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Arts for Health

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Art Events & Festivals CALENDAR

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Speaking with one Voice for Arts & Culture


Flip the switch. Make Concepts Easy. Use the Arts! For over half a century, Young Audiences of Virginia has enhanced the teaching process through interactive workshops & performances for public, private & home school associations. Visit www.yav.org, call 800-314-ARTS or join us on Facebook to learn more. Serving Schools & Young Summer Camps Audiences in Virginia of Virginia


ARTS

for Health and Community

I am asked almost daily the same question: “Why are the arts so important to you?” Why should I add this to my list of things on whose behalf I need to speak? And at the same time, I get daily briefings from several of my network connections that include requests to contact my elected representatives and implore them to support the budgets of national, state and local arts agencies to help assure the health and vitality of the arts organizations in our communities.

employers, who also state that a high concentration of arts in a city leads to higher civic engagement and a more cohesive community.

Having been an “arts advocate” for many years, I have learned that building the argument that arts and creativity are necessary components for a thriving community is difficult to sell. When the economy goes south, arts programs in our schools, funding for artists and arts organizations is first to the chopping block.

In the pages ahead you will find that art and health are great companions. We can argue, and rightly so, that the arts are fundamental to our prosperity – they inspire us and foster creativity, provide inspiration when times are tough and improve academic performance. But the important thing about advocating for the arts and creative thinking is that they are connected with everything with which we engage, whether it be through design, construction, or observation. Arts and creativity are not separate from the work of science, mathematics, technology and engineering. All are disciplines that need each other and together are the cornerstones of who we are.

While lobbying successfully for more science and mathematics in our educational programs, we need to understand that interrelated programs in creative thinking and implementing ideas come from exposure to an arts curriculum. More and more we are hearing from heads of industry their fears that schools are not training the creative workforce that will be needed in the immediate future. Creative industries span arts, museums, symphonies and theatres. Creative thinking is also required for innovation in technical fields – even beyond the clever innovation of Pixar’s brilliant films we need creative minds to build structures that will support the advancement of communities into the next century. Students with an education rich in the arts have higher GPAs and standardized test scores, lower drop-out rates and a more positive outlook toward their community. Students motivated by the arts have better attention spans and improved memory retrieval – skills that get carried over to success in math and science. There is now ample research available demonstrating that creativity is at the top of the list of skills sought by

Nearly one-half of the nation’s healthcare institutions provide arts programming for patients, families and staff. Most deliver these programs because of their healing benefits to patients – shorter hospital stays, better pain management and less medication.

Patricia Rublein Executive Director Cultural Alliance of Greater Hampton Roads

The Cultural Alliance of Greater Hampton Roads has been an advocate for strong arts and cultural communities since 1983. The Cultural Alliance welcomes membership from all arts and cultural institutions and individuals. To learn more about the work of the Alliance, contact Patricia Rublein at 757.889.9479 or visit www.culturalli.org

SINCE 1983 THE CULTURAL ALLIANCE HAS BEEN THE REGIONAL ADVOCATE ON BEHALF OF ARTS AND CULTURE.


OVERTURE

Friends of the

Arts

Arts for Health and Learning Did you know that Expressive Arts are used for personal exploration and growth, enhancing arts and skills learning, and developing confidence? Within this edition we wish to promote the desire to support young people and families in need of emotional, psychological or special needs services through collaborative arts and therapy. We have called upon local organizations like Tidewater Arts Outreach and Young Audiences of Virginia. Over the past two decades or so, the arts have reinvented the region, as virtually every city and county has seen the opening and expansion of performance venues, museums, galleries or arts centers. There are more than 300 arts organizations in Hampton Roads. With museums and galleries in Chesapeake, Hampton, the historic Triangle of Williamsburg, Yorktown and Jamestown not to mention Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Smithfield, Suffolk, and Virginia Beach – Hampton Roads has more choices per capita than any market in the country. One of the nicest things about having so much variety, is, well … the variety. With all these museums and galleries have come presentations that feel like we are not in Kansas any more. So if you’re not into reading history, but you love to see history reenacted, chances are, your definition of art and history will be accommodated. There is no definitive meaning for art; it is subjective, and it fills our lives everywhere. As Tolstoy says, “We are accustomed to understand art to be only what we hear and see in theatres, concerts and exhibitions, together with buildings, statues, poems, novels . . . But all this is but the smallest part of the art by which we communicate with each other in life. All human life is filled with works of art by which we communicate with each other in life. All human life is filled with works of art of every kind – from cradlesong, jest, and mimicry, the ornamentation of houses, dress and utensils, up to church services, buildings, movements and triumphal processions. It is all artistic activity.” In other words, art is the evidence of our expression. Some of us are compelled to express art on canvas, others with pen (or computer) to paper, others on stage. Some are schooled in their art, others are self-taught; but the art literally bursts forth from them, honestly but “primitively,” in a form we call folk art. Just imagine if we embraced our call to express the art inside us, without self-consciousness, judgment or fear – what we could do! Perhaps that expression would take the form of making paintings or poems, but it’s just as likely that we might learn to play the piccolo, take up bonsai or make a really great crème Brule. Whatever your definition of art, we hope you enjoy this issue of Hampton Roads Bravo! We also hope you will find helpful the major venues and events calendar. Look for our next edition in February 2012. And while you’re deciding how you will express the art inside yourself, choose a few museums and galleries, and go experience someone else’s art.

Paul Darden, Publisher

PUBLISHER

Paul Quillin Darden ART DIRECTOR

Sherril Schmitz CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Bill Griggs Cathy Peyton Patricia Rublein MaryAnn Toboz

©Copyright 2011 by Darden Publishing. The information herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable; however, Darden Publishing makes no warranty to the accuracy or reliability of this information. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the written permission from the publisher. All rights reserved. Published semi-annually in partnership with CULTURAL ALLIANCE OF GREATER HAMPTON ROADS 5200 Hampton Boulevard 757-889-9479 www.culturalli.org DARDEN PUBLISHING

931A Shoal Creek Trail Chesapeake, VA 23320 (757) 389-5473 darden.publishing@cox.net www.bravo-hamptonroadsva.net www.dardenpublishing.net Hampton Roads Bravo! is distributed by friends of Bravo! locations throughout Hampton Roads and our advertisers. Without them, none of this would be possible. To obtain a copy or to locate a Bravo! location near you, please contact Darden Publishing. Thank you for your support.

Cover photo courtesy of Young Audiences of Virginia, Inc.

Support the Arts


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C o n t e n t s 1

Cultural Alliance of Greater Hampton Roads

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OVERTURE from the Publisher

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F E AT U R E S 4

Flip the Switch: Healing from the Inside Out with Interactive Creative Arts Young Audiences of Virginia, Inc.

