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ISSUE NO. 7_15 dollars

FASHIONING A COMMUNITY

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EDITOR’S LETTER

WRITING THE NEXT CHAPTER IN OUR PLAYBOOK NAPTOWN TO SUPER CITY, A GREAT LITTLE FILM BY WFYI MEDIA, DOCUments how each new sports team (and each new sports venue) over the last 50 years has created a snowball effect, the result of which was Indianapolis securing and hosting Super Bowl XLVI—by all accounts, the best Super Bowl of all time. The exploration of this sports-centric strategy’s evolution—a deliberate, decades-long, and ultimately successful pursuit by city leaders to put Indianapolis on the world’s center stage—is enlightening. Securing one of the most-watched sporting events in the world gave us a bit of a swagger, and deservedly so. However, I couldn’t help but wonder how we could better harness some of that energy in our otherwise relatively quiet city, year-round. I KNEW I WASN’T ALONE IN MY THINKING, AS RATHER QUICKLY, SIMILAR sentiments found their way into popular conversation. How could we, the residents of Indianapolis, do a better job of sharing our great (and getting even better!) city? How can we entice more young, energetic individuals to move, and then stay, here? THOSE QUESTIONS ARE SOME OF OUR BIGGEST MOTIVATORS IN PUBLISHING THIS MAGAZINE; THE potential therein far outweighs the negatives (we make no money, and rely on countless hours of labor from our incredible, all-volunteer workforce). We understand that in order to make Indianapolis (and the Midwest, in general) the best place to live, work, and play, we need to attract (and then keep!) the best and the brightest. A RECENT COMPETITIVE ASSESSMENT OF THE INDIANAPOLIS REGION COMMISSIONED BY INDY Chamber does a great job of summarizing our relationship with the local sports scene: “When asked what the region’s brand should be....’Sports Capital of the World,’ affordability, and an individual’s ability to impact the community—were frequently mentioned as potential identities. Of these, the region’s existing brand identity related to professional, collegiate, and amateur sports is its strongest and most entrenched. But the region’s residents and leaders have debated this issue—the lack of a cohesive, positive identity outside of sports—for decades.” IN SIX YEARS, INDIANAPOLIS WILL TURN A STATELY 200 YEARS OLD. THE TIME HAS COME TO CLAIM AN identity that not only embraces our past achievements, but also recognizes the need for innovation and forward-thinking, with a healthy dose of good-natured sass. The answer to a strong regional identity lies in embracing the athletic as well as the creative. “Sports Capital of the World” is a tremendous opportunity, regardless of your affinity for athletics, and I believe our legacy can be made greater still if we build on what has worked so well in the past: cooperation, community, and strategic partnerships (where monetary profit doesn’t have to be the sole focus) between sports and community leaders, as well as small business owners, entrepreneurs, and artists. I’M THRILLED THAT PATTERN HAS THIS ROLE TO PLAY IN THE ONGOING DISCUSSIONS ABOUT A CITY’S brand. I hope we get you thinking of important questions, about our city, your city, and your role therein. We have an important legacy to uphold. Now how to facilitate the next chapter such that come 2021, being the “Sports Capital of the World” will be a point of pride for all us!

POLINA OSHEROV_EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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RUC KU S nailed it.

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Mary G. Barr Maria Dickman Amanda Dorman Matthew Gonzales Crystal Hammon Abbi Johnson Michael Kaufmann Cathy Kightlinger Ashley Minyard Polina Osherov Gabrielle Poshadlo Shelby Quinn Walton Cheryl Reed Eric Rees Wandini B. Riggins Madeleine Sophie Sarah Suskiri Ryan Vaughn

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PATTERN ISSUE NO. 7


THE WORLD’S GAME

INDIANA’S PIZZA

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CONTENTS PATTERN ISSUE NO. 7 patternindy.com

TEXT EDITOR’S LETTER, 6 CONTRIBUTORS, 12 MILLION DOLLAR BABY, 22 T.J. OSLUND Q&A, 24 HINCHMAN, 28 STARTERS, 39 Vontae Davis Jeanette Pohlen Walter Knabe Cory Miller Pippa Mann Kathy Moberly Ricardo Dyer Marc Lebryk Danielle Smith MICHELLE MAROCCO Q&A, 52 FASTER THAN YOU, 62 SHYRA ELY-GASH Q&A, 78 FRENCH DEAL, 80 HAYES & TAYLOR Q&A, 92 CIRCLE CITY, CENTERED, 98 GRIT, 104 FLIP IT AND REVERSE IT, 112 OP-ED: RYAN VAUGHN, 148

IMAGES ALKEMIC REACTION, 14 HEAD CASES, 26 THE WORLD OF THE BALLET DANCER, 30 ICE, 54 FOR THE LOVE OF FLOJO, 66 FIELDS OF COLOR, 68 AT THE TOP OF THEIR GAME, 94 THE WANDERER, 114 PAS DE DEUX, 126 DROPPING IN, 134 CHROMATICA, 140 ON THE COVER: Tony Kanaan Photography: Polina Osherov Hair & Makeup: Kate Shaw Design: Kathy Davis ON THE THIS PAGE: Vontae Davis Photography: Polina Osherov

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CONTRIBUTORS

IN WHAT WAYS DO YOU SEE THE WORLDS OF SPORTS, ARTS, AND FASHION INTERSECTING WITHIN INDIANAPOLIS?

MARY G. BARR ROLE IN ISSUE: WRITER AND EDITOR FRENCH DEAL, PAGE 80 I feel the intersection of the arts and sports and fashion in our city is a strategic arrangement of many smart players. While it may look like it’s naturally growing, sprouting, and cross-pollinating, it rarely happens that way. We need the passion and dedicated work of visionaries and patrons. We need the raw, god-given talents of our athletes, designers, and artists who are brave enough to express themselves. We need the love of fans and admirers who emit their own energy. And we need those who are the storytellers to share the message to Indy and beyond. This collective energy makes us feel something individually—often something quite pleasurable. Personally, I love that energy wherever I go in this town, whether I am wearing my stilettos, or my Nikes, or going barefoot.

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MATTHEW GONZALES ROLE IN ISSUE: WRITER “FOR THE LOVE OF FLOJO”, PAGE 66

CATHY KIGHTLINGER ROLE IN ISSUE: WRITER “HEAD CASE”, PAGE 26; PIPPA MANN, PAGE 46

Sports are embedded in Indy’s identity. Some locals involved in the art and/or fashion communities have a problem with that. But like it or not, this city and (most important) its economy have been built on sports. If you decide to make Indy your home, you should accept that. Because no matter what you do here (arts, fashion, education, architecture, whatever) it will inevitably intersect with sports at some point.

I work everyday in an office across 16th Street from the iconic Indianapolis Motor Speedway, which feels a lot like an enormous contemporary art installation. Add Verizon IndyCar Series drivers, who can hold onto an open-wheel race car going more than 200 miles an hour, and the edgy fashion that comes with them and there it is. That’s an example from my workplace, but similar spots are everywhere in the city.

STEVE BROKAW ROLE IN ISSUE: PHOTOGRAPHER TONY KANAAN PHOTOSHOOT, PAGE 62 I’ve had the opportunity to live in and travel to cities all over the world. I’ve found that world class cities always have a strong focus on the arts, sports, and fashion. Either individually or more than one. Not only does it provide enrichment to the people living in the city, but visitors and guests as well. It also helps attract professionals to the city. Indianapolis is no different. People pursue all three with passion. There are opportunities to take part in various professional and amateur sporting events, world-class motorsport races, art museums, art galleries, fashion events, boutiques, First Friday open houses, etc. Bottomline, sports, fashion, and arts helps make Indianapolis a vibrant place to live, work, and visit.

SHELBY QUINN WALTON ROLE IN ISSUE: WRITER GRIT, PAGE 104 To me, any and all forms of movement translate into an art form. Even something as brutish as football can be considered artistic and expressive. It’s great to see these worlds colliding beautifully in this city. The Performance Issue is simply a reflection of what’s going on in Indy. Outsiders like to categorize us as jeanclad hillbillies, but there is an artistic and fashionable current that touches every corner of this city, including the sports world. Personally, I inject my personal sense of style into everything I do, regardless of the activity, and I think a lot of fashion-conscious people in Indy do the same.


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ALKEMIC REACTION Defy gravity with dope style.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ESTHER BOSTON STYLING BY KATIE MARPLE HAIR BY TARIK ROBINSON (MDG SALONS) MAKEUP BY SARAH JACKSON MODELS: ALKEMY (ALEXIS, AUSTIN, BRANDON, QING) ILLUSTRATION BY STEWART FORREST; DESIGN BY LYDIA XIONG

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THIS PAGE: MODEL AUSTIN HAT, NO BAD IDEAS SHIRT MODEL’S OWN PANT, SUGAR AND BRUNO AT PATTERN STORE SHOES, MODEL’S OWN

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THIS PAGE: MODEL QING SHIRT, BOOMERANG BOUTIQUE LONG SLEEVE SHIRT, GAP LEGGING, FOREVER 21 SHOES, MODEL’S OWN OPPOSITE PAGE: MODEL BRANDON HAT, MODEL’S OWN SHIRT, DOPE THERMAL SHIRT, GAP PANTS, FEATHERS AT URBAN OUTFITTERS SHOES, ASICS AT URBAN OUTFITTERS

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OPPOSITE PAGE: MODEL AUSTIN SHIRT, DOPE SHORTS, DOPE SHOES, ADIDAS AT URBAN OUTFITTERS THIS PAGE: MODEL ALEXIS SHIRT, DOPE AT PATTERN STORE SHIRT, DOPE AT PATTERN STORE PANT, SUGAR AND BRUNO AT PATTERN STORE SHOES, MODEL’S OWN

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TOP: MODEL AUSTIN HAT, MODEL’S OWN SHIRT, DOPE PANTS, SUGAR AND BRUNO AT PATTERN STORE SHOES, ADIDAS AT URBAN OUTFITTERS BOTTOM: MODEL QING JACKET, BOOMERANG BOUTIQUE SHIRT, BOOMERANG BOUTIQUE PANTS, SUGAR AND BRUNO AT PATTERN STORE SHOES, SUPRA AT URBAN OUTFITTERS

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THIS PAGE: MODEL AUSTIN HAT, NO BAD IDEAS SHIRT, MODEL’S OWN PANT, SUGAR AND BRUNO AT PATTERN STORE SHOES, MODEL’S OWN

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STYLE

MILLION DOLLAR BABY BRANDS ARE CASHING IN ON THE SPORTSWEAR TREND. BUT DOES ACTIVEWEAR HAVE THE LASTING POWER TO BECOME THE NEW DENIM?

TEXT BY MARIA DICKMAN + ILLUSTRATION BY PATRICK MICHAEL MCCLOSKEY WALK INTO ANY SORT OF BUZZY ESTABLISHMENT NOWADAYS AND YOU WILL BE HARD pressed not to find at least one, if not several, groups of women (and men) dressed head to toe in clothing that, in the past, was considered best left for the gym. Thanks in no small part to several key trends that have proven staying power (see: wedge sneakers, the throw-on-and-go legging, the fashion sweatshirt, leather backpacks, etc.), activewear, sometimes referred to as “athleisure,” is one of the fastest-growing markets in fashion today. In a call with investors last year, Gap Inc’s chief executive officer Glenn Murphy declared activewear the new denim; he isn’t wrong. The same “premiumisation” that transformed the denim industry (wherein consumers are accustomed to shelling out $200 for a pair of designer jeans) is gaining traction in sportswear, as consumers are increasingly drawn to, and willing to pay for, pieces with a high frequency of wear that can be transformed to be appropriate in a multitude of environments. Euromonitor International apparel analyst Ashma Kunde summed it up best in a recent blog post, saying “a winning mix of durability, functionality, and fashionability will continue to command premium prices.” And retailers are taking notice. Probably the most well-known example of this is Canadian import Lululemon, whose cult-like following doesn’t even blink at the $100 price tag on a simple pair of black leggings. Gap Inc’s Athleta has leapt from just one brickand-mortar store in 2011 to 65 in 2013. Luxury e-commerce site Net-A-Porter recently launched Net-A-Sporter with an exclusive focus on all things active, and off the top of my head, H&M, Uniqlo, Forever 21, and Anthropologie are just a few in a long list of mainstream apparel companies to launch an activewear division in the past year or so. Activewear works well for the millennial generation because it’s very much in line with how we live our lives. Its association with healthy, active lifestyles translates well from the gym to the street to the startup. And as sportswear is increasingly integrated into daily attire, designers are responding in kind, interweaving activewear and ready-to-wear in an unprecedented merger of two apparel powerhouses, with on-trend designs and palettes. It’s appropriate that today’s activewear is increasingly a collaboration between the creative and the functional, the catwalk and the street, as its long been an excellent vehicle for designer collaborations. Adidas and Stella McCartney pioneered the concept with a long-running and very profitable relationship. Ralph Lauren and H&M make headlines for their Olympic uniform designs. Venus and Serena Williams have a history of incredible on-court performances that captivate in terms of stunning athleticism and fashion-forward, custom attire from Nike, Puma, and Venus’ own line, EleVen.

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BUT IN THE PAST YEAR, THE CONCEPT OF THE DESIGNER COLLABORATION HAS GONE UP a notch. Nike—whose designs have always veered towards the cutting edge, and who is doing incredible work with Pendleton plaids, patent leathers, and cool color ways and finishes—recently teamed up with Givenchy’s Riccardo Tisci for a collection that made everyone from fashion editors to basketball superstars swoon. In just the last six months, Adidas has worked with everyone from high fashion faves Mary Katrantzou and Jeremy Scott to pop stars like Rita Ora and Pharrell Williams. And even H&M, which debuted a sportswear line to better round out its lifestyle offerings, got a slice of the action with its hotly anticipated, sporty-fashion-fantasy collection by Alexander Wang. The problem with these collaborations, however, is that they are often limited in both product and run. And while sportswear influences have been making a splash on the runways, as well as the streets, designers still are focusing less on items you can sweat in, while embracing those that help make the transition from the fitness studio to the outside world. I attribute this to the rise in popularity of group classes like Soul Cycle and the Dailey Method, where friends regularly gather to be active, and then go out together to work or play afterwards. Chanel and Dior recently debuted sneakers on the couture runways. Brands like Alexander Wang and Norma Kamali have made a name for themselves for their usage of athletic influences, technical design, and fabric, utilizing cotton, jersey, and terrycloth to fashionable acclaim. Isabel Marant practically invented the sneaker wedge, which has been reinterpreted and knocked off by everyone. Rick Owens famously showed his Spring 2014 collection on a group of step dancers, which grounded his designs in reality more firmly than the thousand dollar price tag his jackets command. As street style blogs have furiously documented fashion editors en route to runway shows in very athletic staples like Adidas Stan Smiths and Nike Frees paired with everything from leather and sweats to couture dresses, this mixing of the precious with the practical will no doubt continue to spur growth in the activewear market. There are things to consider, however. Juicy Couture, a brand who may be credited with building the original athleisure trend (in the form of velour tracksuits), declared bankruptcy and now exists merely through licensing deals. J. Crew has announced they have no interest in pursuing the activewear market, with CEO Mickey Drexler explaining, “We’re not getting in because we don’t have the expertise to do that.” Thus, as more and more designers weigh the costs and benefits of entering into the sportswear industry, expect designer collaborations to become the testing ground—not unlike how fashion and technology have debuted products in the past. A recent Business of Fashion article noted that denim is successful because it is “one of the few to transcend the boundaries of class, race, age, gender, and geography—not least because of its broad cultural significance and long-term association with modernity and ease.” Activewear definitely checks the “modernity“ and “ease” boxes, but whether it will cross over from the bourgeois to the everyman has yet to be seen. In the meantime, however, it’s nice to finally gain some recognition that there is no performance without style. ✂


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T.J. OSLUND. FREELANCE PRODUCT GRAPHIC DESIGNER. INFUSING HIS TOUCH OF FORM AND FASHION INTO TODAY’S SPORTSWEAR. TEXT BY MICHAEL KAUFMANN + PHOTOGRAPH BY STEPHEN SIMONETTO T.J. Oslund is a product graphic designer who has spent the last decade-plus working within the action sports and active apparel/footwear industries. After living and working on both coasts, he and his family relocated to the Indianapolis area in 2013 to take a swing at life in the middle. For the last five years, he’s been slinging graphics for Reebok both in-house, and more recently, as a freelance designer working remotely. MICHAEL KAUFMANN: What do high design and high performance have in common? T.J. OSLUND: When considering a really well-designed product, the line between form and function is usually pretty blurry. Thinking specifically about athletic footwear and apparel, where the objective is to augment the performance capabilities of the user, the two should be considered synonymous. Most of the graphic applications I create are meant to be embellishments that make the product more visually appealing or convey a certain attitude. But even when applying frosting to the proverbial cake, I need to consider the performance implications of things like placement, handfeel, and print technique. When the graphic elements I apply contribute directly to a product’s performance, like a pattern of laser perforations for ventilation, the pattern must be functional, providing the right amount of benefit in the right areas, but also be visually compelling to make the product stand out in a crowded marketplace. A strong visual design can also have a less tangible, psychological impact on the performance of the wearer. A well-designed garment, for instance, can inspire confidence in the wearer, which can be a pretty powerful motivator.

MK: Do you wear your own designs? TJO: Sometimes my aim is to design something I would wear, and sometimes I’m chasing a consumer that looks nothing like me. I’m most proud of the designs I would never wear, but speak really well to the intended user. That said, I have no personal objection to wearing a product I’ve designed, and I do from time-to-time. MK: Your moustache doesn’t feel very Reebok to me. Prove me wrong? TJO: It doesn’t? I’m pretty sure J.W. Foster, the company’s original founder, had some fancy facial hair. At its best, Reebok has been a big promoter of self-expression and individuality. Remember the “I Am What I Am” campaign about a decade ago? Actually, the biggest driving force behind the brand right now is a focus on fitness, with an emphasis on individuals and communities. That is in contrast to the world of team sports, where conformity is important and uniforms mask identity. Given that culture, I can say my moustache has never felt unwelcome.

