world is so amazing. This is really a family affair. We love having our eight-year-old son with us for a week during each spring and fall show. There really is a sense of community among the dealers – some are even like extended family. We enjoy creating that same bond with customers and that’s a huge reason we enjoy coming back to Round Top.”

specific pieces they may be searching for. We have many customers who reach out to us to find pieces for them. We’re honored to have their trust in knowing that we will find them great things.” This spring, they are bringing lots of great things, all true to Props’ style. “We will have more neons, old signs, and some great mercantile tables and counters as well as other unique finds. These types of pieces really speak to who we are as dealers. Our love for genuine antiques that have history and can create new history is profound.”

“Many of our customers are in the restaurant and entertainment industries as we always have great old store counters, great mercantile pieces, and old signs including neons. We also have a following of designers and other customers with a great eye for interior design and an affinity toward genuine antiques and original surface furniture.” When it comes to helping clients find that special piece, he says, “Most people we encounter have a general style they gravitate toward. By understanding our customer’s likes, we can then suggest pieces that might make sense with their vibe. People are always open to suggestions, and it’s such a great feeling to help guide them to new pieces that they might not have normally considered. Also, by being able to understand our customers, we can source

Above (from top): 18th-century Venetian settee with original painted frame and reupholstered in a creamy leather with whimsical burlap back; A 1950s neon sign out of the Great Lakes area with original surface on the face and new neon.

markethillroundtop.com | 45


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Architectural Anarchy PHOTOS COURTESY OF ARCHITECTURAL ANARCHY

B

ased in Chicago, Architectural Anarchy is known for its eclectic mix of architectural salvage, antique industrial pieces, vintage advertising, and folk art-like sculptures and paintings. At the fall show at Market Hill, it was impossible to miss its booth, with the giant circus banner hanging from the rafters out front. The uniqueness of Architectural Anarchy comes from the individual style of its owners, Gosia Korsakowski and William Rawski – both veterans of the industry – and in the variety of their inventory. Bill is known for the art, décor, and signs he has amassed for Zap Antiques & Props, the Midwest’s largest prop house. For more than 30 years, Zap has outfitted almost every major production filmed in Chicago. Bill has also been involved with interior design projects for some of Chicago’s best restaurants.

46 | SPRING 2020

Left: Art Deco vintage back bar. Middle (from top): Neon sign; scoreboard. Right: Art Deco light-up marquee.

Gosia grew up in Poland, spending summers traveling, experiencing different cultures, and shopping at various antiques stores and flea markets. It was always her nature to be entrepreneurial, she says. In college, she and a friend opened an art gallery and sold artwork created by fellow students. She then worked in the fashion industry before getting married and moving to the U.S. She began collecting and selling glassware and, by 2007, was making glassware of her own designs. She and Bill met when she started shopping at Zap. In 2010, they went into business together and the rest is history.

When asked what we can expect from Architectural Anarchy in the spring, Gosia says, “We are bringing a collection of vintage carnival game wheels and sideshow banners as well as architectural salvage such as vintage back bars, casement windows and library pocket doors, vintage American hand-painted advertising signs, and vintage neon signs.” With two years of Round Top under their belt, the duo is excited to return to Texas and Market Hill. “We love Texas and the people who are coming to the show,” Gosia says. “Our clients are fun people who are not afraid to be adventurous in designing their homes. They are looking for oneof-a-kind items. They like to use unusual finds in unexpected ways.”

You are sure to find something unusual and unexpected at Architectural Anarchy at Market Hill.


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Modern State Atelier PHOTOS COURTESY OF MODERN STATE ATELIER

1960s Scandinavian leather chairs and ottoman by Folke Ohlsoon

«

G

osia Korsakowski, of Architectural Anarchy, introduces Modern State Atelier. “Modern State is a new spin-off of Architectural Anarchy,” Gosia says. “It was born from a love for mid-century and modern design.”

The emphasis, she tells us, is on American, French, Italian, and Scandinavian mid-century furniture, art, and design. “Many pieces in our inventory are from well-known American designers like Milo Baughman, Vladimir Kagan, Paul McCobb, Knoll; Italian designers like Gio Ponti, Marco Zanuso, Gabriella Crespi and Venini; and Scandinavian designers like Folke Ohlsoon and Borge Mogensen.” Artwork, especially by contemporary emerging painters and sculptors, has been another area that has been added to Modern State inventory.

Come see these pieces in person at Market Hill.

«

Mid-century Dorothy Draper Viennese Collection dresser

« modern mirror called "Rock Pond Mirror"

«

Gino Ponti chairs

« contemporary painting by Kelly Caldwell

markethillroundtop.com | 47


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Paul Meyer PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL MEYER

T

Stephanie adds, “We work hard to create a beautiful and welcoming place for people to find a connection to Paul’s art.

exas artist, Paul Meyer, is inspired by the expanse of his West Texas surroundings and the unconventional materials he uses in his paintings.

Market Hill represents an expansion of their business – which began as a leap of faith and a tiny booth at the Arbors in the fall of 2016. “We had a great experience at The Arbors,” Paul says. “We immediately felt like a part of the community. The response was overwhelmingly positive, not only about the work, but the environment was so supportive. The Arbors really nurtured us and Paul’s work. Our time there during Round Top ended up changing our lives,” says Stephanie. “We were eventually able to focus on Paul’s painting full time. We feel so fortunate to have started in a place that made so much possible for us.”

“It comes from nature,” Paul says. “My love for vast, open spaces like the deserts of the Southwest and places I’ve lived. I am drawn to earthen colors. I use a lot of vibrant, saturated, primary colors, but they usually get washed over with cement, mortar and plaster. It all starts with materials,” he says. “I never approach a new piece from the standpoint of making art. I am mostly fascinated by the materials and exploring all of the various ways they can be incorporated into the process of painting.” The son of a home builder, Paul gained an appreciation for process early on. “I grew up around construction my whole life. I worked with stone masons, concrete guys. I was always around construction debris. It’s a huge inspiration for me. I actually just hauled off a couple truckloads of concrete debris a friend was going to throw away; there’s so much possibility and potential in the refuse.” Paul is a classically trained painter with a BFA from UT. “Before I started [pursuing my BFA], I was experimenting with non-traditional materials. I want to physically manifest and translate what is going on in my head using materials I feel a strong connection with.” Paul takes even the most unassuming materials up a notch by making his own, like the plywood he creates by layering wood veneers, fragments, and paints and stains, then tearing it all apart to reveal the interior gradation. “Most often, my favorite works and/ or the most interesting parts of a painting seem to just happen and are unpre-

48 | SPRING 2020

Portrait with Flowers, mixed media, 36" x 48"

meditated. So, creating an environment and working in ways that welcome the unexpected and discovery is a large part of my process.” This spring, Paul will present his work at Market Hill for the first time. “What’s exciting about Market Hill is that it opens up a lot of possibilities to curate the space,” he says. Something his wife, Stephanie, is passionate about. “Steph has an impeccable eye in how she creates the experience. We couldn’t do this without one another; I paint and she pulls it all together.”