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Arts for Health

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Creative, Compassionate Healing through Art

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Certainly Not Your Typical Artist

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Calendar of Events

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Ceramic Designers Association

Tidewater Arts Outreach

Gerome Meminger Sr.

Don’t miss the many exciting and culturally diverse events August 2011 through January 2012 in Hampton Roads.

19 Festivals of Hampton Roads

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COURTESY OF YOUNG AUDIENCES OF VIRGINIA, INC.

Flip

the Switch:

I

n 2010, Young Audiences of Virginia touched the lives of over 250,000 students throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia. The visiting Teaching Artists didn’t let their audiences sit. They allowed them to become engaged by touching and feeling instruments; drawing a picture of them in one of their favorite moments of the experience; creating their own story, or their own song. All of a sudden each child found their voice or path to inner well -being in an Art they had never encountered until that day. The switch was flipped, the light turned on. That was the day the healing in their lives began. There are many stories to tell, some almost miraculous, that parents have requested remain private. Others want to share the moments their children became “alive” because of an interactive experience with an Art form. Meet students Malana, Myles, Shelby, and a dedicated teacher, Anglelita Benitez. Here are their stories of Leadership, Self Esteem, Autism, and a Physical Disability.

Malana: Leadership Malana became a student in Young Audiences’ Arts 4 Learning String Residency program. In this program a Teaching Artist spends six weeks with students, after school to experience an art form that is new to them. At the end of the residency, the students perform for their fellow classmates, teachers and parents.

Healing from the Inside Out with Interactive Creative Arts

B Y B I L L G R I G G S , Executive Director

Have you ever wondered what makes that “light” in someone’s mind finally turn on? All of a sudden they understand a concept that had evaded their grasp. A Teaching Artist has just flipped the switch. 4

Hampton Roads Bravo!

Think about it. You are an elementary student who is handed a string instrument without frets (markings to determine where the “notes” are) and you have to learn how to make music with it. Even in college, I found learning to play the violin difficult, at best. Needless to say, my playing sounded more like Jack Benny on a bad night. As a Teaching Artist, one never knows what the student will take away from the experience. It is not the intention to make them professional musicians, although,


tioned by the interviewer. Immediately his expression changes, a broad smile covers his face, and confident words begin to flow regarding his accomplishments in learning how to play the violin. “In violin practice I learned how to hold and play the different strings. I also learned the different musical notes. I had a great time during violin (practice). I had fun playing the violin, and I want to try a different instrument after graduating from Westhaven.“ COURTESY OF YOUNG AUDIENCES OF VIRGINIA, INC.

sometimes that happens. The intention is to learn new concepts and new things about yourself which are hiding deep inside until the use of the Arts “Flips the switch.” Suddenly, other hidden talents, passions, ideas, and desirable traits of leadership emerge. Here is Malana’s story, in her own words. “During my 5th and 6th grade years at Westhaven Elementary School in Portsmouth, I was fortunate enough to learn and play the Violin while attending the Young Audiences Arts for Leaning program. The program has made a great impact on my life by exposing me to music. I used to be a music hater, so I wasn’t too happy at first about joining the program. However, the program taught me that playing music is a great past time. The program gave me the goal of being the best player, so I was always occupied with learning and memorizing music. Eventually, I moved onto the 7th grade and joined the Waters Middle School band, but I had to switch to alto saxophone because there was no string class. If it wasn’t for the violin program, learning saxophone would have been difficult. The violin program is what gave me the knowledge of learning all of my notes ahead of time. My father was amazed that I was able to take those same notes I learned and play them on the piano. I eventually became first chair in the 8th grade, and before I knew it I was heading to the 9th grade at I. C. Norcom High School and became a member of the Marching Greyhound Band. In this band, I was called upon to use my skills to help the other new alto sax players learn their music. I received a special award at the end of the year and have been chosen to be a section leader next year. If it wasn’t for my beginnings with the Young Audiences Arts violin program, I would have never had any musical accomplishments. The violin program put me on the path to getting positions and awards that I’m proud of.” Note: The Interactive Arts Experience can empower a quiet, reserved child to visit their inner soul and discover their path. You never know when you are developing a leader or offering an experience that will change the life of a child. Malana did not start out as a leader and respected by her fellow classmates. She started as a music hater. Young Audiences is proud of Malana, and so happy that we could introduce her to a new world.

As you watch him speak, a different person, one with confidence and self-esteem is present. We discover that he uses the world of music to concentrate on Science and Math studies. “I also learned to use music to relax my mind which helped me with my studies. I will never forget what the program has taught me and I‘m looking forward to playing my Violin for a long time.” This healing of the inner being was done in a matter of weeks, six to be exact. Myles has a new world of confidence in which to live, which no one can take away from him. It is his forever. And yes, today, he has his own violin.

Myles: Self Esteem

A student with Autism: Behavioral Changes

A young man with a tight jaw speaks slowly without expression regarding his time in a Westhaven classroom. His answers are short and clipped, almost as if there was a bit of hidden anger behind each word. The conversation changes to his involvement in Young Audiences’ Arts-4-Learning String Residency program when ques-

When working with a group of children, each one is affected in a different way during an Young Audiences Interactive Arts experience. Anglelita Benitez, a Literacy teacher at Willard Model Elementary School speaks of a surprise result that happened before her eyes. “I wanted to personally thank you and Mr. Stephen Kristoff (a Young Audiences Teaching Artist) for bringing phonological

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Going beyond limitations. I can do with 9 digits when others need 10. Imagine you are a visiting Young Audiences Teaching Artist entering a classroom of wide-eyed children whom you have never met. You are there to utilize your Art as a teaching tool to help the students understand concepts of math, science, music, graphics or literacy. At times you are unaware of physical differences as you focus on their faces, eager to soak up every gem from your Art. Meet Shelby. Shelby looks as happy and engaged as every other kindergarten child in the room. Shelby is different. She is missing the thumb on her right hand. As part of the artist’s teaching procedure, Stephen calls students up to join him to turn pages of the book that the class is creating together. As she stands beside Stephen, he notices that she is missing a thumb. He knows that she would not be able to turn the pages of the book that was being used. Stephen quickly says, “You can turn it, with my help and the help of the your classmates. We can make those pages turn!” Resourceful and talented Stephen begins to compose The Page Turning Song on the spot, teaching the entire class to sing it. Together they turned the pages of the book using teamwork, empowerment and transitioning with music. Shelby discovered that she was not different, nor limited, she could do what others could. Shelby was thrilled that she could do it! Young Audiences is thrilled that Stephen helped her avoid embarrassment and failure using creativity and teamwork. That is what our Teaching Artists do everyday in public, private and home schools throughout Virginia. That my friend, is healing. COURTESY OF YOUNG AUDIENCES OF VIRGINIA, INC.