I’ve also been really feeling David M. Cook’s (Bonethrower) stuff lately, and I think he’d make some incredible furniture. He created this candle-lit altar recently for some event, and I really like how he transformed the space with an assemblage of two-dimensional art and three-dimensional objects. He’d also make some pretty rad lawn ornaments; I’d definitely hire him to create a collection of those. MK: If you could make a career out of designing anything else what would it be? TJO: I would love to work on cycling equipment, bike frames and components. I have experience creating graphics for hard goods, but I’ve never gotten to do bikes. I love riding bikes, and I enjoy messing around with them, building and upgrading. A bicycle in its simplest form is a profoundly well-designed tool. I don’t think I’d ever get sick of designing for cycling product. ✂

MK: Name three designers who inspire you. What would you like to see them design that they’re not currently known for? TJO: Stefan Sagmeister is an obvious choice when discussing inspiring graphic design. He’ll consistently blow minds when it comes to a book cover, package design, or ad campaign. But I’d love to see how his innovative and conceptual approach would manifest itself in a performance apparel range. I like this guy Ben Venom in San Francisco. He creates these really beautiful quilts, usually using pieces of old heavy metal tshirts. I love how he uses a very wholesome, traditional medium to create imagery that is decidedly darker or more aggressive than what you’d expect, and he imbues each piece with the spirit and mythology of the metal world. It’d be great to see what he would come up with if tasked to design a collection of priests’ vestments. Is that weird? 25


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The design secrets behind IndyCar’s most vibrant helmets. TEXT BY CATHY KIGHTLINGER PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTOPHER WHONSETLER

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HELIO CASTRONEVES

CHARLIE KIMBALL

MARCO ANDRETTI

SIMON PAGENAUD

Castroneves wore the “Yellow Submarine” helmet during the 2014 racing season. The iconic design was identical to the one worn by Indy 500 champ Rick Mears. Castroneves nearly joined Mears in the esteemed group of four-time Indianapolis 500 winners, but, after a thrilling race with Ryan Hunter-Reay in the closing laps, HunterReay passed the checkered flag first.

Kimball’s helmet design is based on that of Austrian Formula One driver Gerhard Berger, but it includes some patriotic twists. Kimball liked the geometry of the F1 driver’s helmet design, but when it came to the color scheme, Kimball incorporated red, white, and blue so his nationality was apparent when he raced in Europe.

Andretti’s helmet reflects design elements from his family of racing royals, including his father Michael and his grandfather, Mario. Mario raced in a silver helmet with “Andretti” on its side. Then, when Viceroy became Mario’s sponsor, he added a red stripe on top of the helmet to match the brand’s packaging and added blue tips to it. When Marco began racing, he adopted Mario’s design with some changes made by Michael – an American flag along the cheeks – and swapped the red and blue colors on the top. Then, as another signature design element, Marco added a face stripe in 2013.

The helmet Pagenaud wore in the 2014 Indy 500 celebrates the life of his hero, iconic three-time Formula One Champion Ayrton Senna. Its design is a unique blend of Senna’s and Pagenaud’s trademark red schemes. In late 2014, Pagenaud auctioned the race-worn helmet for charity, raising $12,300 for the Ayrton Senna Institute benefiting children’s literacy in Brazil.

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WILL POWER

JOSEF NEWGARDEN

PIPPA MANN

TONY KANAAN

A proud native of Toowoomba, Australia, 2014 Verizon IndyCar Series champion Will Power displays the Australian flag prominently on his helmet. Power became the first Australian to win a major international motorsports title since 1980.

Unlike a lot of drivers, Newgarden’s helmet design is ever-changing. California-based helmet designer Brett King is a friend of Newgarden’s so they work together to create new looks. Newgarden does have one everpresent design element – the initials and birthdates of his car’s mechanics. He says he proudly wears the markings so he has everyone in the car with him when he races.

Mann loves the clean lines of her helmet design – so much so that the look of her first helmet is similar to the one she has now, except the original was mostly blue. But, after her father said he couldn’t pick her out of a crowd on race day, she switched the primary color to red, so she would stand out. That red design, and the clean swooping lines, formed the basis for her logo and brand, which remained unchanged for almost a decade. In May 2014, Mann made a significant decision to exchange the red of her helmet for pink in support of Susan G. Komen. She doesn’t think she’ll ever make the switch back to red.

When Tony Kanaan was a child, he wished for long, flowing hair that he could tuck behind his ears. Unfortunately, Kanaan’s hair was uncooperative. When he started go-karting, he cleverly solved his hairstyle problem by requesting a helmet design that emulated flowing locks. Today, Kanaan’s helmet design is essentially unchanged except for the color scheme and the addition of his son Leo’s actual handprints on the back of the helmet.

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INDUSTRY INSIDER

HINCHMAN A SUIT FIT FOR THE OVAL OFFICE

TEXT BY GABRIELLE POSHADLO + IMS PHOTO THE TERM “JUMPSUIT” COMES FROM THE GARMENT’S ORIGINAL USE: TO PROTECT A PARAchutist from chilling temperatures and harsh winds as they plummet toward the earth. From there, the evolution of the one-piece garment gets a little fuzzy. Most sources credit Florentine Thayat with designing the first fashion jumpsuit in 1919, and widespread and varied usage followed suit (pun intended): Elsa Schiaparelli, Emilio Pucci, Jackie Kennedy Onassis, David Bowie, Elvis … you get the idea. Sometime during those early years, certainly before it appeared on any catwalk, the jumpsuit was adopted by racecar drivers. According to Nancy Sullivan Chumbley, owner of Hinchman Racing Uniforms in Indianapolis, the Hinchman jumpsuit was the very first to hit the brickyard. Since joining the company in 1979 as Lew Hinchman’s secretary (Lew was son to company founder James Blaine “J.B.” Hinchman), Chumbley has journeyed from parttime worker to steward of a legendary name in racing. Today, armed with a business plan centered on replicas of J.B. Hinchman’s vintage design, she aims to resurrect the brand that set the standard in protective and fire retardant racewear—the brand without its iconic patch fails to satisfy the connoisseur.

mail. Rusty Wallace, Dale Earnhardt, Cale Yarborough, you name it. They were all wearing Hinchman.” Most famously, Hinchman was commissioned to make all of the fire suits worn by Steve McQueen and the cast of the 1971 film Le Mans. Chumbley still has the thank-you letter from the actor to prove it. One of the two suits made for McQueen recently sold at auction for just under $1 million. Throughout those years of success, many companies developed competitor suits and yet Lew maintained his staunch disinterest in self-promotion. As the one who kept the books, no one was more familiar with the negative effect this had on the company than Chumbley. Many suitors attempted to purchase the company but Lew had no interest in selling his father’s legacy to a stranger. “During the last eight years of his life, Lew didn’t really do anything to promote or improve the company,” says Chumbley. “He didn’t do trade shows or redesign ads or compete at all. He’d started as the only [racewear brand] and wanted to continue operating as if he still was.”

HUMBLE BEGINNINGS

VICTORY LAP

WHILE WORKING AT A FACTORY, WHICH MANUFACTURED OVERALLS DURING THE 1920S, back when racecar driving was little more than a dangerous hobby, J.B. Hinchman ran a side gig outfitting his buddies in racing jumpsuits. He lost his factory job during the Great Depression, but gained an opportunity to make history. He and his wife made ends meet sewing lab coats out of their home for the then rapidly growing and modernizing pharmaceutical Eli Lilly and Company, and continued racing uniform production only for friends. In 1925, Pete DePaolo became the first of many Indy 500 winners to wear a Hinchman suit at the finish line, and was the man who shared the Hinchman name with the world. Finally, in 1957 an accountant friend convinced Hinchman to ditch the lab coats and make his jumpsuit business official. Hinchman Racing Uniforms was born. An evolution of what the racecar drivers don today, those grandfather suits protected the wearer through much humbler means than today’s modern, high-tech fabrics. The cotton was washed with a borax powder, a chemical compound found in modern laundry boosters, which (allegedly) assigned the suit flame retardant properties. Each suit came with a little jar of the stuff. When Chumbley took over, many jars of the powder still lingered at the old Hinchman headquarters—located downtown Indianapolis near where Lucas Oil Stadium now stands. In 1966, DuPont asked Hinchman to test a new fire retardant fabric, Nomex, which is still used to manufacture modern race suits, as well as firefighter uniforms, flight suits, and myriad other utilitarian applications. That year every participant in the Indy 500 qualified for a free Nomex suit. Hinchman passed away three years later, leaving his son Lew to take the wheel.

OFF TO THE RACES

A STRONG BELIEVER IN WORD-OF-MOUTH ADVERTISING, LEW AND HIS WIFE LIMITED THEIR marketing efforts to race day only. Finally, convinced by friends to take out an ad in National Speed Sport News, Lew was bowled over by the response. In the first two weeks, worldrenowned Italian racing twins Aldo and Mario Andretti were customers. “I don’t think Lew realized how well known the Hinchman name was,” says Chumbley. “When I first started at Hinchman, it wasn’t unusual to receive 20 orders a day in the

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WHEN LEW PASSED AWAY IN 1998 AT AGE 84, CHUMBLEY HAD WORKED BY HIS SIDE FOR 20 years. While he had two sons, one an obstetrician and the other an airline pilot, neither had any interest in taking over the company. Few clients remained and the company’s market value was beleaguered. As a favor to a longtime co-worker, Chumbley watched Lew sign the company over to them both on his death bed. She was now the proud owner of a custom garment business, with no expertise in racing, no experience with sewing, and no investment capital to speak of. “I led with my heart and not my head,” says Chumbley. “I knew how much Larry [her coworker] wanted it, and I couldn’t say no.” When Larry passed away of cancer a year later, all Chumbley was left with was a sense of duty to carry on, but little energy to do so. The mother of two small children, she struggled for 10 years. “When I look back I truly don’t know how I kept the doors open.” With her brother’s death of stomach cancer in 2008, inspiration finally came in an effort to honor his memory. Chumbley started slowly, attending races for the first time in her career and launching a company Facebook page. Having sold the downtown building during Lucas Oil Stadium construction, her new location on the famed Gasoline Alley inside the Indianapolis Motor Speedway placed Hinchman at the center of the action. At the 2014 Indianapolis 500, three drivers were wearing Hinchman suits. Many client relationships began as repairs to competitor suits, which typically are shipped from Europe in standard sizes. While the client is in the shop, few can resist their service as each suit is custom made to order and the allure of the Hinchman tradition. Each suit sells between $1,300-$2,500 and are still lined with the Nomex fabric J.B. Hinchman piloted more than 50 years ago. Chumbley’s newest design is made of a lighter weight outer fabric in order to meet certification standards for racing in Europe. The prospect of once again dressing the drivers of Formula One and other European racers, together with a plan to manufacture vintage replica suits has Chumbley more hopeful than ever for Hinchman’s future. She dreams of one day advertising in Europe, beside Steve McQueen’s dashing image and expanding her 6,500-square-foot space where just six employees fuel the brand, to occupy the entire 20,000-square-foot building. “It’s so fitting that making the suits that defined the Hinchman name way back when is what will save this company,” she says. “Ironically, Lew’s last words to me were ‘promote, promote, promote,’ and that’s exactly what I intend to do.” ✂


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PHOTOGRAPHY BY EDUARDO TORRES AT THE INDIANA UNIVERSITY JACOBS SCHOOL OF MUSIC. WRITTEN BY MADELEINE SOPHIE. DESIGN BY LINDSAY HADLEY.

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LESLIE THEISEN

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—MAURICE MERLEAU-PONTY, PHENOMENOLOGY OF PERCEPTION

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KRISTIN HAMMOND

“I HAVE NO OTHER MEANS OF KNOWING THE HUMAN BODY THAN BY LIVING IT; THAT IS, BY TAKING UP FOR MYSELF THE DRAMA THAT MOVES THROUGH IT AND BY MERGING WITH IT.

EMILY PARKER

THUS I AM MY BODY, AT LEAST TO THE EXTENT THAT I HAVE AN ACQUISITION AND RECIPROCALLY MY BODY IS SOMETHING LIKE A NATURAL SUBJECT, OR A PROVISIONAL SKETCH OF MY TOTAL BEING.” —Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Phenomenology of Perception

Perhaps one question has been asked for sometime (and may very well be

asked for the duration of the foreseeable future) in the pursuit of knowledge:

CAROLINE ATWELL

how do we know what we know? Much has been said about this theory of knowledge, but there has been little regard for all that has been done and discovered with, not without, the body. What if the body can reveal something about one’s behavior and personal physical signature beyond this primacy of the “cogito”? What would happen if bodily intuition were coupled with cognition? How would we see art? How would we see life? How would we love? How would we live? How

EMILY SMITH

would we move?

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KELSEY BYRNE


AS A DANCER, I CAN SAY THAT THE WAYS IN WHICH WE MANIPULATE OUR MOVEMENTS AFFECTS OUR PERSPECTIVE ON ALL ASPECTS OF LIFE. AS AN ART FORM, DANCE IS INSEPARABLE FROM LIFE, WHICH SHOULDN’T BE A NOTION TOO HARD TO FATHOM SINCE LIFE ITSELF VERY MUCH SO DEPENDS ON THE EXISTENCE OF A LIVING, BREATHING, MOVING BODY. 35


TAYLOR CARLSON

DANCERS DO NOT USE ANY OTHER SOURCE BUT THEIR OWN BODY TO CREATE ART. A slight inclination of the head, a calm elevation of the leg, or the fervent twist of the wrist reveals not only the idiosyncrasies of an individual dancer, but also his or her deficiencies. To perform, then, is to reveal our relationship with the world through only

LESLIE THEISEN

the movements our bodies afford. What happens when this kinetic art is captured? Can a singular moment catch the transcendental display seen on a stage, or does the preserved moment demand a further exploration? Although this movement becomes still, the lasting impression of the dancer’s body is dynamic. It is still moving. A dancer’s hierophantic dedication to his or her art often inspires an audience to respect, or perhaps it strikes them with discomfort in self-reflection. This is good, for if the audience members are moved by the dancer’s presence, it is because the dancer has LAURA WHITBY

opened their minds to the possibility of creating something from within themselves. And whatever this may be, if it is worth sharing, then it is worth knowing.

ALEX HARTNETT

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MORGAN BUCHART

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Using hyper-cool temperatures to accelerate healing in soft tissue, joints, and to increase metabolism, Whole Body Cryotherapy is an innovative and clinically proven method of helping your body achieve its ultimate potential—whether you’re a professional athlete, weekend warrior or generally seeking enhanced health and wellness. Contact our CryotherapyIndy experts today to learn more or to make an appointment.

CryotherapyIndy.com


STARTERS CONVERSING WITH INDY’S TOP ATHLETES AND CREATIVES AT THE INTERSECTION OF PERFORMANCE, CREATIVITY, AND STYLE. PHOTOGRAPHY BY POLINA OSHEROV AND ESTHER BOSTON + HAIR: CAMAS BREEN FOR MDG + MAKEUP: DANELLE FRENCH + DESIGN BY KATHY DAVIS

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VONTAE DAVIS FOOTBALL PLAYER TEXT BY POLINA OSHEROV

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OST NFL GUYS DON’T PUT A lot of importance on fashion, but I take pride in how I look. I take the basketball approach,” says the Indianapolis Colts’ Vontae Davis, one of the NFL’s elite cornerbacks. His reputation for swift and accurate defense (observe the bone-jarring tackle he inflicted on Giovani Bernard during last season’s Bengals game) had me thinking that Davis would be all swagger and Incredible Hulk bulk. Not so. Instead, I encounter a softspoken guy with a boyish, lopsided smile; definitely not the giant that I expected. It quickly becomes evident that while Davis is an outstanding athlete, his physical prowess is also enhanced by a fierce determination to be his absolute best. Although the Colts had just returned from a disappointing face-off with the New England Patriots, Davis is in good spirits; he confesses to being a lifelong optimist. “I’ve always been this way,” he explains. “Making a good situation out of a bad one.” Davis, along with the rest of his teammates, plans on coming back next season better, faster, and stronger. When I ask him if he thinks the Colts will make the Super Bowl next year, he neither confirms nor denies. “We have a vision for what we want to become,” he says. “It doesn’t happen overnight, but in the last three years, we have come together as a team, and every year we continue to build on the success of the previous one.” The response sounds a little rehearsed, but also sincere, so we move onto a topic that I am much more comfortable with: fashion! 2015 is shaping up to be a fun year for Davis. Recently engaged, he and his fiancee Megan will be tying the knot in Puerto Rico in June. But before the nuptials roll around, Davis plans to enjoy the off-season by taking his bride-to-be to the Grammys, and then to Paris Fashion Week. Later in the year, he’ll also be doing a spread for GQ. Davis is a self-admitted fashion connoisseur who loves luxury brands like Balenciaga, Versace, and Lanvin. He enjoys flipping through magazines, perusing style websites, and attending fashion shows. He attended his first (Giorgio Armani) in NYC a few years ago and was immediately hooked.

So what is it about style that appeals to him? Davis believes that first impressions matter, and that what you wear is just as important as your personality. You have to be the “full package.” He’s also found that fashion is a great conversation starter, a good way to meet fellow fashion lovers and stand out in the crowd. I chuckle at this. Does he really want to stand out in a crowd and meet new people? Doesn’t he already get recognized and stopped for pictures and autographs wherever he goes? “I’m a down-to-earth kind of a guy,” he says. “A lot of people who don’t recognize me have a hard time believing I’m an actual NFL player.” I have to laugh as I picture Davis digging for his wallet and procuring his NFL player card, likely to the embarrassment of those who insist on arguing with him about his day job. Davis shrugs modestly, indicating that none of this is a big deal. I’m glad to note that after five years on “the job,” he is neither jaded nor entitled.