This led them to meet Paul Michael. “Paul came over to our booth one year and said he’d come to see a painting he’d seen in one of the ads we’d done that year,” tells Paul [Meyer]. “That’s how it all started. I would go over [to Market Hill] and eat, Paul would sit with me, and we’d talk about art. Our relationship began with a shared love of art and has become a great friendship.” “Over the years, as our business has grown,” Stephanie continues, “we knew we wanted to find a permanent space. We are so incredibly happy to be in the stunning space Paul Michael created for Paul’s art at Market Hill.” As for what we can expect to see, Stephanie says, “Paul’s working on a series of white paintings. And we promise to have lots of burros, portraits, and abstracts.”

Visit paulmeyerstudios.com and follow @paulmeyerstudios on Instagram to see more.


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Hastening Design Studio PHOTOS COURTESY OF HASTENING DESIGN STUDIO

A

rtist, furniture maker, interior designer, and antiques dealer, Louis Shields is the owner of Hastening Design Studio in Middleburg, Virginia. A Round Top regular for six years, he will return to Market Hill in the spring. “I love working with Paul Michael and the extraordinarily diverse group of people he has assembled at Market Hill,” Shields says. “My style is both traditional and contemporary. My ideal customer appreciates quality, regardless if it is a 17th-century European piece of furniture or a contemporary modern painting.” When asked to describe a few pieces he’s excited about for this show he says, “For many years on buying trips in France, I have stayed with one of my best friends, an antiques dealer, who also had a boutique hotel in the city of Arles in Provence. I always asked to stay in the room with this burled ash buffet de corps. He recently retired and sold the hotel and graciously offered me this piece of furniture. It is extremely rare, circa 1830. The craftsmanship is extraordinary, incorporating ‘book-matched’ burled ash veneers.” He also mentions two mid-century modern chaise lounges and an early 18th-century Bavarian bureau cabinet. “As I grow older, I become more and more eclectic, but my love for fine quality antiques only grows. I have a profound appreciation for them.” Along with the collection of fine antiques, he will display his original art, including a pair of contemporary paintings as well as "Threshold," a mixed media on canvas that was part of his Element Series

Above: Two mid-century modern chaise lounges; an early 18th-century Bavarian bureau cabinet; and a pair of original contemporary paintings by Louis Shields. Right: "Threshold," a contemporary mixed media on canvas by Louis Shields, 36" x 48".

in 2016. These are just a few of the special pieces that Hastening Design Studio will offer at Market Hill.

To view more of his work online, visit HasteningDesigns.com.

markethillroundtop.com | 49


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Don & Marta Orwig Antiques PHOTOS COURTESY OF DON & MARTA ORWIG

D

on & Marta Orwig Antiques is known for its massive collection of old advertising signs. “I love buying,” Don says. “It’s about the buying, not the selling. The selling isn't the important part, but I have to sell to keep buying.”

He’s been in the business since 1971, and has a fascination with American relics, particularly from country stores. These roadside stops can still be found in nearly every small town in America, but they are going away, going out of business, and it’s important to Don to preserve the fixtures, counters, and signs. They are part of the American story and contain a sense of nostalgia. Most of his time is spent on the road, finding these pieces of American history and bringing them to Round Top. He’s been to 61 shows over the past 30 years, and he’s seen a lot

50 | SPRING 2020


of change. He’s happy to have found a home at Market Hill where he says, “There are such good people, all of the dealers are quality people. Market Hill is about quality. If you want quality, you stop at Market Hill. If you’re looking for junk, go to other places.” His clientele is loyal; the majority of them are repeat customers from over the years. “Eighty percent of people we sell to have bought from us before – 20% happen upon us.” He says they know he has great stuff at wholesale prices, and he recommends shopping early, because a lot of dealers shop from him first then take it elsewhere to resell it.” Among the items he’s most excited about bringing to Market Hill this spring are the 32-foot store cabinet (pictured) and between 80 and 90 great old advertising signs. “We also have three, eightfoot sections of original Warren store cabinets and a gorgeous double-sided Walker seed cabinet,” Don says. “These store cabinets are in addition to a collection of 30 home-sized store cupboards that were collected and used in upstate New York in an owner’s 15 pharmacies. We also just bought the iconic Chicken Shack neon sign out of Waco, Texas. That, too, will be at Market Hill until sold.” Don also bought a four-story courthouse building, and there are about 280 matching door sets. He’s very excited about these. “You could build a building around the doors. Beveled glass. It will be the best booth I’ve ever done.”

Don is one of our favorite characters at Market Hill. We hope you’ll come see what all he’s got in store for us this time.

markethillroundtop.com | 51


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

The Elephant Walk PHOTOGRAPHY BY ASHLEE NOBEL AND COURTESY OF THE ELEPHANT WALK

E

nder Tasci is the man behind The Elephant Walk. In the business for three decades, he’s been coming to Round Top for more than 25 years, finally moving his residence from Orlando, Florida, to Round Top, Texas, and his showroom to Market Hill. When we caught up with Ender, he was still on the hunt – “I am working today!” he told us – but we were able to get some insight into his process and a peek at what he’s bringing to the spring show. In making his selections for Market Hill, Ender says, “What we sell is components to a good design, each and every one of those components has to have redeeming qualities – texture, color, shape – and they need to read modern. That’s basically the key to success in today’s design world. Everything is going clean, simple and modern,” he says. “It used to be that to see a good-looking home, you’d have to see it in a publication. Now all we have to do is go on Pinterest or Instagram or Facebook, or any other website that is creative, and we get to see designs from all over the world being shared. That’s pretty inspiring. For people who are creative, inspiration is endless at the moment. The hardest part is when you do get inspired, where do you go to find that thing?” That’s where Market Hill comes in. “With Market Hill, first and foremost, we have cultivated some of the best vendors under one roof who work very hard to bring the best-of-the-best they can possibly find, every show, show after show,” Ender says. “These are the leading people who inspire one another and make one another work twice as hard. When we start with good dealers who understand the business and motivate one another, we have an environment where all of these ideas pour in.” Being able to present his collection in a sophisticated way is also important to him. “We each have an incredibly beautiful showroom with high ceilings and all of these skylights that bring daylight in. It’s the perfect

