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Winter 2008

The Hands that made

Milwaukee Individuals who left a lasting mark on our city

Also in this Issue: different faiths at mu • digital music revolution • finding a job in a bad economy • the future of manresa • winter Fashion


A Great Place to Live Since 1990

Renee Row Apartments Where Memories are Made 414.933.7514 www.reneerowclybourn.com reneerow@core.com

Don’t get angry, dude. Leave us a comment instead.

Register at our Web site (it’s free) and leave comments on Journal stories. Plus, check out our Web exclusive content. New articles, columns and reviews are uploaded all the time, even when we’re not printing an issue. So go ahead — tell us what you really think.

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Electric Music

Engineerng student Dan Nicorata of Chicago-based Love Me Electric, and how the digital revolution is changing music. by Alli kerfeld

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Milwaukee’s best

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How the works of three individuals — Allis, Pabst and Plankinton — can still be felt in Milwaukee today. by Greg shutters

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The facets of faith

Religion, for many, is important to life on campus. But how do people use their faith, Catholic or not, to get through their life? b y C ai t l i n Ka va n a u g h

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Editor’s Note Looking back is just as interesting as looking forward.

My Journal Students share their worst Christmas gifts.

Rants & Raves Snarky comments on our Fall issue, and responses to an online column.

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City Buzz Some stores you might not consider have some great gift options.

Campus Spotlight Why students hate construction and love meal exchange.

10 Stylephile

Get ready for snow with some new additions to your winter wardrobe.

12 Journal Jabber

Why you will (or won’t) get a job in this economy when you graduate.

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COOLDOWN

32 Journeys

Mara Brandli on how she wants every person to find dignity.

34 The Last Word

The honest infomercial truth, plus what to do until the next Journal.

On the Cover: Milwaukee City Hall, courtesy Milwaukee County Historical Society. Photo illustration by Greg Shutters and Jaclyn Poeschl.

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Please. Just let us do the work.

Advertise in the Marquette Journal Call Student Media Advertising: (414) 288-1738


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A new kind of old winter 2008 STAFF Editor-in-Chief

Greg Shutters Assistant Editor

Sara J. Martinez Features & Online Editor

Patrick Johnson Chief Copy Editor

Sarah Krasin Art Director

Greg Shutters Promotions Director

Becca Ruidl

Writers

Samantha Cavallo Lissie Crichton-Sapp Patrick Johnson Caitlin Kavanaugh Alli Kerfeld Rosemary Lane Nina Lewis Sara J. Martinez Brooke McEwen Jen Michalski Matthew Reddin Ryan Riesbeck Greg Shutters Becky Simo Colleen Stanfa Katie Vowell

Copy Editors Lia Dimitriades Jess Herrick Megan Hupp Katie Vertovec

Photographers

Michele Derdzinski Kevin Kozicki Brooke McEwen Jaclyn Poeschl Ellie Richmond Morgan White

Designers

Patrick Johnson Rima Garsys Greg Shutters Peter Wagoner

Creative Consultants

Alise Buehrer Rima Garsys Patrick Johnson

Online Writers

Erica Bail Erica Breunlin Alise Buehrer Samantha Cavallo Michele Derdzinski Tori Dykes Nick Herff Allison Keough Joey Kimes Kirsten Lehman Ben Martinez Sara Patek

To advertise, call Student Media Advertising: 414-288-1738

The Marquette Journal

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’d like to think that the Marquette Journal is a very forward-thinking magazine. Our articles are always centered on “what’s new” — and even more than that, how “what’s new” will affect you in the future. So if we’re so preoccupied with the present and with the future, why then does our cover have that old building on it? Why are we suddenly talking about the past? Any history professor will tell you: the past dictates the present. And logically, when you look back tomorrow, today will be in the past, so ipso facto the past also affects the future. In our case, Milwaukee’s past has affected our present quite a bit. As you’ll read in the article “Milwaukee’s Best” (p. 18), it was the efforts of a few individuals that kept Milwaukee from becoming a small town like Manitowoc or Sheboygan. Railroads brought industry, industry brought jobs (and that distinctive Milwaukee smell) and jobs brought people. If Milwaukee had ended up a small town, would Marquette have even existed? One can only guess. It’s easy to see how the past has affected our present here at Marquette. But what about the future? Milwaukee’s changing job market can tell us a lot about where the future of industry is going, and what we can expect when we look for jobs after graduation. In our new “Journal Jabber” section (p. 12), you’ll read about how hard (or easy) it can be to find a job, and how the changing job market might put you in a career you never expected. Of course, it’s not good to just look at the past believing that we need to change from it. Sometimes it’s good to look at the past for inspiration, for things and ideas that were abandoned too quickly before their merits were discovered. In “Electric Music” (p. 14), you’ll read about how the digital music revolution is helping bands find an audience and how some people are beginning re-embrace the vinyl record for its superior sound quality. “Milwaukee’s Best” also highlights some of Milwaukee’s finest architecture, which was unfortunately lost during a period of “urban renewal” — proof that newer isn’t always better. So yes, this issue of our forward-thinking magazine has gone a bit “old timey”. Hopefully you’ll learn some facts that you were always curious about, or maybe, just maybe, the past will give you some neat insights about the future. Sincerely,

1131 W. Wisconsin Ave. #006A Milwaukee, Wis. 53233 mu.journal@gmail.com Faculty Adviser

Dr. Steve Byers Greg Shutters gregory.shutters@marquette.edu The views expressed in the Journal’s opinion columns do not necessarily reflect the views of Marquette University.

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“A really gaudy gold bracelet with big presents dangling from it.” Jennifer Rusch, Sophomore College of Education

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“A box of 96 crayons from my parents.” Nate Schultz, Sophomore College of Education

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“My grandma put Vaseline in my stocking!” Courtney Fiene, Freshman College of Business

worst Gifts by Nina Lewis photos by Michele Derdzinski

“My ex-boyfriend got me Victoria’s Secret sweatpants that were two sizes too big.” Kay Buensuceso, Sophomore College of Education

“My parents got me ‘Hooked on Phonics.’ ”

“Dominoes.” Brad Schanke, Sophomore College of Engineering

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What’s the worst Christmas gift you’ve ever received?

William Castedo, Freshman College of Engineering

“When I was 13, my grandma bought me pink onesie pajamas.” Emily Foley, Sophomore College of Engineering

“My aunt bought me a plaid outfit for a 6-year-old when I was 13.” Kevin Fries, Sophomore College of Business


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What Sarcasm?

Dear Mr. Patrick Johnson,

Dear Marquette Student Media & Friends,

I read your column and only one word comes to mind, maybe two: F***ing Brilliant. Yes, you did rant and rave about both parties but I think you brought light to some interesting facts. I am in a Feminist Theory course with Dr. Tobin and we discussed many of the issues you brought up. Does it really matter where Palin got her glasses from? Or my favorite, “Should Hilary have worn that pant suit with a revealing neckline?” I can’t remember the last time we criticized a male politician about how tight his pants wear and how no one needed to see his crotch size, but hey that just might be me!?! I think this was an excellent editorial piece because it seemed unbiased, hitting both parties. Although my favorite part of the entire piece, next to when you called Palin a national MILF, was the closing paragraph. You really got me thinking and the next time I vote for/criticize a politician I think a little bit of your column will play in the back of my mind.

I want to thank all of you working hard to get people to vote and such, even despite the fact that, being in a non-swing state, our Presidential vote doesn’t count for much. I’d specifically like to comment on the most totally awesome article, “Personal Politics,” which appeared in this fall’s Marquette Journal. This article was so most totally awesome because of its innovative style and super-objective reporting. Take, for example that one part about women and family. We’re introduced to the Empowerment co-chair’s point of view on feminism (which has only one definition – pro-choice and angry). I, for one, am glad that MU students weren’t pandered with some stupid comment from Students for Life or something. They’d only say some tripe about how most people support at least some restrictions on abortion that Roe v. Wade doesn’t afford. Heck, you guys should get a Pulitzer Prize for one-sided objectivity right there. I bet a lot of other journalists would even go the religious hippy route and get a counter-opinion from a priest. It’s a good thing there aren’t many of those near this part of town. With 55.6 percent of Marquette’s student population composed of women, it seems natural that they wouldn’t want to hear it. Next, Marquette’s LGBTQQIA community – or at least the LGBT parts – gets a rare chance to take a righteous poop on traditional marriage. The Knights of Columbus – who are extremists that kick puppies – could have been contacted to get some goofy statement about marriage, family, and a child’s supposed “right” to both mother and father. We’re gladly not exposed to this because those views are wrong. Children don’t have rights except to have abortions. I also like how it’s noted that the economy is important to some people. I, for one submit to the Marquette community that the Marquette Journal should be nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize for exposing the truth to campus. There’s really only one right answer to all of these “issues” that people are talking about, so why’s everyone making such a big deal about things? As far as voting goes, I wasn’t sure who I’d vote for until I realized that there was only one candidate on the ballot this year. As a final thought, I’ve been thinking about starting a Marquette Elitists club on campus. Wanna join?

Alicia Ali Your writing is unorganized and confusing. I thought there were some hardcore editors for the Journal. I know they chopped up perfectly good articles and made them not-as-good anymore… maybe I should be blaming them for this one as well. Anti-celebrity? What the hell does that mean? Bush isn’t an anti-celeb. He IS a celeb because everyone knows who he is. He is just one that nobody likes. Kind of like Rosie O’Donnell or that guy who called his daughter a pig. The only way you can be an “anti-celebrity” is if you are a normal, everyday person… which any of our Presidents obviously will never be. So after reading this, I’m still left wondering exactly “how this election has become the world’s greatest three-ring circus”… and how this article, filled with such forced shock-value and pointless crap, ever passed the editors’ desks. Meghan O’Connell

To read Patrick’s online exclusive column, “Popular Politics: I don’t do personal,” log on to marquettejournal.org

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R e s p o n s e s

A Political Opinion

Thanks,

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Fall 2008

POLL DANCING

How the outcome of the 2008 election will affect Marquette students in very real ways

Also in this Issue: 5)&(&/&3"5*0/("1t$0--&(&4-"/(t.*-8"6,&&%&45*/"5*0/4t#30,&/:0-,0''&34)01&t'"--'"4)*0/'03(6:4("-4

What do you think of the Journal? Leave us a comment on our Web site or e-mail us at mu.journal@ gmail.com. We might just print your comment in the next issue!