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AVIS ENJOYS BEING DELIBERATE about his clothing choices. His personal style is a mix of fashion-forward pieces and stylish classics. A tux, a Coltsblue bowtie, an olive Helmut Lang nylon mesh jacket, chino joggers, and a creamy wool sweater are some of the pieces he brings with him to the shoot. He likes muted colors for fall and winter, then brightens up his wardrobe for the warmer months. As a rule, he doesn’t like to dress flashy, but throughout the interview, I am slightly distracted by the occasional glint from his shiny, metallic Lanvin high tops. As he doesn’t own a single gold chain, I guess he prefers to wear his bling on his feet. Where does Davis shop? He’s definitely familiar with the Fashion Mall, but his clothing mostly comes from NYC; wardrobe consultant and personal shopper Sean Julian makes sure to procure stylish pieces not available in Indianapolis. So what about Indianapolis? He’s been here for three years since being drafted from Miami, and it’s hard to think of places so diametrically opposed. He misses the water, the fresh seafood, and the world-class restaurants—understandable. To my chagrin (and I waste no time chastising him for it), I discover that Davis is not very familiar with downtown Indy. I can’t blame him, entirely. During the season, there isn’t much time to go exploring, and in the off-season, Davis stays at his place in Fort Lauderdale. Still, I let out an undignified squawk when I ask him about his favorite bar on Mass Ave, and he gives me a blank look. “Oh come on! Mass Ave! Andrew Luck lives on Mass Ave!” I exclaim and get what I hope is a tiny flicker of recognition, and not annoyance. I am slightly vindicated when Davis notes that the Midwestern work ethic has really made an impression on him and is something that he respects and appreciates. I make him promise me that next season he’ll take the time to explore downtown; I promised him that he won’t be disappointed.


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JEANETTE POHLEN BASKETBALL PLAYER TEXT BY ERIC REES

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eanette Pohlen was selected ninth overall by the Indiana Fever in the 2011 WNBA draft. Her high draft position capped off an impressive collegiate career at Stanford University, including four straight Final Four appearances and three consecutive trips to the championship game. Jeanette carried that run straight into her freshman season in the WNBA, when she helped the Fever win the 2012 title. “That was a special year,” she says. “We could all feel that we had something really good going on here, and it showed.” Unfortunately, she sustained an injury that year in the Finals, and then was injured again last season. Now, she is currently working through physical therapy to get back on the court. That hasn’t kept her from exploring Indy in her free time, which she says has not stopped evolving in the three years that she has lived here. “(The city) is practically night and day from when we moved here for my rookie year,” she says. Team training and physical therapy are still aspects of daily life, but Jeanette can rattle off a list of Indy restaurants and bars that would make any self-proclaimed foodie nod in approval; Patachou, Bluebeard, Union 50, just to name a few. And the interest in Indianapolis outside Banker’s Life Fieldhouse is genuine. During our interview, she flipped the tables and started grilling me on how to get involved around the city. “I definitely think that Indy can claim the ‘sports town’ identity,” she says. “But, there are ways that sports and arts can be intertwined.” She explains that during the seasons for Indy’s various sports teams, it can be hard for athletes to find time to go out and really experience a lot of what the city has to offer. But that doesn’t mean that the drive isn’t there. Jeanette thinks there would be a lot to gain, on both sides, if the sports organizations and Indy’s creative community could find more ways to interface. Jeanette could easily see the Fever hosting various arts causes and events at games. And it doesn’t have to stop with the Fever, Indy has more than a few well-established sports franchises that this type of interaction could work very well. “I just don’t know if people have given that a certain level of thought yet.” “The franchises here have really good people on their teams and in the community,” she says. “There’s a good vision [for Indianapolis] for people to get behind.”

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o could Indianapolis own the “sports city” as its image, its defining mark as a city? “Oh definitely,” she says. She runs through a list of names, most of which are likely to go down in the Indianapolis Sports Hall of Fame, if not the Halls of Fame for their respective leagues: “Reggie Wayne, Frank Vogel, Peyton [Manning]. And Tamika [Catchings],” Jeanette says. “There’s all of these people who are pillars of the community leading our sports teams.” “Growing up in California playing soccer and basketball, I didn’t have a football team to root for really,” she says with a smile. “Living here, how can you not love the Colts? It’s so easy to be a sports fan in this city.”

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ROWING UP IN THE MIDWEST, artist Walter Knabe (pronounced “kah-nob-ee”) has always been drawn to athletics. From the time he joined little league in Cincinnati at age 4, the focus necessary to hit a home run became second nature. Later, when he took up tennis, he knew his driving force in life would be the sort that comes from within, the peaceful inner monologue that pushes an athlete’s body to the limit despite fatigue. Knabe established his reputation in the art world in New York City during the 1980s, designing hand-painted wall coverings for the likes of Richard Gere, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, and Keith Richards. Then, in the early 1990s, when the cost of Manhattan living became too much, he and his family decided to return to their roots. “Raising children in New York City was kind of crazy,” he says. “My instinct has always been to raise kids in the Midwest.”

WALTER KNABE FINE ARTIST TEXT BY GABRIELLE POSHADLO

Without the myriad distractions for which New York is loved, loathed, and celebrated, Knabe found it easier to get work done once settled in Indianapolis. In the years since the move, his design empire has grown from the customized wall coverings to a full line of bedding, wallpaper, and manufactured fabrics, bringing the narrative of fine art to everyday items. “I like the idea of being very democratic with the work and making it accessible,” he says.

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n 2005, the National Gymnastics Foundation teamed up with the Arts Council of Indianapolis to commission outdoor art installations to inspire engagement around the National Gymnastics Championships taking place in the city. Knabe signed on to design installations for shop windows and bus stop shelters, marking his first project in the sporting sector.

“I’ve always been very athletic,” he says. “The commitment needed in sports is applicable to my philosophy to making art work.” Five years later Knabe was approached by Indianapolis Motor Speedway as the first local artist to design the official artwork for the 2010 Indianapolis 500. Unlike any work he’s done before, he aimed to merge the history of the race with the advanced technology and mind numbing speed associated with the Indy 500 of today. “These cars are going so fast, the paint is going to peel off of them,” says Knabe. With a black and white photograph from the first race in 1911 in the background, a contemporary Indy car in vivid red and yellow dominates the foreground, leaving a wake of paint in its path. The past is present, yet oh so distant. The following year the Arts Council of Indianapolis held a competition to select the poster design for the Super Bowl XLVI at Lucas Oil Stadium, and Knabe wanted to make his entry more dramatic than any of the pieces he’d done before.

“It was a poster so I wanted to do something that was very readable, a little more simplistic, but reflected the excitement of the city hosting this important event,” he says. More simple than his usual work, the poster depicted a lifelike Lucas Oil Stadium with Victory (of Soldiers and Sailors Monument fame) towering over a souvenir football. It was about celebration, and it was uncomplicated. With the city’s two most treasured sporting events to his credit, Knabe has his eye on a few others: the Kentucky Derby, U.S. Open, and Wimbledon. “Part of my aesthetic is combining a sense of antiquity and what’s current, making those things coexist,” he says. “For example, Kentucky is steeped in tradition whereas the tennis events are so contemporary and prone to using abstract images.”

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hat’s trending in Indy sports? Consider the perfect storm of last year’s World Cup frenzy combined with the soldout inaugural season of Indy’s new professional soccer team, the Indy Eleven, and then add in dreams of a cuttingedge downtown destination soccer stadium... How can the city not be in awe this spring with professional soccer—the newest kid in our sports-loving town? Zionsville High School graduate and Indy Eleven Defender, Cory Miller, was ahead of the trend (and not just because they used his photo in early announcements of the team before he officially signed on) and is rallying for Indy and for soccer—on and off the field. When Miller’s parents informed him that he’d be moving to Zionsville, from Snellville, Georgia, for his senior year of high school, however, he was not pleased. He “definitely put up a fight” to stay in Georgia with his friends, but when he landed here, he was gratified to find that the local soccer environment was above par. Miller always knew that he wanted to play professional soccer. After he signed with his first professional team, the Carolina RailHawks, he found a note he’d written in elementary school, detailing the steps he was going to take to become a professional soccer player. Despite his plan, Miller took the path less traveled to get there. After graduating from Zionsville High School in 2006, Miller attended Olivet Nazarene University in Illinois. “Most people,” he says, “go to a Division I school or play abroad.” While at Olivet, Miller led the team to two championships. Between 2011 and 2013, Miller played professionally in North Carolina and LA. Meanwhile, the Indy Eleven team was in its formative stages. Miller heard about the team from friends and tried out, but did not make the cut. He then considered playing in Europe traveling there to train, but ultimately decided that he prefered to stay stateside to be closer to family and friends. After coming back from abroad, he started training with the Indy Eleven team to stay in shape. He was such a good fit that after a few weeks, the Indy Eleven officially signed him to the team.

The fact that Indianapolis had a new professional team wasn’t surprising to Miller. Considering the number of kids playing recreational leagues and the quality of high school and club teams, he says Indy was definitely ready for a professional team, though he has been pleasantly surprised by the consistent support that the team has received from the fans. North Carolina and LA may beat Indianapolis when it comes to the weather, but “if you want to play in front of fans, Indianapolis is a great place to play.” The support has been tremendous, with every home game selling out, even when there were only two wins at home last season. “Indy’s a really loyal sports town; you can see that in the support of other home teams. It will be fun to show the fans a winning season this year!”

CORY MILLER SOCCER PLAYER TEXT BY ABBI JOHNSON

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ndy Eleven fans aren’t just loyal; they’re also loud. Miller has talked to several people who have said the intensity of the Indy Eleven crowd that averages around ten thousand fans reminds them of games in Scotland, England, and other places where soccer teams are well established, and small stadiums consistently sell out thirty-five thousand seats. Since Indy Eleven brought Miller on in August of last year, this is the longest length of time he’s lived in Indianapolis since high school, so he’s still reacquainting himself with the city. “It’s definitely different now than when I was in high school. There’s a lot more to do!” Part of getting to know the city will be participating in the Indy Eleven’s community outreach, Goals for Indy, which keeps kids involved and out of trouble. “To think that I worshipped the [Atlanta] Silverbacks as a kid, and now I’m playing in the same league. That’s pretty cool.”

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PIPPA MANN RACE CAR DRIVER TEXT BY CATHY KIGHTLINGER

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nglish racecar driver Pippa Mann likes metal—in her professional life and in her artwork. Mann moved to Indianapolis six years ago to compete in the Verizon IndyCar Series. These racecars are finelytuned, 1,500-pound carbon fiber and metal machines with 2.2-liter turbocharged V-6 engines that can reach speeds of more than 230 miles per hour. When she isn’t racing or doing all it takes to make it as an IndyCar driver—intense motorsports-specific workouts, personal appearances, and deal making (and breaking)—Mann is an active resident of downtown Indianapolis. She knows the local hot spots. Eats well. And she’s creating a burgeoning collection of local artwork. “I like things that speak to me personally,” Mann says. It isn’t a surprise, then, when she tells you her tastes in art and her fledgling collection have a lot of metal in it. There’s a metal sculpture of an IndyCar, created by Tom Patsis (Cold Hard Art, Indianapolis), who moved to Indianapolis to work in the motorsports industry. There’s also two black and white photographs–one of London’s famed Abbey Road and another of an old library with a spiral staircase—in the downtown condominium she shares with her husband, who also works in racing. Those contemporary images, by Bloomington artist Kyle Spears, are emblazoned on stainless steel. And then there’s Robert Indiana’s iconic Love sculpture, installed on the lawn of the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Mann knows a lot more about the history of her pink Susan G. Komen race car than she does about the Hoosier Pop artist who created the circa 1970 Cor-ten steel piece. But she knows she responds positively to it. “I like walking among the art and looking at the work from local artists,” she says of the Penrod Arts Fair. “My husband and I always talk about building a house one day.” And she says she imagines filling it with art.   Mann’s tastes have a softer side, too. She admires New York City artist Paul Villinski and his birds-made-of-vinylrecords-and-record-player installation, Anthem, at The Alexander Hotel. She also owns a Neighborhoods of Indianapolis map, discovered while shopping downtown on Massachusetts Avenue. The 46-by-48-inch paper poster detailing Indianapolis’ micro neighborhoods was created by Naplab’s Josh Anderson and Matt Hale. “It’s the biggest piece of artwork we have on the walls,” says Mann, who grew up in a rural area outside of London and celebrates living in a city. “I grew up in the middle of nowhere with nothing around me. I always wanted to be close to the center of town.”

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he also appreciates architecture—especially the Indianapolis Motor Speedway’s worldfamous Pagoda, made of concrete, glass, and steel. The Japanese-style structure represents the heart of the race track, where Mann has twice competed in the Indianapolis 500—her proudest professional moments. Traditionally, pagodas are shaped to point to the heavens, and at the track, hundreds of thousands of fans marvel at it every year. For Mann, though, it’s the perfect intersection of artwork and her life’s work.

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T ALL STARTED ON THE HIGH SCHOOL BUS, when other members of the color guard saw Kathy Moberly’s colorful makeup. They loved her designs, and wanted her to do their makeup as well. So Moberly started doing everyone’s makeup before each competition, and the color guard unofficially became her first client. Since then, Moberly has navigated her way through the freelance world, seen the results of her work published in many different formats, and built both a team and a reputation for excellence along the way. After graduating from cosmetology school, Moberly began as the department manager in the cosmetics section at a local department store. The job turned out to be a great fit—at that time, cosmetic lines paid to send Moberly to fabulous week-long training sessions in places like Cincinnati, Chicago, and New York. Indianapolis has turned out to be a wonderful place to work as a makeup artist, Moberly says. “I am proud to be part of such an amazing creative community here,” she effuses. It hasn’t always been that way, she says. In many ways Moberly’s career has mirrored Indianapolis’ growth. When she first moved to Indianapolis 20 years ago, “I felt like

it was a sleepy little city with pro sports and that was about all it had to offer.” Moberly started working freelance jobs, and gradually built up a client list, working with celebrities and athletes on TV, calendars, and magazines, so by the time the Super Bowl came to Indianapolis in 2012, Moberly had established herself as one of the best makeup artists in the city. As a result, she was an easy pick to be the head makeup artist for the NFL Network during the Super Bowl. In her words, the Super Bowl “put Indianapolis in the spotlight and made people take notice.” She also says organizations like Pattern have provided additional opportunities and really helped grow and connect the community.

KATHY MOBERLY

MAKEUP ARTIST ARTIST MAKEUP NASHVILLE? TEXT BY ABBI M. JOHNSON TEXT BY XXXXX +

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hroughout her career, Moberly has worked with artists and athletes alike. Despite having different careers, whether it’s a professional football player or a model at New York Fashion Week, Moberly doesn’t notice much of a difference when they’re sitting in the makeup chair. Maybe the athletes are a little bit shy. “Athletes prefer to be in a more private setting” when getting their makeup done, and “definitely have the less-is-more mentality” when it comes to their makeup. Still, “everyone wants to put their best foot forward,”

she says. Ultimately, Moberly loves to see talented individuals and organizations coming together. With such a well-established career, Moberly feels it’s important to give back to the Indianapolis community and to other aspiring makeup artists. Whether it’s being involved in Wish Upon a Wedding and Dress For Success, or mentoring up-and-coming makeup artists, giving back to the community keeps her grounded and humble. “I would do what I do every day for free if I didn’t have to make a living,” she says. I am living my dream, and through my workshops for aspiring makeup artists, I am a mentor, she continues. “My favorite quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson is ‘Love of beauty is taste. Creation of beauty is art!’ I say, ‘Be a creator!’”

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F SUCCESS IN LIFE DEPENDS ON KNOWing what you want, then Ricardo Dyer is already halfway there. “I know for a fact that this is what I want to be doing,” says Dyer, a 21-year-old dance major in his senior year at Butler University. Dyer wasn’t always so certain about his interests. As the youngest in a family of three children, he was an introverted kid with little enthusiasm for sports or other organized activities until the age of seven, when his mother suggested dance lessons, including ballet. “It sounded like fun. But I was shy, and it seemed like I’d have to get comfortable with the process,” he says. By the time he reached high school, Dyer had overcome his on-stage shyness and branched out into musical theatre. He was talented enough to earn a high school scholarship to a performing arts high school, the Governor’s School for the Arts in Norfolk, Virginia, where his interest in ballet returned during his freshman year. “Every Friday we had a ballet class,” Dyer says. “I wasn’t really enjoying my other classes, but ballet was a required foundation class, and I was really into it.” He decided to audition for the school’s dance program, which was designed to prepare dancers for college and dance repertory schools. It had been years since his last formal ballet class, and Dyer had to dig deep to make up for lost time and training. Making dance a career was an informed decision, made after four years of hard work in high school. “Over the years of thinking about what you want to do, you start to realize what it takes to get to the place you want to be,” Dyer says. “I didn’t start out with the work ethic I have now, but eventually, I got fed up with not being what I wanted to be, and I just craved it so much that I knew what I had to do if I wanted to do this for a career.”

At 18, he had two choices: auditioning for a dance repertory school or going on to college. Dyer felt a college experience would help him mature and give him a more complete education. Butler University was a top contender, mainly because Dyer felt it offered a strong background in classical dance and could better prepare him for a professional career. The deal was cinched when he earned a scholarship to help defray expenses.

