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ISSUE NO. 3_10 dollars

UNITING CREATORS AND CONSUMERS OF FASHION IN INDIANAPOLIS

t i s n tra + CONVERSATIONS WITH MICHAEL BRICKER, MAB GRAVES, NIKKI BLAINE, SHEENA BIRT, MICHAEL KAUFMANN, JOHN BEELER AND MORE


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House of

5

th

BOLD + CLEAN + URBAN


LE TT ER

Moving Forward. The problem with a magazine that represents such a dynamic community, but comes out only twice a year, is sitting down and figuring out how to pour all the excitement of the last six months (and the next six months) into one short letter! I’m not going to say much about 2012 except that our community grew steadily and we made many new friends - not just in Indianapolis, but also in NY, LA & Chicago. When January arrived, we hit the ground running. By the second week, our 2013 calendar was essentially set. BAM! We have an exciting year in store for you. And how can we not, when we get to partner with some of the best organizations in town? IndySM, Verge, Carmel Symphony Orchestra, ISO, IRT, Fashion Arts Society, Spirit & Place Festival, Indy International Film Fest, Yelp - all these and more will be joining forces with Pattern to help grow the culture and arts around the city, and to look for ways we can help local businesses of all sizes become more successful. If our January meetup is anything to go by, 2013 is going to be an incredible year. Focused on students and fashion-related internships available in Indianapolis, the meetup was a tremendous success. Over eighty students signed up on our meetup.com page in under two weeks, representing every fashion program in Central Indiana and taking our membership to over 600 people! Professionals in the industry continue to join our ranks as well: a transplant from LA who managed a showroom, an Apparel Design professor from Purdue, an independent jewelry designer, a mobile boutique owner, a Marketing & PR specialist from OneClick, an apparel designer from Motionwear, a merchandiser from Forever 21, four photographers, three makeup artists and five independent designers - all this in January alone! I can’t begin to explain how exciting it is to experience such momentum! And not because it’s gratifying to see hard work pay off (which it is!), but because this is yet another confirmation that the mass of people who want to make a living in some shape or form within the apparel industry continues to swell. Our publication has been spotted on coffee tables and desks all over town: from the Mayor’s Office, to the Conrad suites, the Convention Center to the Indianapolis Museum of Art, The Athenaeum, ExactTarget, the Indianapolis International Airport, and a multitude of other businesses, large and small. And, I’m absolutely thrilled that beginning with this issue, you’ll be able to find our magazine not only at IndyReads, but also at your local Barnes & Noble and Books-a-Million. This added reach and exposure means that our advocacy on behalf of local fashion professionals will continue gaining strength. If you follow local news, you know that mass transit has been a hot topic in our city. Last issue’s op-ed contributor, Aaron Renn, wrote a post (“The Strategic Case for Mass Transit in Indianapolis”) about Indy’s transit dilemma. Specifically, he noted downtown’s dwindling population and subsequent loss of private sector jobs - even though the area itself has undergone tremendous revitalization over the last 20 years. Some argue that lack of density should dissuade us from investing in mass transit. But does it have to be an allor-nothing proposition? Renn suggests that a level-headed approach, customized to Indy’s specific needs, is the way to go. I concur. As much as I love the idea of a sexy light-rail system, more (and better) buses and routes just makes more sense. Is mass transit this city’s most pressing need? No, and neither is a fashion industry. But, can those things, over time, if implemented thoughtfully, help Indy become a more livable, prosperous, and attractive city? Absolutely! At Pattern, we like to think that the business of fashion, in its many iterations, can be one of Renn’s “pieces of the puzzle”, which bring people and jobs back to the city’s core and re-energizes it in ways not seen since the early 1900’s. With that in mind, Pattern’s goal is to continue promoting and supporting a culture of entrepreneurship - one that is already thriving in this city. This year, we’ll also be investing some of our resources into creating and growing local internship and apprenticeship opportunities, making mentorship an important component of our activities. We will strive to uphold international standards of innovation, design and craftsmanship, while staying true to who we are as a community in the heart of the Midwest. We’re never going to be NYC, Paris or Milan, but we’re just fine with that. #hoosierpride Finally, please know that none of these lofty goals are achievable without your direct support. We are still very much in “start-up” mode and at the mercy of your generosity - which is much needed and appreciated. The majority of our expenses are incurred by publishing this magazine, but it’s such a powerful representation of Indy’s incredibly talented creative class that we feel compelled to continue pursuing it. Yes, even in spite of those who think we’re absolutely nuts. If the magazine is to beat the odds and survive, we’ll need a number of generous patrons. Could you be that person? Whether you donate your time or hard-earned dollars, know that your contribution is going towards fueling a vibrant community of creatives who are working tirelessly to reach their full potential. People who believe that Indianapolis is this close to reinventing itself and becoming something truly wonderful, please join us!

POLINA OSHEROV_EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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EDITOR AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR Polina Osherov

DESIGN DIRECTOR Kathy Davis

SENIOR EDITOR Janneane Blevins

EDITOR AT LARGE Benjamin Blevins

FEATURES EDITOR Maria Dickman

COPY EDITOR Sean P. Dougherty

ACCESSORIES EDITOR Danielle Smith

POST PRODUCTION Wendy Towle

DESIGN INTERNS Cara Tudor Julia Rickles

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

CONTRIBUTING STYLISTS

Willyum Baulkey Esther Boston Gaby Cheikh Larry Endicott Wil Foster Kelley Heneveld Jade Howard Jason Lavengood Maddy Lucas Brian McGuffog Polina Osherov Stephen Simonetto

John Beeler Tiffany Benedict Berkson Benjamin Blevins Janneane Blevins Tenaya Bookout Maggie Conner Maria Dickman Cole Farrell Kate Franzman Michael Kaufmann Erina Ludwig Polina Osherov Kim Puckett Tamara Zahn

Benjamin Blevins Janneane Blevins Stephen Garstang Kelly Kruthaupt Olivia Latinovich Chrissy Lavengood Jasmine Owens Michelle Pemberton Jaimee Waldo

Pattern Magazine Uniting & Growing creators and consumers of fashion in Indianapolis www.patternindy.com PATTERN Magazine ISSN 2326-6449, Volume 3, Spring/Summer 2013 is published bi-annually by Pattern, Inc. 12664 Tuscany Blvd, Carmel, IN 46032

For advertising information, please email info@patternindy.com © 2013 Pattern. All Rights reserved. The material of this magazine may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached, or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of publisher. All photography rights belong to each individual photographer.

A SPECIAL THANKS TO: The Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce, Jeb Banner, Tamara Zahn, MDG Salons, Indiana Repertory Theatre, Mark Fisher, Michael Huber, Denver Hutt, Britt Smith, Kristian Andersen, Petra Slinkard, Larry Ladig, Bill and Joanna Taft, Ted and Kim Dickman, The Mayor's Office, Chris Gahl, Pauline Moffat, IndyHub, We Are City, and all of you who come out to our meetups and believe in the dream of a thriving, style-savvy Indianapolis. In lieu of an ad, Larry Jones would like to dedicate his sponsorship to his late sister, Gayle A. Jones Blahut. 10

PATTERN ISSUE NO. 3


CONTENTS PATTERN ISSUE NO. 3 patternindy.com

departments EDITOR’S LETTER: Moving Forward, 9 Q+A: Sheena Birt, Display Coordinator, 28 TRENDS: Kicks & Heels, 42 FASHION ROAD TRIP: Destination Bloomington, 46 Q+A: Nikki Blaine, Life in the Glam Lane, 50 EMERGING TALENT: #PGP: Post Grad Promise, 58 CITY VOICES: Letter from the Mayor, 71 INDY INSIDERS: Transit in Indy, 84 COMMUNITY: Neighborland, 86 RETAIL NEWS: Haute Wheels, 88 TRENDS: The Sartorial Cyclist, 92 Q+A: Michael Bricker, Innovator-in-Chief, 94 OP-ED: Transforming Indy, 118

editorials THE FOX, THE BEAR AND THE BUNNY, 22 photographed by Maddy Lucas

TEA-TIME REVERIE, 52 photographed by Brian McGuffog

TRANS/IT, 62 photographed by Jade Howard

THE WOMAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH, 72 photographed by Polina Osherov

HIGH GLOSS DRIVE BY, 98 photographed by Jason Lavengood

NOUVELLE FEMME, 106 photographed by Esther Boston

POP AND ROLL, 112 photographed by Willyum Baulkey

features MAB GRAVES, Creating a world of Waifs and Strays, 16 by Cole Farrell

DAPPER GENTS, Upping the ante on Indy men’s style, 31 by Polina Osherov

READY TO MOVE. READY-TO-WEAR, 104 by Tiffany Benedict Berkson

THE WOMAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH PHOTOGRAPHED BY POLINA OSHEROV WARDROBE BY BURBERRY

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CO NT RIB UTOR S

WILLYUM BAULKEY

TIFFANY BENEDICT BERKSON

TENAYA BOOKOUT

KATHY DAVIS

PHOtOGrAPHer

writer

writer

DeSiGN DireCtOr

California native tenaya Bookout is the skateboarding epitome of west coast style with an inherent sense of rebelliousness. in 2011, after graduating from University of Southern California’s Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism, she packed up her vintage designer handbag collection and headed to the Midwest with some football hunk and her toy poodle.

with a background in magazine publishing, beginning at indianapolis Monthly, and then indianapolis Dine, Kathy has worked with race car drivers, pro athletes, chefs and models in locations from Ny to LA. Her personal favorite: “Shooting sports fashion for the Finish Line on Mt.Hood in Oregon. Our crew had to take a snow cat to get to the lodge. we had to find snow in July for a winter issue.”

POP & ROLL, PAGE 112 Photography is where willyum Baulkey speaks. Creating isn’t just something he wants to do; it’s something he needs to do. Growing up in rural indiana, one may think there was not a fashion influence, but he made do. He was the boy on the school bus flipping through issues of his friend’s copy of Vogue. Fashion photography for him has always been about escaping into a different version of reality. Behind the camera, he can create the world he wants to live in, a highly fashionable world….with a hair and makeup team.

JOHN BEELER

writer

TRANSIT IN INDY, PAGE 84 John Beeler is a husband and father in Fountain Square, indianapolis. He also runs the Kinetic Project, a small business that offers communications and planning services for organizations that create culture. John is also involved with we Are City, a group of people focused on increasing the conversation around city-building, and celebrating pioneering and impacting efforts to improve cities.

READY TO MOVE. READY-TO-WEAR., PAGE 104 exuberant, life-long vintage fashion lover and wearer tiffany Benedict Berkson moved to indianapolis in 2003 from L.A. A former actress and pharma rep, Ms. Berkson founded Historic indianapolis.com to share the passion for aging and forgotten indy, spurred by the purchase of a Victorian home. through articles and images, Ms. Berkson and H.i. contributors allow readers the opportunity to discover the best of the past and inspiration for the future. the determination to get others exploring new ways to connect and fall in love with indianapolis through its past stories was born of her question: “How can you ever truly love—a person, place, or anything else—with only a superficial, passing acquaintance?”  One of the regular features on H.i. is “Ladies Lounge,” a look back at vintage and indy related fashion.

BENJAMIN BLEVINS

writer & StyLiSt

THE SARTORIAL CYCLIST, PAGE 92; Q+A: MICHAEL BRICKER. INNOVATOR-IN-CHIEF., PAGE 94 Benjamin runs indySpectator, an online urban magazine, and is the content strategist for indyHub, an organization that provides a resource for the city’s twenty-/thirtysomethings. He had the opportunity to help found the community that would become Pattern, and has enjoyed styling shoots, editing Pattern’s magazine, and participating in this ever-evolving community of fashionloving Hoosiers.

JANNEANE BLEVINS

writer & StyLiSt

NEIGHBORLAND, PAGE 86; THE SARTORIAL CYCLIST, PAGE 92 Janneane is a project & community manager at KA+A, a brand & service design consultancy. She co-founded indySpectator, an online urban magazine, and is editor of the Observed & Overheard. 

JOHN BEELER TENAYA BOOKOUT

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Back when Pattern was just a name and an idea, Janneane’s pragmatic idealism helped make this community a reality. through guiding the launch of Pattern Paper’s debut issue (and opportunities to style shoots for the magazine, website and the indyStar), Janneane has been able to actualize her lifelong fascination with fashion’s selfliberating potential. She loves the French New wave and kohlrimmed eyes, and adores Charlotte Gainsbourg and Coco Chanel. Never satisfied with merely echoing what’s been done before, Janneane is constantly searching for that next sartorial twist in the fabric of fashion history.

HAUTE WHEELS, PAGE 88

tenaya is an advertising executive at a creative agency, with offices in indianapolis and Los Angeles. She relishes the occasional freelance opportunity to contribute her frank musings on all things chic.

ESTHER BOSTON

PHOtOGrAPHer

#PGP: POSTGRADPROMISE, PAGE 58; THE SARTORIAL CYCLIST, PAGE 92; READY TO MOVE. READY-TO-WEAR., PAGE 104; NOUVELLE FEMME, PAGE 106 esther grew up in a typical small Hoosier town with little more to do than dream. Being a creative person with ambition, photography became her best means of expression, opening up a world of possibilities beyond anything she could have imagined. After obtaining her BFA in Photography at Herron School of Art and Design and working alongside some of her favorite photographers, she knew it was time to pursue her own enterprise.

GABRIELLE CHEIKH

PATTERN, ISSUE 3: TRANSIT

MARIA DICKMAN

writer

DESTINATION: BLOOMINGTON, PAGE 46; #PGP: POSTGRAD PROMISE, PAGE 58 An indy native and recent DePauw graduate, Maria serves as Pattern's Features editor and the Director of Pr & Marketing. if she's not conducting interviews for the blog, helping promote Meetups & special events, brainstorming content for the next issue of Pattern mag, or attempting to keep up with her inbox, she's most likely plotting her next trip abroad or indulging in a pint at Chumley's. She loves high heels, thick novels, British reality television, and Hoosier basketball.