52 | SPRING 2020


“We carry the top quality in the marketplace, and we’re proud of it.” setting to feature our merchandise.” Another benefit of Market Hill is being out of the elements. “When everyone else is being washed away with storms out there,” he says, “we are able to conduct business in a civilized fashion. When I say ‘civilized fashion,’ the profile of our clientele has changed over the years. We all want comfort. Market Hill provides all of those comforts to anyone who is coming to experience Round Top. It gives them a break from the elements, a break from the diversity [of high and low pieces]. We carry the top quality in the marketplace, and we’re proud of it,” Ender says. When we asked him which pieces express his individual style and which ones he thinks will go first, he says, “You nev-

er know. Things that are really strong in personality, they take another strong personality, and they take a strong space to accommodate them. Sometimes some of the strongest items we have that are most featured, most talked about, most photographed are not the items that are first to sell.” “I have two things that are very, very striking. One is a big, giant, hand-blown Murano glass chandelier. The scale and color are breathtakingly beautiful to me. It has morning glories hanging down from this giant bowl with a wrought-iron frame. It was made in the 1960s. It’s just a gorgeous light fixture that has never been electrified, and it’s hanging in my booth. I think it’s going to be a sought-after piece.”

“I also have some beautiful, old 1950s Venetian mirrors. The scale is wonderful. Then I have a set of 12 needlepoint Louis XV chairs made in Paris that are to die for that I’m extremely excited about.” “And I am bringing a wonderful collection of concrete and marble garden benches. A lot of garden stuff that I’ve collected over the years. Basically, I was hoarding them,” he laughs. “So, now all of that collection is going to be displayed at Market Hill. We’re going to create a garden environment in our booth. We are excited about that.”

Follow the Elephant Walk on Instagram @elephantwalkantiques.

markethillroundtop.com | 53


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Nomadic Trading Company PHOTOS COURTESY OF NOMADIC TRADING COMPANY

W

hen we catch up with Demir, of Nomadic Trading Company, he is preparing for another trip abroad, even after recently returning from one of the most successful buying trips to France and Spain he has ever had. Naturally, we had to ask … how he does it and where he finds the inspiration (and stamina) to maintain his passion after so many years in the business. “A lot of yoga,” he says. “I’m kidding, but it is not untrue, actually. Staying healthy is a big part of what we do; we all eat well and exercise to stay as physically fit as possible, which allows us to be aggressive when we approach the market. A lot of people go to market once or twice a year, and they hire people to do everything for them. They usually don’t touch the merchandise. We drive our own trucks. We load and unload the trucks. We load and unload our containers. We are hands-on,” he says. Another important part of it is and always will be the thrill of the hunt. “The hunt excites me the most,” Demir says. “What

Left: Reclaimed Black Sea oak barn wood table, vintage copper-coated industrial lights Above: 1930s Persian rug

54 | SPRING 2020


are we going to find around the corner? What’s under there? There’s always something new to discover and to create. Along with the prospect of finding the unusual, there’s always something out there that hasn’t been seen, or if it has been seen, it’s been overlooked. In that case, you have an opportunity to transform it, to make it something valuable.” Based in Durham, N.C., Nomadic Trading Company has been making the trip to Round Top for 10 years now, bringing imported goods from France , Holland, Germany, Turkey, Czech Republic, Ukraine, Hungary, Italy and Spain. “In my opinion, it’s the premier market for showing vintage goods in the world. As more buyers hear about us, excitement for the show is elevated every year. Our selection has substantially increased after bringing on my nephew, Timur, and his wife, Lineke, as partners nearly five years ago. We have also brought on my oldest son, Odom, to help with our shows. It’s a family thing. It’s with their energy that we can run two large spaces in Round Top [Market Hill and Excess II] and buy as we do. Market Hill has upped the ante in Round Top. It has created a canvas for some of the best vintage dealers. It has become the premier destination, and it has allowed us to introduce products that we were not able to do before,” Demir says. “Our style is progressive vintage design. In order for us to showcase products in the most effective way, it requires a lot of logistics. At Market Hill, I am not restricted by an eight-foot tent. I have walls. I can hang lights. I can hang rugs on the walls. I am not able to do that in other spaces, exposed to the elements, where I may get mud on them. Things like cement floors help us move quicker, load and unload faster, get the product in and out. It makes a better show for us overall.” As for how he chooses what to bring to Market Hill, Demir says, “Our creative process is constantly evolving, but it’s very simple. We look at every product with an open mind, beyond its

Above (from top): Vintage furniture from Europe; The Nomadic Trading Company crew (from left), Timur, Lineke, Moonie and Demir.

appearance. We also keep our clients in mind. ‘Who would like this?’ is the question I’m always asking.” Something new for the spring show for Nomadic Trading Company is an expanded showroom at Market Hill. “Our space is doubled. That’s going to allow us to express our style and showcase our products much more efficiently. Now I can

bring all of my stuff.” When we asked him to share a product that he’s most excited about bringing, he says, “This is hard for me. I don’t have one single piece I can talk about; I have an entire collection of unique found goods from France and Spain.”

To see some examples of what Nomadic has in store, follow @nomadictradingco on Instagram or visit nomadictrading.com.

markethillroundtop.com | 55


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

The Plaid Veranda PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE PLAID VERANDA

T

he Plaid Veranda embodies our theme of individuality. Owner Judy Jones always has something special in store at Market Hill.

“I love what I do,” says Judy Jones, owner of The Plaid Veranda. “I am an ‘equal opportunity’ buyer – anything that strikes a chord ranging from the seriously important to the sublimely whimsical. If it makes me whisper ‘wow,’ or makes me laugh, I’m in! Nothing makes me happier than when you whisper ‘wow,’ and have to have it!” she says.

