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Summer 2009

Houston W e h av e a

problem The man, the mission and the moon

Exclusive interview with astronaut Jim Lovell Also in this Issue: The struggle of the college faithful • being Aware about autism • the obsession with ambition • fun summer dresses


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features 16

contents

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The man, the mission and the moon An exclusive peek into the life of legendary Apollo 13 astronaut and Milwaukee native Jim Lovell.

b y sa r a j . m a r ti n e z

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Perceptions of a disorder

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Autism Awareness Month encourages everyone to take a thoughtful look at the disease and those afflicted. b y c aitli n k a va n a u g h

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Re-examination of conscience

The college years are often a time of transition for students, especially in the realm of religious faith and affiliation. b y A lli k e r f el d

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departments WARMUP

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Editor’s Note After a year as Editor-in-Chief, I feel like we’ve only just met.

My Journal What will seniors miss the most about Marquette?

Rants & Raves Crime is scary business, and reactions to online articles.

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City Buzz Some options for more diverse dining experiences.

10 Campus Spotlight

We can’t get enough of summer, even when it’s still cold outside.

14 Stylephile

What to do now that the weather is getting warmer.

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COOLDOWN

28 Journeys

“Marquette Superstar” Brian Moore on his rise to the top.

30 The Last Word

There were some stories we decided not to print this year.

On the Cover: Photo courtesy NASA, Photo Illustration by Greg Shutters.

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feels like we just met Summer 2009 STAFF Editor-in-Chief

Greg Shutters Assistant Editor

Sara J. Martinez Features & Online Editor

Patrick Johnson Chief Copy Editor

Sarah Krasin Art Director

Greg Shutters Promotions Director

Becca Ruidl

Writers

Samantha Cavallo Nick Herff Caitlin Kavanaugh Alli Kerfeld Sara J. Martinez Jen Michalski Brenda Poppy Matthew Reddin Ryan Riesbeck

Copy Editors Lia Dimitriades Jess Herrick Katie Vertovec

Photographers

Michele Derdzinski Kevin Kozicki Tim Lamberger Lexi Newell Jaclyn Poeschl Mary Shutters Morgan White

Designers

Patrick Johnson Rima Garsys Greg Shutters

Creative Consultants

Alise Buehrer Rima Garsys Patrick Johnson

Online Writers

Alise Buehrer Lissie Crichton-Sapp Patrick Johnson Joseph Kimes Rosemary Lane Sara Patek Becky Simo

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his issue of the Marquette Journal is the fourth that I have produced in my tenure as Editor-inChief. For many of you, these four issues were the first exposures to the Journal you’ve experienced. We’ve gotten an overwhelming response from our readers this year. But still, I feel as if we’ve just met. For those of you who are not aware, this will be my last issue as editor. A mere four issues is far too few for an editor to have a sufficient grasp of his or her magazine, but this is a college-run magazine, and I’m graduating. But what a year this has been! Recently, the Journal has been the recipient of several awards from both Society of Professional Journalists and the Milwaukee Press Club. Most notable of these is “Best Student Magazine” in SPJ Region 6, an area consisting of Wisconsin, Minnesota, North and South Dakota. I’d like to take the opportunity here to thank our writers, editors, photographers and designers who made this landmark year what it was. For our final issue of the year, Sara J. Martinez wrote a wonderful article about her interview with Jim Lovell, the legendary commander of the Apollo 13 lunar mission (p. 16). Lovell speaks about both his experiences and what he sees as the future of the space program for our generation. It’s a story that will take the 2008-’09 Journal out with a “big bang” (space pun). Also worthy of note is Caitlin Kavanaugh’s story on Autism Awareness Month (p. 22) and Alli Kerfeld’s piece about the turns that one’s spiritual beliefs take during college (p. 25). So what can those of you who aren’t graduating expect from the Journal next year? Luckily for you, my Assistant Editor, Sara J. Martinez, will be taking over the Editor-in-Chief position next year. I’ve worked closely with her during my time at the Journal and can confidently say that she will do an amazing job and will continue to make the Journal even better. If you were here right now, I would have you give her a round of applause. So, dear reader, thus ends my time as editor. It was a pleasure getting to know you at least a little bit. I hope you enjoyed your time reading the Journal as much as I’ve enjoyed working on it. And even though I’ve been your editor for four exciting issues, I feel like we’ve just met.

To advertise, call Student Media Advertising: 414-288-1738

The Marquette Journal

Photos by Kevin Kozicki

Sincerely,

1131 W. Wisconsin Ave. #006A Milwaukee, Wis. 53233 mu.journal@gmail.com Faculty Adviser

Dr. Steve Byers Greg Shutters gregory.shutters@marquette.edu The views expressed in the Journal’s opinion columns do not necessarily reflect the views of Marquette University.

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“The basketball games.” Andrew Hess, Senior College of Engineering

“Hanging out with my 18,000 closest friends at the Bradley Center.” Robyn Keuler, Senior College of Communication

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“The Joan of Arc masses and being involved in music ministry.” Samantha Toigo, Senior College of Business Administration

“Living within walking distance to all of my friends.” Ashley Novak, Senior College of Communication

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“Milwaukee in general.” Chris Hallberg, Senior College of Arts & Sciences

“The Marquette community and having my schedule busy from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.” Megan Guilfoyle, Senior College of Communication

Calling all seniors photos by Michele Derdzinski

What are you going to miss most about Marquette? 6

“All the relationships that I’ve formed with my classmates.” Teddy Stuebi, Senior College of Business Administration

“Why, the Marquette Journal, of course!” Greg Shutters, Senior College of Communication


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We’re All A-twitter

(re: “Have you checked under your bed lately?”) The piece about safety by Patrick Johnson was a great compliment to the piece about campus safety. Students may not always think about their safety during their time at Marquette because they never had to worry about safety before in their lives. We do not think anything can happen to us because we have not been in a position to worry about it. Perhaps it is even true that our love of crime dramas and other shows about danger make us feel like none of that is actually real. I hope your article helped people to reflect upon what can happen in the real world. I have friends who have been affected by the crime issues on campus and it is always best to be aware of reality. Thanks for putting out an awesome campus magazine.

(re: “Feeling Twitterpated”) Thanks for including me in the article! Great job on putting it all together. Students everywhere are working to figure this out!

