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HAUTE HISTORY: Fashion & Architecture on Strait Lane Dining with Paula Lambert Designed in Dallas


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Zanne Hochberg

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TOP: Lady P.K., 1999, oil on canvas 30 x 18, signed lower right: Z Hochberg BOTTOM: Grand Symphony, 1971, oil on canvas 66 x 77, signed upper left: Zanne Hochberg 71 RIGHT: Blue Jazz, 1983, oil on canvas 60 x 70, signed lower right: Z Hochberg 83

OPENING RECEPTION: Thursday, September 21 5:30 – 8:30 PM SHOW: Sept. 21– Oct. 21, 2017 The late Dallas abstract expressionist painter, Zanne Hochberg had a long career in painting. Recently in 2011, a one woman retrospective show for Zanne was held at the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts. Her work can be found in the collections of the DMA and the Blanton Museum of Art. Zanne was born in Rochester, NY. She moved to Dallas in 1953, earned her MFA at SMU and continued her painting career here with numerous exhibitions until her death in 2001. Her canvases are made up of colorful brush strokes, which create everything from unique organic shapes to human figuration. In a 2016 review, Dallas’ own Rick Bretell paralleled Zanne’s work to works by Joan Mitchell, Helen Frankenthaler and Lee Krasner.

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EDITOR’S NOTE

Portrait Tim Boole, Styling Jeanna Doyle, Stanley Korshak

August / September 2017

TERRI PROVENCAL Publisher / Editor in Chief

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Before the heat revved up this summer, we stepped inside the stylish structure on Strait Lane known as the Beck House. Designed by Philip Johnson, the grounds were especially lush in early July—a result of all the rainfall and meticulous tending of house manager Jeff Bogert. While there, we spent a day following Shayna Fontana who offered a new perspective on the much-celebrated manse by way of infrared photography. Stylist Carlos Alonso Parada juxtaposed the best of fall fashion beneath the scores of arches for which the home is known. Entirely photogenic, few could tire of pictures of this postmodern dwelling, so we invite you to take a look at some of ours in Over Arching Style. The $27.5 million-dollar manse is represented by Faisal Halum of Briggs Freeman Sotheby's International Realty. Dallas was leaving for summer vacation when a call came from contributor Peggy Levinson. Interior designer Dan Nelson had just completed a project on a Frank Welch-designed home recently purchased by Paula Lambert. She’s Mozzarella Company’s founder, of course, and creator of 30-some artisanal cheeses. Plus, her food-loving friends and fans enjoy her small group tours to Italy to experience cuisine and cooking classes through her second company Viagga Deliziozi. Days prior to a cruise from Venice to Rome, featuring the renowned cheesemaker and equally famed bestie Stephan Pyles, we found her quite settled into her new home prepping for a dinner party. With a 16-person guest list, which included longtime pals Jan Barbaglio, Jo Marie Lilly, Cheryl and Kevin Vogel, and new friends Dianne and Mark LaRoe among others, it was a special treat to observe the preparations and enjoy the spoils. Take a peek for yourself in Chez Paula. We do know the best design and architecture resources are found in North Texas. Thus, we continue our coverage with a project by Rolnick+Gordon Design who along with Bernbaum-Magadini Architects created a stunning residence for a Houston couple. Made in Dallas takes you inside the penthouse that brims with custom work from both Dallasbased firms, along with furnishings, fixtures, and art from the area. What happens to all those dollars raised for nonprofits during fundraising fêtes? Sometimes those important donations are not always visible going toward institutional costs, programming, and enrichment. That’s not the case for the Dallas Museum of Art. Monies donated from TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art translate to art acquisitions. In Keeping it Fresh, we highlight a selection of contemporary works acquired for the DMA over the event’s 18-year history. She’s photographed British royalty, American politicians, and an untold number of celebrities, architects, architecture, and artists for The Dallas Morning News and numerous magazines including Patron. This fall Nan Coulter’s work will be the subject of a solo show at The GossMichael Foundation. Lee Cullum previews in Nan Coulter: September 14, 2017, marking the date of the exhibition’s opening. In other season openings, this issue explores fall exhibitions coming to Webb Gallery, Cydonia, Galleri Urbane, and Kirk Hopper Fine Art. Brandon Kennedy checks out the Ukrainian Pavilion featuring Boris Mikhailov, curated by Dallas’s own Peter Doroshenko at Venice Biennale on view through November. Moving Cities: Dallas, an installation exhibiting still images and a short film by Jevan Chowdhury in partnership with VisitDallas, is currently on view at NorthPark Center before moving to the African American Museum. These shows, and much more encapsulated in Noted, present the top museum exhibitions, performances, and gallery openings in the region. Swing by for a visit. – Terri Provencal terri@patronmagazine.com; Instagram terri_provencal and patronmag


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CONTENTS 1

FEATURES 56 KEEPING IT FRESH Dallas Museum of Art adds to its holdings through TWO x TWO funds. By Danielle Avram 62 MADE IN DALLAS A Houston high-rise gets the North Texas treatment courtesy of Rolnick+Gordon Design. By Peggy Levinson 70 CHEZ PAULA The founder of the Mozzarella Company enjoys the camaraderie of her foodie friends. By Peggy Levinson 78 NAN COULTER: SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 Presidents, artists, architecture, pictures of pictures: an enduring photojournalist readies her fall exhibition at the Goss-Michael Foundation. By Lee Cullum 82 OVER ARCHING STYLE Designed by Philip Johnson, the legendary Beck House makes room for fall fashion. Photography by Shayna Fontana

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On the cover: Roberto Cavalli embroidered pink gown available at Roberto Cavalli, NorthPark Center; Zana Bayne rose choker. Alternate cover: The Beck House designed by Phillip Johnson; Akris cashmere coat photo printed with Rodney Graham’s Der Mantelanzieher, 2015. Photography by Shayna Fontana.

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ETRO

O U R S TO R E S AKR IS . ALEX ANDER MC QUEEN . ALICE + OLIVIA . ANNE FONTAINE . BALENCIAGA . BANDIER . BERETTA GALLERY BLUEMERCURY . BRUNELLO CUCINELLI . CAROLINA HERRER A . CÉLINE . CHANEL . CHR ISTIAN LOUBOUTIN CHR ISTOFLE . DIANE VON FURSTENBERG . DIOR . DIOR BEAUTY . ELLIS HILL . ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA . ESCADA . ETRO FENDI . GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI . HADLEIGH’S . HARRY WINSTON . HERMÈS . JAMES PERSE . JIMMY CHOO K IEHL’S SINCE 1851 . LEGGIADRO . LELA ROSE . LORO PIANA . MADISON . MARKET . PEEPER’S . R AG & BONE R ALPH LAUREN . ROBERTA ROLLER R ABBIT . SAINT LAURENT . ST. JOHN . ST. MICHAEL’S WOMAN’S EXCHANGE STELLA MC CARTNEY . THEORY . TOM FORD . TORY BURCH . TR INA TURK . TTH FORTY FIVE TEN . VINCE . WILLIAM NOBLE PA R T I A L L I S T I N G

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CONTENTS 2

DEPARTMENTS 6 Editor’s Note 12 Contributors 24 Noted Top arts and culture chatter. By Anthony Falcon Of Note 36 SILVER SERVICE Time-honored event supports the DMA’s Decorative Arts Acquisition Endowment Fund. Openings 38 PICTURESQUE PLACES September brings a new exhibition season to area art galleries. By Steve Carter Fair Trade 42 THE SUMMER OF BORIS MIKHAILOV Dallas Art Fair explores Parliament at the Ukrainian Pavilion of the Venice Biennale and Yesterday’s Sandwich at Art Basel. By Brandon Kennedy

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Studio 44 MARJORIE SCHWARZ’S ABSTRACT IMPULSE A Dallas-based artist paints because she must. By Justine Ludwig Space 46 PALATIAL REFLECTIONS Celia Rogge’s photography finds a new home in Texas through Jan Showers. By Terri Provencal 48 DREAM WEAVES Carol Piper carefully curates a selection of unique rugs and vintage textiles. By Peggy Levinson 50 A SALON TO SWOON FOR Joslyn Taylor and Samantha Sano tapped Lucia Simek to curate the art for The French Room’s antechamber. By Nancy Cohen Israel

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Celluloid 52 MOVERS AND SHAKERS Jevan Chowdhury loves things that move—cars, trains, people, and dancers. By Terri Provencal Crusader 54 CULTURED COUNTDOWN amfAR’s accelerated HIV/AIDS research finds advocacy through TWO x TWO. By Kat Herriman There 91 CAMERAS COVERING CULTURAL EVENTS Furthermore ... 96 SPACE INVADERS John Riepenhoff and Ryan Wallace collaborate on a site-specific installation at the Elaine de Kooning House. By Chris Byrne

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CONTRIBUTORS

DANIELLE AVRAM Dallas-based curator and writer, Avram is currently the Texas Woman’s University’s Gallery Director. She has also held positions at Southern Methodist University, The Power Station, and The Pinnell Collection in Dallas and The High Museum of Art in Atlanta. She has an MFA from the School of The Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts University and a BA from UTD. In Keeping it Fresh she discusses the Dallas Museum of Art’s acquisitions made through TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art funds. CHRIS BYRNE Chris Byrne is the author of the graphic novel project The Magician (Marquand Books, 2013) as well as the book The Original Print (Guild Publishing, 2002). He is Co-Chair of Art21's Contemporary Council and serves on the Dallas Contemporary’s board of directors, the American Folk Art Museum’s Council for the Study of Art Brut and the Self-Taught, and the VisitDallas Cultural Tourism Committee. He is the co-founder of the Dallas Art Fair and was formerly Chairman of the Board of the American Visionary Art Museum.

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NANCY COHEN ISRAEL A Dallas-based art historian and writer, in addition to being a regular contributor to Patron, Israel’s work has appeared nationally in art ltd. and Lilith. As a long-time fan of tea at The Adolphus, she was thrilled to write about the hotel’s new French Room Salon. She looks forward to whiling away many hours there, enjoying interesting conversation while surrounded by the work of many talented Texas artists.

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STEVE CARTER As fall approaches, arts writer Steve Carter turns his attention to openings in four area galleries: Dallas’s Galleri Urbane and Kirk Hopper Fine Art, Waxahachie’s Webb Gallery, and Fort Worth’s Cydonia. It’s a telling cross-section of the many September openings, as Carter enthuses, “Sidney Mullis and Melinda Laszczynski at Galleri Urbane, Bryan Florentin and Floyd Newsum at Kirk Hopper, Esther Pearl Watson at Webb Gallery, and a collective show at Cydonia— these are wonderfully stimulating, diverse shows.”

COLLEEN DUFFLEY Twenty-five years of globetrotting to photograph people, places, and things made Colleen the obvious choice to capture the essence of a dinner party at Paula Lambert’s home as she cooked and entertained with many friends including Stephan Pyles. A lighting expert, Duffley has worked with Lambert—author, entrepreneur, cheesemaker, and the founder of the Mozzarella Company—for many years both commercially and personally.

LAUREN CHRISTENSEN With more than 19 years of experience in advertising and marketing, Lauren consults with clients in art, real estate, fashion, and publishing through L. Christensen Marketing & Design. She serves on the boards of the Christensen Family Foundation and Helping Our Heroes. Her clean, contemporary aesthetic and generous spirit make Lauren the perfect choice to art direct Patron.

SHAYNA FONTANA From the windy streets of Chicago, Shayna Fontana is a fashion and interiors photographer based in Dallas with her husband Rand Horowitz and toddler, Oliver. She has photographed fashion and homes for Patron and is equally talented and versed in each. In Over Arching Style she combined both her artistic passions to create an infrared fashion escapade at the legendary Beck House designed by Phillip Johnson.

LEE CULLUM Cullum is a Dallas journalist and a longtime friend and fan of Nan Coulter. “I have watched Nan's depth and range accelerate over the years and believe now she's on the verge of a new and significant breakthrough in her career. Her eye is unique, original, and utterly connected to America today. If you're struggling to fathom the world in which we navigate, see her fall show at The Goss-Michael Foundation. Enlightenment awaits you along with wonderment and delight.”

BRANDON KENNEDY Kennedy is an artist, curator, and writer living in Dallas. He is also the Director of Exhibitor Relations for the Dallas Art Fair, which will be celebrating its tenth edition in April of 2018. In addition to writing for Patron, he also contributes to Fine Books & Collections magazine and is an avid book collector. For this issue, he explores the exhibitions of artist Boris Mikhailov at the Ukrainian Pavilion of the Venice Biennale and two presentations of his work at Art Basel.

PEGGY LEVINSON Formerly a showroom owner in the Dallas Design Center and home magazine design and style editor, Levinson is a consultant and writes about the design industry in Dallas. In this issue, she shares a dinner party at the home of Mozzarella Company’s Paula Lambert in her Frank Welch home designed by Dan Nelson. In Made in Dallas, she writes about a penthouse in Houston designed by Bernbaum Magadini and Rolnick+Gordon design firm. She also visits with artist Carol Piper and her eponymous rug company in Dream Weaves.

JUSTINE LUDWIG Justine Ludwig is the Director of Exhibitions/Senior Curator at Dallas Contemporary. In recent years she has curated exhibitions at the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati, the Tuft University Art Gallery, and the Museum of Modern Art in Rio de Janeiro. Ludwig holds an MA in Global Arts from Goldsmiths University of London. In Abstract Impulse, she delves into the practice of Dallas artist Marjorie Schwarz.


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PUBLISHER | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Terri Provencal terri@patronmagazine.com ART DIRECTION Lauren Christensen DIGITAL MANAGER/PUBLISHING COORDINATOR Anthony Falcon COPY EDITOR Paul W. Conant PRODUCTION Michele McNutt EDITORIAL INTERN Madeline Montoya CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Danielle Avram Chris Byrne Steve Carter Nancy Cohen Israel Lee Cullum Kat Herriman Brandon Kennedy Peggy Levinson Justine Ludwig CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Bruno Shayna Fontana Kristina Bowman Thomas Garza Tamytha Cameron Robert Laprelle Nan Coulter Celia Rogge Jevan Chowdhury Kevin Tachman Daniel Driensky Walter Weissman Colleen Duffley James Wilson STYLISTS Brad Baker (Lighting) Carlos Alonso Parada Mary Sze ADVERTISING info@patronmagazine.com or by calling (214)642-1124 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM View Patron online @ patronmagazine.com REACH US info@patronmagazine.com SUBSCRIPTIONS www.patronmagazine.com One year $36/6 issues, two years $48/12 issues For international subscriptions add $12 for postage SOCIAL @patronmag

is published 6X per year by Patron, P.O. Box 12121, Dallas, Texas 75225. Copyright 2011, Patron. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without express written permission of the Publisher is strictly prohibited. Opinions expressed in editorial copy are those of experts consulted and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the editors, publisher or the policy of Patron. Unsolicited manuscripts and photographs should be sent to the address above and accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope for return. Publisher will take reasonable precaution with such materials but assumes no responsibility for their safety. Please allow up to two months for return of such materials.

