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PAULBAMSON


PAULBAMSON

BIOGRAPHY I was born in Nigeria but have lived in Nashville, TN for most of my life. For as long as I can remember, drawing has always come easily to me. As I got older, both math and art emerged as strengths. During my time at Montgomery Bell Academy, I gained a greater appreciation for the fine arts, taking Art all four years, and excelled in my math courses as well. This led me to pursue an Architecture degree at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. I draw inspiration from my obsession with technology, movies, and the arts. With a desire to help others any way that I can, I aspire to never stop learning, continue mastering my skills, and better lives through design. With these goals in mind, I plan to eventually start my own practice.

DESIGN PHILOSOPHY Design is problem-solving at its core. The intent is to make lives easier, more efficient, and ultimately better. When it comes to architecture, design becomes about the connection between space and its occupants, making it the perfect combination of pragmatism and poetics, math and art, engineering and design. Architecture requires a designer to have a basic knowledge of a variety different fields and be versed in human behavior and interaction.

CONTACT INFORMATION 2945 Steamboat Drive, Nashville, TN, 37214 615.568.3957 - paultbamson@gmail.com Resume - www.linkedin.com/in/paulbamson Publications - www.issuu.com/paulbamson


CONTENTS SELECTEDWORKS 1 2 3 4

Activate East TVA Tower - Fall 2014 Lone Oaks Inn Cabin - Spring 2014 Discover Center - Spring 2014 Visitor Center - Summer 2014

4 26 36 50

DESIGNPROJECTS 5 6 7 8

Lantern - Fall 2014 70 Visitor Center Publication - Summer 2014 74 IMPRINT Website - Fall 2014 76 Photography 80


ACTIVATETVA


FALL2014 PROFESSORS - James Rose and Keith Boswell FAIA, SOM Technical Partner PARTNERS - Christina Lulich and Ryan Stechmann AWARDS - Brewer Ingram Fuller Sustainable Design Award 2014 Winner Downtown is the urban heart of a largely suburban Knoxville. It is a 15 minute walk from the University of Tennessee and houses many of Knoxville’s museums, convention centers, parks, and corporate headquarters. One of the companies that calls Knoxville home is The Tennessee Valley Authority, also known as TVA. TVA is a government corporation that is responsible for providing affordable electricity to over 9 million people in the Tennessee Valley. TVA owns two large towers in the downtown area. These office towers were the headquarters of TVA for many years and additional office space in the East Tower was leased out to other companies and businesses. An atypical trend in most cities, Knoxville has a surplus of office space compared to residential. The low demand for office space made it difficult for TVA to lease in the currently unoccupied East Tower. Because the East Tower is empty, TVA has been looking for options to sell and/ or renovate the building to put it back to use. There is, however, a high demand for residential, and my team and I expect that with an increase in downtown residents, an increase in office space demand will follow. Thus, we have left two levels of our design unoccupied for future development and leasing, allowing for program adaptability. The two MEP office levels are designed with maximum open space for flexibility. The conceptual basis for this project is to activate the existing, static TVA complex through dynamic strategies which promote TVA’s goals for innovation in high performance design and increased community interaction. The location of the site within downtown Knoxville, at the terminus of Market Square, presents opportunities for views, community interaction, and improved efficiency through increased downtown density. This design aims to activate the plaza, interior spaces, and facade. Knoxville has not yet made a significant appearance on the sustainable design scene, but a retrofit design of the iconic TVA towers could become a model for future design in that direction. Thus, the goal is to maximize energy performance primarily on the facade level but also through storm-water collection, greywater reuse, and rooftop solar power collection. Through an innovative approach to existing photovoltaic-operated louver technology, we have designed a dynamic facade which minimizes solar heat gain, maximizes diffused light and city views, controls fresh air circulation for the HVAC system, and also aesthetically activates downtown Knoxville. Pollution from water runoff damages ecosystems and contaminates limited freshwater. Our strategy for low impact development is a series of bioswales with vegetation that can withstand extreme moisture. These gardens collect the storm-water onsite, minimize runoff, and support a habitat appropriate for birds and butterflies. Through the combination of planted plaza space, green roofs, and permeable paving material on the walkable surfaces, permeable material covers 70% of our site. The increase in planted material helps to filter out pollution in the air in the most densely-occupied outdoor spaces on-site. The design increases both public park space and downtown density. Also, by transforming a currently unoccupied building into leasable apartments, density will increase dramatically during the day and night.