John Tadelski

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Shops with Character by Ryan Riesbeck photos by Morgan White

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o you’re walking around Milwaukee, looking for gifts for friends and family, or maybe a little something for yourself. The mall is too expensive, but where else is there to go? Never fear. This guide to some of the more offbeat shops around Milwaukee is sure to find you the appropriate gift for any person, no matter how hard they are to shop for.

Downtown Books

Planet Bead

Atomic Records

Just beyond the river at 327 E. Wisconsin Ave. is Downtown Books—Bought & Sold. A fairly well-known but unappreciated market, Downtown Books offers used books at outrageously low prices. The store may appear daunting at first with its somewhat confusing maze-like setup. The faithful employees, however, are more than happy to help you find anything you’re looking for.

Those seeking unique apparel should look no further than Planet Bead, which is located in sight of Downtown Books at 710 N. Milwaukee St. Planet Bead specializes in just that ­­— beads. More specifically, the store offers supplies for those who enjoy arts and crafts, with interesting beads that can be used to make necklaces, bracelets and all sorts of other wear. The owner, who prefers to go simply by “Keith” greets customers with a smile, and helps them pick out the beads they need for whatever they may be creating with them.

Finally, for those who are looking for something their music-loving friend can enjoy, Atomic Records offers the prime selection of records and vinyls in Milwaukee. Located at 1813 E. Locust St., Atomic Records holds new and used records from all your favorite artists. College of Arts & Sciences freshman and self-proclaimed audiophile Maggie Gervase said, “I love Atomic Records. They have such a good selection, and vinyl just sounds so much better than the CDs we have now.”

“We provide people with what they want, be they collectors, students or simply people who love to read books,” owner Keith Pajot said. “And the best part is, everything is on sale, always.” But books aren’t the only thing you can find there. Downtown Books also offers a wide variety of old magazines, comics, VHS movies, records and even sheet music.

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“With the economy in such a rut, people should try to make their own gifts instead of paying such high prices at some fancy store,” Keith said.


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Campus Obsession

by Jen Michalski

Construction

Meal Exchange

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Zilber Hall, the student services building under construction on the corner of 12th Street and Wisconsin Avenue, is the most prominent source of commotion on campus. The facility is scheduled to be completed in fall 2009. While some may walk by the site every day and no longer notice the construction, the noise is a constant source of annoyance for students in nearby resident halls.

In exchange for a meal swipe, students can purchase food outside of the residence hall dining halls, regardless of their meal plan. An added plus is that students are able to either sit down with their food or take it to go. One of the more popular locations for the meal exchange program is Marquette Place in the Alumni Memorial Union, where students can dine at Ultimate Baja, Fresh Sushi, Fresh Greens, Grill 155, New York City Subs, Natural Smart Market and Einstein Bros. Bagels.

o start your day, there’s nothing like a cup of coffee and loud drilling noises from on-campus construction. Currently, many students have grown to accept that they will always be woken up by construction, walk next to construction and view construction from their dorm window.

“When you walk past Abbottsford, you can barely hear yourself talking to the people next to you,” said Kristin Skells, a freshman in the College of Education. Marisa Riley, a junior in the College of Communication, said she remembers waking up to the sounds of jackhammers during her freshman year in Cobeen Hall. The construction of the “Wiggle,” the bridge that moved 11th Street behind Carpenter Tower upon its completion in 2007, was also bothersome to students. If you’ve walked past Gesu Parish on Wisconsin Avenue, you might have avoided a large crane, walked under a scaffolding or dodged some bright orange cones. To some students, this occasionally gets in the way of their usual commute.

bagel and tea. A cheeseburger and fries. A chicken Caesar salad. Half a sub and half a salad. These are just some of the options offered in Marquette’s new meal exchange program.

Tony DiZinno, a sophomore in the College of Communication, said he is a frequent visitor to Marquette Place. “It’s a nice change of pace,” he said. Kate O’Donnell, a freshman in the College of Nursing, said her favorite part of the meal exchange program is being able to get Caesar salads from Fresh Greens. “Normally a salad would cost around $7, but if I go during the meal exchange time slot I am able to get what I wouldn’t be able to get at a residence hall cafeteria,” she said.

“I’ll be late to class (at Johnston Hall) because construction always changes,” Riley said.

Other options for the meal exchange program are at the five Brew Cafés located throughout campus, where a variety of bakery and deli items are available. Many students choose this location in the morning, as they can quickly get a muffin and a coffee with one swipe of their MarquetteCard.

While construction is supposedly beneficial and positive, it has not ceased to interfere with students’ everyday lives at Marquette. And unfortunately, the annoyances will not be going anywhere anytime soon.

Whether it is breakfast, lunch or dinner, Marquette Place or the Brew, sit down or take out, the meal exchange option offered by Marquette’s Dining Services is, without a doubt, a crowd pleaser.

photos by Ellie Richmond

photos by Kevin Kozicki marquettejournal.org

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Don’t let your wardrobe freeze up this winter. Freshen up winter essentials like coats, boots and sweaters to create a bold look with everyday clothing items.

On Julien Jacque, Freshman, College of Engineering: jacket, $50, Jack & Jones; oxford, $30, H&M; pants, $90, Jack & Jones; shoes, $65, Lacoste; cashmere sweater, select stores.

On Ashley Novak, Senior, College of Communication: coat, $60, Target; sweater dress, $48, Gap; scarf, $12.90, H&M; boots, $25, Target; clutch, David Meister; gloves, Dsquared; earrings, $25, Macy’s; bracelet, $40, Macy’s.

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Flat boots are a trendy alternative to Uggs. Creative embellishments like buttons and scrunching add individualized style.

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Gray and nude have replaced black and white as popular winter neutrals. Sweaters, dresses, ties and clutches in these colors bring subtle, stylish change to traditional wardrobes.

Coats with bold colors or patterns instantly liven up a bland winter wardrobe while making a visible statement all winter long.

Looks created by Alise Buehrer and Rima Garsys Photos by Lauren Stoxen

Jackets worn shorter and slimmer near the waist are popular for men this winter, as well as slim-fit pants that fold around the ankle. marquettejournal.org

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Selling yourself Finding a job in today’s economy is tough, but not impossible by Rosemary Lane

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he economy is bad.”

“You might not find a job when you graduate.” “Start looking for a job now.” We’ve all heard this pounded into our heads by nagging mothers, professors and damning headlines since gas prices climbed up to four bucks. Job-hunting stinks right now, yes, we know. And the prospect of eating stale Doritos on your parents’ lumpy couch in your red shag carpeted basement seems more and more plausible.

recent graduates. But according to Andrea Koncz, employment information manager for NACE, that number dropped to 1.3 percent by October. Yikes. And what does that mean for college students? “Definitely more competition,” Koncz said. Koncz said certain fields are easier to get jobs in than others. Service, manufacturing, accounting, government and technical fields are still in demand, but liberal arts-related jobs aren’t so lucky. Surprise, surprise.

Laura Kestner, director of the Career Services Center, said the center is seeing strong recruiting in technical fields and accounting, as well as stuThe stats aren’t too heartwarming. A job outlook dents participating in volunteer activities. study by the National Association of Colleges and Employers published in September reported that She said she has also seen a trend in the increasing 6.1 percent of employers’ total hires in August were number of alumni she advises in the center. Last But how difficult is it really to find a job once you’ve graduated?

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year, Kestner said 16 percent of her advisees were alumni, and this fall the number rose to 36 percent. Half of these alumni are recent graduates, but the other half are experienced professionals who have been laid off, she said. And while the job outlook may look gloomy, companies aren’t completely diminishing its number of young hires. Enterprise Rent-a-Car, the largest hirer of Marquette college students, has experienced lay-offs, but it’s still hiring, Kestner said. Wahoo! “College grads have a little bit of a leg up across the board because they are coming in with fresh skills,” Kestner said. “However companies … across the board just aren’t going to be recruiting. It will be worse in the spring.” Kestner said she is also seeing companies cutting down on full-time employees and hiring interns


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because they cannot afford to pay full-time sala- try has been hit hard by the economic slump. Kristen Fischer, author of “Ramen Noodles, Rent and ries. Résumés: An After-College Guide to Life,” said she Jeremy Medina, a journalism major who gradu- has heard a lot of panic in the media industries. ated last May, said he is experiencing this intern “The media is a horrible place to be working when problem. there’s layoffs happening,” Fischer said. Medina was hired as an editorial intern for Paste magazine in Atlanta, Ga. in August after lucklessly Fischer, who became a reporter after graduating job searching for three months from his parents’ with a science degree, said to keep your options open when searching for a job. home in Colorado. Kathleen Murray, a 2008 graduate, said she has learned how to adapt to a new job field. Murray had a broadcast degree and said she now works in the integrated marketing department for Kraft “People are getting away with paying interns noth- Foods Inc. She coordinates licensing agreements ing and getting interns to do way more than they with companies who want to use the Kraft logos on menus and works with the legal department for used to,” Medina said. approval. Medina said he’s had to alter his expectations about having an automatic job, apartment and paying his “I went into Marquette thinking I’d be a news anchor, and now I’m doing something with marketown bills once he graduated. ing and licensing,” Murray said. “I’m happy, but “The hardest part is to graduate and think I have you’ve got to find your niche and where you want this job, can afford this rent and be independent, to be.” but now I’m dependent on my parents more than Murray said when looking for a job, you have to ever,” Medina said. be flexible and persistent (Murray said she called Medina said Paste offered to have him stay on an- her boss-to-be five times before securing an interview). She said she has a lot of friends from Marother term as an intern. quette who were talented and involved but still do “When I told my mom, she said, ‘When are you not have a job. going to get a job?’ ” Medina said. “I’m fully confident in myself and capable of having a job, but And joblessness is not just prevalent in journalism. Anthony Villalobos, who graduated last May from there just aren’t any.” the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, said he It’s widely known that the communications indus- was surprised he couldn’t quickly find a job in law He said though he enjoys his job, he works eighthour days and receives only an $800 stipend for four months.