LARRY ENDICOTT

PHOtOGrAPHer MAB, PAGE 16

Photographer Larry endicott reigns over Fountain Square in a 100 year-old tavern with his lovely pink-haired wife and a black cat. together they create art, smoke hookah and plan for the zombie apocalypse.

PHOtOGrAPHer

DESTINATION: BLOOMINGTON, PAGE 46 indianapolis native Gabrielle Cheikh is a classically-trained professional commercial and portrait photographer. with an education in fine art photography, she has photographed in 6 different countries for many individuals, families, and businesses.

MAGGIE CONNER

writer

NIKKI BLAINE, PAGE 50 Maggie Conner is a fashion fanatic and style blogger for the Haute Hoosier. She attended the Fashion institute of technology in NyC before graduating from indiana University with a journalism degree in 2009. when she’s not blogging or working full-time in a career totally unrelated to fashion, Maggie throws fashion-themed parties and endlessly obsesses over the latest runway trends. She absolutely adores indy and all that it has to offer, especially Broad ripple boutiques and the downtown dining scene.

COLE FARRELL

COLE FARRELL

writer

MAB, PAGE 16 Cole Farrell is a writer and educator living in indianapolis, indiana. His work is continually fascinated with community and identity, and it exists at the intersection of commercial, critical, and creative writing. Cole’s national client roster includes Groupon, Kenra Professional, and AiGA, and pieces of his creative work have been published in Oxford Magazine and indySpectator. As a child, Cole would gather his neighborhood peers and pretend that they were his students. though he no longer engages in playground lectures, he strives every day to expand his classroom to cover an entire world.

WIL FOSTER

PHOtOGrAPHer

Q+A: MICHAEL BRICKER. INNOVATOR-IN-CHIEF., PAGE 94 wil Foster heads up the purposefully ambiguous outfit known as rock Candy Photo. raised in Melbourne, Australia, and based in indianapolis, he has traveled extensively throughout his career, kicking lame photos in the face at every opportunity. His rock ‘n roll attitude and rad personality has endeared him to a client list of celebrities, rockstars, and sports icons.


WILLYUM BAULKEY

MARIA DICKMAN

KATE FRANZMAN

writer

Q+A: SHEENA BIRT. DISPLAY COORDINATOR., PAGE 28 Kate is a francophile, retired roller derby girl, and cat lady-in-training. She began her career in the Lois Lane lane, with a degree in journalism.  Kate received a crash course in indianapolis with a job promoting local alternative publication, NUVO Newsweekly. She then sharpened her social media and blogging skills as new media manager for the indianapolis Museum of Art.  Kate currently works for Pivot Marketing, an ad agency in historic Fountain Square, where she also lives. She does social media strategy and Pr for local brands including Frittle Candy, Black Market, and Hinge. She also freelances for indianapolis Monthly, NUVO Newsweekly, and indySpectator. Kate makes her own toothpaste, idolizes Brigitte Bardot and Anthony Bourdain, and doesn’t own a car. 

STEPHEN GARSTANG

StyLiSt

TRANS/IT, PAGE 62 Stephen was born in the 60’s, grew up in the 70’s, and started art school in the 80’s. He entered the 90’s as a fashion designer of some notoriety in NyC and came out of the decade an impresario of art, fashion, and decoration. He works today just as he did yesterday - but now his job is called “stylist.” He sees the world as a series of pictures. He sees, directs, and shoots these images every day, but, ironically, he’s never liked one of himself.

KATE FRANZMAN

WIL FOSTER LARRY ENDICOTT XXXXXXXXXX

JANNEANE BLEVINS

TIFFANY BENEDICT BERKSON

STEPHEN GARSTANG

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CO NT RIB UTOR S

JADE HOWARD

KELLY KRUTHAUPT

ERINA LUDWIG

MICHELLE PEMBERTON

PHOtOGRAPHeR

StyliSt

wRiteR

StyliSt

TRANS/IT, PAGE 62 while under the tutelage of renowned artist walter Cotten at Sand Diego State University, Jade found his voice through the camera lens. He later honed his commercial skills by assisting some of the best photographers in lA, Dallas, and NyC. Jade continues to shoot all over the country, using his talent to tell stories through pictures.

MICHAEL KAUFMANN

wRiteR

TRANSIT IN INDY, PAGE 84 through his role as Director of Special Projects and Civic investment for the Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County, Michael Kaufmann supports arts, ecology and other equitable livability initiatives for the Marion County Health Department and wishard Health Services. in addition to serving on various community-focused boards, Michael is also the co-founder of we Are City and the 1828 Project, a program for leaders between the ages of 18 and 28.

THE WOMAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH, PAGE 72; NOUVELLE FEMME, PAGE 106 Kelly Kruthaupt grew up in a Midwestern subdivision, the perks of which included skate ramps and close proximity to the local mall. Her first fashion shoot in early middle school (featuring a backdrop of magazine tears from espirit, Guess, and the latest teen Beat) was an early indication of her obsessive need to visually communicate what inspires her. Her search for the new and different has led her around the globe and back home again, styling for a client list that includes US Bank, Reebok, MasterCard, Ruelala, and Smart Bargains. She studied fine art and photography at Antonelli College under Andrea Milette, and in 2011, graduated valedictorian from Harrison College with a degree in Fashion Merchandising. She’s never met a dog she didn’t like, and felt out of place only once, long ago, but doesn’t recall the details.

JASON LAVENGOOD

THE FOX, THE BEAR, THE BUNNY, PAGE 22 erina is the author of Unnoticed Neighbors: A pilgrimage into the Social Justice story (the House Studio, 2011) & holds a History degree from King’s College london. She was chosen as one of six european journalists to tour and discuss youth political apathy across the States in 2004 by the U.S. Foreign Press Center. She has written for the indianapolis Star, indy Spectator, Relevant Magazine, Reject Apathy and newspapers and magazines in london, Johannesburg, and throughout the United States. She has worked as a teacher and mentor to refugees in london, local villagers in rural Uganda and asylum seekers in Nashville, tennessee, where she created an exhibition of local refugee children’s work called My Name is….Currently, she is working on a new collaborative book for the House Studio and her own work of young adult fiction. A londoner at heart, she now lives in indianapolis with her husband and their exuberant puppy, lucy.

PHOtOGRAPHeR

HIGH GLOSS DRIVE BY, PAGE 98 Jason lavengood is a professional photographer based in the indianapolis area. He works primarily in commercial photography and enjoys helping promote the city of indianapolis with his images. His passion lies in the creativity of fashion and advertising photography.

MADDY LUCAS

PHOtOGRAPHeR

THE FOX, THE BEAR, THE BUNNY, PAGE 22 Maddy lucas is a Midwest girl at heart. She grew up in indiana but after high school found herself all over the map. She graduated from ByU-idaho with a BFA in photography. She traveled to europe, lived in the Pacific Northwest, came back to indianapolis, and now lives in Brooklyn, New york with her husband. She loves fashion, travel, and using her hands to create things. All of this is present in her work, and she always tries to add a touch of whimsy, while still showing personality and sincerity.

MICHAEL KAUFMANN

JADE HOWARD

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PAtteRN ISSUE NO. 3

BRIAN MCGUFFOG

PHOtOGRAPHeR

TEA-TIME REVERIE, PAGE 52 Brain McGuffog is 21-year-old studying Film and television at New york University’s tisch School of the Arts. He was born in the south and raised in beautiful Fishers, indiana, where he developed a passion for storytelling, whether that be through film, studio art, writing or photography. McGuffog works as a photo assistant to Annie leibovitz on-set for Vogue and Vanity Fair. He has also worked in film for Daren Aronofsky’s production company and many other working photographers. He shoots professionally for numerous independent editorials in New york and as a staff member for london-based fashion travel magazine SUitCASe. He has a Midwestern heart and loves to come back to indiana to shoot whenever he needs real inspiration. if you count all the step and half brothers and sisters throughout his life, McGuffog is one of 11 siblings.

POLINA OSHEROV

PHOtOGRAPHeR & wRiteR

DAPPER GENTS, PAGE 31 Michelle Pemberton is an award-winning multimedia journalist and fine artist who has been published in magazines, books, and newspapers nationally and internationally. Her fine art is included in the indianapolis Museum of Art and the Kinsey institute's collections. She is also an instructor at Herron, and the cofounder of the Naptown Rollergirls.

KIM PUCKETT

wRiteR

HAUTE WHEELS, PAGE 88 Kim Puckett spends her days as a public relations professional, earning her fashion, lifestyle and technology clients national media coverage in publications like GQ, lucky, GlAMOUR and elle. By night, she’s a tV fanatic, a proud Midwesterner, a Drake fan and a designer handbag collector.

JULIA RICKLES

DeSiGN iNteRN

TYPOGRAPHY FOR DAPPER GENTS, PAGE 31; TRANSIT, PAGE 69 Recent grad and indianapolis-transplant, Julia Rickles loves to make great things. She's an Atlanta native, but the Midwest has quickly become her new stomping ground. Julia is currently an intern at Kristian Andersen + Associates where she spends her days designing and leaning from a fantastic team of creators. when she's not designing, printing, photographing, doodling, tinkering, cutting, and pasting, you can find her sipping a local brew, perusing the iMA, or hunting down a tune she can tap her feet to.

STEPHEN SIMONETTO

PHOtOGRAPHeR

HAUTE WHEELS, PAGE 88 Stephen Simonetto feels so blessed to be working in a field that he truly loves. His goal has always been to create something that is different and beautiful. Photography encompasses everything he does. He never stops the learning process. it is his goal to improve his work with every project he completes.

Q+A: SHEENA BIRT. DISPLAY COORDINATOR., PAGE 28; DAPPER GENTS, PAGE 31; NIKKI BLAINE, PAGE 50; THE WOMAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH, PAGE 72

He is constantly looking at the world around him for inspiration. He loves writing down all the random ideas that pop into his head, whether he is at the store or just woke up from a dream.

Photographer Polina Osherov was born in Moscow, Russia, grew up on the beach in Melbourne, Australia, and settled in indianapolis by way of Chicago in 1999. An active advocate for the growing cultural, arts and fashion scene in indianapolis, Osherov admits to having discovered her personal style only in her 30s. She says of shooting at the indianapolis international Airport, “what a fantastic location! it was easily a 2-3 day shoot - so many wonderful spots both inside and outside the terminal. it really is one of the best looking airports i’ve ever been in. And i’ve been in quite a few!”

in the end he is just a goofy guy who loves what he does and couldn’t imagine doing anything else!

JASON LAVENGOOD


MADDY LUCAS

KELLY KRUTHAUPT

DANIELLE SMITH.

Accessories editor

KICKS & HEELS, PAGE 42 danielle smith provides wardrobe styling and specialty fashion event production services through her boutique firm Fresh Fettle. Her vision of boundless creativity and professionalism has shone with clients such as Macy's North, simon Property Group, Wiley Publishing, After 40, soUtH Magazine, the Art institute of indianapolis, and music group Naturally 7. danielle is also the accessories editor for Pattern. she lives in indianapolis with her husband and son.

CARA TUDOR

desiGN iNterN

PATTERN: WHO WE ARE, PAGE 87 cara tudor is a freelance graphic designer and illustrator working in and around the indianapolis area. she recently graduated from the Art institute of indianapolis with a bachelors degree in graphic design. she has worked with a variety of markets, but fashion is her favorite. cara has a wide range of design capabilities with an emphasis in publication design.

TAMARA ZAHN

Writer

TAMARA ZAHN

OP-ED: TRANSFORMING INDY, PAGE 118 tamara Zahn recently resigned as President of indianapolis downtown, inc. (idi), after nearly 20 years. tamara led idi, a not-for-profit organization strategically focused on developing, managing and marketing downtown indianapolis from its formation in 1993. she was instrumental in the revitalization of downtown indianapolis. Prior to idi, tamara was a Principal of Zahn Associates, her own consulting firm specializing in urban development. she has consulted in downtowns throughout the United states. clients include simon Property Group, the rouse company’s American city corporation and the New York Port Authority. tamara serves on the boards of international downtown Association (idA) and indianapolis cultural trail and centerPoint counseling. she has served on the Host committees for NFL super Bowl 2012, NcAA Final Fours and other major events. she was recognized as one of the first “40 under 40” and “Most influential Women in indianapolis.” tamara is a recipient of the prestigious sagamore of the Wabash award as well as awards from idA, international council of shopping centers and civic organizations. tamara was an olympic torch bearer in honor of her efforts to help create Friends of Holliday Park and the Holliday Park playground and nature center.

BRIAN MCGUFFOG

ERINA LUDWIG

JULIA RICKLES

MICHELLE PEMBERTON

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Mab

MAB GRAVES. CREATING A WORLD OF WAIFS & STRAYS. TEXT BY COLE FARRELL + PHOTOGRAPHY BY LARRY ENDICOTT

WAIFS AND STRAYS Patsy, Pinky, Ithica, (shoes) and Posey

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WAIFS AND STRAYS It might be simplest to say that Mab is a creator of worlds.