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oming to Indianapolis was a welcome adventure. Dyer’s father, a career officer in the military, had moved the family several times from one coast to another, but they had never lived in the Midwest. “I was looking for a big change,” Dyer says. “That’s part of what Butler represented to me.” Once in Indianapolis, Dyer stood out— and not just for his well-honed work ethic. “Out of 120 dance students, only three of us were people of color,” he says. “I’d never gone to school anywhere where I was such an obvious part of the diversity mix.” Choosing Butler gave him a different life than he would have had if he had studied dance in New York City, a second home for Dyer, who has family roots there. During the past four years at Butler, his mornings were busy with academic classes. From noon on, he was either in a dance class or rehearsing for performances until at least 6 p.m. most weekdays, and sometimes all day on Saturdays. Although preparing for a professional dance career didn’t leave a lot of free time to explore Indianapolis, Dyer appreciates the city’s safe environment and the downto-earth quality of the people who live here. “I’m accustomed to a city where there is a lot of diversity and a lot of stimulation,” he says. “It’s definitely a much smaller city, but I’m excited to see where Indy will end up if it continues to bring art and cultivate diversity.” Dyer says racial and ethnic diversity is an important part of the landscape for any community that wants to maintain a strong reputation in the arts. “Being an artist is about being creative, and you can’t really be creative unless you’re surrounded by a wide variety of people and ideas that push you,” he says.

Now in his final semester at Butler University, Dyer is milking all he can from his remaining classes, and moving toward a dance career by auditioning for a spot in a professional company. Last semester, he tackled a dream that seemed unimaginable to him just four years ago—dancing the lead role in a ballet favorite, The Nutcracker. He also landed the lead role in Valse Fantaisie, a work made famous by George Balanchine, and licensed by the George Balanchine Trust. Dyer says those opportunities illustrate why Indianapolis was the right place to prepare for the grueling physical work and long days of a professional dancer. “I can confidently say that I’ve progressed a lot from those first lessons I took when I was 14,” he says. “Every year I’ve been at Butler, I feel like I’ve turned a new page and become a whole new person. I know how to work hard, take correction, and stay humble. If I continue working this hard and retain all that I’ve learned, I hope to be getting paid as a dancer by the end of the year.” In the highly-competitive field of professional dance, Dyer knows that’s a tall order, but he isn’t ready to think about Plan B. “I’m not thinking of backing off,” he says.

RICARDO DYER DANCER TEXT BY CRYSTAL HAMMON

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MARC LEBRYK PHOTOGRAPHER TEXT CHERYL REED

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TUNNING IMAGES OF ATHLETES engaged in fantastically physical feats have been used to inform, motivate, challenge, thrill, and entertain us for as long as, well, as long as there have been athletes and cameras. Getting those shots, according to photographer Marc Lebryk, can be almost as difficult as the athletes’ acts. For the most part, sports photographers are herded into the same pen, and the majority of the shots are replicated by every shooter in the confined area. “The process itself is often the empty calories of the industry,” he says. “You’re there with everyone else. Everyone’s shooting the same action. You can hope, and even work, to find an original angle every time. But there are a lot of games, and there is constant demand to illustrate them all.” Reaching to an old writers’ cliché used to justify submitting generic copy needed to fill the paper’s white space, the Irvington freelance photographer explains what he means by that empty calorie comment. “Photographers have to ‘feed the beast,’ too,” he says. Think about those awesome shots that seem so singular: Odell Beckham Jr.’s twofingered catch against Dallas; any X-gamer flipping so fast over and over he’s just a blur; the gymnast contorted so gracefully while balanced perfectly on the beam; the thrills of

victory and the anguishes of defeat or injury. “They’re amazing. They’re impossible. They’re wonderful,” Lebryk says. “But look at any newspaper, website, or magazine. The next column over, or on following pages, are more pedestrian shots that explain the other sports stories. And the next day or week or so, even those singular shots fade in the rush of shots of the next amazing, impossible athletic feat.” It’s in the unusual that Lebryk gets his deepest photographic satisfaction. Unusual in the sense of the shot he took, not necessarily the subject of the actual photograph. For an auto dealer’s newspaper ad, he once staged a scene where a new car crashed into a 400-pound pumpkin. “I was cleaning pumpkin out of my gear the rest of the day,” he says ruefully, admitting, “I didn’t really think that one through.”

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nother time, on a shot where he was partnering with a friend for a Naptown Roller Girls calendar, his buddy, Greg Andrews, came up with the idea of posing derby girl, “Cereal Killer,” in an old enamel bathtub filled with Fruit Loops. As the shoot waned, Lebryk climbed on a chair for a different perspective. Seeing what Lebryk was up to, stylist Nikki Sutton made a suggestion, the model got silly and tossed a handful of cereal at him, grinning outrageously. Cut. End scene. There’s the shot. “Everybody sees things differently,” he says. “I like to give [my clients] a shot they wouldn’t normally get to see.” He once covered a Bengals-Patriots football game that played on despite a torrential downpour. All of the other photographers sought shelter. The teams stayed on the field. So Lebryk did, too. “I don’t know why I sat there. But that was the way I saw the game. Tom Brady standing there and water just pouring down everywhere. No one else saw it that way that day.” Except everyone who follows USA Today’s “For the Win” page. Lebryk, just 30, came to Central Indiana via the Indianapolis Star upon graduation from Purdue University. Hired to do commercial photography for the newspaper’s ad and special sections, he was often sent on assignment with little direction. He pitched in for sports shooting as needed, but really was expected to just point and shoot. Those seven years of shooting from his own perspective are serving him well in his freelance life. Also serving him well are the connections he made those years. Clients range from USA Today to Purdue, Indiana University, Herff Jones, and Amazon. He leads workshops in photography for Roberts Camera and teaches photography at Ivy Tech. He’s grateful for the work and the wordof-mouth that’s led him to many of those clients. It’s how he gives back. “Photography has been very good to me,” he says. “In the beginning, I was so used to having a regular paycheck that the idea of not knowing when I’d get paid made me afraid to turn down anything. He’s hoping his next decade of professional photography will settle down. He wants to spend more time with his wife, maybe grow a family. But make no mistake: there’s much more to come from Marc Lebryk. “I’m of the opinion that my best photo hasn’t been taken yet,” he says.


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F YOU’RE A NAPTOWN NATIVE YOU’RE pretty much required to love the Colts. And if you’re into the spirit of the sport and the shake of pom poms, you love the Colts cheerleaders. Now combine those Colts cheerleaders with some swimsuits and a warm beach in Mexico at sunrise. What a dream. You can have a glimpse at this with the Colts 2015 calendar, but Danielle Smith, stylist and CEO of Fresh Fettle, experienced it in person when she styled their calendar shoot. After months of studying the cheerleaders and hoping for a way into the Colts organization, Smith finally broke through. She introduced herself to Kelly Tilley, the Colts cheerleader manager, and was invited to do the shoot with just two weeks of notice. Despite the short prep time, a strong creative team, and well-organized trip led to a successful calendar.

DANIELLE SMITH WARDROBE STYLIST TEXT BY ASHLEY MINYARD

“I really wanted to contribute and make the Colts calendar the best calendar out of all the NFL sports teams,” says Smith. “I’m really confident that we achieved that. It’s not only for the fans, but also the organization and the cheerleaders themselves to know that we put out a really good product.”

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utside of the Colts organization, Smith has worked with former athletes for annual fashion shows. She says the biggest difference between athletes and models is the structure of the body. A great alterations assistant is key to the right fit that works around strong thighs and wide shoulders. But she says most of the athletes are good sports (no pun intended). They are fun and easy to work with thanks to their big personalities.

Although athletes aren’t the main focus of her business, she analyzes the sidelines looking for potential clients. Eyeing those in the spotlight or post career, she mentally tweaks pocket squares or changes the fit of a blazer. With sports organizations becoming more open to partnering with the fashion industry, Smith keeps herself available to those who may need her services. “The NBA has a huge fashion following,” says Smith. “LeBron, Dwyane Wade, and Russell Westbrook are working with excellent stylists. They really started to give the NBA new life in the sense of just walking from their car to the locker room. It’s become a catwalk in the last couple of years, as well as postgame interviews. With Indianapolis being such a sports-driven town, it’s bound to happen here soon.”

Right now she’s pursuing a few athletes quietly, keeping her eye on those she believes are reaching a sweet spot in their brand. But she is also interested in less mainstream athletics, with a guilty pleasure for track and strongman competitions. “If I was asked to style a strongman competition, I would be so excited. That’s probably weird, but very true. I would do a cartwheel while pregnant. I would find the hottest briefs, shoes, and gloves ever, and he’d be picking up a car or something.” So regardless of your sport, if you’re an athlete in Indy, look out, because Danielle Smith has her eye on you.

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MICHELLE MAROCCO. JEWELRY ARTIST. CREATING GOOD VIBES THROUGH YOGA, LEATHER, AND DIAMONDS. TEXT BY AMANDA DORMAN + PHOTOGRAPHY BY ESTHER BOSTON Seven years ago, Michelle Marocco noticed a void in her closet. When getting dressed for an event, she couldn’t find the right jewelry to complete her outfit. Enter Niyama Jewelry: her line of bracelets, necklaces, rings, and earrings that juxtapose tribal order silver and brass with diamonds and pearls on leather. Yoga-related details, such as the word “om” and the signature Niyama infinity symbol, accent many of her pieces. Today, celebrities like model Elaine Irwin and musicians Richie Sambora and Frankie Ballard have been spotted in Marocco’s pieces. AMANDA DORMAN: Niyama originally began as art — huge canvases with layers of textures, symbols, and hidden messages. How did you transition to designing jewelry? MICHELLE MAROCCO: The real inspiration was the fact that I wasn’t finding anything. I wanted yoga-inspired jewelry. I wanted diamonds. I wanted leather. I wanted things to be more integrated, and I felt like people were just stopping a minute too soon with their own designs. AD: How does the practice of yoga inspire you creatively? MM: Yoga has been one of the most transformative things I have ever done in my life. There are two parts to my line. One is Niyama, which is spiritually influenced and inspired by my yoga. The yoga influence is everywhere—in the meaning of the word, Sanskrit for “purification through self-discipline of yoga”—and in my logo, the infinity symbol turned upright to resemble seated meditation pose. The other part of my line is Marocco, the higher end pieces with diamonds and leather. This is the stuff that makes my heart race—the audacity of diamonds with leather.

AD: Describe the look of Niyama by Marocco. MM: I’m attracted to texture. I feel texture creates contrast, and contrast creates interest. I use leather, diamonds, opaque diamonds, and ancient sandalwood beads. I incorporate a lot of leather elements into my designs. Putting the leather next to something delicate and fine creates so much interest. AD: Speaking of yoga, the practice of yoga and meditation seems very much a lifestyle for you, not just a hobby. MM: I’m at the point now where I can’t be without it. It would be like not brushing my teeth. It immediately connects me to my creative mojo and also keeps me calm and anxiety-free. To have a flowing practice and to take a class is, in essence, preparing to be calmer and to meditate. My meditation is one with my creativity. I leave meditation thinking, “let’s go make something right now.” AD: So you have a large clientele of yogis. Who else wears Niyama by Marocco? MM: Everyone! I make cool leather cuffs for men. Boys love the coin collection. Girls steal their moms’ Buddha necklaces. I also have a collection called Busy Girl Jewelry. We’re all looking for a way to look cool without taking a lot of time. I noticed I would take the same five bracelets off every night and put the same five on everyday. So I connected a series of bracelets with a metal clasp and it takes two seconds to take on and off.

AD: What is something people don’t know about you? MM: A lot of people don’t realize I do my own gardening. I love to play in the dirt and get dirty. And I love to go out and catch frogs with my boys. Dirt—I just love it. AD: You’re an artist, a painter, a jewelry designer, a yogi, an interior decorator, a gardener, and a mom (phew!). What keeps you going back to Niyama everyday? MM: I have this urgency to create, and I want to share it. I know from hundreds of different clients and friends that they feel energy when they wear my pieces. They connect to the jewelry in the same way I do when I wear it. It’s infused with energetic vibrations. People put it on, and they feel it. They look at it, and it reminds them of something more sacred. ✂ michellemarocco.com

AD: You’re known for this layered-on look. What is your personal style? MM: I will admit I’m a bit overdone most of the time. Coco Chanel said, “Look in the mirror and take off one accessory before you leave the house.” When I leave the house, I take off five. What I like to do is put everything I love on at the same time. I leave the house and say, “I’m going to wear all these things together because I love them.” It creates character, personality, and your own style. Just do it and have confidence in yourself. 53


ICE INDY FUEL ICES OUT THEIR COMPETITION, ON AND OFF THE RINK PHOTOGRAPHY BY POLINA OSHEROV + STYLE BY MARIA DICKMAN + ART DIRECTION AND DESIGN BY KATHY DAVIS + HAIR BY ANTHONY PEREZ + MAKEUP BY JACKS VON LIRIA + JEWELRY COURTESY MOYER FINE JEWELERS

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NO 14 MIKE DUCO, FORWARD HOMETOWN: TORONTO, ON

DABAKAROV DIAMOND PINWHEEL PENDANT WITH 6.83 CTW DIAMONDS, $15,695

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NO 5, TRADED ROBERT CZARNIK FORWARD HOMETOWN: DETROIT, MI

RINGS. WHITE TUNGSTEN BAND WITH BLACK TEXTURE CENTER, $495. TUNGSTEN 0.16CTW DIAMOND ON BLACK BAND, $550 WATCHES, TOP TO BOTTOM. CHOPARD STAINLESS STEEL GENTS CLASSIC RACING WATCH, $10,350 CHOPARD STAINLESS STEEL TITANIUM MONACO HISTORIQUE WATCH, $8,680 HUBLOT BIG BANG CHRONO 4 MM WATCH, $13,700

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NO 41 GARETT BEMBRIDGE FORWARD HOMETOWN: SASKATOON, SK

CHRISTOPHER DESIGNS 11 CTW DIAMOND BRACELET, $49,995

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NO 24 KIRILL GOTOVETS DEFENSE HOMETOWN: MINSK, BELARUS

ESTATE WHITE GOLD AND DIAMOND CROSS NECKLACE, $7,895

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NO 30 CODY REICHARD GOALTENDER HOMETOWN: CELINA, OH

RINGS, TOP TO BOTTOM: CHRISTOPHER DESIGNS 3.01 CTW DIAMOND RING, $144,450 ON MIDDLE FINGER: CUSHION CUT 8.08 CTW DIAMOND RING, $317,850 ON PINKIE: PLATINUM 5.00 CTW DIAMOND WITH DIAMOND HALO, $129,000 CHAINS: DAVID YURMAN STERLING SILVER DOUBLE BOX CHAIN, $650; DAVID YURMAN STERLING SILVER CHAIN, $565; DAVID YURMAN STERLING SILVER CHAIN, $545

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NO 88, TRADED GARRETT KLOTZ FORWARD HOMETOWN: REGINA, SK

MIZUKI STERLING SILVER ICICLE NECKLACE, $3,625

AD

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Everyone deserves a championship ring

146TH AND MERIDIAN IN CARMEL. 317.844.9003. MOYERFINEJEWELERS.COM From simple chic to the fashion runways, Moyer Fine Jewelers has it all.


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TONY KANAAN ON WINNING THE INDY 500, STAYING AT THE TOP OF HIS GAME, AND ENJOYING THE RIDE. TEXT BY MARIA DICKMAN + PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEVE BROKAW + HAIR AND MAKEUP BY KATE SHAW + DESIGN BY KATHY DAVIS 63


AT 5’5” AND 170 POUNDS, TONY KANAAN ISN’T EXACTLY THE MOST INTIMIDATING MAN IN THE ROOM. He should be, though, for what he may lack in sheer presence, he more than makes up for in accomplishments and accolades. To date, the Brazilian native has a total of 17 IndyCar race victories, has held 15 poles, and has 233 consecutive starts (an IndyCar series record). He holds another series record for completing every possible lap in a season (3,305, to be precise). He was the IndyCar Champion in 2004, and the Indianapolis 500 champion in 2013 (his 12th attempt at the Borg Warner trophy). He’s the only driver to have led the Indianapolis 500 in each of his first seven starts. He’s also known as one of the nicest guys in racing. We sat down with the racing legend-to-be to chat all things IndyCar, health and wellness, and “free time.”

“IT TOOK ME 12 TRIES AND 12 YEARS TO WIN THAT RACE. I CAME CLOSE SO MANY TIMES AND PEOPLE THOUGHT, ‘WELL, HE’S NEVER GOING TO WIN ONE.’”

ON RACING

“I KNEW THAT I WANTED TO BE A RACE CAR DRIVER SINCE THE first time I drove a go kart. I started racing when I was eight years old, with my dad. That was a thing we used to do, just as a father-son thing. Starting that young, I raced go-karts for quite a long time. I made my way to IndyCar through the years by winning championships and getting picked up by teams that are interested in having me drive for them. I was always an open wheel guy. IndyCar was always the goal. For me, the race to win was the Indy 500 because of the legacy. It’s another reason I chose IndyCar. I won the MATV 500 IndyCar World Championship in 2014 and the [IndyCar] Series Championship in 2004. I was the 12 hours of Sebring LMP2 Class winner a few years ago. It’s a very traditional race, not an IndyCar race, but a touring car race so that was fun, for sure. I would say if you put it together, those were the three big ones. There were others, of course, but when I was growing up, if you’re going to put in the level of importance—and obviously, all races are important—but once you achieve a really high level, those three were big ones for me.

ON WINNING THE INDY 500

WE HAVE A VERY POWERFUL TEAM WITH CHIP GANASSI racing. We start the year expecting to win the Indy 500 and win the championship. Every race that we enter, that’s the mentality. And then we go for it. The tradition, the build up to the race, the whole place itself—the 400,000 people there watching you, and all the things that come with that win—it’s unbelievable. There’s not a single person in the world who doesn’t know what the Indy, the Indy 500, is when you mention it. It’s tough to achieve your dreams in life. And [winning the 500] was all I ever wanted in my career. It’s everything I’ve dreamed of, since I was a little kid wanting to be a race car driver. I finally did it—I don’t think I can describe how good of a feeling it is. I was completely overwhelmed. In my career it has always been the biggest achievement and a dream come true, but in my personal life it was just the best feeling in the world. It showed me that it didn’t matter how long it took, I kept persevering and I ended up achieving what I wanted. It was not just for me. I use it as an example for my kids, as an example for my friends, and as an example to anyone who follows my career and saw how many times it took me. It took me 12 tries and 12 years to win that race. I came close so many times and people thought, ‘Well, he’s never going to win one.’ And I think that’s probably the biggest impact. It’s showing people that when you want something, if you really work hard, the possibility of what you can achieve is much, much higher.