DOWNTOWN KNOXVILLE KAT Trolley Downtown Loop Gay Street Trolley Summit Hill Drive TVA Complex Public Parking Garage Market Square

WALKABLE DOWNTOWN Our site is located in the center of downtown Knoxville. Local amenities are walkable and parking lots are available nearby. Parking Lots Market Square


SITE PLAN | DOWNTOWN KNOXVILLE

7


EXISTING TVA PLAZA

PROPOSED PLAZA SOLUTION


VIEW FROM SUMMIT HILL DRIVE

9


B

MEP OFFICE ENTRANCE

[3]

OPEN TO BELOW

RESIDENTIAL STORAGE

[1] [2]

OPEN TO BELOW

A

A

OPEN TO BELOW

[4]

B

[4]

[4]

[4]


VIEW FROM MARKET SQUARE PLAZA LEVELS | FLOORS 1-2 The level of the lower plaza occurs 7’ below Market Square level. This is where the primary residential entrance occurs. Alongside the plaza is a zone of retail which continues onto the Market Square level. The second level occurs 6’4” above Market Square level, allowing for a gradually-sloping (1:20) accessible ramp. On this level is the primary MEP Office entrance, residential loading dock, residential storage units, and retail space along Wall Avenue.

PROGRAM 1 Trash and Recycling Room 2 Mechanical and Plumbing Shaft 3 Multipurpose Room 4 Unfinished Retail Tenant Space

11


ADMINISTRATION AREA

[8]

[8]

[11]

[10] [13]

[14]

[10]

[6]

[3] [1]

A

[11]

[7]

[9]

[2]

A

[10]

[8] [4]

[12]

[8]

[7]

DESIGN & PRODUCTION AREA

[8]


VIEW OF NORTHWEST ATRIUM STAIR OFFICE LEVELS | FLOORS 3-6 The two MEP office levels occur above the main entrance. The Market Square level retail provides an occupiable green roof for outdoor meetings for MEP employees. These levels are designed to achieve maximum daylighting. Offices are either concentrated in the tighter areas or floating within the open areas. An atrium in the northwest corner brings in additional diffuse light and unites the two office levels. PROGRAM 1 Trash & Recycling Chute 2 Mechanical Room 3 Men’s Restroom 4 Women’s Restroom 5 Computer Storage 6 Printing Center 7 Storage

8 Conference Room 9 Resource Library 10 Executive Office 11 Visitor’s Office 12 Multipurpose 13 Break room 14 Mail Room

13


[B]

[A]

[A]

[B]

[C]

[C]

[5] [4]

[1]

A

[2]

[3] A

[C]

[C]

[B]

[A]

[A]

[B]

104 TOTAL (10 ADA UNITS)

1,568sf

x32

1,196sf

x32

1,008 sf

x16

672sf

x8

504sf

x16


B

VIEW [A] ROOM [A] OF UNIT B LIVING

[B]

RESIDENTIAL LEVELS | FLOORS 7-14 We designed units with maximum openness for daylighting and views. Most bedrooms have windows and all windows are above adjacent buildings, so every unit has views over Knoxville. The unit sizes range from micro unit to large 2-bedroom. PLAN LAYOUT INFLUENCE Because our goal was to activate the facade both through solartracking louvers and a randomized modular facade, the module placement largely determined the placement of rooms within the plans. No floor plans are exactly the same because modules move around per floor. Program only moves when necessary, and it can be seen in the floor plans where periodically a residential unit layout is flipped.