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with his stacked credentials. Villalobos said he had a 3.9 GPA and four years of legal experience, including working as an officer on reserve for Wauwatosa one summer and working for four years at UWM’s University Legal Clinic. “I was upset,” Villalobos said. “What the heck, I had done all these things and had a great GPA and had people give me great references, and how in the world am I not getting a job right now?” Villalobos said he looked for two months, went on countless interviews and worked with temp agencies before he found a job as a junior conflicts analyst at a Chicago law firm. He considered working in a coffee shop while searching but was unable to find open jobs there. Now he’s very grateful for his job, he said. “I’m definitely very fortunate. I was very grateful, because truthfully, I couldn’t find anything else,” Villalobos said. Kestner from Career Services said to start jobhunting now. An excellent résumé and good interview skills are necessary, she said. “The good thing about a bad economy is employers can pick the best of the best,” Kestner said. “Students really need to know how to sell themselves and their skills.” So turn off those “Golden Girls” re-runs, finish the Doritos bag and start selling yourself. For job purposes, of course.

marquettejournal.org

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Electric Music

How the digital music revolution is shaping our world

contributions by Alli Kerfeld Katie Vowell Colleen Stanfa

Digital Love

“Love Me Electric” on the merits of filesharing by Alli Kerfeld

The group, recognizing this new means of music veryone’s had the rock star dream at some distribution, hired high school friend, Frank Rizpoint in their life. For the females of our gen- zo, as its manager. He sets deadlines, keeps in coneration, it came with the release of Josie and the tact with others in the business and collaborates Pussycats. For males, whenever they realized that with the members to make their vision become a playing the guitar made girls’ knees weak. While reality. Rizzo is not only in charge of booking permany of these dreams are crushed by lack of tal- formances for LME (such as the Warped Tour and ent, parental restrictions and even school com- appearances alongside Lucky Boys Confusion and mitments, a few gifted hopefuls have a chance of All Time Low), but he also manages its PureVolume, Facebook, Stickam, AbsolutePunk.net, Youbreaking through the barriers. Tube, iLike and, of course, MySpace accounts. Enter Love Me Electric. The band’s MySpace account “is the source of evLove Me Electric, better known as LME by its fans, erything Love Me Electric — we have no actual began when College of Engineering senior Dan dot-com site,” Rizzo said in an e-mail. “MySpace Nicorata entered his Chicago-area high school is our host for current shows, blogs, video updates, “screwing around on the guitar” with his older merchandise, basically everything and anything brother Joe. Within the year and with the help you can think of. It’s the first site to get updated of Bob McNellis from the locker next door, they when something happens. When MySpace crashes formed a trio. Soon, LME expanded to include or deletes us, it feels like we’re set back to the 1920s guitarist Matt Cargill and Mark Follenweider on because of how big of a setback it is to leave our fans out in the dark.” the keyboard.

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LME’s sites not only give information on the band and its background but also offer tastes of its poppunk rock and punk-muscle synthesis. Considering most of LME’s shows are in the Midwest area, Dan said he thinks this is a great way to get the “The whole Internet, technologically advanced area band’s music to people who can’t come see live perthat bands are pushing toward is the biggest con- formances. But with all of today’s efforts against iltributor to the success of bands today,” said Dan, legal downloading, at what point does this become the band’s lead vocalist and bassist. “We wouldn’t counteractive? be anything if we didn’t have the Internet to give It doesn’t, according to Dan. us that push.” Sound familiar? Maybe this is the point at which your childhood band fizzled beneath the pressure. Not so with LME — they had found the golden ticket, the Internet.

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“Any form of exposing yourself to new music — even if it’s free, and you’re ‘stealing’ — I have no problem with it,” he said. “My brother and I have been downloading and sharing music for a long time. I’m totally for pirating; everybody should hear what’s out there. Bands shouldn’t make music “If a band is using (the Internet) to reach a higher and keep it to themselves. If they are, they’re being goal and actually connect to fans who love their music and work, or who can relate to their music, closed minded.” then I think that would be the most successful patFollenweider said illegal downloading and file tern out there for other bands,” Rizzo said. sharing has actually greatly helped LME. “In the big picture it actually helps bands more “I think it is great that people can share our music to steal and download for free,” Dan said. “Most with their friends. It’s great because it keeps all the people wouldn’t get into the music that they’re into doors open for our music to gain access to,” Fol- if they didn’t get it for free. We just want to play shows and get heard.” lenweider said.

I am extremely proud of our band,” Follenweider said. “We never gave up and decided to take on this challenge. Obviously, at this stage in our life we are focusing on getting good grades and obtaining our degrees. But the band is by far one of the most important things to all of us, it is a huge part of who we are and I can’t see us giving up on it.”

And get heard they did. “I know myself and “Bands shouldn’t make As of press time, LME even the majority of music and keep it to has more than 65,800 the band are guilty of friends on MySpace illegal downloading,” themselves. If they are, and are touring as regsaid Rizzo. “I think it’s they’re being closed ularly as possible, all good for a band if they minded.” while staying on top of aren’t plastered all over classwork, Dan said. MTV and TRL already, because it can’t hurt .… If it wasn’t for illegal music, ourselves as a band Although the band occupied much of the memwould have never discovered All Time Low’s ‘The bers’ free time throughout high school, each purParty Scene’ or (the bands) Forever The Sickest sued post-high school education. Joe and Cargill Kids and Four Year Strong. In fact, I discovered attend Illinois Institute of Technology, Follenweider is a student at Loyola University Chicago, Fall Out Boy off of LimeWire.” Rizzo studies at Moraine Valley Community ColDan said the reason certain bands push for further lege and McNellis graduated from Governors State downloading restrictions is because they don’t University. need any more exposure. But he noted that music aficionados rely on downloading to find out about “All of the high school bands we played with all new genres, and many up-and-coming bands are of the time broke up once college started because they figured it would be impossible. This is where joining the Internet craze.

“After we graduate, I believe it is in everyone’s interest to put all of their effort in the band and see what can become of it,” said Follenweider. “If things go as we hope, we are going to continue doing what we love — creating and playing music for anyone who enjoys it. If things don’t go well, which we hope won’t happen, then we have our jobs that we worked so hard for to fall back on.”

But the band takes advantage of its available time, Follenweider said. Following the success of its first album, “Medicine And Magic” (2005), Follenweider said the group spent its 2007 winter break recording “from noon to midnight every day.” It released its second compilation, “The Sunrise” (2008), last summer, and they don’t plan on letting up anytime soon.

Continuing to do what they love and using the Internet to offer their fans the best through new digital capabilities, LME’s success keeps rising. The band sells merchandise and CDs through its Web site and is also offering free music to Marquette Journal readers. Send an e-mail to LoveMeElectric@gmail.com with the subject “Free Music” to hear more from the boys. Love Me Electric, from left to right: Bob McNellis, Mark Follenweider, Dan Nicorata, Joe Nicorata, Matt Cargill. (Photo courtesy Dan Nicorata)

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You Get What You Don’t Pay For Downloading Has Some Major Drawbacks by Katie Vowell

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t seems like only yesterday we were rocking out to Ace of Base on our Walkmans, but, in reality, the days of cassettes, CD players and MiniDiscs are long gone. For some time, we have existed in a world of digital music, where iTunes and Windows Media Player have become staples in our daily routine. Dropping by the local music store to purchase the latest “must-have” album may be a distant memory — many find that the most convenient music vendor is sitting right on their desktop. After becoming accustomed to this new age in music, it’s time to step back and ask whether the digital age is all its cracked up to be. “The good thing about digitally downloaded music is that it is extremely easy to search, download and pay for,” said Bruce Cole, assistant cataloger of the Raynor Memorial Libraries’ Jean Cujé Music Collection. “Quick transactions, millions of downloads — that’s theoretically great news for everybody from the artist on down.” Apple single-handedly revolutionized the way we Some students fear what they call RIAA “bullying,” but there are plenty of other drawbacks to digital access music with the creation of iTunes in 2001. music and filesharing. Photo by Kevin Kozicki

“iTunes allows users to buy full-length albums for a smaller cost than what you would find at a retail store,” said Selvin Quire, a junior in the College of Communication and music director for Marquette Radio. “If they don’t want to buy the whole album, they have the ability to pick and choose songs for 99 cents each. Some of the singles released by artists are available before the album comes out. Music lovers have greater control of their favorite music.”

Phillip Naylor, associate professor in the history department and History of Rock ‘n’ Roll instructor, said he is happy vinyls are making a comeback. “It is a richer sound,” Naylor said. “I like listening to old records because they have more character.”

“On one hand, this method of music access brings more exposure to the people and hopefully inspires them to buy their full-length records. However, this can also backfire. The people who can get their music well in advance might use it to make a profit of their own.”

Although vinyls are regaining popularity, the reIn the words of Menality is many refuse to ning, the music inspend money on music “Music is something you dustry is “screwed.” that is available for free feel emotionally, and when Menning said people on the Internet. Illegal are willing to illegally Despite the convenience of online shopping, the downloading has been it is reduced to an MP3, download music depoor quality of MP3s is forcing consumers to re- controversial since digyou don’t have the same spite poor sound qualital music’s debut, and examine the digital revolution. resonance there.” ity for the sole reason the debate regarding its that “you can’t beat “MP3s are a musical joke,” said Rich Menning, ethicality has no end in free.” owner of Atomic Records in Milwaukee. Men- sight. ning explained that when music is digitized, “it is cut into little bits and reconstructed to form a Some bands, such as Radiohead, have accepted the Cole said he agrees. Frankenstein monster.” For this reason, many are existence of downloading and offer a “pay-whatreverting back to vinyl records, where the sound you-want” option when releasing a new album. On “The bad step forward is, of course, the continuing the other hand, we all remember artists like Metal- rise of digital piracy and all the puzzling questions quality is far superior, he said. lica, who sued Napster for illegal music sharing in — legal and otherwise — connected with it,” Cole said. “Consumers are pretty much uninformed, “Music is something you feel emotionally, and 2000. and artists are struggling to understand how and when it is reduced to an MP3, you don’t have the “Illegal downloading plays the role of the double- where their profit margin lies in the digital nightsame resonance there,” Menning said. edged sword in the music industry,” Quire said. mare wonderland.”