56 | SPRING 2020

A big part of her buying focus has been to incorporate antiques into modern settings. “I call them ‘crossover pieces,’” she says. “A significant design style is to add unique, key antiques to a modern setting. It ‘nails down’ a room and adds warmth and a unique ‘only to you’ element.” Judy brings a unique perspective, eclectic style, and sense of charm to Market Hill that we enjoy throughout each show. Come see what all she’s found for us this spring.


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

ReCoop Designs PHOTOS COURTESY OF RECOOP DESIGNS

B

ased in Houston, ReCoop Designs came about by chance. After a four-year stint in the Marines, Cooper Meaders earned a degree in biology. While getting his master’s, he found a part-time job at New Living, an eco-friendly design studio, where he worked in the low- and zero-VOC paint and finishes department. With access to an assortment of equipment and timber, he started making a few pieces and placing them on the showroom floor just to see what would happen – and they all sold. He soon put his schooling aside to focus on crafting handmade creations of his own design. He took what he learned about sustainable, green living practices at New Living and applied it to his company, ReCoop Designs. “As part of a mission-based company,” Meaders says, “I strive to use materials that are almost always salvaged, surplus,

or reclaimed to create unique work that showcases Mother Nature at her finest.” Newcomers to Market Hill, Meaders and his wife, Jennifer, have been coming to Round Top for five years to not only present their collection but also to find inspiration. “Participating in the Round Top Antiques Fair has allowed us to expand our designs creatively,” he says. [Our] creations provide a unique point of view, and the exposure to new styles, designs, and once-lost treasures from the past have impacted our passion and vision.” They also love the people here. “Our customers tend to be folks in search of one-of-a-kind pieces that first and foremost are beautiful and also have a rich history and story to correspond.” As for what we can expect to see at Market Hill, he says, “well-curated antiques,

Above (from left): A cypress driftwood sculpture mounted to a piece of steel plate armor; a custom mounted and painted deer skull; three-sided steel and concrete tables; water fall edge coffee table created from a Red Oak tree salvaged and milled in College Station with a steel base.

architectural elements, lighting, and other various home and lifestyle items.” Among these items, he says, “a cypress driftwood sculpture mounted to a piece of steel plate armor from Battleship, Texas; custom steel-framed sliding barn doors with reclaimed wood salvaged out of a late 1800s home in Brenham, Texas; three-sided steel and concrete tables; and a custom mounted and painted deer skull.”

Come meet Cooper and Jennifer of ReCoop Designs and welcome them to Market Hill. In the meantime, view more of their work online at recoopdesigns.com.

markethillroundtop.com | 57


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Gallery Auctions PHOTOS COURTESY OF GALLERY AUCTIONS

« modern teak sideboard

ikki Vines started Gallery Auctions more than three decades ago, and has created a world-class buying experience under one roof at her showroom in Houston. The top female auctioneer in Texas and, arguably, one of the best in the country, Vikki and her son, Jon, travel the world to carefully select items for auction. Auctions are held every Monday morning and occasionally on Saturdays.

V

dise from all over the world for both dealers and individuals alike. We are especially enjoying our Saturday specialty auctions, which we hold every 6-8 weeks. These themed auctions feature lifetime collections from important local estates, designer handbags, new furniture, European antiques, rugs, mid-century modern pieces and more.” This gives you an idea of what to expect from the collection she’s bringing to Round Top.

“We have been a full-time weekly auction house located in Houston for over 37 years,” she says. “Our weekly auctions provide a consistent, friendly location for the purchase of merchan-

“Gallery Auctions has participated in Round Top for over 15 years. Our style is incredibly eclectic, both timeless and trendy. Our best strength is the great diversity at Market Hill and at

“We sell everything at all price points, from chandeliers to rugs, art to furniture, there is truly something for everyone.” V.Vines #6153 17% bp 58 | SPRING 2020


Above: Incredibly detailed bronze figure of a hunting rabbit complete with a cowboy hat, bowtie and shotgun. Right: Antique bamboo cabinet

each and every auction we conduct. Our booth reflects our diversity, showing that we sell a little bit of everything. Our leather books and copper items are always popular, as well as our mid-century modern furniture. We carry our own special range of new furniture that comes in a wide mix of finishes and styles. We are also very happy to again have Kay Gilbreth’s collection of couture clothing, and her special collection of intriguing home décor objects.” Vikki’s favorite thing about Round Top is ‘the people’. “Both the inspiration we get from others in the trade, from what they are selling, how they are showcasing it, and how they interact with customers. Round Top is our best opportunity to interact directly with the end users and the committed traders for our goods. It is always a pleasure to work with them. Everyone is welcome at Gallery Auctions. Our focus has always been on working with the trade. We sell everything at all price points, from chandeliers to rugs, art to furniture, there is truly something for everyone. Many shops and dealers depend on Gallery Auctions to keep their stores affordably

well-stocked. Our customers remain loyal because of our consistent flow of a huge variety of products through our weekly auctions.” Among the items she’s most excited about showing at Market Hill, she says, “Jon was able to find only two of his favorite bronze figures again on his trip over to the U.K. in November. It is a limited production run incredibly detailed figure of a hunting rabbit complete with a cowboy hat, bowtie and shotgun. This bronze figure stands approximately three-and-a-half feet tall and Jon affectionately refers to him as ‘Huntington T. Hare.’ After speaking to the dealer who Jon purchased the last two from, it appears that the factory where they were made will no longer be forging them, so we are unlikely to ever be able to get any more. There will also be a beautiful antique bamboo cabinet and a modern teak sideboard.”

We can’t wait to see these items at Market Hill. Visit GalleryAuctions.com and follow @galleryauctions on Instagram to see more.

markethillroundtop.com | 59


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Sacred Heart Antiques PHOTOS COURTESY OF SACRED HEART ANTIQUES

F

or Jessica Fairbrother, creator of Sacred Heart Antiques, each piece is special. “I look for things with meaning, things that touch my heart, things that stop me in my tracks. I have to fall a little bit in love with it,” Jessica says. “I never know for whom I’m buying it, but my things always seem to find where they are meant to be.” Jessica shares with us a sampling of items you can find exclusively at Market Hill at Sacred Heart Antiques.