[B]

PROGRAM 1 Trash and Recycling Chute 2 Mechanical Room [E] 3 Printing Center 4 Studio 5 Workout Facility 6 Yoga Room [E] 7 Storage LEVEL 7 AMENITIES 1 Trash and Recycling Chute [D] 2 Mechanical Room 3 Multipurpose Meeting Space 4 Studio A 5 Game and TV Room [E] 6 Movie Room 7 Storage

[3]

[4] [5]

[1]

[2] [7] [6] [7]

[E]

15 [B]

[A]

[A]

[B]


[1]

[2] A

[3]

A


VIEW OF OCCUPIABLE ROOF DECK ROOF DECK | FLOOR 15 An occupiable roof deck provides a nice place for residents to enjoy and a has leasable event space. This also references the many roof decks in Market Square which you can look over at this view. PROGRAM 1 PV Inverter 2 Catering Kitchen 3 Table Storage

17


Gypsum Board

Sprinkler Wood Slat Ceiling Recessed Can Lighting Kitchen Exhaust Recessed Strip Lighting

Acoustic Tile

See HVAC, right

TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL REFLECTED CEILING PLAN Typical ceiling height: 10’ - Double-height micro units: 27’4” The ceilings are composed of a variety of materials adding variety to the spaces.


HOT WATER SUPPLY PIPE HOT WATER RETURN PIPE

COLD WATER SUPPLY PIPE COLD WATER RETURN PIPE

TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL HVAC The fan coil system makes use of the pipes from the existing four-pipe system and minimizes ducts. Fresh and exhaust air are handled at the facade through the module’s fan coil units. The rest of the spaces are conditioned by interior fan coil systems.

19


Original TVA Entrance


EAST TOWER | SECTION AA Sanyo Hit Bifacial Solar Panels Atrium

15’

Mechanical Shaft

Mechanical Room

Trash Chute

Drain, Plumbing, and HVAC Pipes

ROOF DECK

13’8”

LARGE UNITS

13’8”

LARGE UNITS

13’8”

LARGE UNITS

13’8”

LARGE UNITS

27’4”

SMALL/ LARGE UNIT MIX

27’4”

SMALL/ LARGE UNIT MIX

Double Height Micro Unit

Building Amenities

13’8”

ADA Accessible, Multi-terraced Plaza

LEASABLE OFFICE

13’8”

LEASABLE OFFICE

13’8”

MEP OFFICE

17’0”

MEP OFFICE

13’8”

STORAGE

13’4”

RETAIL & SERVICE

Building Cistern

Bioswales for Storm Water Collection

21


SOUTH ELEVATION


MODULAR ENVELOPE 13’8” modules are prefabricated offsite for easy onsite assembly. They are mounted onto the existing structure and floor system as shown on the next page. Modules assemble to create R-40 in opaque zones. The louvers appear on the south and west facades because these are the areas of direct solar gain.

SOLAR TRACKING The photovoltaic solar-tracking louvers only produce the energy necessary to power themselves. The amount of sunlight collected will determine their angle to minimize solar heat gain and maximize daylighting. Where there is a view window, 6” wide louvers are spaced 8” apart on center to allow maximum view range. Where there is window above view level, modules are spaced at 6” on center. In the winter 6”

months, this gap between the louvers will allow more light into the space. 13’8”

8” 10’ 7’4” 4’

DYNAMIC FACADE The facade deals most visibly with solar gain, light, and views, but it also contains multiple components of the HVAC. To further emphasize our dynamic facade, we are handling our fresh air intake and stale air exhaust within the modules (see next page). A heat recovery unit is built into the system for further efficiency.

FACADE DETAIL

PV

er

uv

Lo

re

su

clo

En

it

Un

it

Un

Fin

ish

Me

tal

Ex

tru

Ins

dA

lum

Pa n

el

ed

dS

inu

ula

ted

de

Stu

m

tru

Int

erio

ctu

re

rP an

el

Fra m

e

WEST ELEVATION

23


SOUTHWEST CORNER ISO SECTION | WALL SECTION DETAILS

Solid Enclosure Unit (Total R-40)

SU M M SU

NT

N

Suspended Gypsum Board Ceiling

WI

ER

N

PV Louver Unit

M

SU

W 14x26

M

ER

SU

M MN SUSU ER

W 18x50

ER

SU WI N NT ER

SU

N

WI

NT

ER

SU

N

Dynamic PV Louver (active shading position) Operable Window

Enclosure Unit Insulated Panel Batt Insulation 5-1/2� Steel Stud Finished Interior Panel