awareness to our kindergarteners in such an entertaining manner. I dare say it is common knowledge that our youngsters retain information better when they are enjoying themselves. The use of music and movement is a surefire way to get six year olds to become engaged in the learning and you certainly accomplished that. An activity I thought was an effective form of maintaining student engagement includes the use of songs, the “Willouby” song, in particular. Incorporating their names in the song while teaching beginning sounds was such a kick for them!” Ms. Benitiz then focuses on one particular student with Autism who has surprisingly become engaged in the activity. “I can confidently state that your program was indeed time well spent. As a matter of fact, one of our students diagnosed with autism was reluctant to participate at first, but I found him to not be able to resist the temptation to peek over at you and/or Mr. Kristoff as you sang and played instruments to familiar music such as Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star. Seeing him behave appropriately while there and participate (in his own way), was a treat for me to experience especially considering what I know about him and his lack of tolerance for a changed routine.“ What may seem to be a small step for one child is a major leap for another. As Ms. Benitez attests, you can positively effect the life of a child at an early age when incorporating the Arts as a tool to teach Literacy. She adds a great post script to her letter in which a child knows of one concept of an object but discovers another. “P.S. An “a-ha” moment for me was when Stephen took out a saw and a student said, “That’s not an instrument, that’s a tool.” When Stephen played a tune with it, he taught us that it was a tool, a tool for learning beats and rhythms! There is music in everything… even an old saw!”

Young Audiences of Virginia, Inc. began in 1955. Today we make concepts easy to understand in the subjects of Math, Science, Literacy, and Reading using Music, Theater, Dance, Storytelling, and Visual Arts as tools to look at subject matter in a different light. 14 STEM programs are already in place. 757-466-7555 • Visit http://www.yav.org and on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/YAVirginia


arts for

health

B Y C AT H Y P E Y T O N

E

NERGY creates VITALITY and WELL BEING for members of the Ceramic Designers Association (CDA) who worked together to reduce hunger in the community through their annual Empty Bowls Charity Dinner. In partnership with Virginia Wesleyan College and businesses in the area, the event raised more than $21,000 for local charities to feed the hungry.

COURTESY OF CERAMIC DESIGNERS ASSOCIATION

By being members of a close group which share and are open with their creative expression and knowledge, CDA members experienced the benefits of working together. This creative generosity resulted in more than 1000 hand-crafted bowls and numerous pieces of one-of-a kind ceramic art. Participation with this international event not only builds self worth in ceramic artists, as well as the charity beneficiaries, but fosters a development of community, allowing individual members to do something to help others and themselves.

COURTESY OF CERAMIC DESIGNERS ASSOCIATION

For more information about the Ceramic Designers Association, visit their web site at http://www.cdava.com/home.html Cathy Peyton was the Chairman for Empty Bowls 2010 and 2011.

ceramic designers association

ORIGINAL ART TY FOREHAND TITLE: MEDIUM: SIZE: DATE:

“A New Direction” Acrylic and Spray Paint with Birdcage on Canvas 18” x 36” x 1” 2011 tforehand2@gmail.com www.tyforehand.wordpress.com Hampton Roads Bravo!

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‘‘

“I liked being able to participate in the program. It brought out a side of me I didn’t know was possible. Thank you very much for your outreach and caring.”

“Patients enjoyed every moment! Breathtaking! Two thumbs up!”

COURTESY OF TIDEWATER ARTS OUTREACH - PHOTO BY HEATHER PASKO

TIDEWATER ARTS OUTREACH:

“My first night I was able to be comfortable and expressive through ART! Thanks for a wonderful welcome!” “The stories reminded me of home. The music was wonderful.” The Chesapeake, Newport News

Creative, Compassionate Healing through the B Y M A RYA N N T O B O Z These quotes, taken from our surveys, are just a few of the thousands of reasons why we devote ourselves to sharing the joy of the arts to underserved and isolated people through our community outreach organization, Tidewater Arts Outreach. Life in a nursing home, even the best of nursing homes, is often confusing, frustrating, scary, and lonely. We have seen too many residents angry at their surroundings, scared they’ll be forgotten, and parked at the nurses station for hours, with nothing to do. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, more than 50 percent of nursing home residents have no close relatives, and 46 percent have no living children. These two facts are a major reason why an estimated 60 percent of nursing home residents never have visitors.1 Human contact is critical for health. Yet, a University of Maryland study of more than 1,400 “significant others” of nursing home residents found that the number of visits and calls by family and friends declined by half2 after an individual entered a nursing home. Try to imagine how you would feel if you had to leave your home to live in a new environment where you had limited or no access to your family and friends. We mention nursing homes because seniors in congregate care constitute 65% of the persons we serve. We also bring the arts to veterans and their families, patients, staff and visitors at area hospitals;

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families in homeless and domestic violence shelters, low-income pre-schoolers, children and adults with disabilities, and teens who are transitioning through the court system and living in shelter. Thousands of Hampton Roads citizens have special needs and are spending some or all of their time in congregate care settings or dependent care programs. These people may have been successful and productive, just like us, in their earlier years. Now, they live with one or more of the following conditions: they are frail, physically or mentally ill, emotionally impaired, physically or developmentally disabled, depressed and/or isolated from society. We know that nursing home and assisted living residents often have experienced a series of losses: they may have lost physical or mental abilities, a spouse, their home, contact with friends, independence, a career, and more. We work with vets at the Hampton VA Medical Center who struggle emotional or psychological trauma, in addition to physical injury. Our artists also work in shelters with homeless, disabled or victimized women and their children, who are at risk for repeating cycles of poverty. We work with young patients at CHKD, who are dealing with the psychological implications of chronic illness and long-term hospital stays, stressors undoubtedly shared by their parents. The people we serve experience losses that also result, to some degree, in the loss of personal identity. Finally, these individuals are unable to take part in rich cultural experiences of the everyday society that so many of us take for granted.


survey feedback The fact is, people living with disabilities represent the largest minority world-wide3, and they also are considered to be the most disadvantaged. As a culture, we still do a poor job of providing for many of the emotional, social and even basic medical needs of people with disabilities. The situation for our very eldest citizens, should they find themselves institutionalized, can be dire. We created Tidewater Arts Outreach to give the community a bridge for creative involvement with the disenfranchised, the homeless, the elderly and the disabled. Through music, singing, painting, dancing, and storytelling, our artists are bringing compassion and joy; they are opening paths to creative self-expression and creating an excuse for celebration. Their programs present an occasion for stimulation and socialization, offering outlets for emotion and opportunities for retrospection, reminiscing and rekindling. We match hundreds of artists with opportunities to share their talents in more than seventy locations in seven Hampton Roads cities. We mentor them, schedule their programs, provide directions to locations, compensate them, provide feedback, praise, and encouragement, and welcome them into a community of like-minded artists and caregivers. The staff and clients are so appreciative, and the artists are so rewarded, it is no wonder there are waiting lists of artists and places asking for more music and arts. Yet, we struggle to meet the needs in the community, because we are not only developing the programs, we also are educating the community to the needs that exist, helping facility staffs understand the value of the arts in healthcare, and we are fundraising, through events, personal solicitations, grant-writing and awareness-raising. It is a challenging and rigorous schedule for our small staff and dedicated, but often overworked volunteers.