An antique marble statue seems to be quietly looking down at a French taxidermy bird wearing a small crown, perched on an 18th-century Italian wood fragment. It’s as if he picked the crown that fit from among the assortment of several crowns in the setting. The wooden Infant of Prague with glass eyes is Italian and from the late 18th-century.

60 | SPRING 2020

A French bird looks up from its 18th-century perch at St. Frances, its patron saint. Nearby is a crucifix draped with a mother of pearl and sterling rosary from the 19th century.


Above: A large 18th-century niche with carved shell shelters an amused looking Christ Child from a crèche, a wonderful Italian altar stick and a sterling Reliquary from France. Right: A circa 1870 terracotta of St. Genevieve (patron saint of Paris) standing with a lamb at her feet while a stained glass Madonna and child peer down serenely.

markethillroundtop.com | 61


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Susan Horne

Antiques Décor & Lifestyle PHOTOS COURTESY OF SUSAN HORNE ANTIQUES DÉCOR & LIFEST YLE

S

usan Horne started her business out of a love for antiques and a desire to help clients find special pieces. Susan shares with us her excitement for the spring show at Market Hill where she will showcase her goods. “Market Hill allows us to design a beautiful showroom we can tailor to our own brand,” she says. The brand she has created is based on a promise to her customers to provide quality English antiques, unique one-of-a-kind pieces, and a wonderful experience when visiting her showroom. Her customers have been loyal customers and friends, because they have come to expect and depend on all of these things. “We value our customers and appreciate their time,” she says. “We want to make them feel comfortable and welcome when they are shopping with us.” Susan’s Southern hospitality shines through as she greets everyone who stops by. “I love the people, and I love entertaining,” she says. “I’m always up for sharing a cup of hot tea or a glass of wine when my clients come in. I have met so many new friends through this business. I am very grateful, and each one means a great deal to me.” Designers, hoteliers, home builders, boutique owners, staging companies, and new home owners are just a few of the buyers who will stop by and visit Susan. To provide a great inventory for them, Susan and her daughter, Meghan, travel to England several times a year to assemble an exceptional collection of one-of-a-kind pieces. Her clients have come to appreciate her eye for unique and quality items. “I see they value quality,” she says. “I love English antiques for several reasons. The depth of the wood, the lines, the brass hardware, the quality. I have a hard time parting with some of the pieces.” Susan has been successful because she knows her clients like a variety of styles, so she always has a wonderful selection of

62 | SPRING 2020


Susan’s Favorite Finds ARRIVING FOR THE SPRING SHOW AT MARKET HILL:

MIRROR FROM THE COAL BRAN ESTATE, circa 1850, in wood, gesso and gilded. Decorated with fruit and flowers. Breathtaking! LARGE MARBLE TOP PATISSERIE TABLE from France, circa 1880. The marble is so large, it is in two separate pieces, each about five feet long. LATE-19TH-CENTURY ORIGINAL LACQUER BAMBOO CABINET. The provenance is the late Sir David Tang, and it features a marker label engraved on the foot: “W. Needham Circa 1870.” BEAUTIFUL SELECTION OF CRYSTAL CHANDELIERS FROM ITALY. VINTAGE LUGGAGE TRUNKS FROM FRANCE. Beautifully restored, they will make great side tables or coffee tables. We worked hard for a few months securing these. We drove about five hours north of London to a very small village to purchase them. It really is the love for this business that gets us to go through that much effort to provide beautiful and quality pieces to our clients. Susan Horne

“I love English antiques for several reasons. The depth of the wood, the lines, the brass hardware, the quality.” French, Italian, and Spanish antiques as well. “No matter the origin, antiques never go out of style. They go with every trend that may come and go. Antiques are unique, classic, timeless, and full of personality. If you buy a piece with beautiful lines and curves, and it’s built well, it is unlikely to ever go out of style.”

Susan promises to have a great selection of antique furniture, mirrors, chandeliers, silver, ironstone, and more. By her hard work and attention to detail, she has created a brand that followers have come to know and love – Susan Horne Antiques Décor & Lifestyle.

markethillroundtop.com | 63


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Shabby Slips PHOTOS COURTESY OF SHABBY SLIPS

S

habby Slips Home has blossomed from a custom slipcover and upholstery shop to being filled with the finest antiques from all over the country. Consoles, chests, tables, chairs, mirrors, chandeliers, and much more fill the floors, walls, and everything else between the shop in Houston and Round Top. Many antique pieces are re-upholstered in updated fabrics before seeing the showroom floor, giving the space an especially unique look and feel as they are mixed

64 | SPRING 2020

with new pieces. Since1991, Shabby Slips has evolved into the finest blend of new and updated antique furniture. Round Top became an appealing destination for Shabby Slips to expand as owner and interior designer Renea Abbott says, “Round Top is one of the best places in the world to go on that elusive treasure hunt. Market Hill brought a permanent presence to Round Top making it easier for dealers and buyers to shop in a well-lit, climate-controlled environment (air-conditioning is much

needed!), and a great restaurant to meet friends after the shows. It’s a very comfortable shopping experience, and it is a very eclectic mix of dealers and merchandise – old, new, vintage, antiques, and period pieces,” she says. Renea strives to make the spring show more buyer-friendly so that everyone can afford something to take home. The booth will be filled with fun lighting, antique fixtures, dining tables, chairs, accessories, and “all else will be a surprise!” Happy shopping and come see us this spring!


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Vincent Peach PHOTOS COURTESY OF VINCENT PEACH

C

oming from a long line of “pearl men,” Vincent Peach has created a signature brand of fine jewelry, combining rare pearls with mixed metals, exotic leathers, premium diamonds, and his newly expanded equestrian designs.

A native of Nashville, Tennessee, where he still resides, Vincent designs his pieces in a studio attached to his namesake boutique in Marathon Village, and at his new flagship store in the Green Hills area. Drawing inspiration from his love of all things equestrian, luxury lifestyle, and travel, his pieces are vintage and modern, masculine and feminine, bohemian and baroque. While each piece can be considered an heirloom intended to be passed down to future generations, these aren’t your grand-

mother’s pearls. They are bold, expressive conversation starters. Vincent Peach’s designs have something to say about the person wearing them. His cult following includes Carrie Underwood, Reba McEntire, Alice Cooper, Steven Tyler, Taylor Swift, and Miranda Lambert, to name a few. At Market Hill, you can’t miss his showroom. Designed and sketched by Vincent himself, Paul Michael and his son (and righthand man), Jake Michael, hand-built it to the exact specifications. It’s a special experience stepping inside the space to view his fine jewelry, one that reflects the elegance, sophistication, and uniqueness of these pieces.