Balcony Unit Dynamic PV Louver (in-shade position) Fan Coil Unit (beyond)

EXHAUST AIR EXHAUST FRESH AIR AIR EXHAUST AIR FRESH AIR

Return Air Duct (beyond)

FRESH AIR

4-Pipe HVAC lines

Aluminum Clad Frame Extruded Aluminum Unitized Facade System Facade Anchor

25


OAKSCABIN


SPRING2014 PROFESSOR - William Martella PARTNERS - Barry Adcock, Josh Parsley, and Blake Roberts The Lone Oaks Inn Cabins are a redesign of a student project. Located at Lone Oaks Farm in Middleton, Tennessee, the cabins provide a habitat in the woods. The intent of the redesign was to make the original plans ADA accessible as well as focus on the details that comprise the walls, floors, and roofs. There are two other cabin redesigns as seen in the plan, which were worked on by other students. This project is designed using light wood frame construction with 2x6 studs spaced at 2’ on center. The cabin uses a combination of rigid board and batt insulation with a building wrap for its wall construction. It utilizes natural lighting with large windows and a sky light above, but also has artificial lighting during the night. The three cabins are surrounding a sunken courtyard that has a fire pit. They share the courtyard which provides a nice space of gathering around a fire during a cool night.


SITE PLAN


ADA 5’ TURING RADIUS FLOOR PLAN

SECTION

29


31


WALKWAY FACING ENTRY


INTERIOR BEDROOM

33


SECTION AXON BACK OF CABIN Metal Roof Fascia 2x10” (1.5”x9.5” nominal) rafters Metal Stud Bolted to Beams Finished Wood Canopy with Metal fascia on top

CMU Blocks Concrete Foundation Foundation Pier


1

2

DETAIL 01 ROOF TO TOP OF WALL 1 2-3/4” pre-finished standing seam metal roof system 2 1” rigid board insulation (r-5) 3 3/32” slip sheet 4 9-1/2” thick batt insulation (r-36) 5 5/8” gypsum board ceiling finish 6 2x10” (1.5”x9.5” Nominal) horizontal roof beam supporting fascia 7 1x6 exterior horizontal green oak board finish 1/2”spaced 8 3 2x10” (1.5”x9.5” nominal) vertical roof joists 9 9 2 2x6” (1.5”x5.5”Nominal) horizontal roof joists 10 10 1/2” Interior Sheathing

3

4

8

6

5 9

7

10

4 1 2 3 5

9

7

6 8

10 11

4

5

1 2 3

9

6 7

10 11

8

DETAIL 02 DROP CEILING TO GLAZING 1 3/32” slip sheet 2 1” rigid board insulation (r-5) 3 9-1/2” thick batt insulation (r-36) 4 1/2” Interior Sheathing 5 Drop Ceiling 6 5/8” gypsum board drop ceiling finish 7 4 2x10” (1.5”x9.5” nominal) rafters above window header 8 2x10” (1.5”x9.5” nominal) header 9 Finished Wood Canopy with Metal fascia on top 10 Window frame system 11 Incased glazing

DETAIL 03 FLOOR TO FOUNDATION 1 3/32” slip sheet 2 1” rigid board insulation (r-5) 3 9-1/2” thick batt insulation (r-36) 4 1/2” Interior Sheathing 5 1” Bathroom tile 6 3 to 4” concrete slab on grade 7 4 2x10” (1.5”x9.5” nominal)rafters above CMU 8 CMU Blocks on top on Concrete Foundation 9 1x6 exterior horizontal green oak board finish 1/2”spaced on walkway 10 2x10” (1.5”x9.5” nominal) rafters under walkway 11 11 2x10” (1.5”x9.5” nominal) beams under walkway