Just Outrageous

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Spring 2009

Steve Glynn via Web site +6458)&/ :065)06()5

Bring it Around Town (re: “We Get Around: Student Transportation Options in Milwaukee”) Y’all are so lucky to have trains that take you to other metropolitan areas. I would love to be able to go to LA, or LV, or even down to Tucson for the day on a train, but the closest Amtrak station is up in Flagstaff, about 3 hours away. We just got light rail here in Phoenix. It’s great! I use it to commute to work everyday. Tony via Web site

(re: “Campus Outrage — Road Salt”) I hate the road salt! Why can’t we use sand instead, or just shovel the sidewalks? Does anyone know how Thanks for reminding us all that we really can get to clean Uggs? I’m glad someone else is annoyed around this city without the need of car if we so choose to do so. about this, too. Kaellen Hessel via Web site

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R e s p o n s e s

Staying Safe

Christopher Langlo Junior, Arts & Sciences

rants & raves

:06 8&3& 4"'&

The importance of staying aware on campus

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Experiencing ethnicity Diversity can be delicious by Brenda Poppy

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ay after day, meal after meal, Marquette students eat in the same dining halls, feast on the same menu items and plow through something that looks remarkably the same as the previous day’s chicken.

Ramen, with more varieties than any other grocery store in the area.

Walking into El Rey feels like stepping into Mexico. The walls are covered in murals depicting scenes from Mexican history, and the smell of fresh-made goodies wafts from the authentic bakery. The location at 1023 S. Cesar E. Chavez Drive, which opened in 2007, features its own eat-in restaurant, bakery and deli, along with mounds of fruits and vegetables and a tantalizing mixture of Mexican and American products. But the best part? The price.

Groppi’s extensive selection of cheeses, bakery items and produce add to the mix, creating a truly distinctive shopping experience.

Right down the street from El Rey is another ethnic alternative. The Hmong Asian Food Store, 1243 S. Chavez Drive, may not have initial appeal, “There is no variety,” said Maggie Czerwien, a but it does offer variety. Though some things (like freshman in the College of Arts & Sciences. “They the boxed, dehydrated fungus) may be a little too out of the ordinary, where else could you find bamuse the same ingredients in everything.” boo shoots, banana blossoms and 50-pound bags So, what’s the solution to this widespread epi- of rice? demic of monotonous food choices? Milwaukee’s own ethnic food stores. With markets specializ- “It’s new. It’s something you haven’t tried before,” ing in everything from Italian and Mexican foods said Ka Xiong, an employee of the family-owned to a more obscure blend of Grecian and Asian business. “Our selection ranges from rice to pots cuisines, it is clear that living in a city of diversity and pans. We even sell traditional clothing.” has its advantages. The Hmong Asian Food Store also offers an aisle Choosing which of these stores to go to (and which filled with Asian sauces, a unique tea selection and a ones to trust) can be a bit difficult, however. Czer- wall covered with popular Asian movies and music. wien, an ethnic food veteran, said she has her own Located near the lake at 1441 S. Russel Ave., the rule of thumb when it comes to new places. G. Groppi Food Market offers a selection of Ital“Quality is what matters. Freshness and taste are ian food. According to manager Cory Stephanie, the most important things when it comes to an the store puts a unique European twist on ordiethnic store,” she said. “I will go far lengths to find nary foods. quality food.” The store, which has been open since 1910, is best Fortunately, most of Milwaukee’s ethnic options known for its mouth-watering meat counter. are only a short distance away and are easily accessible via foot or bus. An example is El Rey Mexican “We still carry the same recipe for our sausages Products Inc., a Mexican grocery store with five that the Groppi family used,” Stephanie said. “We are also well-known for our paninis.” Milwaukee locations.

“For students, you are always looking to find stuff cheap,” said Josh Walker, an El Rey employee. “I think things here are considerably cheaper (than other grocery stores). Especially meat and produce.” If that is not enough, the Cesar E. Chavez Drive location offers a floor-to-ceiling selection of

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Still having reservations? El Rey’s Walker noted, “You just have to be adventurous.” So get out there and try a new side of Milwaukee. You never know what you will find.

Shopping at ethnic or specialty grocery stores such as El Rey (right) adds some spice to the otherwise humdrum collegiate diet. Photos by Morgan White


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Spring things

Milwaukee comes alive at the end of the school year by Nick Herff

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andering around the Milwaukee on a warm spring day, one might be wondering what to do with the time. Fortunately, there are plenty of interesting places to visit and entertaining things to do at this time of year.

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Milwaukee Art Museum

One popular place to visit is the Milwaukee Art Museum, located near Lake Michigan at 700 N. Art Museum Drive. Architectural wonder is abundant here with the Cudahy Gardens and the Quadracci Pavilion. Art exhibits like “Sensory Overload” and a showcase of Dutch painter Jan Lievens are on display, the latter of which includes the earliest known portrait of Rembrandt.

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The Rave

The Rave, 2401 W. Wisconsin Ave., a concert venue that is especially popular with Marquette students, is one of the best places to hear live beats. Ticket prices are usually quite reasonable, and its location is very close to campus. Some of the headliners coming to the Rave include Franz Ferdinand on April 29 and The Killers the following day.

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Casablanca

If you get the craving for exceptional Middle Eastern food or the urge to indulge in hookah, you need not travel farther than Casablanca, 728 E. Brady St. Here you will find a wide variety of dishes that include everything from babaghannoj and mesabaha to kibbi and couscous.

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Milwaukee Public Museum

A popular educational destination in Milwaukee that cannot be overlooked is the Milwaukee Public Museum, 800 W. Wells St. Notable exhibits on display include the Titanic artifact showcase, the Streets of Old Milwaukee and Living Oceans. Other featured collections include artifacts from Aztalan, Wisconsin’s most significant archaeological site, and the Titan Arum, a flower that can reach up to 20 feet in height at full bloom.

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Discovery World

Wisconsin boasts a strong musical background, being home to one of the most famous names in rock ‘n’ roll, Les Paul. Science and technology museum Discovery World, 500 N. Harbor Drive, honors Paul with his very own exhibit, Les Paul’s House of Sound. This display presents Paul’s life and gives visitors the opportunity to use the Discovery World audio and video studios to play a lick or two or even get a virtual guitar lesson from him.

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Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra

Catch live music from the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra at the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, 929 N. Water St. Tickets are on the more expensive side, but the quality of music is fantastic. Upcoming concerts include acts such as Rich and Mellow, playing from April 24 to 26, and Salute to American Jazz, May 8 to 10.

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Milwaukee County Zoo

The chance to see rare and exotic animals is available at the Milwaukee County Zoo, 10001 W. Blue Mound Road. Featured attractions include the Bactrian Camel, the Chinese Alligator and the California Sea Lion.

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Bradford Beach

One of the more popular beaches in Milwaukee is Bradford Beach, 2400 N. Lincoln Memorial Drive. Going to the beach is a great way to get away from the noisy city life and a wide variety of games can be played on the beach, with volleyballs, soccer balls and bean bags available for checkout.

Lakefront Brewery

Milwaukee is known for the enjoyable ales it produces, and Lakefront Brewery is no exception. Located at 1872 N. Commerce St., the microbrewery has become a self-proclaimed Milwaukee landmark. “They have a great brewery tour, excellent Friday night fish fry and polka music,” said Michael Brown, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences.