Come see what we mean by that at the spring show.

markethillroundtop.com | 65


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Woodson Antiques PHOTOGRAPHY BY ASHLEE NOBEL

F

ounded by design duo Blake Craghead and Rick Ingenthon, Woodson Antiques is located in an 1861 farmhouse in Raymore, Missouri, just outside Kansas City. The house was a private residence on Woodson Street until they acquired it in 1985. Annual buying trips to Europe soon followed, and, after each trip, they began hosting open houses, inviting people to shop the antiques and accessories from their hauls. Round Top is a regular trip for Woodson Antiques, as well. Rick says, “I’ve been coming [to Round Top] for a decade now. I can’t imagine not doing this show twice a year. It always inspires. It’s some of the world’s best dealers in one area. You don’t have to travel the globe to find what you are looking for – it’s right here in the heart of Texas.” The people in Round Top are also special to them. “It’s all about the relationship. They become your friends more than clients. They aren’t the cookie-cutter folks. They want that one-of-a-kind piece. “I love finding those special pieces that get me excited, then passing them to an equally excited client,” Rick says. As for how clients can find that special piece and incorporate it into their homes, he says, “I try to ask questions about their personal style and how they use the room. I always tell people there are no rules. Surround yourself with things you love and are passionate about it – it will work!” Rick tells us about the pieces he’s picked for the spring show at Market Hill. “I found a Flemish altar piece with all the bells and whistles – carved angels, marble top, and wonderful carving. I also found a pair of high-back leather chairs. Not the usual wingback, but something that is more transitional. They have the best buttery leather.”

Come meet Rick and Blake at Woodson Antiques at Market Hill. In the meantime, learn more at woodsonantiques.com.

66 | SPRING 2020


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

SvO

Smith vanOsdelle PHOTOS COURTESY OF SVO

S

mith vanOsdelle returns to Market Hill for the spring show, building on 10 years of showing antique and mid-century furniture and décor at Round Top. Scott Smith of SvO has once again assembled an extensive collection of European mid-century design pieces, including Knoll Antimott and Cor from Germany, Desede leather from Switzerland, as well as pieces from Danish designers such as Wanscher, Jalk, Wegner, Hans Olsen, and many others. “We specialize in upscale seating, and we strive to be a ready resource for trade

professionals and design aficionados alike,” Smith says. Stop by SvO at Market Hill to select just the right pair of chairs to put the final touch on your project, or just come relax with an espresso while you recharge your phone and yourself. In the meantime, follow SvO on Instagram @svoantiques. Their website, svoworld.com, will be active during the show, March 19-April 5, with items that are actually on the showroom floor available for purchase.

markethillroundtop.com | 67


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

The Select Pick PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE SELECT PICK

H

ouston native Stacy Graubart is a Round Top regular and returns to Market Hill in the spring. What she loves most about what she does is ‘the thrill of the hunt.’ “I also love all the creative, inspiring people I meet along the way,” Stacy says. This is especially true in Round Top. “I have been coming to Round Top for forever,” she says, “since I was a young girl. I have some long-standing relationships with vendors I’ve met in Round Top and have known for many years.” It continues to be a worthwhile experience, she says, “As a seller, I am able to clear out some of our

“I enjoy throwing eclectic pieces into the mix. I don't follow a rigid style."

Right: Vintage game table and reproduction Chippendale chairs lacquered in Mandarin Red.

68 | SPRING 2020


inventory, and as a buyer, I am able to buy for our current projects. Round Top is special because of the variety of products offered at every price point. You can literally find things in the field for $5 or $50,000.” Her style is clean and classic but always with a bit of whimsy and humor. “I enjoy throwing eclectic pieces into the mix. I don't follow a rigid style. I like there to be an element of surprise and fun in every space.” When it comes to selecting pieces to bring to Market Hill, she says, “Our customers are sophisticated and well-traveled. They like fine things, but don't take themselves too seriously. They appreciate the fact that we source our products all over the country and during our travels. They know they are not going to see the pieces they buy on a showroom floor or at a friend’s house.” Developing a personal relationship with her customers helps her guide them along, but she says ultimately, these pieces have to make you feel something. “We spend a lot of time getting to know our clients, their lifestyles, and how they use their homes; but, to be honest, finding each piece is a gut reaction. It’s just a feeling – you know when the piece is the perfect one.” As for what’s new for spring, Stacy says, “We have a great addition to Market Hill this show! Guest designer Karen Pulaski will showcase a few special pieces from her treasure trove of collectibles. Karen is also bringing some of her Zodiac accent pillows, created from antique celestial maps, printed and fabricated in Italy, from her fine linen brand Tribute Goods. All of their prints are original and made exclusively for them by various artists. Tribute Goods is a mission-based company that gives back 10% of proceeds to artists and educational programs.”

Above: French carved drapery valance showcasing antique French puppets. Right: Zodiac accent pillows, created from antique celestial maps, printed and fabricated in Italy.

Come see Stacy’s select picks for spring and welcome Karen to Market Hill as well. In the meantime, visit www.sgdesignshouston.com/the-select-pick where you can sign up for updates. Learn more about Tribute Goods at tributegoods.com.

markethillroundtop.com | 69


VENDOR

Scan QR Code to watch a video walkthrough of the house architectural salvage project.

VIGNETTES

Scoville Brown Cooperative PHOTOS COURTESY OF SCOVILLE BROWN COOPERATIVE on a jobsite when we chatted with him – a house built in 1873, just two properties up from his shop. “It’s been neglected for 40 years,” he said. “The real estate in our area is depressed, and it doesn’t make sense financially for the owner to restore it. So, what do you do with it? I am willing to disassemble it. It’s not profit-motivated. It’s about preserving the history of it.”

A house built in 1873 Jim is dismantling.