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PATTERN ISSUE NO. 3

MAB GRAVES'S ART IS RICH TO EXPERIENCE BUT DIFFICULT to describe. She calls herself a Pop-Surrealist painter, and refers to her colorful characters as her "waifs and strays.� She's a fine artist who has successfully created wall art, cameos, and dolls. She is in the process of publishing a book, finishing a stop-motion animation film, and crafting a series of small paintings called artist trading cards. I was lucky to have an opportunity to sit down with Graves. Without exception, she is a very busy woman, but several months ago she had a sudden health scare that put her in the hospital. "I kept working in my studio, because that's what I tend to do, but before I knew it, I was in exquisite pain," she told me as we sat down at a small table in a corner of City Market. I stopped her before she gave me many of the details--I'm squeamish, and didn't want to have to cut our time short--but suffice it to say that her presence at our lunchtime conversation seemed somewhat miraculous. Sitting across from the artist, herself somewhat waif-like, almost frail, I realized it might be simplest to say that she is a creator of worlds. But for Graves the acts of creation are borne of myriad sources. Inspiration must be culled, and is often accidental. "People often ask me to paint a portrait, or re-create a scene. I don't really paint from a single source--someone sitting still in a chair--so much as I internalize materials from a variety of sources," she said. Much of her work starts as research projects that bubble over, like last year's "Candyland," which started when the artist compared various iterations of the 60-year old board game side by side. As you can


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WAIFS AND STRAYS Mab’s doll-making, which began with a single doll created to add texture to a print show, has attracted attention. Her dolls are regularly the subject of online bidding wars.

imagine, her vision of this world was much different than the one Hasbro had created. And her next show, inspired by Lewis Carroll's "Alice in Wonderland", will provide her own spin on a story that has mattered deeply to her. The worlds she creates are expansive, bold, and more often than not, populated largely by females. "I think you should paint what you know, and I grew up in a house with four girls. So, that's what I know." With work that has shown in cities as far-flung as New York and Spain, it's hard to believe that she has only been painting for five years. Though she had been sketching in notebooks for most of her life, the transition to paint was a challenge she was ready to accept. "It's different than the control you have with a pencil," she told me, "paint is alive and moves in a totally different way." GRAVES IS GRATEFUL FOR THE BELATED DISCOVERY OF her primary art form. When she started painting, she felt like she was completely ready for it. Rather than copying her inspirations or struggling through the creative process, she had a fully-formed aesthetic, and a style that no longer felt derivative. Although she has lived all over, from Chicago to California, Mab Graves feels lucky to put down roots in the Midwest. "I feel blessed to come back to Indianapolis," she said. "I said that I wouldn't be here long, but I've really come to love it." Though she's heard the debates about the relative cachet of a city like Indianapolis, she's found it to be a positive, nurturing environment full of excited people who are willing to promote the work they love. And there is no shortage of love for Graves's work. In 2012, she was able to hire an assistant and an intern.

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Graves says she works 16-20 hours a day, every day of the week. She posts items for sale once a week in her online shop, and everything is typically sold out within 15-20 minutes. She didn't begin creating art with the intention of becoming a businesswoman, but the business acumen she's gained along the way has been priceless. "I always recommend to students who are interested in becoming artists that they major in business and minor in art," she says. "Discipline has been crucial for me. It is discipline that has allowed me the freedom to create the way I want to." The Internet and its various tools for artists --Etsy, Facebook, Artfire-- have also proven invaluable for expanding her reach. "I am passionate about helping artists establish on online presence, because it's so crucial these days. It's definitely a big pet project for me," she said. While much of her work is sold over the Internet, she doesn't want the experience to be an impersonal one. "I think it's part of my job to create an entire experience for people. Receiving things makes people feel special, so I place a huge value on thoughtful packaging and handwritten enclosures." And as for style, Graves says she loves fashion, but pays no attention to it. "I wear pieces that make me feel good. And since I work from home, I make myself get up and get dressed every day, so I have the feeling that I've put in the effort," she said. For someone who began painting on a table made from masonite board and a milk carton in her cramped apartment, Graves has come a long way. "My goal is that my art will outlive me. Art is my heir." With all of the lives she's created, it's easy to believe. ✂


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Once, when the sun was high in its sky, three friends set off on a journey of sorts. For they were: the Fox, the Bear and the Bunny. And theirs was the path of true lovers & friends. 22

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY MADDY LUCAS. TEXT BY ERINA LUDWIG. MAKEUP BY KATE SHAW, FACES BY KATHY MOBERLY. HAIR BY ADRIANNA ZARAGOZA, FRENCH PHARMACIE. STYLING BY JASMINE OWENS. HAND LETTERING BY SETH LUCAS. MODELS EMILY, KATE, AND CHARLES, LMODELZ.


And so it happened the Fox gave chase to the Bear and caught her in a house of glass. For it had been so very long that he had sought her. He took her to places new in their oldness and wooed her under balls of light.

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The Bunny, the quietest of the three, spotted them and felt more alone than any bunny should be. And so the Bunny disappeared and would be found by none. 25


Except the Bear who could uncover a dear friend anywhere. And when they met there was the quiet and the rest of those who know each other best. 26

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THE BEAR: SHIRT BY TOPSHOP. SKIRT AT H&M. VINTAGE FUR VEST. THE FOX: SHIRT AT TOPSHOP. SWEATER BY TOPMAN. PANTS AT H&M. THE BUNNY: SHORTS AND PINK SWEATER AT TOPSHOP. VINTAGE GLASSES.

For insomuch as lovers need glass houses and drops of light; friends make all those loves all the more bright.

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A

SHEENA BIRT. DISPLAY COORDINATOR.

ANTHROPOLOGIE’S WINDOWS DISPLAY AN ABUNDANCE OF IMAGINATION AND INGENUITY RARELY FOUND OUTSIDE OF DIY DREAMS. KATE FRANZMAN TALKS POWER TOOLS AND INSPIRATION WITH THE WOMAN BEHIND THE WHIMSY. TEXT BY KATE FRANZMAN + PHOTOGRAPHY BY POLINA OSHEROV SHEENA BIRT, DISPLAY COORDINATOR FOR ANTHROPOLOGIE at the Fashion Mall, never thought she’d find herself wielding power tools and “getting really dirty” on a daily basis. Combining her talents in art, fashion, design, and marketing, Sheena’s job is to construct eye-catching window displays, interior displays, fixtures, and signage. Sheena received her BFA in fashion design, with a minor in fibers, and began working for a t-shirt company. She became art director for T-shirt One, but missed making things with her hands. Soon after, when the opportunity to build daring displays for the new Anthropologie store came up, she took it. KATE: What skills do you need for a job like this? SHEENA: I’m responsible for all non-product visual elements in the store. It helps that I have a little experience doing a whole bunch of different things. I’ve learned fine art installation and wood construction. I work with all kinds of power tools and I know some basic electrical skills, tricks for fabric dying, and sewing. I’ve learned painting and sculpture techniques that I never was exposed to at school. It gave me an edge. KATE: What makes Anthropologie’s displays so good? SHEENA: We use everyday material like fabric, paper, and cardboard. We elevate common objects and make them special. Our displays are more like fine art installation, rather than your typical signage. The corporate office doesn’t just send us the materials; they send prototypes that we get to interpret. We shop for our own materials 28

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with a budget every month, and we have lots of creative freedom. We install display elements that are in line with the trends for the season and complement the clothing in the window. KATE: What’s the most misunderstood aspect of your job? SHEENA: I don’t dress forms. I’m on ladders everyday, working on my hands and knees on the floor, getting really dirty. My mom can’t believe I work with power tools. It’s very different than what I thought I’d been doing, and I love it, and all the challenges. KATE: What other challenges do you experience? SHEENA: It sounds really fun to go shopping with someone else’s money, but it’s harder than you’d think. You have to have a good plan in place. I always have a super detailed shopping list. I’ve gotten really good at thinking of ways to cut costs. Planning and logistics are skills you really develop over time.

KATE: What’s the process for creating a window display?

SHEENA: I love going to hardware stores like Home Depot, Lowes, Menards. They recognize me there. Fabric stores and craft stores. Yard sales, thrift stores, salvage yards. I love Midland Arts and Antiques. I’m always looking for something off the beaten path.

SHEENA: Corporate sends us inspiration pictures to communicate the color palette and theme. Then, we do our own research and collect inspiration materials to create a vision. Everything goes to the district visual manager for approval, after which we create a budget, take measurements, prep, execute, and install. Altogether it takes about three weeks to put together a window, and we change them out every eight weeks.

KATE: What’s your favorite display concept you’ve done?

KATE: Where else do you find inspiration?

SHEENA: We did a concept about a year ago called “Our House.” The idea was to stage each floor as if an imaginary couple lived in that space, and decorate it with vintage pieces we found at local thrift stores.

SHEENA: Interior design magazines like Living, Etc., Australian Vogue. Blogs. Any design books in-store. Grace Bonnie from Design Sponge. And, of course, what we’re selling in the store right now. ✂

KATE: Where do you shop for your materials?


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UPPING THE ANTE ON INDY MEN'S STYLE UPPING THE ANTE ON INDY MEN'S STYLE

TEXT AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY POLINA OSHEROV + STYLING BY MICHELLE PEMBERTON

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MICHAEL RYPEL A MODERN DAY JEEVES, ENTREPRENEUR MICHAEL RYPEL HAS WORN many different hats in the service of his exclusive clientele. From planning The Golden Globes, to providing PR, marketing and high-end concierge services to celebrities, and now working with Harrods on their Millionaire Gallery brand, Rypel is a man of many talents. Splitting his time between Miami and Indianapolis, Rypel’s appreciation of classic suits goes back to his early fascination with the old-money culture of West Palm Beach. Appreciating the need to look expensive, but not flashy, and “dressing for the job” has played an important role in Rypel’s success.

Age: 40 Provenance: Chicago, Illinois Describe your personal style: Simple, clean, classic. What’s your style inspiration? Classic men’s styling from the 20s, 30s and 40s. Favorite brands: Diesel, Hugo Boss, Donald J. Pliner, Valentino. Must-have accessory: Shoes...if they can be considered an accessory. Do you have any style icons? Who and Why? I’m influenced by classic styles. George Clooney is really great at pulling that off. Where do you shop? Nordstrom, Saks, H&M. I also have custom work done by Astor & Black. What’s your mode of transportation? Lexus Infinity FX Mass transit for Indy? Yes, no and why? Yes. I don’t use it, but the issue needs to be addressed if Indianapolis is going to stay ahead of the game. Build it and they will come. What was your proudest achievement in 2012? Helping to launch the Billionaire Gallery in Dubai. What’s your big project of 2013? We’re taking The Millionaire Gallery concept into Shenzhen, China. AMERICANIMAGECONSULTING.COM

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JONATHAN FREY GRADUATING FROM COLLEGE WITH A HISTORY AND SPANISH degree, Frey had originally planned on attending graduate school and becoming a professor. A trip to Spain with a borrowed pointand-shoot changed all that, instead putting him on the path of visual story-telling. Now an independent film-maker, Frey recalls that shooting weddings afforded him plenty of opportunities to experiment with dressing up as he tried to define his UPS (Unique Personal Style). He says it took some time to get there, but he definitely made it. These days, it’s not hard to spot this guy in the crowd.

Age: 27 Provenance: Indianapolis, IN Describe your personal style: I like to wear timeless pieces that make me look professional. Classic white button downs or colored Bengal stripes, tailored blazers/trousers/ suits, ties, and oxfords. What’s your style inspiration? While I’m not dressing with an era in mind, it seems that I might be channeling the style of the 30s and 40s. The moustache and parted-hair are to blame. Favorite brands: Acne, Bruno Magli, JCrew, Gap, and vintage Dior and Saint Laurent. Must-have accessory: A watch. I think I’m known for wearing ties (because not many wear them anymore) but I don’t always have a tie on. I must have a watch, however. Do you have any style icons? Who and Why? Not really. Where do you shop? I shop a lot of Vintage and usually when I travel. What’s your mode of transportation? I don’t have a car and I bike everywhere or take the bus. Mass transit for Indy? Yes, no and why? Yes! I’d love it if we had more crosstown routes and the frequency would increase. What was your proudest achievement in 2012? Making the Kipp Normand short and showing at The Heartland Film Festival. What’s your big project of 2013? I’m working on a screenplay for a web series about a family living in Fountain Square. JONATHANFREYPHOTOGRAPHY.COM INSTAGRAM: @JONATHANFREY TWITTER: @JONATHANFREY

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KRISTOFER BOWMAN BLUE EYES TWINKLING, KRISTOFER BOWMAN JOKINGLY DESCRIBES himself as a “schlepper of wares.” After a 10 year stint at Silver in the City, first as its manager and later as a buyer, 2012 saw him striking out on his own, first hosting a monthly pop-up, before finally finding a permanent home for his store of curiosities, The Inventorialist, on Mass Ave in the former Dean Johnson Gallery. An Art History major, Bowman has a particular love for beautiful things that have “lived an authentic life.” When not at the store Thursday through Sunday, he spends most of his time “rambling” around, visiting fairs, estate and rummage sales, and flea markets searching for beautiful, one-of-a-kind objects to bring back to share with his enthusiastic customers. He says that when it comes to personal style, he loves to accessorize in ways that make people smile.

Age: 35 Provenance: I grew up in a town of 13,000 people in Far Northern Minnesota. Describe your personal style: A dressed up hipster with a European twist. I wear ties most days. It helps me to stay motivated. What’s your style inspiration? Sleek Euro cuts. Favorite brands: Allsaints, Top Man, Levi’s, but mostly I shop vintage. Must-have accessory: My white canvas People for Urban Progress tote and vintage skinny ties and bow ties. Do you have any style icons? Who and Why? Not really. Where do you shop? I love to thrift and typically do that while I’m in NYC looking for stuff for my store. What’s your mode of transportation? A Honda Element. The back seats haven’t been in for over 5 years because I never know what I’m going to find on my travels. Mass transit for Indy? Yes, no and why? While I personally don’t use mass transit here in Indy, I believe in it and want it to happen. I utilize mass transit when I fly to other parts of the country, so it’d be nice to provide that option to people who visit Indy. What was your proudest achievement in 2012? Opening The Inventorialist. What’s your big project of 2013? Last year I said “yes” to everything, but this year I need things to shuffle into place. I want to keep adding to my plate while keeping a balance. So that means less travel to do shows outside of Indy and more time spent fine tuning the store. THEINVENTORIALIST.COM INSTAGRAM: @KLICKBARNSTORMER      

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JAMAR COBB-DENNARD JAMAR COBB-DENNARD IS A BUSY MAN. A SALES AND MARKETING coach, running his own sales recruiting company, Cobb-Dennard is also heavily involved with the Little Red Door project, volunteers with the Marion County Democratic Party and happens to be in the Guinness World Book of Records for taking part in the world’s longest webinar (thirty-six hours long, if you must know). With his sights set on a political career, Cobb-Dennard appreciates the value of making the right impression. Whatever he chooses to wear on a particular day, Cobb-Dennard always adds a unique or colorful accessory, “a little sizzle” to make his outfit pop.