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Park System

For those looking for a relaxing day, a trip to any one of the local parks is recommended. Lake, Mitchell, Veterans and McKinley Parks are all either within walking distance of campus or a short bus ride away. Discovery World’s exhibit, “Les Paul’s House of Sound,” runs through Dec. 31, 2009. Photo by Morgan White

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Campus outrage

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or the past few months, Milwaukee weather has been teasing us with its few days of warmth and sunshine. It then seems to say, “just kidding” and unleashes a strand of 20-degree temperatures, snow and gloom. “The weather can’t seem to make up its mind,” said Alaina Fahley, a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences. “Wisconsin is very fickle.” Kristina Hunt, a junior in the College of Business Administration, recently planned to hang out with her friends given the nice weather. “We were going to grill out,” she said. “Unfortunately, by the time that day came around, the temperature dropped to like 30 degrees and we had to bail on our plans.” This past winter, Milwaukee faced negative temperatures that threatened hypothermia if you were outside for too long. Snow piled up on sidewalks and salt encrusted many students’ shoes. Gray skies seemed to make the days drag by more slowly than ever. And as April neared, temperatures still hovered in the 30s. On March 20, spring officially began, but many Marquette students were left wondering where it actually was. Snow continued to fall in Milwaukee in the last days of March. “I wish it wouldn’t come and go so quickly,” Hunt said.

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Campus Obsession

by Jen Michalski

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Summer

ummer of ’69.” “Summertime.” “Summer Skin.” “All Summer Long.” “The Boys of Summer.”

Let’s face it…we have an obsession with summer. But Marquette students seem to have an obsession with weather even remotely related to summer. Temperatures above 45 degrees have been the green light for flip-flops, shorts and tank tops while the slightest bit of sun has brought countless students outside for Frisbee and whiffle ball. With winter temperatures that plummeted to far below zero, it is easy to understand why these not-sosummer-like weather conditions have caused people to put away their heavy coats and to pull out their sandals and T-shirts. “I’ve finally been able to take out my jean skirts and sunglasses,” said Ellie Guzzardo, a freshman in the College of Communication. “I love leaving my dorm without having to wear a big, winter coat.” On St. Patrick’s Day, the temperature hit 75 degrees, about 30 degrees warmer than previous days and a Milwaukee record. Students could be seen lying on the grass outside their dorms. “McCormick Beach,” as it’s been called, hosted a variety of sunbathers, Frisbee and football throwers or students who simply wanted to enjoy the weather with friends. “It amazes me how when it gets to be like 30 degrees, after it’s been -16 degrees, I was ready to run outside in a T-shirt,” said Mary Pat Marvinac, a sophomore in the College of Arts & Sciences. Not only does this weather bring about changes in wardrobe and outdoor activity, but it also has the ability to make students a lot cheerier. The drab skies and depressing mood of winter seem to be gone until next year as soon as warm temperatures and sun have made their appearance.

Spring in Milwaukee is always unpredictable. Wintry weather often lasts well into April. Photos by Michele Derdzinski

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“The sunshine makes me so happy,” said Kelly Boylan, a freshman in the College of Education. “I love the feeling of being able to go outside in shorts and a T-shirt and not be freezing.”


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graduation (now what?) Seniors have serious choices to make once they receive their diplomas by Samantha Cavallo before moving into the working world,” he said. “Most occupations in the health care field either require a two-year, graduate or professional degree.” Although Austin knows that going to graduate school will open more doors for him in the future, the process has not been easy. “Once I got invites for interviews, my schedule got more hectic. I had to juggle class, work and extracurricular activities as well as put a little dent in my wallet,” he said. Other students decide to start working after college, but plan for graduate school in the future. Kendra Borchardt, who graduated from Marquette in December, has been working in a Milwaukee law firm in order to further prepare herself before she attends law school. “I’ve been planning to go to law school for a long time,” Borchardt said, “I just wanted to further that goal, so I have been working as a paralegal.” The state of the economy didn’t make getting a job easy after graduation, and Borchardt had trouble securing a position.

Plenty of post-graduation opportunities await seniors. Photo Illustration by Lexi Newell

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s this year’s seniors graduate, they will be faced with the same choices as graduates years before them: What jobs to apply for, where to live or if they should go to graduate school. While some graduates will leave Marquette and start their careers, there are other pathways that graduates can take to success.

oddly enough, but I’m also looking forward to going to a new place and experiencing more of life at a professional level,” Austin said.

“It worked out well because the law firm that I interned with during college needed to hire someone. They told me that they would hire me, and then they didn’t, so I ended up applying for jobs all over Wisconsin and in Maine where my parents live. I had already signed a lease in Milwaukee, so I was glad when the law firm I interned with finally hired me for good,” Borchardt said.

Some graduates take advantage of a proIn addition to learning “I’m looking forward to gram called Teach For more about his field of continuing education ... America, where gradustudy, Austin believes ates work for two years he has gained experiI’m also looking forward teaching K-12 stuGraduate school is a popular option for students ence from just applying to going to a new place dents. who are looking for an advanced degree in a par- to graduate programs and experiencing more of ticular area. Steve Austin, a senior in the College that will help him in his life at a professional level.” “Teach For America’s of Health Sciences, is one student who has chosen career. mission is to eliminate to attend graduate school before moving into the educational inequity by workforce. “The experience has been invaluable in preparing for job interviews enlisting the nation’s most promising future lead“I’m looking forward to continuing education, later on, but I wanted to have a professional degree ers in the effort,” said Lorraine Anderson, director marquettejournal.org

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According to Anderson, a 2008 study published by the Urban Institute found that high school Teach For America doesn’t require applicants to be students taught by Teach For America teachers education majors, but simply looks for soon-to-be outperform their peers, even those taught by fully graduates who are focused on being strong leaders. certified teachers. of recruitment communications for the program.

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principles: social justice, simple living, living in community and spirituality. These tenets do not exist as separate values, but rather, are deeply connected and intertwined in the struggle for justice,” said Wagner, who will be committing one year to the domestic program, volunteering somewhere in the southern United States.

“The positive difference of having a Teach For America teacher was three times greater than having a teacher with three or more years experience,” This program is something that Wagner said she Anderson said. has wanted to do for quite a while, and she is glad that she will have the opportunity to participate in Some students choose to participate in volunteer the coming year. work after graduation, and Mary Kate Wagner, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, is doing “As I headed into my senior year and began looking at other options such as graduate school and Teach For America has found that the program is just that with the Jesuit Volunteer Corps. job hunting, I kept coming back to Jesuit Volunteer not only rewarding for graduates who participate, “Jesuit Volunteer Corps is based on four main Corps and the notion of long-term volunteering as but also for the students they will be teaching. “We seek exceptional students and leaders from all backgrounds and career interests who have a track record of achievement,” Anderson said. “Because leaders come in many forms with many past experiences, we do not look for a narrow profile of experience, such as particular academic majors or specific leadership positions.”

eyes on the prize

Student ambition remains strong despite recession by Matthew Reddin In the midst of this economic recession, it might be expected that many outgoing seniors feel somewhat discouraged with their post-college prospects. But one force drives many onward: ambition.