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Striking a Chord

New Music Minor Scores With Students by Colleen Stanfa

said. “But I do feel that I’m getting enough of an ou can’t walk across campus without seeing education to deserve a music minor.” someone listening to an iPod. Music is a huge part of most people’s lives. Everyone listens to it, In addition to students like Gaska who are planall different types of it, but there are several people ning to minor in music, there are students who participate in ensembles just for fun. who make music as well.

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Lindsey Townsley, a sophomore in the College of Communication, does just that. Having participated in choir throughout high school, she continued her love of singing in college. Townsley is a member of the Marquette University Chorus, the UniErik Janners, director of music, said Marquette versity Women’s Chorus and an a cappella group attracts students who are very involved in high called Gold ‘N Blues. Townsley said she especially enjoys Gold ‘N Blues school music programs. because “the a cappella According to Janners, the idea for a music minor group has personality.” “I do feel that I’m getting has been in the works for a while because there is a high interest in the subject. Janners pushed to turn Townsley also said the enough of an education to this idea into a reality, which required creating a number of students deserve a music minor.” few new courses to satisfy the minor. Each student involved this year has has to take musically based classes such as music grown, and she said she theory, conducting and music history. Music mi- believes this change is because of the implenors also need four performing arts credits. mentation of the new minor program. Jason Gaska, a freshman in the College of Engineering, said he is planning on pursuing a music minor. He said when he was choosing which college to attend, he was already about 90 percent sure Marquette was the right place. When he found out that Marquette would be offering a music minor, however, it made his decision much easier. At Marquette, there are more than 400 students who participate in music ensembles. With interest from the student population, the university has developed a new music minor program this year.

“(I) can tell that it’s a developing program,” Gaska marquettejournal.org

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Milwaukee’S

Milwaukee City Hall Lithograph, 1898

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Best

After over a century, the effects that three men had on our city can still be felt today. by Greg Shutters

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Allis

Pabst

Plankinton

Photo courtesy Milwaukee County Historical Society

Photo courtesy Capt. Frederick Pabst Mansion Inc.

Photo courtesy Milwaukee County Historical Society

While their names are still visible, their legacies become increasingly unknown to new generations of Milwaukeeans and Marquette students. While that period of rapid expansion they helped instigate happened more than 100 years ago, their fingerprints are still identifiable on our city. To better understand their impact, the clock must be turned back to before any of the industrialists got here.

Milwaukee was already beginning to boom. According to historian John Gurda’s book “The Making of Milwaukee,” it had the largest bay and the deepest river on Lake Michigan. But when railroads made their way to the Midwest, Chicago was chosen as a main hub. Milwaukee could have easily faded into obscurity.

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hen Marquette University was founded in 1881, Milwaukee was undergoing a period of rapid expansion. Factories were springing up everywhere, providing jobs for immigrants and established Milwaukeeans alike. Some of the biggest motivators in this expansion were a trio of industrialists — unrelated in industry but mutually responsible for building Milwaukee from a small town into a thriving metropolis. These industrialists were Edward P. Allis, Capt. Frederick Pabst and John Plankinton.

Alexander Mitchell, a Milwaukee railroad tycoon in the mid-1800s, wrote, “If it had not been for enterprise and public spirit and liberality of Enterprise & Public Spirit the the citizens .... Milwaukee to-day might have been Allis, Pabst and Plankinton are all names that Students from the Chicagoland area sometimes no larger than Manitowoc or Sheboygan.” Mitchell would probably ring a bell to most Marquette stu- jokingly (or not so jokingly) call Milwaukee a speaks most directly about Milwaukee’s first raildents. The suburb of West Allis is just a short trip “Chicago suburb.” If things developed differently road pioneers, but “enterprise and public spirit” west on I-94. Off-campus coffee shop, Mocha, is in the mid-1800s, however, it could have been the also apply to the industrial pioneers that the railroads brought. on the corner of Wisconsin and Plankinton Av- other way around. enues. Pabst lends his name to a popular tourist site, concert venue and a college party staple. Before the arrival of Allis, Pabst and Plankinton, What is remarkable about these early captains of

B a c k g r o u n d i n f o r m at i o n Edward P. Allis • Born in Cazenovia, N.Y. • Moved to Milwaukee in 1846 after graduating from college • Started a leather tannery with his college friend William Allen (after borrowing money from Williams parents — just like a college student) • Was an extremely well-networked individual (your professors are right, it pays to network!) • Bought the bankrupt Reliance Works (a machine shop) in 1861, even though he had no mechanical know-how

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Capt. Frederick Pabst • Born in Saxony, in modern-day eastern Germany • Emigrated with his parents to Chicago in 1848 — became a cabin boy and later a captain of Lake Michigan steamships • Married the daughter of Philip Best, a Milwaukee beer brewer who had founded his own brewery in 1844 • Became a partner in the Best brewery in 1864, even though he had little to no experience as a beer brewer

John Plankinton • Born in Delaware • Moved to Milwaukee in 1844 to become a butcher • By the very next year, Plankinton had the largest butcher shop in the county • Began curing and packing meat to send to more distant customers • Formed a partnership with Frederick Layton and opened a packing house on what is now called “Plankinton Avenue”


industry is that they often had an interest and great enthusiasm about the field that they were going into, but no real-world knowledge of it. Frederick Pabst was literally a “captain of industry” — his experience was as a Lake Michigan steamer captain, not a beer brewer. His father-in-law, however, ran a successful brewery in Milwaukee, and Pabst not only became fascinated by the business, but also partnered with his father-in-law to run his brewery.

This made the packing trade lucrative, and in 1852, Plankinton opened a packing house. The packing operation started with little more than a butcher shop, but soon, Plankinton had what Gurda called the “lion’s share” of the meat business. “From small seeds you get these huge enterprises,” Gurda said.

While Plankinton had great business sensibilities of his own, his success owes a lot to the quality of “He was in the right place at the right time,” said the people he surrounded himself with. An associJohn Eastberg, senior historian of the Captain ate of Plankinton’s in his later years was a young Frederick Pabst Mansion Inc. “I don’t think he ever Patrick Cudahy. Cudahy was a poor immigrant would have envisioned himself as a brewer.”

The suburb of West Allis is just a short trip west on I-94,

Pabst studied the processpopular Marquette hangout “Mocha” is on the corner of es involved in the brewing Wisconsin and Plankinton Avenues and of course Pabst of beer and the running of a company, and he belends his name to a house party staple. gan to develop an affinity for the business. What he lacked in technical know-how he made up for in who eventually worked his way up to be a manager promoting and leadership. at one of Plankinton’s packing plants. “His experiences on the Great Lakes primed him for what he did at the brewing company,” Eastberg said. “As a captain moving mercantile goods around the Great Lakes ... an early understanding of marketing was natural for him.” E. P. Allis had even less of an idea what he was getting into. Seeing an increase in the market for machines, he bought the bankrupt Reliance Works machine shop.

The mansion of John Plankinton, (above) and his daughter Elizabeth (below). (photos courtesy Department of Special Collections and University Archives, Marquette University Libraries

“(Cudahy) began on the ground floor,” Gurda said. “Not someone who had advantages.” Plankinton quickly recognized Cudahy’s talent and later made him partner in the company. While the work was often grim, the packing business attracted scores of laborers to the Milwaukee area. By 1880, meatpacking became the most important industry in the city’s economy. In that year, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, Milwaukee’s population topped 115,000.

“What made Allis unusual was that he was not a technical guy,” said Gurda, historian and Milwau- Plankinton’s energy was something legendary, kee expert. “I don’t know if he could tell a T-square especially during the peak packing season. After no small wonder that Plankinton made the impact from a clothes hanger.” Plankinton’s death, Cudahy wrote: on Milwaukee that he did. Like Pabst, Allis made up for his shortcomings by his aggressive market instincts. “(Allis) bet the farm every time, and always won,” Gurda said.

Packing and Processing John Plankinton, unlike Allis and Pabst, started out very knowledgeable in his field. He entered the meatpacking trade already as an experienced butcher. As a natural entrepreneur, he knew to strike when the iron was hot. According to Gurda’s book, the 1850s marked the beginning of a growing surplus of hogs and cattle in the Milwaukee area.