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NOTED 04

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01 AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM A AM presents Fair Park Blues & Jazz Festival Sep. 3. The Souls of Black Folk and Facing the Rising Sun: Freedman’s Cemetery are ongoing at AAM. aamdallas.org 02 AMON CARTER MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART Nature/Culture explores the dichotomy reflective of how nature counterpoints and enlivens our built environment and the problematic use of the term, and its cousin “natural,” when applied to snapshots, portraits, and Native American cultures. Through Dec. 10. On view Aug. 12–Jan. 14, Archiving Eden displays the work of North Texas photographer Dornith Doherty on the planet’s botanical diversity. From Sep. 23–Feb. 11, Caught on Paper brings together more than thirty works from the Amon Carter’s permanent collection. The Polaroid Project: At the Intersection of Art and Technolog y continues through Sep. 3. Between the Lines: Gego as Printmaker remains on view through Aug. 6. Fluid Expressions: The Prints of Helen Frankenthaler highlights the artist’s prints, through Sep. 10. Abstract Texas: Midcentury Modern Painting runs through Oct. 8. Image: Dornith Doherty (b. 1957), Pycnantha, 2014, inkjet print, 2015 © Dornith Doherty, all rights reserved. Courtesy of Dornith Doherty; Holly Johnson Gallery, Dallas and Moody Gallery, Houston. cartermuseum.org 03 ANN & GABRIEL BARBIER-MUELLER MUSEUM An exciting exhibition examining crests and symbols of the warrior class and the powerful samurai clans that used them will continue at the museum. Lunchtime Talks 24

THE LATEST CULTURAL NEWS COVERING ALL ASPECTS OF THE ARTS IN NORTH TEXAS: NEW EXHIBITS, NEW PERFORMANCES, GALLERY OPENINGS, AND MORE.

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are every Thursday at 1 p.m. and Public Tours are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. samuraicollection.org 04 CROW COLLECTION OF ASIAN ART Hidden Nature: Sopheap Pich displays the Cambodian artist’s large-scale sculpture Rang Phnom Flower, through Jan. 7. Styled with Poise: Figures in Japanese Paintings and Prints features depictions of townspeople to Japanese heroines. Visualizing Afterlife, Paradise, and Earthly Spheres in Chinese Art explores three common themes found in art. Jade from the Ming and Qing dynasties showing in Sculpting Nature: Jade from the Collection. Fierce Loyalty: A Samurai Complete, features the art and culture of the Japanese samurai. Image: Sopheap Pich, Rang Phnom Flower, 2015, bamboo, rattan, metal wire, plywood, steel, metal bolts, 297.24 x 163.38 x 65.35 in. Courtesy of the artist, Tyler Rollins Fine Art, and the Crow Collection of Asian Art. crowcollection.org 05 DALLAS CONTEMPORARY What is left of me addresses political oppression and violence through largescale installations and collage-based works by Ambreen Butt. In Bara, Bara, Bara Pia Camil uses diverse media, to explore many different themes of art history, consumerism, and the Mexican landscape. Keer Tanchak personifies the idea of time travel through art history with Soft Orbit, a site-specific exhibit. All three exhibitions continue through Aug. 23. dallascontemporary.org

06 DALLAS HOLOCAUST MUSEUM The Survivor Speaker Series hosts speakers Aug. 6, 16, and 20. DHM will hold a Human Rights Panel Discussion: Fighting Hatred, on Aug. 1. Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in World War II is a special exhibit running Sep. 7–Jan. 26, featuring remarks from Flight Officer Robert T. McDaniel, former Tuskegee Airman; Mrs. Erma Platte, widow of Tuskegee Airmen instructor Captain Claude R. Platte; and Dr. Todd Moye, History Professor at UNT. dallasholocaustmuseum.org 07 DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART Experience the vision of designer Iris van Herpen in Transforming Fashion, through Aug. 20. Modern Opulence in Vienna: The Wittgenstein Vitrine is extended through Aug. 27. Visions of America: Three Centuries of Prints from the National Gallery of Art shows how America has been represented by artists, through Sep. 9. Mexican artist Minerva Cuevas will create a site-specific mural in the DMA’s first-level Concourse Gallery on view Sep. 2–Feb. 11. Waxed: Batik from Java shares a selection of Javanese batik, through Sep. 10. Multiple Selves: Portraits from Rembrandt to R ivera runs through Nov. 5. Shaken, Stirred, Styled: The Art of the Cocktail, runs through Nov. 12. Image: Claes Oldenburg, Profile Airflow, 1969, molded polyurethane over lithograph, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Gemini G.E.L. and the artist. dma.org 08 GEOMETRIC MADI MUSEUM Through Oct. 22, Biennial: Origins in Geometry recognizes emerging artists in geometric abstraction. Save the date for the Geometric


NOTED: VISUAL ARTS 16

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MADI Gala which takes place at Hall Arts on Sep. 15. geometricmadimuseum.org 09 GEORGE W. BUSH PRESIDENTIAL CENTER Portraits of Courage: A Commander in Chief’s Tribute to America’s Warriors uses sixty-six full-color portraits and a four-panel mural rendered by George W. Bush, through Oct. 1. bushcenter.org 10 KIMBELL ART MUSEUM A Modern Vision: European Masterworks from The Phillips Collection runs through Aug. 13. Casanova: The Seduction of Europe explores the 18th-century through the eyes of one of its most colorful characters, Giacomo Casanova, running Aug. 27–Dec. 31. Image: Swiss Oval Snuffbox with Miniature of Catherine the Great, c. 1775, gold and enamel, set with semi-precious gemstones, length 3.25 in. Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. kimbellart.org 11 LATINO CULTURAL CENTER The Trinity: Reflections of a River, the eighth edition of the Trinity River Photo contest, runs through Aug. 19. Cine de Oro features “A Todo Maquina” on Aug. 16 and “Sin Nombre” Sep. 20. This multidisciplinary arts center was founded for the preservation and promotion of Latino and Hispanic arts and culture. lcc.dallasculture.org 12 THE MAC The MAC is a nonprofit organization that stands as an advocate for creative freedom, offering the opportunity for experimentation and presentation of art in all disciplines. the-mac.org

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13 MEADOWS MUSEUM Opening Aug. 6, the Meadows presents Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form, inspired by Picasso’s work, Still Life in a Landscape, within the museum’s holdings, and other works such as Rivera’s Still Life with Gray Bowl. In Paris early in the 20th century, Diego Rivera accused Picasso of plagiarizing the foliage from one of Rivera’s own paintings. The exhibition explores how the “borrowing” of motifs is evident. Through Nov 5. From Sep. 17–Jan. 7, Zurbarán: Jacob and his Twelve Sons, Paintings from Auckland Castle describes Jacob’s blessings to each of his sons, the founders of the 12 tribes of Israel. meadowsmuseumdallas.org 14 MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORTH Doug Aitken: Electric Earth across multiple mediums, continues through Aug. 20 as does Highlights from the Permanent Collection, including work by Mark Bradford, George Baselitz, Phillip Guston, and more. Opening Sep. 23, Misty Keasler’s Haunt, 2015–2017 features thirteen themed haunted houses across America through 40-some images, through Nov. 26. Image: Misty Keasler, Kitchen, Terror on the Fox, Green Bay, WI, 2016. themodern.org 15 MUSEUM OF BIBLICAL ART Glassworks by artist Brad Abrams continue i n Traditions and Transitions, explor i ng life, death, faith, and the natural world. biblicalarts.org 16 NASHER SCULPTURE CENTER Roni Horn’s self-titled exhibition showcases eight cylindrical glass sculptures in the main

gallery. Also through Aug. 20, Foundations: Sculpture and Literature features selections from the Nasher Collection. 2D/3D runs through Oct. 1, presenting a conversation among sculpture, paintings, and works on paper by artists including Pablo Picasso, Willem de Kooning, Alberto Giacometti, Frank Stella, David Smith, and Claes Oldenburg, among others, that explores why 2D artists took up sculpture. Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony presents the artist’s distinctive, multimedia reworking of chanoyu, a traditional Japanese tea ceremony, from Sep. 16–Jan. 7. Image: Pablo Picasso, Flowers in a Vase ( Fleurs dans un vase), 1951–53, painted plaster, terracotta, and iron, 30.12 x 20.25 x 17.25 in., Raymond and Patsy Nasher Collection, Nasher Sculpture Center. nashersculpturecenter.org 17 PEROT MUSEUM Join the first Thursday Late Night at the Perot Museum on Aug. 3. Watch a 3D film in The Hoglund Foundation Theater. A National Geographic Experience: Dream Big 3D, Walking with Dinosaurs 3D, and Wild Africa 3D all screen through Sep. 4. Rediscover a lost civilization in the new temporary exhibition Maya: Hidden Worlds Revealed, through Sep. 4. Snore and Explore takes you behind the scenes for a sleepover at the Perot, Aug. 11 and Sep. 2. perotmuseum.org 18 TYLER MUSEUM OF ART Double Take: Works by Ed Blackburn will continue through Aug. 20. The exhibit Making a Splash continues through Sep. 17. The Tyler Museum of Art hosts monthly events including First Friday and Family Day. tylermuseum.org AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2017

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01 AMPHIBIAN The Bible: The Complete Word of God (abridged) returns for a second run through Aug. 13. Emily Heller, comedian and writer for Fox, NBC, HBO, and TBS, will perform Aug. 22– 26. Comedian Aparna Nancherla performs Aug. 28–Sep. 2. Baron Vaughn, the third comedian of the PHIB Comedy Series, onstage Sep. 4–9, is known for an act as energetic as it is intelligent with ramblings that reference pop culture. National Theater Live returns with Obsession directed by Ivan Van Hove, Sep. 6, followed by Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? on Sep. 13. Next up, Andrew Garfield (Hacksaw R idge) stars in Angels in America Part 1: Millennium Approaches by Tony Kushner, Sep. 27–30. amphibianstage.com 02 AT&T PERFORMING ARTS CENTER #hearhere continues with Fran Lebowitz on Aug. 1. ABBA The Concert brings the great pop phenom back to life on Aug. 19. Aug. 28 marks An Evening with Lyle Lovett, where t he Texas-based musician f uses elements of Americana, swing, jazz, folk, gospel, and blues in a convention-defying manner. Singer and actress Jennifer Hudson headlines CitySquare’s annual A Night to Remember on Sep. 9. Proclaimed one of the top 10 shows of the year, Fun Home comes to the Winspear Sep. 13–24. The Taj Mahal & Keb’ Mo’ Band sees Blues titans Taj Mahal and Keb’ Mo’ perform songs from their long-anticipated collaborative album TajMo, Sep. 20. Image: Taj Mahal and Keb’ Mo’. Photography by Jay Blakesberg. Courtesy of AT&T Performing Arts Center. attpac.org 03 BASS PERFORMANCE HALL Frank Farmer, former Secret Service agent turned bodyguard, is hired to protect superstar Rachel Marron from an unknown stalker. Each expects to be in charge in Bodyguard the Musical, Aug. 1–6. Beautiful, Sep. 12–17, tells the inspiring story of Carole 26

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King’s remarkable rise to stardom, from being part of a hit songwriting team with her husband Gerry Goffin, to her relationship with fellow writers and best friends Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann. basshall.com 04 CASA MAÑANA An exhilarating and riotous look at one of our nation’s founding fathers of the Democratic party, Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson reinvents the life of our seventh president, running Aug. 4–6. casamanana.org 05 DALLAS BLACK DANCE THEATRE Dallas Black Dance Theatre and DBDT: Encore will perform in Dallas DanceFest, Sep. 2–3. dbdt.com 06 DALLAS CHILDREN’S THEATER Goosebumps the Musical: Phantom of the Auditorium, features the haphazard detective work of “Scooby Doo” and the witty banter of “Glee.” The frighteningly fun musical based on the beloved Goosebumps series runs Sep. 22–Oct. 29. Image: Texas Ballet Theater, Beauty and the Beast. Photography by Steven Visneau. dct.org 07 THE DALLAS OPERA Mark your calendars for the 2017–2018 Season at the Dallas Opera. dallasopera.org 08 DALLAS SUMMER MUSICALS Mark your calendars for the 2017 DSM Gala, An Evening with Bernadette Peters, Nov. 4. dallassummermusicals.org 09 DALLAS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Experience the Oscar-winning hit, LA LA Land in Concert, in glorious HD with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra performing live Sep. 1–2. Jaap van Zweden conducts Mahler 5 from Sep. 14–17. Arguably the world’s greatest living cellist, Yo-Yo Ma joins the DSO for one night only to launch the Farewell Celebration Season and DSO Gala

and After Party for Jaap van Zweden, Sep. 16. Hilary Hahn plays the violin, Hannu Lintu conducts, and James Diaz performs on the Lay Family Concert Organ for Dvorak Violin Concerto Sep. 21–24. Beethoven’s blog Emperor Concerto will show Sep. 28–Oct. 1. mydso.com 10 DALLAS THEATER CENTER Through Aug. 6, the renegade hero infamous for redistributing wealth comes to life through Tony-nominated playwright Douglas Carter Beane in the world premiere, Hood: The Robin Hood Musical Adventure. Miller, Mississippi tells the story of one southern family that falls apart as the country attempts to come together during the Civil Rights Movement, showing Aug. 30–Oct. 1. dallastheatercenter.org 11 EISEMANN CENTER Four women at a lingerie sale have nothing in common but a black lace bra in Menopause the Musical, Aug. 2–6. Experience Rock-nRoll Heaven, paying tribute to music’s icons, Elvis Presley and Roy Orbison, Aug. 19. On Aug. 26, the Eisemann Center hosts the Rich-Tone Chorus Inc. Celebrating their 9th year, the Spectacular Senior Follies presents an all-new show, The Fabulous 50s, Sep. 14–17. The Off-Broadway gem, Men Are From Mars–Women Are From Venus LIVE!, offers a fusion of theater and stand-up, in a lighthearted comedy based on the New York Times #1 bestselling book by John Gray, Sep. 15–16. Chita & Tune: Two For The Road is a unique concert event on Sep. 22. Actor Max McLean brings to life one of the most engaging personalities in C.S. Lewis Onstage: The Most Reluctant Convert, Sep. 27–Oct. 7. eisemanncenter.com 12 KITCHEN DOG THEATER It is the mission of Kitchen Dog Theater to provide a place where questions of justice, morality, and human freedom can be explored. Kitchen Dog Theater


02 chooses plays that challenge our moral and social consciences and invite our audiences to be provoked, challenged, and amazed. kitchendogtheater.org 13 LYRIC STAGE After a 10-year break, the Dallas Divas are back in a big way performing with the Dallas Wind Symphony at the Meyerson Symphony Center, Sep. 29. lyricstage.org 14 MAJESTIC THEATER Wanderlust brings artists together for a beautiful evening of dance, Aug. 6. Christian Castro is the musical guest, Aug. 11. Aug. 12 features a screening of the fabled film, The Princess Bride, and behind-the-scenes stories with actor Cary “Dread Pirate Roberts” Elwes. AnimeFest educates the public about anime and the cultural aspects it surrounds, from Aug. 17–19. Musical group Michael Franti and Spearhead perform Aug. 23, followed by singer-songwriter Collin Hay Sep. 9. Ali Wong brings stand-up comedy on Sep. 16. Gov’t Mule performs songs from their newest album, Revolution Come…Revolution Go, Sep. 30. majestic.dallasculture.org 15 TACA The 50th Anniversary TACA Custom Auction Gala takes place at the Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek, Sep. 8. taca-arts.org 16 TEXAS BALLET THEATER A malevolent curse transforms a prince into a frightful beast until a magical red rose kindles a romance. TBT brings Beauty and the Beast to the stage Sep. 7–10 at the Winspear Opera House and concludes at Bass Performance Hall, Sep. 29–Oct. 1. texasballettheater.org 17 THEATRE THREE A present-day version of a classic Greek myth, The Minotaur is a contemporary take on love, honor, and human connection running Aug. 3–27. Darkly comic and heartbreakingly beautiful, Adding Machine, a musical adaptation of Elmer Rice’s incendiary 1923 play, tells the

THE RESIDENT

EXPERT ERIN MATHEWS direct 214.520.8300 emathews@mathews-nichols.com

MATHEWS-NICHOLS.COM

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2017

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NOTED: PERFORMING ARTS

ALL - NEW EXHIBIT

06 story of Mr. Zero, who after 25 years of service to his company, is replaced by a mechanical adding machine, Sep. 28–Oct. 22. theatre3dallas.com

PORTRAITS O F COURAGE A COMMANDER IN CHIEF’S TRIBUTE TO AMERICA’S WARRIORS

THROUGH OCTOBER 15, 2017 See a vibrant collection of oil paintings by President George W. Bush, and the stories of the warriors they represent, honoring the sacrifice and courage of America’s military servicemen and women.