35


DISCOVERCENTER


SPRING2014 PROFESSOR - William Martella Discovery is the act of finding or learning something new. Clay County, KY thrived in the 1950’s. Full of people and opportunities, it’s downtown, Manchester, was dubbed the ‘City of Hope’ by the citizens. Unfortunately, over time, people left the city and with the lack of people to sustain them, the local businesses left as well. This had a negative effect on the advancement of the county and city. The county is working hard to regain what it lost and discovering new possibilities will help them reach their goals. This project focuses on two design challenges that will better the Clay County downtown of Manchester. The first is the redesign of Main Street. The second being a Heritage Center located on the north end of Main Street. Improving the Main Street condition will not only bring people back to the city but will also bring businesses back. A heritage center is a great way for one to connect with and discover their past. This project is unique in that will it is showcasing the past, but the modern design is a peek at the future for Manchester and Clay County as a whole. The street design incorporates planters and parallel parking to make the street safer and more enjoyable to walk on. The planters provide protection for pedestrians as well as good scenery. A market square plaza was also added at the south end of the street to make a nice space for people from around the county to enjoy each other’s company, grab a bite to eat, and attend events that will be held there. The building design is centered around the concept of discovery and how circulation plays a big role in discovery through architecture. A courtyard space, that is dug underground, is placed in the center of the building. Not only does it create zones for occupants to discover, but also to allow for plenty of light to reach areas in the building that otherwise wouldn’t get much light at all. Simple materials like wood and brick are used through out the design which addresses many of the buildings located around the site. The look of these materials does differ to contrast the existing site and draw occupants attention. Program like a gift shop, gallery, conference room, multipurpose room with exterior courtyard, are spaces designed for the public with semi private and private spaces reserved for the administration office and classrooms.


MAIN STREET IMPROVEMENT PLAN


SITE PLAN

39


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Circulation and discovery around a central core

The columns span along the core and exterior.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

STRUCTURAL FRAMING

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PARTI

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


SITE SECTION

41


1b

3a

2

4

5

6 7

1a

3b

UPPER LEVEL 1 a+b Visitor Gallery 2 ADA Accessible Freight Elevator 3 a+b Permanent Gallery 4 Storage 5 Main Stairs 6 Egress Stairs 7 Seating Area


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

GALLERY This view is of top level gallery facing west. The gallery is an open public space with plenty of light from the exterior courtyard. It houses a permanent gallery and traveling gallery for work both local and non local. Manchester, KY is known for quilting and many of the cities best quilts will be present in the gallery.

43


A

5

7a

7b

6 4 3

8 9

2

B

10

1

12 15

A GROUND LEVEL 1 Vestibule Entry 2 Welcome and Information Desk 3 ADA Accessible Freight Elevator 4 Gift Shop Storage 5 Gift Shop 6 Lobby Seating Area 7 a+b Classrooms 8 Egress Stairs and Emergency Exits

9 Office Kitchenette 10 Waiting Area 11 Receptionist Desk 12 Office Storage 13 Conference Room 14 Administrative Office 15 Exterior Stairs leading to Courtyard

14

11

B 13


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

LOBBY This view is of the ground level lobby facing the courtyard. The lobby includes the main circulation core which is designed for the occupants to have quick access to the different spaces in the building. It has seating and is next to the gift store which includes snacks and goods for purchase.

45


4 6 5

3

2

7

8

1

10

LOWER LEVEL 1 Courtyard 2 Mechanical Room 3 ADA Accessible Freight Elevator 4 Auditorium with Seating for 72 5 ADA Accessible Ramp for Auditorium 6 Male and Female Rest rooms 7 Egress Stairs 8 Multipurpose Room 9 Full Sized Kitchen 10 Kitchen+ Multipurpose Room Storage

9


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

MULTIPURPOSE ROOM This view is of the lower level multipurpose room facing the courtyard. With the exterior courtyard pulling plenty of light into the lower level space, the multipurpose room is a great place to hold events, gatherings, and meetings for the community. It has access to the courtyard through sliding glass doors that face the multipurpose room. Ugit, omnieni