ON HIS INSPIRATIONS

I LOST MY DAD WHEN I WAS 13. I TOLD MYSELF THAT I WAS going to keep racing because that’s something that we started doing together. My biggest inspiration is that promise I made to him. It keeps me going. I always say, ‘never give up.’ But I also say, ‘living the dream.’ When people ask: ‘how are you,’ I say ‘living the dream,’ because that is the truth. 64

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ON LIFE OUTSIDE OF THE TRACK

I DON’T HAVE A LOT OF OFF TIME, BUT WHEN I DO, I LOVE spending time with family, my wife (Indiana native Lauren Bohlander) and my kids (Leo and newborn Deco). I love going to the beach, too, so I’m always searching for warm weather and a beach somewhere. I love exercise, so in my off season, I’m always building up for the next season. But as for vacation, you’ll probably find me on a beach just doing nothing. I split my time between Miami, Florida, and Indy. During the season I spend most of my time in Indy, but in the winter I prefer to be in Miami. Both are home. If I’m not on the beach during the day or working out, I love to go to the movies with my wife, or go to dinner. Obviously, I go to Fogo de Chao a lot. I love PF Chang’s—it was the first meal I had with my wife when we were dating. And I love to go out to sushi. We like to go to restaurants that we haven’t tried yet, and find new places. That’s kinda our thing.

ON STAYING FIT

I LOVE EXERCISE. I HAVE A PRETTY GOOD ROUTINE. I WORK out six times a week when I’m home, twice a day. I do weights and then do cardio, which consists of either a run, a swim, or a bike ride. Most people have to wake up and go to the office. That’s my job—to go to the gym. So I usually wake up at 7, go to the gym, spend an hour and a half doing weights, and then in the afternoon I’ll go do my cardio. Sometimes I’ll alternate and do the opposite. And then one day a week I take the day off. I’ll either break the week in half and do Sunday, Monday Tuesday and take Wednesday off, or I’ll go the whole week and then take Sunday off. When I’m in Indy, I love to run on the Monon Trail. I go to Eagle Creek park for cycling, and I have very good friends at St. Vincent’s Sports Performance, which is a really good facility for athletes. The Colts players go there, and I go work out there when I’m in town. In Miami, you’ll find me running and working out at the beach. I live in a beautiful area with a beach two blocks away.

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF DIET

I EAT SIX TIMES A DAY, SMALL PORTIONS EACH MEAL, MIXING protein and carbs. I have a nutritionist who gives me a guide as to portions. I used to weigh my food to see how much I was eating, but nowadays I can usually eyeball it to see how much I can eat. That’s pretty much it. There’s nothing fancy. I allow myself once a week to have what I call a cheat meal. So basically I will allow myself to have dessert, or I’ll go and eat something that’s not in my diet like a pizza or a hot dog or something. It’s not really a diet; just a healthy way of eating and keeping it healthy.

ON HIS BIGGEST CHALLENGES

LIKE EVERYBODY, TO KEEP MYSELF ON THE TOP OF MY GAME every year is the biggest challenge. As time goes by, a lot of things change in life. When I was young, I had nothing to lose. Then I got married, had kids and my mentality changed a lot. You grow and you have different goals. When you win the races that you want to win, sometimes people think it’s hard to keep motivated. So to me, I think my biggest challenge is to keep myself on my ‘A game’ and divide my time with my family. When I didn’t have a wife and kids, I had 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to think about racing, and that was it. Now, I have to manage my time a little bit better because I can’t be that selfish, and I want to spend time with my loved ones. But they understand that it’s been a lifestyle I’ve had for almost 33 years now. I think with the amount of time that I spend taking care of my body that age is just a number. I still have plenty of years left and my goal is, as long I’m competitive and I still feel like I can win races, I’m going to keep doing it.” Living the dream, indeed. ✂


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Navy blue replaced the royal blue from prior Pacers uniforms – a change that persists to this day.

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Slanted stripes departed from the straight lines that typified jerseys at the time.

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The Flo-Jo design marked the first time ever a Pacers jersey featured a V-neck.

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Donnie Walsh, the Pacers president at the time, looked at Griffith Joyner and saw a cultural lightning rod who could give the middle-of-the-road Pacers a much-needed jolt. So he commissioned her to design the

Designing an NBA uniform was a big opportunity for the recently retired Olympian. And it gave the Pacers, so often overlooked, a chance to finally stand out from the pack.

An Olympic sprinter who still holds the world record in the 100 and 200-meter dashes, Griffith Joyner was known for her style as much as her speed. If you’re over 30, you probably remember her body-hugging track suits with one leg cut off at the thigh. Or her six-inch, multi-colored enameled fingernails. Or her makeup, which was immaculately applied, even as she was readying to run at superhuman speeds.

Of course, that had a lot to do with a young sharpshooter named Reggie Miller, who, like

In the end, the partnership worked out well for both parties. Griffith Joyner was praised for designing a uniform that is unusual even by today’s standards. “They are a little flashier than what you see on most NBA teams today,” Walsh said. And believe it or not, the Pacers actually started playing better.

1990 Pacers’ new uniforms. “She was in the headlines at the time,” Walsh said. “She was winning gold medals, and she wanted to do fashion design. No one here was into fashion design at the time.”

In 1990, the struggling Indiana Pacers needed a faster, fresher look. So they turned to possibly the freshest, and definitely the fastest, woman alive: Florence Griffith Joyner.

When the Pacers announced that the FloJo would finally be brought back this year as a “throwback” uniform, fans rejoiced. Certainly, Reggie Miller is one reason why. But mainly, people love the way it looks. Like Griffith Joyner herself – who died in 1998 – it’s a timeless original.

Griffith Joyner, hailed from California. The Pacers had some of their most unforgettable moments while wearing their Flo-Jos, as they came to be called, and Miller was always at the center of the action. Whether he was scoring eight points in 8.9 seconds or flashing the “choke” sign at Spike Lee, Reggie made NBA history in that jersey – history that few basketball fans in Indiana or New York City will soon forget.

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TEXT BY MATTHEW GONZALES PHOTOGRAPHY BY ESTHER BOSTON DESIGN BY AMY MCADAMS-GONZALES

DESIGNED BY A FLAMBOYANT TRACK STAR. MADE FAMOUS BY A BRASH YOUNG JUMP SHOOTER. BACK THIS SEASON BY POPULAR DEMAND.

The italicized, sans serif, lowercase font stood apart from the uppercase lettering on most jerseys of the '90s.


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FIELDS OF COLOR WHEN YOU LIVE IN A SPORTS TOWN, FASHION INSPIRATION IS (ACTUALLY) EVERYWHERE.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY HADLEY FRUITS. FABRIC CURATION BY ABBI JOHNSON. DESIGN BY LINDSAY HADLEY.

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FASHION IS NOT SOMETHING THAT EXISTS IN DRESSES ONLY. FASHION IS IN THE SKY, IN THE STREET, FASHION HAS TO DO WITH IDEAS, THE WAY WE LIVE, WHAT IS HAPPENING. — COCO CHANEL

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PEOPLE ON A RUNWAY. FASHION HAPPENS EVERY MORNING WHEN YOU WAKE UP. — SHALOM HARLOW

PHOTOGRPAHED AT AN INDOOR TRACK

YOU DON’T LEARN STYLE FROM WATCHING

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I THINK THERE IS BEAUTY IN EVERYTHING.

WHAT “NORMAL” PEOPLE WOULD PERCEIVE AS UGLY, I CAN USUALLY SEE SOMETHING OF BEAUTY IN IT. — ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

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AND DRAWS INSPIRATION FROM THE BEST OF THE PAST.

— LANA DEL REY

PHOTOGRPAHED AT A FITNESS CENTER

FASHION IS INSPIRED BY YOUTH AND NOSTALGIA

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FASHION IS ONLY THE ATTEMPT TO REALIZE ART IN LIVING FORMS AND SOCIAL INTERCOURSE. — FRANCIS BACON

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AND NOT A FORM OF IMPRISONMENT. — ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

PHOTOGRPAHED AT A BASEBALL DIAMOND

FASHION SHOULD BE A FORM OF ESCAPISM,

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FASHION HAS TO REFLECT WHO YOU ARE, WHAT YOU FEEL AT THE MOMENT, AND WHERE YOU’RE GOING. — PHARRELL WILLIAMS

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— HARRY WINSTON

PHOTOGRPAHED AT AN ICE RINK

PEOPLE WILL STARE. MAKE IT WORTH THEIR WHILE.

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SHYRA ELY-GASH. IMAGE CONSULTANT. FORMER WNBA STAR NOW COACHES CLIENTS TO BE MORE STYLISH. TEXT BY WANDINI B. RIGGINS + PHOTOGRAPH BY STEPHEN SIMONETTO As a former professional athlete in the WNBA and Europe, Shyra Ely-Gash initially targeted her image consulting company Styles by ME to the women’s basketball community to merge her two loves: fashion and basketball. Now, she styles a number of coaches in the NCAA and WNBA, as well as pro athletes and the general public. An Indianapolis native (who went on to get her fashion merchandising degree from the University of Tennessee), Ely helps her clients to develop a style that reflects their personalities. Styles by ME offers consultations, personal shopping, event styling, closet organization and wardrobe planning, and fashion show and photo shoot styling. WANDINI B. RIGGINS: Can you recall when fashion first spoke to you? SHYRA ELY-GASH: My fondest, earliest memories involve fashion! My mom tells stories of me pushing my sleeves up and blousing my shirts when I was 4 years old. I still have a burn scar on my leg from when I used to hide in my room ironing my clothes—knowing very well that I was not supposed to be operating an iron at 7 years old. I remember being sprawled out on the living room floor, looking through magazines, circling looks that I loved. WBR: What is style? SEG: Style is a form of art. It’s how I express myself. Some people sing, draw, paint, play instruments; I dress. My favorite fashion quote best explains what style and fashion mean to me: “I am building a collection, just like the most exacting art connoisseur. But instead of finding something to hang on a wall, I’ll hang it on my back.” [Quote by Lynn Yaeger] WBR: Who are your style icons? SEG: I have three I admire: Solange Knowles for her bold, print mixing; Jenna Lyons for her effortlessly, genius,

tomboy style; and Jennifer Lopez, because she just gets it right every time. She has a timeless, classic, girly glam style that I love. WBR: What are you trying to communicate through your personal style? SEG: If anything, I just want my style—and those I style— to be recognizable and identifiable to others. I want my style stamp to speak before you have to ask, “who styled that?”

vehicle, and the opportunities basketball has afforded me. And it has allowed me to establish a niche. WBR: What positives does fashion bring to your life and to the lives of people you’ve styled? SEG: Most people don’t realize that there is so much more to styling than just playing with clothing. The warmest, most rewarding feeling I receive is the instant rise in confidence and self-esteem from my clients. WBR: What is your top style rule?

WBR: How do femininity and being an elite athlete intersect for you?

SEG: There are no rules! If you like it, wear it.

SEG: It’s always been extremely important to me to maintain my femininity as a professional athlete, especially in a male-dominated sport. I started playing ball in fifth grade. I also grew up with two brothers, so I was a tomboy, but with girly roots. I remember thinking that if I looked or dressed like a boy, I would be a better ballplayer. But I was never really comfortable. In eighth grade, I made the decision to be completely me.

WBR: Is there really such a thing as a fashion faux pas?

WBR: As a professional athlete you dress identical to your teammates. With your incredible and bold style, can you feel like a stylish woman within that aspect of your life? SEG: I will go to my deathbed disproving the notion that the two are mutually exclusive. You can absolutely be a stylish female athlete. That’s how I birthed my business. “Hoops Meets Heels” is my blog name and hashtag associated with my business. I wanted to help athletes fashionably transition into life off of the court. WBR: Some people think fashion is fickle. How have you made the decision to build your career around an art form that some don’t take seriously? SEG: I always knew I would have a career in fashion. I wasn’t sure in what capacity but it was definitely Plan A. Basketball was Plan B. I’m very grateful for that

SEG: Yes and no, I mentioned that there are no rules when it comes to fashion. However, one of my biggest style pet peeves would be leggings. For one, they are NOT pants! Unless you’re going to the gym, cover your bottom! I think they’re a lazy alternative as it relates to fashion and style. WBR: Tell us about a reluctant client who has blossomed into a man or woman of style. SEG: All my clients have different needs. Some use me as a time-saver; some hate to shop; others have special events; and then some just need help putting looks together. I love to promote my clients and showcase my work on my social media. I always find it funny how the more comfortable they get, the more those pictures start rolling in. I think they love the feedback as much as I do. That’s the confidence spike from which I receive so much pleasure. WBR: What do you say to people who say, “I don’t have a personal style” or “I’m intimidated by fashion?” SEG: That’s what I’m here for! My job is to define and develop their sense of style and to open their eyes to the wonderful world of fashion. I consider myself an image builder. ✂ 79


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FRENCH DEAL INDIANA PACER, DESIGNER, AND FRENCHMAN IAN MAHINMI IMPORTS HIS “MADE IN FRANCE” LABEL TO TOWN

TEXT BY MARY G. BARR + PHOTOGRAPHY BY POLINA OSHEROV + STYLING BY KATIE MARPLE + MAKEUP BY KATE SHAW + ASSISTANT ESTHER BOSTON

DESIGN BY KATHY DAVIS

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IAN MAHINMI WITH HIS EYES CLOSED, HE IS AT ONE WITH THE MUSIC. HE LIBERALLY SMILES AND GENTLY SWAYS TO THE R&B HE HEARS FROM A DISTANT SPEAKER. HE CAN’T HELP IT—MUSIC IS AS INSPIRATIONAL TO HIS LIFE AS IS HIS FRENCH COUNTRY AND ITS FASHION HERITAGE. HE PROJECTS CONFIDENCE AND REFINEMENT WITH A SLEEK, MUSCULAR EDGE—JUST LIKE THE EXCLUSIVE MENSWEAR LINE HE DESIGNS. It would seem a different rhythm from his “day job” as a center with the Indiana Pacers, yet Ian Mahinmi will tell you in a French accent with a hint of a soothing Jamaican cadence he inherited from his mother: “Who you are isn’t something that really begins or ends with what you are doing at the moment.” His creative sensitivity and discipline as global athlete seep into his four-year-old menswear business with his two French partners. What sets French Deal miles apart from other celebrity-wanna-be-designers is a fanatical fit, a high-fashion palette, and surprising couture-like details

MARY G. BARR: What was the genesis of your line, French Deal? IAN MAHINMI: Every time I went back home to France, I wanted to be involved with something in fashion because I love it. About four years ago in Paris, I was introduced to designer Steeven Kodjia, who asked me what I thought of his designs. I really liked the way he thought, and so we exchanged ideas. A few months later, he came in with a few cool jackets, and I told him, “I think you and I can really go somewhere.” So we went into business. Soon another French partner joined us, soccer player Ousmane Dabo. And with the three of us, we really wanted something that represented us.

MGB: You and your partners don’t just have fashion in common. You are all athletic. IM: We were from the same social path. I was not from the best neighborhood—it was pretty rough. Steeven was the same way. Ousmane was the same way. And the thing that moved us was sports. I left at 14 years old—an hour away from where I lived—to play basketball and go to school. Ousmane did the same thing with soccer, and Steeven was a dancer. So we all have that competitive nature that comes into play when we talk about fashion.

such as armscye contrast seaming and scarf-like statement prints in silk as jacket linings. And it doesn’t hurt that he employs the same fabric sourcing as the French power labels. His customers are an elite set of world-stage athletes and musicians. The collection is available as made-to-order and through invitation-only events. But even without an athletic build like Mahinmi’s 6’11” frame, his line is noticeable in its strong voice and approachability. And with plans for expanded e-commerce and in-store distribution, he has many fans who can’t wait for the next page in the Ian Mahinmi playbook.

MGB: How so? And how does that translate within your business? IM: The best way to put it is to look at the quality of our clothes. It’s the details. We challenge each other so much it just shows. When you look at fashion today, we are still new. But you don’t find clothes from a small company with the detail and fit like we do. It’s a result of pushing our little group to have the best of the best. Even some of the details that you don’t see we think about: the buttons, the zipper, the lining. Feel how heavy this button is.

MGB: How did that start for you growing up? What are some of your earliest fashion inspirations? IM: As a kid, [Nike] Air Force 1 was one of the most wanted sneakers for me. I wanted every color to match every one of my outfits. You name the color—I had it.

MGB: Did you always have an appreciation for such fine details in garment construction? IM: Yes, I’m French, after all! The French love luxurious fabrics and detailing. 83


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MGB: So give me a peek into the conversations you had with your partners when you set out to build this company and make it distinctive. IM: The first thing we talked about was quality—and still do. We knew we wanted our products made in France, which is hard in the fashion industry [due to cost]. Not everything in the collection is made in Paris—but everything is made in France. That “Made in France” label is a must. Ousmane and I are French guys who represent France all over the world. Like me, he played on the French national teams. It is a reflection of what we think about fashion, where we come from, our background, and our drive.

MGB: How does your design process work?

MGB: But kind of sounds fun. What is more fun, basketball or fashion?

MGB: How would you best describe your label?

IM: Steeven will come up with an initial concept. What I’m good at is my eye and creative thinking about clothes. And then we build on the idea. Ousmane will do the same thing. Everyone has input on each piece. The collaboration is very easy. Our communication is very easy. The hard part is the fabric choice. We use the best of the best. The jacket leather is lambskin—we pay for the best. We go to the same leather houses that Hermès and Louis Vuitton use. Steeven, Ousmane, and I go through every single patch of leather. That is the toughest part.