For more information call 214 - 346 -1650 or visit bushcenter.org Located on the SMU campus in Dallas, Texas just off US Highway 75.

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18 TITAS MOMIX explores the mysterious creatures and cacti of the desert, Aug. 31 at the Winspear Opera House. Stunning dancers and Latino choreographers bring luscious choreography to the stage, Sep. 15–16 for Ballet Hispánico at the Dallas City Performance Hall. Image: TITAS Presents Ballet Hispánico; Gustavo Ramírez Sansano’s FLABBERGAST (c) Paula Lobo. titas.org 19 TURTLE CREEK CHORALE On Sep. 16, start Dallas Pride Week out right by attending After Dark. Benefiting the Turtle Creek Chorale, After Dark will be a party like no other featuring wine-tasting and dessertpairing stations for guests to enjoy. This one-of-a-kind cabaret show will feature your favorite local theater divas singing alongside talented members of the TCC. turtlecreekchorale.com 20 UNDERMAIN THEATRE So Go the Ghosts of all México Part Two, Sep. 9– Oct. 1, features two warring gangs in which the reins of power shift; the second play in this three-play cycle about the U.S./Mexico drug wars explores the extreme machismo of narcoculture as shown through a cast of all women. Written by Matthew Paul Olmos and directed by Undermain’s Katherine Owens. undermain.org 21 WATERTOWER THEATRE The regional premiere of Hit the Wall, running Jul. 28–Aug. 20, will take you back to the Stonewall Riots in New York’s Greenwich Village in 1969. Image: The cast of Hit The Wall at WaterTower Theatre. Photography by Karen Almond. watertowertheatre.org


NOTED: GALLERIES

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01 ALAN BARNES FINE ART Alan Barnes’s Summer Exhibition and Recent Acquisitions of fine 19 th- and 20 th-century European & American paintings runs through the end of Aug. alanbarnesfineart.com 02 ANDNOW At AndNow, located in the Dallas Design District, Eli Ping will return for a solo show in Sep. Image: Eli Ping, Aphakic, 2016, bronze, 16 x 12 x .75 in. andnow.biz 03 ARTSPACE111 Texas Sculpture Group’s Profusion in the Void runs through Aug. 26. TSG seeks to renew the identification among those who make, research, and enjoy contemporary sculpture. artspace111.com 04 BARRY WHISTLER GALLERY Ann Stautberg: Recent Photographs presents i m a g e r y f r om t he a r t i st ’s Hou st on neighborhood in her hand-colored blackand-white photographs. Count the Hours features a solo show for Ellen Frances Tuch man, present i ng 3D abst ract ions using her signature paper quillwork, Sep. 9–Oct. 14. Image: Ellen Francis Tuchman, Broken Hill, 2015, mixed media on Mylar, 25 x 38 in. barrywhistlergallery.com 05 BEATRICE M. HAGGERTY GALLERY Beatrice M. Haggerty Gallery enhances the cultural environment of students, faculty, and staff at the University of Dallas. udallas.edu/offices/artgallery 06 BEEFHAUS ART BEEF will host an exhibit featuring Dallas-based artists Cassandra Emswiler Burd and Lucia Simek opening Sep. 9. beefhaus.org 07 BIVINS GALLERY Bivins Gallery Group Show: Summer 2017 is on

04 view through Sep. 9. Bivins will showcase t he work of R ichard H ickam, t it led Expressions of Color, Sep. 16–Oct. 21. Image: Tom Holland, Miller’s Mound, 2009, epoxy on aluminum, 52 x 83.5 in. bivinsgallery.com 08 CADD 3rd Thursday Happy Hours will be held at Ro2 Art on Aug. 17 and Circuit 12 on Sep. 21. The 6th Annual Mystery Dinner, Eat Your Art Out on Sep. 23 benefits the CADD Scholarship Fund for a Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts graduating senior. caddallas.net 09 CARLYN GALERIE Carlyn Galerie has established itself as a nationally recognized store devoted to the sale of fine American art glass, clay, fiber, metals, and jewelry. carlyngalerie.com 10 CARNEAL SIMMONS CONTEMPORARY ART Unfolding the Process continues to feature works from Lindsey Dunnagan, Sherry Giryotas, Adreon Henry, Susan Lacky, Julia Ousley, Jen Pack, and Jen Rose through Sep. 2. Image: Jen Pack, High Condensation, 2017, fabric, thread, and wood, 24 x 109 x 4 in. carnealsimmons.com 11 CHRISTOPHER MARTIN GALLERY Paintings by Christopher H. Martin and sculptures by Michael Enn Sirvet continue to display at the Dallas gallery. Martin abstracts observations in nature employing his reverse-painting technique applied to the back of acrylic panels. Both examine an organic sense of existence. christophermartingallery.com 12 CIRCUIT 12 CONTEMPORARY Glimpse Through Liquid displays the work of Graham Caldwell based on imperfect, interconnected, organic systems that take the form of bone, plant tendrils, or blood vessels being gently pulled by gravity, using

glass. Aug. 5–Oct. 7. circuit12.com 13 CONDUIT GALLERY Cuerpo Está Aquí, Mi Cuerpo non Está Aquí is the 5th collaborative installation series by Guatemalan native Hellen Ascoli and Texan James Sullivan. Per Diem continues through Aug. 12. Maitri, an exhibit of new work by Matt Clark, opens Sep. 9 through Oct. 14. Image: Matt Clark, Raimiti #33, enamel on panel, 48 x 36 in. conduitgallery.com 14 CRAIGHEAD GREEN GALLERY Ne w Te xa s Ta l e nt i s a n a n nu a l ju r ie d exhibition that features emerging artists throughout the state. NTT runs Aug. 5–Sep. 2. September marks the 25th anniversary of Craighead Green. The gallery will also display the work of Denise Brown, Jay Maggio, and Joey Brock, Sep. 9–Oct. 7. craigheadgreen.com 15 CRIS WORLEY FINE ARTS Introductions runs through Aug. 22. The group show introduces the work of Marc Dennis, Adrian Esparza, Sherry Owens, and Robert Sagerman. CWFA will show new work by Trey Egan in Future Glow running from Sep. 9–Oct. 7. crisworley.com 16 CYDONIA Homecoming is a group show for Michael Dumontier, Micah Lexier, Trish Tillman, and Emi Winter, Sep. 9–Oct. 28. cydoniagallery.com 17 DADA The DADA Fall Gallery Walk takes place Sep. 9. dallasartdealers.org 18 DAVID DIKE FINE ART DDFA specializes in late 19th- and 20thcentury American and European works with an emphasis on the Texas Regionalists and Texas Landscape painters. A show for late abstract expressionist, Zanne Hochberg, opens Sep. 21 through Oct. 21. Hochberg AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2017

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NOTED: GALLERIES

Kittrell/Riffkind Art Glass Gallery ONE Of A Kind 27th Anniversary Show

02 received her MFA from SMU in the 70s and became a pioneer in the Texas Modernist movement. daviddike.com 19 ERIN CLULEY GALLERY SUMMER 2017, a group show of the gallery’s artists, closes Aug. 5. Sep. 9–Oct. 14, the gallery mounts a solo show of Alison Jardine’s work with an opening reception from 6–8 p.m. on Sep. 9. Jardine was featured in Patron’s Best of the Arts issue. erincluley.com

Susan Gott “The Couple”

20 FORT WORKS ARTS Aug. 2– Sep. 9, Ben Willis curates an interactive ex h ibit ion, Candy Man, i nspi red by t he game Candy Land. Sep. 13–Oct. 14, North Texas artist, Hillary Dohoney, will have her first solo show, adrift, combining realism and trompe l’oeil through her seascape paintings. Image: Ben Willis, Light Reading (detail), 2017, acrylic, glitter, resin, spray paint on panel, 12 x 12 in. fortworksart.com 21 FWADA Fort Worth Art Dealers Association organizes, funds, and hosts exhibits of noteworthy art. Take a stroll through area galleries, museums, and more on Fall Gallery Night, Sep. 9. fwada.com 22 GALERIE FRANK ELBAZ Galerie Frank Elbaz opens Mangelos, featuring the work of the late Croatian artist and founder of Gorgona Group, Julije Knifer, on Sep. 9. galeriefrankelbaz.com 23 GALLERIE NOIR T he work of Da l las-based photog rapher Steve Wrubel’s  Cactus series Desert Daze continues through Aug. Gallerie Noir’s 4th annual Shop. Sip. Rock. takes place 12–4 p.m. on Sep. 16. gallerienoir.com

4500 Sigma Rd. Dallas, Texas

n

972.239.7957

www.kittrellriffkind.com

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24 GALLERI URBANE The solo shows of David Wilburn and Irby Pace titled Queer the Material! Fortify the Domestic! Stone the Hegemony! and Temporary Forms of Continuity of Space continue through Aug. 25. Sep. 9 marks the opening of Sidney


Celebrating 50 Years in the Art Business!

Gerard Valtier

“Soiree Fille Musicale”

SOUTH WEST

GALLERY

4500 Sigma Rd. Dallas, TX 75244 972.960.8935

WWW.SWGALLERY.COM


NOTED: GALLERIES

20 Mullis: Preservation of Forgetting in Gallery One and Melinda Lacszyznski: A Hole A Pool A Moon in Gallery Two. galleriurbane.com 25 THE GOSS-MICHAEL FOUNDATION G-MF’s current artist in residence, Henry Swanson, is featured in Mad Festive through Aug. 10. Swanson’s work blends the worlds of the Masters and PopCulture. Dallas-based photojournalist Nan Coulter opens her solo show on Sep. 14. g-mf.org 26 HOLLY JOHNSON GALLERY Michelle Mackey: Doubletake exhibits new paintings by the Dallas/Brooklyn-based artist, through Aug. 19. Opening Sep. 9, Tommy Fitzpatrick: Crystal Cities displays the artist’s hybrid of abstraction and photorealism through Nov. 11. Image: Tommy Fitzpatrick, Crossvault, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 40 x 36 in. hollyjohnsongallery.com 27 JM GALLERY Father and son, Michael and Ron Heinlen, look for the hidden within the ordinary through their photography. Ron’s images capture mundane, ephemeral city scenes, but present a sense of the shared humanity. Michael finds beauty in ordinary and decayed forms, like the graceful lines and shadows of telephone wires or patterns of crumbling concrete. Aug. 5–Sep. 9. jmgallery.org 28 KIRK HOPPER FINE ART T X M X, a g roup ex h ibit ion feat u r i ng Dan iela Cavazos Madrigal, Analise Minjarez, and Sarita Westrup, continues through Aug. 15. On Aug. 19, Bryan Florentin opens a solo show on view through Sep. 23. Opening Sep. 30, The Things I See presents the work of Floyd Newsum. kirkhopperfineart.com 29 KITTRELL/RIFFKIND ART GLASS Kittrell/Riffkind features the native hand sculptures of Joe Hobbs, opening with a reception Aug. 12, 1–5 p.m. and continuing through Sep. 17. kittrellriffkind.com

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interior design + art

34 30 KRISTY STUBBS GALLERY Kristy Stubbs often brings notable artists to the U.S. from abroad. KSG offers museum-quality paintings and sculpture. stubbsgallery.com 31 LAURA RATHE FINE ART LRFA continues a group artist exhibition, closing Sep. 2, featuring distinctive new works by various gallery artists, including Gino Miles, Stallman, Meredith Pardue, and more. ZHUANG HONG YI: Chromatic Shift opens Sep. 9, blending elements of painting, collage, and sculpture into bold works. Through Oct. 7. laurarathe.com 32 LILIANA BLOCH GALLERY Letitia Huckaby’s 40 Acres Gumbo Ya Ya exhibit, Sep. 9– Oct. 7, is a poetic examination of a promise made by Union General William Sherman for agrarian reform to enslaved African American farmers. lilianablochgallery.com 33 LMB ART GLASS This Design District glass gallery features North American artists and focuses on quality and diversity, with pieces ranging from jewelry and gift items to freeform focal pieces. lmbartglass.com 34 LUMINARTÉ FINE ART GALLERY Simply Stated continues through Aug. 3. Opening Sep. 9, Geometric Investigations will feature Motte Thomas, Chun Hui Pak, and Scott Eakin who explore geometric queries, mirroring the patterns found in nature. Through Oct. 28. Image: Scott Eakin, Ghost of a Firefly, acrylic on panel, 36 x 36 in. luminartegallery.com 35 MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERIES Martin Lawrence Galleries specializes in paintings, sculpture, and limited-edition prints. A Robert Deyber show opens Sep. 7. martinlawrence.com 36 MARY TOMÁS GALLERY Creative Arts Center’s 2017 Annual Juried Membership Exhibit opens Aug. 5 along with R ADAR III, featuring select emerging artists. Through Sep. 2. SPACE & TIME introduces artists Don Parr, who utilizes pristine

Photography by Dan Piassick Katherine Houston, “Silver Spaces”, Acrylic on Acrylic

MARY ANNE SMILEY, RID, ASID maryannesmiley.com 214.522.0705

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2017

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NOTED: GALLERIES

LEA FISHER

Self-Portrait Zero | 3D Oil on Canvas | 30 x 24 in.

Self-Portrait Series

48 salvaged airplane parts, and Kenneth Schiano, who shapes his 2D-panel paintings with conceptual and architectural imagery. Sep. 9–Oct. 7. marytomasgallery.com 37 PHOTOGRAPHS DO NOT BEND Frida Kahlo: Photographic Portraits of Frida Kahlo and Sports & Leisure continue through Aug. 31. Bonnie & Clyde: The End presents photographs taken at the site of the demise of the bank robber couple. Cowboys, Cowgirls and Some Indians features photographs of the genre from John Stryker, John Langmore, and Edward S. Curtis from Sep. 9–Nov. 11. pdnbgallery.com

Self-Portrait 999.9 | 3D Oil on Canvas | 30 x 24 in.