47


SECTION AA

SECTION BB


WEST ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION 49


9SQUARE


SUMMER2014 PROFESSOR - Thomas K. Davis When one visits a park or attraction, one of the most important aspects of their experience is the visitor center. It’s a place to learn, buy goods and souvenirs, grab a bite to eat, or just take a break and hang out for a while. This urban architecture project is a visitor center for historic Centennial Park in Nashville’s West End. In 2010, a new master plan of Centennial Park was designed by landscape architect Kathryn Gustafson. This master plan is the outcome of a number of public meetings that took place over a two-year period. While identified in the master plan, the visitor center was not designed. The proposed site is the intersection of Parthenon Avenue and 31st Avenue North, a highly strategic urban corner of the park. Many elements of the master plan, including the ornamental gardens, were integral to its overall design. The goal is to provide a place where park goers can orient themselves and find out about the park and its main attraction, the Nashville Parthenon. The visitor center provides spaces for indoor events, houses a cafe, outdoor terrace and courtyard, and serves as a new park entry plaza with views eastward to the Parthenon, park, and downtown skyline. While studying the site, I noticed that the park has three major zones; a Park Zone, a Lake Zone, and a Garden Zone. These three zones meet at the site location and are defined by its components. Building upon the concept of three primary zones, the visitor center has a Public Zone, a Private Zone, and an Event Zone. I studied the master plan and found that the gardens surrounding the site have a repetition which was mainly A-B-A-B. Using the regulating lines pulled from the repetition of the gardens, a 9 Square Grid was created defining the program organization of the building. The 9 square grid consists of 40-foot and 10-foot zones. The 40-foot zones consist of program spaces and the 10-foot zones consist of circulation, storage, and service spaces like rest rooms and mechanical/ electrical rooms. The two main public spaces are the outdoor terrace, with exterior seating for the cafe, and the courtyard, which is an extension of the ballroom and event spaces and faces the ornamental gardens. The exterior seating for the cafe is shaded by a canopy of vines which filter sunlight. The terrace is also a space where large tour groups can be dropped off by car and bus. The second level has staff offices which allow for great views of the park as well as views from the conference room and break room. Private restrooms are also available for the staff. The ground level is devoted to the ballroom and event spaces. The ballroom is on the north side of the building directly under the outdoor terrace. The event rooms are on the east side of the building and can be split into two spaces for additional events. The gallery is a mezzanine that wraps around the ballroom.


VISITOR CENTER

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

NASHVILLE PARTHENON

GARDEN ZONE

PRIVATE ZONE EVENT ZONE

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PARK ZONE

PUBLIC ZONE

9 SQUARE GRID

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

LAKE ZONE

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

GUSTAFSON GUTHRIE NICHOL MASTER PLAN


53


VIEW FROM FORMAL GARDENS

55


2

1

3

4

5

6

7


TOWARD PARTHENON

SITE PLAN 1 Formal Gardens 2 Rose Gardens 3 Grand Exterior Stair 4 Cafe Canopy with Vines for Shading 5 Outdoor Terrace 6 Green Roof and Skylight 7 Parking

57


A

B

1

2a

4

C

5

7

6

8

C

3

2b

9a 9b

A

B


CAFE

LEVEL 3 PLAN 1 Exterior Cafe Seating 2 a-b Visitor Center Entries 3 Lobby/ Ticketing and Information 4 Circulation Zone w/ Stairs and Elevator 5 Cafe with Interior Seating 6 Museum Store 7 Orientation/ Multipurpose Space 8 Film Space 9 a-b Egress Stairs

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1a

8

2 1b

6

4a

4b

9 10a

10b 3

5a

7

5b


OFFICES LEVEL 2 PLAN 1 a-b Atrium/ Mezzanine Gallery 2 Circulation Zone w/ Stairs + Elevator 3 Gallery Storage 4 a-b Cubical Office Desks 5 a-b Private Offices for Directors 6 Private Restrooms for Staff 7 Conference Room 8 Break Room 9 Outdoor Balcony 10 a-b Egress Stairs

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1

2

3

8a

6

7b

7a 4 9a

5

8b

9b


BALLROOM PERSPECTIVE

LEVEL 1 PLAN 1 Ballroom 2 Courtyard that Extends from Ballroom 3 Catering Kitchen for Ballroom 4 Event Space Storage 5 Male and Female Public Restrooms 6 Circulation Zone w/ Stairs and Elevator 7 a-b Event Spaces 8 a-b Event Space Divider Storage 9 a-b Egress Stairs

