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PORTFOLIOPatrickDanahy


EDUCATION University of Pennsylvania Master’s of Architecture

| 2017-2020

Schenk Woodman Merit Award Recipient PennDesign Digiblast Winner Three Year Merit Scholarship

| 2018 | 2017 | 2017-2020

PatrickDanahy 2101 Chestnut St. Apt. 1208 Philadelphia, PA 19103 pdanahy@design.upenn.edu 240.498.7955

Clemson University

B.A. Architecture | 2013-2017 Peter R. Lee and Kenneth J. Russo Award for Design Excellence Fourth Year Faculty Award

| 2017 | 2017

Four Year Merit Scholarship

| 2013-2017

EXPERIENCE Cunningham|Quill

Designed, Drafted and Assisted in Project Development and Documentation Design Intern

| 2015-2017

RR|CA

Project Documentation within Design Build Architectural Draftsman

Research Assistant

Direct Digital Manufacturing| Dave Lee

| 2016 | 2015-2016

WB Engineers|Consultants Site and Project Documentation and Systems Development Design Intern

| 2013

Bowie Gridley Architects LEED Development Design Intern

| 2011

COMPETITIONS

Publications

HOK Futures

Finalist | 2018

NonArchitecture|EATING

Finalist | 2018

ACMA Composites

Participant| Pavilion Fabrication

Evolo VMODERN

Honorable Mention Recipient

HKS Mid-Atlantic

Design Fellowship Recipient

AIA MARYLAND

Jury Citation Recipient

| 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2015

NonArchitecture| Little Black Box| ARCHITECT Magazine|

2018 2018 2015

Software

Rhino Revit AutoCad Grasshopper Mudbox Maya Dynamo Python VRay Adobe CS


Contents 2017-2018

Transtemporal Fictions

5

| 2017

15 19

COMPETITIONS Digiblast Winner

23 | 2017

EATING| Non-Architecture Finalist

27 | 2018

Finalist

31 | 2018

Fantastical Fiction| HOKFutures

Object Studies

| 2017

Primitive Displacements

| 2017


| Fall 2017 | Transtemporal Fictions University of Pennsylvania

501studio Transtemporal Fictions Professor: Miroslava Brooks Penn Museum| Philadelphia, PA Fall 2017

An archive is an outdated medium of interaction, reducing the cyclical nature of time, stripping it of trans temporal significance through distillation and segregation of past and present. Through abstraction Kazimir Malevich believed that trans-temporality could be achieved. It is not abstraction, but instead disruption that decontextualizes existing paradigms to recontextualize the absent mind into a paradigmatic reality. This ideology manifests itself within the model of the archive through a micro architecture of thickness, or the control of poche as means of interaction and distortion from existing paradigms. The archive exists as a reduction of time to past, present and future. Similarly, existing paradigms are in place to inform users on interactions with the built environment. In providing disruption of these paradigms the archive acts to decontextualize thought, allowing for unbiased observation of time, object, and the built environment. If one was not told specifics of movement through space, would stairs, floors, and walls exist as distinct spatial organization tools? This archive distorts that reality, creating subtle fictions that allow for a new understanding of context. There is no archive and yet there is only archive, in that the composition of the built work contains objects ranging from significant to banal, allowing for reduction of this classical labeling paradigm through aggregation and bashing of objects, allowing for trans-temporality of objects, sitting centuries of context in on observation of thickness and space.


| Fall 2017 | Transtemporal Fictions University of Pennsylvania

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| Fall 2017 | Transtemporal Fictions University of Pennsylvania

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| Fall 2017 | Transtemporal Fictions University of Pennsylvania

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| Fall 2017 | Transtemporal Fictions University of Pennsylvania

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| Fall 2017 | Transtemporal Fictions University of Pennsylvania

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University of Pennsylvania

501studio

| Fall 2017 |

Object Studies

Object Studies Professor: Miroslava Brooks Effigy Vessel Fall 2017

“The object you can touch, handle, and turn is no longer available for manipulation and instead an extremely abused visual presentation is given through the painted representation. The abuse is both on the objects and on the observer.� - Michael Young The object study is vital to architectural understanding through texture and form. We understand interaction and deconstruct aesthetic principles. Representation provides removal from the context of the real, prompting distortion. The effigy vessel appears textureless to subject the observer to project a materiality onto the object. Does the materiality change as the amalgam forms? An understanding of form and its link to perceived materialty develops, as well as principles of geometric manipulation and boundary conditions. The part is distorted and cut to imply properties of the boundary. The reaction of the part with other parts allow for speculation on material make-up.


| Fall 2017 |

Object Studies

University of Pennsylvania

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| Fall 2017 |

Object Studies

University of Pennsylvania

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| Fall 2017 | Primitive Displacements University of Pennsylvania