Age: 31 Provenance: Kalamazoo, MI; Has lived in Indy for 10 years. Describe your personal style: Understated ebullience. What’s your style inspiration? Detroit Renaissance, Motown 50s & 60s. Favorite brands: Cole Haan, Catou and Kenneth Cole. Must-have accessory: A great watch. I’m trying to build a fabulous watch collection! Do you have any style icons? Who and Why? Taye Diggs. That man looks delicious in a suit! Where do you shop? Other people’s closets, Designer Men’s Room, local vintage and I’ve just started to dabble in custom work, mostly by Berny Martin of Catou. What’s your mode of transportation? I live downtown, so I try to walk everywhere I can. Otherwise, I drive a BMW X3. Mass transit for Indy? Yes, no and why? Yes, as long as it’s for the right reasons and done the right way. What’s your big project of 2013? No specific big projects planned, just wanting to continue building on what’s already happening. JAMARSPEAKS.COM INSTAGRAM: @JAMARSPEAKS TWITTER: @JAMARSPEAKS

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BEN ROE GRADUATING WITH A VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS DEGREE FROM Herron School of Art, Roe has had a colorful and varied career as a graphic designer and illustrator specializing in branding and web design. Recently, Roe’s creative chops and charismatic personality saw him hired on as the Senior Manager of Arts for Indy’s Department of Parks and Recreation, a position which has him overseeing the programming of all the Indy Parks. While he may have (by his own admission) dressed like a “total dork” in school, a trip to London changed all that, helping Roe develop a playful style, which is both professional yet allows him to stay true to his artsy side.

Age: 33 Provenance: Indianapolis, IN Describe your personal style: My personal style is always changing based on where I am in my life. Ten years ago, if you told me that I would wear ties to work because I liked it, I’d think you were crazy. I try to keep myself simple and understated but use accessories to make the outfit more fun. Uncomplicated, but interesting. What’s your style inspiration? I’m inspired by any number of things. It’s not very cut and dry. My closet has everything from Sinatra to Willie Nelson. Favorite brands: Calvin Klein & Tommy Hilfiger for basics, Lucky Brand, Marks & Spencer, Scully western wear, Ben Sherman, Durango boots, Penguin ties, a lot of vintage. Must-have accessory: Ties and cowboy boots. Do you have any style icons? Who and Why? Not really. I wear what I feel like wearing. Where do you shop? Vintage/resale stores, online and eBay. What’s your mode of transportation? I drive a big-ass Hemi Dodge Ram that I bought for the sole purpose of carting vintage motorcycles and scooters cross-country to rallies. I have 5 bikes. All vintage. Some of them actually run, and when it’s warm, I make a point of riding them as much as possible. Mass transit for Indy? Yes, no and why? Yes. A big city needs a grown up transit system. We’re the 12th largest city in the country. It’s time. What was your proudest achievement in 2012? Getting the Indy Parks position. Very excited about all the great things I’ll get to do. What’s your big project of 2013? To have the best arts programming for the Indy Parks, ever. ROGUEROBOT.COM

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TRENDS

IN LIEU WITH BLUE Manolo Blahnik Nordstrom, The Fashion Mall at Keystone, Indianapolis nordstrom.com

FOILED OVER Giuseppe Zanotti Nordstrom, The Fashion Mall at Keystone, Indianapolis nordstrom.com

KICKS & HEELS FROM MINT TO SAPPHIRE, SHORELINE COLORS ARE IN THIS SPRING. EDITED BY DANIELLE SMITH

GET LIFTED Ash Footwear 44 Mercer Street, New York ashfootwearusa.com

ON THE BLOCK Reed Krakoff Nordstrom, The Fashion Mall at Keystone, Indianapolis nordstrom.com

CYAN SAYS Cole Haan The Fashion Mall at Keystone, Indianapolis colehaan.com

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“I HAVE THIS REALLY BIG IDEA.”

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY & BUSINESS LAW.

klflegal.com

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HIGH TIED Ash Footwear 44 Mercer Street, New York ashfootwearusa.com

BLUE MAGIC MEN STAY A STEP AHEAD OF THE TRENDS WITH THIS HYPNOTIC HUE. EDITED BY DANIELLE SMITH

SOLE SEEKER Cole Haan The Fashion Mall at Keystone, Indianapolis colehaan.com

WINGMAN DSW 4619 East 82nd Street, Indianapolis dsw.com

COOL YOUR HEELS Cole Haan The Fashion Mall at Keystone, Indianapolis colehaan.com

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BLUE STREAK Cole Haan The Fashion Mall at Keystone, Indianapolis colehaan.com


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FASHION ROAD TRIP

DESTINATION BLOOMINGTON THREE INDEPENDENT RETAILERS THRIVE IN THE HOOSIER HEARTLAND TEXT BY MARIA DICKMAN + PHOTOGRAPHY BY GABRIELLE CHEIKH IN THE ULTIMATE COLLEGE TOWN JUST FIFTY MILES SOUTH OF INDIANAPOLIS, AN ECLECTIC retail scene flourishes. Bloomington, home of the Cream and Crimson, Upland Brewing Company, and Johnny Cougar Mellencamp, may give off a small town vibe, but its fashion scene is anything but backwards. Pattern visited with three boutique owners who can’t imagine opening up shop elsewhere.

CACTUS FLOWER Opened: 1977 Vibe: Feminine & unique Website: cactusflowerclothing.com Visit: 322 E. Kirkwood Contact: (812) 333-8279 OWNER JILL SCHAFFER IS A VETERAN OF THE BLOOMINGTON RETAIL SCENE. “I STARTED when I was in college,” she said. “I had a little studio where I sold vintage clothing and some jewelry that I made. It was something fun to do, and I just stuck with it.” She laughs. “I was a little crazy.” The business grew little by little, and then she found the building on Kirkwood. “There was nothing down this way before then, but I moved into the upstairs room here [the current location]. Rent was only $50, and I got what I paid for, because every time it rained, I had to put buckets down.” Thirty-five years later, Schaffer’s still here. Although she expanded into the downstairs fifteen years ago, the upstairs room remains host to racks and racks of vintage goodies. “I personally like the ‘50s and older, but for the store we stock a lot of really fun ‘60s and ‘70s pieces, and even some from the ‘80s and ‘90s. Everything is always really fun, and really unique.” She pulls a ‘60s shift off one of the racks. “This is from a designer who only did couture. Everything was one-of-a-kind, and he wasn’t alive very long, so he doesn’t have too many pieces.” She fingers the thick material, which is covered in tulips. “The fabric is completely handwoven. I really like things like this, just beautiful.” Her Mad Men-era clothing sells best, as do her selection of designer leather handbags. “Those just seem to fly off the shelves.” Little wonder, as most of her stock is priced under $100. Downstairs, feminine vintage-inspired dresses, jackets, and skirts entice co-eds looking for affordable trends. “We get all kinds of customers, especially because we have the vintage clothing and estate jewelry, but then we also have the downstairs, which is very indie clothing,” Schaffer said. “Our customers are looking for something a little bit unusual. We get all age ranges, and customers who shopped here in college decades ago still come by when they’re in town.” Schaffer recently launched an online store to appease her customers who moved away, and still wanted access to Cactus Flower’s well-curated mix of vintage and new fashions. But don’t expect a brick-and-mortar offshoot anytime soon. “I never really thought about expanding, because I had a son and he was my priority, but he’s in college now...so I don’t know.” She shrugs. “If we ever did expand, it would be harder to do the vintage with the new. This is something unique to Bloomington.” “I love the local retail scene. I love this building - we’ve got one of the best coffee shops in the Midwest at Soma, and the Laughing Planet is fun, and CD place and the jewelry store. There are a lot of eclectic indie shops around town,” she pauses. “I think the small town atmosphere sets Bloomington apart. Indy has a lot of really nice shopping, too, but none like Cactus Flower.”

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BOUTIQUES RELISH Opened: 2004 Vibe: Luxe wardrobe fundamentals Website: relishbloomington.com Visit: 204 N. Morton Street Contact: (812) 333-2773 RELISH

RANDY AND ANGIE STOCKLIN, ONE CLICK VENTURES Even in this digital age, print lives. Neatly framed rows of magazine covers and style watch pages adorn a hallway at One Click, showcasing the handbags and scarves recommended by shopping magazines, like People Style Watch. When funding a startup, raising capital isn’t the only option. One Click was bootstrapped by the Stocklins themselves. Reinvesting profit allowed them to grow One Click conservatively through calculated risks.

TUCKED BACK ABOUT A BLOCK OFF OF THE COURTHOUSE SQUARE, RELISH’S MIX OF FURniture and clothing evokes a big city sensibility that may give pause to those unfamiliar with Bloomington’s culture. “The size of the market makes Bloomington unique,” owner Sharon Fugate said. “We’re a relatively small town with big city amenities, in some ways. We’re a destination community, so we don’t rely on the size of the population at hand. We get a new population twice a year, so its always changing, and because we’re a destination community, we draw from Indy, Columbus, Greencastle, Louisville, Chicago, and beyond.” “We tag ourselves as an urban marketplace,” she said. “It’s important to us to be downtown. It’s the heart and soul of a community, so for us there was no question.” And in a town like Bloomington, Relish’s downtown sensibility makes sense: “We concentrate on the aesthetic — lots of texture, a pretty specific color palette, and quality, classic design.” Both the offerings and layout at Relish reflect this focus on the aesthetics. Because floor space is predominantly given to furniture, browsing the women’s apparel section feels like shopping a friend’s closet, albeit one filled with easy but edgy separates in a neutral color palette. “I think anytime you open a small business, its very personality-driven,” Fugate said. “So the natural color palette reflects our personal taste. But it’s an individual offering, for individuals. What we’re trying to show here is what you don’t see other places. Trends have a very small place here. We’re really trying to show you what you’re unaware of.” This dedication takes Fugate and business partner/husband Brad around the country - to Atlanta, Chicago, New York, and North Carolina - while buying for the store. “We don’t carry most brands you’re familiar with, and we’re protective of our sources. Rather than go deep on companies, we sort of cherry pick. We like to have a variety of product,” she said. But what remains consistent in their buying? “We look for a certain element of archive. We’re trying to help women establish wardrobes, one piece at a time. We don’t intend for our products to be throwaway items, so you really develop a closet. We align ourselves with companies that are really of quality, and have incredible fits for women’s bodies.” “I’m not a classic shopper,” Fugate admitted. “I wouldn’t do this for entertainment, but after I lock the doors in the evening, I do a little shopping. I think that’s what people appreciate - we’ve done the vetting of the product mix, so women know when they come here that, even though they may not know what they’re looking for, they will find it. I think the mantra is good design.”


AZ VINTAGE

AZ VINTAGE Opened: 2012 Vibe: Cozy & colorful Website: azvintagebloomington.com Visit: 236 N. Morton St. Contact: (812) 333-1960 AZ VINTAGE, WITH ITS IMPRESSIVE ARRAY OF GARMENTS FROM THE ‘40S TO ‘80S, REFLECTS owner Alison Zook’s sunny personality. Nestled between Bloomington Bagel Company and Know Yoga Know Peace, AZ Vintage opened in April of last spring. “I’ve been doing this for ten years,” Zook said. “I started selling online, moved into antique malls, and it became sort of a natural progression to open the store.” The space, while small, is stocked cozily with furniture from the ‘50s and ‘60s, nestled between racks of vintage apparel. “I love midcentury modern, so that’s what I focus on, but I carry a little bit of everything. Shit in the ‘80s was just ugly, so I try to stay away from a lot of that, but housewares I do a wide range,” she said. “I also feature a lot of local, independent artists, which gives texture to the store.” One example of this? Lil Bub, a dwarf cat whose genetic mutations ensure she’ll remain a perma-kitten. All the proceeds from Lil Bub merchandise go towards Bloomington Wild Care. “I sell Lil Bub stuff to sort of pay it forward, sideways, diagonally and backwards. I’ve had so much help getting this place set-up, so I want to support everyone else as much as I can.” This mentality is not uncommon. “Bloomington is really unique for this type of business. There’s a group of us who work together - the Bloomington Antique Dealers Association. Our nickname is BADASS,” Zook laughed. “It’s a really supportive community. The students are here, which is a good market. Everyone works together, because the more vintage stores in town, the bigger the draw.” Why here? “The week after I graduated high school, Bloomington was the closest escape. I love it here,” she said. “There’s lots of culture thanks to the university, but at the same time, it’s still a small town.” Despite her years of experience and abundant community support, Zook is still working to establish different aspects of her business. “Right now, I’m working on my online presence. I have a website that recently launched, and I’m planning to focus more on that in the new year,” she said. “I love the blog side of the site, where I can talk about stuff that I do, and different pieces in-store.” “I thought for a long time I needed a better name - something catchier,” she added. “AZ Vintage is kinda like everything vintage, but also a play on my name. I was worried about it being too “me,” too egotistical, but it works!” The technical aspects aside, Zook bounced with energy when talking about her business. “It’s very green, reusing materials, that commonly exist, so I also try to carry a variety of things that aren’t necessarily typical vintage,” she said. “And I really love customers who appreciate vintage style, and how well things were made.” Her dream customer? “Nancy Sinatra. Nancy would totally shop here.” “It’s all just starting, so it’s fun and exciting.” ✂

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NIKKI BLAINE When I started, I was the squeaky wheel that was constantly rolling. Whenever there was a fashion show, I was in it. Whenever there was an opportunity to dress someone, I was doing it.

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DESIGNERS

NIKKI BLAINE LIFE IN THE GLAM LANE.