Majoring in both theatre arts and public relations, Kover has made the most of her time at Marquette. For the past three years, she has been on the executive board of the Marquette University Players Society, a student-run theater group. She began as a publicist and is now the group’s vice president.

In an era when companies are failing, internships are getting cut and a job is harder to find than ever, Her advice to ambitious students searching for emstudent ambition remains uncrushed. ployment or internships? “Don’t wait for (employLaura Kestner, director of the Career Services Cen- ers) to come up to you,” Kover said. “You have to ter, has spent 16 years working to help students find make contact and ask how you can be involved.” jobs and careers. While times are bad, she said, it’s also spurred more students to take initiative and to That’s how Kover got her job at the nearby Milwaukee Chamber Theatre working in group sales. go in to the center for help. A guest director at Marquette told her that the theLast year, for example, Kestner said the Career atre had an unpaid internship available, and Kover Services Center had 963 student appointments, in- immediately applied for it. cluding walk-ins. Between July 2008 and January Now, that internship has blossomed into a paid 2009, the center had 884 students come in. position, although Kover does refer to it as “very Kestner says the increase in students makes sense, part-time, but something for the résumé.” Kover said she never really thought of herself as ambiand it’s nothing she hasn’t seen before. tious until she came to college. Here, she decided “They generally come in once they realize I’m not to really step it up — and it’s certainly paid off. going to scare them any more than they already Another student whose résumé is well-stocked is are,” she said. “It’s not all gloom and doom.” College of Communication senior Marie Wittig, Some students, like Sarah Kover, a senior in the whose dream is to one day run a public relations College of Communication, demonstrate that am- department for a major non-profit organization. bitions are still possible. Kover dreams of running Wittig began work on her résumé even before colher own theater.

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lege, working as an accounting intern at her father’s company from high school until her second year of college. Wittig then became a marketing intern at a plastics company called HanitaTek. “My friends thought I was crazy for starting to intern as early as I did,” Wittig said. “But it was the best decision I ever made.” From there, Wittig’s résumé grew, with internships at a small Milwaukee public relations firm called Zeppos & Associates and then a much larger firm, Hoffman York. She is presently a marketing communications intern at Ronald McDonald House Charities, a job which she said completely changed her outlook on life. “It taught me that although sometimes PR and advertising professionals are seen as unethical, you have the power to give back in this industry by promoting a cause that helps millions of families each year,” Wittig said. Just as ambitious is Jen King, a senior in the College of Business Adminstration. King is majoring in information technology and marketing and has always wanted to own her own business. Her dream business would be focused on Web design. However, she adds that it would likely deal with IT services as well, especially if she decides


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universities to make sure they achieve the best per- With all of these options, graduating seniors may be able to worry a little less about what to do after formance possible. they get their diplomas, despite an economy that is After forwarding her less than accommodating for new hires. With all of résumé to a connection these options, students can look to many different “The positive difference at The Advisory Board venues for post-graduation plans. Company, Bruggeof having a Teach For mann said she was conAmerica teacher was three tacted to set up a phone times greater than having interview and to fill out a teacher with three or an application.

a means for sustainable development and social justice,” Wagner said. “After more research and consideration, this decision felt right to me.” With all of these options open to graduates, it could be easy to forget that getting a job is a route many students are still taking.

more years experience.” Megan Bruggemann, a “After the phone insenior in the College of terview I was flown to Business Administration, was offered a job in Washington, D.C., as a Washington, D.C., for a morning of interviews and marketing associate for The Advisory Board Com- lunch,” she said. The company called her a week pany, which serves organizations like hospitals and later with a job offer.

to take over Quality Computer Professionals Inc., “Sometimes you’ll just have to start small, with a business in Lake Bluff, Ill., currently owned by boring or unpaid internships, and just find a better one next time.” Kover said. her father. “It’s very small right now, pretty much just him that Wittig added that experience isn’t everything. “Atruns it,” King said of her father’s store. She said she titude, poise and confidence go a long way during would likely expand the business, which presently an interview,” she said. focuses only on IT services. “Extra things outside your major can be a big help,” King said she feels it’s never too soon to start think- King suggested. “And always have your résumé ready.” ing about careers. “Start looking early,” King recommended. “Just make sure you know what you want.”

“The true test of ambition is when you have the door slammed in your face.”

Post-graduation, King will be working at Metavante Corporation, a business that provides financial IT services, tests programs and works with customers, an experience she has not yet had in the IT market. Wittig has a job lined up in Milwaukee, but hopes to get an entry-level position in the Chicago public relations industry instead. Kover, on the other hand, is still looking for an apprenticeship — a paid internship at a theatre company — and hopes to end up on the East Coast, somewhere she has never lived. For fellow job-seekers, the seniors advocate persistence and dedication.

But what about ambition? And what happens when students dreaming of success face failure?

“The true test of ambition is when you have the door slammed in your face,” Wittig said. “If you keep striving for your goals despite bumps in the road, I think you define ambition.” It’s certainly evident that our “road” has a few extra bumps we might not have been expecting. What’s not evident is who’s going to have the ambition necessary to plow through those bumps — and maybe be a little better off for it afterward. Students like Sarah Kover (above), Comm. ‘09, are keeping their goals in sight despite the dark economic times. Photo by Lexi Newell

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The warm weather has finally arrived! Celebrate the season with eye-catching color, retro shapes and extravagant jewelry. With summer just around the corner, now is the perfect time to refresh your fashion sense and don a bright smile as the perfect accessory.

Floral patterns always show their face during springtime, but this season’s blooms are exceptionally vivid. Color block patterns are an even more inventive way to show off summer’s friendly hues. On Arianna Green, Junior, College of Arts & Sciences: Luci dress and necklaces. Colin Stuart shoes. On Theresa Kennedy, Junior, College of Communication: THAKOON for Target dress. Banana Republic necklace and bracelet. Luci bracelet. Nine West shoes.

On Luke Patton, Senior, College of Communication: Lacoste polo. Arrow shorts. Sperry TopSider shoes.

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Men’s wardrobes often fall short on color and texture variations, but incorporating shades of spring into polos, shorts and shoes is the best way for men to make a statement. Balance faded shades with intense hues for the most effective combination.

Accessories should be layered on heavily this season. Stacked bangles, stop-traffic necklaces and even large, bright bags can become the focal point of any ensemble.

Top-siders and slip-ons provide middle ground between men’s formal and athletic shoes.