501studio Primitive Displacements Professor: Miroslava Brooks Collaborators: Erin Quigley, Qiaomu Xue, Tian Zhang Penn Museum| Philadelphia, PA Fall 2017

The texture of the whole is composed of the part and in that is non-differential from the whole. The part is the whole, while being the part. Form and texture define the whole, so thereby a condition of texture created by the part transfers to the definition of the whole. The part is the whole, which is the part. The macro scale form is defined by geometric collage of the combination of parts, then distorted and smoothed to disguise the aesthetic of the object and embed its own characteristic aesthetic. The condition of observation in a museum setting fetishizes the object as an inherent form of history. We actively seek to disrupt this logic in regaining character in the object, through the expression of distorted forms and the observation thereof. Perception shifts reality in the favor of something less malleable and transformative. “All that is solid melts into air.” – Karl Marx The eternal nothingness that is this rigid preservation of objects, is rejected by a proposition by our team to release the static object, creating a dynamic source of viewing. The whole, derived from the part, defines the part which textures the whole. This incestual conglomeration of part to whole expresses the true representation of the problem and creates a solution, in which the two become so intertwined that there limits distinction.


| | Fall 2017 | Primitive Displacements University of Pennsylvania

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| Fall 2017 | Primitive Displacements University of Pennsylvania

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| Summer 2017 | MoMA PS1 University of Pennsylvania

Digiblast MoMA PS1 Winner Professor: Ezio Blasetti, Danielle Willems Summer 2017

Item Culling allows for structural surface bridging between the floor and ceiling canopies, creating dynamic spaces that react to the programmed elements of the courtyard. The canopies open to allow light to enter, while the recurrsion creates shadow patterns in dwelling nodes. These nodes are identified along circulation paths through the courtyard, with the recurrsion acting as a directional growth along these paths. Two languages of recurrsion, motion and dwelling present themselves through both rotational growth along shifted closed curve and flowing growth along a projected grid. The recurrsion latches onto the concrete walls of the MoMA PS1 courtyard to situate the pavilion in its site. The mesh canopy plays with space by lifting and pulling to provide moments of exposure, which are in turn promoted by the recurrsion and growth at these moments. This space is meant to be inhabited and explored, creating discovery in its light and growth control.


| Summer 2017 |

MoMA PS1

University of Pennsylvania

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| Summer 2017 | MoMA PS1 University of Pennsylvania

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University of Pennsylvania Synthetic Consumption | Winter 2018 |

Non-Archtitecture EATING Finalist Collaborator: Caleb Ehly Fictional Site Winter 2018

In an age of synthetic production, in every sense of the word, what becomes of the boundaries of consumption? Schisms are created between the vegan, the vegetarian, the meat eaters. Does synthetic flesh, genetically engineered Petri dish tissues and meats, create a new category of consumption. Is this category presented within the means of our existing agricultural system? This design proposal suggests that the urban food production of the near future is driven by the excess energy and heat given off by transportation networks throughout our cities. The synthetic meat machines that have slowly worked their way into the public’s attention feed off this emittance of energy and produce a synthetic forest, a technological food marketplace in a metaphorical approach to city parks. The subway hubs promote bacterial growth in synthetic meat machines, which produce flesh for consumption. This flesh asks the question of appearance driven by cultural acceptance and anthropological response to consumption. Does this synthetic flesh produce a new meat, or does it grow like an apple tree, reaching for the skies of the urban heat sinks, begging climate change to continue its domination in utter indifference to the natural interventions in our world?


| Winter 2018 |

Synthetic Consumption

University of Pennsylvania

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| Winter 2018 |

Synthetic Consumption

University of Pennsylvania

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University of Pennsylvania Fantastical Fiction | Spring 2018 |

HOK Futures A Fantastical Fiction Collaborator: Caleb Ehly Philadelphia, PA Spring 2018

The discovery of objects sparks transtemporality of place, eluding to previous settlements and shortening timelines. Placemaking and Object collection become synonymous through a place’s temporal cataloging. It is this temporality that must be manipulated to achieve trans-temporal figures within a shifting landscape. Through these trans-temporal figures, the unreal becomes a true reality; the furnace lights a lighthouse.


| Spring 2018 |

Fantastical Fiction

University of Pennsylvania

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| Spring 2018 |

Fantastical Fiction

University of Pennsylvaniav

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| Spring 2018 |

Fantastical Fiction

University of Pennsylvania

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| Spring 2018 |

Fantastical Fiction

University of Pennsylvania

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Patrick Danahy |240.498.7955| pdanahy@design.upenn.edu

Portfolio| Patrick Danahy  
Portfolio| Patrick Danahy  
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