TEXT BY MAGGIE CONNER + PHOTOGRAPHY BY POLINA OSHEROV MAKING IT AS A FASHION DESIGNER IN INDIANAPOLIS IS NOT AN EASY FEAT, AND NO ONE knows that better than Nikki Blaine. After a twenty-year career in the industry, she could tell a war story or two. But despite some bumps in the road, Blaine is one of the most successful designers in town with her namesake line, Nikki Blaine Couture, and a boutique in Zionsville. She sat down with me and revealed her hopes for the future, what Indianapolis needs to become a fashion-forward city, and her tips for aspiring young fashion designers. MAGGIE: I love the location of this store. How did you get introduced to Zionsville? NIKKI: I do love Zionsville. It’s such a quaint town, very intimate, very personable. I’m actually from Indianapolis, but Antonio (Fermin) introduced me to Zionsville. Now, one of my regular clients lives right next door to me. Actually, my very first time driving through Zionsville was to drop off her pieces, and I was like, “Oh my god, this is amazing.” I love it here.

type of person, so I gravitate to the museums and to the eclectic style of society. I love different things, and Mass Ave. offers a great variety of things. Indianapolis is growing, you know? And we’re becoming more accustomed to change. And the more that unique, creative individuals come to Indianapolis, the better the city will be. Maybe then I won’t feel so obliged to go somewhere else. We’re just so complacent in T-shirts and jeans here. I can’t wait to be in an atmosphere where people invest a lot of energy in how they’re dressed and look. MAGGIE: How would you describe the women you dress? NIKKI: My regular clientele are distinguished women, professional women, entrepreneurs, and CEOs. They will always come to me for special occasions, galas, or their birthdays. Whenever they want to shine, that’s their time to come to me.

MAGGIE: I saw that you dressed some celebrities at the MTV film awards style lounge last year. How did you get involved with that?

MAGGIE: You are a pretty big name in the fashion community here. Do you have advice for other designers in Indianapolis who are just starting out?

NIKKI: A couple of years ago, a friend of mine had invited me to a party that was in LA. She suggested I bring some of my pieces from my collection because it was going to be an industry party, and you never know who you’re going to meet. So, I went to the party, and ran into a couple of interesting people, and next thing you know, they told me to bring my things to this celebrity Mother’s Day weekend. So, I said, “Okay,” and I appeared, and they loved my stuff. Everybody was grabbing my cards. And my name just started circulating, and all of the sudden my email was blowing up. So now I’m always getting invitations to things, but it’s all about my time, and if I’m able to go or not. I realize being in LA is exciting, and they love Nikki Blaine Couture, but I’m still just primarily a one-person business, so I can’t spread myself too thin. I’m still growing, and I’m not quite there yet to meet all that demand.

NIKKI: Well, when I started, I was the squeaky wheel that was constantly rolling. Whenever there was a fashion show, I was in it. Whenever there was an opportunity to dress someone, I was doing it. I was doing everything that everybody else didn’t want to do, and that’s what made a difference for me. It started with hair shows. I would dress the whole hair show of a particular salon. And then from there, people would start saying “Oh my god, I love those costumes! Where did you get those costumes from?” And then, I had the opportunity for my own segment in the hair show to showcase my designs. And things just snowballed from there. But I was just always getting involved. I don’t say no unless I just do not have time. So, that’s what I would tell any aspiring designer. You have to just put yourselves out there, even if you don’t want to, even when you don’t feel like doing it. Do it anyway.

MAGGIE: Would you ever consider moving from Indianapolis, someday?

MAGGIE: Do you have any specific designers that inspire you?

NIKKI: Oh, absolutely! You know, these are my roots, I’m from Indianapolis, but I definitely prefer to travel. My design aesthetic is appreciated more in other cities than it is here, I think. For one thing, in Indianapolis, everyone’s always like, “Oh, I love that! But I have no place to wear it.” Whereas in LA or New York, there are plenty of red carpet opportunities—everyone wants to look fabulous, and everybody wants to be draped in sequins, and, you know, just wants to be the belle of the ball. It’s a perfect fit for me.

NIKKI: Gianni Versace used to be my number one inspiration. Now, I’m really loving Valentino, Balenciaga, and Chanel, which are all very classic. I also love Alexander McQueen because his designs are very theatrical. So if you want to be noticed, quickly, you do something a little unusual like Alexander McQueen. But here’s the thing, you’ll become a one hit wonder if you don’t turn around and do something else. And I think what happens with a lot of people is that they realize, “That was a lot of work. I don’t think I want to do that again.” But if you’re really passionate about it, you’ll get up and do it again. It’s a lot of hard work that you may not get paid for. So, you have to figure out a way to supplement your income when you put all this effort and energy into this outfit or this fashion show, and you didn’t get anything out of it. I’ve had a lot of nights where I’m like, “What am I going to do? How am I going to get this bill paid?”

MAGGIE: It definitely seems like you have been garnering more national attention lately. What’s your next step? NIKKI: My next step is primarily building my team, so I can create several of the same things and not be so individualized in my garments. Unfortunately, I’ve taken a step back because I can’t meet the demand; so, that’s my struggle. MAGGIE: That’s kind of a good struggle to have, though… NIKKI: It is good, but it’s only good within a small window because then people think I’m not ready, so they will go on to somebody that is ready. So, I realize I need to take a step back and formulate my team so I will be ready, because at least the hard part is done. Now, it’s just a matter of having that inventory, having that accessibility, having the resources, and then we’ll go full throttle. MAGGIE: What are your favorite places in Indianapolis for style?

MAGGIE: What’s your favorite part of the design process? NIKKI: My favorite part is picking the fabric, because that is really what separates me from everyone else in Indiana. I will have fabrics that no one has ever seen before because you can’t buy them in Indianapolis. I travel to the east and west coasts for my fabrics. To me, it’s like going on a vacation. I’m like a kid in the candy store, at the fabric store. Go figure. The Nikki Blaine Couture spring collection has an airy neutral color palette and easy silhouettes, perfect for a jet-setting woman with timeless style. Check it out at her Zionsville boutique, located at 116 N. Main St. in Zionsville. ✂

NIKKI: I’ve always enjoyed going down to Mass Ave. Personally, I’m an artsy eclectic

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tea-time REVERIE PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN MCGUFFOG STYLIST & MODEL OLIVIA LATINOVICH HAIR & MAKEUP BY TERESS FURLIN, P’ZAZZ HAIR SALON LOCATION: MOSES FOWLER HOUSE LAFAYETTE IN & CONNOR PRAIRIE FISHERS, IN QUOTES: LEWIS CARROLL, ALICE IN WONDERLAND


VINTAGE HAT BY THE WM. H. BLOCK CO. VINTAGE LACE DRESS BY JESSICA MCCLINLTOCK. NECKLACE IS STYLIST’S OWN.

“It’s no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then.”

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BLOUSE BY AMERICAN APPAREL. VINTAGE SCHOOL UNIFORM PROPERTY OF BETHANY CHRISTIAN SCHOOLS. SHOES BY ALDO.

“Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”


DRESS AT INDY SWANK VINTAGE COLLECTION. HAT AT INDY SWANK VINTAGE ACCESSORIES. SHOES BY ALDO.

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VINTAGE HAT BY THE WM. H. BLOCK CO. VINTAGE LACE DRESS BY JESSICA MCCLINLTOCK. SHOES BY ALDO.

”If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense.”


DRESS AT INDY SWANK VINTAGE COLLECTION. HAT AT INDY SWANK VINTAGE ACCESSORIES. SHOES BY ALDO.

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EMERGING TALENT

#PGP: POST GRAD PROMISE HIGHLIGHTING STUDENT DESIGNERS FROM THREE INDIANA FASHION PROGRAMS.

TEXT BY MARIA DICKMAN + PHOTOGRAPHY BY ESTHER BOSTON MODEL EMILY GREGORY + HAIR AND MAKEUP BY HANNAH & ALEISHA, STUDIO 2000

KATELYNNE EGLEY PURDUE UNIVERSITY

Experience: A lifetime of experiences have led me here. I started off in dance and music. I used to want to be an architect, but I found that I loved the tangible aspects of designing and constructing clothes — the touch and the flow of the fabric. Once I figured out what I was good at, I stuck with it. I completed a one year accelerated Associate’s degree in Fashion Design from Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) in New York last year, and I also worked as the Knitwear Design Intern at TSE, a luxury knitwear label. Currently, I work as a Sales Lead at The Limited in Lafayette, which has given me insight into how professional women dress in Indiana, access to fashion, and an understanding of how to target different markets. Inspiration: I draw a lot of inspiration from fabric. I may have a conceptual idea of what I want to design, but the fabric takes it further. Once I have the fabric, I start to see how I want the garment to drape, to flow, to lay against the body. I gravitate towards unusual fabrics because I like that extra personality. When I was in New York, I scoured the Garment District for good deals and fabric, but now I use JoAnn Fabrics, which is good but commercial, and shop thrift stores. Goals: I am always in search of different characters and new experiences. I want to continue to improve my work as a designer and further study the art of dressing and the poetry of the fabric. I want to combine my passions and knowledge into something tangible and accessible that empowers others. I am working to secure a position as an associate designer in the luxury market. At that price point, designers have a lot of freedom with using different textiles and trims, and they don’t have to compromise on the design. Most meaningful accomplishment: My graduation from the accelerated program at FIT in New York in one year (as opposed to two). It was a challenging experience, but I’m proud to have graduated from such well-renowned program. I really gained strength and confidence as a designer.

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MADELINE GOHEEN BALL STATE UNIVERSITY

Experience: I’ve been designing since kindergarten, when I made a sad little stuffed elephant. Every time I work with someone new, I gain a new role and different skills. In the past, I’ve worked with Nikki Blaine Couture and Marlene Haute Couture. Currently, I’m working as a product designer at Natril Gear, which is an outdoor gear company in Fort Wayne. I design and prototype new products. I plan to continue in my role there until I get married in November, at which point I’ll be moving to Indianapolis and looking for my next opportunity. Inspiration: Photography. Pinterest has been a godsend, because I used to store photographs on my computer. I pore over hundreds of photographs and sketch whatever catches my attention. So much inspires me that I often sketch too many ideas! One of my challenges is narrowing down my ideas into one cohesive garment. I have a love affair with dresses, particularly with interesting backs. Every project is an opportunity to learn a new skill or try a fresh idea. Goals: Ultimately, I would love to work for myself, on my own designs, but for now, I’m continuing to try new things and learn everything I can from experienced industry professionals. Most meaningful accomplishment: I’m very proud to have served as the House & Tech leader at Ball State for my senior fashion show. I was really nervous at first about taking on a leadership position, but I pushed myself out of my comfort zone, which resulted in what I think was an amazing trio of shows for our senior lines.

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ELENA WINCHESTER PURDUE UNIVERSITY

Experience: I’ve been designing and selling clothes since high school. Last summer I interned with Wes Gordon. There, I had a genius mentor named Yutaka Hasegawa. He taught me the fundamentals of couture pattern making. Together, we draped and drafted patterns for Wes. I spent a lot of my internship at the sewing machine, creating samples. I’ve also worked in retail at Gucci in Chicago and interned for the fashion editor of Sheridan Road Magazine, so I’ve watched all aspects of the industry come together in complete harmony. Inspiration: I find that my best inspiration comes at odd hours, especially when I’m laying in bed at night. It’s the perfect time to think things over. I keep a sketchpad next to my bed that I fill with design ideas. I draw from everyday things, but I gravitate towards ballet. I love the movement of the body, and how that’s enhanced by clothing. Goals: I definitely plan to keep designing. Right now I’m working to get my name out there. I also teach sewing lessons, and I want to continue to share what I’ve learned with my students. Most meaningful accomplishment: I try to take advantage of every opportunity for recognition that comes my way. My internships have given me so much experience with many aspects of the fashion industry. I was a finalist in the Paris American Academy Annual Design Competition, and the Purdue Fashion Association has selected my garments as the best-constructed designs for the past two fashion shows.

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HANNAH JONES ART INSTITUTE OF INDIANAPOLIS

Experience: I interned with Walter Knabe Design Studios in Carmel, where I learned the process of screen printing from start to finish. I’ve also participated in two fashion shows through the Art Institute. I first started designing when I joined AI; there, I gained the experience necessary to execute my visions. Inspiration: Music, dark Victorian & vintage designs. Goals: I enjoy roles in which I can take the lead. My next step at this point is unknown, but I hope to work as a junior designer or assistant designer at a larger fashion house. My dream job would be in the design department at Christian Dior. Most meaningful accomplishment: Taking the initiative to go to college. I grew up in a very small town in the middle of cornfields. We didn’t have stoplights, restaurants, or even gas stations. That is the atmosphere I was accustomed to, so when I moved to Indianapolis, I moved alone. I didn’t know anyone, and I lived alone in an apartment outside of student housing. For me to move to the city and begin to attend school was intimidating, yet rewarding.

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TRANS/IT PHOTOGRAPHY BY JADE HOWARD MODELS ELIOT & BENJAMIN STYLING BY STEPHEN GARSTANG

THIS PAGE TANK TOP BY AMERICAN APPAREL. SHORTS BY MARC BY MARC JACOBS. SHOES ARE LION’S DEN BY HABAND. OPPOSITE PAGE SILK SHIRT LINER BY MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA FOR H&M. SHORTS BY GAMMA SPORTS. 80’S FLIP POP STAR SHADES FROM BROAD RIPPLE VINTAGE. ADIDAS SOCCER CLEATS.

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THIS PAGE JUMPSUIT VINTAGE TADASHKI FROM VALUE VILLAGE. BLACK WORK SUIT BY LORD JEFF FROM CITI TRENDS. OPPOSITE PAGE JUMPSUIT VINTAGE TADASHKI FROM VALUE VILLAGE. POLISHED DENIM VEST AND JEAN BY LORD JEFF FROM CITI TRENDS. TRAFFIC CONE COURTESY CITY OF INDIANAPOLIS.