History and Mission Tidewater Arts Outreach was incorporated in March 2004 and received its 501(c)3 designation in May 2004. The program was begun as a result of MaryAnn Toboz’ involvement with Heart and Soul in Salt Lake City, Utah from 1999 to 2002. TAO has presented regular monthly programs in dozens of Hampton Roads facilities since December of 2004. A growing group of talented and dedicated board of directors and advisors work to ensure TAO has the resources it needs to fulfill its mission. The number of programs presented monthly, and locations served, has grown steadily each year. The board engages in regular strategic planning, board performance monitoring and TAO program quality assurance. The strategic plan calls for continued development of TAO programs, growing staff hours, mentoring artists, and utilizing graduate students as interns for support in marketing, evaluation and research. TAO has a staff of five part-time members: executive director, creative services director, development assistant, volunteer coordinator and administrative assistant. This staff interfaces with board members and other volunteers, develops, schedules and monitors our programs; writes grants, meets with funders and donors, and engages in other fundraising activities; recruits and manages volunteers and maintains organizational administrative, legal and financial records. Our success is evidenced in the surveys we submit for feedback from our locations.

FY11 facility STAFF RESPONSES include: • The clients were extremely engaged, even to the point of joining the band on stage and singing into the microphone. They really “came alive” during the performance. • Thank you for always bringing such joy to the lives of our residents. • Clients played an instrument, sang, or danced. Most of them talked about the band for the rest of the night. • TAO programs/artists are engaging and provide unique experiences for residents. They have very mixed cognitive functionality so they enjoy that programs reach all levels. • They gave him a big round of applause and cheered. They told him how much they enjoyed his program and wanted to know when he was going to come back. • Uplifting, nostalgic. Residents especially enjoyed the variety in music selections, the quality, and the personalities of the musicians. TAO always provides us with very special programs that our residents always look forward to. • I had kids tell me that they had a great time and some residents hung up their arts work in their rooms. Kids showed me their finished projects the rest of the day! • Patients were engaged during the program and seemed like they didn’t want them to go. Once they started interacting they laughed and enjoyed socializing and cutting up with each other. Moods were improved. • The musicians were talented, and residents enjoyed the music; the group gave educational information on the instruments and origins/backgrounds which the residents really enjoyed. • There was an “after glow” in the air afterwards and the friendly exchange between the artists and participants was part of it. • Kids enjoyed something most had never experienced before and it helps our clients build confidence in their use and expression of creativity and art.

FY11 program PARTICIPANT RESPONSES include: • I loved the dancing! • I really enjoyed the program and feel it was both therapeutic and relaxing for many of us vets. Thank you for providing such an outlet. • I liked it because I had my own harmonica and I blended into the music. • Their style of singing sparked the crowd. They encouraged participation from the residents and humor is a great healer. • Writing my feelings in the form of song or poetry was great. Writing my own songs helped me get back into poetry. • I love the arts. I enjoyed expressing myself through writing and dance. • I loved their talent, delivery, and enthusiasm! • It was very relaxing and very enjoyable. Thank you very much. • There wasn’t anything else on my mind but the program. • We wanted more! • I really enjoyed getting to actually play the drums instead of just listening to them.

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COURTESY OF TIDEWATER ARTS OUTREACH - PHOTO BY DREW LANDMAN

There are many more high-ranking sur• Help staff connect culturally with patients, families and veys and positive comments from the past year. other staff members from diverse cultures Clearly, TAO music, arts and performing arts • Specific arts activities can ensure that people leave a programs are honoring the elderly and disabled, legacy, and create a lasting expression showing them the community does care, • While the arts cannot cure, they can help heal making a difference in the lives of hundreds of • Provide additional, profound communications special needs individuals and improving morale opportunities for verbal and non-verbal participants at locations served. We are opening hearts, and Music has been shown to preserve cognitive skills in unlocking smiles, voices, and memories. The clients with dementia.6 Jazz dance has been shown to have positive effects on cognition, mood and balance in programs bring hope, peace, and comfort to older adults.7 Study after study shows there are far-reaching people who are in pain, facing loss, and perhaps benefits to having regular, stimulating programs and social feeling confused, forgotten, frightened and experiences in long-term care, and that the arts are an alone. The arts cannot cure, but they can help important tool to help people with special needs engage heal. There are many opportunities for more and thrive. engagement, and many unmet needs. Congregate care staffs are burdened. Benefits to the artists include: Therapists and CNAs work long hours and have • Stipends for work Warwick Forest, Newport News large caseloads and paperwork that must be • Feedback and program support completed, often at the expense of time with • Creative challenge patients, residents and clients. Stress and burnWe created Tidewater Arts Outreach • Intimacy in performance or program out is high; turnover is more than fifty percent • Opportunities for live feedback and program to give the community a bridge for 4 in long-term care . Activities staffs often lack development creative involvement with the resources to build a wide variety of community • New audiences for work relationships to ensure the creative community disenfranchised, the homeless, Our board of directors is tasked with raising $80,000 is regularly engaging with their clients. Nursing the elderly and the disabled. in the next fiscal year, above and beyond the operating homes and hospitals can be lonely for residents budget of $160,000. Our goal is to create an endowment –too much time is spent alone and/or isolated, fund of $100,000, so that we can get off the constant and many relationships are limited to exchanges merry-go-round of simply making ends meet, as we have with caregivers who are challenged to meet the done for years, and take time for serious evaluation, planning and strategic business basic needs associated with dependent care. This leaves little time for quality of life development. We have worked in all these areas over the course of years, and we care, a necessity we feel is as basic as food, medicine, or shelter. In fact, more and recognize the value in devoting more time to these tasks. We are in a unique posimore research shows that some arts interventions can improve functioning in areas tion to influence culture change in long-term care, and help our society realize the where medicine cannot. Through the arts, we help community members use their human potential in the frail, ill, disabled and elderly in our midst. We have the creativity to help their isolated neighbors’ lives be filled with more hope, compassion, chance of creating an organization that will be around to serve Hampton Roads for and inspiration and less loneliness, frustration, and isolation. many, many years to come, but there is a window here that won’t be around Tidewater Arts Outreach music, arts and performing arts forever. If we can secure the needed funding to create a stable, sustainable model, experiences are beneficial in many ways: we will have succeeded. Without needed funding, the human capital that has • They enrich the soul, stimulate the mind and promote wellness through the created this remarkable exchange of talents and compassion will dry up and be healing power of music and the arts, gone, with nothing to fill its place. We would hate to see that happen, and so • They allow our special needs clients to have a voice, a creative choice and an would the thousands of people whom we serve. artistic outlet for self-expression, None of us wants to end up in a nursing home, but if we do, we hope there • They create a sense of community and a source of inspiration for our artists are a variety of music, arts, cultural and sensory experiences to help us fill our days and performers by providing them with opportunities to share their talents, and stimulate our minds, and enable us to continue to relate meaningfully to one • They provide other volunteers the chance to contribute a variety of skills and another and the world around us. As able-bodied artists, we feel our gifts are easy resources that support our humanitarian services and increase the impact of enough to give. One day, we might not be able to drive a car, punch a clock, hoe the back forty or dive off the deep end. But, with luck and with the right plans in donor contributions. place, there will be people to hear our story, and we’ll be able to tell it, creatively. We Further, the arts in healthcare settings: may even pick up a new, creative pursuit – and why not? In retirement, creativity • Help patients feel safe, comfortable and welcomed and play should be our most important pursuits. Thank you for considering how • Reduce anxiety and the experience of pain you might be a part of this vision of a more compassionate and healing community, • People feel connected, heard and appreciated through the arts. • Help people be seen and understood as individuals, not as patients, numbers, Just as our seniors, mothers, teens and children thank us for the music and or by their job descriptions or diseases arts we bring them, we in turn thank you, for your interest in our mission of com• Help to enhance the facility’s community relations and express its values passionate outreach in Hampton Roads. • Reduce staff stress; improves morale5 http://www.theseniorsource.org/pages/StatInfo_nursing.html http://gerontologist.oxfordjournals.org/content/41/5/589.abstract • Enhance a sense of connection with the community http://www.un.org/disabilities/convention/facts.shtml • Has the potential to help reduce staff turnover & attract quality staff http://www.clintmaun.com/index.php5?cID=265 http://www.remo.com/portal/pages/health_rhythms/research.html • Replace activities that can no longer be accomplished with meaningful activities http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7945001?dopt=Citation that are appropriate and achievable http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19228249 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