38 THE POWER STATION Opening Aug. 26, PROXIMIDAD features the Dallas edition of the two-month-long self-directed residency and cultural exchange with artists Jeff Gibbons and Gabriel Rico and institutions The Power Station and Cerámica Suro Contemporenea in Guadalajara, México, resulting in two separate exhibits that ruminate on the exchange. powerstationdallas.com

SAMUEL LYNNE GALLERIES 1105 Dragon St. | Dallas, Texas 75207 www.SamuelLynne.com | 214.965.9027

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39 THE PUBLIC TRUST Exhibiting contemporary artwork by mid-career and emerging artists, the gallery’s program extends into publishing significant art publications, limited-edition prints, and multiples. trustthepublic.com 40 THE READING ROOM Recent TCU graduate Casey Leone’s extensive photo project related to the 1939 film of political comedy, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, will open on Sep. 9. thereadingroom-dallas.blogspot.com 41 RO2 ART CHAOS, Ro2’s 5th Annual Small Works Show, is on view along with Mary Jo Karimnia, Cups Are Emotion in the project room through Aug. 19. Aug. 26–Sep. 23, FRUIT EFFICIENCY: Chris Dreier and Gary Farrelly present the second iteration of FRUIT SOLUTIONS, which premiered in Berlin. The artists exhibit concurrently in A HARD PLACE at 500x, presented by UTD CentralTrak. At The


CONTEMPORARY ART

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42 ROUGHTON GALLERIES For more than 44 years, Roughton Galleries has been dedicated to the finest 19th- and 20th-century American and European paintings. roughtongalleries.com 43 RUSSELL TETHER FINE ART RTFA showcases the work of internationally recognized artists and selected artists from North America, and offers collection and estate management. russelltether.com 44 SAMUEL LYNNE GALLERIES Work by Lea Fisher, J.D. Miller, Phil Romano, and John Henry are in continual rotation and remain on view. Mark your calendars for a solo JD Miller exhibition opening Oct. 14 and a John Henry exhibition opening Nov. 18. samuellynne.com 45 SITE131 SITE131 opens the fall season with a group show, THE GRID: order in a disordered world, Sep. 9–Dec. 16. site131.com 46 SMINK Paperwork 2 includes work by Robert Szot, Margaret Fitzgerald, Paula Roland, Anne Fairchild, Thel, Dara Mark, Jerry Skibell, Diane McGregor, and Zach Rieke through Sep. 1. sminkinc.com

Artist Kenneth Schiano, detail: Cairn, dry pigment, wax on panel, 48.5 x 48 x 2 in.

Magnolia, Carol Trice: Short Stories is on view through Aug. 29 and Julia Trinh opens Aug. 31. Ro2art.com

47 SOUTHWEST GALLERY In their 50th Year Celebration, 50 artists will present 50 pieces of art (each 50 square in.) from manifold genres to honor the gallery’s milestone. Join the SWG family on Friday, Sep. 8 from 5–8 p.m. and Sat. from 10 a.m.–5 p.m. to meet gallery artists and enjoy food, tales, and fun that lasts the entire weekend. swgallery.com 48 TALLEY DUNN GALLERY Multiple Impressions features work by Peter Doig, Helen Frankenthaler, David Hockney, Alex Katz, Ellsworth Kelly, Beatriz Milhazes, Louise Nevelson, Richard

For current exhibits visit us at www.marytomasgallery.com 1110 Dragon Street | Dallas, TX 75207 | 214.727.5101 Hours: M-F 10-5, SAT 12-4 and by appointment

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2017

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OF NOTE

SILVER SERVICE

Time-honored event supports the DMA’s Decorative Arts Acquisition Endowment Fund.

Saturday, September 9, 2017 Opening Reception, 5-8PM

Artist in Attendance Exhibition on display through October 7, 2017

1130 Dragon St. Dallas, TX 75207 214.761.2000 LauraRathe.com

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The 25 th anniversary of the Silver Supper, an annual fundraiser benefiting the DMA’s Decorative Arts Acquisition Endowment Fund, takes place Friday, September 22 at the Dallas Museum of Art. Chaired by Rusty Duvall and Peggy Sewell, the annual black-tie dinner also honors the 75th anniversary of the Hoblitzelle Foundation.   Esther and Karl Hoblitzelle (she a Broadway starlet known as Esther Walker, he a vaudeville and motion picture entertainment pioneer) were passionate silver collectors from the 1930’s through the 1950’s, particularly of the high-rococo style. In 1987, the Hoblitzelle Foundation made a substantial gift of English and Irish silver to the DMA, including 550 pieces of silver as well as 47 paintings that contained 17th-century Italian and Dutch masters and works by 19th-century American artists.  The pivotal gift made the Dallas Museum of Art one of the most venerated collections of silver holdings stateside. The gift prompted a Silver Supper inspired by the Hoblitzelle parties to build interest among patrons for the museum’s decorative arts program. What began as a dinner attended by less than twenty people has grown into one of the DMA’s four signature fundraisers. This year the Covered Cup, designed by Paul de Lamerie, a 18th-century European silversmith, holds pride of place and will be on display at the event. Differing from English conservative smiths in their design aesthetic, de Lamerie trained in the French rococo aesthetic by his Huguenot father. Thus, many of England’s elite seeking rococo-style silver frequented de Lamerie’s atelier including Algernon Coote, 6th Earl of Mountrath (1684–1744), for whom de Lamerie made this piece. In commemoration of these two historic anniversaries, the Silver Supper 2017 is underwritten by the Hoblitzelle Foundation to ensure that all funds raised will go directly to support the DMA’s Decorative Arts Acquisition Endowment Fund. For more information regarding Silver Supper 2017, call 214.922.1800 or e-mail SilverSupper@dma.org. Image: Paul De Lamerie (British, 1688 - 1751), Covered Cup, 1742, silver, 15 x 9.36 x 6.75 in. Dallas Museum of Art, The Karl and Esther Hoblitzelle Collection, gift of the Hoblitzelle Foundation. P


NOTED: GALLERIES

10 Serra, Joel Shapiro, Frank Stella, and others through Aug. 5. Opening Aug. 26, This is Now will present new work by gallery artists through Oct. 7. talleydunn.com 49 VALLEY HOUSE GALLERY TREES: A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in. (Greek Proverb), is a group show on view Aug. 19–Sep. 16. Mary Vernon: Paintings celebrates the artist’s 50-year teaching career at SMU, Sep. 23–Oct. 28. Image: Alison Gildersleeve, The Sky Overhead, oil on canvas, 54 x 54 in. valleyhouse.com 50 WILLIAM CAMPBELL CONTEMPORARY ART Prints from Lococo Fine Art Publisher are on display through Aug. 5. Known for color-enhanced black-andwhite photographs on linen and large-scale sculpture, an exhibit for Bob Wade opens Sep. 9 in time for Fall Gallery Night. williamcampbellcontemporaryart.com AUCTIONS 01 DALLAS AUCTION GALLERY The Decorative Art Auction, Sep. 13, features works by Maxfield Parrish, Andy Warhol, Pablo Picasso, and Lui Liu. The auction includes antique English and Continental furniture, accessories, art glass, and silver collections. dallasauctiongallery.com 02 HERITAGE AUCTIONS Heritage will hold one of a series of regular onlineonly Prints and Multiples Auctions in Sep. Early bidding begins on Aug. 22, with a live online auction on Sep. 12. The auction will feature work by Jeff Koons, Shepard Fairey, KAWS, and others. The fall season of signature live auctions kicks off on Sep. 15 with Asian Art, followed by Fine and Decorative Arts, featuring the Gentleman Collector Sep. 22–24. ha.com/fineart

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2017

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BY STEVE CARTER

PICTURESQUE PLACES September brings a new exhibition season to area art galleries— Patron checks in with four.

W

ith autumn in the air, the art season gets underway. Naturally the galleries of North Texas mark the turning of the season with openings far and wide. Given our multitude of galleries, it’s impossible to make it to all of them. But an autumnal art road trip might be in order, and Patron previews four notable upcomings, at Dallas’s Galleri Urbane and Kirk Hopper Fine Art, Webb Gallery in Waxahachie, and Cydonia in Fort Worth. First stop is Monitor Street’s Galleri Urbane, with two solo exhibitions opening on September 9: Gallery One hosts Sidney Mullis: Preservation of Forgetting, and Gallery Two presents Melinda Laszczynski: A Hole A Pool A Moon. These mark the first Galleri Urbane solo exhibitions for each, and it’s a marvelous pairing. Sidney Mullis, based in State College, Pennsylvania, is known for her performance-based video works, sculptures, and interactive objects, but with Preservation of Forgetting, the focus is sculpture.

Top: Esther Pearl Watson, Granddad Gave Us His Old Truck, 2017, acrylic and foil on wood panel, 5 x 7 in. Courtesy of the artist and Webb Gallery. Below: Bryan Florentin, Accretion (bisected witch's hat), 2017, mixed media, 72 x 34 x 37 in. Courtesy of the artist and Kirk Hopper Fine Art.

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OPENINGS

Mullis’s timely art continues to be concerned with gender, desire, intimacy, and sexuality, and her abstract, abstruse works seduce viewers into her unique vision. The show’s title piece, Preservation of Forgetting (2017), is a towering kitchen sink of a conundrum. The artist’s materials list reads, “objects that I found, objects that I stole, objects that I needed to get rid of, sea salt, papier mâché, fabric, wax, wood (5 x 5 x 9’),” and there’s a comic absoluteness to the sculpture’s galumphing presence. Houston-based Melinda Laszczynski is a self-described “compulsive collector of things that have potential,” and her A Hole A Pool A Moon is evidence of that—her recent paintings, sculpture, and works on paper all show her singular hand. “Melinda’s is a very different aesthetic from Sidney’s,” gallerist Ree Willaford observes, “but they have this same process of layering and gluing and finding and adhering. I think it’s going to be a really nice balance between the two women—I’m excited.” On to Deep Ellum, where Kirk Hopper Fine Art has been casting its long shadow on Commerce Street since 2011. Accretion/Churn, a solo show by photography-based artist Bryan Florentin holds forth in the gallery from August 19 through September 23, followed by Floyd Newsum’s solo exhibition, The Things I See, running from September 30 through November 4. Historically, the fallibility of memory and the poetry of flux haunt Bryan Florentin’s creative vision. His work is steeped in contradictions—appearances versus realities, containers versus contents, and visual records of a scene versus later visual records

of the same scene, chronicling the collision of past, present, and future. This recent body of work involves photography-grounded pieces, and Accretion (bisected witch’s hat) is a large-scale mixed-material 3D piece. Houston’s Floyd Newsum, painter and printmaker, returns to KHFA with The Things I See, his second solo show there. Newsum is known for his stunning West African-infused palette, recurring symbology of fish, birds, kites, ladders, dogs, and the paradox of his guileless compositions. “It’s what I like about his work,” Kirk Hopper says. “It’s spontaneous and childlike.” But lurking beneath that surface guilelessness are larger issues, often ominous and unavoidable—politics, world events, the drift of cultural currency—swirling together with a stealthy, quiet urgency that demands viewer reckoning. Newsum’s epic After the Storm CNN is in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Heading south to Waxahachie, just off the square (literally and metaphorically), Webb Gallery is a one-of-a-kind destination. Outsider art, fraternal lodge art, carnival collectibles, antiques, and more, it’s a dizzying eye-feast. The gallery inhabits two floors of two 1902 storefronts, and the ambience is apt—it’s a congress of wonders, the elephants’ graveyard of folk art. The Webbs, Bruce and Julie, are the Wizards of Odd. September 17 marks the opening of BLACKHOLE BACKFIRE, a solo exhibition of work by Esther Pearl Watson, one of Webb Gallery’s most celebrated, and bestselling, artists; it runs

Melinda Laszczynski, Moon Skin, acrylic, spray paint, glitter, and paint skins on panel, 12 x 9 in.; Melinda Laszczynski, Disco Lemonade, acrylic, spray paint, and paint skins on panel, 14 x 11 in. Courtesy of the artist and Galleri Urbane.

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2017

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OPENINGS

Clockwise from top left: Trish Tillman, Waves and Tides, 2016, vinyl, wood, embellishments, 32 x 37 x 1 in. Courtesy of the artist and Cydonia Gallery. Floyd Newsum, The Run, 2005–2017, gouache, ink on paper, and Mylar, 12 x 10 in. Courtesy of the artist and Kirk Hopper Fine Art. Micah Lexier, 7 Pieces in 3 Versions, 2015, 21 laser-cut 16-gauge coldrolled steel on plinth, 26 x 26 x 8 in. Entire work consists of 21 separate parts, divided into seven piles, stacked three high. Courtesy of the artist and Cydonia Gallery.

through December 17. Watson’s art is autobiographically grounded, and the thumbprints of her unconventional upbringing and backstory are all over her work. “Half of her paintings are her real-life experiences,” Bruce Webb explains. “Some are about the fantasy flying saucers that her dad was always dreaming of, and then some are these pastoral scenes…she’s taken all of those ‘truth is stranger than fiction’ stories of her childhood, and that’s the fodder for her paintings. In a way, it’s partly a therapy for Esther Pearl.” One highlight of the exhibition will certainly be Watson’s enigmatic mural, Pasture Cows Crossing Indian Creek, Comanche, Texas (2014). The 10’ by 13’ painting was previously displayed in the atrium of the Amon Carter. The BLACKHOLE BACKFIRE opening on the 17th will also feature live music from Texas’s swing accordionista, Ginny Mac and company. From Waxahachie out 287 to Fort Worth, the road trip ends at Cydonia, one of the city’s newest art destinations. Gallerist Hanh Ho originally opened Cydonia in Dallas back in 2014, but moved the gallery to Fort Worth earlier this year. The space is comprised of two galleries, each with its own unique character, but the sleek, inviting, contemporary feel knits them together.

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Homecoming, a collective show, opens on September 9, featuring works from four artists: Canadians Micah Lexier and Michael Dumontier, New Jersey-based Emi Winter, and New Yorker Trish Tillman. It’s a diverse group, but the thematic underpinning makes for a compelling show. “The idea of home is so powerful,” Hanh Ho observes, “and I think some people equate the idea of home with the idea of love. With Homecoming, there’s this idea of renewal and return.” Ho notes that Toronto-based Micah Lexier has attained hero status in Canada, influencing a generation of artists. His unpretentious moorings are evident in the video projection and 2D and 3D works here. “Artist’s artist,” Michael Dumontier’s minimalist pieces have a primitive poetic purity that engages imaginations. Trish Tillman’s wall-mounted sculptural works have a totemic aspect, her choice of materials so subjectively personal as to suggest self-portrait. And Emi Winter is American by way of Oaxaca, raised there by her anthropologist parents. Her two woven rugs fuse pre-Columbian tradition with abstract elements, reinforcing the timeless, seasonal resonance of homecoming. P


BY BRANDON KENNEDY

The Summer of BORIS MIKHAILOV Dallas Art Fair explores Parliament at the Ukrainian Pavilion of the Venice Biennale and Yesterday’s Sandwich at Art Basel.