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TRANS/IT

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THIS PAGE JUMPSUIT VINTAGE TADASHKI FROM VALUE VILLAGE. TORSO SILKSCREEN T-SHIRT IS STYLIST’S OWN FROM VINTAGE CANAL STREET. BIKE 80’S BIANCHI SUPER LEZZERA, MODEL’S OWN ACCOUTREMENTS. GLOVE IS STYLIST’S OWN. OPPOSITE PAGE BRIEFS SEAMLESS MESH BOXER BY UNIQLO. NECKPIECE BY DILLON DUKE. HAT, GLASSES, FANNY PACK, BACKPACK ARE STYLIST’S OWN. PONCHO IS MODEL’S OWN.

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CI TY VO IC ES

Letter From the Mayor. The future of our city is dependent not only on our ability to effectively and cost-efficiently provide the core local government functions all residents expect, but also on our ability to attract the creative class of today and tomorrow. We are fortunate that so many business leaders in the areas of manufacturing, life sciences, logistics, technology, and engineering call Indianapolis home. Our long-term success requires us to make decisions that will not only maintain the industries that have helped to build our great city, but that will also appeal to the next generation of entrepreneurs and workers. To compete for the young talent we need, we must provide the amenities they seek. That is why I am continuing to push for an improved mass transit system. Connectivity is critical to our future. Organizations like the Arts Council, Big Car, CICF, Harrison Center, IDADA, IndyHub, People for Urban Progress, and of course, Pattern, are showcasing many of the creative, talented individuals across our city. An improved mass transit system will not only connect residents and visitors to jobs, health care, schools and sporting events but it will also provide exposure and growth to an exciting variety of cultural experiences, arts, cuisines and styles. All of these things play an important role in the vibrancy and the future economic vitality of our region. If you agree that an improved mass transit system is needed to build upon the thriving community we are today, please voice your support by visiting IndyConnectNow.com and take action. Your involvement is essential to our progress. Sincerely,

GREGORY A. BALLARD_MAYOR OF INDIANAPOLIS

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY POLINA OSHEROV. STYLING BY KELLY KRUTHAUPT. HAIR BY PHILIP SALMON. MAKEUP BY KATHY MOBERLY. ASSISTANTS

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ESTHER BOSTON, MARIA DICKMAN. MODEL ALISON GINGERICH, WINGS MODEL MANAGEMENT. SHOT ON LOCATION AT THE INDIANAPOLIS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT.

THE WOMAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH EARRINGS BY ALLISON FORD. BRACELET BY MARC BY MARC JACOBS. UNDERGARMENTS BY SWEET REVENGE. SKIRT BY CATOU COUTURE. BLOUSE, RING, STOCKINGS AND SHOES ARE STYLIST’S OWN.

FLEE THE WINTER IN SPRING’S CLASSIC CUTS

TRENCH BY BURBERRY. PURSE BY FEATHER LEATHER STONE. SUITCASE BY ADRIENNE VITTADINI. VINTAGE BRA BY DOLLHOUSE BETTIE. SHOES BY CELINE.

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JACKET, PANT AND SHOES BY BURBERRY. TOP BY BCBG AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. PURSE BY FEATHER LEATHER STONE. EARRINGS AND BRACELET ARE STYLIST’S OWN.

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SUIT BY BURBERRY. NECKLACE BY KATE SPADE. CLUTCH BY FEATHER LEATHER STONE. GLOVES ARE STYLIST’S OWN.

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TRENCH AND BOOTS BY BURBERRY. PURSE BY VALENTINO. GLASSES BY DIOR. BELT, GLOVES, RING, & EARRINGS ARE STYLIST’S OWN.

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PANTS BY ARMANI & TOP AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. SCARF BY VERSACE. SHOES BY PRADA.WATCH BY DONNA KARAN. GLASSES BY DIOR. RING AT BURBERRY. PURSE BY FEATHER LEATHER STONE.

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DRESS BY BCBG AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. PURSE BY FEATHER LEATHER STONE. SHOES ARE MODEL’S OWN. NECKLACE IS STYLIST’S OWN.

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DRESS BY ALLSAINTS. SHOES BY BURBERRY. PURSE BY STELLA MCCARTNEY. GLASSES BY PRADA. TASSEL (ON BAG) & BRACELET BY FEATHER LEATHER STONE.

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INDY INSIDERS

TRANSIT IN INDY AND THE CREATION OF COLLECTIVE STYLE

TEXT BY MICHAEL KAUFMANN AND JOHN BEELER + PHOTOGRAPHY BY KELLEY HENEVELD MICHAEL KAUFMANN: TRANSIT. Transportation. Transformation. Transformers. Robotizing infrastructure. Bus cells. Blood cells. Immunity against the virus of urban decay. JOHN BEELER: Maybe transit is the virus, the invader upon the construct of the suburb. And culture is the way society adapts to new things. And clothing is a great barometer of culture. Furthermore, movement inspires culture because movement necessitates function. We wear jeans because early settlers and ranchers needed durable pants to ride horses with. Trains forced height restrictions on hats and widths upon dresses. In the 20th century car culture created styles based on car hopping. In the 1960s, driving a moped inspired Mod style. Surfing, and then later skateboarding, inspired a lot of the style in the 80s and 90s. (You could say that the 2000s are represented by our lack of movement, ergo the Snuggie). In the 2010s, we’ll say biking inspired the decade’s style. But when it comes to fashion as a barometer of cultural impact, transit is pretty right up there with board games and stamp collecting. What would “transit culture,” and, more specifically, transit style look like? MK: Transit style is mobile urban style. By transit I mean multi-modal movement. It is durable, flexible—it is part uniform and part individual. It is personal architecture. Cubicle on wheels on shoes. Like a turtle. Paperless. The information age has allowed for greater malleability in workspace. Personal space is now workspace, so the uniform matches the job. Open office to non-office. The suit is deadweight. Lose the suit. It is imperialist and oppressive, cue Stockhausen. Find the hybrid suit that speaks to freedom, democratic, fairtrade, yet not bourgeois-pseudo-bohemian. Don’t create new materials; figure out what is already available, reusable. Thanks PUP. We need polyblend or non-wrinkle fabrics that can roll up to the knees and elbows, sports coats that can be balled up in a bike bag. Showing your shins and forearms should be a declaration of confidence and quality of life affluence. Breathable, reflective, serious and playful. We don’t have to abandon sophistication or snazzy for the sake of bus and bike. Tie optional. Belts optimal, the belt buckle as the new demarcation of individuality. Shoes waterproof and breathable, smartwool socks for all occasions. Colorful socks that celebrate the pants being rolled. We need clothes that can sustain a zombie apocalypse, with secret pockets that don’t make you look like a National Geographic photographer. JB: That’s a great start. Is it possible to create culture from style-up? Does fashion lead, or does it follow? Maybe we need to meet in the middle. Democracy. After all transit—mass transit—is a democratizer (e.g. Rosa Parks). Style is personal, as in the body that is wearing it owns it at that particular moment. Very much like the way we own a car, or a bike, or a horse as we occupy it. But we need to reconceptualize the way we think about style, to find commonality but incorporate individuality, to dress with the awareness that we are in the same space but not the same person. If we’re going to improve transit, we need a style that that moves away from oblivious individualism but doesn’t skew to uniformity. Like buses do. Assuming style can create culture. MK: Yes. I think you are onto something. But I disagree that bikes are personal in the same way as cars. Bikes are highly social because you are not concealed; you are exposed. Car culture cuts you off from your surroundings. Your attire requires zero responsivity to its surroundings when you are in a car. You could go without pants. This is where bike fashion and bus fashion relate. Pants are required by law. 84

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JB: That they are. When we drive, our cars talk for us, meaning that it’s Toyota or Ford that’s doing the talking. When we walk, bike, or bus, our collective styles become conversation; our own particular style does the talking. MK: Especially if you aren’t wearing any pants. ✂


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COMMUNITY

NEIGHBORLAND #MAKINGINDYBETTER

TEXT BY JANNEANE BLEVINS + IMAGES SUBMITTED BY BIG CAR THIS PAST FALL, AT THE INAUGURAL TEDXINDIANAPOLIS, BIG CAR UNVEILED A PLACE to continue the conversation about the future of our city. Meet Neighborland, a digital public forum where you can work with neighbors to build a better city. It begins simply with a statement, “I want in my neighborhood.” The Neighborland helps you connect to the people and organizations who want the same thing and can share knowledge and resources to help make it happen.

SEE, SHARE, AND SUPPORT IDEAS FOR THE PLACES YOU CARE ABOUT ON NEIGHBORLAND.

WE WANT A MONORAIL IN INDIANAPOLIS. — korkman A monorail that is solar and propels itself with electromagnets. That runs all the way around the city with four distinct stations and forty substations. https://neighborland.com/ideas/indy-a-monorail

WE WANT FAR EAST/WEST BIKE CONNECTORS IN INDIANAPOLIS. — Tom Streit + 5 neighbors I’d like to see some more complete streets and bike traffic lanes that are aimed at getting people across town east/west north of downtown. (30th/29th, 38th, and 86th) Creating easy and safe ways of traveling across the city this direction would allow people who live in areas that are surrounded by highways the ability to get on a bike/ walk to areas without reliance on motor transportation. https://neighborland.com/ideas/indy-far-east-west-bike-connec

WE WANT BETTER PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION IN INDIANAPOLIS — Lindsey + 10 neighbors https://neighborland.com/ideas/indy-better-public-transportat

WE WANT STREETCARS IN INDIANAPOLIS. — Lyndsay Crespo & 3 neighbors https://neighborland.com/ideas/indy-streetcars

WE WANT PEDESTRIAN-ORIENTED URBAN DESIGN IN INDIANAPOLIS. — Mark McKenna & 3 members Accessible urban design for those who walk: truly democratic. https://neighborland.com/ideas/indy-pedestrian-oriented-urban

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Photography by Dauss Miller

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RETAIL NEWS

HAUTE WHEELS Indy’s new boutiques flaunt brakes & motors

RETRO 101 AT A GLANCE OWNER/OPERATOR: Heather Pirowski

TEXT BY KIM PUCKETT & TENAYA BOOKOUT + PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEPHEN SIMONETTO OUR FASCINATION WITH MOBILITY CAN EASILY BE CONNECTED TO OUR FONDEST CHILDHOOD memories. It’s a hot, sticky summer afternoon. You’re outside playing and suddenly you hear it in the distance—the anthem of summertime, that not-so-pitch-perfect melody of the ice cream truck, plastered with stickers of sweets. It’s the iconic family road-trip, traveling cross-country in a decked out RV and arguing with your siblings over the top bunk. It’s your first prom night, counting down the seconds until the limo pulls up, and you get to make your grand exit. But big-wheeled fun machines aren’t just for child’s play anymore –mobile pop-ups, or fashion trucks, are rolling all over the country, paving a path in Indianapolis and parking in your hood. In 1999, Vacant, a Los Angeles-based company, explored an unconventional retail concept. They opened up the very first pop-up store in the U.S. Inspired by Japanese consumer culture and the market for exclusive merchandise, Vacant’s founders stocked their store with limited edition apparel, shoes, and accessories. Then, once emptied of its last remaining stock, the depleted store would close its doors, move on, and “pop-up,” renewed and refilled, in a new location. Of course, temporary retail shops are nothing new. For the past decade, we’ve seen these types of retailers become commonplace nationwide, usually in the form of seasonal stores hawking fireworks, Halloween costumes, and specialty meats. Yet, more and more fashion retailers are making the transition from brick-and-mortar shops to brakes-andmotor venues. Taking a cue from the food truck phenomenon, designers, local boutique owners, and trailblazing trendsetters are among the small handful of emerging mobile fashion merchants who are making strides to restructure the retail industry nationwide. From big name brands like Jay-Z’s tricked-out trailer showcasing his Rocawear clothing line, to small local retailers hawking vintage wares from campers, mobile boutiques are taking to the streets with hopes of feeding fashion palettes and gaining some neighborhood street cred. A quick search of Instagram or Twitter for #fashiontrucks yields filtered images of gutted industrial vans, camper trailers, buses, and delivery trucks turned groovy boutiques on wheels. Retailers announce flash sales and current locations, hoping to draw a crowd. For local fashion truck owner Heather Pirowski, social media serves as the main marketing tactic for her traveling 1978 bus-turned-shop: Retro 101. “This is all about connecting the dots for me,” Pirowski said. “Facebook and Twitter are the easiest way to let people know where I’ll be rolling up to next, but for my customers who aren’t on Twitter, email is the best way to communicate.” The idea for Pirowski’s price-driven apparel, accessory, and novelty mobile shop came to her after a few drinks and a Craigslist search in July 2012. “I had just done a pop-up in City Market, and I love food trucks, so I thought why not combine them?” said Pirowski. “My girlfriends and husband were like, what? But I still drove to Ohio to pick up my bus for $1,200.” After a hellacious return trip that included a stop at a cow farm to replace dry-rotted tires and multiple breakdowns, which conspired to turn the two hour trip into a five hour odyssey, the Retro 101 bus was on its way to showcasing nostalgic candy cigarettes, and trendy chevron ponchos, and locally made jewelry. The Retro 101 bus makes stops all over the Indianapolis area, and plans to roll year round – even in Indiana’s frigid winter. With a sales and marketing background, Pirowski uses her business savvy to turn a profit, but her best asset is her effervescent personality. Candid conversations with customers make for an enjoyable experience, and everyone soon forgets that they’re shopping on a small bus, bumping elbows with strangers. Reasonable price points and continuously updated inventory helps Retro 101 stay fresh and accessible to even the most casual shopper. Since the bus doesn’t exactly accomodate private dressing rooms, items like costume jewelry, apparel with flattering silhouettes, hats and scarves, make for easy impulse buys. Retro 101 isn’t the only fashion truck in town. Yessiree Petunia, a vintage shop on