In those days, Mr. Plankinton possessed enough energy for any dozen ordinary men. He would appear at the packing house on such mornings with his trousers rolled up, a soft slouch hat on his head, and with a business fire in his eye. I was but 25 years of age, a mere boy at the time, so it is not to be wondered at that I should shrink a little in the presence of such an employer. A hand-crafted book, commissioned by Plankinton’s daughter Elizabeth, is filled with such tributes from his friends and colleagues (the book is now in the rare books collection of the Milwaukee Public Library). The stories and anecdotes about Plankinton’s life contained within shows that it was

A Blue Ribbon Business While Frederick Pabst did not start out as a brewmaster, it was only a matter of time before he became one. In 1864 he became partner in Philip Best’s Brewery, and by 1868 Pabst had made it the largest brewery in Milwaukee. In 1871, Best became the largest brewer in the nation — a title that, under the Pabst name, it would hold for several years during the 20th century. Several chance factors played a role in Pabst’s early success. Milwaukee had attracted a large German population early on in its history. That, coupled with Milwaukee’s location made brewing beer a marquettejournal.org

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Did you know? While John Plankinton was a talented businessman, he was not without faults. According to Thomas Jablonsky, associate professor of History, the Plankinton family held strong anti-Catholic sentiments — not an uncommon trait for Yankee businessmen of their time. This proved troublesome for Marquette University, since it was planning to buy the Plankintons’ Grand Avenue property when it was offered for sale. “There was a prohibition by the Plankinton estate not to sell to Catholics,” Jablonsky said. In order to get the land, Marquette set up a dummy corporation to buy it so that any Catholic connection could not be traced, according to documents in the University Archives. The land was sold and all three Plankinton properties wound up in the hands of Catholic organizations — in 1918, Marquette took control of John Plankinton’s former mansion, as well as the mansion belonging to his son William. The Knights of Columbus bought the Elizabeth Plankinton mansion in 1907 and kept it for many years until they sold it to Marquette. To make room for new university buildings, Marquette bulldozed William’s mansion in 1970, John’s in 1975 and Elizabeth’s in 1980.

very lucrative business. “You had the German population base to consume the product,” Eastberg said. “Plus they had a knowledge of brewing and materials necessary for manufacturing in the immediate area.” This meant that Pabst could easily benefit from not only customers, but also a skilled workforce. Chance also played a role in Pabst’s dominance in the form of the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. The Chicago breweries knocked out by the fire eliminated Chicago as a major contender to be the era’s “Brew City.” While Pabst seems like he might have just “gotten lucky,” it was his skill that made his streak of good luck a million dollar venture. At this time, most breweries were local-only, because before refrigerated rail cars beer easily spoiled in transport. “It was a very seasonal kind of a business,” Gurda said. “Transportation limited how much you could ship.” But Pabst took the initiative and became one of the first brewers to ship his product to other cities. “The market (in Milwaukee) was too small to support the ambitions he began to harbor,” Gurda said, referring to Pabst’s decision to expand the market for his beer. After his brand was introduced nationally, Pabst became best known for his publicity and promotional techniques. “He was the kind of guy who would show up at the Pabst rooms in New York City and buy the place a beer,” Gurda said. “He was sort of a larger than life personality.” The spirited promotions made Pabst a millionaire by 1880, and in 1889, the Best brewery was renamed for Pabst. Many found jobs in the Pabst brewery during the latter part of the 19th century due to Pabst’s success. By 1890, Milwaukee’s population had jumped (above left) The Pabst Brewery as it appeared at the height of the company’s success (photo courtesy Capt. Frederick Pabst Mansion Inc.) (left) The Pabst Brewery, which closed in 1996, as it appears today. The old brewery complex is currently under construction, with the intention to restore the buildings and convert them to housing and entertainment venues. (photo by Jaclyn Poeschl)

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to more than 200,000 — a 75 percent increase one of the largest names in farm equipment manufrom a decade before, according to the U.S. Census facturing. Bureau. By 1900, manufacturing had surpassed both meatpacking and brewing While beer no longer to become Milwaukee’s holds the role as the “Allis bid on the entire most economically most important inimportant industry, system without ever dustry to Milwaukee’s and the city’s populaeconomy, it has left a making a pump or a foot tion topped 285,000. mark on the city. Even of pipe.” Milwaukee for years after many of the major became known as the breweries left Milwaukee — including Pabst’s — the city continues to be “Machine Shop of the World.” While Allis never lived to see the turn of the century, it was his concalled “brew city”. tributions to the Allis company that made Milwaukee’s manufacturing industry possible.

World’s Machine Shop If beer made Milwaukee famous, it was manufacturing that made it even more successful. Later in the 19th century, Milwaukee began to shift away from processing industries like meatpacking and brewing and move toward manufacturing and metalworking. According to Gurda, no one was more instrumental in that shift than E.P. Allis.

Building a City Industry brought in the masses, but without buildings, roads and other features of a city, Milwaukee could not serve its new public. That’s where industrialists like Allis, Pabst and Plankinton stepped in. Pabst especially was a builder. In addition to his mansion, which still stands at 2000 W. Wisconsin Ave., Pabst built Milwaukee’s first skyscraper, the Pabst Building, in 1893 on the corner of what is now Water Street and Wisconsin Avenue. “It was an icon,” said Gurda, explaining that companies would even make coin jars in the shape of the Pabst Building. Pabst also built the Pabst Theatre in 1895 after the Nunnemacher Grand Opera House burned down.

“He was the godfather of that shift,” Gurda said. Even after buying the Reliance Works machine shop in 1861, Allis still did not know much about manufacturing. That was a major influence in his business principle: “Find a promising market, hire the best engineers available and get out of their way,” Gurda wrote. The first test of that principle would come in 1871, when Milwaukee’s municipal government wanted to install the first city water system and opened up bids for contracts. “Allis bid on the entire system without ever making a pump or a foot of pipe,” Gurda said. Allis won the contract, and after hiring some of the best engineers available, his company completed the water system. Reliance Works soon became one of the largest employers in Milwaukee, and began building things like the Milwaukee River Flushing Station (now Alterra on the Lake) and some of the largest steam engines of the time. When Allis died in 1889, he left one of the largest and most successful companies in Wisconsin. In 1901, Allis’ company merged with two Chicago firms and a Pennsylvania firm to become AllisChalmers Manufacturing Co., which later became

Milwaukee’s North Point Water Tower (left) contained a standpipe to absorb pulsations from the municipal water system’s reciprocating steam engine pumps. E.P. Allis and his company built the system in 1874. The tower remained in use until 1963. Allis’ company built the Flushing Station (right) in 1888, which pumped lake water into the polluted Milwaukee River to keep it flowing. The building is now an Alterra (photos by Kevin Kozicki).

Winning the blue Ribbon As the story goes, Pabst won its “Blue Ribbon” at the World’s Columbian Exposition in 1893. Before it assumed the name with which we are all familiar, the beer was originally called “Best Select,” and later “Pabst Select” when the brewery was renamed for Pabst in 1889. Upon winning the first prize, Pabst didn’t miss an opportunity to market his beer as “blue ribbon.” “They actually affixed a blue ribbon to all of their bottles,” historian John Gurda said. “Part of it was a snob appeal — buy the best.” Pabst later renamed Pabst Select “Pabst Blue Ribbon” as an homage to the ribbons that were once tied around the bottles. But what would a blue ribbon be without controversy? According to Gurda, Budweiser also claims to have won the 1893 blue ribbon.

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Pabst built Milwaukee’s first skyscraper in 1893 (above), and the Pabst Theatre (below) in 1895. Pabst’s skyscraper was demolished in 1980, but his theatre remains a popular concert venue. (photos courtesy Capt. Frederick Pabst Mansion Inc.)

kee becoming, as historian Eastberg described it, years later. Pabst’s Whitefish Bay Resort was torn “the German Athens of the West”. down in 1914 due to a steady decline in popularity. Plankinton’s hotel was demolished a year later to Pabst even built a permanent amusement park, make way for Milwaukee’s first “shopping center,” the “Whitefish Bay Rethe Plankinton Arcade sort,” in 1889. Located — better known now “It is the only house of the in the neighboring subas the older section of urb of Whitefish Bay, Grand Avenue Mall. period that survived with it attracted as many as its original function and 15,000 people on a popBoth John Plankinton’s interiors intact.” ular Sunday. home and his son William’s home were purPlankinton was also quite the builder. He funded chased by Marquette University in 1918, accordthe first Milwaukee Public Library building in 1880, ing to the University Archives. William’s mansion the city’s Industrial Exposition Building in 1881 served first as the Trinity Hospital Annex and then and built the Plankinton House, a luxury hotel, in the Alumni and Athletic Office. Following Amer1884. He and his family also built their luxurious ica’s trend of urban renewal, the building was torn homes along what is now Wisconsin Avenue. Most down in 1970. John Plankinton’s mansion housed notable of these homes was the Elizabeth Plankinton mansion, which John built for his daughter as Though it once housed the College of Music, Marquette determined it had no future use a wedding gift. Elizabeth’s wedding was called off, for the John Plankinton mansion (below) and however, and she became disenchanted with the demolished it in 1975. house, never actually living there. The Elizabeth Plankinton mansion (bottom) sparked protests when it was razed in 1980.

Unlike Plankinton and Pabst, E.P. Allis never built much outside of his own factory buildings and the (photos courtesy Department of Special Collections and University Archives, Marquette homes in which he and his family lived. Most no- University Libraries) table is the home of his son Charles, on Prospect Avenue. The building is now the Charles Allis Art Museum, which is open to the public. Although several of these buildings were of great importance to Milwaukee’s history, many did not The Pabst Theatre was famous in its early days for survive. The public library Plankinton helped bringing some of the best German-language stage found moved to its current location in 1898. The Inshows to Milwaukee — a popular attraction for dustrial Exposition Building burned to the ground many of the city’s German-born residents. The in 1905, and the Milwaukee Auditorium (now Pabst Theater was a major contributor to Milwau- the Milwaukee Theatre) was built in its place four Plankinton built the Plankinton House Hotel (left) in 1884. It was demolished in 1915 to make way for the Plankinton Arcade, pictured below c. 1956 (center). The Plankinton Arcade is a major building in the current Grand Avenue Mall, which opened in 1982. (photos courtesy Milwaukee County Historical Society)

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the College of Music, but was demolished in 1975. That same year, urban renewal came very close to claiming the famed Pabst Mansion as well. After Frederick Pabst and his wife died, the family sold the mansion to the Catholic Archdiocese of Milwaukee, who used the mansion as the home of the Milwaukee Archbishops for several years. When the building was sold in 1975, its buyers intended to demolish it and build a parking structure in its place. The plan would have gone through if a new historic preservation group had not stepped in. Wisconsin Heritages Inc. raised funds and purchased the home, opening it up for tours. Tours are still available, and the mansion is a familiar site for students living on the west side of campus. “Milwaukee is fortunate the Pabst Mansion survived and weathered the 20th century,” Eastberg said. “It is the only house of the period that survived with its E.P. Allis’ son Charles owned a mansion (above) on the corner of Prospect and Royall and now houses the original function and interiors intact.” Charles Allis Art Museum. Admission is $3 with a Student I.D. (photos by Jaclyn Poeschl) Frederick Pabst’s mansion (below) narrowly escaped the wrecking ball. It is now open for tours.