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NOT your typical Artist

Certainly

Gerome Meminger Sr.

B

orn in Hampton,Virginia. After retiring from the military, he pursued a hidden artistic passion for painting and writing poems to accompany them. Through doing so, Gerome became an artist, poet, and author of the books entitled “Poetry Art & Truth” and two children’s books, “The Lonely Little Blue Book” and “The Adventures of The Little Blue Book–Saving Pennies, Nickels and Dollars”. While enjoying having the ability to express his views with paper, paint and a pen, he writes and paints to stir an emotion, to touch a nerve, or generate a smile. He is a versatile self-taught artist with an innate ability to paint. When looking at a blank canvas, and listening to music, a certain mood may come over Gerome, then he searches the canvas for what he calls “The Sweet Spot” which becomes his starting point. He will visualize a completed work of art in his mind. His preferred medium is acrylic and mixed, due to the fact that sometimes he will paint very fast to capture the vision and the story in his mind, because he says if he waits too long the image slowly fades and the painting may be lost forever. When painting, Gerome is a pioneer and ignore the rules and doesn’t want to try to stay inside the lines, because his style he says is unorthodoxed and he is just being himself. He states, “I want my work to be expressive and let it tell the story through my work.”

At times Gerome will get so involved in the painting with such force, some of the bristles of his brush may come out on the canvas. The bristles on the canvas now becomes very much a part of the painting and one of his signature markings of his work. Gerome’s paintings range from a painted red horizon to an assemblage piece made with wood and iron and whatever. The quote, “one man’s treasure”, well Gerome sees any object as a piece of a treasure that can be placed in his art. As he paints, he says he does not strive for perfection, he strives to produce a heartfelt emotion in his work and possibly a masterpiece. Gerome wants to be written in the history books along with some of the great artist he states. They Too… Once Dreamed… Gerome’s style has been given many titles. Some are described as abstract, other’s bordering on impressionist. His art has been displayed in museums and is collected throughout the United States and in Europe. His work was selected to be hung in the Hampton Virginia Convention Center and his books are in several libraries, to include the inventory of major bookstores such as Barnes & Noble and Books-A-Million. Gerome’s gallery - “Art By Gerome Galleria”, 7 E. Queensway, Downtown Hampton, has over 600 works of art hanging. See for yourself… www.artbygerome.com Facebook - Gerome Meminger

Hampton Roads Bravo!

11


12

Hampton Roads Bravo!


2011-12 August COURTESY OF YORK COUNTY

Thru Amazing Butterflies, Virginia Living Museum, Newport News; Sept 5 $17 adults, $13 children (ages 3-12); 757-595-1900; www.thevlm.org

September 3

Virginia Symphony Concert, Pack a picnic supper, bring a lawn chair or blanket. Pre-concert performance by The Fifes and Drums of York Town, picnic judging at 6 pm. Yorktown Victory Monument; Concert 7:30 pm; Free; 757-890-4490; www.visityorktown.org

3, 10 17

Yorktown Market Days, Fresh produce, meat, seafood, baked goods, cut flowers, quality art, entertainment and more; Riverwalk Landing, Yorktown; 8 am - 12 pm; Free; 757-890-3500; www.visityorktown.org

9Oct 1

Fresh Paint: New Works. Exhibition and sale of the most recent work by ocal artists. Awards, silent auction. Opening reception, Sept 9, 6:30-8:30 pm. Free and open to the public, parking. The Artists Gallery, 608 Norfolk Avenue, Virginia Beach, 757-425-6671; www.theartistsgallery.org

9, 16 “Rhythms on the Riverwalk” Concert Series, Three Fridays of jazz, 23, 30 two Fridays of country. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. Riverwalk Landing, Yorktown; 6:30 - 8:30 pm; Free; 757-890-3500; www.visityorktown.org USAF Heritage of America Band “Airwaves” Concert Series

2, 9 USAF Heritage of America Band “Airwaves” Concert Series, 16, 23 Musicians from Langley Air Force Base. Bring lawn chairs. Riverwalk Landing, Yorktown; 6:30 pm; Free; 757-890-3500; www.visityorktown.org 4 & 11 “Shagging on the Riverwalk” Beach Music Concert Series, Riverwalk Landing, Yorktown; 6:30 - 9:30 pm; Free; 757-890-3500; www.visityorktown.org

9

Larry the Cable Guy with Reno Collier, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 7 pm & 9:30 pm; $82, $72, $62, $52; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

10

Point of Grace, Jaci Velasquez and Salvador, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 2 pm; $42, $37, $27, $22; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