MERCHANDISE: Affordable women’s apparel, locally-made accessories, and old school candies and toys. CUSTOMERS: Shoppers looking for affordable, on-the-move fashion and collectibles. PRICE RANGE: $3-$30 WEBSITE: shopretro101.com TWITTER: @ShopRetro101 FACEBOOK: facebook.com/shopRETRO101

wheels, brings Lesley Jean Saligoe’s Etsy store to the streets of Broad Ripple. During the warmer months, Saligoe can be spotted slinging vintage clothing and up-cycled jewelry and accessories from her pint-sized camper trailer, which she adoringly refers to as Matilda. For Saligoe, starting her mobile boutique was an inexpensive alternative to the steep overhead costs associated with brick-and-mortar retail locations. Like Pirowski, Saligoe took to searching Craigslist for her mobile boutique, and began filling it with unique vintage finds, ranging from $3 earrings to $60 dresses. Maintaining a low price-point has been crucial for her, stating that she “always wants vintage to be accessible.” “I don’t want people to feel overwhelmed by vintage. I don’t want people to feel like they have to do costumey looks—you can do one scarf, one ring, one handbag,” Saligoe said. “I like helping people find that one item that they didn’t even know they wanted or liked. That’s why I keep my prices down. I want it to be for anybody who’s interested.” For entrepreneurs such as Saligoe, having the freedom to meet the customers where they are has proved to be profit-worthy and allowed her to establish a number of dedicated return customers. With such a teeming local market, more mobile shops are bound to crop up in Indy. Converting a fixer-upper vehicle into a profitable fashion truck isn’t a simple or easy endeavor. So, if you’re considering getting behind the wheel of a mobile enterprise, make sure you’re prepared to get your hands greasy. 89


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TO GET STARTED, HEED THE ADVICE BELOW 1. Consider your brand identity; merchandise appropriately. 2. Brainstorm a fitting name. 3. Form your LLC and register it online. 4. Design a logo. 5. Start building a website. If the .com domain is available, purchase it. 6. Sign up for social media sites likeTwitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, YouTube, and any other social media sites where you can connect to potential customers. 7. Find your van, truck, trailer, or bus. Craigslist is a great place to kickoff your search. 8. Get your mobile unit repaired (tires, brakes, oil, windshield wipers, etc.). 9. Paint the vehicle and customize with your logo. 10. Register with the BMV and slap on your shiny new license plate. 11. Contact your insurance company and brief them on your new business plan in order to establish the appropriate coverage you’ll need to be protected on the road.

12. If needed, be sure to build a platform of stairs with a railing for customers to enter the shop. 13. Clear out the interior and decide what stays and what parts get renovated. 14. Figure out electricity and lighting in unit. 15. Decide on flooring, hash out your ideal interior design and pick out some wallpaper or interior paint. 16. Find clothing racks, hooks, rods and shelving to neatly showcase your merchandise. Remember, space will be tight! 17. Stock up your inventory. 18. Register with Square at SquareUp.com, and they’ll mail you a free mobile card reader so you’ll be able to accept credit cards with your iPhone, Android, or iPad. 19. Schedule a launch party, and spread the word via social media and word of mouth. 20. Search for local events, festivals, craft fairs, shows, etc., to set up shop. 21. Get the appropriate permit(s) needed to sell in different cities and zones, if needed. 22. Price all of your merchandise and load it up. ✂

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YESSIREE PETUNIA Lesley Saligoe, pictured below. For more information about the mobile retail business and how to start your own, check out the American Mobile Retail Association americanmobileretailassociation.blogspot.

YESSIREE PETUNIA AT A GLANCE OWNER/OPERATOR: Lesley Saligoe MERCHANDISE: Women’s vintage clothing, housewares, accessories, and up-cycled vintage jewelry. CUSTOMERS: Professional women, students, and locals. PRICE RANGE: $3- $60 WEBSITE: yessireepetunia.blogspot.com TWITTER: @YessireePetunia FACEBOOK: facebook.com/ yessireepetuniavintage SERVICES: “Matilida,” the vintage trailer, is available for rent for photoshoots and private events such as bridal showers, birthdays and ladies shopping night.  


As a member of the Sotheby’s International Realty network and a REALTORŽ representing unique properties for more than 7 years and $40 million in sales, I offer unrivaled access to qualified people and distinctive properties around the world and here at home. To market a home requires this uncommon knowledge and these resources. If you are approaching a decision about a current or future home, allow me to represent you.

Tina Smith French Interior by Josephine Trotter, used with permission.


TRENDS

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6. 16.

THE SARTORIAL CYCLIST

TEXT BY JANNEANE & BENJAMIN BLEVINS + PHOTOGRAPHY BY ESTHER BOSTON BICYCLE GARAGE INDY bgindy.com 4340 East 82nd Street
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1. Bontrager Crochet Glove in Black, $14.99 2. Brooks Saddle in Standard Honey, $119.99 3. Brooks Trouser Strap in Antique Brown, $29.99 4. SUGOi Lovebirds Jersey in Light Lotus, $64.99 5. Nutcase Street Sport Helmet in Pop Bullseye, $59.99 THE BIKE LINE thebikeline.com 6520 Cornell Avenue
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19. Showers Pass Club Shoe Cover, $30 20. Showers Pass Women’s Club Pro Jacket in Powder, $82.50 21. Showers Pass Hybrid ZipOff in Taupe, $90

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MICHAEL BRICKER. INNOVATOR-IN-CHIEF.

BENJAMIN BLEVINS TALKS WITH MICHAEL ABOUT PEOPLE FOR URBAN PROGRESS, DESIGNING UNIVERSES, AND LAUNCHING LOOKBOOKS FOR THEIR NEW LINES. TEXT BY BENJAMIN BLEVINS + PHOTOGRAPHS BY WIL FOSTER MICHAEL USES HIS KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERTISE IN ARCHItecture, design, and production to change the way we live through re-purposing unwanted materials, film-making and responsible fashion. BENJAMIN: Michael, can you tell us a little about your background? MICHAEL: I’m from Indianapolis, originally. I got my masters degree in architecture from the University of Texas in Austin, where I lived for about 6 years. BENJAMIN: You’ve had films at SXSW, the LA Film Festival, Sundance, the Indianapolis Film Fest—How did you first get into working on films? MICHAEL: I got into it accidentally. Austin has a pretty big film scene and I’d done design for theatre before and was curious about design for film, and just got really lucky. At the time, UT was making feature films, and they were pairing industry professionals with students, so I applied to be an intern and they hired me as the set designer. Then the production designer was fired and I was promoted to be the art director, so my first movie was as the art director on a half million dollar feature. I’ve been fortunate to continue working as the production designer on some really great projects that—like you said—have gone to places like SXSW and Sundance. BENJAMIN: Tell us a bit about how People for Urban Progress began... MICHAEL: I came back to Indy right after I graduated in 2008, and PUP started in the fall. I was actually living

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here and in Austin for about a year and a half. So I had a place in both cities, since I was teaching at the university there and PUP was just starting out and I actually had just finished doing a feature in Muncie, so I was kind of like all over the place. I remember driving on the highway and seeing the RCA Dome, and I knew it was coming down and kept wondering what that material was and what was going to happen to it. I started PUP with Maryanne , and we just kept asking questions, and found out there wasn’t really a plan for the material. So, we came up with one, and we took it to a couple of different organizations in the city that we thought could help us implement it. And, for better or worse, we came up empty-handed. So, we decided that if the materials were going to be saved then we were going to have to be the ones to do it. Then we started thinking about creating an organization that would be willing to take on similarly challenging urban projects. BENJAMIN: So you were starting PUP at the same time as you were living in Austin and Indianapolis, and designing and producing in both places, and teaching… Do you still do three or four things at once? MICHAEL: When I’m here, I’m here. But I’m constantly doing film work. Last year, I was gone almost six months out of the year doing film work. I’m not teaching currently, but in the last two years I’ve taught two courses—architectural theory and film production—at Wabash College. BENJAMIN: Is it common for people to study and practice architecture and film? MICHAEL: For what I do in film, it is. Because I’m designing sets and the universe of the movie which can include a lot of construction. A lot of production designers come from an architecture background.

BENJAMIN: Do you see the work that PUP is doing as sort of designing the architecture of Indianapolis, then? When you described your production work as “designing the universe of the film”—is PUP designing the universe of our city? MICHAEL: Yeah, I think so. I’ve always been interested, architecturally, in these projects that are either too small for firms to be interested in or too large for communities to feel like they can handle by themselves. So there’s a real need in that space, and I think that we’re doing our best to occupy that space (Or at least identify what some of those projects could be, and then connecting designers to those projects and to those communities). We’re serving as a link between communities and designers. Our use of the Bush Stadium seats at IndyGo bus stops is a good example: A traditional architecture firm isn’t going to be interested in putting more seats at bus stops, but the project still has to be designed and implemented the right way (and partnerships with organizations like IndyGo have to be made), and that’s something we’re willing to do. BENJAMIN: When you’re placing the Bush Stadium seats at bus stops, do you go directly through IndyGo? What does that relationship look like? MICHAEL: In that particular partnership, we hatched the idea with them and they’ve been really supportive. We placed the first set of four seats in December 2011. Then four more sets of four in November 2012, and there are 5 more that are getting installed this spring. Sponsors are interested because it’s an affordable way to visibly and practically improve the city. We’re really hoping to have 30 or 40 sets more installed by the end of the year. Which is amazing because there are 4,000 bus stops in the city, and, before we started, only 42 of them had a bench. So if we add 40 more, we’re essentially doubling the number.


look over the history of our product, we’ve really made an effort to move away from being “craft goods”, and toward a line that is made of more medium or high fashion wares. BENJAMIN: Absolutely. Especially looking at the panniers. When you look at that, you’re like “That is the sharpest looking bike gear I’ve ever seen!” MICHAEL: Yeah—we’re pumped about that one. We’ve also got a great new duffle bag that just launched. [The bag is composed of: Dome material shell, salvaged car seat belt straps, and Super Bowl material lining.] We’re constantly redesigning and upgrading our goods so that we can deliver a one-of-a-kind product that helps support the public good in Indianapolis BENJAMIN: Is there much demand for PUP’s products outside of the Midwest? BENJAMIN: You’re never replacing benches—you’re putting these in places that have nothing? MICHAEL: Both. The idea is: if there’s a bench there, then that bench gets moved to a new spot. So, even if one set of stadium seats is replacing a bench, we’re not reducing the number of benches. We like the idea of sponsors getting to pick where they want their bench to go. We’re trying to find a happy medium there. BENJAMIN: You’ve lived in a lot of different cities that have transit systems: Where do you see Indianapolis in that spectrum of urban transit? Or is it not even on the spectrum? MICHAEL: Probably not. I think that we can only be heading in the right direction. PUP has a great relationship with IndyGo, and we’ve really learned a lot from them. They really know what they’re doing and they’re fighting the good fight for transit in the city. I think they are ready and waiting for additional funding and support to help realize their vision. And we’re really excited about that. IndyGo has been working with IndyConnect for the past several years to make sure Indy develops a transit plan that sticks—one that addresses our serious needs but also provides contemporary solutions for how to fund and expand it. Currently, there’s a move away from light rail and towards bus rapid transit. I see people kind of bristle at that a little bit because people see light rail as flashier… BENJAMIN: And maybe having more cachet? MICHAEL: Exactly. But I think that the bus rapid transit could be a good approach: It’s more affordable; it could reach more people, more quickly; less infrastructure is required. I think Indianapolis could be one of the first cities in the country to implement a full-scale bus rapid transit system. Which could be really exciting, if it works. The city would be a model for other cities, and from there you could add light rail as you expand.

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MICHAEL: They do through Etsy and our website. We have one retailer in Grand Rapids, and just added shops in Boston and St. Louis. We’re hoping to expand further: I was fortunate enough to be able to present the product at Parson’s Design Boost in September. I was slightly apprehensive, because I was presenting PUP’s work at a fashion conference in New York City.… the theme for the event was “how can the fashion industry be more responsible.” They were using the word “intelligent”, which makes sense, but it was really more about being and creating responsibly. BENJAMIN: In a holistic sense of responsibility—so environmentally friendly and reusable? MICHAEL: Right. It was a great conference, but a lot of the speakers (there were 14 of us, I think) were either speaking about what was broken in the fashion industry or offering up hypothetical ideas about what to do about it. We were the only ones presenting “This is what we’re doing right now.” Which was pretty exciting, and the response was incredible, so we’re hoping to leverage that momentum to get a retailer in New York. What we’ve found with the product—that I’m really proud of—is that the design and quality is what gets people interested in buying it. The story is secondary. It makes it so that if you’re not from Indy, you’re still interested in buying it. If we’d done it the other way, then really we’d just selling a souvenir, you know? BENJAMIN: Yeah, you don’t want to sell sentimentality. MICHAEL: I think, for our generation, we’re interested in something that has a good story—something that’s upcycled or re-used. It matters less where, specifically, that came from, I think. BENJAMIN: I like that they don’t look up-cycled—there’s different connotations to up-cycled and reused—you know, where it needs to look frayed and tattered and beat to hell, whereas these are gorgeous.

approach. She’ll work with the designers, and they’ll talk about what products are or aren’t working, ensuring that the line always feels fresh (i.e. do we want to retire certain products? which ones do we want to create new?). We’re moving into a more traditional “fashion” approach, where we’re doing lookbooks and launching seasonal lines. We had a lookbook for the fall, and we’re doing one for the spring and fall this year. We’ve started to plan farther ahead, and Jessica’s been great about figuring out which products we want to add. Then, she either designs it herself or works with the designers (Christina Friedenson designed our pannier bag and Ray White designed our duffle bag). Then Jessica weighs in on it, and sometimes I’ll take a look as well. The only product that I designed and made myself was the messenger bag, and I’m in the process of re-designing and updating it. BENJAMIN: Moving into more fashion-centric ways of doing business, and also then combining that with Indy transit —how do you see those two mixing, or do you see them mixing at all? MICHAEL: They are mixing within our organization, and it’s not something that we set out to do. I think that we’ve only recently identified as an organization that uses fashion as a mechanism for community change. It’s how we’re funding the work. But, it’s also fundamental to our mission because we’re using materials that are of the city. We’re taking material out of the city, turning it into a product, and then selling that product so we can put it back out into the city in a different way. Which, to my knowledge, hasn’t been done much before (at least not in the way we’re doing it). In a way, the RCA Dome is the best example: we’re taking something that was part of the city for 25 years, shrinking it down in size—to a wallet, to a messenger bag, etc—and then the money made from that goes to help fund a shade structure that’s installed out in the community. And we’re doing similar things with the Bush Stadium seats, where some of them will be sold privately to help fund some of the bus stops. BENJAMIN: PUP has Dome products, Super Bowl products, and Bush Stadium seats - is there anywhere else that you source things from in the city? MICHAEL: No, not really—We don’t need it. We are picking up some banner material from the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. But we have to say no a lot because people often want to give us something… But if it doesn’t relate to the history or mythology of the city, then we generally just can’t do it. We’re not set up to just absorb everything because we’re not a recycling organization… in the traditional sense. BENJAMIN: Unrelated, but obligatory: do you happen to have a favorite spot to eat/drink/shop around the city?