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SECTION AA

65


SECTION BB

67


SECTION CC

69


INTERIORREFLECTION


FALL2014 PROFESSOR - James Rose A candle is used to illuminate a space. The light produced shines on objects, which in turn, cast shadows throughout the room. A lantern defuses light, controls its intensity, and creates a certain mood in a space with a variety of light and shadow. Interior reflection is the idea that whatever is on the inside will always show and be displayed on the outside. This lantern design is a study of the relationship between light and shadow. There are two cubes. The interior cube is made up of four side each with a different pattern design. Candles are placed on the inside of this cube and the light will be filtered though the patterns reflecting on the outer cube. The outer cube is made of rice paper and basswood sticks for structure. The light and shadow from the interior cube are shown on the exterior rise paper completing the idea. Both cubes are essential for the design to work. Most small candles only light up a few feet around it which means that the light produced wouldn’t fill the room. Without the outside cube, the shadows pattern filtered by the interior cube might not be seen. The interior lantern cube is necessary for the patterns. When it came time to build the model, I decided to 3D print the 4 sides that comprise the inner cube. I designed them using Sketchup and sent them to be printed. 3D printing is an amazing technology with a lot of promise. There is something fascinating about building a 3D model of an object on a computer and being able to hold that same object in your hand a few hours later. The 3D printer has been around a long time, but has only recently gained popularity due to the reduced prices of printers and better software that runs them. This spread of awareness will make 3D printing a more prominent tool for creation and testing.


4 FACES OF THE INNER CUBE

1

2

3

4

INTERIOR REFLECTION These four faces were designed in Sketchup and each boasts a pattern meant to reflect light and shadows onto the outer cube in different ways. Much like human emotion, the four faces reflect a variety of shadow patterns ranging from the light, open nature of 1 to the heavy, closed nature of 4.

INNER CUBE

LIT LANTERN WITH BOTH INNER AND OUTER CUBES

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IMPRINTWEBSITE


FALL2014 ORGANIZATION - IMPRINT. “IMPRINT was founded in January of 2013 by a group of students who saw a need to create a new way to talk about and experience design and design education. By developing a living, evolving online archive capturing student life and work at the College of Architecture and Design, IMPRINT becomes a forum for conversations about all aspects of design. By uniting the voices of the three disciplines within our college — architecture, interior design and landscape architecture — we can achieve that.” IMPRINT is the student run publication that I join earlier in 2014. It features a number of editorials about a variety of subjects in our design education and the profession. As I was designing the IMPRINT Website, I wanted to create an immersive fullscreen site that displayed clear organization. First, I created a background, comprised of various images of the Art and Architecture Building at the University of Tennessee, by arranging them in a 5 column grid. This grid then defined the organization of the site’s different categories—About, Series, Publications, Submit, and Contact. Designing a website is surprisingly similar to the process of designing a building in that the user experience drives the decisions made. Drawing inspiration from Google’s Material Design on its latest version of Android, I aimed to create a sense of fluidity and continuity by making sure that every element on screen originated from a point, proceeded along its set path, and had a bit of depth. This process allowed elements to come from somewhere, not just appearing out of nowhere, which made for a more intuitive and friendly user experience. The first version of the site was designed in Wix. Check out the site here http://imprintutk.wix.com/imprintutk

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WOMEN IN DESIGN: Talking to Non-Designers January 27, 2015


VCPUBLICATION


SUMMER2014 PROFESSORS - Thomas K. Davis and Gary Gaston, Design Director at NCDC PARTNERS - Hayley Mull The Nashville Urban Design Program of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, College of Architecture and Design and the Nashville Civic Design Center present Centennial Park Visitor Center. This publication illustrates a summary of the Centennial Park Master Plan, precedents used for inspiration, a brief bio of the students involved, their design process, and their final work. All work was done during the Summer of 2014, which is the fourth summer of the Nashville Urban Design Program led by Thomas K. Davis, Associate Professor at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. The publication was put together as part of a professional elective that involved creating a summary of our summer and work. The four major spaces addressed in the publication are public, terrace, event, and private spaces. Each student took a unique approach to the programed spaces and in the publication, the drawings showing these spaces are grouped so their similarities and differences could be compared. The publication was designed with the general public of Nashville in mind so the projects and schemes can be easily comprehended. The publication can be found here. http://issuu.com/paulbamson/docs/centennial_park_vc_publication_fina


CENTENNIAL PARK VISITOR CENTER NASHVILLE URBAN DESIGN PROGRAM SUMMER 2014 University of Tennessee, Knoxville College of Architecture and Design Nashville Civic Design Center Publication by Paul Bamson and Hayley Mull

COVER


TYPICAL INTRO PAGE The introduction pages show a brief example of what is to come in the section.