10

Star Party/Laser Light Night, Virginia Living Museum, Newport News; Free observing at sunset; Planetarium program 7:30 pm; Laser light shows: family fun 8:30 pm, hard rock 10 pm, Pink Floyd 11:30 pm; $6 per show; 757-595-1900; www.thevlm.org

17-18 24-25

Fall Native Plant Sale, Virginia Living Museum, Newport News; 757-595-1900; www.thevlm.org

6, 13, Yorktown Market Days, Fresh produce, meat, seafood, baked goods, cut 20, 27 flowers, quality art, entertainment and more; Riverwalk Landing, Yorktown; 8 am - 12 pm; Free; 757-890-3500; www.visityorktown.org

7, 14 The Fifes and Drums of York Town, Yorktown Battlefield Visitor 21, 28 Center; Included with admission; 3:45 pm; 757-898-9418; www.visityorktown.org 13

Star Party/Laser Light Night, Virginia Living Museum, Newport News; Free observing at sunset; Planetarium program 7:30 pm; Laser light shows: family fun 8:30 pm, hard rock 10 pm, Pink Floyd 11:30 pm; $6 per show; 757-595-1900; www.thevlm.org

20

Celebrate Butterflies Day, Virginia Living Museum, Newport News; $17 adults, $13 children (ages 3-12); 757-595-1900; www.thevlm.org

21

Poisoned Dwarf, Celtic music focusing on Irish traditional music in the churchyard of Grace Episcopal Church. Bring lawn chairs and blankets for seating and pack a picnic supper; 111 Church Street, Yorktown; 5 pm; Free; 757-890-4490; www.visityorktown.org

23, 25 La Traviata (Presented by Lyric Opera), The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; Sept 23, 8 pm; Sept 25, 2:30 pm; Call for ticket info 757-446-6666; www.lyricoperavirginia.org

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE FERGUSON CENTER

6Surfs Up! Exhibition and Sale of Surfing related art. Raffle and silent auction Sept 3 to benefit Autism and Healing Surfers. Surfers Reception, Aug 20, 6-8:30 pm. Painting demonstrations by Bob Langston and Rick Romano TBA. Free and open to the public, free parking; The Artists Gallery, 608 Norfolk Avenue, Virginia Beach, 757-425-6671; www.theartistsgallery.org

Point of Grace

Jaci Velasquez

Larry the Cable Guy


OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 2011 EVENTS

October 1

Yorktown Wine Festival, Sample wines from premiere wineries throughout Virginia. Art and food vendors plus entertainment. Rain or Shine. Riverwalk Landing, Yorktown; 12 to 6 pm; Admission $ 757-877-2933; www.villageevents.org

1

Chesapeake Bay Wind Ensemble Concert: Creepy Mansion, Mary T. Christian Auditorium in Templin Hall, Thomas Nelson Community College, Hampton, 7:30 pm; Tickets available at door, $5 for adults. Children under 18 free; www.cbwe.org

The Fab Faux

2 Chesapeake Bay Wind Ensemble Concert: Creepy Mansion, Tabb High School, 4431 Big Bethel Road, Yorktown, 3 pm; Tickets available at door, $5 for adults. Children under 18 free; www.cbwe.org

k.d. lang

2

7-29

The President’s Own U.S. Marine Band, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 3 pm; Ticket request forms available at the Ticket Office or in Daily Press ads beginning Sept 1; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

COURTESY OF THE FERGUSON CENTER

COURTESY OF THE FERGUSON CENTER

8

Herbie Hancock, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 7 pm; $59, $49, $39, $32; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

14

The New Mel Brooks Musical Young Frankenstein, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 8 pm; $67, $57, $47, $37; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

15

The New Mel Brooks Musical Young Frankenstein, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 2 pm & 8 pm, $67, $57, $47, $37; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

16-17

Stockley Gardens Fall Arts Festival presented by Hope House Foundation; Saturday 10 am - 5 pm; Sunday noon - 5 pm; Stockley Gardens Park located off Olney Road in the Ghent section of Norfolk; www.stockleygardens.com

19

Yorktown Day, Patriotic ceremonies, a parade, fifes and drums performances, and demonstrations by “The Old Guard” commemorate the 230th anniversary of America’s momentous Revolutionary War victory at Yorktown. Yorktown Battlefield; 9 am-5 pm; Free; 757-898-2410; www.visityorktown.org

20

State Choir of Russia, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 7:30 pm; $37, $32, $27, $22; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

21

Tony Bennett, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 8 pm; $117, $97, $87, $77; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

Tony Bennett

14

7

“Rhythms on the Riverwalk” Concert Series, Features three Fridays of jazz followed by two Fridays of country. Bring lawn chairs and blankets for seating. Riverwalk Landing, Yorktown; 6:30 - 8:30 pm; Free; 757-890-3500; www.visityorktown.org

7

The Fab Faux, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 8 pm; $79, $59, $49, $39; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

8

Yorktown Market Days and Fall Festival Celebration, Fresh produce, meat, seafood, baked goods, cut flowers, quality art and entertainment, ALSO hayrides, a pumpkin patch and Children’s Hay Maze, Face Painting, and Children’s Activities. Riverwalk Landing, Yorktown; 8 am-3 pm; Free; 757-890-3500; www.visityorktown.org

Hampton Roads Bravo!

Herbie Hancock

9

The President’s Own U.S. Marine Band

2nd annual invitational glass exhibition & sale, Altered Glass and Crystal Works, Manipulations in Glass, featuring works by selected local glass artists and members of the Artists Gallery Glass Guild. A cut above the ordinary, works include fused glass, lampwork glass, blown glass, stained glass, slumped or formed glass, and carved glass. On-site demonstrations on selected Saturdays TBA, silent auctions, and more. Gala opening reception Oct 7, 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. Open to the public. Refreshments, free parking; The Artists Gallery, 608 Norfolk Avenue, Virginia Beach, 757-425-6671; www.theartistsgallery.org

Star Party/Laser Light Night, Virginia Living Museum, Newport News; Free observing at sunset; Planetarium program 7:30 pm; Laser light shows: family fun 8:30 pm, hard rock 10 pm, Pink Floyd 11:30 pm; $6 per show; 757-595-1900; www.thevlm.org

COURTESY OF THE FERGUSON CENTER

1 k.d. lang and The Siss Boom Bang with special guest Teddy Thompson, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 8 pm; $73, $63, $58, $43; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

COURTESY OF THE FERGUSON CENTER


Gypsy Fire: Compañia Flamenca Jose Porcel, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 7:30 pm; $44, $39, $34, $29; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

29

Herman’s Hermits starring Peter Noone & Davy Jones of The Monkees, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 8 pm; $49, $44, $39, $34; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