MICHAEL: Right.

MICHAEL: I’m addicted to Bluebeard. I’m there a lot. I also like Imbibe, across the street.

BENJAMIN: What was the first product that PUP put out? Was it the Dome material line?

BENJAMIN: So, decisions on design—is that you? What kind of team do you have that makes the creative calls?

BENJAMIN: If you had to go buy clothes somewhere, as a guy in Indianapolis, do you go online?

MICHAEL: The first thing we made was a bi-fold wallet, followed by a clutch. And we had those two for a while, and then we added a messenger bag. Those have all since been redesigned—some of them more than once. If you

MICHAEL: It’s actually Jessica (Bricker’s twin sister and PUP Lead Product Designer). She oversees the entire product department—from design, to working with our artists and our retailers. We have a really collaborative

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BENJAMIN: So, no secret menswear spots? MICHAEL: No. I wish. ✂


OPENING FALL 2013 APARTMENTS + COMMERCIAL

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DRESS BY MOON AT LUCKY B BOUTIQUE. JEWELRY BY KENNETH JAY LANE AT SAKS. SHOES ARE MODELS OWN.

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HIGH GLOSS DRIVE BY SLEEK & SIMPLE OUTFITS SHIFT INTO HIGH GEAR WITH BOLD DETAILS.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JASON LAVENGOOD MAKEUP & HAIR BY ELLA HATTERY STYLING BY CHRISSY LAVENGOOD MODEL BROOKE, HELEN WELLS AGENCY SPECIAL THANKS TO INDYCAR: INDY RACING EXPERIENCE AND DALLARA 99


DRESS BY ARK & CO. AT LUCKY B BOUTIQUE. JEWELRY BY KENNETH JAY LANE AT SAKS.

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DRESS BY ARK & CO. AT LUCKY B BOUTIQUE. JEWELRY BY KENNETH JAY LANE AT SAKS.

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BLOUSE BY DIANE VON FURSTENBURG AT SAKS. PANT BY L’AGENCE AT 8FIFTEEN. JEWELRY BY KENNETH JAY LANE AT SAKS. SHOES ARE MODELS OWN.

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SHIRT BY SKIES ARE BLUE AND PANT BY MICKEY & JENNY, BOTH AT LUCKY B BOUTIQUE. JEWELRY BY KENNETH JAY LANE AT SAKS. SHOES ARE MODELS OWN.

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READY TO MOVE. UNION STATION: INTO THE FUTURE AS WE CULL THE BEST OF OUR PAST. TEXT BY TIFFANY BENEDICT BERKSON + PHOTOGRAPHY BY ESTHER BOSTON HOW OFTEN DO YOU APPEAR IN PUBLIC WITHOUT BEING DRESSED? HOW frequently do you arrive at your destination without the aid of timesaving transportation? For the vast majority of the local population, both answers hover somewhere between rarely and never. Twenty-first century city-street folk are always dressed and heading somewhere—and, typically, looking to do it quickly and easily. Whether it is done fashionably, of course, is debatable. Indianapolis was a typical 19th century city, brought into being in 1821. Carved from a forested plot of land, it became a stage upon which dreams would be realized, fortunes made and lost, and legends begun. After the general needs of the citizenry were met, resources and imagination would be devoted to desires, improvements, and embellishments. One such desire, mass transit, was quickly realized. Railways chugged into town in 1847. Six years later, Indianapolis established the first Union Station in the world, consolidating multiple train lines into one departure/arrival spot. Then came the booming Civil War era, which brought with it many more residents, and the city’s first street railway system. As to the city’s fashion-minded, one might either purchase fabrics and sewing notions from a dry goods dealer, or hire a seamstress. The last couple of decades of the 19th century would introduce long-loved Indianapolis department stores: L.S. Ayres, H.P. Wasson, L. Strauss, and William H. Block & Company. At some point, all of these stores fronted Washington Street—no doubt, in part, due to the traffic and prominence of being situated on the well-traveled National Road. It seems every successful brick and mortar business throughout time has understood the importance of “location, location, location.”    Why else would hotels have proliferated along Illinois Street, just beyond the doors of Union Station? Travelers sought rest between stops, just as daily visitors sought entertainments. No surprise, then, that when the Traction Terminal Building and Shed was installed, shops that targeted shorter-range travelers populated the immediate area. Market and Capitol Streets were the spigot through which thousands of out of town visitors poured. Block strategically relocated his department store to the corner of Market and Illinois streets, the first beacon of (white terra cotta) light for the fresh-offthe-interurban masses to discover, directly across from the Traction Terminal Building. Rink’s Cloak House, one of the first ladies-only department stores in the country, was also located within the same block of Illinois Street. The proximity of both shops to the city’s mass transit offered maximum potential impact on the masses.  Throughout the early decades of the 20th century, it was through the windows of these department stores that fashion trends were most often surveyed and interpreted. There were few magazines at that time. These elaborate window displays were a forerunner to social media, visually ushering observers into the present and future of fashion, to be digested and discussed. Those window displays introduced a tectonic shift in fashion: ready-towear garments. Eliminating the necessity of a seamstress, society would be irrevocably altered, just as it was by public transportation. The playing field was leveled; the lower and middle classes of Indianapolis now had access to fashions once consumed only by the upper class. As the automobile allowed for the increased development of the suburbs, and people fled from downtown, these once mighty windows lost their relevance. Displays that once forecasted the future became relics of the past. The era of buying one collective outfit became as confining as bus timetables. People no longer wanted to look like they were all headed to the same party; they came to value freedom and diversity in transit as much as in their manner of dress and lifestyle.  Today, each person broadcasts their individuality—reluctantly or emphatically—through their transportation, style, where they shop, and so much more. A city’s identity is evaluated similarly. So the question is: What does Indianapolis want to be? If the description includes world-class, inclusive, desirable, competitive, diverse, and innovative, then the restoration of mass transit is a must. It’s the city’s next groundbreaking event, hurtling us into the future as we cull the best of our past. What’s more fashionable than that? ✂ 104

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READY-TO-WEAR.

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NOUVELLE FEMME PHOTOGRAPHY BY ESTHER BOSTON STYLING BY KELLY KRUTHAUPT MAKEUP BY MORGAN WRIGHT HAIR BY PHILIP SALMON MODEL SYDNEY, WINGS MODEL MANAGEMENT EARRINGS BY ALLISON FORD. NECKLACE BY BROOKLYN CHARM. SWEATER IS STYLIST’S OWN. BELT AT NORDSTROM. SKIRT BY NIKKI BLAINE. SHOES ARE MODEL’S OWN.

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EARRINGS BY ALLISON FORD. BRACELET BY MARC BY MARC JACOBS. UNDERGARMENTS BY SWEET REVENGE. SKIRT BY CATOU COUTURE. BLOUSE, RING, STOCKINGS AND SHOES ARE STYLIST’S OWN.

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STUDD EARRINGS BY NUNU DESIGNS. SNAKE SKIN FLEX BRACELET BY ANNE KLEIN. FEATHER BROOCH AT NORDSTROM. DRESS BY CATOU COUTURE. JACKET BY THEORY. BOOTS ARE MODEL’S OWN. GLOVES ARE STYLIST’S OWN.

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DRESS BY CATOU COUTURE. EARRINGS BY KENNETH COLE AT TJ MAXX.


DRESS BY CATOU COUTURE. HAT BY ALLISON FORD. SHOES BY JEFFREY CAMPBELL. EARRINGS AND GLOVES ARE STYLIST’S OWN.

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AMP UP YOUR WARDROBE WITH HI-FRUCTOSE COLORS

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY WILLYUM BAULKEY STYLING ASSISTANT JAIMEE WALDO MAKEUP BY ANGIE GIBSON HAIR BY TARA WELCH MODELS PEYTON DREW, KATHERINE GULLING, CHASE AUSTIN GIRL. NUDE DRESS AND NEON PINK PANTS BY EIMAJ DESIGNS. BOY. PLAID SHIRT BY PAPER DENIM & CLOTH. BOWTIE BY EIMAJ DESIGNS. GLASSES ARE MODEL’S OWN.

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THIS PAGE GIRL. BANDEAU, JACKET, & SHORTS BY EIMAJ DESIGNS. BRASS KNUCKLE CLUTCH & THUNDERBOLT EARRINGS BY BULLET BOUTFITS. OPPOSITE PAGE GIRL. RETRO SWIMSUIT BY OFABZ SWIMWEAR. NECKLACE BY BULLET BOUTFITS. BOY. PLAID SHIRT BY PAPER DENIM & CLOTH. BOWTIE BY EIMAJ DESIGNS. GLASSES ARE MODEL’S OWN.

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GIRL BANDEAU, JACKET, & SHORTS BY EIMAJ DESIGNS. BRASS KNUCKLE CLUTCH & THUNDERBOLT EARRINGS BY BULLET BOUTFITS. BOY WHITE T-SHIRT BY AMERICAN APPAREL. JEANS BY EXPRESS. SUSPENDERS BY BULLET BOUTFITS. GIRL CORSET AND PANTS BY EIMAJ DESIGNS.

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OP -ED

Transforming Indy. “Two years ago, I never thought I would stay in Indy. Now, I don’t want to leave. Thank you, Pattern,” says recent DePauw graduate Maria Dickman, who has become an active participant and organizer of the community’s activities and growth. Yes, thank you, Pattern! I love this community. Individuals, organizations – and movements — like Pattern are transforming Indianapolis from a good city into a great city. I am amazed at the extraordinary things that people are doing here in Indianapolis. This passion and creativity are what inspired me during my nearly twenty years at Indianapolis Downtown, Inc. (IDI), and what inspires me now, during my current self-prescribed (and much treasured) time off. I count Pattern high on my list of what is working in this city. The achievements of this dedicated and growing team of talented volunteers exemplifies one of my favorite quotes from Margaret Mead: “Never doubt that a small team of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world”. As a longtime lover and practitioner of community development, I observe in Pattern the ingredients of authentic community organizing. Pattern is: Building Community. Fashion creators and consumers are joining together under the umbrella of Pattern. The numbers of like-minded individuals who are coming together are impressive and increasing dramatically: from 200 members just over a year ago to 600, now. This year, Pattern will reach out to engage students who are enrolled in relevant courses in more than six area universities and colleges. This effort is instrumental in keeping smart and educated talent here. Anyone and everyone is welcome. It’s free. It’s inclusive. It’s diverse. Working Together. Pattern members are committed to making Indianapolis a better place. They are putting their talents and time into action. Once a month, members come together in meetups to learn from each other, improve their businesses and brands, and offer their support and contacts. Acquaintances are becoming friendships, and silos are collapsing into collaborations. Telling the Story and Showcasing the Best of the Best. This group is aspirational. They keep an eye on the fashion capitals of New York, Paris and beyond – but are not intimidated. They are happy to display some of what makes Indianapolis shine via each beautiful, well-scripted issue of Pattern magazine. This issue is no exception. The world is taking note. The previous issue received more than 30,000 online reads from national and international viewers. No doubt, the next Vera Bradley or Finish Line will be featured. It is not coincidental that this issue focuses on transit. Both transit and Pattern are essential to the future well-being and vitality of our community. Transit is all about connections; that’s what Pattern does well. If you are already a member of Pattern, wonderful. Your talent and energy are what makes a difference. Please keep up the great work. If you are just learning about Pattern – welcome. Can you help? Always. Sign up (www.patternindy.com) and jump in. Spread the word. Share your time and talent. And most importantly, support the individuals, the organization and the movement.

TAMARA ZAHN

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CARSON PIRIE SCOTT ALDO BANANA REPUBLIC COACH EXPRESS FRANCESCA’S COLLECTIONS H&M LOFT LUCKY BRAND NINE WEST OAKLEY SOLSTICE SUNGLASS BOUTIQUE SUNGLASS HUT SWAROVSKI TALBOTS VICTORIA’S SECRET

49 W. MARYLAND ST., DOWNTOWN INDIANAPOLIS SHOPPING LINE 317.681.8000 ®


More than 20 million people visit Indianapolis annually, spending nearly $3.6 billion, generating $570 million in local and state taxes, and supporting 70,000 regional jobs. As a resident, you’re also an Indy Ambassador. Invite your friends and family to our city. Treat them to the pickle plate at Black Market. Buy them a Sun King Osiris. Take them to a show at Radio Radio. Post about it. Tweet about it. Share the Indy love. Turn your friends on to Indy and into visitors, because a thriving city benefits us all.

To plan your friends’ next visit, click on VisitIndy.com.

PATTERN Magazine Issue 3 SPRING 2013  

Please subscribe to our publication! https://checkout.subscriptiongenius.com/patternindy.com/ And follow us: Website: http://www.patternindy...

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