INTRODUCTION

TYPICAL PRECEDENT PAGE 27

ACROPOLIS MUSEUM Athens, Greece 2009 Bernard Tschumi Architects The Acropolis Museum is located in Makryianni, the historic district. Completed in 2009, it sits southeast of the Parthenon just 1,000 feet. The Museum has 90,000 square feet of space for exhibitions and amenities for visitors. The entry to the museum is on the pedestrian street, Dionysios Areopagitou. There is a 360-degree view of Athens and the Acropolis on the top level gallery. “The Acropolis Museum tells the story of life on the Athenian Acropolis and its surroundings by uniting collections formerly dispersed in multiple institutions, including the small Acropolis Museum built in the 19th century.� 58

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There were 6 precedents that the students drew inspiration from. Each precedent had unique characteristics and design aesthetics and were chosen based on their positive impacts on urban design in their respective cities.

Points of Inspiration

1. Its Massing and Form 2. Exposure of Structure 3. Facade design 4. Directions of Views 5. Respect for Acropolis and Sensitivity to surrounding site

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THE BRIDGE TO CENTENNIAL

PROCESS

TYPICAL PROCESS PAGE 53

Joshua Parsley Fourth Year Architecture Student University of Tennessee, Knoxville College of Architecture and Design A native of Tennessee, Joshua Parsley attended Ravenwood High School as an active designer and athlete on the basketball team. Currently pursuing a double major in architecture and bio chemistry, he hopes to combine a gifted talent of design with a passion for the plant sciences.

Each student has an intro page that displays a short bio, project summary, and process drawings.

Project Summary

When creating a space intended for visitors to populate, direction and insight are paramount in its design. To successfully integrate these elements, the concept of exposure must be considered. The Visitor Center at Centennial Park focuses on this idea of exposure by acknowledging visitor intentions while discretely informing them of details and relative context. As the space is inhabited, qualities of the park such as views from the site and information on other events and properties of Centennial are exposed to the visitor. This may happen at the point of entry where a grand perspective of the Parthenon is framed by two towering volumes or on the bridge in which adjoins the forms, giving views to nearly the entire park. Exposing this vision to visitors not only educates their understanding and properties of the park, but it orientates them in relation to their position. Exposure is critical in maintaining a successful visitor center, without it, Centennial Park risks a complete disregard to its beauty and qualities it possess.

THE BRIDGE TO CENTENNIAL

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THE JEWEL IN THE CITY LEFT IMAGE

Level 1 Plan

BELOW IMAGE Transverse section through gallery and private space Behind the larger areas like the gallery and ballroom are the private spaces such as restrooms, mechanical, and storage tucked along each side.

LEFT IMAGE

Level 1 Plan

BELOW IMAGE Transverse section through office spaces The office spaces flank the ballroom on either side. This placement allows them to have the best views as well as the most sunlight, creating the full facade facing the gardens.

TYPICAL PROJECT PAGE The projects were arranged according to four categories: public, terrace, event and private space. Since the designs varied, the projects were compared side by side to show the similarities and differences between them.

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PHOTOGALLERY


FALL2012–SPRING2013 During my time at the University of Tennessee, I had the opportunity to take trips to Chicago and DC, which were great learning experiences. Seeing great architecture in a picture is nothing like being able to experience it in person, but it’s the next best thing. Capturing a moment in time, which is the amazing aspect of photography, gives a preview of people, places, and things in hopes that one will eventually go and experience them for themselves. These photographs are some of my favorite taken during these trips. More photographs are available on my Instagram. http://instagram.com/ptbamson


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THANKYOU!


PAULBAMSON


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Paul Bamson - Architecture Portfolio (Early 2015)