November 4Jan 3

Gypsy Fire: Compañia Flamenca Jose Porcel COURTESY OF THE ARTISTS GALLERY

27

COURTESY OF THE FERGUSON CENTER

Night of the Living Museum, Virginia Living Museum, Newport News; 5-9 pm. Admission fee TBA; 757-595-1900; www.thevlm.org

COURTESY OF THE FERGUSON CENTER

22

Peter Noone

Artists Gallery Annual Holiday Boutique, Paintings, Ceramics, Woodcarvings, drawings, Glass, Jewelry, and more, created especially for Holiday Gift-giving . Gala Opening Champagne Reception Friday, Nov 4, 6:30-8:30 pm. Raffle. Silent Auction. Additional Open House with refreshments, Nov 12, 12 noon - 4 pm. Free and open to the public, refreshments, free parking; The Artists Gallery, 608 Norfolk Avenue, Virginia Beach, 757-425-6671; www.theartistsgallery.org 4 Idina Menzel, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 8 pm; $72, $62, $57, $42; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org 11 Veterans Day Ceremony, “Letters from War” is the theme of this annual event in which all veterans are honored. York Hall, 301 Main Street, Yorktown; 12 pm; Free; 757-890-3500; www.visityorktown.org

Winter Snow, Artists Gallery Holiday Boutique

12

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE FERGUSON CENTER

Star Party/Laser Light Night, Virginia Living Museum, Newport News; Free observing at sunset; Planetarium program 7:30 pm; Laser light shows: family fun 8:30 pm, hard rock 10 pm, Pink Floyd 11:30 pm; $6 per show; 757-595-1900; www.thevlm.org

12 - 13 Yorktown Holiday Open House Weekend, Historic Yorktown. Special events, festive decorations, special sales, discounts, door prizes, strolling entertainment, and much more; Hours of operation vary by business. 8 am-5 pm; Free; 757-890-4490; www.visityorktown.org 13

National Acrobats of the People’s Republic of China, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 3 pm & 7 pm; $42, $37, $32, $22; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

15

Masters of Illusions – Live!, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 7:30 pm; $72, $57, $52, $42; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

17

Lewis Black, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 7:30 pm; $67, $57, $47, $37; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

Idina Menzel National Acrobats of the People’s Republic of China

12 Yorktown Market Days, As part of the Yorktown Holiday Open House Weekend, the market will operate with extended hours and offer items unique to the holiday season, in addition to the usual array of fresh produce, meat, seafood, baked goods, cut flowers, quality art, and more. Riverwalk Landing, Yorktown; 8 am-3 pm; Free; 757-890-3500; www.visityorktown.org

Note: Program will contain adult language and content.

Lewis Black COURTESY OF THE FERGUSON CENTER

Hampton Roads Bravo!

15


NOVEMBER 2011-JANUARY 2012 EVENTS

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE FERGUSON CENTER

Dave Koz & Friends

23Star of Wonder: Mystery of the Christmas Star, Virginia Dec 31 Living Museum, Newport News; $4 plus museum admission $17 adults, $13 children (ages 3-12); 757-595-1900; www.thevlm.org

COURTESY OF THE FERGUSON CENTER

23Laser Holidays, Virginia Living Museum, Newport News; Dec 31 $4 plus museum admission $17 adults, $13 children (ages 3-12); 757-595-1900; www.thevlm.org

Jonathan Butler

Rick Braun Candy Dulfer

27

Miracle on 34th Street, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 3 pm & 7:30 pm; $42, $32, $27, $22; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org Paul Anka

30

Paul Anka “Christmas My Way”, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 7:30 pm; $89, $79, $69, $59; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

COURTESY OF THE FERGUSON CENTER

Miracle on 34th Street

16

2

Christmas Tree Lighting, A tradition that began in 1945 continues with the Yorktown Christmas Tree Lighting, 7:30 pm; Evening highlights include a 7 pm performance by The Fifes and Drums of York Town at the Victory Monument, festive music at Riverwalk Landing, the procession of lights through the historic village, and the arrival of Santa and Mrs. Claus. Free; 757-890-3500; www.visityorktown.org

3

Christmas Market on Main, Features arts and crafts, demonstrations, roasted chestnuts and hot cider, entertainment, and more. Historic Main Street, Yorktown; 10 am-4 pm; Free; 757-890-3500; www.visityorktown.org

3

Yorktown Lighted Boat Parade, Festively decorated sail and power boats compete for “Best of Show.” The Yorktown waterfront is bedazzled with holiday sights and sounds, including a spectacular floating parade of lights, caroling around a beach bonfire, musical performances and complimentary hot cider. Yorktown waterfront. 6-8 pm; Free; 757-890-4970; www.visityorktown.org

Hampton Roads Bravo!

COURTESY OF YORK COUNTY

December

4

Cookies with Santa, Christmas is alive at York Hall where children and parents can visit with Santa Claus, enjoy tasty treats, and shop for holiday gifts in The Gallery at York Hall; Cameras are encouraged. 301 Main Street, Yorktown; 1-4 pm; Free; 757-890-4490; www.visityorktown.org

5

Jingle Bell Rock with Eddie Money, Lou Gramm and Mickey Thomas, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 7:30 pm; $62, $57, $47, $42; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

6

Dave Koz and Friends Christmas Tour 2011 with Special Guests Rick Braun, Jonathan Butler, and Candy Dulfer, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 7:30 pm; $69, $59, $49, $43; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

10

Yorktown Market Days, Fresh produce, meat,d seafood, baked goods, cut flowers, quality art, entertainment and more; Riverwalk Landing; 8 am-12 pm; Free; 757-890-3500; www.visityorktown.org

Yorktown Market Days


10

Chesapeake Bay Wind Ensemble Concert: A Hampton Roads Holiday, Mary T. Christian Auditorium in Templin Hall, Thomas Nelson Community College, Hampton, 7:30 pm; Tickets available at door, $5 for adults. Children under 18 are free; www.cbwe.org

10

Star Party/Laser Light Night, Virginia Living Museum, Newport News; Free observing at sunset; Planetarium program

11

Chesapeake Bay Wind Ensemble Concert: A Hampton Roads Holiday, St Kateri Tekakwitha Catholic Church, 3800 Big Bethel Rd, Yorktown, 3 pm; Tickets available at door, $5 for adults. Children under 18 free; www.cbwe.org

12

Celtic Woman “A Christmas Celebration — The Symphony Tour”, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 8 pm; $89, $74, $64, $54; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

13

Chesapeake Bay Wind Ensemble Concert: A Hampton Roads Holiday, Kimball Theatre, Merchant’s Square, Duke of Gloucester St, Williamsburg, 7:30 pm; Tickets available at door, $12 for adults, $10 for senior citizens. Children under 18 free; www.cbwe.org