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his past May, two mornings into my first trip to Venice, I zigzagged through damp cobblestone streets in the Cannaregio district in search of the Ukrainian Pavilion. Over yet another bridge and down the main drag through a gauntlet of produce carts, I took a left down a narrow alley and discovered an unassuming space transformed into Boris Mikhailov’s Parliament. Slanted clerestory windows draw overcast light down into the main gallery where ten large-scale unframed portraits and two smaller framed photographs of members of the German Parliament lay scrambled with horizontal interference. Taken from TV footage discussing the armed conflict in Eastern Ukraine, Berlin-based artist Boris Mikhailov discovered the potential compositions for this project while his wife, muse, and sometimes collaborator

Viktoria (Vita) adjusted the rabbit ears of their television during a broadcast. Entranced by the temporary digital breakdown of the bureaucrat’s otherwise controlled image, Boris reached for his camera and snapped intermittently while Vita continued to conduct the desired disruption. With only minimal retouching to edit out any text or other information, these serial images project questions of “post-truth” and appropriated media manipulation excised from their original context and medium. Perhaps owing to their modest and repetitive presentation here, they open larger conversations without being didactic or simply political, slowly revealing their sprawling query long after the initial viewing of the images is over. Within a series of smaller connected rooms at the rear of the building, there are a few smaller framed photos and several similar larger portraits scattered about. A mismatched pair initiates

Boris Mikhailov, Parliament, 2017. Installation view at Ukrainian Pavilion for the 57th Venice Biennale. Photo: zhuzhalka group. Courtesy of Dallas Contemporary

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FAIR TRADE

their own dialogue in a darker room where a glitch-laden sound installation by SVITER art-group & Ivan Svitlychnyi clicks and crashes, adding its aural complement to the visual distortion. A heavily disrupted framed abstraction rests against the far wall and is completely visible—yet completely undecipherable, even upon a closer inspection—through a room’s doorway. Reporters offer their microphones to dignitaries and the artist himself while cameras with mounted lights record their responses. Notable officials from The Ministry of Culture of Ukraine are present as well as the two co-curators from the Dallas Contemporary, Director Peter Doroshenko and Assistant Curator Lilia Kudelia. I have traveled to Venice for the opening celebration of this exhibition, alongside almost two dozen members of the Contemporary’s Board of Directors and numerous other staff members. Along with several of the board members and the galleries that represent the artist’s work, the Dallas Art Fair is also a sponsor of this ambitious project. The non-collecting museum has also been a beneficiary of the Dallas Art Fair’s Gala for the past several years, and being able to also support an exhibition that opens here on the world-stage that eventually travels to the Dallas Contemporary in September 2018, is a welcomed addition to their partnership. In the last room, a large industrial table rests against the wall with generous stacks of the exhibition catalogue at the ready. Wonderfully illustrated with photos by both the artist and his admirer, friend, and protégé Juergen Teller (designed in collaboration with DC’s Zacree Cobos), this artist’s book gives us a charming glimpse into the everyday life of Boris and Viktoria’s Berlin home and studio. Essays by the co-curators, artist friends, and a Ukrainian official round out the historical background and context of the works presented here, along with several full-page images of the works presented in the exhibition. Life and art are in a constant, leisurely conversation in this documentation of their domestic and working space: prototypes from the Parliament series rest in a grid on the floor ready for inspection, vodka is poured amidst a lunchtime spread while caviar toasts playfully become epaulets, numerous photographs from earlier series line the walls of their apartment and further the field, viewfinders are constantly consulted, Boris is photographed wearing an eye mask while clicking away, nudity is approached with nonchalance or humor, and everyone is wearing a smile. A casual photo of Boris and Vita in their living room graces the wraparound glossy covers, quite focused while consulting various technologies. Hovering just above the heaping table in the room here, a purposefully torn and folded photo of Boris keeps watch, administering eye drops while peering skyward. I briefly duck into the back and discover a nice spread of hors d’oeuvres, only to be called back to the entrance for the opening celebration. The Ukrainian national anthem is played, then several officials give brief statements regarding Boris’s work and the occasion itself, followed by the co-curators’ remarks and appreciation. The celebrated artist is quietly appreciative and smiling behind tinted glasses. Everyone applauds at the conclusion as a few more interviews materialize and the remainder of the guests head towards the reception outside.

With obligatory mid-morning vodka refreshment in hand, I cross the patio to examine and partake of the regional food being offered. I join Peter Doroshenko and adjunct curator Pedro Alonzo in conversation as they reveal that the food was blessed earlier by a local Rabbi who was originally from New Jersey, and that Boris was pleased by the gesture. A month later at Art Basel, I encounter a slide presentation of Mikhailov’s early work in the Unlimited section of the fair. In a darkened room, a collection of dozens of images entitled Yesterday’s Sandwich slowly cycle through on the wall. These images from the 60s and 70s were exhibited much later than the date of their creation, due to the sometimes provocative or public nature of the photographer’s gaze. Some simply show everyday life in the former Soviet Union while another memorable image presents a juxtaposed composition of a female nude with a peacock’s plumage radiating from her derrière. Upstairs in the booth of London’s Sprovieri Gallery, they have a solo presentation of the Ukrainian artist’s works spanning across several decades. There are a few small color prints made from Yesterday’s Sandwich as well as much larger hand-colored photographs from the early 1990s showing scenes of everyday life, albeit while tracking his subjects from behind or improvising an assembled triptych of weathered machinery and figures awash in greenish hues. Just beyond is a large vertical black-and-white architectural tower façade twisted and smeared into an almost total abstraction, punctured by power or railway lines and a shimmering ovoid of the moon or sun. It is torn from gravity and continuity, finding an image and context between the two. Finally, in the last two works, the smiling artist jester appears au natural in a repeated footnote of offset grids, channeling both Muybridge’s motion studies and an off-kilter fashion test proof sheet. Instead of wielding the latest hot accessories and fashion garments, a dildo and a small sword punctuate the ever-changing poses of the artist himself. They are somehow crudely classical, somewhat quizzical and terrifically absurd, leaving me with a smile and plenty more. P

The End of an Era, 1995, from the series Yesterday’s Sandwich, late 1960s–70s, installation view at Feature, Art Basel, 2017. Courtesy the artist and Sprovieri, London Photo © Sebastiano Pellion di Persano

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2017

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marjorie schwarz‘s abstract impulse A DALLAS-BASED ARTIST PAINTS BECAUSE SHE MUST.

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arjorie Schwarz begins her painting practice with a breath. A dedicated meditator, she understands the power of this action—as a measure of time and as a measure of life. This manner of working is a pledge to living in the present with committed focus. It is the guiding principle in her painting practice. Each brushstroke represents a breath. Made from countless brushstrokes built up over long periods of focus, Schwarz’s paintings appear infinite. The artist’s most recent works are driven by the desire to make abstract paintings. The medium-sized canvases are utterly engrossing. Easy to get lost in their structure and form, the works only truly reveal themselves through extended viewing. Schwarz explains that in abstract painting you do not need source material. It all comes from within. This is her brand of minimalism, as while the works are visually complex, they come from a place of mental restraint. Internal vibrations drive the paintings. Images are born

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from nothingness. Schwarz’s internal vibrations open windows to otherworldly landscapes—not unlike those from the imagination of Jodorowsky or a benevolent Giger or abandoned concrete Yugoslavian monuments. The resultant paintings are cryptic architectural manifestations rising from a mythic haze or sandstorm. Perhaps they are merely mirages. Alternatively, each canvas may be seen as a Rorschach test—speaking more to the psychology of the viewer than the artist. Rendered in the holographic rainbow tonalities of a gasoline spill, each painting gives similar illusions of iridescence. The composition manifests via misty veils of water-soluble oils. Built up painstakingly over months, the paintings exhibit smooth, pearlized surfaces. Schwarz attests to how the more you paint the harder the task becomes. Over time you become more aware of the legacy of painting and seek new modes of seeing and expression. This challenge is what draws her to the medium. She relishes in the


STUDIO

BY JUSTINE LUDWIG

Opposite, from left: Marjorie Schwarz, untitled, 2016, water soluble oil on canvas, 16 x 20 in.; blindspot, 2017, water soluble oil on canvas, 30 x 36 in. This page, from left: slowday, 2016, water soluble oil on canvas, 11 x 14 in.; nightblind, 2016, water soluble oil on canvas, 26 x 32 in.; blankets, 2011, water soluble oil on canvas, 16 x 20 in. All images courtesy of the artist.

impossibility of creating a truly great painting—striving for something that is constantly out of reach, just beyond her grasp. Schwarz refers to her objective as seeking truth. She strives for a moment embodied within a single gesture. When does each brushstroke and thus, each breath, come together in such a way that the painting reads as true? The impossibility of paintings in part comes from the fact that each one can be worked on forever. Beneath some of her newest works are past paintings that teetered on the edge of completion, but could not find their conclusion. The investment of time, like the buildup of sedimentation, adds the visual weight of the work. Even with the old work completely covered up, its presence is still felt. It is a form of ritual cannibalism, with the past painting consumed by the new, resultantly strengthening the final product. Past works primarily focus on flora and quotidian objects. Here Schwarz reconsiders the unconsidered. Folded shirts, rocks, and floral arrangements are all approached with the same rapt attention. These mundane subjects, through their depiction, are made sacred—worthy of deep attention. Employing her signature technique of slowly building up washes of pigment, the final results are faded and almost aqueous, as if they were being viewed through a shallow pool of water. Schwarz graduated from Southern Methodist University in

1999 and has remained in Dallas since. Her practice is private and restrained. She speaks about painting in a manner that is both frank and mystical. As such, it is not surprising that experiencing her work feels like glimpsing the inner sanctum of the human brain made physically manifest. In 2015 at The Goss-Michael Foundation, Schwarz exhibited thirty-five paintings of photographs. The source material is the artist’s family album—consisting of slightly off-kilter headshots and documentation of familial gatherings taken by the hand of an amateur photographer. The works are executed in ghostly washes of paint as if to imply that memories fade and photography is unable to capture moments as they truly were. The size of small books, these canvases are intimate objects that call for both conceptually and physically close reading. The paintings are snapshots, much like the photographs that inspired them—loose in composition and fleeting in subject matter. Schwarz did not make these works with a direct intent toward public consumption. Packed away, the series was coaxed out of hiding and put on view by former Goss-Michael Foundation Director and Curator, Michael Mazurek. Creating a massive body of work with no concern as to whether or not it will be exhibited is emblematic of Schwarz’s paint-as-breath coda. Like breathing in, she paints because she must. P

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2017

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SPACE

BY TERRI PROVENCAL PHOTOGRAPHY BY CELIA ROGGE

PALATIAL REFLECTIONS

CELIA ROGGE’S PHOTOGRAPHY FINDS A NEW HOME IN TEXAS THROUGH JAN SHOWERS.

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leven days prior to the vernal equinox, the opening of For Home Forty Five Ten was at the top of must-attend lists— though there were many events on that ninth evening of March. For Home, reinvented from the former Forty Five Ten boutique that had previously combined clothing and home accessories before moving to multi-storied accommodations on Main Street, ushered in an amped up furnishings component that made way for interiors vignettes by top-design minds: David Sutherland, George Cameron Nash, Allan Knight, Jan Barboglio, Emily Summers, and Jan Showers. For the opening of her space, the latter design doyenne installed a large photograph of an enfilade (defined in architecture as an axial

arrangement of doorways connecting a suite of rooms) or a “vista of doors” as elegantly described by Showers. The picture compelled all upon first glance to its seeming infinity. The work is by Celia Rogge, a fine art photographer who was in attendance that evening. Titled Neue Kammern Enfilade III, it was captured within adjoining rooms at Schloss Sanssouci (built between 1745–1747) in Potsdam, Germany outside Berlin. Both the work and the artist beguiled. Jan Showers who represents her exclusively in Texas said, “I rarely showcase artists, but Celia’s work spoke to me in a way I just could not resist.” Showers met Rogge at High Point following a party given by Kravat in the celebrated Dallas interior designer’s honor. “I stopped by to see my friend Alexa Hampton in her space and I couldn’t take

Above: Celia Rogge, Neue Kammern Enfilade III drew all within sight to Jan Showers's space at For Home. Opposite: Rogge captured Golden Glow outside her window in Manhattan's Upper West Side.

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my eyes off ten works on the wall. I was drawn to every single one of them, and her—Celia was there during market; she’s very engaging.” With architecture as a constant in her arsenal, Rogge says, “Berlin is a big playground for me.” German-born, based in Manhattan, she is the daughter of a German engineer, perhaps explaining her affinity for symmetry. For an entire year, ending this past March, German Ambassador to the U.S. Peter Wittig and his wife, Huberta von Voss-Wittig, exhibited images of her work from both New York and Berlin in Key Moments in Light and Structure within the Berlin Bar at their residence. The Wittigs fell in love with her work at the consulate in New York and “really liked the idea of bringing it to Germany.” These images appear in her enfilades tome, which features Neoclassical Palais Lichtenau Festsaa, “taken in the former home of my mother and her family (von Lüttwitz),” who resided there until the Russians approached during World War II before fleeing to her stepfather’s castle in Czechoslovakia. Palais Lichtenau remained in the family until 2007. Her oeuvre places an emphasis on small details that invite the viewer in. The enfilades of course, but light play, color, and reflections in glass on building exteriors also serve as muse. “Every season it always changes,” she says of architecture in New York and London. In a handheld device-era, many uppermost architectural details are neglected. “We’re so used to looking just to the top of our heads. Always look up. That’s my motto.” She enjoys working with glass facades. In St. Paul’s Rogge combines the old and the new where London’s St. Paul’s Cathedral is reflected and rendered as a portrait in the glass of a newer building. “I look at the outline of it. It’s not just a flat reflection. It’s just a different way of looking at things.” Rogge finds inspiration by just looking up or even out her own window as is the case in Golden Glow. “I was living in a building that overlooked this arch in the Upper West Side of Manhattan. It’s a bizarre thing and has no business being there.” Another series, Calliope, finds a blonde muse photographed in infrared, casting a silvery and platinum light on the picturesque places she inhabits. “She’s standing there in a vacuum with her own thought.” The work attracted Cindy Rachofsky, who will include a piece from this series in the TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art auction. Celia will return to Dallas for the event. “I’m looking forward to October, and I’ll definitely be coming with my camera.” P

Where the art of living meets the art we live with.

972-807-9255 1426 N Riverfront Blvd | Dallas, Texas 75207 www.guggenhome.com

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2017

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SPACE

BY PEGGY LEVINSON

DREAM WEAVES CAROL PIPER CAREFULLY CURATES A SELECTION OF UNIQUE RUGS AND VINTAGE TEXTILES.

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arol Piper’s lifelong passion for art and textiles led her from studying weaving after college to helping friends find the perfect rug. Portuguese needlepoint rugs were all the rage, and Piper was able to find and sell them from a corner of an antique store. Then she saw a need for Persian rugs and contacted wholesale dealers in New York. Now, she operates a thriving business dealing with the finest antique and decorative carpets. Carol sources rugs from Europe, the Middle East, and Asia, and she specializes in hard-to-find, unique, and extraordinary antique rugs. Piper’s partner Ryan Reitmeyer studied under rug scholars at Bard College in New York and worked at prestigious rug showrooms such as Michaelian and Kohlberg and Joseph Carini carpets. Carini is a graffiti artist whose rugs are sold exclusively at Carol Piper in this region. Houston artist Randy Twaddle wanted to make a rug from his Transformer art series in the late 1990s. Friends put him in touch with Piper, and they have been making rugs ever since, using a fine tapestry weave in order to render the sharply defined curves and lines of a charcoal drawing. Randy Twaddle was featured in a solo show titled Sham-A-Ling-Dong-Ding at Moody Gallery in Houston. Piper is currently talking to other artists about producing art rugs. Three years ago, the company started collecting antique and vintage textiles ranging from antique Japanese cloths to African prayer rugs to a vintage hand-painted textile by a fashion designer in the 1950s. Says Piper, “We are always trying to find or make the unique, the artistic, the different, and we don’t want to sell what’s down the street. For instance, vintage textiles are all the rage in the UK; I think it’s the next best thing coming across the pond.” We are betting she’s right. P

Top: Randy Twaddle textile installation at Moody Gallery in Houston. Bottom: Randy Twaddle Sprig Rug available through Carol Piper Rugs.

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Swoon, the50 studio designers Samantha Reitmeyer (left) and Josyln Taylor (right) with curator Lucia Simek at The Adolphus. PATRONMAGAZINE.COM


SPACE BY NANCY COHEN ISRAEL PHOTOGRAPHY BY SHAYNA FONTANA

A SALON TO SWOON FOR Design team Josyln Taylor and Samantha Sano tapped Lucia Simek to curate the art for The French Room’s antechamber.