IM: They are both fun. I love to shop, especially in London and in Paris. For me, fashion is something that takes my mind somewhere else creatively—when I’m off the court. I talk to my business partners on an everyday basis, and it’s what I do off-season.

IM: I can’t talk about my brand without mentioning hip hop and R&B. Music inspires us. It is us. Just like there is a range of rock music—we are in the hip hop vibe but classic, elegant, more luxurious and upscale. Hip hop style sometimes suggests a little trashy, a little saggy, but we are classy. Also, my partners and I are athletes before anything else so I think you get that energy, strength, and refined fit reflected in the clothes.

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MGB: World-stage athletes are your main clientele. Your fellow Pacers, as well as some of the Colts, are some of your customers. Does that influence your sizing? IM: French Deal does regular sizing but I can custom order for anyone regardless of size. Athletes are not the regular build so everything has to be custom made. You just have to tell me. MGB: So very French—made-to-order. IM: I could never find clothes in the store. With my brand, I want everyone to have access to it—and feel the French experience. You can be short, big, tall, but you can get it! French Deal will custom fit for everyone, athlete or not. 88

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MGB: How’s business?

MGB: What’s next for French Deal?

IM: It’s great. I have to keep remembering we are still a new business. They say it takes five years for a company like this to explode. Right now, it’s 100 percent online contact with orders and custom orders. We plan to have improved e-commerce later this year. It’s a lot from our network as our client base right now. We’ve done pop-up stores in Paris, Rome, Dallas. In Indianapolis, we did a pop-up store where a lot of Pacers and NFL guys came through. We’ve been taking it baby step by baby step.

IM: We had half a body when we started: jackets, tshirts, shirts, and cufflinks. Then we added pants. So next will be accessories. We want the complete silhouette from head to toe: hats, ties, bowties, shoes. There is so much we want but we also want to take our time so we can make the best. Later in the year, more e-commerce will be part of the business. Then in the next couple years, we plan to be in stores.

MGB: I must ask—selfishly, but seriously— what about women’s wear? Is that in your plan? IM: We have to go one step at a time. MGB: Speaking of one step at a time… those are some serious [Christian] Louboutins you have on. What size are they? IM: I’m a size 14 or size 48 European shoe. You can put two of your feet into one of my shoes! ✂ Frenchdeal.biz


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Special Homes. Special Clients. Special Agents. Joe Shoemaker, Principal Broker & Owner joe@macduffrealty.com 317 413.8501

MacDuff Realty Group Real Estate Services for Central Indiana MacDuffRealty.com Photographer: Esther Boston 路 Location: form + function

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HAYES AND TAYLOR. TSHIRT DESIGNERS. THIS DYNAMIC DESIGNING DUO IS BRINGING NEW LIFE TO LOCAL SPORTSWEAR. TEXT BY ASHLEY MINYARD + PHOTOGRAPHY BY ESTHER BOSTON

AM: How did you guys have the knowledge to do all of this?

AM: So I’m sensing a lot of bromance here. What is that dynamic like working together?

ASHLEY MINYARD: So what’s the backstory for Hayes & Taylor? How did it all begin?

BK: It’s one of those things where we didn’t. That first order we did with my brother’s print group—they had some brands they used. We had to do the research to find out what we wanted to use. Then you have to find the wholesale account. You just Google things and order samples.

BK: I think we know what the other person is capable of and it just kind of works. We also see each other every day.

JOE SCHNIEDERS: We’ve been friends since high school. He posted something on Facebook about wanting to start a tshirt company, and I had a similar idea. We started talking about it, and we ran with it. That was August 2011. AM: So where did it go from there? BRIAN KELLY (BK): We got about 12 design ideas together and printed our first batch. It wasn’t the greatest thing we’ve ever done. JS: At least compared to what we’re making now. It was kind of like the crap you’d buy at Meijer. BK: It was sort of trial and error. We started researching different printers and other types of apparel. I think every time we did another run, it got better. Finally we ended on the product that we use now. AM: Tell me about some of your other partnerships and licensing agreements? JS: We are respectful of copyrights and trademarks. The professional leagues are quite willing to help. The amateur leagues, like colleges, are a lot stricter. BK: As far as Colts and Pacers go, we leave their names out, and we don’t use logos. We kind of beat around the bush, but we haven’t had any complaints. We’ve received cease and desist letters from some of the colleges, which finally led us to start the whole licensing process. This year we got IU, and we just stopped selling college apparel otherwise. But in 2015, we’re going to have Butler, Ball State, Indiana State, Valparaiso, Indianapolis Indians, and, hopefully, Purdue. We got in trouble a lot so we learned from that and bit the bullet to pay for licensing fees.

JS: We connected with Jared at Art Press early on, and he was really helpful with giving us advice. BK: Those guys have helped us a lot, even with some of the shipping we do today. JS: We were in need of some retail space at one time. We did these shirts for Chuck Pagano when he was diagnosed with cancer. I think at that time we were only selling a couple dozen shirts in a month. Then it was like 1,500 in two days. We were like holy shit what do we do? BK: Jared let us use their storefront in Fishers. The processes that he told us about then, we still use now. JS: In retrospect that was the turning point for us. Everything that we were doing wrong and right was with that shirt order. This is what we should be doing here, we should be ordering it this way, and this is how we should be promoting our stuff. That was a rough couple of days. AM: If you were to describe your brand in three words what would they be? BK: Comfortable, bitchin’, and local.

JS: We’ve got a very similar personality. We both have a very off the wall sense of humor. We ying-yang each other pretty well. Brian is very impulsive, quick to act, while I’m a little more cautious and deliberate. He does a good job of pushing me, and I do a good job of preventing him from going nuts. AM: So what would be some tips you would give to someone who’s trying to start a business in Indy? BK: You have to have patience. You’re not going to get rich right away. Or ever. If you get to the point where you have zero debt, and buy each other beer and food, and write each other checks every once in a while, that’s good. If you get to that point where you owe no one any money, that’s good. If we based our company off of the first batch of shirts we did, we would’ve quit. JS: You have to go slow, and represent your business at all times. Always be prepared to talk about it. You have to have that elevator pitch down so when someone asks you what you do, you can tell them. Be enthusiastic about it. AM: Anything else you would like to add? JS: Go ahead and put in there that I’m a golden god. ✂ hayesandtaylor.com

JS: Can I count contractions as one word? You’ll like wearing. BK: You took it that way, as a full sentence? JS: We just want to make shirts we like wearing. BK: A lot of times we see people wear sports shirts on one occasion. Even though it’s a sport shirt we want you to wear it out to a bar or club or whatever. 93


Jared Byzco

Guy-Jo Gordon

Brandon Jett Betsy Boxberger

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Jennifer Cvar

Faces of Downtown Indy sports and performance. In Partnership with Downtown Indy. STORY BY AMANDA DORMAN

Hannah Taschwer

Darrell Hutchinson

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JENNIFER CVAR FOUNDER AND EVENT DIRECTOR, INDY CRITERIUM RACE & FESTIVAL Jennifer Cvar’s first experience on the bike began with taking spin classes at the YMCA at the Athenaeum. After fellow spin enthusiasts helped her purchase her first road bike, and joining Central Indiana Bicycling Association (CIBA), Cvar fell in love with the sport. She began racing in 2009, traveling to St. Louis for the Gateway Cup and Cincinnati for the Hyde Park Blast. The courses were on main urban roads and often drew 500+ cyclists and hundreds more spectators. She envisioned the same thing for downtown Indianapolis. In 2010, she founded the Indy Criterium. What was the inspiration behind starting the Indy Criterium? Jennifer Cvar: I envisioned a large cycling race in the heart of downtown Indianapolis with a festival alongside that would attract spectators who may not know about cycling, but enjoy listening to music, drinking a beer, and watching a competitive amateur event. Year one was all about the racers. They came out in droves and loved the course.

“IF YOU’RE ON A TOUGH GROUP RIDE AND YOU MUSCLE THROUGH THE PAIN, IT MAKES YOU A STRONGER PERSON BOTH ON AND OFF THE BIKE. IT’S ABOUT TRAINING THAT INTERNAL GRIT.” How else has the Indy Criterium changed since year one? JC: The first year we had about 225 racers, which at the time was a really nice turnout. In the second year, we attracted the highest number of racers in the state and have held that distinction ever since [as the largest sanctioned race in Indiana]. We have had more than 500 racers the past three years and 3,000 to 4,000 in total attendance—racers, spectators, and volunteers. Besides big attendance numbers, why is the Indy Criterium a game changer for downtown? JC: We are bringing together cycling lovers of all types into one venue for one day to celebrate the bicycle and all that it has to offer. We are promoting the sport of cycling and the use of bicycles in an urban setting as a mode of transportation. We are also promoting healthy active lifestyles.

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HANNAH TASCHWER TRIATHLETE

BETSY BOXBERGER BALLERINA, INDIANA SCHOOL OF BALLET

As a competitive swimmer in high school and long distance track runner, it’s no surprise Hannah Taschwer is now racing in triathlons. During the day you can find her working as a scientist in the Technical Services/Manufacturing Sciences laboratories in insulin development at Eli Lilly and Company. At night, you can find her training at one of her favorite places in downtown Indy, the IU Natatorium.

Betsy Boxberger has been dancing at the Indiana School of Ballet (ISB) since the studio opened in downtown Indy in 2006. Since then, she has performed as Raymonda in Raymonda, the lead female in Valse Fantaisie, Odette in Swan Lake, and Dew Drop, Snow Queen, and George Balanchine’s Sugar Plum in The Nutcracker.

Let’s get to what we’re all wondering: how do you balance working full time at Eli Lilly and competing? Hannah Taschwer: Triathlon training requires a lot of commitment and dedication. This sometimes means getting up for 5:30 a.m. swim practice, going to work, and then hitting the pavement for a run or bike afterward. If that’s what it takes to be competitive, I’ll do it because I’m incredibly passionate about this sport.

How has the ISB changed since you have been there? Betsy Boxberger: Since its first year, ISB has grown in almost every way: enrollment numbers, faculty size, and studio space. One of ISB’s newest projects is really expanding the studio’s reach. The new outreach program, Indy Ballet Classrooms, reaches students who might not have experienced ballet before. This summer, students from across the country will come to train at ISB’s first national Summer Intensive.

What makes the Natatorium one of your favorite places to train? HT: The Natatorium is a very elite competition pool and one of Indy’s signature sports venues. It has hosted significant events like the Pan Am Games and U.S. Olympic Team Trials. Several world records have been set there. I especially love training there because it’s surreal and inspiring to swim in the same pool as so many world-class athletes. Any advice for someone wanting to start training for their first tri? HT: Recognize that this sport requires a lot of commitment. You’re training for three different sports at once, and that can be overwhelming. Take your time, and ease into it.

“I’M VERY GOAL DRIVEN. WHEN I WANT TO ACHIEVE SOMETHING, I PUT MY HEART AND SOUL INTO IT.”

“NOT ONLY DOES BALLET REQUIRE ATHLETICISM AND ARTISTRY, BUT IT ALSO REQUIRES SIGNIFICANT PREPARATION TIME. IT TAKES ABOUT NINE YEARS OF INTENSIVE TRAINING TO BECOME A BALLET DANCER.” What is your favorite part about being located downtown? BB: It is great to be a part of the energy of downtown Indy. The studio’s central location makes it accessible to students looking for instruction and audience members, both returning and new. ISB’s downtown presence helps keep ballet connected to the community. What other types of exercise do you do outside of the studio? BB: I love taking walks. I also use Pilates exercises to work on my core strength, and I practice yoga to help keep me centered.


PETER BRASOVAN AND JARED BYCZKO FOUNDERS AND OWNERS, CROSSFIT NAPTOWN

BRANDON JETT AND GUY-JO GORDON SENIOR ACCOUNTANT AND DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY RELATIONS, INDY ELEVEN

DARRELL HUTCHINSON BASKETBALL PLAYER, CRISPUS ATTUCKS MEDICAL MAGNET HIGH SCHOOL Built as an all-black high school in Indianapolis, Crispus Attucks (now Crispus Attucks Medical Magnet High School), has significant historical relevance in Indiana. In 1955, the school’s basketball team, led by future professional star Oscar Robertson, won the Indiana state championship and became the first all-black school in the nation to win a state title. Now, 60 years later, Darrell Hutchinson, shooting guard for the Crispus Attucks Tigers, is making his own mark in Indiana’s history. Hutchinson, a 6'3" basketball standout and high achiever in the classroom, holds the school record for the most points in a career. How did you first get into the sport? Darrell Hutchinson: I was playing outside a pre-school where my mother worked, and she saw talent in me. I was three years old. You’re kind of a big deal at Crispus Attucks. Why do you enjoy playing with the Tigers? DH: My school has a lot of history. This year we just want to win state so we can continue that rich history and make everyone in the community proud.

“MY PARENTS HAVE ALWAYS PUSHED SCHOOL FIRST. IF I CAN’T GET THE GRADES, I CAN’T PLAY.” What are you most proud of accomplishing? DH: Last year I broke the school single-season record for points. I’m injured this year for a couple of games, but I plan to break my own record. This year I also broke the 1,000-point mark for players. I’m thankful to be in the 1,000-point club.

The year 2014 was great for soccer in downtown Indy: Indy Eleven made their debut in April and fans packed IUPUI’s Michael A. Carroll Stadium for a sold-out game. The team would continue on to host 13 more sold-out games during their inaugural season, averaging 10,450 fans per game. Meet two of the behind-the-scenes faces, Brandon Jett and Guy-Jo Gordon. What surprised you about Indy Eleven’s first season? Brandon Jett: I knew soccer had really taken hold in the city over the last few years, but the fan response is tremendous. To see the stadium rocking throughout the year was an awesome experience. Guy-Jo Gordon: The support from the beginning was overwhelming. We expected a decent turnout but no one could have anticipated us selling out every home game and getting the love we received around the city.

GORDON: “WITH INDIANAPOLIS INCREASINGLY BECOMING A GLOBAL CITY, AND SOCCER BEING THE WORLD’S MOST POPULAR SPORT, THERE’S AN OBVIOUS CHANCE FOR INDY ELEVEN TO HELP FORTIFY THE CITY’S REPUTATION AS ONE OF THE BEST SPORTS CITIES IN THE COUNTRY.” Why is downtown the right spot for Indy Eleven? BJ: Indy is becoming a world-class city and a lot of that is because of the growth happening downtown. It’s where our fans want us to be. What is something people don’t know about your sport? BJ: Soccer has grown by leaps and bounds over the last 10 to 15 years. I remember trying to convince friends to watch the 2002 World Cup, and nobody was interested. For the 2014 World Cup, we had thousands of people show up for a block party on Mass Ave. to watch the USA versus Belgium game.

Since college friends Peter Brasovan and Jared Byczko opened CrossFit NapTown in 2011, the “box” (CrossFit lingo for gym) has grown to more than 50 classes a week, including a running club and yoga classes. The team qualified for the CrossFit Regionals two years in a row and the CrossFit Games in 2014. Most recently, the duo opened their second location downtown, NapTown Fitness, which includes fast-paced, 45-minute group training classes plus a yoga studio. Let’s start with the basics. What is CrossFit? Peter Brasovan: CrossFit redefined fitness as “constantly varied functional movements at high intensity.” CrossFit simply took the notion of fitness to the next level. CrossFit created a way to bring fitness to a community and to make it accessible to all that are interested in it. Jared Byczko: CrossFit hasn’t invented a magic pill. CrossFit hasn’t created new movements that guarantee a six pack in six weeks. What CrossFit has done is create a model to help individuals take control of their lives.

BRASOVAN: “CROSSFIT IS TRULY 100% SCALABLE TO ANYONE – FROM A PROFESSIONAL ATHLETE TO AN EXPECTING MOTHER.” What sets your “box” apart? PB: We focus on each member individually. We expect each coach to know the first name of every member. JB: We are dedicated to our athletes. Without the community who believed in and supported Peter and me, we would not be where we are today.

BYCZKO: “IT MAKES YOU WORK THAT MUCH HARDER AS A COACH, WHEN ATHLETES COME TO YOUR CLASS BECAUSE YOU KNOW THIS SESSION IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF HIS OR HER DAY.” Why is downtown the right spot for CrossFit NapTown? PB: The young professional demographic is looking for ways to not only improve their fitness but to meet new people. CrossFit NapTown allows for both of these things to happen. JB: We lived downtown before downtown was even a thing. Ten to 12 years ago, I could count how many bars and restaurants we went to on one hand. Today, I would need both hands and both feet and that still wouldn’t be enough. The culture, demographic,and overall well-being of the city is changing—drastically—for the better. We are fortunate that we were in the right place at the right time to cement ourselves in this community.

JETT: “IT’S A PERSONAL GOAL OF MINE, CALL IT AN ITEM FOR MY BUCKET LIST, TO SEE A GAME IN EVERY SOCCER STADIUM IN THE U.S.”