The year 1980 was a terrible blow to Milwaukee’s Admission is $7 with a Student I.D. architectural heritage, as both the historic Pabst (photos courtesy Capt. Frederick Pabst Mansion, Inc.) Building and the final remaining Plankinton mansion were torn down. The Pabst Building was purchased by the Carley Capital Group in Madison and was torn down, with no building taking its place until the 100 East building was constructed in 1989. The motive for the demolition seemed to be simply to increase the property value for a new build. “It was largely a developer trying to make a bigger buck,” Gurda said. The Plankinton Mansion met a similar end. The building, having housed the Knights of Columbus for many years (fittingly, the address was 1492 W. Wisconsin Ave.) was purchased by the city’s Redevelopment Authority and resold to Marquette on the grounds that it be demolished. According to Thomas Jablonsky, associate professor of History, Marquette encountered several lawsuits by historic preservationist groups after they acquired the land. Jablonsky said there was also neighborhood opposition, as some did not favor the idea of Marquette owning all the property on Wisconsin Avenue between 12th Street and 16th Street. Once the courts filed in favor of Marquette, preservationists had no time to fight back. “I think it was done on a Sunday night,” Gurda said. “They were trying to not do anything that would call attention to the fact they were tearing it down.”

Decline and recovery The 1970s and ‘80s were not only tough decades for the historic buildings that our early industrialists constructed, but it was also even tougher for their companies. Like many Midwestern cities that relied mainly on heavy industry, these decades saw a major downturn in Milwaukee’s economy. In 1985, Pabst was sold to a California firm who, in Gurda’s words, “tried to ride on momentum from previous years.” Pabst’s share in the beer market fell drastically, and the Milwaukee brewery was closed in 1996. Allis-Chalmers filed for bankruptcy in 1987, after selling off many of its assets and enduring years of falling market share. Ironically, when Pabst and Allis’s companies were on the decline, Patrick Cudahy Inc., an indirect successor to John Plankinton’s business by way of his partner Patrick Cudahy, continued to thrive. Meatpacking had never reached the level that manufacturing did in Milwaukee’s economy, but at the same time it did not feel the recession of the 1980s as harshly. Industry in Milwaukee has never been the same since, but that’s not to say the city is suffering. Large industries such as healthcare and electronic funds transfer have begun to call Milwaukee home. In addition, according to Gurda, despite the downturn in manufacturing jobs Milwaukee is still one of the leading producers of manufactured goods in the U.S. “There’s an interesting mix of (industries) you wouldn’t have guessed,” Gurda said.

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“Now you’re beginning to see a city getting very complex and demanding all sorts of specializations ... that begins (Marquette’s) introduction There were always other brewers, packers and into the broader urban economy and the profes“Marquette ... did send a bulldozer in to take the manufacturers — in Pabst’s case, he consistently sions that uphold a complex urban economy,” said Jablonsky. building down quickly ... because it had dragged had Schlitz, Blatz and Miller to contend with. on for years,” Jablonsky said. “Had Frederick Pabst not been here, there would That complex urban economy is what makes Milhave been beer royalty in Milwaukee, but he was waukee more than just Marquette’s location. It still the king of kings, the brightest of the luminar- also becomes a place to work and a place to have Milwaukee’s Royalty fun. The work of the industrialists Allis, Pabst and ies,” Gurda said. Plankinton created a job market in Milwaukee and When Allis died in 1889, Plankinton in 1891 and Pabst in 1904, Milwaukee lost what could be called Also, according to Jablonsky, Marquette’s initial consequently built the city that made Marquette three of its finest entrepreneurs. Without them, the successes at the end of the 1800s cannot not be di- into a university. city may not have built itself as well or as quickly rectly attributed to the Plankinton, Allis or Pabst Perhaps Gurda put it best. “Cities start with jobs influences. as it did. — they start as economic entities and become so They weren’t the only people making a difference, “Marquette almost could have been in the cornfields much more.” and it wouldn’t have mattered,” said Jablonsky. however. Jablonsky explained that Marquette’s reasoning for quick action was to prevent the university from wasting more time and money.

ously did was create all sorts of employment opportunities.”

“What really stands out is that you had a critical But at the turn of the century, the growing popumass of entreprenuers,” Gurda said. “Milwaukee lation in Milwaukee began to affect the way Mar- Sara J. Martinez contributed to this story. really got more than its proportional share of the quette taught its students. entreprenuers and enterprises, so what that obvi-

with Becky Simo rebecca.simo@marquette.edu

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t’s got its share of nicknames: Brew City (OK, I see where that comes from,) Mil-Town (lame, but I get it) and Cream City (huh?)*. It’s got a lot of beer: Miller Brewing Company, Sprecher Brewing Company, Stonefly Brewery and Lakefront Brewery all call Milwaukee home. It’s got Arthur “The Fonz” Fonzarelli permanently standing on the RiverWalk (“Aaaayyyyy!”). Then there are the brewery tours, sausage races at our Major League Baseball games and the memorable recent parade that consisted of hundreds of Harley-Davidson motorcycles riding down Wisconsin Avenue. It sounded like a plague of locusts, lasted for what felt like several hours, blocked traffic and made it impossible to cross the street. And yet, somehow, everybody was mostly OK with this. Yes, Milwaukee’s a pretty weird place. Some might even call it a pretty tacky place. Whatever you think of a city that celebrates drinking, noisy

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motorcycles and erects statues of bygone celebrities, Milwaukee is, for many of us, a home away from home for the next few years. And you know what? It has kind of grown on me. I have to admit, though, there are still some things about this city that I don’t quite understand.

So, my new theory, which is probably pretty obvious to most of you, is this: it all comes down to the beer.

I mean, beer is a pretty common element in college students’ lives, and it’s a major source of income for this Brew City of ours. It is everywhere at parFor some reason that I cannot quite figure out, Mil- ties, baseball games, barbecues and probably in waukeeans really enjoy brewery tours. In an effort your fridge. A quotation so famously attributed to to debunk this mystery, I did some serious, scien- Benjamin Franklin reads, “Beer is proof that God tific research. And by serious, scientific research I loves us and wants us to be happy,” and while there exists virtually no documentation that Franklin mean asking my roommate about the topic. did say those words, the phrase has become the “It makes it OK to be drunk and try all kinds of mantra of many. beer. It’s kind of expected,” she said. “Plus, you can get a lot of beer for usually a few dollars. What’s It is all about the beer. And in Milwaukee, a city not to love? It’s not alcoholism, it’s a sophisticated that’s flowing with the stuff (sometimes literally, depending upon which Friday-night party you’re at), I tour!” guess it’s only natural that beer-lovers would want to Sophisticated tour, indeed. I figured that was a see exactly how their brew of choice is made. pretty good explanation, but it made me think. * “Cream City” comes from a certain type of brick Why brewery tours? There are plenty of other things made from Milwaukee soil that has a light, creamy that are manufactured here, and everywhere, but as color. Still, I think it’s a stretch. far as I know, people don’t make a habit of visiting, say, the Klement’s sausage plant. And who would Views in this column do not necessarily want to? Raw meat being ground up and, well, I reflect the views of Marquette University. won’t continue so you can still eat the stuff without gagging. But trust me, it’s not pretty.


Facets of Faith Students keep Marquette’s mission of diversity alive as they live out their faith on campus. by Caitlin Kavanaugh

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The Rev. David Fleming explains that Jesuits see “all things in this world as gifts of God, presented Perhaps Marquette’s religious environment is par- to us so that we can know God more easily and tially due to its Jesuit identity. Stephanie Russell, make a return of love more readily.” executive director of the Office of Mission and Identity, explains that Jesuits are a religious order This return of love seems to radiantly beam from Marquette, parof Catholics priests who ticularly when have taken lifelong vows it comes to acof poverty, chastity and This return of love seems cepting other obedience, and whose to radiantly beam from faiths currently The different religions represented on campus spirituality is grounded Marquette, particularly when on campus. work together in a similar way. Each one brings a in the Spiritual Exercises it comes to accepting other different color to campus, mixing with one anoth- of St. Ignatius of Loyola. faiths currently on campus. Shazeen Haruer to create the current portrait that makes Mar- They are “men on misnani, a sophoquette University a fridge-worthy item. But does sion” and use these more in the Marquette merely tolerate these religions or does it teachings to breathe life accept them with open arms and encourage them into student and faculty retreat programs, which College of Arts & Sciences, attributes Marquette’s diversity to its accommodating attitude. to grow? More importantly, what is it about Mar- teach about love and finding God in all things. quette that allows its campus to be so colorful? emember finger-painting as a kid? You’d run to art class, open up the paint and anxiously dip all ten chubby fingers into the liquids. After spreading an array of colors onto a previously blank page, you would bring the painting home to your mom, keeping your hopes high and praying the painting would be displayed in the most prestigious place in your home — the front of the refrigerator.