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magine yourself relaxing in the living room of young art collectors, possibly European, surrounded by an eclectic collection of contemporary art. This fantasy no longer requires a transatlantic flight. The experience is now as close as the French Room Salon in the newly restored Adolphus Hotel. The salon is the brainchild of design team Samantha Sano and Josyln Taylor of SWOON, the Studio. “The big, overarching idea we had was that this hotel would feel residential in nature,” Taylor explains. The creative duo called upon artist and curator Lucia Simek to fulfill this vision. Several elements served as the basis for their discussions. All three agreed on the residential nature of the area, which serves as a transitional space between the French Room Bar and The French Room. They wanted to honor the hotel’s illustrious past and its aspirational nods to France while at the same time rooting it in local culture. Napoleon Bonaparte provided the unlikely inspiration for Simek’s approach. In looking through the hotel’s collection, she found a 19th-century portrait of the emperor, dressed in his coronation robes, which had been acquired by the Adolph Busch family. It is one of several versions painted by his court artist François Gerard and one that Napoleon favored over those painted by the betterknown Jacques Louis David. “Napoleon’s striving for power and honor, and his brilliant innovations which ran alongside his foibles, could be seen as analogous to the way Dallas has positioned itself as a city. In the Salon, I wanted to reference the decadence of his era, as well as his mission to build an empire,” says Simek. Working within a limited budget, Simek amassed a collection of works on paper, paintings, and sculpture that features the work of over 30 artists in a variety of media and styles. Installed salon style, the curation offers a broad cross-section of Texas artists. “The work is breaking stereotypes about Texas, since the majority of visitors won’t be from Dallas. They are operating under the suppositions of what art would be like in Texas,” Simek says.  The image of Texas that fuels the imaginations of visitors still finds a place among work installed. The folk-art-inspired, backwardlooking horse in Bruce Lee Webb’s This Town could be a metaphor for this metropolis that prides itself on its cowboy roots. Plaster Studio Photo, a photograph by Bill Wood, also gives historical context to this area. From 1937 until 1973, the Bill Wood Photo Company was the go-to place for photographers in Fort Worth. Wood’s photographs were rediscovered by Diane Keaton who eventually co-organized an exhibition of his work at the International Center of Photography in New York. Simek found this print in a trove of his work that she spotted on eBay.  Geometry and structure also guided many curatorial decisions. Work by artists such as Joan Winter, Travis LaMothe, and the late John Wilcox exemplify this in black-and-white simplicity. The work of Cassandra Emswiler Burd, Leslie Wilkes, and Pamela Nelson

provide colorful geometric counterparts. “I wanted there to be a narrative of building a place that came out of nowhere,” Simek says. This train of thought extends from the newly conceived space and its collection to the city of Dallas itself. “I wanted to include artists from here who have roots here but have moved on and done well,” she adds. Myron Stout is a prime example of this. The midcentury Denton-born painter moved to New York where he studied with Hans Hofmann before moving to Provincetown, Massachusetts. The Museum of Modern Art is one of the many institutions that own his work. Since the French Room Salon is the antechamber to The French Room, it only seems natural to pay homage to France. “We are playing with the idea of luxury and wealth and the aspirational aspects of things French,” Simek explains. Faune et Fleur du Texas, an Hermès scarf designed by Kermit Oliver, is the ultimate fusion of the two places. Keer Tanchak’s small, elegant portrait finds its inspiration in 18th-century French miniature painting. It’s title, Ready to Kick Ass, could be the motto of Adolphus Busch and the business community of Dallas’s early days.  The SWOON team also took into consideration the importance of past generations who built the city. With the legendary Neiman Marcus a block away, they wanted the hotel to stay connected to the early glory of downtown. Taylor says, “Stanley Marcus was definitely one of our muses. It was the spirit of the aesthetic of this dapper cultured man” that inspired them. “It was important to include Allison Smith in the collection to connect to Neiman Marcus,” Sano adds. Smith, a renowned photographer in her own right, is the granddaughter of Marcus. “My photograph Nonesuch was made in Maine at my parents’ home. Their home was called Nonesuch Farm and named after my grandparents’ home on Nonesuch Road in Dallas,” Smith explains.  Ultimately, Simek says, “I was looking for a dynamic smattering of work to keep it visually interesting.” To that end, she also wanted to include the elegant work of Linnea Glatt, Linda Ridgway, and Francisco Moreno.   Taylor and Sano had a simple goal. “For us, The Adolphus is such a special place. The challenge was to honor a history but at the same time make it fresh for a new generation,” says Taylor. Sano adds, “So many people were afraid of what we were going to do with it.” Skeptics needn’t worry. Plans are afoot to make the space a destination event even for locals. It is an ideal venue for intimate gatherings that will allow it to be a salon in the traditional sense, but for a contemporary crowd. Simek hopes that it will bring conversations of art and culture into a more relaxed arena. Surrounded by art while enjoying delicacies from the famed dining room, the French Room Salon should help write the next chapter of the cultural history of Dallas. P

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2017

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CELLULOID

BY TERRI PROVENCAL PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEVAN CHOWDHURY

Movers and Shakers

Jevan Chowdhury loves things that move—cars, trains, people, and dancers.

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ometimes a transatlantic email lands in the right inbox the first time as was the case for Jevan Chowdhury. The British director emailed a query to Jane Robertson, Director of Cultural Tourism at VisitDallas, and she responded… immediately. Chowdhury wanted to continue work on his Moving Cities film project, which began in London in 2014 and only included European cities at that point. He needed her help to slate something in Dallas as the first American city. Its impetus—filming transportation and dance in its myriad forms within the context of the city—inspired Robertson, prompting her response: “Your tourism work is so interesting and a perfect partner for VisitDallas.”

Top: Olga Pavlova, Deep Elllum; Bottom: (left) Claude Alexander III and Kimara Wood, Dallas Black Dance Theatre, Deep Ellum; (right) Nycole Ray, Fair Park. All photography by Jevan Chowdhury taken August 31, 2016.

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Her initial enthusiasm, a great deal of legwork, and tapping the right steering committee, evolved into Moving Dallas, an 8-minute film combining international performers with transportation and city life. The timing was perfect. The Dallas Convention and Visitor’s Bureau would be “announcing their new identity” and released the video on December 1, 2016, to coincide with the name change to VisitDallas. “It was a wonderful way to expose our new name and what we are doing,” she enthused. The filmmaker describes Moving Cities as “a collection of individual portraits of each city and trying to explain the relationship between the movement of the city—the cars, the trains, the people, and the dancers. I’m curious about people, their identity, and how they move.” In addition to film, Chowdury produces commercials, branding, and animation as Director of Wind & Foster, a Londonbased creative studio he founded. “I was born in London and I’ve always felt it’s very machinelike; it’s very mechanized because there’s nine million people that live there, and they have to go to work every day,” Chowdhury explained. “We have the cheap underground system and bus system and it’s a miracle that it all works. We are all a part of those machines. Dropping a dancer into that zombie land is interesting because the dancer is doing the opposite by definition of free movement.” Through VisitDallas and an influential steering committee—all of whom studied dance or work within the dance community— Moving Dallas was filmed at 17 locations using 56 dancers from 10 dance companies and organizations. “You’ve got a really brave cultural and tourism bureau. I wanted to show the gritty side mixed in with the beauty,” Chowdhury said. From classical ballet to contemporary dance, acrobatics and southern swagger, the committee—Lily Weiss, Director of Dallas Arts District; Charles Santos, Executive Director of TITAS; Gayle Halperin, President Bruce Wood Dance; and Zenetta Drew, Executive Director of Dallas Black Dance Theatre—delivered. And so did Chowdhury. Using kinetic cinematography, he created something perception-changing for the world looking in. “The project has really waved the flag for Dallas in a way that I hadn’t expected it to because it’s shown a cross-section of society that I don’t think people are aware of in Europe and elsewhere,” he admits. Through September 5, 2017, Moving Cities: Dallas appears at NorthPark Center in a gallery space between Louis Vuitton and Burberry, then the exhibit will move to the African American Museum on September 6 to coincide with the State Fair of Texas and continues through November 10, 2017. The exhibition features 38 stills shot during the making of the original video at places like DART stations, Ross Avenue, Fair Park, freeways, the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge, and more. Celebrated dancers appear of course, such as Bruce Wood’s Albert Drake, Russian prima ballerina Olga Pavlova, and Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s Nycole Ray, “who could just take over a space,” moving within construction, traffic, and urban life. But the film also included folklorico, hip hop, mariachis, and more. “They know themselves very well and are able to press a pause button on the city and go ‘Hey, look at where you live.’ They are trying to represent the humanity of living in this city.” Sitting at the Winspear Opera House, a site known to every performer in the video, Chowdhury reflects, “People here are exceptionally humble and very welcoming, and that makes all the glass and concrete and infrastructure obsolete.” P

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CRUSADER

BY KAT HERRIMAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY KEVIN TACHMAN

Conceptual artist Joseph Kosuth created this installation for amfAR The Foundation for AIDS Research office in New York. Opposite: Kevin Robert Frost, CEO amfAR The Foundation for AIDS Research. Photography by Kevin Tachman.

CULTURED COUNTDOWN

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amfAR’s accelerated HIV/AIDS research finds advocacy through TWO x TWO.

WO x TWO for AIDS and Art is not your typical benefit. The gala is amfAR’s single largest domestic fundraiser—raising over 7.5 million last year. amfAR’s CEO Kevin Robert Frost believes the event’s success lies in the unique partnership between the organization and the Dallas Museum of Art, the evening’s dual beneficiaries. “You put these things together, and most people would say this is a formula for disaster, but it’s actually been a recipe for tremendous success,” Frost says. “I feel like the impact of TWO x TWO is hard to measure because it goes so much farther than the money that is raised. It is the relationships that we’ve been able to build and the support that amfAR’s been able to build that goes way beyond our normal reach.” 54

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Frost gives full credit to local power collectors and Dallas Museum board members, Cindy and Howard Rachofsky, for being the glue that enables TWO x TWO to function. “Cindy and Howard do an extraordinary job of making TWO x TWO into such a premiere event,” Frost says. “I don’t know of anything else out there like it. The event is a testament not only to their love of contemporary art but also their commitment to the cause.” The Rachofskys certainly have the pull to bring big names from the contemporary art world to the table, and every year they seem to up the ante. In the past, big-ticket items by blue chip artists like Laura Owens, Richard Phillips, and Jeff Koons have sold for seven figures. The energy in the room seems to snowball every year, getting grander and grander.


Like the Rachofskys, the evening’s corporate sponsor, Harry Winston, seems to go above and beyond for amfAR. A fact that Frost notes during a conversation about the nonprofit’s talent for creating lasting partnerships: “What makes our partnership with Harry Winston unique is that not only do they sponsor all our events, but they are also contributing directly to our research program, and particularly research related to trying to find a cure for AIDS,” Frost says. “I think it’s a sign of just how dedicated Harry Winston is to what we do.” At the moment, the entire organization is consumed with the Countdown to a Cure initiative, which hopes to make AIDS obsolete by 2020. “These days we are very much dedicated to finding a cure,” Frost says. “Everything we do these days ties into finding a cure. It is where we are putting the vast majority of our resources.” If last year’s record-breaking sales are any indication, the festivities in Dallas will raise a significant portion for amfAR’s targeted fight. Frost hopes in addition to donations that new voices will be inspired to get more involved. Take, for example, this year’s honoree, artist Jonas Wood, who has routinely donated to the auction but is now participating with the organization in a bigger way. These new faces not only inspire those outside the amfAR family but those within. At the amfAR headquarters in New York, one sees the impact art has had on the organization not only as a fundraising tool but as a source of inspiration. The offices are outfitted with a site-specific Joseph Kosuth installation, which depicts the history of AIDS and the organization. “We wanted to create an environment that invigorated us, where we were constantly stimulated and surrounded by the people we love,” Frost says. “That is what Joseph really captured in the installation. It’s not just the milestones. It’s not just the story of our past, but also our roadmap to the future. It’s what inspires us everyday to find a cure.” In this way, Frost sees the artwork that is sold at TWO x TWO serving two purposes. It raises money and it inspires action. “The fight against AIDS can be an emotionally challenging fight because most of the people who work here have loved ones that have died of AIDS,” Frost says. “Yet at the same time, we also understand that there has always been risk of complacency. We face that risk even more so today because the success we’ve achieved threatens our future. Art helps combat this fatigue in a way we can’t.” P

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Yayoi Kusama, All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins, 2016, wood, mirror, plastic, acrylic, and LED. Courtesy YAYOI KUSAMA Inc., OTA Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore, and Victoria Miro, London. Photography by Thierry Ball. ©Yayoi Kusama, Dallas Museum of Art, TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund. Opposite: Joan Semmel, American, born 1932, Purple Diagonal, 1980, oil on canvas, 79.5 × 105.75 × 2.5 in. (framed). Dallas Museum of Art, TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund.

Keeping It Fresh

Dallas Museum of Art adds to its holdings with new acquisitions through TWO x TWO funds.

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BY DANIELLE AVRAM

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n Saturday, October 28, the art world elite will descend upon Dallas for the 19th iteration of TWO x TWO, a fundraiser unlike any other. Since 1999, TWO x TWO’s art auction has raised over $67 million, with proceeds split between amfAR: The Foundation for AIDS Research, and the Dallas Museum of Art. The event has become amfAR’s largest U.S. fundraiser, and has added over 250 major works of art to the DMA’s permanent collection. Co-founder Howard Rachofsky describes TWO x TWO as an event that “started very modestly with relatively modest ambitions, but very early on had success, and the question became whether or not we could maintain continuity and the freshness of it so that it could begin to develop a life of its own.” He credits the success of the celebrated event in part to the creative drive of his wife Cindy and a rotating series of chairpersons, who keep it original, topical, and unique, as well as the low expense ratio of the event, which allows about 88–90% of proceeds to go directly to the beneficiaries. But beyond the logistics and spectacle of the event itself, the art is the star of the show, and Rachofsky works hand-in-hand with Gavin Delahunty, the DMA’s Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, to ensure that the roster of participating artists and dealers is a deft mix of up-and-comers and established stalwarts. Says Rachofsky, “I love the idea that we have fresh work from younger artists so that the community can benefit from the production of really interesting artists from around the world, as well as well-known names and significant artists. TWO x TWO is an

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opportunity for the local and international collecting communities to reach out and interact with these artists.” Rachofsky describes his involvement post-event as, “writing one check to amfAR and one to the museum,” so it is the senior contemporary curator’s prerogative to use the funds accordingly. Delahunty, who joined the museum in 2014, says that TWO x TWO “allows us to ensure that the collection is balanced. The funds enable us to identify works by senior artists of great significance, but we also look at the work of mid-career artists who are known internationally and who are well established. Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, research is carried out in the area on those younger emerging artists.” Delahunty has secured some major works during his tenure, including paintings by Frank Bowling, Jackson Pollock, and Joan Semmel, and sculptures by Walter de Maria and Theaster Gates. Prior to his arrival, the museum had acquired significant pieces by Nancy Spero, Glenn Ligon, Lynda Benglis, Daniel Buren, and Bruce Connor. Clockwise from top: Frank Bowling OBE RA, British, born in Guyana, 1936, Marcia H Travels, 1970, acrylic on canvas, 111.25 × 213 x 1.5 in. Dallas Museum of Art, TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund; Walter De Maria, American, 1935–2013, Large Rod Series: Circle/Rectangle 5,7,9,11,13, 1986, stainless steel, A, I, 5-sided rod: 5.31 × 52 × 5.63 in.; B, H, 7-sided rod: 5.31 × 52 × 5.37 in.; C, G, 9-sided rod: 5.18 × 52 × 5.31 in.; D, F, 11-sided rod: 5.06 × 52 × 5.18 in.; E, 13-sided rod: 5.18 × 52 × 5.18 in. Collection of the Dallas Museum of Art through TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art through the Phyllis C. Wattis Fund for Major Acquisitions, 2015; Glenn Ligon, American, born 1960, Untitled, 2002, coal dust, printing ink, oil stick, glue, acrylic paint, and gesso on canvas, 74.84 x 118.12 in.; framed dimensions (T-FRAME): 87 x 137 in. Dallas Museum of Art, TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund; Daniel Buren, French, born 1938, Sanction of the Museum, 1973, six fabric squares, acrylic, cotton cloth, and hanging bars. Overall (variable for each installation and for each cloth component:): 160 x 166 in. Dallas Museum of Art, TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund.