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FORM STUDIES

HOW YOGA CONTINUES TO TAKE SHAPE IN INDIANAPOLIS TEXT BY SARAH SUSKIRI + PHOTOS BY KELLEY HENEVELD AS THE SUN CLIMBS OVER INDIANAPOLIS AND LIGHT SPILLS ACROSS POLISHED STUDIO floors, arms and eyes rise towards the sky like a summons to the day. The room itself seems to hold still for a moment before expanding and contracting with the slow, measured breath that fills it. It’s hard to imagine a time when yoga was more of a mysterious, rarefied practice than a mainstream, cultural icon of fitness, but it wasn’t that long ago that if you asked for the yoga schedule at your local gym, you’d get some funny looks. Today, however, a quick search for yoga in Indianapolis reveals no less than 30 different locations for meditation and fitness. With the boom of studios literally opening more doors to more people, Indy’s yoga scene has welcomed students of all ages, abilities,

PRACTICE INDIE LOCATION: W. 10th ST. AND N. CAPITOL AVE. DROP-IN: $11 GET TO KNOW: SHANNON BRASOVAN, GENERAL MANAGER Originally from Birmingham, the first thing Brasovan does each morning is pour a cup of coffee into her “Namaste, Y’All” mug. She started taking yoga classes at a Lululemon store eight years ago. And recently, she was asked to become an ambassador for the performance fashion brand. “When I was dancing and in theater, there was an acting method called the Stanislavsky that says if you put yourself physically in a situation, your mind will follow. Fashion can do that because it’s helping people reflect on the outside what they feel or want to feel on the inside.”

and income levels to take a place on the mat. And it seems no coincidence that the growing popularity and diversity of yoga has emerged alongside the city’s emboldened creative and entrepreneurial spirit. There’s a single-minded daringness and a willingness to fail over and over again that’s essential to both. “Yoga can be intimidating, because there are crazy shapes and strange words,” says Lisa Riolo, one of Indianapolis’ most experienced instructors, whose practice dates back to 1988. “But if you don’t step out there, you aren’t going to find the thing that’s going to nail it. Some piece of it worked, or some piece didn’t. So keep what did, and throw out what didn’t. There are no consequences to worry about here.”

INVOKE STUDIO LOCATION: E. 10th ST. AND FORT WAYNE AVE. DROP-IN: $17 GET TO KNOW: AMY PEDDYCORD, OWNER With an MBA from Columbia University and a keen sense of big-city business savvy, Peddycord has led Invoke’s growth to what it is today: 100 classes a week, 25 teachers, and a growing roster of businesses across the city who partner with Invoke to provide corporate wellness classes. “I was so broke and had so much business school debt. When I moved back to Indiana, I worked all the time and was flying back to my job in New York. For the first year and a half, I didn’t make a dime. Four years ago, I was able to focus on the studio solely. The thing I’m most proud of is we’ve created a sense of community.”

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ALL PEOPLE YOGA LOCATION: E. 86th AND WESTFIELD BLVD. DROP-IN: $15 GET TO KNOW: GAIL PAYNE, OWNER A self-described “Type-A” personality, lifelong athlete, and goal-setting go-getter, Payne is living proof yoga is not just for people who like patchouli. “I’ll go run a marathon just so I can check it off. Yoga doesn’t exactly work that way. I practice as much as I can with the intention that every day I do it, I’m inching my way closer to the splits, but it’s a process. To quote [acclaimed yoga teacher and author] Rolf Gates, ‘yoga is a work in, not a work out.’”

ALL PEOPLE YOGA

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SIMPLY YOGA

CITYOGA

LOCATION: S. 1st ST., ZIONSVILLE DROP-IN: $15 GET TO KNOW: DARYA BOWSKILL, INSTRUCTOR A native of London, Bowskill’s parents took the family to yoga as a regular Sunday practice on the way home from church. She rediscovered yoga as an adult while pursuing a master’s degree in art history. “I’ve sewn and drawn and painted all my life. Growing up, I ate chocolate and made art. I love sewing as a way to unwind and even considered going into fashion at one point. I’m still pursuing that center and calmness, just in a different form.”

SIMPLY YOGA


CITYOGA

CITYOGA LOCATION: 25th AND CENTRAL AVE. DROP-IN: $16 GET TO KNOW: ADRIENNE LOVELL, REGISTERED YOGA TEACHER Lovell’s practice began in 2006 with the birth of her of her son. When not at CITYOGA, she continues to promote the nurturing spirit of yoga by teaching kids’ yoga classes. “It felt right to me, when I was pregnant, to get in touch with my body as it was changing. It helped so much. Knowing he was coming, I wanted to be a better person for him, centered emotionally and physically. Now, he’s 8, and we still do yoga together.”

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DESIGN A COLLABORATION BETWEEN UNITED STATE OF INDIANA MANAYUNK CALLIGRAPHY INVOKE STUDIO

Invoke Studio is Indianapolis’ urban fitness oasis. We are a community-minded space for people who aspire to fulfill the full potential of both mind and body, offering a full schedule of yoga, Pilates, fitness classes and teacher trainings.


TM


XXX

GRIT

N

N WALTO TEXT BY SHELBY QUIN

ON +

HAIR BY PHILIP SALM + V RO HE OS NA LI PO + PHOTOGRAPHY BY

IT’S 8 A.M. ON A BLUSTERY CHICAGO MORNING. THE TEMPERATURE HAS YET TO REACH ITS HIGH OF 22 DEGREES, BUT IT’S NOT FAR FROM IT. THE ROAD BACK TO INDIANAPOLIS IS LONG, AND

TRANSPORTATION. THIS IS NOT JUST ANOTHER HOBBY. THIS

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IS AN EVENT. THIS IS DEDICATION. THIS IS LIFE ON TWO WHEEL

S, AND IT’S NOT FOR THE FAINT-HEARTED. IN FACT, IT’S A

REQUIRE-


STON + + ASSISTANT ESTHER BO LY ER OB M Y TH KA BY MAKEUP

S DESIGN BY KATHY DAVI

THE 40 MPH CROSSWIND PROMISES TO MAKE THIS JOURNEY ONE FOR THE BOOKS. AS I PULL ON MY FOURTH AND FINAL LAYER OF SOCKS, IT HITS ME. THIS IS NOT A MERE MODE OF

MENT THAT YOU ARE, MINIMALLY, A LITTLE BIT INSANE. “YOU

GUYS ARE CRAZY!” OFFERS A STRANGER, AS WE MAKE OUR

WAY THROUGH THE LOBBY OF THE JAMES HOTEL, THE FOUR

OF

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AN AFTERNOON RIDING IS BETTER

THAN GOING TO THE GYM BECAUS

E… “FOR ME, RIDING A MOTORCYCL

E IS A LOT LIKE YOGA. IT’S ONE OF

THE ONLY FORMS OF EXERCISE

I ENJOY, AND IT

JAKE SCHROEDER

AGE: 27 OCCUPATION: ENTREPRENEUR YEARS RIDING: 22 ONE DAY I’D LIKE TO RIDE… “in Chile. Mountains, ocean, desert, rainforest, people, food.” An afternoon riding is better than going to the gym because… “you can’t do wheelies on stationary bikes.”

(continued from page 105)

us each weighed down with no less than 10 extra pounds of winter riding gear. His comment is almost congratulatory. His smile suggests he may even be a bit envious. Further conversation with our new friend reveals that he was once a rider. Past tense. This is common. People grow tired of fighting their way through traffic, inundated with texting, oblivious drivers. People grow older and have families, forcing them to hang up their helmets responsibly. But, seemingly, no one walks away from this life entirely willingly. Whenever former riders reminisce about their moto days of yesteryear, they do so with reverence. They remain eager to “talk shop.” They still want to know what you ride, where you ride, who you may know, and so on. If it seems as though motorcyclists are in the midst of a passionate love affair with their bikes and the road, you aren’t far off. This is a form of romance. A bike is not merely a vehicle, but an extension of one’s body. Riding is a physically demanding experience. When you move, the bike moves. When you react suddenly, the bike follows. To have control of your bike is to have control of your body. It is when people lack this control that 106

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things go wrong. It’s also a mind game. If you’re on a bike and thinking of anything other than being in that moment, you are doomed to make a mistake. Riding requires your full physical and mental concentration. It’s an activity akin to yoga. It’s physical and meditative. It forces you to know yourself. It demands you trust yourself. For those who are so concerned, riding is also a fashion show. Although it is almost completely void of vanity, in the world of motorcycles, fashion and function merge harmoniously. The opportunities to look good and ride safely are endless. From the stylish cuts and premium fabrics of Icon 1000, to the sporty comfort of Alpinestars, gear is available for every type of rider. The clothing is an intrinsic aspect of the culture. The gear a rider wears tells a story. Whether you are a road warrior or an enduro rider, or both or neither, what you wear, from a functional standpoint, is your first impression. It opens you up to conversations and questions about the style of riding with which you identify, but it is without bias and preconception. If you have a bike and you love to ride, you’ve already scored. The fashion is bonus. It’s your field goal. Fashion is not a replacement for passion,


HEALS THE BODY AS WELL AS THE

MIND. GOING TO THE GYM OFTEN

FEELS LIKE A PUNISHMENT. RIDI

NG A MOTORCYCLE IS ANYTHIN

G BUT A HARDSHIP.” —SHELBY QUIN

N WALTON

SHELBY QUINN WALTON

AGE: 24 OCCUPATION: WRITER/ MARKETING PROFESSIONAL YEARS RIDING: 9 MONTHS

NICK KARTES

AGE: 28 OCCUPATION: VIDEO PRODUCTION YEARS RIDING: 6 AN AFTERNOON RIDING IS BETTER THAN GOING TO THE GYM BECAUSE… “To quote Hunter S. Thompson, ‘Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming “Wow! What a Ride!”’”

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JACQUELINE GOHIER

AGE: 29 OCCUPATION: SOUS CHEF (MARRIOTT CONFERENCE CENTER) YEARS RIDING: 2 AN AFTERNOON RIDING IS BETTER THAN GOING TO THE GYM BECAUSE… “it’s truly the most liberating activity in the world. No matter how bad your day, getting on your motorcycle makes you feel totally alive, and like nothing else matters.”

ONE THING I’D LIKE NON-RIDERS

TO KNOW ABOUT RIDING IS… “MO ST RIDERS ARE PRETTY LAID BAC K PEOPLE. THERE ARE A FEW THA T RUIN IT FOR

and for those who try to make it such, the effort is transparent. In a world wherein it can feel nearly impossible to meet new people and make new friends, the easiest—and most thrilling—way to connect is to buy a motorcycle. Thanks to Hollywood’s persistent portrayal of motorcyclists as a group of leather clad, hostile misanthropes, this truth may come as a surprise. Riders are people who lead multifaceted and colorful lives, and the common thread of loving motorcycles creates a tightknit community that transcends age, race, gender, and socioeconomics. Upon becoming a motorcyclist, you are immediately inducted into a network of people who will forever have your back. 108

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THE REST OF US, BUT MOST OF

US ARE

But, all of this romance is not without risk. This is a dangerous pursuit. You can lose yourself while speeding through the apexes of a menacingly winding road. You can let your thoughts wander and overlook that the asphalt before you is covered in loose dirt. You can challenge a car and lose. If you’re going to do it, you have to love it. You have to accept the thrill as well as the peril. In fact, the peril must thrill you. You have to embrace the initial feelings of terror, until they transform into familiar feelings of exhilaration. You have to be braver and ballsier than you knew you were capable of being. Why do we ride? Why do we risk it all? It’s simple, and it’s complicated. Motorcycles


DUSTIN W.

AGE: 32 OCCUPATION: OFFICE WORKER YEARS RIDING: 15+ AN AFTERNOON RIDING IS BETTER THAN GOING TO THE GYM BECAUSE… “the gym is work. That’s why it’s called ‘working out.’ There is no feeling of work involved in riding a bike. It’s pure joy.”

APPROACHABLE, REGULAR PEO

PLE WITH FAMILIES AND JOBS.

IT’S NOT SONS OF ANARCHY.”—D

USTIN W.

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LUDWIG H.

AGE: 50 OCCUPATION: SHIPPING/ RECEIVING CLERK YEARS RIDING: 35+ ONE DAY I’D LIKE RIDE… “the Nuerburgring racetrack in Germany. Each lap is 13 miles through dense forests. It’s just the most beautiful track in the world to me. Also, I am German, and grew up in that area.”

XTING YCLES INSTEAD OF TE OK OUT FOR MOTORC LO D AN S, AD RO E NTION ON TH IS… “PAY MORE ATTE KNOW ABOUT RIDING TO S ER RID NNO E ONE THING I’D LIK

teach you about life by forcing you to accept your mortality. In a culture wherein talking about the forthcoming end is somewhat taboo, riding a motorcycle keeps the inevitable top of mind, every single time you climb aboard. We ride because life is weird and death is weirder, and we’ve managed to find peace while we teeter somewhere on the edge. While the originality of quoting Hunter S. Thompson in a story about motorcycles may be called into question, his words ring true:

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RCYCLES OR TWEETING. MOTO

“You watch the white line and try to lean with it... letting off now, watching for cops, but only until the next dark stretch and another few seconds on the edge ... The Edge ... There is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over. The others, the living, are those who pushed their control as far as they felt they could handle it, and then pulled back, or slowed down, or did whatever they had to when it came time to choose between Now and Later.” —Hunter S. Thompson, Hell’s Angels ✂


ANNE MARIE SCHROEDER

AGE: 28 OCCUPATION: DREAMER YEARS RIDING: 2 ONE DAY I’D LIKE TO RIDE… “in Australia. It’s a beautiful country with a rich dirt bike culture. And, smashing out on the beach often floods my dreams.” ONE THING I’D LIKE NON-RIDERS TO KNOW ABOUT RIDING IS… “’Midnight bugs taste best.’ I don’t know who said it, but I like it.”

OACHING. THE

HOUETTE WHEN APPR

SIL HAVE A VERY SMALL

D THAT MAY CAUSE

TO ESTIMATE, AN SPEED IS VERY HARD

IG H.

ACCIDENTS.” — LUDW

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DESIGNERS

FLIP IT & REVERSE IT INDY DESIGNER FINDING NEW WAYS TO FASTEN FASHION ON THE WEST COAST.

TEXT BY MARIA DICKMAN + LOOKBOOK PHOTOGRAPHY BY MAT ABAD + PORTRAIT BY GABRIELLE CHEIKH IAN STIKELEATHER IS HARD TO MISS. HE’S BOISTEROUS AND OPINIONATED. HE LOVES good whiskey and great company. But beneath his devil-may-care attitude lies a shrewd knowledge of business and a keen sense of what just works, skills he’s parlayed into the promising Stikeleather Apparel brand. Created in Indianapolis in 2010 and now based in Los Angeles, Stikeleather Apparel was born from a desire to nurture innovative ideas and harness technology to improve apparel design and function. This was a passion long nurtured by Stikeleather, who originally found himself in real estate development and housing construction, his family’s business. “Real estate is the opposite of fashion,” he says. “Right here is the immediate market, and it’s a very long business cycle. In contrast, I was always into the business side of fashion because it’s such a fast business. The turnover time is interesting, and I love the global aspect of the product—I can make a shirt here and sell it anywhere in the world.” His fascination with the fashion industry’s inner workings led him to design school at the Art Institute of Indianapolis. “It opened up the whole world to me and brought out my inner designer, who was sort of napping,” he explains. “It’s funny, but even in high school I collected cork boards filled with hangtags, and I was always really into brands. I forgot, but I actually designed our letter jackets in high school. They were red with white sleeves. They were quite striking — actually, really loud, now that I think about it.” His first foray into making apparel had him experimenting with incorporating heating and cooling elements into his designs. While looking for ways to get the fans in and out of the garments quickly for washing, he started playing around with closures. “We ended up settling on magnets, which really appealed to me as a closure. And so from there, I was interested in taking that and seeing what I could do with it.” The answer: a lot. “I think of them as very similar to snaps,” he explains. “Right now they’re to the point where they’re completely invisible, and you can really create some great stuff with magnets that you can’t with snaps” — think reversible shirts and jackets, as well as interchangeable elements like collars, hoods, and ties. “I can barely bother with buttons now,” he notes. “Magnets are just so nice and convenient.” Key to Stikeleather’s growth for both brand and designer was a move to Los Angeles two years ago. “The level of craftsmanship is fairly high to make these garments look really great, especially since it’s a new concept,” he says. “I had a few sewers working for me, so we were able to prototype some things, but we were never able to get anywhere near mass production. There was really just no production that I could find in and around the Midwest that could get it right. Then I found the factories in LA.”