JESUIT IDENTITY

marquettejournal.org

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Gesu Parish, photo by Kevin Kozicki

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“I’ve found they’re very accepting and make an effort to help,” she said, leaning forward intently. “Especially this year, being president of the Muslim Student Association, I had (Campus Ministry) contact me to see how they could help. They have been an incredible resource and source of support.” Alana Wauneka, a former Mormon and a junior in the College of Business Administration, also commends Marquette for its religions programs, which she believes allow students of other faiths to feel comfortable on campus. “They’re really pretty accepting of everyone,” she said, smiling softly, remembering her experiences. Although Marquette does provide numerous religious organizations for minority religions on campus, there is more to the university that shows how the College of Arts & Sciences, said he begs us to that would distract you, especially things that are remember the importance of such an act. not a good way for you to be spending your time deep its ocean of acceptance truly reaches. … not that eating and drinking aren’t good, obvi“Marquette would never downgrade another reli- “Christian faith is a tangible participation in the ously they are,” she said with a short laugh. gion,” said Allison Scheetz, a junior in the College divine, a step with the rest of humanity toward of Communication. Its respect for other religions transformation that can create harmony among After recovering from giggles, she said sincerely, is a big part of what keeps those of other faiths peoples,” he said. It is doing more than being toler- “It’s trying to be conscious of being a better person, ant, he said, it is acting under the Christian notion kind and generous.” coming to a Catholic campus, she said. of love. At the end of Ramadan, Eid ul-Fitr is celebrated to “(The) attitude toward Catholicism is also very positive,” she added, noting that she feels the school This is the love, Gundlach believes, that has helped mark the end of the fasting. would never force its beliefs onto anyone. “I really different religions to join — like colored segments of a stained glass window, molding together to cre- “The main part of celebrating is going to the like how Marquette handles (its) Jesuit identity.” ate an astonishing piece worthy of admiration. mosque and saying a special Eid prayer,” Harunani said. “We also give gifts to each other and a lot of Athiest Allison Herman, a sophomore in the Colpeople give money.” lege of Communication, seems to agree that respect is a big part of Marquette’s ability to attract While most Christians get to leave the chaotic students from other religions. Walking through campus during the holiday sea- semester behind for break and rejoin their fami“When I first came to Marquette, I didn’t share my son appears to be Milwaukee’s version of a reli- lies to celebrate Christmas, minority religions are view for months,” Herman said, describing her ini- gious, student-clad Las Vegas — a place full of sometimes forced to spend holiday time without tial fear of being condemned for her beliefs. But life, lights and shows. But among all the wreaths, the people they care for. since coming, she said she has found a different Christmas cheer and fattening treats are students reality than she initially suspected. of other faiths with important holiday traditions of Although Harunani has been lucky enough to go home for each holiday, she realizes that not all of their own. her friends are quite so privileged. “I’ve never encountered anybody who would say, ‘No, you can’t think another way than us.’ But holi- Harunani, a devout Muslim, offers up a much difdays can get a little touchy-feely,” she said, shiver- ferent way of celebrating the winter holidays than “I have had friends who were stuck up here dur ing as if the temperature had suddenly dropped an evergreen covered in ornaments and tinsel. Ra- ing some of the holidays, and I felt horrible,” she several degrees. “Any event where (there is a prayer madan, Harunani explained enthusiastically, is the explained. “I just skip all my classes and go home. said), I feel a little outside of the circle. But other- first main Muslim holiday celebrated close to the God is important.” wise it’s pretty good, with the exception of major winter season. It is a month of fasting from sunrise holidays (when I) realize everyone else is going until sunset that lasted from Sept. 1 until Sept. 30 Thankfully, there are people around who enable to Mass and I’m not. But it’s OK. They’re all very this year. For Muslims, fasting is more than simply Muslim students to practice their faith during open-minded people, which is very cool.” times away from family. denying your body food.

DIVERSE TRADITIONS

The acceptance and respect Marquette offers has enabled people of other faiths to feel welcome in the community. But Garrett Gundlach, a senior in

“It’s supposed to be a removal from all distractions,” Harunani said, taking a more serious tone. “It’s abstaining from food, water, sex, gossip, anything

“Usually you develop friend networks up here so you can go to prayer with them in the morning, which is nice,” Harunani said. marquettejournal.org

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Lydia Roussos, a junior in the College of Arts & While these students experience challenges before Sciences who is Jewish, understands the challenge the Christmas season, for non-denominational of being away from family. Christian Jasmine Zapata, a senior in the College of Health Sciences, the challenge is something that “Last year I was in the dorms for Hanukkah and will prove to be a daily struggle. that was hard because you’re not allowed to light candles. I had to go down to the nasty kitchen in “My little brother died last November,” Zapata said, the basement of Mashuda to light a menorah.” lowering her gaze to the table. “Last Christmas, my mom didn’t want to do anything that reminded her In times like these, Roussos said she spends holi- of our traditional Christmas, so it’s (been) kind of days withherrabbi’s family. “I have a home away hard recently.” from home there,” she said. Despite this tragedy, Zapata remains positive when This year, however, Hanukkah falls during winter explaining her family’s past traditions. “We had to break and Roussos is excited to be able to spend do a series of events before we open presents,” she the time with her family. laughed. “We always read the Christmas story and sing carols together.”

The months ahead will be difficult, but Zapata chooses to keep her eyes toward God, from whom she derives her peace. “The main part is appreciating the meaning of Christmas and each other,” she said. It is this understanding and strong spirit of love that is consistent in most holidays. It is the intangible thread that ties people together, works to mend their differences and nourishes the unity of a diversified campus.

The

Manresa Project

by Brooke McEwen

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“We didn’t want to create an alternate ministry,” Mountin said. “We tried to enhance programs alIn 2000, University President the Rev. Robert A. ready existing on campus.” Wild received an invitation to apply for a $2 million grant for Theological Exploration of Vocation When deciding on a name for the program, from the Lilly Endowment Inc., said Susan Mount- Mountin said she knew its roots must be groundin, director of The Manresa Project. Marquette re- ed the teachings of St. Ignatius Loyola. The name ceived two months and $50,000 to research and Manresa comes from a small town in Spain where Ignatius spent time in prayer. At Marquette we have the opportunity to question reflect on how the grant could affect the school. who we are. What do we want to do with our lives? We question what talents we have. How can we use In 2002, Marquette was one of a total of 88 colleges Out of the 88 schools awarded the Theological Exthem to best serve the world? We question our faith. and universities that were rewarded the grant to ploration of Vocation, Lilly said Marquette gave its explore vocation, Mountin said. Each school de- program the best name, according to Mountin. How does faith in God play a role in our lives? signed a program based on its individual needs. So Manresa quietly enhanced programs, leaderEnter The Manresa Project, our guide to discover- Marquette’s needs sparked the idea for Manresa. ship conferences and classes, Mountin said. ing ourselves and exploring our vocations. We see its logo on posters, remember its name from our Program coordinators approached Manresa from First Year Reading Program selection and some- three vantage points: academics, ministry and stu- But unfortunately, Mountin said Manresa’s funding from the Lilly Endowment is coming to a close. times fail to understand the developmental role it dent development. e the difference. Most Marquette students look at those short, sweet words and reminisce about campus tours and college applications. But our Marquette mantra goes much deeper than freshman year flashbacks. As students at Marquette, we are called to be men and women for others.

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plays in our lives as Marquette students.


The project was initially funded for five years, from “Manresa is the heart and soul of Marquette,” vsky said. “If literature is going to mean anything for them it will be finding greater meaning in the 2002 to 2007. It then received a sustainability grant Brandli said. text.” from 2008 through 2009. However, a struggling point of the project is its difThe literary works “This is the last real year of funding,” Mountin said. fusion. encompass post“Given Marquette’s and the world’s finances, it’s a war pieces written “We can’t claim difficult time to make decisions about resources.” “Education goes beyond the after 1945. The sethings that are just classroom,” Brandli said. lected stories have Mountin said she knows that parts of the program ours,” Mountin said. “Life is not a textbook or a to do with human will continue in the future, but which parts will be multiple choice test. You need relationships after Manresa has worked a priority has yet to be decided. to contemplate things.” World War II. Stowith the Office of Inries include women “We must be realistic with the economy,” she said. ternational Educawho have lost hustion for Real People, Manresa has collaborated with a variety of cam- Real Stories, a speaker series about the vocations of bands in battle, men who return from the war pus organizations to provide programming that people with diverse backgrounds, she said. It has and young men psychologically ruined from its includes speakers, service learning and leadership helped incorporate discernment into the Office of impact. Student Development’s Women’s Leadership Conopportunities, Mountin said.

Mara Brandli, a sophomore in the College of Arts ference. It incorporated vocation into the College “Literature is a face-to-face encounter with anoth& Sciences, has been involved in Manresa since of Business Administration’s LEAD program with er person,” he said. her freshman year. a portion called “Life Beyond the Bottom Line.” Pustejovsky said he intentionally designed the “There are so many different paths to finding a vo- The project also created Manresa classes, Mountin course to raise questions among students and is cation,” Brandli said. “Manresa wants to provide said. The project gives faculty a small award to de- always open to talking about how faith shapes the the tools and the means for students to do it.” sign coursework that integrates discernment into classroom. the classroom. Brandli said speakers often highlight Manresa’s He said he calls attention to the relationships withgoals and pose questions relatable to all students. John Pustejovsky, associate professor of German, in literature and the fact that we all will live our has developed two Manresa courses and is in- lives in committed relationships with others in one “Education goes beyond the classroom,” Brandli structing a Manresa course called “The Modern form or another. said. “Life is not a textbook or a multiple choice German Short Story” this semester. test. You need to contemplate things.” “Literature is really about real life,” Pustejovsky. “It’s He said he finds ways to let the course material only about the real world and how to deal with its Brandli said she considers Manresa one of Mar- speak to students about the issues of the world and social and political realities. It’s about how to make your way among these things as a whole person.” quette’s strongest attributes. The program instills incorporates vocation broadly. students with a sense of vocation that lingers long after graduation, she said. “Most people won’t become professors,” Pustejomarquettejournal.org

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opportunity to live in a community of energy and curiosity. Another area is Campus Ministry, where I am blessed to be able to walk the path of life with my position as a retreat leader. I am also part of the Manresa Student Advisory Board. Recently I have been given the chance to be a participant on the Global Medical Brigade to Honduras, where for the first time I will have insight into a world I have been waiting to meet for a long time. Finally, as a part of Partners in Ministry, I spend a fulfilling amount of time as the youth program coordinator at the Casa Romero renewal center, where I am both spiritually and culturally inspired on a regular basis.

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COOLDOWN 35

into the professional world, and there is nothing wrong with that.” Finally, I found the fuel I needed to escape a world of expectations and guidelines and journey toward a world of pure bliss. The Roads I Took To Get There This journey on the highway of the heart required and will continue to require three things: passion, intent and patience. These are precisely the three roads that allow me to just be happy every single day of the week.