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This page, clockwise from left: Jackson Pollock, American, 1912–1956, Figure Kneeling Before Arch with Skulls, c. 1934–1938, oil on canvas, framed dimensions: 33.5 × 27.5 × 2 in. Dallas Museum of Art, TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund; Nancy Spero, American, 1926–2009, Mother and Children (2), 1956, oil on canvas, 55 x 48 in. Dallas Museum of Art, TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund; Lynda Benglis, American, born 1941, Odalisque (Hey, Hey Frankenthaler), 1969, poured-pigmented latex, 165 x 34.5 in. Dallas Museum of Art, TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund; Bruce Gulder Conner, American, 1933–2008, KNOX, 1963, mixed media, 39.5 x 36.5 x 9.5 in. (framed). Dallas Museum of Art, TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund. Opposite: Theaster Gates, American, born 1973, Ground rules. Red square for floor hockey and nigger sports, 2015, wooden flooring, 96.5 × 36.5 × 2.6 in. Dallas Museum of Art, TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund.

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Delahunty, who selected these works from the over 250 purchased with TWO x TWO funds, did so because, “they exemplify how we are tracking the critical debates surrounding contemporary art and the methodologies utilized in recent art practices, including feminist theory, postcolonial discourse, appropriation, participation, sexuality, and abstraction. As the permanent collection grows, our ambition is to build around the particular strengths of DMA’s existing collection, throwing new light on familiar works as well as challenging well-known narratives by introducing material from beyond the canon.” Case in point, this past spring the museum announced its acquisition of Pollock’s Figure Kneeling Before Arch with Skulls (c. 1934–38). Featuring a shrouded figure crouched in front of a skull-laden altar, the painting is a major example of the influence of Renaissance art and Mexican modernism on the artist’s early work. The fifth piece by Pollock to enter the museum’s collection, Figure Kneeling augments pre-existing holdings such as paintings Cathedral (1947) and Portrait and a Dream (1953), as well as Untitled (1956), one of only six of the artist’s sculptures in existence. Shedding light on an oft-overlooked time in Pollock’s career, the painting also allows for connections to be formed between one of the 20th century’s most important artists and the museum’s strong interest in Mexican modernism—the subject of the recent exhibition México 1900–1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde. Similarly, Delahunty has spearheaded the acquisition of works by Frank Bowling and Walter De Maria, key figures in the fields of abstract painting, and minimalism and conceptual art, respectively. Bowling’s Marcia H Travels (1970), and De Maria’s Large Rod Series: Circle/Rectangle, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 (1986) and Pure Polygon Series (1975–76), mark the first works by each to be added to the permanent collection, with De Maria’s a joint acquisition with the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, a groundbreaking partnership between the two institutions. Later this year the museum will also welcome Yayoi Kusama’s All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins (2016), the first of the Japanese superstar’s famous “infinity rooms” to be purchased by the museum. Delahunty describes his curatorial mission for growing the permanent collection as one inspired by the words of late New York-based collector Bernard Reis, who gifted Pollock’s Cathedral to the DMA’s collection in 1950, making it one of the first paintings by the artist to enter a museum collection. “Reis gifted the work on the appeal of board member—later president— Stanley Marcus, who suggested that Reis ‘gift the museum an important work by a younger artist,’” he says. “Cathedral was chosen since Reis felt it necessary to place an example of ‘the most progressive and important new art in the heart of the United States.’ Reis’s remark remains my goal to this day.” But simply adding new works to the coffers is not enough, and to that end it’s important that a museum not only acquire works but strategically utilize the existing collection to impact programming. For example, the existing holding of Bruce Connor’s KNOX (1963), an early collage by the iconic assemblage filmmaker purchased with TWO x TWO funds, has played a key role in the forthcoming world premiere of a newly restored version of Conner’s 1967 film REPORT, which examines the assassination of John F. Kennedy. The film will be screened as part of an exhibition focusing on twenty-four pioneers of film and video, entitled Truth: 24 Frames Per Second (on view October 22, 2017–January 28, 2018). In this sense, the impact of TWO x TWO extends far beyond collector-filled event tents to influence the trajectory of artists’ careers and, in some cases, the way we reexamine art and art history themselves. P

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The living room is open to patios overlooking Houston on three sides. A sectional custom designed in Allan Knight fabric brings comfort to the room situated near chairs from Therien; the standing sculpture is by Tom Corbin; light fixtures are by Dallas-based glass artist, Carlyn Ray.

MADE IN DALLAS A HOUSTON HIGH-RISE GETS THE NORTH TEXAS TREATMENT COURTESY OF ROLNICK+GORDON DESIGN

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BY PEGGY LEVINSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES WILSON

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hen Bert and Jamie Wolf moved from Harlingen, Texas to Houston, t hey pu rchased a bare 3900-square-foot penthouse in a thirty-story building overlooking the dramatic skyline. To make it the home of their dreams, they started looking for the perfect design team. The Wolfs had worked with Marilyn Rolnick on their previous home in Harlingen, so after interviewing several Houston designers, they again chose the Dallas firm, Rolnick+Gordon, to guide them through a 180-degree change in style. The designers looked at the empty shell and knew they needed to bring in the right architect to create the sense of intimacy desirable in any home; they immediately thought of Bruce Bernbaum with Dallas architecture firm, Bernbaum-Magadini. Together, along with lighting designer Suzanne Branch and contractor Steve Goodman, they created a space grand yet intimate, luxurious though approachable, formal but unquestionably livable. The Wolfs brought almost none of their old furnishings to the project, so the designers had a blank slate to work with. Marilyn Rolnick and partner Richard Gordon did miles of legwork researching fitting furniture pieces, textiles, original art, and accessories to present to their clients. After narrowing down choices, Jamie would come to Dallas to see all the treasures that could be part of her new home. “A professional designer who can listen and look at a project through the owners’ eyes helps make the process smooth and pleasurable,” says Rolnick. “I don’t want to superimpose my particular taste on my client.” Trips were made to designer showrooms, local art galleries, and ateliers to find and approve selections that Rolnick and Gordon had made. Bernbaum-Magadini looked at the empty space with one

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thing in mind—maximize the spectacular 180-degree view of downtown Houston. To that end, they created a central core with living and bedroom areas circulating around it. The entry foyer faces a niched wall with cove lighting that forms the back wall of the core. Behind that are the powder bath and pantry with the open kitchen facing the living room. The living room juts out into the view with terraces on either side, creating a room in the sky. The den, office, and bedrooms circle around the perimeter, enabling each room to have abundant natural light. Bernbaum worked with lighting designer Suzanne Branch and contractor Steven Goodman to create the required spaces with different design elements and lighting. One of the required elements was a display wine cabinet that the architect positioned facing the corridor so the back forms a wall in the kitchen. The dropped ceiling in the 24-by-26-foot living room adds architectural layering that both brings the scale down and allows cove lighting around the ceiling perimeter of the room. These architectural and design elements were then passed on to the design team to complete—clad and covered with the most elegant of woods, stones, and marble.

The elevator entry features Carnival Dance Red by Winston Mascarenhas from Craighead Green Gallery; Jennifer Pritchard created the porcelain installation. The bench is from Allan Knight and the light is from Boyd. The bronze mother and child are from the owner’s collection. Custom door in walnut is by Bruce Bernbaum.

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The dining area features a custom light by artist Carlyn Ray and tables from Allan Knight with Brueton chairs by William Cannings from Cris Worley and a sculpture on the console AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2017 65Fine Art.


The semi-private elevator lobby welcomes you with an encaustic on canvas strips, Carnival Dance Red by Winston Mascarenhas from the Craighead Green Gallery over a stone bench from Allan Knight. The bronze sculpture of a swinging child is from the client’s collection, and a porcelain installation by Austin artist Jennifer Pritchard leads you to the front door. Upon entering the custom walnut front door, you are greeted by a lighted niche with a highly figurative marble installation surrounded by a frame of wire-brushed wood. The luminous abstract is by Frank Arnold from Cabo San Lucas. An open kitchen by Redstone Kitchens faces the living room with views of the city on three sides. A trompe l’oeil paper motif by Yrjo Edelmann faces the kitchen island. Also in the kitchen is an abstract by contemporary Chinese artist Zhuang Hong Yi from Laura Rathe Fine Art. The cavernous scale of the room is brought down by the recessed ceiling and by strategically placed hanging light fixtures crafted by glass artist Carlyn Ray. The pendant over the dining area is made of hand-pulled glass rods of varying links each with its own LED light. A three-piece fixture over the sitting area, done as a complement, is made of fused-glass panels in metal frames. The designers worked with Ray to blend the colors. A custom sectional in silk velvet anchors the room on a rug by Interior Resources. The colorful abstract pillows are Opuzen from Allan Knight. A Holly Hunt coffee table and lounge chairs from Therien Studio complete the seating area. The dining area has two square Allan Knight tables that gang together for dinner parties with chairs from Brueton. A William Cannings sculpture from Cris Worley is in the serving alcove. All the rooms circling the central core have floor-to-ceiling windows facing

This page: A custom Redstone Kitchen includes a wine rack designed by Bernbaum Magadini’s Bruce Bernbaum, and lighting pendants from Studio Italia. A painting by Yrjo Edelmann from Craighead Green Gallery and Chinese artist Zhuang Hong Yi from Laura Rathe Fine Art (Dallas) hang side by side. Opposite, above: The powder bath features a painting by Gabriella Garza from The Bright Group and TKO fixtures with a Maya Romanoff wall covering. Pendant lights are from Ochre Lighting. A metal table by Tom Corbin offers the perfect perch for hand towels. Opposite, below: A highly figured marble slab from Allied Stone adorns the hall with a custom rug from The Rug Company, and a custom bench designed by Rolnick+Gordon. The painting is by Frank Arnold from Cabo San Lucas.

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The master bath includes tile exclusively from Antique Floors and a light fixture from The Bright Group. Both showrooms are in the Dallas Design District.

A serene master bedroom has a bed and bench from Holly Hunt with chairs by Cameron Collection. The drapery is from Opuzen and nightstands are by Joseph Jeup with acrylic lamps and a console by Allan Knight. Above the bed hangs a glass sculpture by Carlyn Ray.

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The den has a sectional by the Cameron Collection and console by Hellman-Chang. The chairs and spherical light fixture are from Scott + Cooner.

The office bath has a hanging mirror installed over the retractable shade and a painting by a friend of the homeowners.

downtown Houston. Lutron shade panels regulate the sunlight in all the rooms. The den has a Cameron Collection sectional with an X console from Hellman-Chang. Callas chairs by Zanotta from Scott + Cooner are placed around a marble-topped game table. A CTO hanging fixture also from Scott + Cooner provides overhead light. A combination study and bedroom features a built-in desk and shelves, with cabinetry by Redstone. The chair and lamp are from Donghia with a coffee table by Joseph Jeup and a rug from The Rug Company. An abstract painting by Richard Giglio depicting a Pablo Neruda poem is from the David Sutherland showroom. The sculptural doll heads from The Phillips Collection and a Rock, Paper, Scissors sculpture by Kevin Box from Craighead Green Gallery are perched on the desk. Built-in bookshelves showcase a collection of artifacts from the couples’ travels over the last twenty years. An elegant bed from Holly Hunt is upholstered in “Jet Set” leather and fabric from Great Plains. The bedside tables are by Joseph Jeup with acrylic lamps from Allan Knight. Draperies are from Opuzen and the club chairs are from the Cameron Collection. A bundled glass-twig sculpture from Carlyn Ray is placed above the bed and a silver-leaf, coral sculpture is from Christopher Martin Gallery. The master bath has suspended mirrors that attach to the ceiling in front of recessed shades. This home in the sky appears suspended in the air high above Houston or, with the flip of a switch, becomes cozy and intimate with dimmed lights and lowered shades. Grand, yet intimate. P

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Chez Paula

Paula Lambert in the dining room with a painting by Barnaby Fitzgerald and custom dining table designed by Dan Nelson.

The founder of the Mozzarella Company enjoys the camaraderie of her foodie friends.

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Baguettes with hibiscus-flower butter.

BY PEGGY LEVINSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY COLLEEN DUFFLEY

A prepping station.

Chilled pea soup with minted mascarpone with mint flower garnish.

Paula’s grilled salmon with grilled garlic chives.

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f you should get an invitation to a dinner party hosted by Dallas’s gourmet treasure Paula Lambert and interior designer Dan Nelson, accept immediately. Cancel that trip to the Amalfi coast or the cruise on Lake Como—the company at Chez Paula will be more lively and inclusive, the stories more humorous, and the food will undoubtedly be better. We give you a quick glimpse of the most recent party with a view inside Paula’s new home designed by Dan Nelson, and share the stories of the illustrious guests. Paula and Dan met some years ago through a mutual friend. They lost contact (literally) until Paula almost ran over Dan in the Whole Foods parking lot while she was delivering cheese. Said Paula, “Hey, I’ve got a design project for you,” and the two curious and cultivated friends also discovered a mutual love of food and cookbooks. They’ve been cooking together and decorating ever since—lucky us to be able to share in both endeavors.

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A giant carved whale by The Texas Kid greets all who enter.

The entry gallery wall collection features a photo by architect Frank Welch from his Paris album and a lithograph by Henri Cartier Bresson.

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Paula just moved to a Frank Welch-designed home in a private cul de sac near Turtle Creek. The light-filled space is surrounded by private decks on all sides that float in the trees above the creek. It is the perfect ambiance for the diverse art collections of Paula and her companion George Works with whom she shares her home. A giant, carved, wooden whale greets you when you first enter the marine blue door. The mounted whale is the work of the late Willard Watson, aka The Texas Kid, a former funky fixture of the local art scene. He was famous for the yard art in his Love Field-area home and his eye-popping Longhorn-decorated Cadillac, as well as the animals he carved out of found wood and stone. A vintage sectional sofa in gray velvet faces the fireplace with an excellent David Dreyer abstract above the mantle. Nelson designed the chunky brass-topped coffee table from a photo of a similar one Paula had sent of a dining table in a restaurant in London. A gallery wall displays personal favorites of Paula’s including an original lithograph by Henri Cartier Bresson. A giant Ari Van Selm painting of red poppies is above two Knoll Wassily lounge chairs in white canvas; across from it is an abstract by Danny Williams. There are several Dan Rizzie’s throughout the home, this one above a Saarinen table leads into the open dining room. The dining room, clearly the focal point of this story, is dominated by a seven-by-six-foot painting by Barnaby Fitzgerald that barely fits betweens two sconces on the wall. The scene depicts an angel hovering over cooks in a kitchen. To Paula, the angel is Saint Julia— Julia Childs is probably the patron saint of all accomplished chefs. She had first seen an image of it, but it was not available. When she saw the real thing at Valley House Gallery, the angel was sold, to her this time. When it was delivered, her husband Jim, who had suffered a massive stroke and could not speak, took a look at the painting


Above: In the living room, the red poppy painting is by Ari Van Selm, the blue abstract is by Danny Williams, and an abstract by David Dreyer is above the mantle. The bench is an antique from Embree and Lake. The coffee table was designed by Dan Nelson, inspired by a photograph of a dining table at a restaurant in London. Left: A watercolor by K. Butler hangs above a custom kilim banquette designed by Nelson.