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AT THE START, HIS PRODUCTION AND PATTERN MAKER FELL ILL AND THEY HAD TO SHUT down. He’s fine, Stikeleather notes, but it put them months behind in production. Despite the initial setbacks, he’s confident in his progress. “There’s really no preparation for this in business school,” he says. “Half of it is finding the right vendors and putting the right team together who can really execute the concept. I’ve been lucky that I’ve finally been able to put together a team that I’m really happy with to go to market, who can execute the product at a high level that I’ve always envisioned, but never been able to fulfill. Until now.” LA’s had a marked influence on the line. Although initially catering to both women and men, Stikeleather eliminated the womenswear division and streamlined the men’s styles. His color palettes, too, have changed. “They’ve gotten a lot darker,” he notes. “I’ve been joking with myself that the big parking lot across the street is my color palette, all blacks, whites, greens, burgundies, and navies. I’m not sure if [the darker palette] is on purpose or if that’s just what I see outside my window all day.” His fall 2015 line also reflects the activewear trend currently dominating the fashion landscape. “I think activewear is becoming the new denim substitute, the way denim was ubiquitous and everywhere,” he says. “Stretch and high performance fabrics are replacing denim for both casual and upscale, depending how you want to do that.” The line reflects this shift, experimenting with both neoprene and knits in addition to his usual crisp oxfords. “I’m really happy with the results we’ve been able to get with the magnetic closures in knits,” he adds. His design process has evolved in accordance with the business’ demands. Stikeleather mixes elements from the underground party scene (described as “like the best of Coachella with a little bit of Burning Man mixed in”) with concepts like dancewear, playing with shapes and fabrics to get the effect he wants. “One of the problems with the size of our company is that we can’t always order everything we like,” he says. “We draw inspiration from other scenes, and lines and people we admire, but it comes down to: can we execute and deliver it? Our design process revolves around what we can source.” He starts with a great collection of fabrics, then pairs that with a specific wardrobe staple. “Guys wear maybe a dozen different garments, so we pick one and pair it to a fabric. We ask ourselves, if we were to make a Stikeleather jacket, what would that look like? We put the Stikeleather stamp on it, and then a magnetic closure maybe, or maybe not.” His most recent collection is the first to offer some garments without magnetic closures, which is a direct result of Stikeleather Apparel being picked up by T&A Showroom, the largest men’s showroom in the country, with offices in LA, New York, and Paris. “They wanted us to go from eight garments, to 20 or 30,” he explains. “We didn’t really have a choice but to expand into other areas, so we ended up with jackets and tshirts, in addition to the traditional oxfords.” By the time this goes to print, Stikeleather will have refined the Stikeleather Apparel web sales and fulfillment process, complete with a redesigned website, just in time for their first big trade show in Las Vegas in February. By the end of the year, he wants to have established a presence on both coasts. He’s still tinkering with his original heating and cooling elements, as well, developing an app for the user to control the settings wirelessly, although it’s still very much in prototyping. And while he follows the fashion tech space closely (“everyone’s waiting on a battery breakthrough to really explore what you can do with wearables”), for now, his main focus remains on magnets. “It’s definitely a design process, but at the end you have this completely invisible closure of a shirt that’s just crisp and clean. I think it’s worth it.” ✂


FALL 2015 COLLECTION

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SHIRT, STAPLE (HANG TIME) PANTS, H&M


Benjamin Knapp is many things. He’s incredibly well-spoken, deliberate in his speaking and thorough in explanation. He’s considerate, asking me questions even as I interview him and checking with the stylist to see if he’ll be shirtless before digging into his burrito. And of course, he’s stunning, even when his razor sharp cheekbones aren’t being cast in shadow by the broken windows in the motel that is literally being torn down around us. Consider this a minor moment in a surreal series of events that in the past eight months has brought him from California to New York, Milan, and very briefly, back home to Indianapolis for the holidays. Keep in mind: he was never supposed to be a model. Advocacy runs in his family; his sister Jenna has been heavily involved with Building Tomorrow in Uganda (their father is Chairman of the Board of Directors) and now lives primarily in El Salvador, doing creative writing and art therapy in the prisons. While in high school at Brebeuf, Knapp travelled to El Salvador, Kenya, and, thanks to a state department program that incentivizes students to learn languages not commonly taught in school but of international importance, he spent a summer in Jordan. “Travel got me interested in what was happening outside my own immediate surroundings,” he says. “In Jordan, I realized I was part of a world that was fascinating. The people were amazing and hospitable, but also politically and religiously super interesting. The Middle East is a part of the world that is geopolitically important, but that people, especially Americans, don’t understand at all. I wanted to challenge that for myself. I wanted to keep learning from them, and if I wanted to understand them, I needed to know the language.” Thus, after graduating from Santa Clara University with degrees in environmental and Middle Eastern studies with an Arabic emphasis, he considered moving to Beirut to work with Jesuit Refugee Services. The opportunity to somehow help the refugee crisis in Syria, Jordan, and Lebanon was appealing, although a prior experience volunteering in the West Bank gave him pause. “Working [in

the West Bank] was really depressing. Knowing that, it made me question if I could work well [in Beirut] and feel like I was contributing, without feeling totally demoralized by everything around me,” he explains. “So I was taking a break to regroup and try to figure out what would be best for me when the modeling thing came out of the blue.” The guy who cut his hair in the Bay Area did fashion shows in New York, and had for years been pushing Knapp to try modeling. “I wasn’t particularly interested,” he says. But on the way back to school from a weekend in San Diego, he stopped in LA to have dinner with a friend, who had arranged for him to meet an agent. “I was already considering staying in California, so I figured since I wasn’t already invested in anything, I had nothing to lose.” Within the first few days of living in LA, Knapp met someone who knew the president of VNY Model Management in New York. He sent them pictures, and they signed him. “That first week I was in this weird limbo, because I had just moved to LA. I didn’t have a place; I was sleeping in my car some nights; and I was probably moving to New York,” he explains. “During the day I was trying to meet as many people as I could and do some shoots. At night we’d go out to a club and then to some crazy after party in a Beverly Hills mansion. I was just trying to go with the flow, be cool, and act like this lifestyle wasn’t completely foreign to me.” In terms of surreal experiences, his was just getting started. He was driving up to Santa Clara before making the cross country move when he received a phone call from his agent, asking him for the closest airport. A few hours later, he was on a plane to New York to meet with Calvin Klein, who promptly cast him as an exclusive in their show at Milan Fashion Week, where he chatted backstage with Iggy Azalea and Nick Young. “It’s been a whirlwind,” he says. “I didn’t know how to walk, or where to turn at the end of the runway. They send me to a shoot, and sometimes the photographer will give direction. But mostly, I’m just learning on the go. It’s really fun, and stressful, and maddening. Not having a schedule has been really bizarre — not knowing where

I’m going to be tomorrow or next week. It’s a completely different lifestyle.” Now, New York is his base. He lives by himself in Astoria, in fellow Hoosier and model Clark Bockelman’s old apartment. “He was a year behind me at Brebeuf. I didn’t really know him that well back then, but we reconnected at the Calvin Klein show in Milan, and now we hang out all the time.” Knapp devotes his free time to creative outlets like playing the piano and guitar, or drawing. He joined a climbing gym with Bockelman (“way more fun than lifting weights”). Acting, too, interests him, which makes sense considering the connections he’s made thus far. He’s also learning how to write a script. “One of ways that I’ve been fortunate is that I’ve met all these people who have incredible lives, so I think storytelling is really important,” he explains. “It’s true in modeling, too — learning how to get a message across and tell a story in various ways, in different mediums. I haven’t paid a lot of attention to it before, but it’s really interesting. I think movies can be super powerful and influential. I mean, Hollywood is Hollywood, and a lot of movies are made just to make money. But so many independent films have amazing stories, so if I can play any role in that — acting, writing, whatever — I’d like to give that a shot.” Modeling, he admits, isn’t the end-all, be-all — at least, not for him. “It’s been fun! But I don’t know how long I’ll do it, although that depends on how well it goes. Sometimes I feel like I need to take myself out of the industry to stay sane and make sure I know what’s really important, and what to focus on,” he says. “Luckily, I have a family who is really supportive. I went to school and got my education, and I’ll be okay if modeling doesn’t work out. It’s been a chance to try something completely different and see what I can learn from it, to see if there are ways I can take things away from it to apply elsewhere, or weave in my other interests.” Ben Knapp was never supposed to be a model, just like he was never meant to be an advocate, scholar, actor, or writer. He’s meant to do all these things, and, I expect, he will. ✂ 117


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JACKET, FOREVER 21 MEN SHIRT, VINTAGE PANTS, H&M SHOES, DR. MARTENS


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SHIRT, HUDSON (HANG TIME) PANTS, ROCKAWEAR BLAK (HANG TIME)


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JACKET, ALLSTAR OUTFITTERS (HANG TIME) SHIRT, STIKELEATHER APPAREL PANTS, MODEL’S OWN SHOES, CREATIVE CREATIONS (HANG TIME)


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PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEVE SQUALL STYLE BY KATIE LEE JONES HAIR & MAKEUP BY KATIE LEE JONES MODEL: CASEY KUHNS (INDEPENDENT) DESIGN BY STACEY MCCLURE

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FLOWER CAGE VEIL HEADPIECE, ETHEL CORREY VINTAGE DUSTER ROBE VINTAGE HIGH-WAIST BLOOMERS, VASSARETTE

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VINTAGE 1960S BLACK HAT MILITARY JACKET, ARDEN B VINTAGE HIGH-WAIST BLOOMERS, VASSARETTE VINTAGE VELOUR BOOTIES

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VINTAGE FEATHER HAT, ETHEL CORREY VINTAGE GLOVES SKIRT, JESSICA MCCLINTOCK

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VINTAGE FEATHER HAT, ETHEL CORREY LEOTARD, DANSKIN

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1970S DISCO DRESS, YESSIRREE PETUNIA VINTAGE VINTAGE TURBAN HAT

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1970S DISCO DRESS, YESSIRREE PETUNIA VINTAGE SHOES, SOURCE

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(KATY) EARRINGS, VIBRESS CUSTOM JEWELRY BY REHEMA MCNEIL. JACKET, BB DAKOTA AT THE DISTRICT EXCHANGE. SWEATSHIRT, CIVIL REGIME, STYLIST’S OWN. CUFF, WHATWORKZ. PURSE, CHARMING CHARLIE, LIPSTICKNGUNZ ARCHIVE. BELT, THE DISTRICT EXCHANGE. SHORTS, MACHINE CLOTHING COMPANY, STYLIST’S OWN. TIGHTS, URBAN OUTFITTERS. SHOES, TOMS AT THE DISTRICT EXCHANGE. (KATELYN) EARRINGS, VIBRESS CUSTOM JEWELRY BY REHEMA MCNEIL. VEST, TARGET. JUMPSUIT, HOMMAGE, STYLIST’S OWN. TURQ CUFF, LIPSTICKNGUNZ ARCHIVE. TASSEL CUFF, THE REFINERY. RING, WHATWORKZ. VINTAGE PURSE, STYLIST’S OWN. SOCKS, STYLIST’S OWN. SHOES, BRECKELLES AT THE REFINERY.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY WIL FOSTER STYLING BY RACHEL JOHNSON HAIR BY ANTHONY PEREZ MAKEUP BY DANELLE FRENCH STYLING ASSISTANT TINITA FULLER (LIPSTICKNGUNZ) PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT ELESE HACKER MODELS KATELYN LAUBER (HEYMAN TALENT) & KATY BREWER (LMODELZ) SKATERS JARED BIRDEN, SCOTT WILSON & NATE OLP DESIGN BY KATIE SNIDER

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(KATY) BEANIE, BDG, URBAN OUTFITTERS. LOVE NECKLACE, WHATWORKZ. GOLD NECKLACE & BAG, LIPSTICKNGUNZ ARCHIVE. TANK, STYLIST’S OWN. ARM CHAIN, VIBRESS CUSTOM JEWELRY BY REHEMA MCNEIL. SKIRT, STYLIST’S OWN. SHOES, JESSICA SIMPSON AT THE REFINERY. (KATELYN) BEANIE, TARGET. EARRINGS, STYLIST’S OWN. DRESS, FREE PEOPLE AT THE REFINERY. THIGH SOCKS, STYLIST’S OWN. TASSEL CUFF, THE REFINERY. CHAIN CUFF, LIPSTICKNGUNZ ARCHIVE. RING, WHATWORKZ. PANTIES, RUE VIOLET.

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(KATELYN) VINTAGE HAT, STYLIST’S OWN. EARRINGS, STYLIST’S OWN. BULLET NECKLACE, SUGARSKULLSALEZ, WHATWORKZ. JACKET, FRENCH CONNECTION, STYLIST’S OWN. VINTAGE BAND TSHIRT, STYLIST’S OWN. BAG, STYLIST’S OWN. SLEEVE CUFF, VIBRESS CUSTOM JEWELRY BY REHEMA MCNEIL. LEGGING, BODYCENTRAL AT THE DISTRICT EXCHANGE. SHOES, JESSICA SIMPSON AT SIMPLY CHIC.

(KATY) SHADES, FANTAS EYES AT SIMPLY CHIC. JACKET, CUSTOM DECORATED, STYLIST’S ARCHIVE. NECKLACE, VIBRESS CUSTOM JEWELRY BY REHEMA MCNEIL. VINTAGE DRESS, WHATWORKZ. PURSE, EXPRESS AT SIMPLY CHIC. CUFF, LIPSTICKNGUNZ ARCHIVE. SHOES, BLOWFISH AT SIMPLY CHIC. .

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(KATY) SUNGLASSES, FANTAS EYES AT SIMPLY CHIC. EARRINGS, VIBRESS CUSTOM JEWELRY BY REHEMA MCNEIL. JACKET, CHARLOTTE RUSSE, STYLIST’S OWN. TOP, ROCK & REPUBLIC AT SIMPLY CHIC. BRACELET, LIPSTICKNGUNZ ARCHIVE. CLUTCH, LIPSTICKNGUNZ ARCHIVE. SHOES, JESSICA SIMPSON AT SIMPLY CHIC. (KATELYN) BALL CAP, TARGET. EARRINGS, VIBRESS CUSTOM JEWELRY BY REHEMA MCNEIL. NECKLACE, ERICA WEINER AT THE REFINERY. DRESS, TARGET. RING, SIMPLY CHIC. SHOES, CHARLETTE RUSSE AT THE DISTRICT EXCHANGE.

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GLASSES, CELINE AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE JACKET, ALEXANDER WANG AT NORDSTROM LEGGINGS, ZARA TEREZ AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE SNEAKERS, ALDO

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SUNGLASSES, FENDI AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE SUIT, POPPY SEEDS SKATES, STYLIST’S OWN


PHOTOGRAPHY BY ESTHER BOSTON STYLE BY KELLY KRUTHAUPT HAIR BY MARY LANDWER MAKEUP BY SARAH JACKSON MODEL: MICHELLE B (LMODELZ) DESIGN BY LARS LAWSON

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HEADBAND, ADIDAS AT INDIANAPOLIS RACQUET CLUB DRESS, CLOVER CANYON AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE SKIRT, STYLIST’S OWN WATCH, MICHELE AT G. THRAPP SHOES, CHINESE LAUNDRY AT MACY’S RACQUET, INDIANAPOLIS RACQUET CLUB

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WATCH, MICHELE AT G. THRAPP EARRINGS, STYLIST’S OWN HOODIE, ALEXANDER WANG AT NORDSTROM SOCKS, NIKE SHOES, MICHAEL KORS AT MACY’S

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JACKET, ADIDAS BRALETTE, WITHOUT WALLS AT URBAN OUTFITTERS SHORTS, ASHA BRYANT (ISU) BOXING GLOVES, TITLE BOXING, INDIANAPOLIS

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DUSTER AND SHORTS, VERSION 14.0 BY MAGICA, MAGICA DARABUNDIT (PURDUE) BRALETTE, STYLIST’S OWN SHOES, JIMMY CHOO AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

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OP ED

THE QUALITY OF PLACE IS BUILT ON TRANSCENDENCE THERE ARE OBVIOUS INTERSECTIONS BETWEEN THE INDUSTRIES OF sports and fashion. Look no further than your average gameday telecast to see ESPN broadcasters complimenting or harassing one another not on the quality of their commentary but rather the sharpness of their dress. Athletes are modeling in fashion magazines, and sports magazines are editorializing on fashion. Colleges like Oregon are as known for their bold styles as they are for their talented play. Whether it’s “Broadway Joe” donning his furs in New York or the “Fab Five” refusing to wear basketball shorts that don’t at least cover their knees, fashion and sports have an inextricable history. WHILE THESE OBVIOUS INTERSECTIONS HIGHLIGHT THEIR SHARED HISTORY, LIKE SPORTS AND fashion, it’s what we find beyond the obvious that makes these industries such a powerful pairing. At their core, sports and fashion build community by enabling individual freedom of expression and groups freedom of association. It might seem trite to suggest that sports and fashion create what we all have come to believe are basic civil liberties, and I don’t mean to suggest that is the case. Rather, sports and fashion are powerful means of realizing these civil liberties and they do so by transcending the issues that divide us. INDIVIDUAL ATHLETES USE FASHION TO SEND A MESSAGE OR SET AN ATTITUDE. FOR YEARS NOTHING was more intimidating than Tiger’s red polo on Sunday, and as fans we rallied around him and the sport of golf like never before. It didn’t matter whether you were a young kid from a tough neighborhood taking a golf lesson at Riverside Golf Academy or the President of one of Indy’s Fortune 500 companies; you knew what was happening on Sunday. That red polo simultaneously symbolized a new opportunity and absolute dominance in a profession. As such, sport and fashion came together and built a community of shared interest among those with great differences. WHAT IS TRUE FOR THE INDIVIDUAL ATHLETE IS ALSO TRUE FOR TEAMS. UNIFORMS SERVE THE VERY utilitarian purpose of distinguishing one team from the other.  Within the team, however, they serve to create parity by virtue of the fact that they are, well… uniform. A uniform forms the basis of a group identify and that identity extends beyond a team to its community of supporters.  The uniform breaks down our differences, highlights our similarities, and becomes an individual expression of belonging to a larger group. Ask your local Uber driver wearing a Colts jersey about #deflategate, and you’re likely to get the same response you would have from a downtown restaurant owner.  There is a shared passion for sports teams, and uniforms, scarves, or hats are the individual expression of that passion that opens the door to conversation among people from diverse backgrounds.   THE ACT OF BUILDING COMMUNITY BY CONNECTING PEOPLE WHETHER THROUGH SPORTS OR FASHION or the powerful intersection of sports and fashion is an essential part of the fabric which constitutes culture. In Indy, the quality of our community will continue to be defined by our ability to transcend our differences, build relationships with one another, and appreciate our shared commitment to community. As such, sports and fashion will continue to play an important role in defining Indy’s culture.

RYAN VAUGHN PRESIDENT OF INDIANA SPORTS CORP

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Competitive by nature,

DOWNTOWN INDY

is home to the world-class

Cultural Trail, 64 miles of onstreet bike lanes, the picturesque Canal Walk, monumental fitness events, countless yoga studios, gyms and active public spaces.

We’re full speed ahead.

The 500 Festival Mini-Marathon is the largest half marathon in the United States. Find out more about this and other events at

www.downtownindy.org


VisitIndy_Pattern_1.28.15.pdf

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More than 26 million people visit Indy annually. As an influential resident, you’re also a top ambassador. Invite your friends and family to our city. Take them to First Friday Food Truck Festival. Turn them on to local fashion at the Pattern Store. Treat them to a plate of Chili Cheese Etouffee at Yats. Post about it. Tweet about it. Share the love. Turn your friends into visitors, because a thriving city benefits us all.

For what to see, do, and eat, go to VisitIndy.com | BLOG: DoingIndy.com | FOLLOW US: @VisitIndy

PATTERN Magazine Issue 7 Spring 2015  

To order a hard copy of our magazine visit https://squareup.com/store/patternindy/! Please subscribe to our publication! And follow us: Webs...

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