17

The Nutcracker with the American Youth Ballet Company (Presented by Community Alliance for the Performing Arts Fund (CAPA), The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 7 pm; Call for ticket info 757-229-8535; www.capafund.org

18

The Nutcracker with the American Youth Ballet Company (Presented by Community Alliance for the Performing Arts Fund (CAPA), The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 2 pm; Call for ticket info 757-229-8535; www.capafund.org

31

Noon Year’s Day, Virginia Living Museum, Newport News; $17 adults, $13 children (ages 3-12), plus extra fee for some activities; 757-595-1900; www.thevlm.org

January 2012

Toyland Parade, Decorate a stroller or wagon, or even yourself, and join in the 1:30 pm parade. Santa and Mrs. Claus will be on hand and Mrs. Claus will host her own storytelling show. The Polar Express will be chugging along through Riverwalk Landing. All aboard! 1 pm; Free; 757-890-3500; www.visityorktown.org

COURTESY OF CHESAPEAKE BAY WIND ENSEMBLE

10

7:30 pm; Laser light shows: family fun 8:30 pm, hard rock 10 pm, Pink Floyd 11:30 pm; $6 per show; 757-595-1900; www.thevlm.org

Breakfast with Santa, Join Santa and Mrs. Claus for a kid-friendly breakfast. Experience the enchantment on the children’s faces as they relay their Christmas wish list to Santa. Special treats for the kids. Riverwalk Restaurant, Yorktown waterfront. Seating is limited. 8:30 am; Tickets Required. Admission $ 757-875-1522; www.visityorktown.org

COURTESY OF THE ARTISTS GALLERY

10

The Artists Gallery

6Feb 4

Fabulous Forgeries 2012, the very popular annual exhibition and sale of works by artists who re-create paintings after the Great Masters, or carry them a step further, or use a bit of humor in the re-creations and giving homage to the Great Masters. A surprise visit from one of the great masters himself, who will present the PEOPLES CHOICE AWARDS. Special Catherine Toscano Kastenbaum Memorial Award of $500. Opening reception, Jan 6, 6:30-8:30 pm. Refreshments, parking, free and open to public; The Artists Gallery, 608 Norfolk Avenue, Virginia Beach, 757-425-6671; www.theartistsgallery.org

Hampton Roads Bravo!

17


JANUARY EVENTS 2012

13

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 8 pm; $69, $59, $49, $39; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

14

Star Party/Laser Light Night, Virginia Living Museum, Newport News; Free observing at sunset; Planetarium program 7:30 pm; Laser light shows: family fun 8:30 pm, hard rock 10 pm, Pink Floyd 11:30 pm; $6 per show; 757-595-1900; www.thevlm.org

19

21

18

Larry King, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 7:30 pm; $72, $62, $57, $42; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org Damn Yankees, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 8 pm, $62, $52, $47, $37; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org

Hampton Roads Bravo!

Larry King

22

Damn Yankees, The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 3 pm, $62, $52, $47, $37; 757-594-8752; www.fergusoncenter.org 27 King & I (Presented by Lyric Opera), The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 8 pm; Call for ticket info 757-446-6666; www.lyricoperavirginia.org COURTESY OF THE FERGUSON CENTER

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

COURTESY OF THE VIRGINIA LIVING MUSEUM, OLIVIA TRISKA-2010

COURTESY OF THE FERGUSON CENTER

Virginia Living Museum Bay Aquarium

29 King & I (Presented by Lyric Opera), The Ferguson Center for the Arts, 1 University Place, Newport News; 2:30 pm; Call for ticket info 757-446-6666; www.lyricoperavirginia.org


2011-12 August

November

Big Bands on the Bay, Ocean View, 800-368-3097

100 Miles of Lights, Hampton Roads, 888-493-7386, ext. 100

TGIF Summer Concert Series, Bennett’s Creek Park off of Shoulders Hill Rd., Suffolk, 514-7267

Celebration in Lights, Newport News, 926-1400

Fridays at The Fountain Concert Series, Newport News, 873-2020 Downtown Hampton Saturday Summer Street Festival, Hampton, 727-1641 84th Hampton Cup Regatta, Hampton, 329-4502 East Coast Surfing Championships, Virginia Beach, 800-822-3224

September Verizon Wireless American Music Festival, Virginia Beach, 491-7866

Chesapeake Heritage Arts Festival, Chesapeake, 382-6411 Grand Illumination & Parade, Portsmouth, 623-1757 Holiday Lights at the Beach, Virginia Beach, 800-822-3224 Indian River Christmas Craft Show, Chesapeake, 382-6411 Oyster Point Oyster Roast, Newport News, 926-1400 Oyster Festival, Urbanna, 804-758-0368 Veteran’s Day Ceremony, Newport News, 247-8523 Veteran’s Day Parade, Virginia Beach, 468-2357 Winter Wonderland in Olde Towne, Portsmouth, 393-8543

Hampton Bay Days, Hampton, 727-1641 Blues at the Beach, Virginia Beach, 491-7866 A Taste of Suffolk: A Downtown Street Festival, Suffolk, 514-4130 Festa Italiana, Virginia Beach, 491-7866

December

State Fair of Virginia, Richmond, 804-994-2800

Celebration in Lights, Newport News, 926-1400

The Neptune Festival, Virginia Beach, 498-0215

Christmas Parade, Williamsburg, 800-363-6511 Grand Illumination, Williamsburg, 800-HISTORY

October

Grand Illumination Parade, Norfolk, 623-1757

Yorktown Wine Festival, Riverwalk Landing, Yorktown, 877-2933

Holiday Parade & Grand Illumination, Suffolk, 923-2360

37th Annual Fall Festival of Folklife, Newport News, 926-1400

Hometown Holiday Parade, Virginia Beach, 800-822-3224

Reenactment of the York Town, Virginia Tea Party of 1774, Riverwalk Landing, Yorktown, 898-1936

Hollydazzle, Newport News, 926-1400

33rd Annual Suffolk Peanut Fest, Suffolk, 539-6751

Hampton Holly Days Parade, Hampton, 727-8311

22nd Annual Lighted Boat Parade, Hampton, 727-8311 Olde Towne Holiday Music Festival, Portsmouth, 393-5111

Yorktown Market Days and Fall Festival Celebration, Riverwalk Landing, Yorktown, 890-3500 Craft Beer Festival, Virginia Beach, 491-7866 Hope House Foundation’s Stockley Gardens Fall Arts Festival, Ghent section of Norfolk, 625-6161 23rd Annual Town Point Virginia Wine Festival, Norfolk, 441-2345

Call for more information, times and dates.


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Hampton Roads Bravo - August 2011 Edition  

Art Events & Festivals CALENDAR AUGUST 2011-JANUARY 2012. Speaking with one Voice for Arts & Culture. For over half a century, Young Audienc...

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