A

t Scoville Brown, you won’t find a chaise lounge or ottoman, but instead a fireplace mantel or stained-glass window. Jim Braunscheidel is in the business of architectural salvage. Unless you’re in the home building or resto industry, or a fan of HGTV’s Fixer Upper, you might not be familiar with what architectural salvage is or what it involves. When a building or home is scheduled to be demolished, Jim goes in and dismantles it, painstakingly removing items of value or intrigue, decorative or functional, including wooden floors, barn doors, crown molding – anything that displays fine craftsmanship or reflects historical significance – and finding other uses for them. This could mean repurposing these items into original designs, or working with clients on a new construction or renovation project. It’s an arduous process of recycling, reducing, and reusing very old and important architectural details that might otherwise be discarded and lost forever. Based in Wellsville, New York, Jim was

70 | SPRING 2020

This is Jim’s passion; one that he has carved into a career. “I started off as a carpenter by trade. I was a homebuilder for 20 years until I had an accident. I was on a jobsite, restoring an elevator, and the car turned on by itself and started moving downward. My leg was caught and injured badly. I was in the hospital for a month. At the time, I had a very successful construction business. I lost everything. I had to redefine myself,” Jim says. “I had been collecting architectural salvage when a friend told me people want to buy this stuff.” This is how he got his start, working with clients who were restoring their homes and in need of authentic architectural elements. “When the housing market crashed, I had to redefine myself again,” Jim says. “I took what I learned from my days as a carpenter and started to build things from the salvage. At Brimfield, around 2008, I had a very inspired set-up. In walked people from all of the high-end retailers and within an hour, I sold as much as it now takes me a month to accomplish – it was crazy!” “They all reached out after the show for custom pieces. I chose to work with Ralph Lauren Co. It started with simple riser platforms and crates and led to display tables. In 2015, I built over 100 tables, a focal point in flagship stores all over the world. But, in 2016, Ralph Lauren restructured,

Front door of the salvage project.

slashing its budget on store development, and I built two tables. This rocked my world again. It was, like, now what?” Jim found himself rebuilding again. “I met Paul Michael, and he invited me to Market Hill,” he says. “We connected. My father, who passed away a few years back, was my rock. Like Paul, my father was firm but fair, expecting the best but understanding. I feel part of the family at Market Hill. I am accepted, and it encourages me to grow and expand.” Another part of his business is expanding his client base, connecting the right people with the right products. “I am new to Texas. I am looking for the right customers to find me. Getting these pieces and parts in the hands of the right people is a priority. It’s why I do what I do.” Meet Jim at Market Hill to hear more about his passion and process and to find the missing piece for your project while also preserving a bit of history.

For more information, visit, scovillebrown.com.


VENDOR

VIGNETTES

Stephanie Wheeler PHOTOGRAPHY BY ULRICH BRINKMANN

“Blooms in Motion “ 60" x 60"

P

ainting flowers has been a longtime passion for Atlanta artist Stephanie Wheeler. In 2003, she introduced to Round Top a series of florals and landscapes that launched her career and created a new visual language that expressed her feelings, creating a sense of calm through color and abstraction in her art. “It’s been a joy to have a place where I can exhibit all of the many forms of art I pursue,” Stephanie says. Stephanie displays a wide range of works at the Market Hill showroom. From vibrant floral canvases to landscapes from her travels, colorful abstracts to clay pot-

“Garden Pot” 48" x 48"

“I allow myself to be surprised, to find a new reality.” tery and female figure sculpture, she offers something new each season. A new series of sculptural collage pieces inspired by her recent trip to Singapore will be featured at the spring show. “My inspiration comes from nature. It offers never-ending fascination. I paint

what I see, and, in that moment, I discover. I allow myself to be surprised, to find a new reality.” Among the places you’ll find Stephanie’s art is Blackberry Farm, the luxury country inn in Walland, Tennessee, where her paintings and other works are displayed in guest rooms. Recently, she teamed up with Atlanta designer Tim Green for her art to be featured at the Orchid Dinner at the Plaza Hotel benefiting the New York Botanical Garden.

To learn more about Stephanie and view her work online, visit stephaniewheelergallery.com.

markethillroundtop.com | 71


MARKET HILL

The Vendors ABLES ANTIQUES

Facebook @MissKittysVintageLifeStyle

ANTICA COLLECTION

anticacollection.com

PROPS ANTIQUES

Facebook @PropsAntiques

PROVENANCE ANTIQUES

provenanceantiquesatlanta.com

ARCHITECTURAL ANARCHY

RECOOP DESIGNS

1stdibs.com/dealers/architectural-anarchy

recoopdesigns.com

ARCHITECT’S DAUGHTER

SACRED HEART ANTIQUES

thearchitectsdaughterblog.com

DEBBIE MICHAEL DON & MARTA ORWIG ANTIQUES ELEPHANT WALK ANTIQUES GALLERY AUCTIONS

galleryauctions.com

HASTENING DESIGN STUDIO

hasteningdesigns.com

MODERN STATE ATELIER

Facebook @Sacred Heart Antiques

SCOVILLE BROWN COOPERATIVE

scovillebrown.com

SHABBY SLIPS STEPHANIE WHEELER

stephaniewheelergallery.com

SUSAN HORNE ANTIQUES

susanhorneantiques.com

SMITH VANOSDELLE

svoworld.com

NOMADIC TRADING COMPANY

THE PLAID VERANDA

PAUL MEYER

sgdesignshouston.com

PAUL MICHAEL COMPANY

vincentpeach.com

PAUL’S WORLD

woodsonantiques.com

nomadictrading.com

THE SELECT PICK

paulmeyerstudios.com paulmichaelcompany.com

VINCENT PEACH WOODSON ANTIQUES

Instagram @PaulsWorldAR

markethillroundtop.com 72 | SPRING 2020


MARKET HILL

The Building BUILDING REAR DEBBIE MICHAEL

RECOOP DESIGNS

SCOVILLE BROWN COOPERATIVE

ARCHITECT’S DAUGHTER SHABBY SLIPS THE SELECT PICK

ANTICA COLLECTION

HASTENING DESIGN STUDIO

THE ELEPHANT WALK

VINCENT PEACH

NOMADIC TRADING CO.