Looks created by Alise Buehrer and Rima Garsys Photos by Jaclyn Poeschl marquettejournal.org

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Apollo 13’s Saturn V rocket being moved during assembly, Dec. 16, 1969. Photo courtesy NASA

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The man, the mission and the moon

A moment with Apollo 13 commander and Milwaukee native Jim Lovell

by Sara J. Martinez

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ay 25, 1961. Your young, modern president has been in office only a few months, and he’s still spouting the same revolutionary ideas from his campaign. By the end of this decade, he says, the United States will put a man on the moon. Just 20 days ago we saw the first American man get launched into space. The Mercury Freedom 7 carried Alan B. Shepard Jr. in a suborbital flight. He didn’t even orbit the Earth, let alone reach the moon.

something that would surely lead to a technological revolution and catapult the country further into a major global leadership position. Change will come, he said. And it did. On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin took Apollo 11 into space, making headlines and history with the first manned soft landing on the moon and the first moonwalk. Mission accomplished. Or not.

A man on the moon? Within the decade? That “one small step” will always be remembered, Inconceivable. but even more iconic in American history are five words uttered by Milwaukee native Jim Lovell, the only man to have ever flown to the moon Not so, says President John F. Kennedy Jr. twice without making a landing: “Houston, we've America needs to be renewed, and he promises had a problem.” marquettejournal.org

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n Dec. 21, 1968, six months before Apollo 11, Capt. James A. “Jim” Lovell Jr., along with Frank Borman and William A. Anders, set out on what would be the first manned spacecraft to orbit the moon. They orbited the moon 10 times over the course of 20 hours, providing a Christmas treat to awestruck Americans. Hope had reaffirmed the collective faith in the country: anything was possible. This proposed moonwalk would be a cakewalk. Less than a year after Armstrong took a giant leap for mankind, Lovell would have the chance to not only orbit the moon a second time, but also to take his own treasured steps on the soft ground, to collect his own moon rocks and to leave his own dusty trail of footprints. On April 11, 1970, Lovell and crewmembers Fred Haise and Jack Swigert took off on Apollo 13, intending a third American lunar landing after the United States’ second successful moonwalk in July 1969. Two days into the mission, however, an oxygen tank explosion within the shuttle would change everything. The damage would make a lunar landing impossible, and the quick oxygen depletion made a safe return to Earth improbable. “Houston, we’ve had a problem,” Lovell told mission control. Regularly misquoted in popular culture, Lovell’s calm and collected assertion demonstrated a composure that would be key in assisting his own safe return to Earth. His relaxed nature is apparent even today, an 80-year-old man who elected to be interviewed at the Starbucks across the street from his son’s restaurant in Lake Forest, Ill. Upon my arrival at Lovell’s of Lake Forest on a snowy day after Christmas, exactly 40 years since Lovell and his crew landed back on Earth after Apollo 8, Lovell was sitting in his car outside the restaurant. “I can’t get in,” he said. “I can’t get ahold of my son, and they changed the locks to the place. How about we head over to Starbucks?” Locked out of his restaurant on a Sunday afternoon? No big deal — he’s seen worse.

(above and middle) Apollo 13 astronaut Jim Lovell meets with Journal editors Sara J. Martinez and Patrick Johnson. (bottom) Lovell points out the Steeds of Apollo mural behind the bar at Lovell’s of Lake Forest, Lake Forest, Ill. Photos by Tim Lamberger (right) Lovell during suit-up before the Apollo 13 mission, April 11, 1970. Photo courtesy NASA

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e didn’t know what the situation was or the trouble we were in until we saw the oxygen escaping from the spacecraft,” Lovell said about the initial explosion on Apollo 13. “Then we began to worry.” As reality hit, the new mission was clear: survival. “I thought our chances were quite slim in the beginning, but you had to think positive. If you think negative about something, you never get anywhere,” Lovell said. “We had to figure out what we had to work with, what the problems were, what the crises were. And working with the ground, we were able to overcome these crises that came along.”

a positive attitude and by focusing on what they could do to solve each individual problem as it arose. The big picture, that they were on a doomed mission with the likelihood of three fatalities, had to be pushed aside. It was important to focus on the little things, he said, working them out one by one to get back on the proper course.

We’re interrupted by a young girl and her mother. “Are you the astronaut?” they ask. “Why, yes I am,” he smiles and shakes hands with the child. He turns back to us, “It’s their tax money that put me up there, I guess I’d better say hello.”

It’s no longer as important to him that he never got to walk on the moon after being so close twice. The he Apollo 13 mission cost $4.4 billion, accordjourney and how he overcame the crisis is what’s ing to NASA. Today, the average cost of a space important. shuttle launch is about $450 million per mission.

According to the Guinness Book of World Records, Lovell and his crew hold the absolute altitude record for a manned spacecraft, meaning they have traveled Lovell said he and his crew were able to survive by the farthest from Earth than any human in history at working with the cards they were dealt, by keeping approximately 248,658 miles from Earth at one point.

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Lovell said he would return to space if he had another opportunity, but individuals sent into space need to be positive assets to the flight and to add something that makes it worthwhile to send them up there.

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What’s with the horses?

Photos by Tim Lamberger In 1969, the St. Regis Hotel in New York City commissioned artist Luman Winter to depict a mural of the great horses of the sun-god Apollo, whose mission was to pull the Chariot of the Sun across the sky. The Apollo 13 crew asked Winter to design the mission’s insignia based on this 20-by-8 foot mural titled “Steeds of Apollo.” The symbolic patch illustrates three flying horses pulling the Apollo crew’s “chariot” through the cosmos. The motto “Ex luna, scientia,” means “From the moon, knowledge.” “Steeds of Apollo” was displayed in the main lobby of the St. Regis Hotel for several years, but it went missing after the hotel was refurbished. In 1994, the painting resurfaced at an auction of space artifacts in California during the filming of “Apollo 13.” Tom Hanks, who portrayed Jim Lovell in the Academy Awardwinning film, purchased the mural and gave it to the Lovell family. It is now on display behind the bar at the entrance to Lovell’s of Lake Forest in Lake Forest, Ill. Lovell said the mural has an important symbolic value: the fourth horse in the background represents Ken Mattingly, Apollo 13’s original command module pilot. After it was found that he had been exposed to German measles, Mattingly was replaced by Jack Swigert — two days before launch. From Houston, Mattingly played a key role in helping the crew to navigate a safe return to Earth after the oxygen tank explosion.

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(top) Fred Haise, left, and Lovell training for the fateful mission. (above) Apollo 13 lifts off, April 11, 1970. (above right) Mission control, shortly before the Apollo 13 crew began having difficulties. Lovell’s flightmate, Fred Haise, can be seen on the screen. April 13, 1970. (right) An in-flight photo of the makeshift device that saved the crew’s life. The device removed excess carbon dioxide from the cabin. It was constructed, per instructions provided by Houston, from duct tape, maps and other materials they had on hand in the spacecraft. Photos courtesy NASA


“A lot of people who go into space now aren’t even “I was very, very lucky to have been in the right pilots,” Lovell said. They’re mission specialists, geol- place, at the right time, with the right credentials,” ogists, astronomers, engineers and more. Nowadays, Lovell said. young astronauts are much better educated than he was, Lovell said, many with doctorate degrees.