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The dining table is set with plates from Paula’s extensive Deruta pottery collection.

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The Frank Welch-designed solarium has more space for prepping and cooking a meal.

and said quite clearly, “GD, Paula—I thought we had agreed not to buy figurative art.” The painting indeed makes quite an impression. Cheryl and Kevin Vogel, Valley House’s owners were in attendance at the dinner party. A custom ten-foot dining table designed by Dan Nelson in silvered ash was set for sixteen on this recent evening. Each place was set with colorful patterns of Italian majolica and a different Italian Deruta plates, all with the signature of “Sonia” on the bottom. A giant Jan Barboglio candelabra adorned with delicate hypericum blossoms towered over the table and allowed for easy conversation among all the diners. Also in the dining room are a vibrant blue abstract by Ari Van Selm and a work by Jane Eiffler. The adjoining chef’s kitchen is spacious enough to accommodate the multiple activities of four chefs preparing a meal—slicing, steaming, sautéing, and roasting—all in an organized kind of chaos. Dan Nelson was at one work station slicing lemons and limes and preparing the mango avocado salsa, while Diane Boddy was chopping herbs and roasting tomatoes and green beans. Stephan Pyles was everywhere—demonstrating proper chopping techniques and teaching about the wide array of herbs that Nelson and Boddy had brought from their gardens, and outside on the deck with George Works trying out a recently inherited green egg cooker. Paula was the executive chef overseeing and assisting in all parts of the menu while guests were chatting and enjoying delicious wines and assorted cheeses from Paula’s own Mozzarella Company, including a delightful fresh ricotta with a basil pesto and handmade “baguette crust” crackers. Paula’s vast assortment of Deruta pottery adorns the walls of the kitchen. An existing hanging cabinet had to be specially reinforced to accommodate the weight of all the dinnerware.

Paula in the kitchen with her beloved poodle, Teddy, featuring her collection of Majolica plates on the wall.

A vibrant blue abstract by Ari Van Selm hangs above benches by Jan Barboglio.

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George Works serves wine to his guests at the dinner party. The candelabra is by Jan Barboglio, and the colorful abstract is by Jane Eiffler.

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Guests sat down to a chilled pea soup with mint, mascarpone, and nasturtium blossoms and began a memorable dinner of savory dishes, tasty wines, and stimulating conversations with lots of laughs. Some of the guests told funny stories of a recent trip to Big Springs, Texas, Stephan’s hometown. The ethereal and elegant Jan Barboglio shared plans of casting in metals like bronze, silver, and gold in addition to her customary iron. Dan Nelson, who was past visual director of The Dallas Opera, was chatting with Mark and Diane Laroe, the current chairs of The Dallas Opera First Sight First Night. Dan told stories of how visiting opera companies, mostly from Italy, would stay at the Melrose Hotel because they had a kitchen that allowed them to prepare their own Italian food. We heard how Stephan and Paula had first met—he had just opened his first restaurant, Routh Street Café. Paula Lambert walked in and wanted him to buy some mozzarella cheese, but he wanted only goat cheese. “But I don’t have a goat,” said Paula. After a trip to a farm for a goat, Paula and Stephan have been traveling buddies and cooking together ever since. And for us foodies in Dallas, that’s a wonderful thing. P

Clockwise from top left: Three of our chefs for the evening: Stephan Pyles, Paula Lambert, and interior designer Dan Nelson prepare the feast; Jan Barboglio visits with Dianne LaRoe; Paula Lambert’s famous cheese from the Mozzarella Company.

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Nan Coulter: September 14, 2017 PRESIDENTS, ARTISTS, ARCHITECTURE, PICTURES OF PICTURES: AN ENDURING PHOTOJOURNALIST READIES HER FALL EXHIBITION AT THE GOSS-MICHAEL FOUNDATION.

Clockwise from left: Nan Coulter, Little Rock, 2013; one and forty-one, 2002; Berlin, 2007. All images archival inkjet prints.

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BY LEE CULLUM PHOTOGRAPHY BY NAN COULTER

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he first thing Nan Coulter does every morning is drive to Greenway Parks to feed the family chickens at the home of her son, Bunky Vroom, and his wife, Anne Clayton. These are no ordinary chickens. They are a quartet of two Barred Plymouth Rock hens which lay brown eggs plus two Ameraucanas, specialists in elegant pale, misty bluish eggs, rare, I suppose, as hen’s teeth. This is a daily ritual that might surprise friends of Nan who have not known her to be one for routine. But to her it seems perfectly natural. “I’ve always lived in a city,” she explained, “but I’ve always wanted to live on a farm. This is as close as I will get.” Nan grew up in Detroit, went to boarding school in Scottsdale, Arizona, then to William Woods College in Fulton, Missouri. Horses were her thing then, not a Leica, though her older brother did let her poke around his basement dark room from time to time. It was not until she moved to Dallas with her then husband Jacques Vroom and started studying art history and photography at SMU that the camera became her obsession. Before long Nan mastered the art of photojournalism, mainly at The Dallas Morning News, shooting opera, theater, and the bar scene late at night. On her own in London, she caught Prince Charles and his bride, Diana, as they swept by in their wedding carriage.

Much later, in Washington, she chronicled in pictures the crowds at the first inauguration of Barack Obama, and, eight years later, the women’s march saturating those same historic streets. Nan Coulter is alive with ideas. That’s why The Dallas Morning News’ Christopher Wynn made her an editor-at-large for his Arts and Culture section. She stays on top of the galleries and knows sooner than nearly anyone else who’s coming or going or about to have a show. Now it’s Nan herself whose work will open in September at The Goss-Michael Foundation. “It is definitely not a retrospective,” she insists, but she will “pull from different times” with the thought that “a photograph is like a Rorschach test.” You see in it what you want, or need, to see. A scarecrow, for example, with American flags for arms and a face fashioned from an orange garbage bag seems to some like an anti-war declaration. Not to Nan. Actually it’s part of a series she did titled War Décor of indigenous displays in America during the Persian Gulf War of 1991, and it looks far more like patriotism than protest. It’s a captivating photo that’s been shown at the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts at Harvard University. The genius of the piece is in its composition. Instead of centering

This page from left: Nan Coulter, Venice, 2008; Dallas, 2004. All images archival inkjet prints.

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This page clockwise from left: Nan Coulter, Michael Dean (Ilford), 2016; Beatriz Gonzรกlez (Bogotรก), 2015; Frank, 2016; A self-portrait of Nan Coulter. Opposite: Paolo 4 June 17, 2017; thirty-nine years, 2017; Mad Cow, 2002. All images archival inkjet prints.

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the scarecrow, Nan has placed it to the right of tall, deep woods in the heart of East Texas, whose slender, towering pines are bound to endure long after the wit and whimsy of this unexpected figure fall prey to weather or vandals or curious creatures disappointed because their Rorschach test is focused on food. There are pictures of politicians slated for the show as well—one of George H.W. Bush, looking so fit it must have been taken not long after he left office, standing next to an ersatz portrait of the original George of the nation, Washington; and another of Bill Clinton, also younger then and the only person showing in a foursome that included Anna Wintour, editor of Vogue; Huma Abedin of Hillary’s illstarred campaign; and fashion designer Oscar de la Renta, on whose khaki-suited shoulder rests the long, graceful hand of Bill Clinton, surely the hand of an artist. The former president had an impish look, as if, with minimal exertion, he had just landed a lavish donation. That was then, of course. For now, Nan has traveled this summer to the Venice Biennale to photograph a digital recreation of The Wedding at Cana by Renaissance luminary Paolo Veronese. The original painting was cut into a pair of panels by Napoleon and carted off to the Louvre, leaving the Palladian refectory on the island of San Giorgio Maggiore denuded and forlorn. But no longer, thanks to Factum Arte in Madrid, which scanned the work and restored a facsimile to its first, and Italians believe, proper home. What Nan went to see at San Giorgio is what it is like to look at a picture of a picture, and at Goss-Michael, we’ll get a third rendering still titled Paolo. “What,” she wonders, “is real?” To compound the question, she is including Venice in the fall show taken in another Venice—Venice, California. Here Nan’s photo architecture competes with nature, and almost certainly loses as big clouds, shadowy and murky white, close in on a spare but respectable-seeming building, soon to be lost, if not to climate change, then to shabby gentility. Nan returns time and again to her roots in photojournalism, with shots of British writer/artist Fabian Peake’s studio, dominated by a mound of paint scraped off a palate knife for 39 years. There are poignant portraits of Dallas architect Frank Welch, who died a few weeks ago; and of London sculptor Michael Dean, who has exhibited at the Nasher; as well as playful pictures of her granddaughters, Ellie and twin redheads, Sloane and Sabine. But it’s breakthrough time now for Nan Coulter as she pushes toward a new style of work. I could see it in two of her photos I have of Versailles viewed from a rushing train and morphed into elegant abstraction. For Nan, “all is not as it seems,” which of course is immediately apparent. “I like ambiguity,” says Nan. “I don’t like to explain things.” Somehow, no explanation is necessary. Her work, from beginning to the current moment, telegraphs the immediate, the urgent, the inescapable. Even in radical pixilation, Nan Coulter gives us the world of the real, though more often today it’s in heavy disguise. P

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THERE 2017 DADA SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS AT ONE ARTS PLAZA PHOTOGRAPHY BY THOMAS GARZA

Julie Torres, Edith Baker, Rini Baker Andres

Julie Woltjen

Simon Waranch, Cathy Drennan

Georgia and Monte Martin, Jackson Daughety

Steve Green, Margaret King, Kenneth Craighead

Eva Semrad

THROUGH AUGUST 20, 2017

DOUG AITKEN: ELECTRIC EARTH IS ORGANIZED BY THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, LOS ANGELES. LEAD SUPPORT IS PROVIDED BY THE ANNENBERG FOUNDATION, THE ELI AND EDYTHE BROAD FOUNDATION, AILEEN GETTY FOUNDATION, EUGENIO LOPEZ, LUMA FOUNDATION, MAURICE MARCIANO, CAROLYN POWERS, AND FONDAZIONE SANDRETTO RE REBAUDENGO. MAJOR SUPPORT IS PROVIDED BY MANDY AND CLIFF EINSTEIN, MIMI AND PETER HAAS FUND, AND PANASONIC. GENEROUS SUPPORT IS PROVIDED BY JILL AND PETER KRAUS, THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS, MARIA SEFERIAN, AND JULIA STOSCHEK FOUNDATION E. V., DÜSSELDORF. ADDITIONAL SUPPORT IS PROVIDED BY JULIET MCIVER, EILEEN AND PETER MICHAEL, AND DAVID AND ANGELLA NAZARIAN. SUPPORTERS OF THE EXHIBITION CATALOGUE INCLUDE 303 GALLERY, GALERIE EVA PRESENHUBER, REGEN PROJECTS, AND VICTORIA MIRO GALLERY. EXHIBITIONS AT MOCA ARE SUPPORTED BY THE MOCA FUND FOR EXHIBITIONS WITH LEAD ANNUAL SUPPORT PROVIDED BY DELTA AIR LINES, SHARI GLAZER, HÄSTENS, AND SYDNEY HOLLAND, FOUNDER OF THE SYDNEY D. HOLLAND FOUNDATION. GENEROUS FUNDING IS ALSO PROVIDED BY JERRI AND DR. STEVEN NAGELBERG, AND THAO NGUYEN AND ANDREAS KRAINER. EXHIBITION SUPPORT IN FORT WORTH IS GENEROUSLY PROVIDED BY THE KLEINHEINZ FAMILY ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS AND EDUCATION. IN-KIND MEDIA SUPPORT IS PROVIDED BY

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MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORTH Doug Aitken, diamond sea, 1997 (still). Video installation with three channels of video (color, sound), three projections, monitor, and chromogenic transparency mounted on acrylic in aluminum lightbox with LEDs. 11:50 minutes/loop. Exhibition copy. La Colección Jumex, México


ART21 & GUILD HALL AT THE ELAINE DE KOONING HOUSE PHOTOGRAPHY BY WALTER WEISSMAN

Lindsey McCan, Mia Locks

THE POLAROID PROJECT At the Intersection of Art and Technology

Alexandra Fairweather, Eric Goodman, Christina Mossaides Strassfield

Through September 3 Free Admission #polaroidproject The Polaroid Project showcases 136 images by more than 100 artistphotographers along with examples of the tools and artifacts that helped make Polaroid a household name.

Tina Kukielski, Jai Jai Fei Guy Bourdin (1928–1991), Charles Jourdan (detail), 1978, C-Print on Fujiflex paper, © The Guy Bourdin Estate 2017 / Courtesy of Louise Alexander Gallery This exhibition has been organized by the Foundation for the Exhibition of Photography, Minneapolis/New York/Paris/Lausanne, in collaboration with the MIT Museum, Cambridge, Mass., and the WestLicht Museum for Photography, Vienna.

Mary Heilmann, Kevin Teare, Mary Boochever

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FURTHERMORE BY CHRIS BYRNE PHOTOGRAPHY BY WALTER WEISSMAN

John Riepenhoff and Ryan Wallace collaborate on a site-specific installation at the Elaine de Kooning House.

T

his summer, a wooden modernist home on a quiet lane in the Northwest Woods neighborhood of East Hampton, New York, is providing a staging ground for some of today’s brightest visual artists to create their work. John Riepenhoff and Ryan Wallace are collaborating on a site-specific installation at the house, which Elaine de Kooning purchased in 1975 while reconciling with her husband Willem when both were producing some of the best paintings of their careers. As well as being internationally exhibited artists in their own right, Riepenhoff and Wallace are also gallery owners—Riepenhoff of The Green Gallery in Milwaukee and Wallace of Halsey McKay a few miles away in downtown East Hampton. Thus they have a special perspective on both the making and presentation of the aesthetic enterprise. In addition to his famed mannequins (some within The Joule Hotel collection) dressed in workers’ garb holding up pieces by other artists for the perusal of the viewer (in this instance a gridded panel by Ryan Wallace), a new iteration of The John Riepenhoff Experience will be unveiled. This interactive sculpture features a ladder leading up to an inverted wooden box with a circular opening just large enough for the spectator to peer into. Once the viewer’s head is inside, one encounters a miniature exhibition by Jerry “The Marble Faun” Torre—the groundskeeper in

the Maysles Brothers documentary, Grey Gardens—now a ceramicist and stonecutter who himself had a residency at the home last year. As a foil to Riepenhoff’s intimate gesture, Ryan Wallace has utilized the studio as an arena for an expansive and audacious recycling project. The dozens of tiles that blanket the floor were cut from his previous paintings and arranged intuitively into a rhythmic grid that activates the space. Wallace is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and Rhode Island School of Design Museum, among others. Riepenhoff was included in the 2017 Whitney Biennial and he has been featured at both the Tate Modern, London, and Crystal Bridges in Bentonville, Arkansas. He was a collaborator in The Open and co-organized the Milwaukee International and Dark fairs. He is the proud founder of Milwaukee’s first Beer Endowment for artist-run organizations. During the run of the exhibition, Guild Hall’s Contemporaries Circle and Art21’s Contemporary Council will release Summer of Shorts, a ten-week digital campaign of ten new short films from the Art21 series Extended Play and New York Close Up. On August 9th, the revered realist painter, Eric Fischl, will be honored with a cocktail party at the house, with proceeds benefiting Dallas Contemporary. P

John Riepenhoff (with Jerry the Marble Faun) and Ryan Wallace, July–August 2017, Elaine de Kooning House, East Hampton. Photo assemblage by Chris Byrne and Scott Newton.

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