PAUL’S WORLD

WOODSON ANTIQUES

GALLERY AUCTIONS

PLAID VERANDA ANTIQUES

SVO

ABLES ANTIQUES

SMITH VANOSDELLE

RESTAURANT AT MARKET HILL

+ Props Antiques

PAUL MEYER

DON & MARTA ORWIG ANTIQUES

SUSAN HORNE ANTIQUES PROVENANCE ANTIQUES

PAUL MICHAEL COMPANY SACRED HEART ANTIQUES

STEPHANIE WHEELER FINE ART MODERN STATE ATELIER ARCHITECTURAL ANARCHY

ENTRANCE


MARKET HILL

The Vendors ABLES ANTIQUES

Facebook @MissKittysVintageLifeStyle

ANTICA COLLECTION

anticacollection.com

PROPS ANTIQUES

Facebook @PropsAntiques

PROVENANCE ANTIQUES

provenanceantiquesatlanta.com

ARCHITECTURAL ANARCHY

RECOOP DESIGNS

1stdibs.com/dealers/architectural-anarchy

recoopdesigns.com

ARCHITECT’S DAUGHTER

SACRED HEART ANTIQUES

thearchitectsdaughterblog.com

DEBBIE MICHAEL DON & MARTA ORWIG ANTIQUES ELEPHANT WALK ANTIQUES GALLERY AUCTIONS

galleryauctions.com

HASTENING DESIGN STUDIO

hasteningdesigns.com

MODERN STATE ATELIER

Facebook @Sacred Heart Antiques

SCOVILLE BROWN COOPERATIVE

scovillebrown.com

SHABBY SLIPS STEPHANIE WHEELER

stephaniewheelergallery.com

SUSAN HORNE ANTIQUES

susanhorneantiques.com

SMITH VANOSDELLE

svoworld.com

NOMADIC TRADING COMPANY

THE PLAID VERANDA

PAUL MEYER

sgdesignshouston.com

PAUL MICHAEL COMPANY

vincentpeach.com

PAUL’S WORLD

woodsonantiques.com

nomadictrading.com

THE SELECT PICK

paulmeyerstudios.com paulmichaelcompany.com

VINCENT PEACH WOODSON ANTIQUES

Instagram @PaulsWorldAR

markethillroundtop.com 72 | SPRING 2020


ROUND TOP SPRING 2020

Antiques Show Venues Below are listings of the major venues you will find at the Round Top Antiques Show; these are among Paul’s favorites. The following are numerically listed in geographical order, from north to south on Highway 237. Note that there are many other venues in addition to the ones listed. 1. LA BAHIA

9. THE BONEYARD AT ROUND TOP

17. COLE’S

550 Texas Highway 237 Burton, 77835 labahiaantiques.com 979.289.2684

1465 Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 713.899.1674

3625 Texas Highway 237 & Willow Spring Road (FM 954) Warrenton, 78961 colesantiqueshow.com 979.551.5916

MARCH 27 - APRIL 4

2. COUNTY LINE NORTH MARCH 21 - APRIL 4

1822 State Loop 458 Carmine, 78932 770-940-4002

3. THE BIG RED BARN MARCH 30 - APRIL 4

475 Texas Highway 237 South Carmine, 78932 roundtoptexasantiques.com

MARCH 21 - APRIL 4

10. BILL MOORE ANTIQUES MARCH 14 - APRIL 4

1350 N. Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 760.587.1300

11. ROUND TOP MERCANTILE 438 N Washington St, Round Top, 78954 877.568.0253

12. ROYERS ROUND TOP CAFÉ

MARCH 26 - APRIL 4

18. EXCESS I & II MARCH 24 - APRIL 4

Texas Highway 237 & Willow Spring Road (FM 954) Warrenton, 78961 excessfield.com 979. 278.3447

19. NORTH GATE MARCH 19 - APRIL 5

105 Main St. Round Top, 78954 royersroundtopcafe.com 979.249.3611

Texas Highway 237 Warrenton, 78961

13. ELLIS MOTEL 185 Henkel Circle Round Top, 78954

4001 Texas Highway 237 Warrenton, 78961 979.885.8762

MARCH 21 - APRIL 4

14. JUNK GYPSY

21. RENCK HALL

6. MCLAREN’S

1215 Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 gypsyville.com 979.249.5865

4137 Texas Highway 237 Warrenton, 78961 warrentonantiques-renckhall.com

4. BLUE HILLS

MARCH 21 - APRIL 4

1707 S. Texas Highway 237 Carmine, 78932 bluehillsatroundtop.com 979.278.3691

5. THE VENUE

2000 N. Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 beardauction.com MARCH 14 - APRIL 5

1745 Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 mclarensantiquesandinteriors.com 917.900.5036

7. ARBOR ANTIQUES MARCH 25 - APRIL 4

1503 Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 arborantiques.com 888.233.5414

MARCH 19 - APRIL 5

15. MARBURGER FARMS ANTIQUES MARCH 31 - APRIL 4

2248 Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 roundtop-marburger.com 800.947.5799

16. THE COMPOUND MARCH 21 - APRIL 4

20. BAR W

MARCH 19 - APRIL 5

MARCH 26 - APRIL 4

22. ZAPP HALL

MARCH 27 - APRIL 4

4217 S. Texas Highway 237 Warrenton, 78961 zapphall.com 713.824.1157

23. RECYCLING THE PAST MARCH 19 - APRIL 5

1132 FM 1291 N. Round Top, 78954 recyclingthepast.com 979.484.7288

8. MARKET HILL

2550 Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 roundtopcompound.com 979.551.5916

1542 Texas Highway 237 Round Top, 78954 markethillroundtop.com 800.732.3722

More locations and dates are available at roundtop.com.

MARCH 19 - APRIL 5

Market Hill is a 119,000-SF venue that’s unlike anything else around. With free parking, A/C, clean bathrooms, free WiFi, food and drink and, of course, the best vendors in Round Top.

Photography by Ashlee Nobel


MARKET HILL 1542 HWY 237 North Round Top, TX 78954

M A R K E T H I L L R O U N D TO P. COM F O L LOW U S O N I N STAG R A M @ M A R K E T _ H I L L _ R O U N D _ TO P

Profile for paulmichaelhome

Market Hill Magazine Spring 2020  

Read the latest edition of the Market Hill Magazine about our venue in Round Top, Texas.

Market Hill Magazine Spring 2020  

Read the latest edition of the Market Hill Magazine about our venue in Round Top, Texas.