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Lovell went to the University of Wisconsin-Madhere is a positive value to our work in space, ison on a naval ROTC scholarship and after two Lovell said, and he hopes to see the Obama years was appointed to the United States Naval administration recognize the positive value of Academy to study aviation. work in space and to continue its funding and research. One great return from the investment, he “In high school, I really wanted to be a rocket en- emphasized, is the development of technology that gineer, but I didn’t have any money to go to col- keeps the United States first in the world. lege,” he said. He credits the Navy for providing his education. Today, robots have reduced the need for humans to do monotonous yet When Lovell first apdangerous work outplied for the space proside of the spacecraft. “The human brain is gram, however, he was Regular maintenance the most complex and turned down. He wasn’t operations duties have cheapest computer we can selected to join the been replaced by smart put into space.” NASA astronauts until machines. The need for late 1962 after being rewell-educated astrojected from the original nauts and Americans Mercury Seven. eager to continue space exploration, however, will never go away, Lovell said. His advice to students is to, above all, get a good education. Be aggressive, and if you are turned “The human brain is the most complex and cheapdown, keep trying. Prospective astronauts should est computer we can put into space,” he said. “There keep this advice in mind, he said. will always be a place for man.” “I was very disappointed that I didn’t make the Mer- With the proposed space shuttle retirement loomcury program, but that’s the way it goes,” Lovell said. ing, Lovell said he thinks that it will be drastic if “If you get turned down the first time, try again.” the administration goes forth with the plan. The U.S. would become dependent on Russia to proHis persistence paid off, and his experiences will vide support for the international space station for never be forgotten — there is even an Academy the next four to five years, he said. He hopes PresiAward-winning film commemorating the “suc- dent Obama will see the benefits of space research cessful failure” of Apollo 13. and development.

The money used for economic bailouts, he said, could be used for something more productive that will provide positive results rather than just keeping certain companies afloat. “I think the space program should focus on good challenges,” Lovell said, like going back to the moon, or eventually going to Mars. “Perhaps in your lifetimes.” Mars? We laughed, much like the people laughed in 1961, Lovell said. “In 1961, when President Kennedy announced that they were going to land on the moon before the end of the decade, I thought they were absolutely crazy,” he countered. “When he made that announcement, we had not yet put anybody into Earth orbit. Alan Shepard made a 15-minute suborbital flight about two weeks before that talk.” At that point in time, sending someone to the moon really was inconceivable. A young, innovative president took office in 1961, promising a hopeful future and changes that would unify the nation. He entered office in times of social and economic turmoil, and he offered a promise that seemed outrageous. Though he was assassinated two years later, his dream lived on, and that incomprehensible vision became a worldchanging reality. Will man land on Mars in Lovell’s lifetime? Probably not, he said. In ours? Anything is possible. Patrick Johnson contributed to this story.

(above) Lovell and crewmates Haise, right, and Swigert, not pictured, receive a call from President Richard Nixon upon their safe return to Earth. Photo courtesy NASA (right) Lovell in the “Captain’s Quarters” lounge at Lovell’s of Lake Forest, nearly 40 years after his historic flight. Photo by Tim Lamberger

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perceptions of a disorder by Caitlin Kavanaugh

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with a basic knowledge. One of the main errors people make when they first encounter autism is trying to categorize it into a single disorder with clearly defined characteristics.

eastern Wisconsin defines autism as “a lifelong neurological disorder that significantly affects how a person perceives the world, interacts with other people and communicates.”

According to Amy Van Hecke, assistant professor of psychology and director of Marquette’s Autism Clinic, autism is considered a spectrum disorder, meaning there “is a range of different presentations For an autistic person, the world is a vastly differ- from severe autism to the more high-functioning ent place from what others might experience. Of- Asperger’s disorder.” tentimes it is a terrifying situation, brimming with frustration, anger and challenges. With April be- There are those on the higher end with increding Autism Awareness Month, it provides a perfect ible intellectual abilities, and there are also those opportunity to promote understanding and ac- who struggle to achieve literacy. In between these ceptance throughout campus and the Milwaukee extremes, there are many people containing their own unique combination of skills and challenges. community.

While the above definition sounds a bit daunting, Van Hecke wants to remind parents as well as people diagnosed that not even lower-functioning autism should be considered a “death sentence.”

he room was filled with aliens. They approached you slowly, but you didn’t understand. Their gestures were foreign and confusing. They looked at you with disappointment when you couldn’t respond. Confused and overwhelmed, you wished you could hide; their voices were deafening. Why were they yelling at you? Why didn’t you understand?

Naturally, the first step of understanding begins

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With some creativity, she explains, “There are many ways that a person with autism can lead a successful and fulfilling life. It just takes early identification and intervention so we can help the child or adult reach their full potential.”

Nancy Lembke-Windler, an early childhood instructor at Forest Park Elementary in Kenosha, To put it succinctly, the Autism Society of South- Wis., agrees that early intervention is key if the


During April, Autism Awareness Month, people continue to seek answers.

Photo courtesy iStockPhoto

diagnosed individual wishes to progress. She also recognizes integration as a crucial element for advancement. Windler learned this firsthand in 1980, when she received a teaching position at a private school that only enrolled autistic children.

room. This type of environment promotes growth through social learning. The autistic students, particularly those who are severely socially and mentally underdeveloped, benefit greatly from interaction with children who do not have the disorder.

It was these characteristics that Windler picked up on and used to become a part of each student’s world — something which requires a lot of patience.

This patience also comes in handy for interpreting an autistic student’s behaviors. For instance, many “We walked around with aprons filled with treats This style of teaching is what brings Windler the autistic individuals have difficulty giving eye conmost satisfaction and en- tact when they are spoken to. While some people and used time-out ables her to become very might view this as disinterest or possibly even a boxes the size of sign of rudeness, one of Windler’s older students close to her students. phone booths,” WinFor an autistic person, the explained that for her, it was impossible to use two dler recalls of her exworld is a vastly different “I remember little id- senses at the same time. She could either listen or perience. “I remember place from what others iosyncrasies that each give eye contact, not both. thinking that there might experience. student had: dimples must be a better way.” that could hold a nickel, Similar misunderstandings happen all the time a deep belly laugh, their when people who are unfamiliar with autism enAt this point, Windler knew she wanted to teach special needs children in love for dinosaurs or their need to carry a pencil counter someone with the disorder. an inclusion setting, meaning combining students wherever they go,” Windler said. “People think that because I look normal, I know with and without disabilities within the same classmarquettejournal.org