Passion is what gets me out of bed. I am passionate about a few things in particular: the colors My life activity is to experience constant curios- and movements of nature, huts in El Salvador and ity while staying grounded in the previously men- language. Few things make my soul more content tioned campus activities. At one time or another, than a bike ride through the leaves, so I do it as I have said that my favorite thing in life is to meet often as possible. My family and I have been avid new people — it is an endless joy. So as long as I am tent campers since my first year on the planet, and surrounded by humanity’s diversity, my activities I have been drawn to the love of the Hispanic culture for as long as I can remember. So, a hut and are constantly growing. El Salvador seem like a good two-in-one combination. Finally, the boundless capacity of language My Journey makes the world an endless discovery. My journey is one of love and dignity. It all begins with my family. From day one, I have known Intent is what allows me to make choices based off nothing but unconditional love from my parents of my deepest feelings. When I feel captivated or and brother. From the years of wanting to try out trapped, I know something needs to change. Rareevery after-school activity to the mornings when ly do I find myself on a road of expectations, and I did nothing but sleep in until 1 p.m. knowing I that is simply because life is too short to conform. had to be wide-awake for a busy night as a carhop at Gilles’ Frozen Custard Drive-in in my home- Patience lets me breathe. Life does not happen town of Fond du Lac, Wis. Going hand-in-hand overnight, so keeping myself grounded within the with this, they showed me the true meaning of realm of the world’s mysteries is essential. One self-dignity. Although a guiding hand was always step, one smile, one person at a time. present, they allowed me to live my life as my own without imposing a single sense of dissatisfaction Continuing the Journey or embarrassment. By having the respect and trust that my heart was strong enough to make a path My journey will continue until the world feels Name: Mara Brandli of my own, my family has become the foundation peace in each person’s dignity. Right now, I plan Age: 19 for my life mission and journey to show the world to continue by working closely with the commuCollege: Arts & Sciences that it, too, can feel peace despite overwhelming nity at Casa Romero. I find that sometimes the Major: International Affairs best way people can help others is to walk the challenges. Minors: Philosophy, Spanish journey together. Working with middle-schoolers My journey has had its fair share of challenges. and high-schoolers, I am able to show this beautiTrying to live a life out of one’s heart is a bit of a ful community the power of self-inspiration and Campus Activities: struggle at first. Living in an environment of ex- trust. Although the struggles of one’s past can be There are two types of activities in my life. One pectations and guidelines, reality can get the best disheartening, I try to remind people that every type is the kind that can be written on a piece of of the heart’s energy. However, one day this jour- day is a fresh start. paper. The other is the activity of life. I find that the ney of the heart vividly became the one and only reasons my campus or “paper” activities appear as way for me to be happy. As the senior class presi- But in general, we do not need anything extraorthey do is because they are the frameworks for my dent in a high school of 2,600 students, my last task dinary to continue or make a journey. Find the of the year was to write and present the gradua- wholeness in the ordinary and life becomes exlife activity. tion speech. My principal’s emotional reaction to traordinary. As long as I live with passion, intent At Marquette, I find myself enjoying several differ- the speech left me in tears of joy. After apologizing and patience for the days to come, my journey will ent corners. My home corner is my resident assis- for her emotions, she said something to me that I continue. But for now, how I can predict sometant position in Carpenter Tower where I have the will never forget: “People like us bring our hearts thing that has a new start every day?

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Yours for only $19.95! Plus Shipping & Handling. by Lissie Crichton-Sapp

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re you tired of letting Billy Mays run away with the contents of your wallet? Do you want more than 10 minutes to call to get the special free bonus? Well, like most infomercials, I can’t promise you these wishes can come true, but I can sure supply you with a short-lived anecdote! At least, before this magazine shatters in your hands. Twenty-minute limited warranty. Grandma always told us: if it’s too good to be true, it probably is. But it’s just so tempting, now that we can call toll-free without parents. After all, who doesn’t want a knife that can cut through anything or some good old Kinoki Detox Foot Pads? Just one phone call (and three payments of $12.95) and all your dreams will come true! Not so, for freshman nursing student Catherine Sestito. “Infomercials are just stupid. Nobody is going to buy those things,” she said. “Only elderly people without lives tend to.”

calendar

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1799 George Washington dies 1891 First basketball game played

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So what are some of the craziest infomercials out there? Ystad said he likes those with “shiny pictures and flashing lights,” and Bowlus didn’t even know how to describe his favorite.

“For a solid 45 minutes, they never said what the “They’re fun to watch,” he said, noting that he takes product was,” Bowlus said. “(It would) make us things into consideration like “how hot the chick is millions and was the best thing ever, but I could never figure out what it was. They just knew the and how ridiculous the product is.” product was so crappy that they just wanted people But what if someone actually received a malfunc- to buy it without mentioning what it was.” tioning infomercial product as a gift? The final verdict depends on “how awesome it functioned Sestito’s favorite? “The Bosley hair transplant … as a conversation piece. I don’t like to return gifts, they’re just so funny,” she laughed. “They have this so I’d probably keep it,” said philosophy instructor fake doctor that gives approval that (the product) will make your hair grow back. They’ll show a Michael Ystad. before and after picture where the hairlines don’t And about the person who gave the gift? “I’d think even match — it’s so obviously fake.” they have no life and no money. I’d be kind of upset. It’s just ridiculous to think of someone who would want to buy you that crap,” Sestito said.

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Well, sometimes it’s not about actually wanting to buy the product. Infomercials also provide a sense of entertainment. Tyler Bowlus, a junior in the College of Engineering, said he frequently watches 4 a.m. airings.

THURSDAY JOURNAL ISSUE #2 RELEASE! 11

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1865 Slavery abolished in the U.S.

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Midwest Airlines Center, Feb. 21 - Mar. 1


Why does slang keep changing? Why are people wearing political T-shirts all the time? What are the best places to go to in Milwaukee? What fashions should I stay away from this season? How can I be the best Marquette Fanatic? How do I protect my PC from viruses? Where are the best places to find art in Milwaukee? Can anyone help me pick out an apartment for next year? How can I use the Pandora Web site? Are there any cool concerts coming up at The Rave? What was that movie “W” like? Is politics just a popularity contest? Is depression in college students normal? What is the real definition of “binge drinking”? How are students from other parts of the world managing their college experience? Is it ethical to download music for free? Why does slang keep changing? Why are people wearing political T-shirts all the time? What are the best places to go to in Milwaukee? What fashions should I stay away from this season? How can I be the best Marquette Fanatic? How do I protect my PC from viruses? Where are the best places to find art in Milwaukee? Can anyone help me pick out an apartment for next year? How can I use the Pandora Web site? Are there any cool concerts coming up at The Rave? What was that movie “W” like? Is politics just a popularity contest? Is depression in college students normal? What is the real definition of “binge drinking”? How are students from other parts of the world managing their college experience? Is it ethical to download music for free? Why does slang keep changing? Why are people wearing political T-shirts all the time? What are the best places to go to in Milwaukee? What fashions should I stay away from this season? How can I be the best Marquette Fanatic? How do I protect my PC from viruses? Where are the best places to find art in Milwaukee? Can anyone help me pick out an apartment for next year? How can I use the Pandora Web site? Are there any cool concerts coming up at The Rave? What was that movie “W” like? Is politics just a popularity contest? Is depression in college students normal? What is the real definition of “binge drinking”? How are students from other parts of the world managing their college experience? Is it ethical to download music for free? Why does slang keep changing? Why are people wearing political T-shirts all the time? What are the best places to go to in Milwaukee? What fashions should I stay away from this season? How can I be the best Marquette Fanatic? How do I protect my PC from viruses? Where are the best places to find art in Milwaukee? Can anyone help me pick out an apartment for next year? How can I use the Pandora Web site? Are there any cool concerts coming up at The Rave? What was that movie “W” like? Is politics just a popularity contest? Is depression in college students normal? What is the real definition of “binge drinking”? How are students from other parts of the world managing their college experience? Is it ethical to download music for free? Why does slang keep changing? Why are people wearing political T-shirts all the time? What are the best places to go to in Milwaukee? What fashions should I stay away from this season? How can I be the best Marquette Fanatic? How do I protect my PC from viruses? Where are the best places to find art in Milwaukee? Can anyone help me pick out an apartment for next year? How can I use the Pandora Web site? Are there any cool concerts coming up at The Rave? What was that movie “W” like? Is politics just a popularity contest? Is depression in college students normal? What is the real definition of “binge drinking”? How are students from other parts of the world managing their college experience? Is it ethical to download music for free? Why does slang keep changing? Why are people wearing political T-shirts all the time? What are the best places to go to in Milwaukee? What fashions should I stay away from this season? How can I be the best Marquette Fanatic? How do I protect my PC from viruses? Where are the best places to find art in Milwaukee? Can anyone help me pick out an apartment for next year? How can I use the Pandora Web site? Are there any cool concerts coming up at The Rave? What was that movie “W” like? Is politics just a popularity contest? Is depression in college students normal? What is the real definition of “binge drinking”? How are students from other parts of the world managing their college experience? Is it ethical to download music for free? Why does slang keep changing? Why are people wearing political T-shirts all the time? What are the best places to go to in Milwaukee? What fashions should I stay away from this season? How can I be the best Marquette Fanatic? How do I protect my PC from viruses? Where are the best places to find art in Milwaukee? Can anyone help me pick out an apartment for next year? How can I use the Pandora Web site? Are there any cool concerts coming up at The Rave? What was that movie “W” like? Is politics just a popularity contest? Is depression in college students normal? What is the real definition of “binge drinking”? How are students from other parts of the world managing their college experience? Is it ethical to download music for free? Why does slang keep changing? Why are people wearing political T-shirts all the time? What are the best places to go to in Milwaukee? What fashions should I stay away from this season?

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Marquette Journal, Winter 2008  

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