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“we are not monsters. we are human like everyone else.” how to do all the little social silliness and the niceties. I don’t. I have to watch and observe and learn them,” said Katey Boller, a 39-year-old currently diagnosed with Asperger’s. These social norms and certain acts of politeness are not inherent, but rather they are like a language that has to be studied and learned. Again, depending on the severity of the disorder, others diagnosed may be very socially fluent as well. This is the important part of Autism Awareness Month — to educate others about a commonly misunderstood condition. Nathan Pannel, a 20-year-old from Franklin, N.C., diagnosed with Asperger’s, wants to dispel any belief that autistic individuals are to be feared.

explained that Disability Services is “always chang- One child in particular, Mochel recalls, is the one who had a fascination with fans. ing and always making things more accessible.” Robert Mochel, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, also believes strongly in helping those with special needs in the Milwaukee community and on campus. For this reason, in January 2007, Mochel and a friend started the Autism Awareness Society of Marquette. Mochel said the group has so far been very successful. In addition to setting up information tables in the Alumni Memorial Union and Lalumiere Language Hall during Autism Awareness Week, they also hold special events designed to give parents of autistic children a break from their hectic lives.

“We are not monsters,” Pannel said. “We are human like everyone else. We are just uniquely dif- This year in late February the group worked with Children’s Service Society of Wisconsin and put ferent and uniquely blessed.” together a special day dedicated to spending time This is a similar attitude taken by Heidi Vering, co- with special needs students and children from the ordinator of the Office of Disability Services, who Milwaukee area. About 70 youths from 38 differbelieves that students with disabilities are some- ent families came to immerse themselves in board games, crafts, sporting activities and bowling. thing to be thankful for. “Oftentimes students with learning disabilities are unbelievable athletes or beautiful musicians or artists,” Vering said. “The best part of my job is to give those an opportunity to grow in other areas to make sure their voices are being heard.” Disability Services tries its best to accommodate most issues these students would come across. They offer note-taking services, assistive technology, extended exam times and assistance with housing accommodations. However, Vering explains that when it comes to autism on campus, those who excel academically do not find a large amount of use for these services. Sometimes what they require is social assistance, which, at a college level, Marquette is not required to provide. Regardless, Vering said the school does the best it can to take care of its students with special needs. “There are a lot of people in this world who have disabilities and have contributed more than you could imagine,” she said. Because of this, Vering

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“He used to go on the top bunk bed and put all his stuffed animals and toys on the blades of the fan, wait for you to walk in and then pull the string so that toys would fly everywhere,” Mochel said with a laugh. “It’s really hard because part of you is like, no you can’t do that, but then part of you is like, all right that’s pretty funny.” Challenges and humor aside, Mochel said working with these children is also an extremely rewarding process. “When a kid has a six-word vocabulary and your name is one of the words in there — that’s pretty cool,” Mochel said.

Van Hecke also recognizes working with autistic individuals as an intensely rewarding experience and is pleased to say that the Autism Clinic on campus offers evaluations and consultations for families at the school and in the community on an ability-to-pay basis, making them more accessible “We planned on starting the bowling around 10 and affordable to the public. a.m., but when the first kid checked in at 8:30, it In the future, Van Hecke took less than five minsaid she would like to utes before balls were work with the Counrolling down the lane,” “When a kid has a six-word seling Center on treatMochel said, rememvocabulary and your name ment plans for students bering the their enthuis one of the words in there on the autism spectrum siasm. — that’s pretty cool.” as well as to begin social skills training groups The respite program, for Marquette students. which Mochel also helps coordinate, is another service aimed toward In the end, we are all just pieces of a giant puzzle. relieving parents with special needs children. Taking care of each piece is essential if we hope to “It’s basically a free babysitting service,” Mochel remain a driven, loving and unified whole. Understanding and awareness are important steps in this said. process. Such is the beauty that lies within Autism Currently, the group has several students paired Awareness Month. It offers the ideal starting point with separate families, whom they baby-sit for at to begin the journey for acceptance, which Marleast once a month and in some cases four times a quette is already beginning to travel upon. month. Mochel notes that babysitting children on the lower end of the autistic spectrum can be very challenging, but the kids also have a great sense of humor.


re-Examination of conscience

How faith evolves during the college years by Alli Kerfeld

St. Joan of Arc Chapel Photo by Kevin Kozicki

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n a world of concrete materials — from structures, to mathematical equations, to historical dates — a constant abstract is the realm of the spiritual and Godly. Confrontation of the unknown can be an uncomfortable yet daily question for many college students, especially those attending a Catholic institution. Higher education demands a delicate balancing act from students, which can create difficult situations and foster questioning in their lives.

what they bring to campus. Jordan Allen, an atheist and senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, grew up in an evangelical tradition. He said he always had second thoughts about his religious experiences, but he didn’t fully disconnect from the religious sphere until freshman year.

“It is almost a daily struggle,” said Claire Anglim, a Catholic senior in the College of Communication. “Having conversations with people whose views radically differ from mine; it can be tempting to go back and forth.”

Entering this time of transition has varying effects on the spirituality and faith life of incoming students. “I had no real expectations about my faith life coming into Marquette,” said Jacob Jasperson, a senior in the College of Business Administration. Jasperson was raised in the Lutheran church and is a candidate for confirmation into the Catholic church today. He said his faith was strengthened from being surrounded by other devout Catholics and inter-religious dialogue, which, according to Blaha, is a staple of Campus Ministry.

“By the end of high school, I knew I wasn’t feeling it,” Allen said. “But I didn’t want to create conflict, so coming to school was a good, clean break.”

Anglim’s experiences were echoed nationwide in a study of college students at a wide range of universities, conducted by the University of California, Los Angeles Higher Education Research Institute. The research found from freshman year to junior year, college students’ overall level of spirituality increased. However, these same students also less “Having students from Muslim, Hindu, Jewish and regularly attended religious services. a variety of other backgrounds is a great blessing. Period,” said Blaha. “It creates a wonderful place This type of change is normal, said Steve Blaha, as- to talk about interfaith and how the faiths of the sistant director of Campus Ministry. world have similar but different visions." “We’ve grown up with our parents’ faith, which is a transitory faith,” he said. “Folks fall out, stop going to church, its all part of the growing process. We need to ask, ‘Who is He?’ ‘How do I relate?’ With this questioning and testing, there is a natural healthy backlash against practices of faith in homes growing up.”

This dialogue supplements a rigorous and thorough course load requiring careful thought and analysis of the world around us, said Bobby Lima, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences.

“Studying has opened up more who I am. I am constantly forced to research policy, and I always find which side I agree with,” he said. “I think (stuSome students say this “transitory faith” is exactly dents) are ready to experience new people, ideas

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and opinions on faith when they come to college.” Allen agreed, and he believes that we should strive for more questioning in our daily life; not only internally, but externally as well.

Lima, who was raised Catholic, participated in the Christian Leadership Retreat at Marquette prior to his freshman year but infrequently attends Catholic mass. He said that although part of it may be laziness, many people don't feel the need to be validated by attending religious services. But he maintained that spirituality may become more important in students’ lives because of the issues they face as growing adults.

critical intersection between college life and faith is when students are able to look at reality from different perspectives and strive to understand and explain it.

This can be a struggle for students, Anglim said. “They see the value in helping others in their faith, “I would hope that at some point, with education in but then the church’s teaching focuses on rules. general, and especially at Marquette, people would That is what is so beautiful about the Jesuit identity be forced to encounter, in some respect, things that of Marquette. You can be Catholic and question — they had never thought of before,” Allen said. “It has a lot to do with living on your own,” Lima it’s the Magis, the moral, going above and still beIt is a question of critical thinking, and sometimes said. “There have been many things that I have got- ing considered Catholic,” she said. the world encourages tolerance to a fault, Allen ten through here that I didn’t feel like I could get said. He believes that we ought to question what through on my own. I think my faith has some- But Allen said it is important to note that religion and spirituality should never be a means to the end others believe in, in order to help them understand thing to do with that. for morality. why they believe things and to understand their Blaha agreed that being logic for ourselves. away from home for “I always say, ‘Would you not have been concerned the first time, forming about (Hurricane) Katrina absent your religious According to the UCLA “If liberal means critical relationships, reaching superstition?’ People have emotions and morals study, college students thinking and careful a higher level of edu- naturally, the big problem is when people say they are open to different evaluation of the world, cation and beginning are only mobilized to do good because of their perspectives on spirithen that’s exactly what to look for careers and faith,” Allen said. tuality. The study found the Catholic faith is about.” vocations are all parts that seven in 10 colof life that are practi- All of the students agreed that in order to balance lege juniors agreed that cal and future-oriented their lives, they maintained an open viewpoint to people can grow spiritually without being religious, a growth of 12 per- and ignite the question of faith. These experiences others’ opinions and tried to encourage discussion cent from when the same students took the survey not only create a part of faith formation, but also in the appropriate atmosphere. moral and ideological formation as a whole. freshman year. “It’s great to question things and to come in contact “If people don't feel included or that the church Many students change political, social and cultural with different opinions and ideas,” said Jasperson. isn’t reaching out to them, then why should they opinions during college years. The UCLA study “But only if it���s done in the proper way and context make an effort?” Anglim said. But, she countered, found that as students age, they tend to become can it lead to a more informed and thorough understanding of your position.” “It is still really important to be religious. You need more liberal. to have people in the Catholic church who are passionate about it as well as changing things they “If liberal means critical thinking and careful think may be wrong. If people don't stay, nothing evaluation of the world, then that’s exactly what Stained glass from Marquette University High the Catholic faith is about,” said Blaha. He said a School’s former chapel. Photos by Mary Shutters. will grow better and closer to God.”

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Brian Moore

Winner of MUTV’s “Marquette Superstar” “Marquette Superstar” is Marquette University Television’s annual singing competition. Episodes are aired on MUTV and online at MarquetteSuperstar.com, where viewers can vote to choose the winner. After six elimination episodes, Brian Moore was selected as this year’s Marquette Superstar.

Name: Brian Moore Age: 19 College: Communication Major: Communication Studies Campus Activities: Working in Straz cafeteria, intramural sports My Journey I didn’t know what “Marquette Superstar” was to begin with. I got a call from my buddy fifteen minutes before auditions to try out. At first I told him that I didn’t want to do it, but after persistent begging I finally relented. After my audition I didn’t think I was going through to the next round, but when I made it I realized that this was really a fun opportunity —I’m doing what I love, making new friends, and everything turned out for the best. It was a great experience, overall. The Roads I Took to Get There I’ve enjoyed singing my entire life, and have played piano and guitar off and on for many years. I remember in second or third grade, my music teacher would have me sing in front of the rest of the class. I didn’t take singing seriously, though, until my junior year of high school. My friend asked me to start a band with him. We recorded in his basement studio, and that’s when I started writing my own music. Continuing the Journey I’d like to see if I can get some guys together and perform some gigs around Milwaukee. I also got to see the Broadcast department here at Marquette, and I’d like to work more with them in the upcoming years, maybe even help out with Superstar next year.

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Stories we didn’t print We can only do so much with each issue. by Ryan Riesbeck

Here at the Marquette Journal, we like to print every story we can. But with only four issues each year, we can only do as much as our budget allows. Also, a lot of the money goes toward our love for drinking fine wine while sitting in leather chairs discussing the latest in literature and politics — which happens. Often.

“The Economic Stimulus Plan: Good or Bad?”

“10 Tips for a Better Sex Life”

If we wanted to read a 1,000-page snooze-fest, we’d pick up The Fountainhead.

Anyway, some stories just slip through our fingers. So, with apologies from us, here are some of the stories we just couldn’t print this year:

“Joaquin Phoenix to start rap career”

“Michael Phelps: Doped up” The Olympics are over. We don’t care anymore.

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“The Large Hadron Collider and you: Dealing with a spaghetti universe”

Tom Perriello sworn in to the U.S. House of Representatives

We were worried that we would create a magazine-in-a-magazine and somehow open a wormhole into another dimension. You can thank us later.

The supercollider failed to engulf the Earth in a black hole. Boring.

There was some other political event going on in January. We can’t remember what, though. Probably not important.

SUNDAY

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Easter

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1775 The American Revolution begins

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1865 Abraham Lincoln shot at Ford’s Theatre 1918 The “Red Baron” shot down over France

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1970 Apollo 13 crew safely lands in Pacific

Earth Day

World Book and Copyright Day

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CLASSES END

2

6

A

7

M

8

18

S

9 BACCALAUREATE

11

12

1964 Stephen Colbert born

14

15

COMMENCEMENT

18

19

20

1952 Mr. T born

National Maritime Day

26

1927 Ford ends production of Model T’s

28

29

1961 JFK announces support for Apollo program

SA T URDAY

1912 Ocean Liner RMS Titanic sinks

SENIOR WEEK

24

30

Honestly, we all thought he was dead.

“Statements, followed by questions: The best way to title articles?”

calendar APRIL

What do we look like? Cosmo?

see you next year!


Pay what the Pros pay on your musical gear or production equipment, just for being a Marquette Student. E-mail gcstudentdiscount@gmail.com OR call 858.337.1536 for your special student discount.

Offer not valid in Guitar Center retail locations. * Restrictions apply

The Journal doesn’t stop here. Check our Web site for the stories you won’t read in the magazine.

www.marquettejournal.org


Sisters of St. Joesph of the Third Order of St. Francis

They’re Your Fingers B

U

T

GODS Hands Let us help you reach

I f H e ’ s ca llin g yo u , ca ll u s . 715.341.8457

Vocation@ssj-tosf.org

ssj-tosf.org


Marquette Journal, Summer 2009